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Sample records for group feedback phase

  1. Feedback to Suppress Phase Noise at Aladdin

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Robert A; Kleman, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the Aladdin infrared beamline is adversely affected by a Robinson mode in which all bunches move in unison with a frequency of 3 kHz. To decrease these oscillations, feedback has been installed in the radiofrequency system to damp longitudinal motion of the bunch centroids. Simulations indicate that at frequencies around 3 kHz, the phase noise generated by Robinson modes may be reduced 20 dB by feedback with a damping time of 0.3 ms. This agrees with the measured performance of feedback circuitry. Since the feedback greatly improves operation of the infrared beamline, it is now incorporated into the standard operation of Aladdin.

  2. Development of the Teacher Feedback Observation Scheme: evaluating the quality of feedback in peer groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Kreijns, Karel; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2018-01-01

    Research suggests that feedback is an essential element in learning. This study focuses on feedback that teachers provide in reciprocal peer groups to improve their performance in the classroom. The Teacher Feedback Observation Scheme (TFOS) was developed to identify feedback patterns, which

  3. Group Projects in Interior Design Studio Classes: Peer Feedback Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    Group projects have been shown to be effective for providing peer feedback in classrooms. While students in regular enrollment classes benefit from peer feedback, low-enrollment classes face many challenges. This study compares peer feedback effectiveness between two interior design studio classes with different design projects. In one class,…

  4. Roles of participation and feedback in group potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, Nuria; Peiró, José M; Zornoza, Ana; Picazo, Carmen

    2009-08-01

    The roles of group participation and group performance feedback were examined as antecedents of group potency, i.e., beliefs shared among a work group's members about the general effectiveness of the work group. Also examined were how group participation and the congruence of the feedback received from different sources about performance predicted convergence in members' beliefs about group effectiveness. The sample comprised 61 work groups of professionals involved in Master in Business Administration (MBA) programs (284 participants). Mean group size was 4.6 members (SD = .58). 65% of participants were male, and 51% were between 30 and 40 years of age. Data were gathered at two measurement times. Increases in group participation were positively related to increases in group potency and the convergence in beliefs about group effectiveness among group members over time. Results supported the premise that group performance feedback is an antecedent of changes in group potency over time.

  5. Feedback in group psychotherapy for eating disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Poulsen, Stig; Lindschou, Jane

    2017-01-01

    -generated allocation sequence concealed to the investigators. One-hundred and 59 adult participants, diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or eating disorder not otherwise specified according to DSM-IV, were included. Eighty participants were allocated to the experimental group, and 79 participants...

  6. Asserive Training in Groups Using Video Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galassi, John P.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The study investigated the effectiveness of group assertive training with nonassertive college students. Significant differences were found between experimental and control subjects on the College Self-Expression Scale, the Subjective Unit of Disturbance Scale, eye contact, length of scene, and assertive content but not on response latency.…

  7. The phase detection and calculation for low hybrid wave phase-feedback control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiang; Liang Hao; Zhou Yongzhao; Shan Jiafang

    2008-01-01

    A method of phase detection and calculation for low hybrid wave phase-feedback control system and the implementing the algorithms on DSP cores embedded in FPGA is introduced. By taking the advantages of matlab-aided design and algorithms optimization to carry out parallel processing of multi-channel phase calculation in FPGA with rich resources, the purposed of fast phase-feedback control is achieved under the need of complicated mathematical operations. (authors)

  8. Clinical workplace learning : perceived learning value of individual and group feedback in a collectivistic culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Emilia, Ova; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Feedback is essential for workplace learning. Most papers in this field concern individual feedback. In collectivistic cultures, however, group feedback is common educational practice. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived learning value and characteristics of individual

  9. Application of Phase Shifted, Laser Feedback Interferometry to Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovryn, Ben; Eppell, Steven J.; Andrews, James H.; Khaydarov, John

    1996-01-01

    We have combined the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce a new instrument that can measure both optical path length (OPL) changes and discern sample reflectivity variations. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. LFI can yield a high signal-to-noise ratio even for low reflectivity samples. By combining PSI and LFI, we have produced a robust instrument, based upon a HeNe laser, with high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static (dc) or oscillatory changes along the optical path. As with other forms of interferometry, large changes in OPL require phase unwrapping. Conversely, small phase changes are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured. We introduce the phase shifts with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) and use either the Carre or Hariharan algorithms to determine the phase and visibility. We have determined the accuracy and precision of our technique by measuring both the bending of a cantilevered piezoelectric bimorph and linear ramps to the EOM. Using PSI, sub-nanometer displacements can be measured. We have combined our interferometer with a commercial microscope and scanning piezoelectric stage and have measured the variation in OPL and visibility for drops of PDMS (silicone oil) on coated single crystal silicon. Our measurement of the static contact angle agrees with the value of 68 deg stated in the literature.

  10. Feedback versus no feedback in improving patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Waaddegaard, Mette

    2014-01-01

    or control group at a ratio of 1:1. The experimental group will receive standard treatment (systemic and narrative group psychotherapy) with feedback intervention, whereas the control group will receive standard treatment only. The participants are diagnosed with bulimia nervosa binge eating disorder...

  11. Barriers and Facilitators to Effective Feedback: A Qualitative Analysis of Data From Multispecialty Resident Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Shalini T; Zegarek, Matthew H; Fromme, H Barrett; Ryan, Michael S; Schumann, Sarah-Anne; Harris, Ilene B

    2015-06-01

    Despite the importance of feedback, the literature suggests that there is inadequate feedback in graduate medical education. We explored barriers and facilitators that residents in anesthesiology, emergency medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and surgery experience with giving and receiving feedback during their clinical training. Residents from 3 geographically diverse teaching institutions were recruited to participate in focus groups in 2012. Open-ended questions prompted residents to describe their experiences with giving and receiving feedback, and discuss facilitators and barriers. Data were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with a grounded theory approach. A total of 19 residents participated in 1 of 3 focus groups. Five major themes related to feedback were identified: teacher factors, learner factors, feedback process, feedback content, and educational context. Unapproachable attendings, time pressures due to clinical work, and discomfort with giving negative feedback were cited as major barriers in the feedback process. Learner engagement in the process was a major facilitator in the feedback process. Residents provided insights for improving the feedback process based on their dual roles as teachers and learners. Time pressures in the learning environment may be mitigated by efforts to improve the quality of teacher-learner relationships. Forms for collecting written feedback should be augmented by faculty development to ensure meaningful use. Efforts to improve residents' comfort with giving feedback and encouraging learners to engage in the feedback process may foster an environment conducive to increasing feedback.

  12. Clinical workplace learning: perceived learning value of individual and group feedback in a collectivistic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Emilia, Ova; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2018-04-19

    Feedback is essential for workplace learning. Most papers in this field concern individual feedback. In collectivistic cultures, however, group feedback is common educational practice. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived learning value and characteristics of individual and group feedback in a collectivistic culture. During two weeks, on a daily basis, clerkship students (n = 215) from 12 clinical departments at Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, recorded individual and group feedback moments by using a structured form: the providers, focus and perceived learning value of feedback. Data were analysed with logistic regression and multilevel techniques. Students reported 2687 group and 1535 individual feedback moments. Group feedback more often focused on history taking, clinical judgment, patient management, patient counselling, and professional behaviour (OR ranging from 1.232, p cultures, group feedback may add to the array of educational measures that optimize student learning. Congruence between culture and type of feedback may be important for the effectiveness of feedback.

  13. Effects of longitudinal small-group learning on delivery and receipt of communication skills feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Masters, Dylan E; Chang, Anna; Kruidering, Marieke; Hauer, Karen E

    2013-11-01

    Although feedback is a critical component of learning, recent data suggest that learners may discount feedback they receive. The emotional threat inherent in feedback can contribute to its ineffectiveness, particularly for sensitive topics like communication skills. Longitudinal relationships among peers may increase their sense of safety and soften the perceived threat of feedback to allow students to give, receive and potentially more effectively incorporate feedback. We studied the effects of prior shared learning experiences among medical students in the delivery and receipt of feedback on clinical (communication) skills. During a formative clinical skills examination, we divided Year 3 students at a US medical school into two subgroups comprising, respectively, small-group classmates from a 2-year longitudinal pre-clerkship clinical skills course (with prior peer-learning relationships), and peers with no prior shared small-group coursework. Students in both subgroups observed peers in a simulated clinical case and then provided feedback, which was videotaped, transcribed and coded. Feedback recipients also completed a survey on their perceptions of the feedback. Students valued the feedback they received and intended to enact it, regardless of whether they had prior peer-learning relationships. Coding of feedback revealed high specificity. Feedback providers who had prior peer-learning relationships with recipients provided more specific corrective feedback on communication skills than those with no such relationships (p = 0.014); there was no significant difference between subgroups in the provision of reinforcing feedback on communication skills. Year 3 medical student peers can deliver specific feedback on clinical skills; prior peer-learning relationships in pre-clerkship clinical skills courses enrich the provision of specific corrective feedback about communication skills. Feedback between peers with pre-existing peer-learning relationships represents

  14. Temperature feedback control for long-term carrier-envelope phase locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zenghu [Manhattan, KS; Yun, Chenxia [Manhattan, KS; Chen, Shouyuan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, He [Manhattan, KS; Chini, Michael [Manhattan, KS

    2012-07-24

    A feedback control module for stabilizing a carrier-envelope phase of an output of a laser oscillator system comprises a first photodetector, a second photodetector, a phase stabilizer, an optical modulator, and a thermal control element. The first photodetector may generate a first feedback signal corresponding to a first portion of a laser beam from an oscillator. The second photodetector may generate a second feedback signal corresponding to a second portion of the laser beam filtered by a low-pass filter. The phase stabilizer may divide the frequency of the first feedback signal by a factor and generate an error signal corresponding to the difference between the frequency-divided first feedback signal and the second feedback signal. The optical modulator may modulate the laser beam within the oscillator corresponding to the error signal. The thermal control unit may change the temperature of the oscillator corresponding to a signal operable to control the optical modulator.

  15. Generalised synchronisation of spatiotemporal chaos using feedback control method and phase compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing-Yuan, Wang; Na, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Coupled map lattices are taken as examples to study the synchronisation of spatiotemporal chaotic systems. First, a generalised synchronisation of two coupled map lattices is realised through selecting an appropriate feedback function and appropriate range of feedback parameter. Based on this method we use the phase compression method to extend the range of the parameter. So, we integrate the feedback control method with the phase compression method to implement the generalised synchronisation and obtain an exact range of feedback parameter. This technique is simple to implement in practice. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness and the feasibility of the proposed program. (general)

  16. Noncommutative phase spaces on Aristotle group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancille Ngendakumana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We realize noncommutative phase spaces as coadjoint orbits of extensions of the Aristotle group in a two dimensional space. Through these constructions the momenta of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of a naturally introduced magnetic eld. These cases correspond to the minimal coupling of the momentum with a magnetic potential.

  17. Regional Floras: the target groups, usage and feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, F.S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The target groups for regional floras may be generalized for the purpose of this discussion, into four main groups. Firstly, in the Flora Malesiana region – a major producer of tropical hardwoods and other commercial forest products – one large target is the forest industry, consisting of foresters,

  18. Development of the Corrective Feedback Instrument: A Tool for Use in Counselor Training Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse-Killacky, Diana; Page, Betsy J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an instrument for measuring emotional barriers that can inhibit giving, receiving, and exchanging corrective feedback in counselor training groups. Also assesses leader behaviors that can help group members address those barriers. Testing showed that the instrument can be used to identify group member concerns. (RJM)

  19. Pitfalls and feedback when constructing topological pressure-temperature phase diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceolin, R.; Toscani, S.; Rietveld, Ivo B.; Barrio, M.; Tamarit, J. Ll.

    2017-04-01

    The stability hierarchy between different phases of a chemical compound can be accurately reproduced in a topological phase diagram. This type of phase diagrams may appear to be the result of simple extrapolations, however, experimental complications quickly increase in the case of crystalline trimorphism (and higher order polymorphism). To ensure the accurate positioning of stable phase domains, a topological phase diagram needs to be consistent. This paper gives an example of how thermodynamic feedback can be used in the topological construction of phase diagrams to ensure overall consistency in a phase diagram based on the case of piracetam crystalline trimorphism.

  20. Phase noise reduction by self-phase locking in semiconductor lasers using phase conjugate feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lykke; Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Torben Nørskov

    1994-01-01

    noise takes a finite-low value corresponding to a state of first-order self-phase locking of the laser. As a result, the spectral shape of the laser signal does not remain Lorentzian but collapses around the carrier to a delta function with a close to carrier noise level of less than -137 d...

  1. Plant-soil feedbacks: role of plant functional group and plant traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, R.; Schröder-Georgi, T.; Weigelt, A.; van der Putten, W.H.; De Deyn, G.B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF, we grew

  2. North American Wood Waste Forum: Summary of Group Feedback, 2-3, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Falk

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the feedback and recommendations of the North American Wood Recovery Group. This report summarizes the barriers and opportunities in wood recovery, reuse, and recycling as identified by this group of stakeholders from the wood industry, waste industry, and relevant government agencies.

  3. CAN AGN FEEDBACK BREAK THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF GALAXIES, GROUPS, AND CLUSTERS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspari, M. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Brighenti, F. [Astronomy Department, University of Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Temi, P. [Astrophysics Branch, NASA/Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ettori, S., E-mail: mgaspari@mpa-garching.mpg.de [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly thought that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback can break the self-similar scaling relations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. Using high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we isolate the impact of AGN feedback on the L {sub x}-T {sub x} relation, testing the two archetypal and common regimes, self-regulated mechanical feedback and a quasar thermal blast. We find that AGN feedback has severe difficulty in breaking the relation in a consistent way. The similarity breaking is directly linked to the gas evacuation within R {sub 500}, while the central cooling times are inversely proportional to the core density. Breaking self-similarity thus implies breaking the cool core, morphing all systems to non-cool-core objects, which is in clear contradiction with the observed data populated by several cool-core systems. Self-regulated feedback, which quenches cooling flows and preserves cool cores, prevents dramatic evacuation and similarity breaking at any scale; the relation scatter is also limited. The impulsive thermal blast can break the core-included L {sub x}-T {sub x} at T {sub 500} ≲ 1 keV, but substantially empties and overheats the halo, generating a perennial non-cool-core group, as experienced by cosmological simulations. Even with partial evacuation, massive systems remain overheated. We show that the action of purely AGN feedback is to lower the luminosity and heat the gas, perpendicular to the fit.

  4. Analysis of Feedback processes in Online Group Interaction: a methodological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Espasa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present a methodological model to analyze students' group interaction to improve their essays in online learning environments, based on asynchronous and written communication. In these environments teacher and student scaffolds for discussion are essential to promote interaction. One of these scaffolds can be the feedback. Research on feedback processes has predominantly focused on feedback design rather than on how students utilize feedback to improve learning. This methodological model fills this gap contributing to analyse the implementation of the feedback processes while students discuss collaboratively in a specific case of writing assignments. A review of different methodological models was carried out to define a framework adjusted to the analysis of the relationship of written and asynchronous group interaction, and students' activity and changes incorporated into the final text. The model proposed includes the following dimensions: 1 student participation 2 nature of student learning and 3 quality of student learning. The main contribution of this article is to present the methodological model and also to ascertain the model's operativity regarding how students incorporate such feedback into their essays.

  5. CAN AGN FEEDBACK BREAK THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF GALAXIES, GROUPS, AND CLUSTERS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspari, M.; Brighenti, F.; Temi, P.; Ettori, S.

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly thought that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback can break the self-similar scaling relations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. Using high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we isolate the impact of AGN feedback on the L x -T x relation, testing the two archetypal and common regimes, self-regulated mechanical feedback and a quasar thermal blast. We find that AGN feedback has severe difficulty in breaking the relation in a consistent way. The similarity breaking is directly linked to the gas evacuation within R 500 , while the central cooling times are inversely proportional to the core density. Breaking self-similarity thus implies breaking the cool core, morphing all systems to non-cool-core objects, which is in clear contradiction with the observed data populated by several cool-core systems. Self-regulated feedback, which quenches cooling flows and preserves cool cores, prevents dramatic evacuation and similarity breaking at any scale; the relation scatter is also limited. The impulsive thermal blast can break the core-included L x -T x at T 500 ≲ 1 keV, but substantially empties and overheats the halo, generating a perennial non-cool-core group, as experienced by cosmological simulations. Even with partial evacuation, massive systems remain overheated. We show that the action of purely AGN feedback is to lower the luminosity and heat the gas, perpendicular to the fit

  6. Group support system and explanatory feedback: An experimental study of mitigating halo effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intiyas Utami

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive assessment potentially leads to halo effect that will affect accuracy of auditors decision-making process. Biased initial audit decision will potentially influence final audit decision. It is there-fore necessary to mitigate halo effect that is the consequence of auditors good impression on clients initial condition. This re-search aims to empirically show that halo effect can be mitigated by explanatory feedback and Group Support System (GSS. The researchers experimentally mani-pulate explanatory feedback and GSS using online web-site. The subjects are stu-dents who have already taken auditing courses. The results show that: 1 explanato-ry feedback can mitigate halo effect so that audit decision will be more accurate 2 GSS can also mitigate halo effect 3 explanatory feedback and GSS are the best me-thods to mitigate halo effect.

  7. Phase and amplitude feedback control system for the Los Alamos free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Higgins, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    Phase and amplitude feedback control systems for the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) are described. Beam-driven voltages are very high in the buncher cavity because the electron gun is pulsed at the fifth subharmonic of the buncher resonant frequency. The high beam loading necessitated a novel feedback and drive configuration for the buncher. A compensation cirucit has been added to the gun/driver system to reduce observed drift. Extremely small variations in the accelerator gradients had dramatic effects on the laser output power. These problems and how they were solved are described and plans for improvements in the feedback control system are discussed. 5 refs., 7 figs

  8. The cloud-phase feedback in the Super-parameterized Community Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, M. A.; Randall, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent comparisons of observations and climate model simulations by I. Tan and colleagues have suggested that the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process tends to be too active in climate models, making too much cloud ice, and resulting in an exaggerated negative cloud-phase feedback on climate change. We explore the WBF process and its effect on shortwave cloud forcing in present-day and future climate simulations with the Community Earth System Model, and its super-parameterized counterpart. Results show that SP-CESM has much less cloud ice and a weaker cloud-phase feedback than CESM.

  9. Distribution of Feedback among Teacher and Students in Online Collaborative Learning in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Cesar; Rochera, Maria Jose; de Gispert, Ines; Diaz-Barriga, Frida

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the characteristics and distribution of the feedback provided by the participants (a teacher and her students) in an activity organized inside a collaborative online learning environment. We analyse 853 submissions made by two groups of graduate students and their teacher (N1 = 629 & N2 = 224) involved in the collaborative…

  10. Chaotic Feedback Loops within Decision Making Groups: Towards an Integration of Chaos Theory and Cybernetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaten, James A.

    This paper offers a model that integrates chaos theory and cybernetics, which can be used to describe the structure of decision making within small groups. The paper begins with an overview of cybernetics and chaos. Definitional characteristics of cybernetics are reviewed along with salient constructs, such as goal-seeking, feedback, feedback…

  11. Focus Groups: How Feedback from Employees Can Impact the Decision-Making Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Jordan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The idea for the use of focus groups as a management tool was derived from a planned assessment with student employees. The success of the student employee focus groups led the researchers to expand the use of these groups with the library staff. In the evaluation of the results, the researchers discovered that the feedback from both focus groups could be shared with administration, potentially resulting in the management team making the suggested changes in the work environment. This article addresses the process of using focus groups as assessment tools and potential change agents for managerial decision-making.

  12. On The Use of A Phase Modulation Method for Decorrelation in Acoustic Feedback Cancellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    A major problem in using an adaptive filter in acoustic feedback cancellation systems is that the loudspeaker signal is correlated with the signals entering the microphones of the audio system, leading to biased filter estimates. One possible solution for reducing this problem is by means...... of decorrelation. In this work, we study a subband phase modulation method, which was originally proposed for decorrelation in multichannel acoustic echo cancellation systems. We determine if this method is effective for decorrelation in acoustic feedback cancellation systems by comparing it to a structurally...... similar frequency shifting decorrelation method. We show that the phase modulation method is suitable for decorrelation in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, although the frequency shifting method is in general slightly more effective....

  13. Midterm peer feedback in problem-based learning groups: the effect on individual contributions and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Rachelle J A; van Berkel, Henk J M; Popeijus, Herman E; Leppink, Jimmie; Schmidt, Henk G; Dolmans, Diana H J M

    2014-03-01

    Even though peer process feedback is an often used tool to enhance the effectiveness of collaborative learning environments like PBL, the conditions under which it is best facilitated still need to be investigated. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of individual versus shared reflection and goal setting on students' individual contributions to the group and their academic achievement. In addition, the influence of prior knowledge on the effectiveness of peer feedback was studied. In this pretest-intervention-posttest study 242 first year students were divided into three conditions: condition 1 (individual reflection and goal setting), condition 2 (individual and shared reflection and goal setting), and condition 3 (control group). Results indicated that the quality of individual contributions to the tutorial group did not improve after receiving the peer feedback, nor did it differ between the three conditions. With regard to academic achievement, only males in conditions 1 and 2 showed better academic achievement compared with condition 3. However, there was no difference between both ways of reflection and goal setting with regard to achievement, indicating that both ways are equally effective. Nevertheless, it is still too early to conclude that peer feedback combined with reflection and goal setting is not effective in enhancing students' individual contributions. Students only had a limited number of opportunities to improve their contributions. Therefore, future research should investigate whether an increase in number of tutorial group meetings can enhance the effectiveness of peer feedback. In addition, the effect of quality of reflection and goal setting could be taken into consideration in future research.

  14. Ab initio quantum-enhanced optical phase estimation using real-time feedback control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berni, Adriano; Gehring, Tobias; Nielsen, Bo Melholt

    2015-01-01

    of a quantum-enhanced and fully deterministic ab initio phase estimation protocol based on real-time feedback control. Using robust squeezed states of light combined with a real-time Bayesian adaptive estimation algorithm, we demonstrate deterministic phase estimation with a precision beyond the quantum shot...... noise limit. The demonstrated protocol opens up new opportunities for quantum microscopy, quantum metrology and quantum information processing....

  15. Low-level feedback control for the phase regulation of CLIC Drive Beam Klystrons

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)752526

    2015-01-01

    The requirement of luminosity loss below 1% raises tight tolerances for the phase and power stability of the CLIC drive beam (DB) klystrons and consequently for the high voltage pulse ripple of the modulators. A low-level RF (LLRF) feedback system needs to be developed and combined with the modulator in order to guarantee the phase and amplitude tolerances. To this aim, three feedback control strategies were investigated, i) Proportional Integral (PI) controller, ii) Linear Quadratic Integral Regulator (LQI) and iii) Model Predictive Controller (MPC). The klystron, as well as the incident phase noise were modelled and used for the design and evaluation of the controllers. First simulation results are presented along with future steps and directions.

  16. Output Feedback Adaptive Control of Non-Minimum Phase Systems Using Optimal Control Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Hashemi, Kelley E.; Yucelen, Tansel; Arabi, Ehsan

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes output feedback adaptive control approaches for non-minimum phase SISO systems with relative degree 1 and non-strictly positive real (SPR) MIMO systems with uniform relative degree 1 using the optimal control modification method. It is well-known that the standard model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) cannot be used to control non-SPR plants to track an ideal SPR reference model. Due to the ideal property of asymptotic tracking, MRAC attempts an unstable pole-zero cancellation which results in unbounded signals for non-minimum phase SISO systems. The optimal control modification can be used to prevent the unstable pole-zero cancellation which results in a stable adaptation of non-minimum phase SISO systems. However, the tracking performance using this approach could suffer if the unstable zero is located far away from the imaginary axis. The tracking performance can be recovered by using an observer-based output feedback adaptive control approach which uses a Luenberger observer design to estimate the state information of the plant. Instead of explicitly specifying an ideal SPR reference model, the reference model is established from the linear quadratic optimal control to account for the non-minimum phase behavior of the plant. With this non-minimum phase reference model, the observer-based output feedback adaptive control can maintain stability as well as tracking performance. However, in the presence of the mismatch between the SPR reference model and the non-minimum phase plant, the standard MRAC results in unbounded signals, whereas a stable adaptation can be achieved with the optimal control modification. An application of output feedback adaptive control for a flexible wing aircraft illustrates the approaches.

  17. Formulae for thermal feedback of group constants in digital reactor simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perneczky, L.; Toth, I.; Vigassy, J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem, how the feedback of the thermohydraulic field to the neutron density in a reactor can be calculated is analysed. After a brief survey of the digital models in reactor simulation the applied model based on the time-dependent two-group diffusion equations is described. Using the reactor physical code system THERESA numerical results for the VVER-440 reactor are presented. (Sz.Z.)

  18. Prototype phase and amplitude feedback-control systems for the FMIT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Patton, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The phase and amplitude feedback-control systems for the Fusion Materials irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator have been successfully prototyped and tested. The testing was performed at low power with two 100-W rf systems driving a high-Q resonant cavity at 80 MHz. The control systems can maintain the cavity field amplitude to within +-1% and the phase to within +-1 0 of the set-point values. When there are multiple rf systems independently driving a resonant cavity through individual drive loops, amplitude matching and proper phasing between the outputs of each rf system are essential for proper system operation. Experimental results are presented

  19. Feedback system of the RF phase in KEK-ATF linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okugi, T.; Hayano, H.; Kuriki, M.; Naito, T. [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    KEK-ATF linac is built in the Assembly Hall for TRISTAN project in 1991. The thermal condition of the hall is not good enough for a stable linac operation, because the temperature of the klystron gallery is drifted by 1degC within one day. RF phase is also drifted by 3-5deg of the S-band frequency in day and night. In order to control the RF phase, we installed RF phase detectors, which have S/H circuit in order to use for pulsed RF. By using the phase detector, an RF phase feedback system was tested. It was found that a stable klystron operation could be performed within the phase drift of {+-}0.5deg in a day. (author)

  20. The influence of extratropical cloud phase and amount feedbacks on climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, William R.; Kay, Jennifer E.

    2018-04-01

    Global coupled climate models have large long-standing cloud and radiation biases, calling into question their ability to simulate climate and climate change. This study assesses the impact of reducing shortwave radiation biases on climate sensitivity within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The model is modified by increasing supercooled cloud liquid to better match absorbed shortwave radiation observations over the Southern Ocean while tuning to reduce a compensating tropical shortwave bias. With a thermodynamic mixed-layer ocean, equilibrium warming in response to doubled CO2 increases from 4.1 K in the control to 5.6 K in the modified model. This 1.5 K increase in equilibrium climate sensitivity is caused by changes in two extratropical shortwave cloud feedbacks. First, reduced conversion of cloud ice to liquid at high southern latitudes decreases the magnitude of a negative cloud phase feedback. Second, warming is amplified in the mid-latitudes by a larger positive shortwave cloud feedback. The positive cloud feedback, usually associated with the subtropics, arises when sea surface warming increases the moisture gradient between the boundary layer and free troposphere. The increased moisture gradient enhances the effectiveness of mixing to dry the boundary layer, which decreases cloud amount and optical depth. When a full-depth ocean with dynamics and thermodynamics is included, ocean heat uptake preferentially cools the mid-latitude Southern Ocean, partially inhibiting the positive cloud feedback and slowing warming. Overall, the results highlight strong connections between Southern Ocean mixed-phase cloud partitioning, cloud feedbacks, and ocean heat uptake in a climate forced by greenhouse gas changes.

  1. Feedback versus no feedback to improve patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Waaddegaard, Mette; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    of continuous feedback on adherence and outcome in group psychotherapy. Methods/design: The trial is set up in a randomized design for outpatients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or eating disorder not otherwise specified (DSM-IV). They are allocated 1:1 to the experimental group...

  2. DWARF, 1-D Few-Group Neutron Diffusion with Thermal Feedback for Burnup and Xe Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.C.; Putnam, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: DWARF allows one-dimensional simulation of reactor burnup and xenon oscillation problems in slab, cylindrical, or spherical geometry using a few-group diffusion theory model. 2 - Method of solution: The few-group, neutron diffusion theory equations are reduced to a system of finite-difference equations that are solved for each group by the Gauss method at each time point. Fission neutron source iteration can be accelerated with Chebyshev extrapolation. A thermal feedback iterative loop is used to obtain consistent solutions for the distributions of reactor power, neutron flux, and fuel and coolant properties with the neutron group constants functions of the latter. Solutions for the new nuclide concentrations of a time-point are made with the flux assumed constant in the time interval. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 4 groups; 40 regions; 50 macroscopic materials (Only 10 are functions of the feedback variables); 50 nuclides per region; 250 mesh points

  3. Experience feedback of operation events in Ling'ao phase Ⅱ nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhi; Tao Shusheng; Sun Guochen; Zhang Zengqing

    2012-01-01

    As a new operating nuclear power plant, Ling'ao Phase Ⅱ occurred 20 pieces of operational events in one year of first cycle. By analyzing the events in this paper, the causes of the events are mainly concentrated in three aspects: interface between commissioning and operating, DCS system and the management of human factors. Finally, author gives some suggestions on experience feedback, as a reference to other similar nuclear power plants. (authors)

  4. Renormalization group approach to QCD phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midorikawa, S.; Yoshimoto, S.; So, H.

    1987-01-01

    Effective scalar theories for QCD are proposed to investigate the deconfining and chiral phase transitions. The orders of the phase transitions are determined by infrared stabilities of the fixed points. It is found that the transitions in SU(3) gauge theories are of 1st order for any number of massless flavors. The cases of SU(2) and SU(4) gauge theories are also discussed. (orig.)

  5. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E

    2015-02-01

    To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed quality managers on six domains of quality management. Questionnaires measured organization of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, quality improvement policy, and management strategies (score range 0-100%). Based on the scores, responders received feedback and a benchmark and were granted access to a toolbox of quality improvement instruments. If requested, additional support in improving quality management was available, consisting of an elucidating phone call or a visit from an experienced consultant. After 1 year, the level of quality management was measured again. Of the initially 60 participating care groups, 51 completed the study. The total quality management score improved from 59.8% (95% CI 57.0-62.6%) to 65.1% (62.8-67.5%; P quality management score (P = 0.001). Of the 44 participating outpatient clinics, 28 completed the study. Their total score changed from 65.7% (CI 60.3-71.1%) to 67.3% (CI 62.9-71.7%; P = 0.30). Only the results in the domain multidisciplinary teamwork improved (P = 0.001). Measuring quality management and providing feedback and a benchmark improves the level of quality management in care groups but not in outpatient clinics. The questionnaires might also be a useful asset for other diabetes care groups, such as Accountable Care Organizations. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  6. Exploratory study of the characteristics of feedback in the reflective dialogue group given to medical students in a clinical clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chen Wen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Structured narrative reflective writing combined with guided feedback is an efficient teaching method for enhancing medical students’ reflective capacity. However, what kinds of feedback offered and reflection presented in a reflective group remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of feedback in a reflective dialogue group. Methods: Fifth-year medical students on a monthly interval rotation at the pediatric department of a medical center in eastern Taiwan during the 2012 academic year completed their reflective writing regarding patient and family psychosocial issues, and were subsequently debriefed in a 2-h group discussion session to receive feedback from a clinical tutor and peers. Content analysis was conducted to explore the characteristics of feedback and reflection presented in the reflective dialogue. The evaluative questionnaire regarding the benefits of reflection with others was administrated following the group session. Results: Forty students participated in five reflective groups and 108 psychosocial issues were discussed and identified. The tutor played an initiating role in the group discussion by providing six equal feedback types involving exploring new knowledge, initiating advanced discussion, highlighting the issues, and encouraging the students. The students provided eight types of feedback that involved a substantial deep discussion on psychosocial issues and action plans based on the complex interactive ecological network of clinical encounters. Each student attained 1.25 times the depth or breadth of reflection after receiving feedback and experienced the benefits of reflection with others. Conclusion: Through structured narrative reflective writing combined with pluralistic group discussion with a tutor and peers, the medical students had time to think deeply and broadly about psychosocial issues among patients and their family members. Facilitative feedback providing new

  7. Utilizing time-frequency amplitude and phase synchrony measure to assess feedback processing in a gambling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Adreanna T M; Tootell, Anne V; Fix, Spencer T; Aviyente, Selin; Bernat, Edward M

    2018-04-29

    The neurophysiological mechanisms involved in the evaluation of performance feedback have been widely studied in the ERP literature over the past twenty years, but understanding has been limited by the use of traditional time-domain amplitude analytic approaches. Gambling outcome valence has been identified as an important factor modulating event-related potential (ERP) components, most notably the feedback negativity (FN). Recent work employing time-frequency analysis has shown that processes indexed by the FN are confounded in the time-domain and can be better represented as separable feedback-related processes in the theta (3-7 Hz) and delta (0-3 Hz) frequency bands. In addition to time-frequency amplitude analysis, phase synchrony measures have begun to further our understanding of performance evaluation by revealing how feedback information is processed within and between various brain regions. The current study aimed to provide an integrative assessment of time-frequency amplitude, inter-trial phase synchrony, and inter-channel phase synchrony changes following monetary feedback in a gambling task. Results revealed that time-frequency amplitude activity explained separable loss and gain processes confounded in the time-domain. Furthermore, phase synchrony measures explained unique variance above and beyond amplitude measures and demonstrated enhanced functional integration between medial prefrontal and bilateral frontal, motor, and occipital regions for loss relative to gain feedback. These findings demonstrate the utility of assessing time-frequency amplitude, inter-trial phase synchrony, and inter-channel phase synchrony together to better elucidate the neurophysiology of feedback processing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Evolution of the baryon fraction in the Local Group: accretion versus feedback at low and high z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirani, Sébastien; Jung, Intae; Silk, Joseph; Pichon, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Using hydrodynamical zoom simulations in the standard Λ cold dark matter cosmology, we investigate the evolution of the distribution of baryons (gas and stars) in a Local Group-type universe. First, with standard star formation and supernova feedback prescriptions, we find that the mean baryonic fraction value estimated at the virial radius of the two main central objects (i.e. the Milky Way and Andromeda) is decreasing over time and is 10-15 per cent lower than the universal value 0.166, at z = 0. This decrease is mainly due to the fact that the amount of accretion of dissipative gas on to the halo, especially at low redshift, is in general much lower than that of the dissipationless dark matter. Indeed, a significant part of the baryons does not collapse on to the haloes and remains in their outskirts, mainly in the form of warm hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). Moreover, during the formation of each object, some dark matter and baryons are also expelled through merger events via tidal disruption. In contrast to baryons, expelled dark matter can be more efficiently re-accreted on to the halo, enhancing both the reduction of fb inside Rv and the increase of the mass of WHIM outside Rv. Varying the efficiency of supernova feedback at low redshift does not seem to significantly affect these trends. Alternatively, when a significant fraction of the initial gas in the main objects is released at high redshifts by more powerful sources of feedback, such as active galactic nuclei from intermediate-mass black holes in lower mass galaxies, the baryonic fraction at the virial radius can have a lower value (fb˜0.12) at low redshift. Hence, physical mechanisms able to drive the gas out of the virial radius at high redshifts will have a stronger impact on the deficit of baryons in the mass budget of Milky Way-type galaxies at present times than those that expel the gas in the longer, late phases of galaxy formation.

  9. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngendakumana, Ancille, E-mail: nancille@yahoo.fr; Todjihoundé, Leonard, E-mail: leonardt@imsp.uac.org [Institut de Mathématiques et des Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin); Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim, E-mail: kimpaye@kie.ac.rw [Kigali Institute of Education (KIE), Kigali (Rwanda)

    2014-01-15

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given.

  10. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngendakumana, Ancille; Todjihoundé, Leonard; Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given

  11. A phase plane graph based model of the ovulatory cycle lacking the "positive feedback" phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurbel Sven

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract When hormones during the ovulatory cycle are shown in phase plane graphs, reported FSH and estrogen values form a specific pattern that resembles the leaning “&" symbol, while LH and progesterone (Pg values form a "boomerang" shape. Graphs in this paper were made using data reported by Stricker et al. [Clin Chem Lab Med 2006;44:883–887]. These patterns were used to construct a simplistic model of the ovulatory cycle without the conventional "positive feedback" phenomenon. The model is based on few well-established relations: hypothalamic GnRH secretion is increased under estrogen exposure during two weeks that start before the ovulatory surge and lasts till lutheolysis. the pituitary GnRH receptors are so prone to downregulation through ligand binding that this must be important for their function. in several estrogen target tissue progesterone receptor (PgR expression depends on previous estrogen binding to functional estrogen receptors (ER, while Pg binding to the expressed PgRs reduces both ER and PgR expression. Some key features of the presented model are here listed: High GnRH secretion induced by the recovered estrogen exposure starts in the late follicular phase and lasts till lutheolysis. The LH and FSH surges start due to combination of accumulated pituitary GnRH receptors and increased GnRH secretion. The surges quickly end due to partial downregulation of the pituitary GnRH receptors (64% reduction of the follicular phase pituitary GnRH receptors is needed to explain the reported LH drop after the surge. A strong increase in the lutheal Pg blood level, despite modest decline in LH levels, is explained as delayed expression of pituitary PgRs. Postponed pituitary PgRs expression enforces a negative feedback loop between Pg levels and LH secretions not before the mid lutheal phase. Lutheolysis is explained as a consequence of Pg binding to hypothalamic and pituitary PgRs that reduces local ER expression. When hypothalamic

  12. Making the Good Even Better: Feedback from easyCBM Focus Groups, School Year 2009/2010. Technical Report # 1001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald; Lai, Cheng-Fei

    2010-01-01

    This technical report provides a summary of feedback from teachers, administrators, and support personnel who used the easyCBM progress monitoring and benchmark assessment system during school year 2009/2010. Data were gathered from semi-structured focus groups conducted during the 2010 easyCBM August Institute at the University of Oregon. Results…

  13. Improved synthetic-heterodyne Michelson interferometer vibrometer using phase and gain control feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeti, José Henrique; Kitano, Cláudio; Connelly, Michael J

    2015-12-10

    Synthetic-heterodyne demodulation is a useful technique for dynamic displacement and velocity measurement using interferometric sensors as it can provide an output signal which is immune to interferometric drift. With the advent of cost effective, high-speed real-time signal processing systems and software, processing of the complex signals encountered in interferometry has become more feasible. In conventional synthetic-heterodyne demodulation schemes, to obtain the dynamic displacement or vibration of the object under test requires knowledge of the interferometer visibility and also the argument of two Bessel functions. In this paper, a new synthetic-heterodyne demodulation method is described leading to an expression for the dynamic displacement and velocity of the object under test that is significantly less sensitive to the received optical power. In addition, the application of two independent phase and gain feedback loops is used to compensate for the nonideal gain and phase response of the anti-aliasing filter required for the signal acquisition of the received wideband interferometer signal. The efficacy of the improved system is demonstrated by measuring the displacement sensitivity frequency response and linearity of a Piezoelectric Mirror-Shifter (PMS) over a range of 200 Hz-9 kHz. In addition, the system is used to measure the response of the PMS to triangular and impulse type stimuli. The experimental results show excellent agreement with measurements taken using two independent industry standard calibration methods.

  14. Self-induced frequency scanning and distributed Bragg reflection in semiconductor lasers with phase-conjugate feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin-Golomb; Yariv

    1986-07-01

    A GaA1As semiconductor laser with feedback from a barium titanate photorefractive ring passive phase-conjugate mirror can be made to perform repeating or nonrepeating frequency scans over a 10-nm range toward either the blue or the red. The direction of scanning and whether the scans repeat may be controlled by adjusting the overlap of the interaction beams in the crystal. This overlap region may be adjusted so that the diode frequency spectrum, originally occupying about 10 longitudinal modes, scans and narrows as the conjugate signal builds up, coming to rest often in one, but sometimes two or three, longitudinal modes as a result of self-generated distributed-feedback effects. Also reported similar effects caused by feedback from the total-internal-reflection passive phase-conjugate mirror. The alignment-control mechanism of the ring mirror is, however, not available in this case.

  15. Self-induced frequency scanning and distributed Bragg reflection in semiconductor lasers with phase-conjugate feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin-Golomb, M.; Yariv, A.

    1986-07-01

    A GaAlAs semiconductor laser with feedback from a barium titanate photorefractive ring passive phase-conjugate mirror can be made to perform repeating or nonrepeating frequency scans over a 10-nm range toward either the blue or the red. The direction of scanning and whether the scans repeat may be controlled by adjusting the overlap of the interaction beams in the crystal. This overlap region may be adjusted so that the diode frequency spectrum, originally occupying about 10 longitudinal modes, scans and narrows as the conjugate signal builds up, coming to rest often in one, but sometimes two or three, longitudinal modes as a result of self-generated distributed-feedback effects. We also report similar effects caused by feedback from the total-internal-reflection passive phase-conjugate mirror. The alignment-control mechanism of the ring mirror is, however, not available in this case.

  16. Self-induced frequency scanning and distributed bragg reflection in semiconductor lasers with phase-conjugate feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin-Golomb, Mark; Yariv, Amnon

    1986-07-01

    A GaAlAs semiconductor laser with feedback from a barium titanate photorefractive ring passive phase-conjugate mirror can be made to perform repeating or nonrepeating frequency scans over a 10-nm range toward either the blue or the red. The direction of scanning and whether the scans repeat may be controlled by adjusting the overlap of the interaction beams in the crystal. This overlap region may be adjusted so that the diode frequency spectrum, originally occupying about 10 longitudinal modes, scans and narrows as the conjugate signal builds up, coming to rest often in one, but sometimes two or three, longitudinal modes as a result of self-generated distributed-feedback effects. We also report similar effects caused by feedback from the total-internal-reflection passive phase-conjugate mirror. The alignment-control mechanism of the ring mirror is, however, not available in this case.

  17. Quantum renormalization group approach to geometric phases in spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, R.

    2013-01-01

    A relation between geometric phases and criticality of spin chains are studied using the quantum renormalization-group approach. I have shown how the geometric phase evolve as the size of the system becomes large, i.e., the finite size scaling is obtained. The renormalization scheme demonstrates how the first derivative of the geometric phase with respect to the field strength diverges at the critical point and maximum value of the first derivative, and its position, scales with the exponent of the system size

  18. The effect of peer-group size on the delivery of feedback in basic life support refresher training: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsuk; Je, Sangmo; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Roh, Hye Rin; Chang, Chulho; Kang, Hyunggoo; Lim, Taeho

    2016-07-04

    Students are largely providing feedback to one another when instructor facilitates peer feedback rather than teaching in group training. The number of students in a group affect the learning of students in the group training. We aimed to investigate whether a larger group size increases students' test scores on a post-training test with peer feedback facilitated by instructor after video-guided basic life support (BLS) refresher training. Students' one-rescuer adult BLS skills were assessed by a 2-min checklist-based test 1 year after the initial training. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of student number in a group on BLS refresher training. Participants included 115 final-year medical students undergoing their emergency medicine clerkship. The median number of students was 8 in the large groups and 4 in the standard group. The primary outcome was to examine group differences in post-training test scores after video-guided BLS training. Secondary outcomes included the feedback time, number of feedback topics, and results of end-of-training evaluation questionnaires. Scores on the post-training test increased over three consecutive tests with instructor-led peer feedback, but not differ between large and standard groups. The feedback time was longer and number of feedback topics generated by students were higher in standard groups compared to large groups on the first and second tests. The end-of-training questionnaire revealed that the students in large groups preferred the smaller group size compared to their actual group size. In this BLS refresher training, the instructor-led group feedback increased the test score after tutorial video-guided BLS learning, irrespective of the group size. A smaller group size allowed more participations in peer feedback.

  19. Implementation and Impact of an Automated Group Monitoring and Feedback System to Promote Hand Hygiene Among Health Care Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Laurie J.; Riley, Linda; Saiman, Lisa; Cohen, Bevin; Alper, Paul; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    Article-at-a-Glance Background Despite substantial evidence to support the effectiveness of hand hygiene for preventing health care–associated infections, hand hygiene practice is often inadequate. Hand hygiene product dispensers that can electronically capture hand hygiene events have the potential to improve hand hygiene performance. A study on an automated group monitoring and feedback system was implemented from January 2012 through March 2013 at a 140-bed community hospital. Methods An electronic system that monitors the use of sanitizer and soap but does not identify individual health care personnel was used to calculate hand hygiene events per patient-hour for each of eight inpatient units and hand hygiene events per patient-visit for the six outpatient units. Hand hygiene was monitored but feedback was not provided during a six-month baseline period and three-month rollout period. During the rollout, focus groups were conducted to determine preferences for feedback frequency and format. During the six-month intervention period, graphical reports were e-mailed monthly to all managers and administrators, and focus groups were repeated. Results After the feedback began, hand hygiene increased on average by 0.17 events/patient-hour in inpatient units (interquartile range = 0.14, p = .008). In outpatient units, hand hygiene performance did not change significantly. A variety of challenges were encountered, including obtaining accurate census and staffing data, engendering confidence in the system, disseminating information in the reports, and using the data to drive improvement. Conclusions Feedback via an automated system was associated with improved hand hygiene performance in the short term. PMID:25252389

  20. Implementation and impact of an automated group monitoring and feedback system to promote hand hygiene among health care personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Laurie J; Riley, Linda; Saiman, Lisa; Cohen, Bevin; Alper, Paul; Larson, Elaine L

    2014-09-01

    Despite substantial evidence to support the effectiveness of hand hygiene for preventing health care-associated infections, hand hygiene practice is often inadequate. Hand hygiene product dispensers that can electronically capture hand hygiene events have the potential to improve hand hygiene performance. A study on an automated group monitoring and feedback system was implemented from January 2012 through March 2013 at a 140-bed community hospital. An electronic system that monitors the use of sanitizer and soap but does not identify individual health care personnel was used to calculate hand hygiene events per patient-hour for each of eight inpatient units and hand hygiene events per patient-visit for the six outpatient units. Hand hygiene was monitored but feedback was not provided during a six-month baseline period and three-month rollout period. During the rollout, focus groups were conducted to determine preferences for feedback frequency and format. During the six-month intervention period, graphical reports were e-mailed monthly to all managers and administrators, and focus groups were repeated. After the feedback began, hand hygiene increased on average by 0.17 events/patient-hour in inpatient units (interquartile range = 0.14, p = .008). In outpatient units, hand hygiene performance did not change significantly. A variety of challenges were encountered, including obtaining accurate census and staffing data, engendering confidence in the system, disseminating information in the reports, and using the data to drive improvement. Feedback via an automated system was associated with improved hand hygiene performance in the short-term.

  1. Relativized problems with abelian phase group in topological dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D

    1976-04-01

    Let (X, T) be the equicontinuous minimal transformation group with X = pi(infinity)Z(2), the Cantor group, and S = [unk](infinity)Z(2) endowed with the discrete topology acting on X by right multiplication. For any countable group T we construct a function F:X x S --> T such that if (Y, T) is a minimal transformation group, then (X x Y, S) is a minimal transformation group with the action defined by (x, y)s = [xs, yF(x, s)]. If (W, T) is a minimal transformation group and varphi:(Y, T) --> (W, T) is a homomorphism, then identity x varphi:(X x Y, S) --> (X x W, S) is a homomorphism and has many of the same properties that varphi has. For this reason, one may assume that the phase group is abelian (or S) without loss of generality for many relativized problems in topological dynamics.

  2. 77 FR 28894 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Collection of Qualitative Feedback Through Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... Policy and Strategy, 20 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, DC 20529-2020. Comments may also be submitted...: Individuals or households; Business or other for-profit. The information collection activity will garner... directly to the improvement of program management. Feedback collected under this generic clearance will...

  3. Vanadium (4) complexing in phase of adsorbent with benzimidazole groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvoeva, O P; Kuchava, G P; Evtikova, G A; Belyaeva, V K; Myasoedova, G V; Marov, I N [AN SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii

    1989-04-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of V{sup 4+} sorption by POLYORGS XI-H adsorbent with benzimidazole groups (BIm) are investigated. Using ESR method it is stated that (VO{sup 2+}):(BIm)1:2 complex, where VO{sup 2+} is combined with nitrogen atoms of two imidazole groups, is formed in adsorbent phase. The highest distribution factor of 4.7x10{sup 3} is attained at pH6.

  4. Vanadium (4) complexing in phase of adsorbent with benzimidazole groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvoeva, O.P.; Kuchava, G.P.; Evtikova, G.A.; Belyaeva, V.K.; Myasoedova, G.V.; Marov, I.N.

    1989-01-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of V 4+ sorption by POLYORGS XI-H adsorbent with benzimidazole groups (BIm) are investigated. Using ESR method it is stated that [VO 2+ ]:[BIm]1:2 complex, where VO 2+ is combined with nitrogen atoms of two imidazole groups, is formed in adsorbent phase. The highest distribution factor of 4.7x10 3 is attained at pH6

  5. Efficient phase locking of two dual-wavelength fiber amplifiers by an all-optical self-feedback loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bing; Chen, Keshan; Yao, Tianfu; Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Haojun

    2017-10-01

    Efficient phase locking of two dual-wavelength fiber amplifiers has been demonstrated by using a self-feedback coupling and intracavity filtering configuration, and the effect of bandwidth and wavelength spacing on their phase locking performances have been investigated in experiment. Two independent fiber lasers with different operating wavelength were combined incoherently by a 3 dB fiber coupler to form a dual-wavelength seed source laser, which was injected into the fiber amplifiers' coupling array through the self-feedback loop. The effect of bandwidth and wavelength spacing was researched by altering the seed laser's pump power and operating wavelengths respectively. As long as the feedback loop and the single-mode fiber filtering configuration were well constructed in the unidirectional ring laser cavity, stable phase locking states and high fringe visibility interference patterns could always be obtained in our experiment. When the spacing of two operating wavelength was varied from 1.6 nm to 19.6 nm, the fringe visibility decreased slightly with the increase of wavelength spacing, and the corresponding fringe visibility was always larger than 0.6. In conclusion, we believe that efficient phase locking of several multi-wavelength laser sources is also feasible by passive self-adjusting methods, and keeping the component laser beams' phase relationship stable and fixed is more important than controlling their operating wavelengths.

  6. Interest groups, the Lesotho Highlands Water Project Phase 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interest groups can bring about changes in the water policy arena. ... Lesotho Highlands Water Project Phase 1 as a case study. ... attempts to influence public policy and their representation ... ties concern the relations between state actors and non-state ..... 'bears responsibility here [LHWP], since it is the sponsor of.

  7. Surfacing the life phases of a mental health support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Wanda K

    2004-01-01

    Support groups have increased rapidly in number and become a viable alternative to formal treatment in the United States. However, little is known regarding how mental health advocacy or support groups start and develop, or about challenges that can threaten their survival. In this 2 1/2-year ethnography, the author studied the culture of a developing family support program associated with a system of care. Several phases emerged, reflecting an organizational dynamic. The group dynamics and response to challenges have implications for organizers and parent organizations about the need for technical assistance necessary for survival of the group. Participant observation and immersion in the culture of such groups can provide a deeper understanding of the ideologies and values around which they organize and the kinds of tensions that members can experience during the group's cycle.

  8. Design of a Hardware-Implemented Phase Calculating System for Feedback Control in the LHCD Experiments on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiang; Liang Hao; Zhou Yongzhao

    2009-01-01

    A fully hardware-implemented phase calculating system for the feedback control in the lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments is presented in this paper. By taking advantages of field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips with embedded digital signal processing (DSP) cores and the Matlab-aided design method, the phase calculating algorithm with a square root operation and parallel process are efficiently implemented in a single FPGA chip to complete the calculation of phase differences fast and accurately in the lower-hybrid wave (LHW) system on EAST. (fusion engineering)

  9. Phase 2 of the International Piping Integrity Research Group programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlaston, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The results of phase 1 of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-1) programme have been widely reported. The significance of the results is reviewed briefly, in order to put the phase 2 programme into perspective. The success of phase 1 led the participants to consider further development and validation of pipe and pipe component fracture analysis technology as part of another international group programme (IPIRG-2). The benefits of combined funding and of the technical exchanges and interactions are considered to be of significant advantage and value. The phase 2 programme has been designed with the overall objective of developing and experimentally validating methods of predicting the fracture behaviour of nuclear reactor safety-related piping, to both normal operating and accident loads. The programme will add to the engineering estimation analysis methods that have been developed for straight pipes. The pipe system tests will expand the database to include seismic loadings and flaws in fittings, such as bends, elbows and tees, as well as ''short'' cracks. The results will be used to validate further the analytical methods, expand the capability to make fittings and extend the quasi-static results for the USNRC's new programme on short cracks in piping and piping welds. The IPIRG-2 programme is described to provide a clear understanding of the content, strategy, potential benefits and likely significance of the work. ((orig.))

  10. Extended Group Contribution Model for Polyfunctional Phase Equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens

    of physical separation processes. In a thermodynamic sense, design requires detailed knowledge of activity coefficients in the phases at equilibrium. The prediction of these quantities from a minimum of experimental data is the broad scope of this thesis. Adequate equations exist for predicting vapor......Material and energy balances and equilibrium data form the basis of most design calculations. While material and energy balances may be stated without much difficulty, the design engineer is left with a choice between a wide variety of models for describing phase equilibria in the design......-liquid equilibria from data on binary mixtures, composed of structurally simple molecules with a single functional group. More complex is the situation with mixtures composed of structurally more complicated molecules or molecules with more than one functional group. The UNIFAC method is extended to handle...

  11. On the Representation of Cloud Phase in Global Climate Models, and its Importance for Simulations of Climate Forcings and Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storelvmo, Trude; Sagoo, Navjit; Tan, Ivy

    2016-04-01

    Despite the growing effort in improving the cloud microphysical schemes in GCMs, most of this effort has not focused on improving the ability of GCMs to accurately simulate phase partitioning in mixed-phase clouds. Getting the relative proportion of liquid droplets and ice crystals in clouds right in GCMs is critical for the representation of cloud radiative forcings and cloud-climate feedbacks. Here, we first present satellite observations of cloud phase obtained by NASA's CALIOP instrument, and report on robust statistical relationships between cloud phase and several aerosols species that have been demonstrated to act as ice nuclei (IN) in laboratory studies. We then report on results from model intercomparison projects that reveal that GCMs generally underestimate the amount of supercooled liquid in clouds. For a selected GCM (NCAR 's CAM5), we thereafter show that the underestimate can be attributed to two main factors: i) the presence of IN in the mixed-phase temperature range, and ii) the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process, which converts liquid to ice once ice crystals have formed. Finally, we show that adjusting these two processes such that the GCM's cloud phase is in agreement with the observed has a substantial impact on the simulated radiative forcing due to IN perturbations, as well as on the cloud-climate feedbacks and ultimately climate sensitivity simulated by the GCM.

  12. Behavior Tracking Software Enhancement and Integration of a Feedback Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Company is proposing to adapt a behavioral tracking program and feedback module specifically developed for the U.S. Army Special Forces for NASA human space...

  13. Renormalization group theory of phase transitions in square Ising systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nienhuis, B.

    1978-01-01

    Some renormalization group calculations are presented on a number of phase transitions in a square Ising model, both second and first order. Of these transitions critical exponents are calculated, the amplitudes of the power law divergences and the locus of the transition. In some cases attention is paid to the thermodynamic functions also far from the critical point. Universality and scaling are discussed and the renormalization group theory is reviewed. It is shown how a renormalization transformation, which relates two similar systems with different macroscopic dimensions, can be constructed, and how some critical properties of the system follow from this transformation. Several numerical and analytical applications are presented. (Auth.)

  14. Control of group velocity by phase-changing collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the influence of phase-changing collisions on the group velocities in Doppler-broadened, cycling, degenerate two-level systems where F e =F g +1 and F g >0, interacting with pump and probe lasers, that exhibit electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). Two model systems are considered: the N system where the pump and probe are polarized perpendicularly, and EIA is due to transfer of coherence (TOC), and the double two-level system (TLS) where both lasers have the same polarization, and EIA is due to transfer of population (TOP). For the case of Doppler-broadened EIA TOC, which occurs at low pump intensity, there is a switch from positive to negative dispersion and group velocity, as the rate of phase-changing collisions is increased. For the case of EIA TOP at low pump intensity, the dispersion and group velocity remain negative even when the collision rate is increased. Pressure-induced narrowing, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the negative dispersion and a decrease in the magnitude of the negative group velocity, occurs in both EIA TOC and EIA TOP, at low pump intensity. When the pump intensity is increased, a switch from negative to positive dispersion and group velocity, with increasing collision rate, also occurs in the double TLS system. However, the effect is far smaller than in the case of the N system at low pump intensity

  15. Quantum field theory and phase transitions: universality and renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn-Justin, J.

    2003-08-01

    In the quantum field theory the problem of infinite values has been solved empirically through a method called renormalization, this method is satisfying only in the framework of renormalization group. It is in the domain of statistical physics and continuous phase transitions that these issues are the easiest to discuss. Within the framework of a course in theoretical physics the author introduces the notions of continuous limits and universality in stochastic systems operating with a high number of freedom degrees. It is shown that quasi-Gaussian and mean field approximation are unable to describe phase transitions in a satisfying manner. A new concept is required: it is the notion of renormalization group whose fixed points allow us to understand universality beyond mean field. The renormalization group implies the idea that long distance correlations near the transition temperature might be described by a statistical field theory that is a quantum field in imaginary time. Various forms of renormalization group equations are presented and solved in particular boundary limits, namely for fields with high numbers of components near the dimensions 4 and 2. The particular case of exact renormalization group is also introduced. (A.C.)

  16. A model of group cognitive behavioral intervention combined with bio-feedback in oncology settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Miri

    2010-01-01

    This article's goal is to present a model for social work with cancer patients and their relatives aimed at teaching ways of coping with cancer and its implications. The article presents a model of six meetings, emphasizing learning processes and acquisition of skills enabling participants to recognize and change distressing thoughts, combined with learning relaxation methods and guided imagery. An additional unique property of this model is the bio-feedback, which assists in creating awareness of physiological alertness states and in learning and implementing the different methods for decreasing pressure and stress.

  17. Phase structure of NJL model with weak renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ken-Ichi; Kumamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the chiral phase structure of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and density by using the functional renormalization group (FRG). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the fermionic effective potential V (σ ; t) is given as a partial differential equation, where σ : = ψ bar ψ and t is a dimensionless RG scale. When the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DχSB) occurs at a certain scale tc, V (σ ; t) has singularities originated from the phase transitions, and then one cannot follow RG flows after tc. In this study, we introduce the weak solution method to the RG equation in order to follow the RG flows after the DχSB and to evaluate the dynamical mass and the chiral condensate in low energy scales. It is shown that the weak solution of the RG equation correctly captures vacuum structures and critical phenomena within the pure fermionic system. We show the chiral phase diagram on temperature, chemical potential and the four-Fermi coupling constant.

  18. Phase Grouping Line Extraction Algorithm Using Overlapped Partition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jingxue

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at solving the problem of fracture at the discontinuities area and the challenges of line fitting in each partition, an innovative line extraction algorithm is proposed based on phase grouping using overlapped partition. The proposed algorithm adopted dual partition steps, which will generate overlapped eight partitions. Between the two steps, the middle axis in the first step coincides with the border lines in the other step. Firstly, the connected edge points that share the same phase gradients are merged into the line candidates, and fitted into line segments. Then to remedy the break lines at the border areas, the break segments in the second partition steps are refitted. The proposed algorithm is robust and does not need any parameter tuning. Experiments with various datasets have confirmed that the method is not only capable of handling the linear features, but also powerful enough in handling the curve features.

  19. A study on M/G/1 retrial G - queue with two phases of service, immediate feedback and working vacations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varalakshmi, M.; Chandrasekaran, V. M.; Saravanarajan, M. C.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we discuss about the steady state behaviour of M/G/1 retrial queueing system with two phases of services and immediate feedbacks under working vacation policy where the regular busy server is affected due to the arrival of negative customers. Upon arrival if the customer finds the server busy, breakdown or on working vacation it enters an orbit; otherwise the customer enters into the service area immediately. After service completion, the customer is allowed to make finite number of immediate feedback. The feedback service also consists of two phases. At the service completion epoch of a positive customer, if the orbit is empty the server goes for a working vacation. The server works at a lower service rate during working vacation (WV) period. Using the supplementary variable technique, we found out the steady state probability generating function for the system and in orbit. System performance measures and reliability measures are discussed. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to validate the analyticalresults.

  20. CEXE INCEXE, 1 Group 3-D Time-Dependent Xe Oscillations in X-Y-Z Geometry with Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, R.; Pacino, S.

    1973-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CEXE solves the three- dimensional xyz time-dependent xenon spatial oscillation problem using a modified one energy group theory and a nodal representation. 2 - Method of solution: CEXE solves for the spatial neutron source distribution with coupled Doppler and moderator temperature feedbacks. The time dependence of the iodine and xenon concentrations are based on the assumption of constant power during each time-step interval. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum reactor core size representation is restricted to a nodal configuration of 19 x 19 x 10 in the x, y, z directions, respectively

  1. Automated feedback to foster safe driving in young drivers: phase 2 : traffic tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) provides a promising approach to reduce speeding. A core principle of ISA is real-time feedback that lets drivers know when they are driving over the speed limit. The overall goal of the study was to provide insight...

  2. Automated feedback to foster safe driving in young drivers : Phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) represents a promising approach to reduce speeding. A core principle for ISA systems is that they provide real-time feedback to drivers, prompting them to reduce speed when some threshold at or above the limit is re...

  3. A TECHNIQUE OF IDENTIFICATION OF THE PHASE-DISPLACEMENT GROUP OF THREE-PHASE TRANSFORMER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburjania, A.; Begiashvili, V.; Rezan Turan

    2007-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the arbitrary choice of arbitrarily pisitive direction of induced currents and voltages contradicts the energy conservation law and leads to equilibrium equations and standards making no sense from the physical standpoint. Of 12 recognized standard phase-displacement groups of three-phase transformer, only three have real physical bases. The rest are based on a wrong assumption about mutual biasing of primary and secondary currents. They does not rule out the occurrence of emergency situations and, thus, must be eliminated from use. A new method of identification of the phase-displacement of three-phase transformer is proposed. The method is based on well-known physical laws with consideration for the dual character of the inertia of mutual inductance and exhausts for all possible versions of connection of transformer windings. (author)

  4. EU-US standards harmonization task group report : feedback to standards development organizations - security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-12

    Harmonization Task Groups 1 and 3 (HTG1 and 3) were established by the EU-US International Standards Harmonization Working Group to attempt to harmonize standards (including ISO, CEN, ETSI, IEEE) on security (HTG1) and communications protocols (HTG3)...

  5. EU-US standards harmonization task group report : feedback to ITS standards development organizations communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Harmonization Task Groups 1 and 3 (HTG1 and 3) were established by the EU-US International Standards Harmonization Working Group to attempt to harmonize standards (including ISO, CEN, ETSI, IEEE) on security (HTG1) and communications protocols (HTG3)...

  6. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Janneke; van der Weijden, Trudy; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. Continuing professional education may be necessary to refresh and reflect on the communication and motivational interviewing skills of experienced primary care practice nurses. A video-feedback method was designed to improve these skills. Pre-test/posttest control group design. Seventeen Dutch practice nurses and 325 patients participated between June 2010-June 2011. Nurse-patient consultations were videotaped at two moments (T0 and T1), with an interval of 3-6 months. The videotaped consultations were rated using two protocols: the Maastrichtse Anamnese en Advies Scorelijst met globale items (MAAS-global) and the Behaviour Change Counselling Index. Before the recordings, nurses were allocated to a control or video-feedback group. Nurses allocated to the video-feedback group received video-feedback between T0 and T1. Data were analysed using multilevel linear or logistic regression. Nurses who received video-feedback appeared to pay significantly more attention to patients' request for help, their physical examination and gave significantly more understandable information. With respect to motivational interviewing, nurses who received video-feedback appeared to pay more attention to 'agenda setting and permission seeking' during their consultations. Video-feedback is a potentially effective method to improve practice nurses' generic communication skills. Although a single video-feedback session does not seem sufficient to increase all motivational interviewing skills, significant improvement in some specific skills was found. Nurses' clinical competences were not altered after feedback due to already high standards. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. NGC 741—Mergers and AGN Feedback on a Galaxy-group Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellenberger, G.; Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L.; O’Sullivan, E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giacintucci, S. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Duchesne, S. W. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 6140 (New Zealand); Raychaudhury, S., E-mail: gerrit.schellenberger@cfa.harvard.edu [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2017-08-10

    Low-mass galaxy cluster systems and groups will play an essential role in upcoming cosmological studies, such as those to be carried out with eROSITA. Though the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and merging processes are of special importance to quantify biases like selection effects or deviations from hydrostatic equilibrium, they are poorly understood on the galaxy-group scale. We present an analysis of recent deep Chandra and XMM-Newton integrations of NGC 741 that provides an excellent example of a group with multiple concurrent phenomena: both an old central radio galaxy and a spectacular infalling head-tail source, strongly bent jets, a 100-kpc radio trail, intriguing narrow X-ray filaments, and gas-sloshing features. Supported principally by X-ray and radio continuum data, we address the merging history of the group, the nature of the X-ray filaments, the extent of gas-stripping from NGC 742, the character of cavities in the group, and the roles of the central AGN and infalling galaxy in heating the intra-group medium.

  8. Long-term climate monitoring by the global climate observing system: report of breakout group 1 - climate forcings and feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.; Bretherton, F.

    1995-01-01

    The assignment for Breakout Group A was to re-visit and expand upon the plenary session discussion on climate forcings and feedbacks and to develop a set of recommendations for each of the science disciplines or activities covered within this breakout category. Working guidelines for the group included identifying: (1) what has to be done; (2) why it has to be done, i.e. who is the customer? (3) the process for remedying deficiencies and, specifically, how to leverage the activities at operational centers; and (4) priorities (recognizing that it is premature to distinguish between major systems). The science ares addressed included: greenhouse gases (GHGs); radiation budget; water vapor; aerosols; clouds; precipitation; tropospheric ozone; and solar radiation. The role of climate satellites was also noted

  9. Observations of a quasi-coherent fluctuation mode in the KT-5C tokamak during -90 deg. phase shift feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Kan; Wen Yizhi; Yu Changxuan; Liu Wandong; Wan Shude; Zhuang Ge; Yu Wen; Xu Zhizhan

    1997-01-01

    A new fluctuation phenomenon is observed through Langmuir probe measurements at the edge plasma in the KT-5C tokamak by applying a -90 deg. phase shift feedback. Using a two point correlation technique, it is found that this fluctuation mode has a longer poloidal wavelength and a definite frequency when compared with the usual edge turbulence. It is also found through bispectral analysis that this mode is a spontaneously excited quasi-coherent mode, which has almost no contribution to the cross-field particle flux. (author)

  10. Feedforward and feedback control of locked mode phase and rotation in DIII-D with application to modulated ECCD experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, W.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Strait, E. J.; Sweeney, R.; Volpe, F. A.; The DIII-D Team

    2018-03-01

    The toroidal phase and rotation of otherwise locked magnetic islands of toroidal mode number n  =  1 are controlled in the DIII-D tokamak by means of applied magnetic perturbations of n  =  1. Pre-emptive perturbations were applied in feedforward to ‘catch’ the mode as it slowed down and entrain it to the rotating field before complete locking, thus avoiding the associated major confinement degradation. Additionally, for the first time, the phase of the perturbation was optimized in real-time, in feedback with magnetic measurements, in order for the mode’s phase to closely match a prescribed phase, as a function of time. Experimental results confirm the capability to hold the mode in a given fixed-phase or to rotate it at up to 20 Hz with good uniformity. The control-coil currents utilized in the experiments agree with the requirements estimated by an electromechanical model. Moreover, controlled rotation at 20 Hz was combined with electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) modulated at the same frequency. This is simpler than regulating the ECCD modulation in feedback with spontaneous mode rotation, and enables repetitive, reproducible ECCD deposition at or near the island O-point, X-point and locations in between, for careful studies of how this affects the island stability. Current drive was found to be radially misaligned relative to the island, and resulting growth and shrinkage of islands matched expectations of the modified Rutherford equation for some discharges presented here. Finally, simulations predict the as designed ITER 3D coils can entrain a small island at sub-10 Hz frequencies.

  11. User Preferences for Content, Features, and Style for an App to Reduce Harmful Drinking in Young Adults: Analysis of User Feedback in App Stores and Focus Group Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milward, Joanna; Khadjesari, Zarnie; Fincham-Campbell, Stephanie; Deluca, Paolo; Watson, Rod; Drummond, Colin

    2016-05-24

    Electronic screening and brief intervention (eSBI) is effective in reducing weekly alcohol consumption when delivered by a computer. Mobile phone apps demonstrate promise in delivering eSBI; however, few have been designed with an evidence-based and user-informed approach. This study aims to explore from a user perspective, preferences for content, appearance, and operational features to inform the design of a mobile phone app for reducing quantity and frequency of drinking in young adults engaged in harmful drinking (18-30 year olds). Phase 1 included a review of user reviews of available mobile phone apps that support a reduction in alcohol consumption. Apps were identified on iTunes and Google Play and were categorized into alcohol reduction support, entertainment, blood alcohol content measurement (BAC), or other. eSBI apps with ≥18 user reviews were subject to a content analysis, which coded praise, criticism, and recommendations for app content, functionality, and esthetics. Phase 2 included four focus groups with young adults drinking at harmful levels and residing in South London to explore their views on existing eSBI apps and preferences for future content, functionality, and appearance. Detailed thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. In Phase 1, of the 1584 apps extracted, 201 were categorized as alcohol reduction, 154 as BAC calculators, 509 as entertainment, and 720 as other. We classified 32 apps as eSBI apps. Four apps had ≥18 user reviews: Change for Life Drinks Tracker, Drinksmeter, Drinkaware, and Alcohol Units Calculator. The highest proportion of content praises were for information and feedback provided in the apps (12/27, 44%), followed by praise for the monitoring features (5/27, 19%). Many (8/12, 67%) criticisms were for the drinking diary; all of these were related to difficulty entering drinks. Over half (18/32, 56%) of functionality criticisms were descriptions of software bugs, and over half of those (10/18, 56%) were for app

  12. Kohn Anomaly and Phase Stability in Group VB Transition Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Landa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the periodic table, only a few pure metals exhibit lattice or magnetic instabilities associated with Fermi surface nesting, the classical examples being α-U and Cr. Whereas α-U displays a strong Kohn anomaly in the phonon spectrum that ultimately leads to the formation of charge density waves (CDWs, Cr is known for its nesting-induced spin density waves (SDWs. Recently, it has become clear that a pronounced Kohn anomaly and the corresponding softening in the elastic constants is also the key factor that controls structural transformations and mechanical properties in compressed group VB metals—materials with relatively high superconducting critical temperatures. This article reviews the current understanding of the structural and mechanical behavior of these metals under pressure with an introduction to the concept of the Kohn anomaly and how it is related to the important concept of Peierls instability. We review both experimental and theoretical results showing different manifestations of the Kohn anomaly in the transverse acoustic phonon mode TA (ξ00 in V, Nb, and Ta. Specifically, in V the anomaly triggers a structural transition to a rhombohedral phase, whereas in Nb and Ta it leads to an anomalous reduction in yield strength.

  13. Personalised normative feedback for preventing alcohol misuse in university students: Solomon three-group randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T Moreira

    Full Text Available Young people tend to over-estimate peer group drinking levels. Personalised normative feedback (PNF aims to correct this misperception by providing information about personal drinking levels and patterns compared with norms in similar aged peer groups. PNF is intended to raise motivation for behaviour change and has been highlighted for alcohol misuse prevention by the British Government Behavioural Insight Team. The objective of the trial was to assess the effectiveness of PNF with college students for the prevention of alcohol misuse.Solomon three-group randomised controlled trial. 1751 students, from 22 British Universities, allocated to a PNF group, a normal control group, or a delayed measurement control group to allow assessment of any measurement effects. PNF was provided by email. Participants completed online questionnaires at baseline, 6- and 12-months (only 12-months for the delayed measurement controls. Drinking behaviour measures were (i alcohol disorders; (ii frequency; (iii typical quantity, (iv weekly consumption; (v alcohol-related problems; (vi perceived drinking norms; and (vii positive alcohol expectancies. Analyses focused on high-risk drinkers, as well as all students, because of research evidence for the prevention paradox in student drinkers.Follow-up rates were low, with only 50% and 40% responding at 6- and 12-months, respectively, though comparable to similar European studies. We found no evidence for any systematic attrition bias. Overall, statistical analyses with the high risk sub-sample, and for all students, showed no significant effects of the intervention, at either time-point, in a completed case analysis and a multiple imputation analysis.We found no evidence for the effectiveness of PNF for the prevention of alcohol misuse and alcohol-related problems in a UK student population.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN30784467.

  14. Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase II project...

  15. Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase I project...

  16. Modeling Single-Phase Inverter and Its Decentralized Coordinated Control by Using Feedback Linearization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renke Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a very crucial problem to make a microgrid operated reasonably and stably. Considering the nonlinear mathematics model of inverter established in this paper, the input-output feedback linearization method is used to transform the nonlinear mathematics model of inverters to a linear tracking synchronization and consensus regulation control problem. Based on the linear mathematics model and multiagent consensus algorithm, a decentralized coordinated controller is proposed to make amplitudes and angles of voltages from inverters be consensus and active and reactive power shared in the desired ratio. The proposed control is totally distributed because each inverter only requires local and one neighbor’s information with sparse communication structure based on multiagent system. The hybrid consensus algorithm is used to keep the amplitude of the output voltages following the leader and the angles of output voltage as consensus. Then the microgrid can be operated more efficiently and the circulating current between DGs can be effectively suppressed. The effectiveness of the proposed method is proved through simulation results of a typical microgrid system.

  17. We're All in This Together Now: Group Performance Feedback to Increase Classroom Team Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellecchia, Melanie; Connell, James E.; Eisenhart, Donald; Kane, Meghan; Schoener, Christine; Turkel, Kimberly; Riley, Megan; Mandell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study's primary goal was to evaluate the use of performance feedback procedures delivered to a classroom team to increase daily data collection. Performance feedback (PFB) was delivered to four classroom teams responsible for the daily collection of data representing student performance during prescribed instructional activities. Using a…

  18. Magnetic superspace groups and symmetry constraints in incommensurate magnetic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mato, J M; Aroyo, M I; Ribeiro, J L; Petricek, V

    2012-01-01

    Superspace symmetry has been for many years the standard approach for the analysis of non-magnetic modulated crystals because of its robust and efficient treatment of the structural constraints present in incommensurate phases. For incommensurate magnetic phases, this generalized symmetry formalism can play a similar role. In this context we review from a practical viewpoint the superspace formalism particularized to magnetic incommensurate phases. We analyse in detail the relation between the description using superspace symmetry and the representation method. Important general rules on the symmetry of magnetic incommensurate modulations with a single propagation vector are derived. The power and efficiency of the method is illustrated with various examples, including some multiferroic materials. We show that the concept of superspace symmetry provides a simple, efficient and systematic way to characterize the symmetry and rationalize the structural and physical properties of incommensurate magnetic materials. This is especially relevant when the properties of incommensurate multiferroics are investigated. (topical review)

  19. Cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with optical feedback cw diode lasers for gas phase analysis and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Robert; Chu, Johnny; Hippler, Michael

    2012-10-21

    A variant of cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (CERS) is introduced, in which diode laser radiation at 635 nm is coupled into an external linear optical cavity composed of two highly reflective mirrors. Using optical feedback stabilisation, build-up of circulating laser power by 3 orders of magnitude occurs. Strong Raman signals are collected in forward scattering geometry. Gas phase CERS spectra of H(2), air, CH(4) and benzene are recorded to demonstrate the potential for analytical applications and fundamental molecular studies. Noise equivalent limits of detection in the ppm by volume range (1 bar sample) can be achieved with excellent linearity with a 10 mW excitation laser, with sensitivity increasing with laser power and integration time. The apparatus can be operated with battery powered components and can thus be very compact and portable. Possible applications include safety monitoring of hydrogen gas levels, isotope tracer studies (e.g., (14)N/(15)N ratios), observing isotopomers of hydrogen (e.g., radioactive tritium), and simultaneous multi-component gas analysis. CERS has the potential to become a standard method for sensitive gas phase Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Combining a leadership course and multi-source feedback has no effect on leadership skills of leaders in postgraduate medical education. An intervention study with a control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherpbier Albert

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leadership courses and multi-source feedback are widely used developmental tools for leaders in health care. On this background we aimed to study the additional effect of a leadership course following a multi-source feedback procedure compared to multi-source feedback alone especially regarding development of leadership skills over time. Methods Study participants were consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education at clinical departments. Study design: pre-post measures with an intervention and control group. The intervention was participation in a seven-day leadership course. Scores of multi-source feedback from the consultants responsible for education and respondents (heads of department, consultants and doctors in specialist training were collected before and one year after the intervention and analysed using Mann-Whitney's U-test and Multivariate analysis of variances. Results There were no differences in multi-source feedback scores at one year follow up compared to baseline measurements, either in the intervention or in the control group (p = 0.149. Conclusion The study indicates that a leadership course following a MSF procedure compared to MSF alone does not improve leadership skills of consultants responsible for education in clinical departments. Developing leadership skills takes time and the time frame of one year might have been too short to show improvement in leadership skills of consultants responsible for education. Further studies are needed to investigate if other combination of initiatives to develop leadership might have more impact in the clinical setting.

  1. Combining a leadership course and multi-source feedback has no effect on leadership skills of leaders in postgraduate medical education. An intervention study with a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malling, Bente; Mortensen, Lene; Bonderup, Thomas; Scherpbier, Albert; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2009-12-10

    Leadership courses and multi-source feedback are widely used developmental tools for leaders in health care. On this background we aimed to study the additional effect of a leadership course following a multi-source feedback procedure compared to multi-source feedback alone especially regarding development of leadership skills over time. Study participants were consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education at clinical departments. pre-post measures with an intervention and control group. The intervention was participation in a seven-day leadership course. Scores of multi-source feedback from the consultants responsible for education and respondents (heads of department, consultants and doctors in specialist training) were collected before and one year after the intervention and analysed using Mann-Whitney's U-test and Multivariate analysis of variances. There were no differences in multi-source feedback scores at one year follow up compared to baseline measurements, either in the intervention or in the control group (p = 0.149). The study indicates that a leadership course following a MSF procedure compared to MSF alone does not improve leadership skills of consultants responsible for education in clinical departments. Developing leadership skills takes time and the time frame of one year might have been too short to show improvement in leadership skills of consultants responsible for education. Further studies are needed to investigate if other combination of initiatives to develop leadership might have more impact in the clinical setting.

  2. Characteristics of phase-averaged equations for modulated wave groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopman, G.; Petit, H.A.H.; Battjes, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The project concerns the influence of long waves on coastal morphology. The modelling of the combined motion of the long waves and short waves in the horizontal plane is done by phase-averaging over the short wave motion and using intra-wave modelling for the long waves, see e.g. Roelvink (1993).

  3. Volunteer feedback and perceptions after participation in a phase I, first-in-human Ebola vaccine trial: An anonymous survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie-Anne Dayer

    Full Text Available The continued participation of volunteers in clinical trials is crucial to advances in healthcare. Few data are available regarding the satisfaction and impressions of healthy volunteers after participation in phase I trials, many of which lead to unexpected adverse events. We report feedback from over 100 adult volunteers who took part in a first-in-human trial conducted in a high-income country testing an experimental Ebola vaccine causing significant reactogenicity, as well as unexpected arthritis in one fifth of participants. The anonymous, internet-based satisfaction survey was sent by email to all participants upon their completion of this one-year trial; it asked 24 questions concerning volunteers' motivations, impressions of the trial experience, and overall satisfaction. Answers were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 115 trial participants, 103 (90% filled out the survey. Fifty-five respondents (53% were male. Thirty-five respondents (34% were healthcare workers, many of whom would deploy to Ebola-affected countries. All respondents cited scientific advancement as their chief motivation for participation, while 100/103 (97% and 61/103 (59% reported additional "humanitarian reasons" and potential protection from Ebolavirus, respectively. Although investigators had documented adverse events in 97% of trial participants, only 74 of 103 respondents (72% recalled experiencing an adverse event. All reported an overall positive experience, and 93/103 (90% a willingness to participate in future trials. Given the high level of satisfaction, no significant associations could be detected between trial experiences and satisfaction, even among respondents reporting adverse events lasting weeks or months. Despite considerable reactogenicity and unexpected vaccine-related arthritis, all survey respondents reported overall satisfaction. While this trial's context was unique, the positive feedback is likely due at least in part to the

  4. Phase transition over gauge group center and quark confinement in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlachev, S.B.; Makeenko, Yu.N.

    1979-01-01

    A lattice gauge model with the phase transition corresponding to spontaneous breakdown of the group center symmetry is considered. It is shown that the phase diagram, obtained in multicolor case, separates the high and low-temperature phases with confined and nonconfined quarks. The possibility of the Lorentz-invariant continuum limit in the phase with permanently confined quarks is confirmed

  5. Simulating the formation and evolution of galaxies: multi-phase description of the interstellar medium, star formation, and energy feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, E.; Chiosi, C.

    2007-10-01

    Context: Modelling the gaseous component of the interstellar medium (ISM) by Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics in N-Body simulations (NB-TSPH) is still very crude when compared to the complex real situation. In the real ISM, many different and almost physically decoupled components (phases) coexist for long periods of time, and since they spread over wide ranges of density and temperature, they cannot be correctly represented by a unique continuous fluid. This would influence star formation which is thought to take place in clumps of cold, dense, molecular clouds, embedded in a warmer, neutral medium, that are almost freely moving throughout the tenuous hot ISM. Therefore, assuming that star formation is simply related to the gas content without specifying the component in which this is both observed and expected to occur may not be physically sound. Aims: We consider a multi-phase representation of the ISM in NB-TSPH simulations of galaxy formation and evolution with particular attention to the case of early-type galaxies. Methods: Cold gas clouds are described by the so-called sticky particles algorithm. They can freely move throughout the hot ISM medium; stars form within these clouds and the mass exchange among the three baryonic phases (hot gas, cold clouds, stars) is governed by radiative and Compton cooling and energy feedback by supernova (SN) explosions, stellar winds, and UV radiation. We also consider thermal conduction, cloud-cloud collisions, and chemical enrichment. Results: Our model agrees with and improves upon previous studies on the same subject. The results for the star formation rate agree with recent observational data on early-type galaxies. Conclusions: These models lend further support to the revised monolithic scheme of galaxy formation, which has recently been strengthened by high redshift data leading to the so-called downsizing and top-down scenarios.

  6. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Influence of feedback loop characteristics on the field structure in a phase-conjugating ring mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esayan, A. A.; Zozulya, A. A.; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.

    1991-10-01

    An analysis is made of stimulated scattering in a ring resonator formed by a self-intersecting beam with simultaneous rotation and contraction of the beam due to feedback. Conditions for the excitation of lasing are obtained and the phase conjugation quality is determined near the lasing threshold.

  7. Phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using a room-temperature superlattice harmonic mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayton, D. J.; Khudchencko, A.; Pavelyev, D. G.; Hovenier, J. N.; Baryshev, A.; Gao, J. R.; Kao, T. Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.; Vaks, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) using a room temperature GaAs/AlAs superlattice diode as both a frequency multiplier and an internal harmonic mixer. A signal-to-noise level of 60 dB is observed in the intermediate frequency

  8. Phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using a room-temperature superlattice harmonic mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayton, D.J.; Khudchenko, A.; Pavelyev, D.G.; Hovenier, J.N.; Baryshev, A.; Gao, J.R.; Kao, T.Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J.L.; Vaks, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) using a room temperature GaAs/AlAs superlattice diode as both a frequency multiplier and an internal harmonic mixer. A signal-to-noise level of 60?dB is observed in the intermediate frequency

  9. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  10. Structural Phase Transition Nomenclature, Report of an IUCr Working Group on Phase Transition Nomenclature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toleddano, J.C.; Glazer, A.M.; Hahn, Th.; Parthe, E.; Roth, R.S.; Berry, R.S.; Metselaar, R.; Abrahams, S.C.

    1998-01-01

    A compact and intuitive nomenclature is recommended for naming each phase formed by a given material in a sequence of phase transitions as a function of temperature and/or pressure. The most commonly used label for each phase in a sequence, such as [alpha], [beta], ..., I, II, ... etc., is included

  11. Feedback on video recorded consultations in medical teaching: why students loathe and love it – a focus-group based qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerheim Anders

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feedback on videotaped consultations is a useful way to enhance consultation skills among medical students. The method is becoming increasingly common, but is still not widely implemented in medical education. One obstacle might be that many students seem to consider this educational approach a stressful experience and are reluctant to participate. In order to improve the process and make it more acceptable to the participants, we wanted to identify possible problems experienced by students when making and receiving feedback on their video taped consultations. Methods Nineteen of 75 students at the University of Bergen, Norway, participating in a consultation course in their final term of medical school underwent focus group interviews immediately following a video-based feedback session. The material was audio-taped, transcribed, and analysed by phenomenological qualitative analysis. Results The study uncovered that some students experienced emotional distress before the start of the course. They were apprehensive and lacking in confidence, expressing fear about exposing lack of skills and competence in front of each other. The video evaluation session and feedback process were evaluated positively however, and they found that their worries had been exaggerated. The video evaluation process also seemed to help strengthen the students' self esteem and self-confidence, and they welcomed this. Conclusion Our study provides insight regarding the vulnerability of students receiving feedback from videotaped consultations and their need for reassurance and support in the process, and demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the design and execution of such educational programs.

  12. Genetic influences on functional connectivity associated with feedback processing and prediction error: Phase coupling of theta-band oscillations in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiral, Şükrü Barış; Golosheykin, Simon; Anokhin, Andrey P

    2017-05-01

    Detection and evaluation of the mismatch between the intended and actually obtained result of an action (reward prediction error) is an integral component of adaptive self-regulation of behavior. Extensive human and animal research has shown that evaluation of action outcome is supported by a distributed network of brain regions in which the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a central role, and the integration of distant brain regions into a unified feedback-processing network is enabled by long-range phase synchronization of cortical oscillations in the theta band. Neural correlates of feedback processing are associated with individual differences in normal and abnormal behavior, however, little is known about the role of genetic factors in the cerebral mechanisms of feedback processing. Here we examined genetic influences on functional cortical connectivity related to prediction error in young adult twins (age 18, n=399) using event-related EEG phase coherence analysis in a monetary gambling task. To identify prediction error-specific connectivity pattern, we compared responses to loss and gain feedback. Monetary loss produced a significant increase of theta-band synchronization between the frontal midline region and widespread areas of the scalp, particularly parietal areas, whereas gain resulted in increased synchrony primarily within the posterior regions. Genetic analyses showed significant heritability of frontoparietal theta phase synchronization (24 to 46%), suggesting that individual differences in large-scale network dynamics are under substantial genetic control. We conclude that theta-band synchronization of brain oscillations related to negative feedback reflects genetically transmitted differences in the neural mechanisms of feedback processing. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence for genetic influences on task-related functional brain connectivity assessed using direct real-time measures of neuronal synchronization. Copyright © 2016

  13. The Reliability of Multisource Feedback in Competency-Based Assessment Programs: The Effects of Multiple Occasions and Assessor Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen-van Loon, J.M.; Overeem, K.; Govaerts, M.J.; Verhoeven, B.H.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Driessen, E.W.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Residency programs around the world use multisource feedback (MSF) to evaluate learners' performance. Studies of the reliability of MSF show mixed results. This study aimed to identify the reliability of MSF as practiced across occasions with varying numbers of assessors from different

  14. Business Activity Monitoring: Real-Time Group Goals and Feedback Using an Overhead Scoreboard in a Distribution Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goomas, David T.; Smith, Stuart M.; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Companies operating large industrial settings often find delivering timely and accurate feedback to employees to be one of the toughest challenges they face in implementing performance management programs. In this report, an overhead scoreboard at a retailer's distribution center informed teams of order selectors as to how many tasks were…

  15. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204 People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  16. Phase diagram of the Hubbard model with arbitrary band filling: renormalization group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannas, Sergio A.; Cordoba Univ. Nacional; Tsallis, Constantino.

    1991-01-01

    The finite temperature phase diagram of the Hubbard model in d = 2 and d = 3 is calculated for arbitrary values of the parameter U/t and chemical potential μ using a quantum real space renormalization group. Evidence for a ferromagnetic phase at low temperatures is presented. (author). 15 refs., 5 figs

  17. United States Air Force Academy Educational Outcomes Assessment Working Group. Phase 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Porter, David

    1997-01-01

    This publication provides an account of educational outcomes assessment activity undertaken by seven assessment teams under the Phase II Charter of the Dean of the Faculty's Educational Outcomes Assessment Working Group...

  18. Group-velocity dispersion effects on quantum noise of a fiber optical soliton in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Heongkyu; Lee, Euncheol

    2010-01-01

    Group-velocity dispersion (GVD) effects on quantum noise of ultrashort pulsed light are theoretically investigated at the soliton energy level, using Gaussian-weighted pseudo-random distribution of phasors in phase space for the modeling of quantum noise properties including phase noise, photon number noise, and quantum noise shape in phase space. We present the effects of GVD that mixes the different spectral components in time, on the self-phase modulation(SPM)-induced quantum noise properties in phase space such as quadrature squeezing, photon-number noise, and tilting/distortion of quantum noise shape in phase space, for the soliton that propagates a distance of the nonlinear length η NL = 1/( γP 0 ) (P 0 is the pulse peak power and γ is the SPM parameter). The propagation dependence of phase space quantum noise properties for an optical soliton is also provided.

  19. Peer Feedback in Learning a Foreign Language in Facebook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari, E.; Simons, P.R.J.; Pilot, A.; Naderi, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Feedback can have different forms and functions depending on its objectives as well as its provider: teacher feedback, student feedback, peer feedback, written feedback, oral feedback, etc. One of the most constructive forms of feedback may be peer feedback, since it involves group learning (Van

  20. Evaluating a web-based health risk assessment with tailored feedback: what does an expert focus group yield compared to a web-based end-user survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosbergen, Sandra; Mahieu, Guy R; Laan, Eva K; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Jaspers, Monique Wm; Peek, Niels

    2014-01-02

    Increasingly, Web-based health applications are developed for the prevention and management of chronic diseases. However, their reach and utilization is often disappointing. Qualitative evaluations post-implementation can be used to inform the optimization process and ultimately enhance their adoption. In current practice, such evaluations are mainly performed with end-user surveys. However, a review approach by experts in a focus group may be easier to administer and might provide similar results. The aim of this study was to assess whether industrial design engineers in a focus group would address the same issues as end users in a Web-based survey when evaluating a commercial Web-based health risk assessment (HRA) with tailored feedback. Seven Dutch companies used the HRA as part of their corporate health management strategy. Employees using the HRA (N=2289) and 10 independent industrial designers were invited to participate in the study. The HRA consisted of four components: (1) an electronic health questionnaire, (2) biometric measurements, (3) laboratory evaluation, and (4) individually tailored feedback generated by decision support software. After participating in the HRA as end users, both end users and designers evaluated the program. End users completed an evaluation questionnaire that included a free-text field. Designers participated in a focus group discussion. Constructs from user satisfaction and technology acceptance theories were used to categorize and compare the remarks from both evaluations. We assessed and qualitatively analyzed 294 remarks of 189 end users and 337 remarks of 6 industrial designers, pertaining to 295 issues in total. Of those, 137 issues were addressed in the end-user survey and 148 issues in the designer focus group. Only 7.3% (10/137) of the issues addressed in the survey were also addressed in the focus group. End users made more remarks about the usefulness of the HRA and prior expectations that were not met. Designers made

  1. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I remedial investigation: Sediment and Cesium-137 transport modeling report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, R.B.; Bao, Y.S.; Moore, T.D.; Brenkert, A.L.; Purucker, S.T.; Reece, D.K.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow-up information to the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that may present immediate risk to public health at the Clinch River and ecological risk within WAG 2 at ORNL. A sixth report, on groundwater, in the series documenting WAG 2 RI Phase I results were part of project activities conducted in FY 1996. The five reports that complete activities conducted as part of Phase I of the Remedial Investigation (RI) for WAG 2 are as follows: (1) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Seep Data Assessment, (2) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Tributaries Data Assessment, (3) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Ecological Risk Assessment, (4) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Human Health Risk Assessment, (5) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Sediment and 137 Cs Transport Modeling In December 1990, the Remedial Investigation Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was issued (ORNL 1990). The WAG 2 RI Plan was structured with a short-term component to be conducted while upgradient WAGs are investigated and remediated, and a long-term component that will complete the RI process for WAG 2 following remediation of upgradient WAGs. RI activities for the short-term component were initiated with the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This report presents the results of an investigation of the risk associated with possible future releases of 137 Cs due to an extreme flood. The results are based on field measurements made during storms and computer model simulations

  2. Quantum field theory and phase transitions: universality and renormalization group; Theorie quantique des champs et transitions de phase: universalite et groupe de renormalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn-Justin, J

    2003-08-01

    In the quantum field theory the problem of infinite values has been solved empirically through a method called renormalization, this method is satisfying only in the framework of renormalization group. It is in the domain of statistical physics and continuous phase transitions that these issues are the easiest to discuss. Within the framework of a course in theoretical physics the author introduces the notions of continuous limits and universality in stochastic systems operating with a high number of freedom degrees. It is shown that quasi-Gaussian and mean field approximation are unable to describe phase transitions in a satisfying manner. A new concept is required: it is the notion of renormalization group whose fixed points allow us to understand universality beyond mean field. The renormalization group implies the idea that long distance correlations near the transition temperature might be described by a statistical field theory that is a quantum field in imaginary time. Various forms of renormalization group equations are presented and solved in particular boundary limits, namely for fields with high numbers of components near the dimensions 4 and 2. The particular case of exact renormalization group is also introduced. (A.C.)

  3. Competing failure analysis in phased-mission systems with multiple functional dependence groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chaonan; Xing, Liudong; Peng, Rui; Pan, Zhusheng

    2017-01-01

    A phased-mission system (PMS) involves multiple, consecutive, non-overlapping phases of operation. The system structure function and component failure behavior in a PMS can change from phase to phase, posing big challenges to the system reliability analysis. Further complicating the problem is the functional dependence (FDEP) behavior where the failure of certain component(s) causes other component(s) to become unusable or inaccessible or isolated. Previous studies have shown that FDEP can cause competitions between failure propagation and failure isolation in the time domain. While such competing failure effects have been well addressed in single-phase systems, only little work has focused on PMSs with a restrictive assumption that a single FDEP group exists in one phase of the mission. Many practical systems (e.g., computer systems and networks), however may involve multiple FDEP groups during the mission. Moreover, different FDEP groups can be dependent due to sharing some common components; they may appear in a single phase or multiple phases. This paper makes new contributions by modeling and analyzing reliability of PMSs subject to multiple FDEP groups through a Markov chain-based methodology. Propagated failures with both global and selective effects are considered. Four case studies are presented to demonstrate application of the proposed method. - Highlights: • Reliability of phased-mission systems subject to competing failure propagation and isolation effects is modeled. • Multiple independent or dependent functional dependence groups are considered. • Propagated failures with global effects and selective effects are studied. • Four case studies demonstrate generality and application of the proposed Markov-based method.

  4. A Time Difference Method for Measurement of Phase Shift between Distributed Feedback Laser Diode (DFB-LD Output Wavelength and Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongning Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A time difference method to conveniently measure the phase shift between output wavelength and intensity of distributed feedback laser diodes (DFB-LDs was proposed. This approach takes advantage of asymmetric absorption positions at the same wavelength during wavelength increase and decrease tuning processes in the intensity-time curve by current modulation. For its practical implementation, a measurement example of phase shift was demonstrated by measuring a time difference between the first time and the second time attendances of the same gas absorption line in the intensity-time curve during one sine or triangle modulation circle. The phase shifts at modulation frequencies ranging from 50 Hz to 50 kHz were measured with a resolution of 0.001π. As the modulation frequency increased the shift value increased with a slowed growth rate.

  5. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.8 Section 76.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1...

  6. Improving the international system for operating experience feedback. INSAG-23. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The operational safety performance of nuclear facilities has, in general, improved notably over time throughout the world. This has been achieved, in part, through operating experience feedback (OEF) and the introduction of new technology. While the continued strong safety performance by operators is encouraging, safety significant events continue to recur in nuclear installations. This indicates that operators are not learning and applying the lessons that experience can teach us. This report focuses on systems that are operated by intergovernmental organizations with close contacts to national regulatory authorities. These systems provide an alternative network to the worldwide system employed by the operators of nuclear facilities known as the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). The WANO system is restricted to its members, who have concluded that keeping the information exchanged confidential improves its usefulness. INSAG recognizes the merits of this approach, particularly in light of the primary responsibility of licensed operators for the safety of their facilities. Nevertheless, INSAG encourages WANO to share key safety lessons with national regulatory authorities and intergovernmental organization

  7. RADIO GALAXY FEEDBACK IN X-RAY-SELECTED GROUPS FROM COSMOS: THE EFFECT ON THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giodini, S.; Finoguenov, A.; Boehringer, H.; Pierini, D.; Smolcic, V.; Massey, R.; BIrzan, L.; Zamorani, G.; Oklopcic, A.; Pratt, G. W.; Schinnerer, E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Thompson, D.

    2010-01-01

    We quantify the importance of the mechanical energy released by radio galaxies inside galaxy groups. We use scaling relations to estimate the mechanical energy released by 16 radio-active galactic nuclei located inside X-ray-detected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field. By comparing this energy output to the host groups' gravitational binding energy, we find that radio galaxies produce sufficient energy to unbind a significant fraction of the intragroup medium. This unbinding effect is negligible in massive galaxy clusters with deeper potential wells. Our results correctly reproduce the breaking of self-similarity observed in the scaling relation between entropy and temperature for galaxy groups.

  8. Two-group interfacial area concentration correlations of two-phase flows in large diameter pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Xiuzhong; Hibiki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The reliable empirical correlations and models are one of the important ways to predict the interfacial area concentration (IAC) in two-phase flows. However, up to now, no correlation or model is available for the prediction of the IAC in the two-phase flows in large diameter pipes. This study collected an IAC experimental database of two-phase flows taken under various flow conditions in large diameter pipes and presented a systematic way to predict the IAC for two-phase flows from bubbly, cap-bubbly to churn flow in large diameter pipes by categorizing bubbles into two groups (group-1: spherical and distorted bubble, group-2: cap bubble). Correlations were developed to predict the group-1 void fraction from the void fraction of all bubble. The IAC contribution from group-1 bubbles was modeled by using the dominant parameters of group-1 bubble void fraction and Reynolds number based on the parameter-dependent analysis of Hibiki and Ishii (2001, 2002) using one-dimensional bubble number density and interfacial area transport equations. A new drift velocity correlation for two-phase flow with large cap bubbles in large diameter pipes was derived in this study. By comparing the newly-derived drift velocity correlation with the existing drift velocity correlation of Kataoka and Ishii (1987) for large diameter pipes and using the characteristics of the representative bubbles among the group 2 bubbles, we developed the model of IAC and bubble size for group 2 cap bubbles. The developed models for estimating the IAC are compared with the entire collected database. A reasonable agreement was obtained with average relative errors of ±28.1%, ±54.4% and ±29.6% for group 1, group 2 and all bubbles respectively. (author)

  9. Propagation of the Semidiurnal Internal Tide: Phase Velocity Versus Group Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2017-12-01

    The superposition of two waves of slightly different wavelengths has long been used to illustrate the distinction between phase velocity and group velocity. The first-mode M2 and S2 internal tides exemplify such a two-wave model in the natural ocean. The M2 and S2 tidal frequencies are 1.932 and 2 cycles per day, respectively, and their superposition forms a spring-neap cycle in the semidiurnal band. The spring-neap cycle acts like a wave, with its frequency, wave number, and phase being the differences of the M2 and S2 internal tides. The spring-neap cycle and energy of the semidiurnal internal tide propagate at the group velocity. Long-range propagation of M2 and S2 internal tides in the North Pacific is observed by satellite altimetry. Along a 3,400 km beam spanning 24°-54°N, the M2 and S2 travel times are 10.9 and 11.2 days, respectively. For comparison, it takes the spring-neap cycle 21.1 days to travel over this distance. Spatial maps of the M2 phase velocity, the S2 phase velocity, and the group velocity are determined from phase gradients of the corresponding satellite observed internal tide fields. The observed phase and group velocities agree with theoretical values estimated using the World Ocean Atlas 2013 annual-mean ocean stratification.

  10. How to Evaluate Phase Differences between Trial Groups in Ongoing Electrophysiological Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies endeavor to reveal periodicities in sensory and cognitive functions, by comparing the distribution of ongoing (pre-stimulus) oscillatory phases between two (or more) trial groups reflecting distinct experimental outcomes. A systematic relation between the phase of spontaneous electrophysiological signals, before a stimulus is even presented, and the eventual result of sensory or cognitive processing for that stimulus, would be indicative of an intrinsic periodicity in the underlying neural process. Prior studies of phase-dependent perception have used a variety of analytical methods to measure and evaluate phase differences, and there is currently no established standard practice in this field. The present report intends to remediate this need, by systematically comparing the statistical power of various measures of “phase opposition” between two trial groups, in a number of real and simulated experimental situations. Seven measures were evaluated: one parametric test (circular Watson-Williams test), and three distinct measures of phase opposition (phase bifurcation index, phase opposition sum, and phase opposition product) combined with two procedures for non-parametric statistical testing (permutation, or a combination of z-score and permutation). While these are obviously not the only existing or conceivable measures, they have all been used in recent studies. All tested methods performed adequately on a previously published dataset (Busch et al., 2009). On a variety of artificially constructed datasets, no single measure was found to surpass all others, but instead the suitability of each measure was contingent on several experimental factors: the time, frequency, and depth of oscillatory phase modulation; the absolute and relative amplitudes of post-stimulus event-related potentials for the two trial groups; the absolute and relative trial numbers for the two groups; and the number of permutations used for non-parametric testing

  11. Students’ expectations of feedback given on draft writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Simpson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic writing is the primary means of assessing university students and feedback (oral or written responses on writing can contribute significantly to student learning and success (Ferris, 2003; Hyland & Hyland, 2006. This study explores students’ expectations of feedback on draft writing. The research design was two-pronged. The initial quantitative aspect employed a questionnaire which students completed after receiving feedback from Writing Centre consultants who aim to give developmental feedback. A subsequent phase involved focus groups with volunteer students. This mixed methods design allowed for greater depth of understanding as the qualitative findings extended the quantitative results. The study concludes that students expect feedback to be understandable, encouraging and to focus on both positive and negative aspects of their writing. Importantly, students expect feedback to ‘unpack’ the conventions of academic literacy while still encouraging independence and originality.

  12. Combining a leadership course and multi-source feedback has no effect on leadership skills of leaders in postgraduate medical education. An intervention study with a control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Bente; Mortensen, Lene; Bonderup, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    regarding development of leadership skills over time. METHODS: Study participants were consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education at clinical departments. STUDY DESIGN: pre-post measures with an intervention and control group. The intervention was participation in a seven-day leadership...... of variances. RESULTS: There were no differences in multi-source feedback scores at one year follow up compared to baseline measurements, either in the intervention or in the control group (p = 0.149). CONCLUSION: The study indicates that a leadership course following a MSF procedure compared to MSF alone does...... not improve leadership skills of consultants responsible for education in clinical departments. Developing leadership skills takes time and the time frame of one year might have been too short to show improvement in leadership skills of consultants responsible for education. Further studies are needed...

  13. A Phase Transformation with no Change in Space Group Symmetry: Octafluoronaphtalene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawley, G. S.; Dietrich, O. W.

    1975-01-01

    A solid-state phase transformation in octafluoronaphthalene has been discovered at 266.5K on cooling, and at 15K higher on heating. The symmetry of both phases is found to be the same, namely monoclinic with space group P21/c. The unit cell parameters change by up to 10%, but the integrity...... of a single crystal, which shatters on cooling, is good enough for a single-crystal structure determination. This has been done in both phases to a sufficient accuracy that a mechanism for the transformation can be proposed. Molecules which lie parallel to one another shear to a new parallel position...

  14. Group Lifting Structures For Multirate Filter Banks, II: Linear Phase Filter Banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brislawn, Christopher M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The theory of group lifting structures is applied to linear phase lifting factorizations for the two nontrivial classes of two-channel linear phase perfect reconstruction filter banks, the whole-and half-sample symmetric classes. Group lifting structures defined for the reversible and irreversible classes of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are shown to satisfy the hypotheses of the uniqueness theorem for group lifting structures. It follows that linear phase lifting factorizations of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are therefore independent of the factorization methods used to compute them. These results cover the specification of user-defined whole-sample symmetric filter banks in Part 2 of the ISO JPEG 2000 standard.

  15. The quantum-field renormalization group in the problem of a growing phase boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, N.V.; Vasil'ev, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    Within the quantum-field renormalization-group approach we examine the stochastic equation discussed by S.I. Pavlik in describing a randomly growing phase boundary. We show that, in contrast to Pavlik's assertion, the model is not multiplicatively renormalizable and that its consistent renormalization-group analysis requires introducing an infinite number of counterterms and the respective coupling constants (open-quotes chargeclose quotes). An explicit calculation in the one-loop approximation shows that a two-dimensional surface of renormalization-group points exits in the infinite-dimensional charge space. If the surface contains an infrared stability region, the problem allows for scaling with the nonuniversal critical dimensionalities of the height of the phase boundary and time, δ h and δ t , which satisfy the exact relationship 2 δ h = δ t + d, where d is the dimensionality of the phase boundary. 23 refs., 1 tab

  16. Detecting concealed information from groups using a dynamic questioning approach: simultaneous skin conductance measurement and immediate feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewout H Meijer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lie detection procedures typically aim at determining the guilt or innocence of a single suspect. The Concealed Information Test (CIT, for example, has been shown to be highly successful in detecting the presence or absence of crime-related information in a suspect’s memory. Many of today’s security threats, however, do not come from individuals, but from organized groups such as criminal organizations or terrorist networks. In this study, we tested whether a plan of an upcoming mock terrorist attack could be extracted from a group of suspects using a dynamic questioning approach. One-hundred participants were tested in 20 groups of 5. Each group was asked to plan a mock terrorist attack based on a list of potential countries, cities and streets. Next, three questions referring to the country, city, and street were presented, each with 5 options. Skin conductance in all 5 members of the group was measured simultaneously during this presentation. The dynamic questioning approach entailed direct analysis of the data, and if the average skin conductance of the group to a certain option exceeded a threshold, this option was followed up. E.g., if the reaction to the option ‘Italy’ exceeded the threshold, this was followed up by presenting 5 cities in Italy. Results showed that in 19 of the 20 groups the country was correctly detected using this procedure. In 13 of these remaining 19 groups the city was correctly detected. In 7 of these 13, the street was also correctly detected. The question about the country resulted in no false positives (out of 20, the question about the city resulted in 2 false positives (out of 19, while the question about the streets resulted in 2 false positives (out of 13. Furthermore, the 2 false positives at the city level also yielded a false positive at the street level. Taken together these results indicate our dynamic questioning approach can help to unveil plans about a mock terrorist attack.

  17. Altered Sensory Feedbacks in Pianist's Dystonia: the altered auditory feedback paradigm and the glove effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF in musician's dystonia (MD and discusses whether altered auditory feedback can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al. 2004. Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in synchrony with a metronome on a MIDI-piano with 3 auditory feedback conditions: 1. normal feedback; 2. no feedback; 3. constant delayed feedback. Experiment 2 employs synchronization-continuation paradigm: 12 MD patients and 12 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in two phases: first in synchrony with a metronome, secondly continue the established tempo without the metronome. There are 4 experimental conditions, among them 3 are the same altered auditory feedback as in Experiment 1 and 1 is related to altered tactile sensory input. The coefficient of variation of inter-onset intervals of the key depressions was calculated to evaluate fine motor control. Results: In both experiments, the healthy controls and the patients behaved very similarly. There is no difference in the regularity of playing between the two groups under any condition, and neither did AAF nor did altered tactile feedback have a beneficial effect on patients’ fine motor control. Conclusions: The results of the two experiments suggest that in the context of our experimental designs, AAF and altered tactile feedback play a minor role in motor coordination in patients with musicians' dystonia. We propose that altered auditory and tactile feedback do not serve as effective sensory tricks and may not temporarily reduce the symptoms of patients suffering from MD in this experimental context.

  18. An Islanding Detection Method by Using Frequency Positive Feedback Based on FLL for Single-Phase Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Qinfei; Guerrero, Josep M.; Jing, Tianjun

    2017-01-01

    An active islanding detection method based on Frequency-Locked Loop (FLL) for constant power controlled inverter in single-phase microgrid is proposed. This method generates a phase shift comparing the instantaneous frequency obtained from FLL unit with the nominal frequency to modify the reference...

  19. The effect of solar and lunar currents on simultaneous phase path, group path and amplitude measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulch, R.N.E.; Butcher, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The solar and lunar variations in the phase path, group path and amplitude of a fixed frequency transmission were obtained at the September equinox over a slightly oblique path. The phase of the lunar semi-diurnal tide in the phase path and amplitude were similar, the maxima occurring near 0200 lunar time, whereas the group path had a maximum near 0800 lunar time. These results were compared with other results obtained near the same location. The results suggest a complex situation in the E-region, where the height of the lunar current depends on season, and also suggest that the location and distribution of the solar and lunar currents may be different. (author)

  20. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised NOX...

  1. Initial phase of the development of sunspot groups and their forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlyand, B.O.; Burov, V.A.; Stepanyan, N.N.

    1979-01-01

    Some characteristics of the initial phase of sunspot groups and their forecast have been considered. Experimental data on 340 sunspot groups were obtained in 1967-1969. It was found that oscillations of the magnetic flux in the groups indicate the possibility of the existence of typical periods (2 and 4 days) of the magnetic field development. Most of the groups appears in young plages. The probability of the protons injection from the young groups is very small. The typical time of the development of the proton centre is 10-30 days. The characteristics of the group on the first day of its existence are vaguely connected with the lifetime of the group. On the second and third days the magnetic characteristics (the summary magnetic flux and the number of the unipolar regions) have the highest correlation coefficient (approximately 70%) with the lifetime of the group. The problem of the group lifetime forecast was being solved with the pattern recognition technique. On the base of the second day observation of the existence of the group verification of the received forecast 14% exceeds the verification of the climatological forecast. The forecast of the Zurich class with the same technique is effective beginning with the fifth day of the group existence and the forecast of the flare activity of the group since the day of its appearance. The exceeding of the verification as compared with the climatological forecasts in these problems is 10% and 8% accordingly

  2. Identical phase oscillators with global sinusoidal coupling evolve by Mobius group action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Seth A; Mirollo, Renato E; Strogatz, Steven H

    2009-12-01

    Systems of N identical phase oscillators with global sinusoidal coupling are known to display low-dimensional dynamics. Although this phenomenon was first observed about 20 years ago, its underlying cause has remained a puzzle. Here we expose the structure working behind the scenes of these systems by proving that the governing equations are generated by the action of the Mobius group, a three-parameter subgroup of fractional linear transformations that map the unit disk to itself. When there are no auxiliary state variables, the group action partitions the N-dimensional state space into three-dimensional invariant manifolds (the group orbits). The N-3 constants of motion associated with this foliation are the N-3 functionally independent cross ratios of the oscillator phases. No further reduction is possible, in general; numerical experiments on models of Josephson junction arrays suggest that the invariant manifolds often contain three-dimensional regions of neutrally stable chaos.

  3. Sustained impact of a short small group course with systematic feedback in addition to regular clinical clerkship activities on musculoskeletal examination skills--a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrig, Martin; Berendonk, Christoph; Rogausch, Anja; Beyeler, Christine

    2016-01-28

    The discrepancy between the extensive impact of musculoskeletal complaints and the common deficiencies in musculoskeletal examination skills lead to increased emphasis on structured teaching and assessment. However, studies of single interventions are scarce and little is known about the time-dependent effect of assisted learning in addition to a standard curriculum. We therefore evaluated the immediate and long-term impact of a small group course on musculoskeletal examination skills. All 48 Year 4 medical students of a 6 year curriculum, attending their 8 week clerkship of internal medicine at one University department in Berne, participated in this controlled study. Twenty-seven students were assigned to the intervention of a 6×1 h practical course (4-7 students, interactive hands-on examination of real patients; systematic, detailed feedback to each student by teacher, peers and patients). Twenty-one students took part in the regular clerkship activities only and served as controls. In all students clinical skills (CS, 9 items) were assessed in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) station, including specific musculoskeletal examination skills (MSES, 7 items) and interpersonal skills (IPS, 2 items). Two raters assessed the skills on a 4-point Likert scale at the beginning (T0), the end (T1) and 4-12 months after (T2) the clerkship. Statistical analyses included Friedman test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and Mann-Whitney U test. At T0 there were no significant differences between the intervention and control group. At T1 and T2 the control group showed no significant changes of CS, MSES and IPS compared to T0. In contrast, the intervention group significantly improved CS, MSES and IPS at T1 (p skills during regular clinical clerkship activities. However, an additional small group, interactive clinical skills course with feedback from various sources, improved these essential examination skills immediately after the teaching and several months later

  4. Measuring Group Synchrony: A Cluster-Phase Method for Analyzing Multivariate Movement Time-Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRichardson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A new method for assessing group synchrony is introduced as being potentially useful for objectively determining degree of group cohesiveness or entitativity. The cluster-phase method of Frank and Richardson (2010 was used to analyze movement data from the rocking chair movements of six-member groups who rocked their chairs while seated in a circle facing the center. In some trials group members had no information about others’ movements (their eyes were shut or they had their eyes open and gazed at a marker in the center of the group. As predicted, the group level synchrony measure was able to distinguish between situations where synchrony would have been possible and situations where it would be impossible. Moreover, other aspects of the analysis illustrated how the cluster phase measures can be used to determine the type of patterning of group synchrony, and, when integrated with multi-level modeling, can be used to examine individual-level differences in synchrony and dyadic level synchrony as well.

  5. How to be patient. The ability to wait for a reward depends on menstrual cycle phase and feedback-related activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise eReimers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA plays a major role in reinforcement learning with increases promoting reward sensitivity (Go learning while decreases facilitate the avoidance of negative outcomes (NoGo learning. This is also reflected in adaptations of response time: higher levels of DA enhance speeding up to get a reward, whereas lower levels favor slowing down. The steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone have been shown to modulate dopaminergic tone. Here, we tested fourteen women twice during their menstrual cycle, during the follicular (FP and the luteal phase (LP, applying functional magnetic resonance imaging while they performed a feedback learning task. Subsequent behavioral testing assessed response time preferences with a clock task, in which subjects had to explore the optimal response time (RT to maximize reward. In the FP subjects displayed a greater learning-related change of their RT than during the LP, when they were required to slow down. Final RTs in the slow condition were also predicted by feedback-related brain activation, but only in the FP. Increased activation of the inferior frontal junction and rostral cingulate zone was thereby predictive of slower and thus better adapted final RTs. Conversely, final RT was faster and less optimal for reward maximization if activation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was enhanced. These findings show that hormonal shifts across the menstrual cycle affect adaptation of response speed during reward acquisition with higher RT adjustment in the FP in the condition that requires slowing down. Since high estradiol levels during the FP increase synaptic DA levels, this conforms well to our hypothesis that estradiol supports Go learning at the expense of NoGo learning. Brain-behavior correlations further indicated that the compensatory capacity to counteract the follicular Go bias may be linked to the ability to more effectively monitor action outcomes and suppress bottom-up reward desiring during

  6. On the phase of Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, R.; Mokhtari, S. [Dept. of Phys., Louisiana Tech. Univ., Ruston, LA (United States)

    1995-10-07

    We compute the eta function for Chern-Simons quantum field theory with complex gauge group. The calculation is performed using the Schwinger expansion technique. We discuss, in particular, the role of the metric on the field configuration space, and demonstrate that for a certain class of acceptable metrics the one-loop phase contribution to the effective action can be calculated explicitly. The result is found to be proportional to a gauge invariant part of the action. (author)

  7. Line group techniques in description of the structural phase transitions in some superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meszaros, C.; Bankuti, J. [Roland Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary); Balint, A. [Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Goedoello (Hungary)

    1994-12-31

    The main features of the theory of line groups, and their irreducible representations are briefly discussed, as well as the most important applications of them. A new approach in the general symmetry analysis of the modulated systems is presented. It is shown, that the line group formalism could be a very effective tool in the examination of the structural phase transitions in High Temperature Superconductors. As an example, the material YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} is discussed briefly.

  8. Diabetes-Induced Oxidative Stress in Endothelial Progenitor Cells May Be Sustained by a Positive Feedback Loop Involving High Mobility Group Box-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered to be a critical factor in diabetes-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC dysfunction, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 in diabetes-induced oxidative stress. HMGB-1 was upregulated in both serum and bone marrow-derived monocytes from diabetic mice compared with control mice. In vitro, advanced glycation end productions (AGEs induced, expression of HMGB-1 in EPCs and in cell culture supernatants in a dose-dependent manner. However, inhibition of oxidative stress with N-acetylcysteine (NAC partially inhibited the induction of HMGB-1 induced by AGEs. Furthermore, p66shc expression in EPCs induced by AGEs was abrogated by incubation with glycyrrhizin (Gly, while increased superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in cell culture supernatants was observed in the Gly treated group. Thus, HMGB-1 may play an important role in diabetes-induced oxidative stress in EPCs via a positive feedback loop involving the AGE/reactive oxygen species/HMGB-1 pathway.

  9. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  10. Feedback reliability calculation for an iterative block decision feedback equalizer

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, G; Nix, AR; Armour, SMD

    2009-01-01

    A new class of iterative block decision feedback equalizer (IB-DFE) was pioneered by Chan and Benvenuto. Unlike the conventional DFE, the IB-DFE is optimized according to the reliability of the feedback (FB) symbols. Since the use of the training sequence (TS) for feedback reliability (FBR) estimation lowers the bandwidth efficiency, FBR estimation without the need for additional TS is of considerable interest. However, prior FBR estimation is limited in the literature to uncoded M-ary phases...

  11. Conversation therapy with people with aphasia and conversation partners using video feedback: a group and case series investigation of changes in interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Best

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Conversation therapies employing video for feedback and to facilitate outcome measurement are increasingly used with people with post-stroke aphasia and their conversation partners; however the evidence base for change in everyday interaction remains limited. We investigated the effect of Better Conversations with Aphasia, an intervention that is freely available online (https:// extend.ucl.ac.uk/. Eight people with chronic agrammatic aphasia, and their regular conversation partners participated in the tailored 8 week program involving significant video feedback. We explored changes in (i conversation facilitators (such as multi-modal turns by people with aphasia and (ii conversation barriers (such as use of test questions by conversation partners. The outcome of intervention was evaluated directly by measuring change in video-recorded everyday conversations. The study employed a pre-post design with multiple 5 minute samples of conversation before and after intervention, scored by trained raters blind to the point of data collection. Group level analysis showed no significant increase in conversation facilitators. There was, however, a significant reduction in the number of conversation barriers. The case series data revealed variability in conversation behaviors across occasions for the same dyad and between different dyads. Specifically, post-intervention there was a significant increase in facilitator behaviors for two dyads, a decrease for one and no significant change for five dyads. There was a significant decrease in barrier behaviors for five dyads and no significant change for three dyads. The reduction in barrier behaviors was considerable; on average change from over 8 to fewer than 3 barrier behaviors in 5 minutes conversation. The pre-post design has the limitation of no comparison group. However, change occurs in targeted conversational behaviors and in people with chronic aphasia and their partners. The findings suggest change

  12. Consciousness viewed in the framework of brain phase space dynamics, criticality, and the Renormalization Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this paper will be addressed in three stages: I will first review currently prominent theoretical conceptualizations of the neurobiology of consciousness and, where appropriate, identify ill-advised and flawed notions in theoretical neuroscience that may impede viewing consciousness as a phenomenon in the physics of brain. In this context, I will also introduce relevant facts that tend not to receive adequate attention in much of the current consciousness discourse. Next, I will review the evidence that accrued in the last decade that identifies the resting brain as being in a state of criticality. In the framework of state phase dynamics of statistical physics, this observational evidence also entails that the resting brain is poised at the brink of a second order phase transition. On this basis, I will in the third stage propose applying the framework of the Renormalization Group to viewing consciousness as a phenomenon in statistical physics. In physics, concepts of phase space transitions and the Renormalization Group are powerful tools for interpreting phenomena involving many scales of length and time in complex systems. The significance of these concepts lies in their accounting for the emergence of different levels of new collective behaviors in complex systems, each level with its distinct macroscopic physics, organization, and laws, as a new pattern of reality. In this framework, I propose to view subjectivity as the symbolic description of the physical brain state of consciousness that emerges as one of the levels of phase transitions of the brain-body-environment system, along the trajectory of Renormalization Group Transformations

  13. Phase and group velocities for Lamb waves in DOP-26 iridium alloy sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.A.; McGuire, D.J.

    1994-07-01

    The relatively coarse grain structure of iridium weldments limits the ultrasonic inspection of these structures to frequencies in the low megahertz range. As the material thickness is nominally 0.635 mm for clad vent set capsules, the low frequencies involved necessarily entail the generation of Lamb waves m the specimen. These waves are, of course, dispersive and detailed knowledge of both the phase and group velocities is required in order to determine accurately the location of flaws detected using Lamb waves. Purpose of this study is to elucidate the behavior of Lamb waves propagating in the capsule alloy and to quantify the velocities so that accurate flaw location is ensured. We describe a numerical technique for computing the phase velocities of Lamb waves (or of any other type of guided wave) and derive the group velocities from this information. A frequency-domain method is described for measuring group velocity when multiple Lamb modes are present and mutually interfering in the time domain, and experimental confirmation of the group velocity is presented for the capsule material

  14. Renormalization group evolution of neutrino parameters in presence of seesaw threshold effects and Majorana phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Gupta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We examine the renormalization group evolution (RGE for different mixing scenarios in the presence of seesaw threshold effects from high energy scale (GUT to the low electroweak (EW scale in the Standard Model (SM and Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM. We consider four mixing scenarios namely Tri–Bimaximal Mixing, Bimaximal Mixing, Hexagonal Mixing and Golden Ratio Mixing which come from different flavor symmetries at the GUT scale. We find that the Majorana phases play an important role in the RGE running of these mixing patterns along with the seesaw threshold corrections. We present a comparative study of the RGE of all these mixing scenarios both with and without Majorana CP phases when seesaw threshold corrections are taken into consideration. We find that in the absence of these Majorana phases both the RGE running and seesaw effects may lead to θ13<5° at low energies both in the SM and MSSM. However, if the Majorana phases are incorporated into the mixing matrix the running can be enhanced both in the SM and MSSM. Even by incorporating non-zero Majorana CP phases in the SM, we do not get θ13 in its present 3σ range. The current values of the two mass squared differences and mixing angles including θ13 can be produced in the MSSM case with tan⁡β=10 and non-zero Majorana CP phases at low energy. We also calculate the order of effective Majorana mass and Jarlskog Invariant for each scenario under consideration.

  15. MRI-guided Therapeutic Ultrasound : In vitro Validation of a New MR Compatible, Phased Array, Contact Endorectal Ultrasound Transducer with Active Feedback Control of Temperature Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomir, Rares; Rata, Mihaela; Lafon, Cyril; Melodelima, David; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Mathias, Adrien; Cotton, François; Bonmartin, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Contact application of high intensity ultrasound was demonstrated to be suitable for thermal ablation of sectorial tumours of the digestive duct. Experimental validation of a new MR compatible ultrasonic device is described here, dedicated to the minimal invasive therapy of localized colorectal cancer. This is a cylindrical 1D 64-element phased array transducer of 14 mm diameter and 25 mm height (Imasonic, France) allowing electronic rotation of the acoustic beam. Operating frequency ranges from 3.5 to 4.0 MHz and up to 5 effective electrical watts per element are available. A plane wave is reconstructed by simultaneous excitation of eigth adjacent elements with an appropriate phase law. Driving electronics operates outside the Faraday cage of the scanner and provides fast switching capabilities. Excellent passive and active compatibility with the MRI data acquisition has been demonstrated. In addition, feasibility of active temperature control has been demonstrated based on real-time data export out of the MR scanner and a PID feedback algorithm. Further studies will address the in-vivo validation and the integration of a miniature NMR coil for increased SNR in the near field.

  16. High salinity volatile phases in magmatic Ni-Cu-platinum group element deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J. J.; Mungall, J. E.

    2004-12-01

    The role of "deuteric" fluids (exsolved magmatic volatile phases) in the development of Ni-Cu-PGE (platinum group element) deposits in mafic-ultramafic igneous systems is poorly understood. Although considerable field evidence demonstrates unambiguously that fluids modified most large primary Ni-Cu-PGE concentrations, models which hypothesize that fluids alone were largely responsible for the economic concentration of the base and precious metals are not widely accepted. Determination of the trace element composition of magmatic volatile phases in such ore-forming systems can offer considerable insight into the origin of potentially mineralizing fluids in such igneous environments. Laser ablation ICP-MS microanalysis allows researchers to confirm the original metal budget of magmatic volatile phases and quantify the behavior of trace ore metals in the fluid phase in the absence of well-constrained theoretical or experimental predictions of ore metal solubility. In this study, we present new evidence from major deposits (Sudbury, Ontario, Canada; Stillwater Complex, Montana, U.S.A.) that compositionally distinct magmatic brines and halide melt phases were exsolved from crystallizing residual silicate melt and trapped within high-T fluid conduits now comprised of evolved rock compositions (albite-quartz graphic granite, orthoclase-quartz granophyre). Petrographic evidence demonstrates that brines and halide melts coexisted with immiscible carbonic phases at the time of entrapment (light aliphatic hydrocarbons, CO2). Brine and halide melt inclusions are rich in Na, Fe, Mn, K, Pb, Zn, Ba, Sr, Al and Cl, and homogenize by either halite dissolution at high T ( ˜450-700° C) or by melting of the salt phase (700-800° C). LA-ICPMS analyses of single inclusions demonstrate that high salinity volatile phases contained abundant base metals (Cu, Fe, Sn, Bi) and precious metals (Pt, Pd, Au, Ag) at the time of entrapment. Notably, precious metal concentrations in the inclusions

  17. Quantum phase transition by employing trace distance along with the density matrix renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Da-Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We use an alternative method to investigate the quantum criticality at zero and finite temperature using trace distance along with the density matrix renormalization group. It is shown that the average correlation measured by the trace distance between the system block and environment block in a DMRG sweep is able to detect the critical points of quantum phase transitions at finite temperature. As illustrative examples, we study spin-1 XXZ chains with uniaxial single-ion-type anisotropy and the Heisenberg spin chain with staggered coupling and external magnetic field. It is found that the trace distance shows discontinuity at the critical points of quantum phase transition and can be used as an indicator of QPTs

  18. Feedback Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zamir, Amir R.; Wu, Te-Lin; Sun, Lin; Shen, William; Malik, Jitendra; Savarese, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the most successful learning models in computer vision are based on learning successive representations followed by a decision layer. This is usually actualized through feedforward multilayer neural networks, e.g. ConvNets, where each layer forms one of such successive representations. However, an alternative that can achieve the same goal is a feedback based approach in which the representation is formed in an iterative manner based on a feedback received from previous iteration's...

  19. The Influence of Group Versus Individual Prenatal Care on Phase of Labor at Hospital Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, Ellen L; Emeis, Cathy L; Caughey, Aaron B; Weinstein, Sarah R; Futernick, Sarah B; Lee, Christopher S

    2016-07-01

    Group prenatal care, an alternate model of prenatal care delivery, has been associated with various improved perinatal outcomes in comparison to standard, individual prenatal care. One important maternity care process measure that has not been explored among women who receive group prenatal care versus standard prenatal care is the phase of labor (latent vs active) at hospital admission. A retrospective case-control study was conducted comparing 150 women who selected group prenatal care with certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) versus 225 women who chose standard prenatal care with CNMs. Analyses performed included descriptive statistics to compare groups and multivariate regression to evaluate the contribution of key covariates potentially influencing outcomes. Propensity scores were calculated and included in regression models. Women within this sample who received group prenatal care were more likely to be in active labor (≥ 4 cm of cervical dilatation) at hospital admission (odds ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-2.99; P = .049) and were admitted to the hospital with significantly greater cervical dilatation (mean [standard deviation, SD] 5.7 [2.5] cm vs. 5.1 [2.3] cm, P = .005) compared with women who received standard prenatal care, controlling for potential confounding variables and propensity for group versus individual care selection. Group prenatal care may be an effective and safe intervention for decreasing latent labor hospital admission among low-risk women. Neither group prenatal care nor active labor hospital admission was associated with increased morbidity. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  20. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  1. Renormalization group improved computation of correlation functions in theories with nontrivial phase diagram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Tonero, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple and consistent way to compute correlation functions in interacting theories with nontrivial phase diagram. As an example we show how to consistently compute the four-point function in three dimensional Z2-scalar theories. The idea is to perform the path integral by weighting...... the momentum modes that contribute to it according to their renormalization group (RG) relevance, i.e. we weight each mode according to the value of the running couplings at that scale. In this way, we are able to encode in a loop computation the information regarding the RG trajectory along which we...

  2. The effects of self-controlled video feedback on the learning of the basketball set shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Adam Aiken

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Allowing learners to control some aspect of instructional support (e.g., augmented feedback appears to facilitate motor skill acquisition. No studies, however, have examined self-controlled (SC video feedback without the provision of additional attentional cueing. The purpose of this study was to extend previous SC research using video feedback about movement form for the basketball set shot without explicitly directing attention to specific aspects of the movement. The SC group requested video feedback of their performance following any trial during the acquisition phase. The yoked (YK group received feedback according to a schedule created by a SC counterpart. During acquisition participants were also allowed to view written instructional cues at any time. Results revealed that the SC group had significantly higher form scores during the transfer phase and utilized the instructional cues more frequently during acquisition. Post-training questionnaire responses indicated no preference for requesting or receiving feedback following good trials as reported by Chiviacowsky and Wulf (2002, 2005. The nature of the task was such that participants could have assigned both positive and negative evaluations to different aspects of the movement during the same trial. Thus, the lack of preferences along with the similarity in scores for feedback and no-feedback trials may simply have reflected this complexity. Importantly, however, the results indicated that SC video feedback conferred a learning benefit without the provision of explicit additional attentional cueing.

  3. Output-Feedback Nonlinear Adaptive Control Strategy of the Single-Phase Grid-Connected Photovoltaic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmajid Abouloifa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of controlling the single-phase grid connected to the photovoltaic system through a full bridge inverter with LCL-filter. The control aims are threefold: (i imposing the voltage in the output of PV panel to track a reference provided by the MPPT block; (ii regulating the DC-link voltage to guarantee the power exchange between the source and AC grid; (iii ensuring a satisfactory power factor correction (PFC. The problem is dealt with using a cascade nonlinear adaptive controller that is developed making use of sliding-mode technique and observers in order to estimate the state variables and grid parameters, by measuring only the grid current, PV voltage, and the DC bus voltage. The control problem addressed by this work involves several difficulties, including the uncertainty of some parameters of the system and the numerous state variables are inaccessible to measurements. The results are confirmed by simulation under MATLAB∖Simulink∖SimPowerSystems, which show that the proposed regulator is robust with respect to climate changes.

  4. A discrete single server queue with Markovian arrivals and phase type group services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attahiru Sule Alfa

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a single-server discrete queueing system in which arrivals occur according to a Markovian arrival process. Service is provided in groups of size no more than M customers. The service times are assumed to follow a discrete phase type distribution, whose representation may depend on the group size. Under a probabilistic service rule, which depends on the number of customers waiting in the queue, this system is studied as a Markov process. This type of queueing system is encountered in the operations of an automatic storage retrieval system. The steady-state probability vector is shown to be of (modified matrix-geometric type. Efficient algorithmic procedures for the computation of the rate matrix, steady-state probability vector, and some important system performance measures are developed. The steady-state waiting time distribution is derived explicitly. Some numerical examples are presented.

  5. Effect of vision angle on the phase transition in flocking behavior of animal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, P The; Lee, Sang-Hee; Ngo, V Thanh

    2015-09-01

    The nature of the phase transition in a system of self-propelling particles has been extensively studied during the past few decades. A theoretical model was proposed by [T. Vicsek et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.75.1226] with a simple rule for updating the direction of motion of each particle. Based on the model of Vicsek et al., in this paper, we consider a group of animals as particles moving freely in a two-dimensional space. Due to the fact that the viewable area of animals depends on the species, we consider the motion of each individual within an angle φ=ϕ/2 (ϕ is called the angle of view) of a circle centered at its position of radius R. We obtained a phase diagram in the space (φ,η_{c}) with η_{c} being the critical noise. We show that the phase transition exists only in the case of a wide view's angle φ≥0.5π. The flocking of animals is a universal behavior of the species of prey but not the one of the predator. Our simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observation [C. Beccoa et al., Physica A 367, 487 (2006)PHYADX0378-437110.1016/j.physa.2005.11.041].

  6. Effect of vision angle on the phase transition in flocking behavior of animal groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, P. The; Lee, Sang-Hee; Ngo, V. Thanh

    2015-09-01

    The nature of the phase transition in a system of self-propelling particles has been extensively studied during the past few decades. A theoretical model was proposed by [T. Vicsek et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.75.1226] with a simple rule for updating the direction of motion of each particle. Based on the model of Vicsek et al., in this paper, we consider a group of animals as particles moving freely in a two-dimensional space. Due to the fact that the viewable area of animals depends on the species, we consider the motion of each individual within an angle φ =ϕ /2 (ϕ is called the angle of view) of a circle centered at its position of radius R . We obtained a phase diagram in the space (φ ,ηc ) with ηc being the critical noise. We show that the phase transition exists only in the case of a wide view's angle φ ≥0.5 π . The flocking of animals is a universal behavior of the species of prey but not the one of the predator. Our simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observation [C. Beccoa et al., Physica A 367, 487 (2006), 10.1016/j.physa.2005.11.041].

  7. The effect of charged groups on hydrophilic monolithic stationary phases on their chromatographic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibin; Liu, Chusheng; Wang, Qiqin; Zhou, Haibo; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-10-21

    In order to investigate the effect of charged groups present in hydrophilic monolithic stationary phases on their chromatographic properties, three charged hydrophilic monomers, i.e. N,N-dimethyl-N-acryloyloxyethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)ammonium betaine (SPDA), [2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (AETA), and 3-sulfopropyl acrylate potassium salt (SPA) were co-polymerized with the crosslinker N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), respectively. The physicochemical properties of the three resulting charged hydrophilic monolithic columns were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, ζ-potential analysis and micro-HPLC. High column efficiency was obtained on the three monolithic columns at a linear velocity of 1mm/s using thiourea as test compound. Comparative characterization of the three charged HILIC phases was then carried out using a set of model compounds, including nucleobases, nucleosides, benzoic acid derivatives, phenols, β-blockers and small peptides. Depending on the combination of stationary phase/mobile phase/solute, both hydrophilic interaction and other potential secondary interactions, including electrostatic interaction, hydrogen-bonding interaction, molecular shape selectivity, could contribute to the over-all retention of the analytes. Because of the strong electrostatic interaction provided by the quaternary ammonium groups in the poly (AETA-co-MBA) monolith, this cationic HILIC monolith exhibited the strongest retention for benzoic acid derivatives and small peptides with distorted peak shapes and the weakest retention for basic β-blockers. The sulfonyl groups on the poly (SPA-co-MBA) hydrophilic monolith could provide strong electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding for positively charged analytes and hydrogen-donor/acceptor containing analytes, respectively. Therefore, basic drugs, nucleobases and nucleotides exhibited the strongest retention on this anionic monolith. Because of the weak but distinct cation exchange properties of

  8. CGILS: Results from the First Phase of an International Project to Understand the Physical Mechanisms of Low Cloud Feedbacks in Single Column Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minghua; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter N.; Austin, Phillip H.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Bony, Sandrine; Brient, Florent; Cheedela, Suvarchal K.; Cheng, Anning; DelGenio, Anthony; hide

    2013-01-01

    1] CGILS-the CFMIP-GASS Intercomparison of Large Eddy Models (LESs) and single column models (SCMs)-investigates the mechanisms of cloud feedback in SCMs and LESs under idealized climate change perturbation. This paper describes the CGILS results from 15 SCMs and 8 LES models. Three cloud regimes over the subtropical oceans are studied: shallow cumulus, cumulus under stratocumulus, and well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus. In the stratocumulus and coastal stratus regimes, SCMs without activated shallow convection generally simulated negative cloud feedbacks, while models with active shallow convection generally simulated positive cloud feedbacks. In the shallow cumulus alone regime, this relationship is less clear, likely due to the changes in cloud depth, lateral mixing, and precipitation or a combination of them. The majority of LES models simulated negative cloud feedback in the well-mixed coastal stratus/stratocumulus regime, and positive feedback in the shallow cumulus and stratocumulus regime. A general framework is provided to interpret SCM results: in a warmer climate, the moistening rate of the cloudy layer associated with the surface-based turbulence parameterization is enhanced; together with weaker large-scale subsidence, it causes negative cloud feedback. In contrast, in the warmer climate, the drying rate associated with the shallow convection scheme is enhanced. This causes positive cloud feedback. These mechanisms are summarized as the "NESTS" negative cloud feedback and the "SCOPE" positive cloud feedback (Negative feedback from Surface Turbulence under weaker Subsidence-Shallow Convection PositivE feedback) with the net cloud feedback depending on how the two opposing effects counteract each other. The LES results are consistent with these interpretations

  9. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylwester, Eric Robert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr4, HfBr4, RfBr4, NbBr5, TaOBr3, HaCl5, WBr6, FrBr, and BiBr3. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy (ΔHa) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and ΔHa was observed: RfBr4 > ZrBr4 > HfBr4. The ΔHa values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of 261Rf was performed. 261Rf was produced via the 248Cm(18O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74-6+7 seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78-6+11 seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75±7 seconds for 261Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant

  10. Group theoretical arguments on the Landau theory of second-order phase transitions applied to the phase transitions in some liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosciszewski, K.

    1979-01-01

    The phase transitions between liquids and several of the simplest liquid crystalline phases (nematic, cholesteric, and the simplest types of smectic A and smectic C) were studied from the point of view of the group-theoretical arguments of Landau theory. It was shown that the only possible candidates for second-order phase transitions are those between nematic and smectic A, between centrosymmetric nematic and smectic C and between centrosymmetric smectic A and smectic C. Simple types of density functions for liquid crystalline phases are proposed. (author)

  11. Effects of Internal, External and Preference of Attentional Focus Feedback Instructions on Learning Soccer “Head Kick”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Okan Miçooğulları

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different types of feedback on learning soccer “head kick” of female adolescent. Novices performed head kick during two practice days [one week apart for two weeks using either internal or external preference attentional focusing instructions. There was also a preference group who choosen their feedback type themselves. Internal focus feedback related with body movements, whereas external focus feedback related with movement effects. The subjects (N=64 were randomly assigned to three groups internal focus feedback group (IFF (N=15, external focus feedback group (EFF (N=15 and preference group (PF (N=34. To promote learning two skill acquisition days for two weeks and one retention day was applied at initial day of third week. Technique of the skill was measured in acquisition days and targeting was measured in retention day. In technique measuring part, EFF group was significantly more accurate than IFF group, PF group was better than those two groups (PF>EFF>IFF. Similar to acquisition phase, EFF group was significantly more successfull than IFF group, PF group was better than those two groups (PF>EFF>IFF in retention phase. Acquisition and retention phase results indicated significance main effect for attentional focus feedback groups. This study results’ indicated that external focus feedback was more effective than internal focus feedback in terms of acquisition and retention of learning soccer head kick for students with limited amount of knowledge about this skill. This study also indicated that not only the source of attention but also control over to source of attention of preference was an important factor in the amount of retention.

  12. Applications of a solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) to the micro-determination of ABO blood group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Fenqiang; Guo Jingyuan

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate solid phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) method which has been improved. The research included the tests of its methodological parameters, sensitivity, accuracy, and the studies on its applications to the detection of blood group substances in varied forensic biological materials. The coefficient variation of intra-assay was 5.6%, and that of inter-assay was 10.15%. As to its applications to the forensic serology, the ABO blood groups of human bloodstain, hair follicular tissues and salivary stains had been tested and the results were satisfying. Later, 50 unknown type bloodly samples had been blind tested. The judging level used to identify the positive and negative wells was 800 cpm, that meant, if the radioactive count of a well were over 800 cpm, it was determined as a positive well, if that of a well were below 800 cpm, it was negative well. As SPRIA is a method of micro-determination which can micro-test the blood group antigens contained in varied forensic biological materials, it should has a good future of its applications to the forensic medicine fields

  13. About Politeness, Face, and Feedback: Exploring Resident and Faculty Perceptions of How Institutional Feedback Culture Influences Feedback Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Subha; Könings, Karen D; Mann, Karen V; Pisarski, Emily E; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2018-03-06

    To explore resident and faculty perspectives on what constitutes feedback culture, their perceptions of how institutional feedback culture (including politeness concepts) might influence the quality and impact of feedback, feedback seeking, receptivity, and readiness to engage in bidirectional feedback. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, five focus group discussions with internal medicine residents, three focus group discussions with general medicine faculty, and eight individual interviews with subspecialist faculty were conducted at Brigham and Women's Hospital between April and December 2016. Discussions and interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim; concurrent data collection and analysis were performed using the constant comparative approach. Analysis was considered through the lens of politeness theory and organizational culture. Twenty-nine residents and twenty-two general medicine faculty participated in focus group discussions, and eight subspecialty faculty participated in interviews. The institutional feedback culture was described by participants as: (1) a culture of politeness, in which language potentially damaging to residents' self-esteem was discouraged, and (2) a culture of excellence, in which the institution's outstanding reputation and pedigree of trainees inhibited constructive feedback. Three key themes situated within this broader cultural context were discovered: normalizing constructive feedback to promote a culture of growth, overcoming the mental block to feedback seeking, and hierarchical culture impeding bidirectional feedback. An institutional feedback culture of excellence and politeness may impede honest, meaningful feedback and may impact feedback seeking, receptivity, and bidirectional feedback exchanges. It is essential to understand the institutional feedback culture before it can be successfully changed.

  14. Phase and group refractive index curves for electromagnet waves moving in an ionised medium (1962); Courbes des indices de phase et de groupe d'ondes electromagnetiques se propageant dans un milieu ionise (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consoli, T [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    The family of curves presented in this table give the phase and group refractive indexes of plane electromagnetic waves propagating along and across a static magnetic field in a plasma. (author) [French] Les courbes presentees sous formes de reseaux donnent les indices de phase et de groupe d'ondes electromagnetiques planes se propageant longitudinalement ou transversalement dans un plasma en presence d'un champ magnetique statique. (auteur)

  15. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Human health risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purucker, S.T.; Douthat, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow- up information to the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that could cause potential human health risk and ecological risk within WAG2 at ORNL. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the human health risk assessment results based on the data collected for the WAG 2 Phase 1 RI. Estimates of risk are provided based on measured concentrations in the surface water, floodplain soil, and sediment of White Oak Creek, Melton Branch, and their tributaries. The human health risk assessment methodology used in this risk assessment is based on Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS). First, the data for the different media are elevated to determine usability for risk assessment. Second, through the process of selecting chemicals of potential concern (COPCs), contaminants to be considered in the risk assessment are identified for each assessment of exposure potential is performed, and exposure pathways are identified. Subsequently, exposure is estimated quantitatively, and the toxicity of each of the COPCs is determined. The results of these analyses are combined and summarized in a risk characterization

  16. Angular beam width of a slit-diffracted wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, Edwin H

    2012-01-01

    Taking magnetostatic surface wave diffraction as an example, this paper theoretically investigates the 2D diffraction pattern arising in the far-field region of a ferrite slab in the case of a plane wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities incident on a wide, arbitrarily oriented slit in an opaque screen. A universal analytical formula for the angular width of a diffracted beam is derived, which is valid for magnetostatic and other types of waves in anisotropic media and structures (including metamaterials) in 2D geometries. It is shown that the angular width of a diffracted beam in an anisotropic medium can not only take values greater or less than λ 0 /D (where λ 0 is the incident wavelength, and D is the slit width), but can also be zero under certain conditions. (methodological notes)

  17. Feedback loop compensates for rectifier nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Signal processing circuit with two negative feedback loops rectifies two sinusoidal signals which are 180 degrees out of phase and produces a single full-wave rectified output signal. Each feedback loop incorporates a feedback rectifier to compensate for the nonlinearity of the circuit.

  18. Dissociation between active and observational learning from positive and negative feedback in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Stefan; Ferrea, Stefano; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina; Südmeyer, Martin; Bellebaum, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Feedback to both actively performed and observed behaviour allows adaptation of future actions. Positive feedback leads to increased activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, whereas dopamine neuron activity is decreased following negative feedback. Dopamine level reduction in unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients has been shown to lead to a negative learning bias, i.e. enhanced learning from negative feedback. Recent findings suggest that the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from feedback might differ, with the striatum playing a less prominent role in observational learning. Therefore, it was hypothesized that unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients would show a negative learning bias only in active but not in observational learning. In a between-group design, 19 Parkinson's Disease patients and 40 healthy controls engaged in either an active or an observational probabilistic feedback-learning task. For both tasks, transfer phases aimed to assess the bias to learn better from positive or negative feedback. As expected, actively learning patients showed a negative learning bias, whereas controls learned better from positive feedback. In contrast, no difference between patients and controls emerged for observational learning, with both groups showing better learning from positive feedback. These findings add to neural models of reinforcement-learning by suggesting that dopamine-modulated input to the striatum plays a minor role in observational learning from feedback. Future research will have to elucidate the specific neural underpinnings of observational learning.

  19. Plant species and functional group effects on abiotic and microbial soil properties and plant-soil feedback responses in two grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Lawson, C.S.; Hedlund, K.; Edwards, A.R.; Brooks, A.J.; Igual, J.M.; Mortimer, S.R.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2006-01-01

    1 Plant species differ in their capacity to influence soil organic matter, soil nutrient availability and the composition of soil microbial communities. Their influences on soil properties result in net positive or negative feedback effects, which influence plant performance and plant community

  20. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Weijden, T. van der; Dulmen, S. van

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. Background: Continuing professional education may be

  1. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Dulmen, S. van

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. BACKGROUND: Continuing professional education may be

  2. ABCDEFG IS - the principle of constructive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, M

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is an integral part of any learning experience. Constructive feedback is a powerful instrument and facilitates the learner's professional and personal development. "ABCDEFG IS", a mnemonic for the principles of constructive feedback, stands for Amount of the information, Benefit of the trainees, Change behaviour, Descriptive language, Environment, Focused, Group check, Interpretation check, and Sharing information. The eight important steps of feedback are: Ensure prior information, Collect data, Make appropriate meeting arrangement, Begin by encouraging self assessment by the trainee, Highlight areas where the trainee is doing well, Give feedback, Handle reaction maintaining the dignity and Plan actions. Communication and reflection also share many of the principles and steps of constructive feedback and giving regular feedback, thus, helps to improve communication and reflection. The feedback provider would be able to provide genuine feedback by following the appropriate steps and principles of constructive feedback and realize how important and rewarding its role is in teaching learning activities.

  3. Renormalization Group and Phase Transitions in Spin, Gauge, and QCD Like Theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuzhi [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    In this thesis, we study several different renormalization group (RG) methods, including the conventional Wilson renormalization group, Monte Carlo renormalization group (MCRG), exact renormalization group (ERG, or sometimes called functional RG), and tensor renormalization group (TRG).

  4. Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation Phase 1 Seep Task data report: Contaminant source area assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2, Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Seep Task efforts during 1993 and 1994 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented here follow results form the first year of sampling, 1992, which are contained in the Phase 1 RI report for WAG 2 (DOE 1995a). The WAG 2 Seep Task efforts focused on contaminants in seeps, tributaries, and main streams within the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. This report is designed primarily as a reference for contaminants and a resource for guiding remedial decisions. Additional in-depth assessments of the Seep Task data may provide clearer understandings of contaminant transport from the different source areas in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 consists of WOC and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, and the associated flood plains and subsurface environment. The WOC watershed encompasses ORNL and associated WAGs. WAG 2 acts as an integrator for contaminant releases from the contaminated sites at ORNL and as the conduit transporting contaminants to the Clinch River. The main objectives of the Seep Task were to identify and characterize seeps, tributaries and source areas that are responsible for the contaminant releases to the main streams in WAG 2 and to quantify their input to the total contaminant release from the watershed at White Oak Dam (WOD). Efforts focused on 90 Sr, 3 H, and 137 Cs because these contaminants pose the greatest potential human health risk from water ingestion at WOD. Bimonthly sampling was conducted throughout the WOC watershed beginning in March 1993 and ending in August 1994. Samples were also collected for metals, anions, alkalinity, organics, and other radionuclides

  5. Frequencies of Blood Group Systems MNS, Diego, and Duffy and Clinical Phases of Carrion’s Disease in Amazonas, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Acosta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrion’s disease (CD, is a human bartonellosis, that is, endemic in the Andes of Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia. Bartonella bacilliformis, a native hemotrophic bacteria, is the causative agent of CD, and the interaction with the host could have produced changes in the gene frequencies of erythrocyte antigens. The goal here is to investigate the relationship between allele frequencies of blood group systems MNS, Diego, and Duffy and the clinical phases of CD, within a genetic context. In this associative and analytical study, 76 individuals from Bagua Grande, the province of Utcubamba, and the department of Amazonas in Peru, were enrolled. Forty of them resided in Tomocho-Collicate-Vista Hermosa area (high prevalence of cases in chronic phase, verrucous, or eruptive phase, without previous acute phase. Thirty-six individuals were from the area of Miraflores (high prevalence of cases in acute phase only and were evaluated for blood group systems MNS, Diego, and Duffy. This study constitutes one of the first attempts at evaluating the genetic factors and clinical phases of CD. No significant statistical differences (P>0.05 between allele frequencies of blood groups MNS, Diego, and Duffy and the prevalence of chronic and acute phases were detected in the two areas of Amazonas, Peru.

  6. Effect of phase-encoding direction on group analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yasuo; Miyata, Jun; Isobe, Masanori; Son, Shuraku; Yoshihara, Yujiro; Aso, Toshihiko; Kouchiyama, Takanori; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2018-05-17

    Echo-planar imaging is a common technique used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), however it suffers from image distortion and signal loss because of large susceptibility effects that are related to the phase-encoding direction of the scan. Despite this relationship, the majority of neuroimaging studies have not considered the influence of phase-encoding direction. Here, we aimed to clarify how phase-encoding direction can affect the outcome of an fMRI connectivity study of schizophrenia. Resting-state fMRI using anterior to posterior (A-P) and posterior to anterior (P-A) directions was used to examine 25 patients with schizophrenia (SC) and 37 matched healthy controls (HC). We conducted a functional connectivity analysis using independent component analysis and performed three group comparisons: A-P vs. P-A (all participants), SC vs. HC for the A-P and P-A datasets, and the interaction between phase-encoding direction and participant group. The estimated functional connectivity differed between the two phase-encoding directions in areas that were more extensive than those where signal loss has been reported. Although functional connectivity in the SC group was lower than that in the HC group for both directions, the A-P and P-A conditions did not exhibit the same specific pattern of differences. Further, we observed an interaction between participant group and the phase-encoding direction in the left temporo-parietal junction and left fusiform gyrus. Phase-encoding direction can influence the results of functional connectivity studies. Thus, appropriate selection and documentation of phase-encoding direction will be important in future resting-state fMRI studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Relative Effects of Daily Feedback and Weekly Feedback on Customer Service Behavior at a Gas Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Yongjoon; Lee, Kyehoon; Oah, Shezeen

    2013-01-01

    The relative effects of daily and weekly feedback on customer service behavior at a gas station were assessed using an ABC within-subjects design. Four critical service behaviors were identified and measured daily. After baseline (A), weekly feedback (B) was introduced, and daily feedback (C) was introduced in the next phase. The results indicated…

  8. Operating experience feedback in TVO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piirto, A [Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    TVO is a power company operating with two 710 MW BWR units at Olkiluoto. For operating experience feedback TVO has not established a separate organizational unit but rather relies on a group of persons representing various technical disciplines. The ``Operating Experience Group`` meets at about three-week intervals to handle the reports of events (in plant and external) which have been selected for handling by an engineer responsible for experience feedback. 7 charts.

  9. Engaging medical students in the feedback process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David A; Boehler, Margaret L; Schwind, Cathy J; Meier, Andreas H; Wall, Jarrod C H; Brenner, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    There are potential advantages to engaging medical students in the feedback process, but efforts to do so have yielded mixed results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a student-focused feedback instructional session in an experimental setting. Medical students were assigned randomly to either the intervention or control groups and then assigned randomly to receive either feedback or compliments. Tests of knowledge, skills, and attitudes were given before and after the intervention. There was a significant gain of knowledge and skill in the group that received instruction. Satisfaction was higher after compliments in the control group but higher after feedback in the instructional group. There was no change in the subject's willingness to seek feedback. A student-focused component should be carefully included as part of an overall effort to improve feedback in surgical education. The role of medical student attitudes about feedback requires further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Single-Phase LLCL-Filter-based Grid-Tied Inverter with Low-Pass Filter Based Capacitor Current Feedback Active damper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yuan; Wu, Weimin; Li, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The capacitor-current-feedback active damping method is attractive for high-order-filter-based high power grid-tied inverter when the grid impedance varies within a wide range. In order to improve the system control bandwidth and attenuate the high order grid background harmonics by using the quasi....... In this paper, a low pass filter is proposed to be inserted in the capacitor current feedback loop op LLCL-filter based grid-tied inverter together with a digital proportional and differential compensator. The detailed theoretical analysis is given. For verification, simulations on a 2kW/220V/10kHz LLCL...

  11. Buckling feedback of the spectral calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xingqing; Shan Wenzhi; Luo Jingyu

    1992-01-01

    This paper studies the problems about buckling feedback of spectral calculations in physical calculations of the reactor and presents a useful method by which the buckling feedback of spectral calculations is implemented. The effect of the buckling feedback in spectra and the broad group cross section, convergence of buckling feedback iteration and the effect of the spectral zones dividing are discussed in the calculations. This method has been used for the physical design of HTR-10 MW Test Module

  12. CGILS : Results from the first phase of an international project to understand the physical mechanisms of low cloud feedbacks in single column models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, M.; Bretherton, C.S.; Blossey, P.N.; Austin, P.H.; Bacmeister, J.T.; Bony, S.; Brient, F.; Cheedela, S.K.; Cheng, A.; Del Genio, A.D.; De Roode, S.R.; Endo, S.; Franklin, C.N.; Golaz, J.C.; Hannay, C.; Heus, T.; Isotta, F.A.; Dufresne, J.L.; Kang, I.S.; Kawai, H.; Köhler, M.; Larson, V.E.; Liu, Y.; Lock, A.P.; Lohmann, U.; Khairoutdinov, M.F.; Molod, A.M.; Neggers, R.A.J.; Rasch, P.; Sandu, I.; Senkbeil, R.; Siebesma, A.P.; Siegenthaler-Le Drian, C.; Stevens, B.; Suarez, M.J.; Xu, K.M.; Von Salzen, K.; Webb, M.J.; Wolf, A.; Zhao, M.

    2013-01-01

    CGILS—the CFMIP-GASS Intercomparison of Large Eddy Models (LESs) and single column models (SCMs)—investigates the mechanisms of cloud feedback in SCMs and LESs under idealized climate change perturbation. This paper describes the CGILS results from 15 SCMs and 8 LES models. Three cloud regimes over

  13. Renormalization-group study of superfluidity and phase separation of helium mixtures immersed in a disordered porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatnikova, A.; Berker, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    Superfluidity and phase separation in 3 He- 4 He mixtures immersed in aerogel are studied by renormalization-group theory. The quenched disorder imposed by aerogel, both at the atomic level and at the geometric level, is included. The calculation is conducted via the coupled renormalization-group mappings, near and away from aerogel, of the quenched probability distributions of random interactions. Random-bond effects on the onset of superfluidity and random-field effects on superfluid-superfluid phase separation are seen. The quenched randomness causes the λ line of second-order phase transitions of superfluidity onset to reach zero temperature, in agreement with general predictions and experiments. The effects of the atomic and geometric randomness of aerogel are investigated separately and jointly. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Processing graded feedback: electrophysiological correlates of learning from small and large errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Caroline Di Bernardi; Takase, Emilio; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2014-05-01

    Feedback processing is important for learning and therefore may affect the consolidation of skills. Considerable research demonstrates electrophysiological differences between correct and incorrect feedback, but how we learn from small versus large errors is usually overlooked. This study investigated electrophysiological differences when processing small or large error feedback during a time estimation task. Data from high-learners and low-learners were analyzed separately. In both high- and low-learners, large error feedback was associated with higher feedback-related negativity (FRN) and small error feedback was associated with a larger P300 and increased amplitude over the motor related areas of the left hemisphere. In addition, small error feedback induced larger desynchronization in the alpha and beta bands with distinctly different topographies between the two learning groups: The high-learners showed a more localized decrease in beta power over the left frontocentral areas, and the low-learners showed a widespread reduction in the alpha power following small error feedback. Furthermore, only the high-learners showed an increase in phase synchronization between the midfrontal and left central areas. Importantly, this synchronization was correlated to how well the participants consolidated the estimation of the time interval. Thus, although large errors were associated with higher FRN, small errors were associated with larger oscillatory responses, which was more evident in the high-learners. Altogether, our results suggest an important role of the motor areas in the processing of error feedback for skill consolidation.

  15. Sorption behavior of charged and neutral polar organic compounds on solid phase extraction materials: which functional group governs sorption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bäuerlein, P.S.; Mansell, J.E.; ter Laak, T.L.; de Voogt, P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous polar anthropogenic organic chemicals have been found in the aqueous environment. Solid phase extraction (SPE) has been applied for the isolation of these from aqueous matrices, employing various materials. Nevertheless, little is known about the influence of functional groups on the

  16. Feedback systems in the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.A.; Jobe, R.K.; Johnson, R.; Phinney, N.

    1987-02-01

    Two classes of computer-controlled feedback have been implemented to stabilize parameters in subsystems of the SLC: (1) ''slow'' (time scales ∼ minutes) feedback, and (2) ''fast'', i.e., pulse-to-pulse, feedback. The slow loops run in a single FEEDBACK process in the SLC host VAX, which acquires signals and sets control parameters via communication with the database and the network of normal SLC microprocessors. Slow loops exist to stabilize beam energy and energy spread, beam position and angle, and timing of kicker magnets, and to compensate for changes in the phase length of the rf drive line. The fast loops run in dedicated microprocessors, and may sample and/or feedback on particular parameters as often as every pulse of the SLC beam. The first implementations of fast feedback are to control transverse beam blow-up and to stabilize the energy and energy spread of bunches going into the SLC arcs. The overall architecture of the feedback software and the operator interface for controlling loops are discussed

  17. The coupling of thermochemistry and phase diagrams for group III-V semiconductor systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.J.

    1998-07-21

    The project was directed at linking the thermochemical properties of III-V compound semiconductors systems with the reported phase diagrams. The solid-liquid phase equilibrium problem was formulated and three approaches to calculating the reduced standard state chemical potential were identified and values were calculated. In addition, thermochemical values for critical properties were measured using solid state electrochemical techniques. These values, along with the standard state chemical potentials and other available thermochemical and phase diagram data, were combined with a critical assessment of selected III-V systems. This work was culminated with a comprehensive assessment of all the III-V binary systems. A novel aspect of the experimental part of this project was the demonstration of the use of a liquid encapsulate to measure component activities by a solid state emf technique in liquid III-V systems that exhibit high vapor pressures at the measurement temperature.

  18. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  19. Novel protocol for highly efficient gas-phase chemical derivatization of surface amine groups using trifluoroacetic anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchoslav, Jiri; Kehrer, Matthias; Hinterreiter, Andreas; Duchoslav, Vojtech; Unterweger, Christoph; Fürst, Christian; Steinberger, Roland; Stifter, David

    2018-06-01

    In the current work, chemical derivatization of amine (NH2) groups with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) as an analytical method to improve the information scope of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is investigated. TFAA is known to successfully label hydroxyl (OH) groups. With the introduction of a newly developed gas-phase derivatization protocol conducted at ambient pressure and using a catalyst also NH2 groups can now efficiently be labelled with a high yield and without the formation of unwanted by-products. By establishing a comprehensive and self-consistent database of reference binding energies for XPS a promising approach for distinguishing hydroxyl from amine groups is presented. The protocol was verified on different polymers, including poly(allylamine), poly(ethyleneimine), poly(vinylalcohol) and chitosan, the latter one containing both types of addressed chemical groups.

  20. Collective irrationality and positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolis, Stamatios C; Zabzina, Natalia; Latty, Tanya; Sumpter, David J T

    2011-04-26

    Recent experiments on ants and slime moulds have assessed the degree to which they make rational decisions when presented with a number of alternative food sources or shelter. Ants and slime moulds are just two examples of a wide range of species and biological processes that use positive feedback mechanisms to reach decisions. Here we use a generic, experimentally validated model of positive feedback between group members to show that the probability of taking the best of options depends crucially on the strength of feedback. We show how the probability of choosing the best option can be maximized by applying an optimal feedback strength. Importantly, this optimal value depends on the number of options, so that when we change the number of options the preference of the group changes, producing apparent "irrationalities". We thus reinterpret the idea that collectives show "rational" or "irrational" preferences as being a necessary consequence of the use of positive feedback. We argue that positive feedback is a heuristic which often produces fast and accurate group decision-making, but is always susceptible to apparent irrationality when studied under particular experimental conditions.

  1. Collective irrationality and positive feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatios C Nicolis

    Full Text Available Recent experiments on ants and slime moulds have assessed the degree to which they make rational decisions when presented with a number of alternative food sources or shelter. Ants and slime moulds are just two examples of a wide range of species and biological processes that use positive feedback mechanisms to reach decisions. Here we use a generic, experimentally validated model of positive feedback between group members to show that the probability of taking the best of options depends crucially on the strength of feedback. We show how the probability of choosing the best option can be maximized by applying an optimal feedback strength. Importantly, this optimal value depends on the number of options, so that when we change the number of options the preference of the group changes, producing apparent "irrationalities". We thus reinterpret the idea that collectives show "rational" or "irrational" preferences as being a necessary consequence of the use of positive feedback. We argue that positive feedback is a heuristic which often produces fast and accurate group decision-making, but is always susceptible to apparent irrationality when studied under particular experimental conditions.

  2. Internet-Based Self-Help with Therapist Feedback and in Vivo Group Exposure for Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Holmstrom, Annelie; Sparthan, Elisabeth; Furmark, Tomas; Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth; Buhrman, Monica; Ekselius, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-four individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) were assigned to a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package or to a waiting list control group. Treatment consisted of a 9-week, Internet-delivered, self-help program that was combined with 2 group exposure sessions in real life and minimal therapist contact via e-mail.…

  3. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. ...... behind, and front runners do not slack off. But in both pay schemes relative performance feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work; we refer to this as a "negative quality peer effect"....

  4. KEKB bunch feedback systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobiyama, M; Kikutani, E [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    Design and the present status of the bunch by bunch feedback systems for KEKB rings are shown. The detection of the bunch oscillation are made with the phase detection for longitudinal plane, the AM/PM method for transverse plane. Two GHz component of the bunch signal which is extracted with an analog FIR filter is used for the detection. Hardware two-tap FIR filter systems to shift the phase of the oscillation by 90deg will be used for the longitudinal signal processing. The same system will be used with no filtering but with only digital delay for transverse system. The candidate for the kicker and the required maximum power are also estimated. (author)

  5. VLF group delay of lightning-induced electron precipitation echoes from measurement of phase and amplitude perturbations at two frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, C.D.D.; Dowden, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of phase and amplitude perturbations (trimpis) of the NWC signal at Dunedin at both the NWC frequencies, 22,250 Hz and 22,350 Hz, enables measurement of the received phase of the echo signal (phasor difference of the perturbed and unperturbed signals) at each frequency and so the rate of decrease of phase with frequency. This, of course, is the group delay. The 100-Hz difference implies that measurement of echo group delays of up to 5 ms could be made without ambiguity, though other factors limit this to about 2.5 ms. Some 38 difference trimpis during May and June 1988 showed echo delays up to 2 ms corresponding to reflection from points displaced more than 1,000 km from the NWC-Dunedin great circle path. The echo amplitudes observed at such large displacements are much greater than expected from smooth circular depressions of the ionosphere modifying the waveguide phase velocity and so imply sharper discontinuities in the waveguide

  6. Group theoretical treatment of the low-temperature phase transition of the Cd6Ca 1/1-cubic approximant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, R.; Shibata, K.; Nishimoto, K.; Takeuchi, S.; Edagawa, K.; Saitoh, K.; Isobe, M.; Ueda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    An antiparallel orientational transition is reported for an intermetallic compound, i.e., Cd 6 Ca crystal, which is a 1/1-1/1-1/1 crystalline approximant to the icosahedral quasicrystal Cd 5.7 Ca. A group theoretical analysis based on the Landau theory predicts that the space group of the low-temperature phase is either C2/c or C2/m, in good agreement with the observations. Accordingly, two types of orientational orderings of Cd 4 tetrahedra, which are located in the center of icosahedral clusters, may occur below 100 K: In both cases, the Cd 4 tetrahedra are orientationally ordered in an antiparallel fashion along the [110] direction of the high temperature body-centered-cubic phase. Such a transition in a metal is reminiscent of orientational transitions in molecular solids

  7. Computer-learning methods in forecasting crystalline phases in ternary systems containing group V elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiseleva, N.N.; Burkhanov, G.S.

    1988-05-01

    New ABC compounds have been forecast as having structures of TiNiSi, ZrNiAl, MgAgAs and PbFCl types, while AB/sub 2/C/sub 2/ ones have structures of ThCr/sub 2/Si/sub 2/ and CaAl/sub 2/Si/sub 2/ (C = P, As, Sb, or Bi, while A and B are metals or semimetals). Only the fundamental properties of the elements are used. Cybernetic methods and computer training are effective in forecasting new crystalline phases.

  8. Feedback to Managers, Volume II: A Review and Comparison of Sixteen Multi-Rater Feedback Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsor, Ellen; Leslie, Jean Brittain

    "Feedback to Managers" is a two-volume report. Volume 2 compares 16 of the better feedback instruments available. The following are the instruments: (1) ACUMEN Group Feedback; (2) BENCHMARKS; (3) the Campbell Leadership Index; (4) COMPASS: the Managerial Practices Survey; (5) the Executive Success Profile; (6) Leader Behavior Analysis…

  9. Diazonium modification of porous graphitic carbon with catechol and amide groups for hydrophilic interaction and attenuated reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Chad D; Zhang, Ya; Lucy, Charles A

    2015-11-27

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) is an increasingly popular and attractive phase for HPLC on account of its chemical and thermal stability, and its unique separation mechanism. However, native PGC is strongly hydrophobic and in some instances excessively retentive. As part of our effort to build a library of hydrophilic covalently modified PGC phases, we functionalized PGC with catechol and amide groups by means of aryl diazonium chemistry to produce two new phases. Successful grafting was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Under HILIC conditions, the Catechol-PGC showed up to 5-fold increased retention relative to unmodified PGC and selectivity that differed from four other HILIC phases. Under reversed phase conditions, the Amide-PGC reduced the retentivity of PGC by almost 90%. The chromatographic performance of Catechol-PGC and Amide-PGC is demonstrated by separations of nucleobases, nucleosides, phenols, alkaline pharmaceuticals, and performance enhancing stimulants. These compounds had retention factors (k) ranging from 0.5 to 13. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of exercise on the pulmonary system in proliferative phase of menstrual cycle in a group of perimenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrith Pakkala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hormonal levels influence dynamic lung function parameters. Significant increase in both progesterone (37% and estradiol (13.5%; where as, no change in plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH was observed in exercising women in previous studies. Therefore, this study was intended to see the limitations of the pulmonary system in adaptability to exercise in proliferative phase of menstrual cycle in perimenopausal women. Material and Methods: The present study was conducted as a part of cardiopulmonary efficiency studies on two groups of nonathletes (n = 10 and athletes (n = 10 comparable in age and sex. Menstrual history was ascertained to confirm proliferative phase of menstrual cycle. Dynamic lung functions were measured in both groups before exercise and immediately after exercise. Results: It was observed that exercise per se does not cause a statistically significant change in dynamic lung function parameters maximum mid-expiratory flow (MMEF, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR, and MEF 25-75% in either of the groups. Conclusion: This finding supports the hypothesis that the respiratory system is not normally the most limiting factor in the delivery of oxygen even under the predominant influence of estrogen in proliferative phase, which is further accentuated by exercise.

  11. Age differences in feedback reactions: The roles of employee feedback orientation on social awareness and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Burlacu, Gabriela; Truxillo, Donald; James, Keith; Yao, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Organizations worldwide are currently experiencing shifts in the age composition of their workforces. The workforce is aging and becoming increasingly age-diverse, suggesting that organizational researchers and practitioners need to better understand how age differences may manifest in the workplace and the implications for human resource practice. Integrating socioemotional selectivity theory with the performance feedback literature and using a time-lagged design, the current study examined age differences in moderating the relationships between the characteristics of performance feedback and employee reactions to the feedback event. The results suggest that older workers had higher levels of feedback orientation on social awareness, but lower levels of feedback orientation on utility than younger workers. Furthermore, the positive associations between favorability of feedback and feedback delivery and feedback reactions were stronger for older workers than for younger workers, whereas the positive association between feedback quality and feedback reactions was stronger for younger workers than for older workers. Finally, the current study revealed that age-related differences in employee feedback orientation could explain the different patterns of relationships between feedback characteristics and feedback reactions across older and younger workers. These findings have both theoretical and practical implications for building theory about workplace aging and improving ways that performance feedback is managed across employees from diverse age groups. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. U.S.-GERMAN BILATERAL WORKING GROUP PHASE 3 ACTIVITIES-AN OVERVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S.-German Bilateral Working Group originated in 1990 in order to share and transfer information, ideas, tools and techniques regarding environmental research. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) de...

  13. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R ampersand D effort here at SLAC

  14. Skriftlig feedback i engelskundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools.......The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools....

  15. Student Engagement with Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jon; Shields, Cathy; Gardner, James; Hancock, Alysoun; Nutt, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This report considers Biological Sciences students' perceptions of feedback, compared with those of the University as a whole, this includes what forms of feedback were considered most useful and how feedback used. Compared with data from previous studies, Biological Sciences students gave much greater recognition to oral feedback, placing it on a…

  16. Gas-phase spectroscopic studies of heavy elements compounds (group V) using FTIR technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, A. W.; Ajji, Z.

    1998-12-01

    Antimony oxide trihalide, OSbX3 where X=F, CI and Br, and antimony (III) oxychloride, OSbC1 molecules were produced by an on-line process for the first time using antimony chloride SbC13 passed over heated silver oxide then followed by passing the obtained products over heated NaF and heated KBr for SbOF3 and OSbBr3, respectively. The obtained OSbC13 reacts with heated silver to produce OSbC1. The products have been characterized by the infrared spectra of their vapors. The low resolution gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectrum, reported for the first time, shows the most characteristic band of OSbX3 at 1272, 1217 and 1200 cm -1 and the bands are assigned to the O=Sb stretching fundamental of OSbX3 were X=F, Cl and Br, respectively. The band at 1200 cm -1 needs more experimental investigation. The band at 924 cm -1 is assigned to the O=Sb stretching fundamental of OSbCl molecule. This result is in consistent with expectation and shifted to lower frequency in comparison with arsenic analogous molecule which is investigated by matrix-isolation technique. The work will be continued in order to cover the bismuth and arsenic compounds of similar structures. (author)

  17. Psychosocial and psychoeducational group program for main caregiver of mentally sick in early phase of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estíbaliz Amaro Martín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Deinstitutionalization processes in recent times have led to a new age in relations between family and mental health professionals. Care professionals were replaced, after the psychiatric reform, for care carried out by the family without the knowledge, information and skills to assume these functions. This is the situation of many families of patients with schizophrenia.Disabling features of schizophrenia usually cause depends on their families, who take care with the consequent impact on their lives. Psychosocial interventions assessing their work and want to build an alliance with them by giving them skills and coping mechanisms to reduce adverse family atmosphere, anticipate and solve problems and reduce the expressions of anger and guilt keeping appropiate expectations. However, these actions must be enforced by providing main caregivers with the skills that enable them to gain control, this is the main target of psychoeducational programs.Today there are many people in favour of such interventions in the early stages of schizophrenia. However, it is no clear how far development of these programs is supported by evidence of effectiveness. So it has proposed a psychosocial and psychoeducational program aimed at main caregivers of patients with schizophrenia in early stages. This program will be led by a psychiatric nurse in collaboration with other professionals in the interdisciplinary team; psychiatrist, clinical psychologist and social worker. It has developed clinical trial with a control group who will receive the gide for families, caregivers and people affected, "Cómo afrontar la esquizofrenia," and an experimental group will receive, in addition to the guide, the group intervention sessions.

  18. Antiferroelectric phase in liquid crystalline compounds with azo group in their molecular core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpar, Miroslav; Novotná, Vladimíra; Hamplová, Věra; Podoliak, Natalia; Nonnenmacher, D.; Giesselmann, F.; Glogarová, Milada

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 3 (2011), s. 309-315 ISSN 0267-8292 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100911; GA AV ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0047 Grant - others:German Czech bilateral program(DE) D4-CZ5/2010-2011; GA UK(CZ) SVV-2011-263303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : liquid crystals * antiferroelectricity * azo linkage group * photosensitivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.858, year: 2011

  19. Polycomb Group Proteins RING1A and RING1B Regulate the Vegetative Phase Transition in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG protein-mediated gene silencing is a major regulatory mechanism in higher eukaryotes that affects gene expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we report that two conserved homologous PcG proteins, RING1A and RING1B (RING1A/B, are required for global H2A monoubiquitination (H2Aub in Arabidopsis. The mutation of RING1A/B increased the expression of members of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL gene family and caused an early vegetative phase transition. The early vegetative phase transition observed in ring1a ring1b double mutant plants was dependent on an SPL family gene, and the H2Aub status of the chromatin at SPL locus was dependent on RING1A/B. Moreover, mutation in RING1A/B affected the miRNA156a-mediated vegetative phase transition, and RING1A/B and the AGO7-miR390-TAS3 pathway were found to additively regulate this transition in Arabidopsis. Together, our results demonstrate that RING1A/B regulates the vegetative phase transition in Arabidopsis through the repression of SPL family genes.

  20. Effects of gamma radiation on banana 'nanica' (Musa sp., group AAA) irradiated in pre climacteric phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Simone Faria; Dionisio, Ana Paula; Walder, Julio Marcos Melges

    2007-01-01

    The present work verified the effect of gamma radiation on physical and chemical parameters of banana 'nanica', analyzing possible alterations on the period of conservation and the possibility of commercial irradiation aiming the exportation. The results had demonstrated that the radiations had not produced effect on pH and total acidity. However, the bananas of the 'control group' and those that had received 0,75 kGy, had presented greater maturation degree and, radiated with 0,30 kGy, had presented greater firmness. In accordance with the results of the organoleptic analysis, can be perceived that the bananas most mature, especially of the 'control group', had had greater acceptance. The bananas of treatments 0,30 and 0,60 kGy had had minors notes for presenting minor maturation stadium. Knowing that the irradiation in adequate dose and fruits of good quality brings benefits to the storage and the process of exportation, we conclude that the dose most appropriate for the control of the maturation of the 'nanica' banana is 0,30 kGy. (author)

  1. A renormalization group scaling analysis for compressible two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Deng, Y.; Glimm, J.; Li, G.; Zhang, Q.; Sharp, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    Computational solutions to the Rayleigh--Taylor fluid mixing problem, as modeled by the two-fluid two-dimensional Euler equations, are presented. Data from these solutions are analyzed from the point of view of Reynolds averaged equations, using scaling laws derived from a renormalization group analysis. The computations, carried out with the front tracking method on an Intel iPSC/860, are highly resolved and statistical convergence of ensemble averages is achieved. The computations are consistent with the experimentally observed growth rates for nearly incompressible flows. The dynamics of the interior portion of the mixing zone is simplified by the use of scaling variables. The size of the mixing zone suggests fixed-point behavior. The profile of statistical quantities within the mixing zone exhibit self-similarity under fixed-point scaling to a limited degree. The effect of compressibility is also examined. It is found that, for even moderate compressibility, the growth rates fail to satisfy universal scaling, and moreover, increase significantly with increasing compressibility. The growth rates predicted from a renormalization group fixed-point model are in a reasonable agreement with the results of the exact numerical simulations, even for flows outside of the incompressible limit

  2. INTRAVAL Working group 2 summary report on Phase 2 analysis of the Finnsjoen test case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Peter; Winberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive series of tracer tests on a relatively large scale have been performed by SKB at Finnsjoen, Sweden, to increase understanding of transport phenomena which govern migration of radionuclides in major fracture zones. The conducted experiments were subsequently selected as a test in the international INTRAVAL Project, in part because the tests at Finnsjoe invite to direct address of validation of geosphere models. This report summarizes the study of the Finnsjoe test case within INTRAVAL Phase 2, which has involved nine project teams from seven countries. Porous media approaches in two dimensions dominated, although some project teams utilized one-dimensional transport models, and even three-dimensional approaches on a larger scale. The dimensionality employed did not appear to be decisive for the ability to reproduce the observed field responses. It was also demonstrated that stochastic approaches can be used in a validation process. Only four out of nine project teams studied more than one process. The general conclusion drawn is that flow and transport in the studied zone is governed by advection and that hydrodynamic dispersion is needed to explain the breakthrough curves. Matrix diffusion is assumed to have small or negligible effect. The performed analysis is dominated by numerical approaches applied on scales on the order of a 1000m. Taking scale alone into account, the results of most teams are possible to compare. A variety of validation aspects have been considered. Five teams utilized a model calibrated on one test, to predict another, whereas the two teams utilizing stochastic continuum approaches addressed; 1) validity of extrapolation of a model calibrated on one transport scale to a larger scale, 2) performance assessment implications of choice of underlying distribution model for hydraulic conductivity, respectively. 37 refs

  3. A group-based approach to stabilisation and symptom management in a phased treatment model for refugees and asylum seekers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. A. Robertson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatised asylum seekers and refugees may present with significant and complex mental health problems as a result of prolonged, extreme, and multiple traumatic events. This is further complicated by ongoing complex social circumstances. Concepts: In our work at the Traumatic Stress Clinic (TSC, the understanding afforded by the concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD together with the related notion of a phased treatment model, provides a useful framework for organising our work with this population. Clinical Applications: An explication of complex PTSD as it applies to our client group is presented, followed by a description of our phased treatment model and an outline of the core principles, which guide our clinical approach. Our symptom management and stabilisation groups have been developed and refined over time and draw on techniques from a variety of cognitive behavioural therapies. These are described in some detail with illustrative clinical case vignettes. Conclusion: This paper concludes with some reflections on the challenges inherent to working with this complex client group.

  4. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  5. [Physical, chemical and morphological urine examination guidelines for the Analytical Phase from the Intersociety Urinalysis Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoni, Fabio; Gessoni, Gianluca; Fogazzi, Giovanni Battista; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Caleffi, Alberta; Gambaro, Giovanni; Epifani, Maria Grazia; Pieretti, Barbara; Perego, Angelo; Ottomano, Cosimo; Saccani, Graziella; Valverde, Sara; Secchiero, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    With these guidelines the Intersociety Urinalysis Group (GIAU) aims to stimulate the following aspects: Improvement and standardization of the analytical approach to physical, chemical and morphological urine examination (ECMU). Improvement of the chemical analysis of urine with particular regard to the reconsideration of the diagnostic significance of the parameters that are traditionally evaluated in dipstick analysis together with an increasing awareness of the limits of sensitivity and specificity of this analytical method. Increase the awareness of the importance of professional skills in the field of urinary morphology and the relationship with the clinicians. Implement a policy of evaluation of the analytical quality by using, in addition to traditional internal and external controls, a program for the evaluation of morphological competence. Stimulate the diagnostics industry to focus research efforts and development methodology and instrumental catering on the needs of clinical diagnosis. The hope is to revalue the enormous diagnostic potential of 'ECMU, implementing a urinalysis on personalized diagnostic needs for each patient. Emphasize the value added to ECMU by automated analyzers for the study of the morphology of the corpuscular fraction urine. The hope is to revalue the enormous potential diagnostic of 'ECMU, implementing a urinalysis on personalized diagnostic needs that each patient brings with it.

  6. Phase transition for a uniformly frustrated 19-vertex model by use of the density matrix renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yasushi; Horiguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    We investigate a uniformly frustrated 19-vertex model with an anisotropy parameter η by use of the density matrix renormalization group for the transfer matrix for 0.6≤η≤1.3. The scaling dimension x is calculated from eigenvalues of the transfer matrix for several values η. The finite-size scaling analyses with a logarithmic correction are carried out in order to determine transition temperatures. It is found that there are two kinds of phase transitions, although there is a possibility of a single transition. This result is not compatible with the result for the uniformly frustrated XY model

  7. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-01-01

    This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition

  8. The role of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase in standardization and harmonization of the preanalytical phase in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornes, Michael P; Church, Stephen; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Labor......Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry...... and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) was established to lead in standardization and harmonization of preanalytical policies and practices at a European level. One of the key activities of the WG-PRE is the organization of the biennial EFLM-BD conference on the preanalytical...... summarises the work that has and will be done in these areas. The goal of this initiative is to ensure the EFLM WG-PRE produces work that meets the needs of the European laboratory medicine community. Progress made in the identified areas will be updated at the next preanalytical phase conference and show...

  9. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out...... that there is a separation be-tween the feedback controller and the fault tolerant part. The closed loop feedback properties are handled by the nominal feedback controller and the fault tolerant part is handled by the design of the Youla parameter. The design of the fault tolerant part will not affect the design...... of the nominal feedback con-troller....

  10. Feedback on Feedback--Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, Oranna; Stollhans, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that providing assessment feedback through the medium of screencasts is favourably received by students and encourages deeper engagement with the feedback given by the language teacher (inter alia Abdous & Yoshimura, 2010; Brick & Holmes, 2008; Cann, 2007; Stannard, 2007). In this short paper we will report the…

  11. Does source matter? Nurses' and Physicians' perceptions of interprofessional feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Sandrijn M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Eva, Kevin W; Irby, David M; Regehr, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    Receptiveness to interprofessional feedback, which is important for optimal collaboration, may be influenced by 'in-group or out-group' categorisation, as suggested by social identity theory. We used an experimental design to explore how nurses and resident physicians perceive feedback from people within and outside their own professional group. Paediatric residents and nurses participated in a simulation-based team exercise. Two nurses and two physicians wrote anonymous performance feedback for each participant. Participants each received a survey containing these feedback comments with prompts to rate (i) the usefulness (ii) the positivity and (iii) their agreement with each comment. Half of the participants received feedback labelled with the feedback provider's profession (two comments correctly labelled and two incorrectly labelled). Half received unlabelled feedback and were asked to guess the provider's profession. For each group, we performed separate three-way anovas on usefulness, positivity and agreement ratings to examine interactions between the recipient's profession, actual provider profession and perceived provider profession. Forty-five out of 50 participants completed the survey. There were no significant interactions between profession of the recipient and the actual profession of the feedback provider for any of the 3 variables. Among participants who guessed the source of the feedback, we found significant interactions between the profession of the feedback recipient and the guessed source of the feedback for both usefulness (F1,48 = 25.6; p feedback they guessed to be from nurses were higher than ratings of feedback they guessed to be from physicians, and vice versa. Among participants who received labelled feedback, we noted a similar interaction between the profession of the feedback recipient and labelled source of feedback for usefulness ratings (F1,92 = 4.72; p feedback to the in-group than to the out-group. This finding has potential

  12. Behaviour of the surface hydroxide groups of exfoliated kaolinite in the gas phase and during water adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Táborosi, Attila; Szilágyi, Róbert K

    2016-02-14

    The chemical and physical properties, and thus the reactivity of phylloaluminosilicates can be tailored by intercalation, delamination, and exfoliation processes. In going from the periodic crystalline to the molecular exfoliated phase, surface defects and modifications gain importance as each face of the phylloaluminosilicate comes in direct contact with the external chemical environment. In this work, we extend our earlier studies on the molecular cluster modelling of exfoliated kaolinite sheets by evaluating the positions and orientations of surface hydroxide groups and bridging oxide anions, as the sites of reactivity. The previous focus on the inner chemical environment of a single kaolinite layer is shifted to the surface exposed octahedral aluminium-hydroxide and tetrahedral silicon-oxide sheets. The combination of semi-empirical, ab initio wave function, and density functional calculations unanimously support the amphoteric nature of the surface hydroxide groups with respect to H-bonding donor/acceptor capabilities. To a lesser extent, we observe the same for the bridging oxide anions. This is in contrast to the crystalline phase, which manifests only donor orientation for maintaining an inter-layer H-bond network. These results suggest that both electrophilic and nucleophilic characteristics of the octahedral and tetrahedral sheets need to be considered during intercalation and concomitant exfoliation of the kaolinite sheets.

  13. Comparison of the Cc and R3c space groups for the superlattice phase of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Ragini; Pandey, Dhananjai

    2005-01-01

    Recent controversy about the space group of the low temperature superlattice phase of Pb(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 is settled. It is shown that the R3c space group for the superlattice phase cannot correctly account for the peak positions of the superlattice reflections present in the neutron diffraction patterns. The correct space group is reconfirmed to be Cc. A comparison of the atomic coordinates of Cc and Cm space groups is also presented to show that in the absence of superlattice reflections, as is the case with x-ray diffraction data, one would land up in the Cm space group. This superlattice phase is found to coexist with another monoclinic phase of the Cm space group

  14. Skill learning from kinesthetic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, David; Vega, Roberto; Sanchez, Yerly Paola; Zheng, Bin

    2017-10-01

    It is important for a surgeon to perform surgical tasks under appropriate guidance from visual and kinesthetic feedback. However, our knowledge on kinesthetic (muscle) memory and its role in learning motor skills remains elementary. To discover the effect of exclusive kinesthetic training on kinesthetic memory in both performance and learning. In Phase 1, a total of twenty participants duplicated five 2 dimensional movements of increasing complexity via passive kinesthetic guidance, without visual or auditory stimuli. Five participants were asked to repeat the task in the Phase 2 over a period of three weeks, for a total of nine sessions. Subjects accurately recalled movement direction using kinesthetic memory, but recalling movement length was less precise. Over the nine training sessions, error occurrence dropped after the sixth session. Muscle memory constructs the foundation for kinesthetic training. Knowledge gained helps surgeons learn skills from kinesthetic information in the condition where visual feedback is limited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Incident Management Organization succession planning stakeholder feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne E. Black

    2013-01-01

    This report presents complete results of a 2011 stakeholder feedback effort conducted for the National Wildfire Coordination Group (NWCG) Executive Board concerning how best to organize and manage national wildland fire Incident Management Teams in the future to meet the needs of the public, agencies, fire service and Team members. Feedback was collected from 858...

  16. Feedforward: helping students interpret written feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Hurford, Donna; Read, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    "Assessment for Learning is the process of seeking and interpreting evidence for use by learners... "(Assessment Reform Group, 2002, p.2): for the Higher Education tutor, written feedback forms an integral part of this. This short article reports on teaching methods to engage students in feedback and assessment of their written work.

  17. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  18. The Mythology of Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcroft, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Much of the general education and discipline-specific literature on feedback suggests that it is a central and important element of student learning. This paper examines feedback from a social process perspective and suggests that feedback is best understood through an analysis of the interactions between academics and students. The paper argues…

  19. Feedback effect on flute dynamics in a mirror machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Be’ery, I; Seemann, O

    2015-01-01

    The effect of active feedback on flute instability is experimentally studied in a table-top mirror machine. Changing the plasma conditions from mirror-loss dominated to flute-loss dominated, it is demonstrated that while the feedback has no effect on plasma density in the first case, it increases the plasma density by up to 50% in the second case. Measurements of the dependence of instability amplitude on feedback gain show that large gain stimulates high frequency perturbations. The period of these perturbations corresponds to the inherent delay of immersed electrode feedback. Variation of the spatial phase between the input and output of the phase reveals a large asymmetry between positive and negative phase shifts. A simplified model is introduced to explain how a negative phase shift causes positive feedback between the external feedback and the centrifugally driven rotation. (paper)

  20. Tactile feedback improves auditory spatial localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eGori

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our recent studies suggest that congenitally blind adults have severely impaired thresholds in an auditory spatial-bisection task, pointing to the importance of vision in constructing complex auditory spatial maps (Gori et al., 2014. To explore strategies that may improve the auditory spatial sense in visually impaired people, we investigated the impact of tactile feedback on spatial auditory localization in 48 blindfolded sighted subjects. We measured auditory spatial bisection thresholds before and after training, either with tactile feedback, verbal feedback or no feedback. Audio thresholds were first measured with a spatial bisection task: subjects judged whether the second sound of a three sound sequence was spatially closer to the first or the third sound. The tactile-feedback group underwent two audio-tactile feedback sessions of 100 trials, where each auditory trial was followed by the same spatial sequence played on the subject’s forearm; auditory spatial bisection thresholds were evaluated after each session. In the verbal-feedback condition, the positions of the sounds were verbally reported to the subject after each feedback trial. The no-feedback group did the same sequence of trials, with no feedback. Performance improved significantly only after audio-tactile feedback. The results suggest that direct tactile feedback interacts with the auditory spatial localization system, possibly by a process of cross-sensory recalibration. Control tests with the subject rotated suggested that this effect occurs only when the tactile and acoustic sequences are spatially coherent. Our results suggest that the tactile system can be used to recalibrate the auditory sense of space. These results encourage the possibility of designing rehabilitation programs to help blind persons establish a robust auditory sense of space, through training with the tactile modality.

  1. Angle measurement with laser feedback instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenxue; Zhang, Shulian; Long, Xingwu

    2013-04-08

    An instrument for angle measurement based on laser feedback has been designed. The measurement technique is based on the principle that when a wave plate placed into a feedback cavity rotates, its phase retardation varies. Phase retardation is a function of the rotating angle of the wave plate. Hence, the angle can be converted to phase retardation. The phase retardation is measured at certain characteristic points identified in the laser outputting curve that are then modulated by laser feedback. The angle of a rotating object can be measured if it is connected to the wave plate. The main advantages of this instrument are: high resolution, compact, flexible, low cost, effective power, and fast response.

  2. Dynamic fabric phase sorptive extraction for a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products from environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakade, Sameer S; Borrull, Francesc; Furton, Kenneth G; Kabir, Abuzar; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Fontanals, Núria

    2016-07-22

    This paper describes for the first time the use of a new extraction technique, based on fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE). This new mode proposes the extraction of the analytes in dynamic mode in order to reduce the extraction time. Dynamic fabric phase sorptive extraction (DFPSE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was evaluated for the extraction of a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) from environmental water samples. Different parameters affecting the extraction were optimized and best conditions were achieved when 50mL of sample at pH 3 was passed through 3 disks and analytes retained were eluted with 10mL of ethyl acetate. The recoveries were higher than 60% for most of compounds with the exception of the most polar ones (between 8% and 38%). The analytical method was validated with environmental samples such as river water and effluent and influent wastewater, and good performance was obtained. The analysis of samples revealed the presence of some PPCPs at low ngL(-1) concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE IMAGING OF TWO-PHASE FLOW WITH A MESH GROUPING TECHNIQUE BASED ON PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BO AN LEE

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An electrical resistance tomography (ERT technique combining the particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm with the Gauss-Newton method is applied to the visualization of two-phase flows. In the ERT, the electrical conductivity distribution, namely the conductivity values of pixels (numerical meshes comprising the domain in the context of a numerical image reconstruction algorithm, is estimated with the known injected currents through the electrodes attached on the domain boundary and the measured potentials on those electrodes. In spite of many favorable characteristics of ERT such as no radiation, low cost, and high temporal resolution compared to other tomography techniques, one of the major drawbacks of ERT is low spatial resolution due to the inherent ill-posedness of conventional image reconstruction algorithms. In fact, the number of known data is much less than that of the unknowns (meshes. Recalling that binary mixtures like two-phase flows consist of only two substances with distinct electrical conductivities, this work adopts the PSO algorithm for mesh grouping to reduce the number of unknowns. In order to verify the enhanced performance of the proposed method, several numerical tests are performed. The comparison between the proposed algorithm and conventional Gauss-Newton method shows significant improvements in the quality of reconstructed images.

  4. Electrical Resistance Imaging of Two-Phase Flow With a Mesh Grouping Technique Based On Particle Swarm Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bo An; Kim, Bong Seok; Ko, Min Seok; Kim, Kyung Young; Kim, Sin

    2014-01-01

    An electrical resistance tomography (ERT) technique combining the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm with the Gauss-Newton method is applied to the visualization of two-phase flows. In the ERT, the electrical conductivity distribution, namely the conductivity values of pixels (numerical meshes) comprising the domain in the context of a numerical image reconstruction algorithm, is estimated with the known injected currents through the electrodes attached on the domain boundary and the measured potentials on those electrodes. In spite of many favorable characteristics of ERT such as no radiation, low cost, and high temporal resolution compared to other tomography techniques, one of the major drawbacks of ERT is low spatial resolution due to the inherent ill-posedness of conventional image reconstruction algorithms. In fact, the number of known data is much less than that of the unknowns (meshes). Recalling that binary mixtures like two-phase flows consist of only two substances with distinct electrical conductivities, this work adopts the PSO algorithm for mesh grouping to reduce the number of unknowns. In order to verify the enhanced performance of the proposed method, several numerical tests are performed. The comparison between the proposed algorithm and conventional Gauss-Newton method shows significant improvements in the quality of reconstructed images

  5. Electrical Resistance Imaging of Two-Phase Flow With a Mesh Grouping Technique Based On Particle Swarm Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo An; Kim, Bong Seok; Ko, Min Seok; Kim, Kyung Young; Kim, Sin [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    An electrical resistance tomography (ERT) technique combining the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm with the Gauss-Newton method is applied to the visualization of two-phase flows. In the ERT, the electrical conductivity distribution, namely the conductivity values of pixels (numerical meshes) comprising the domain in the context of a numerical image reconstruction algorithm, is estimated with the known injected currents through the electrodes attached on the domain boundary and the measured potentials on those electrodes. In spite of many favorable characteristics of ERT such as no radiation, low cost, and high temporal resolution compared to other tomography techniques, one of the major drawbacks of ERT is low spatial resolution due to the inherent ill-posedness of conventional image reconstruction algorithms. In fact, the number of known data is much less than that of the unknowns (meshes). Recalling that binary mixtures like two-phase flows consist of only two substances with distinct electrical conductivities, this work adopts the PSO algorithm for mesh grouping to reduce the number of unknowns. In order to verify the enhanced performance of the proposed method, several numerical tests are performed. The comparison between the proposed algorithm and conventional Gauss-Newton method shows significant improvements in the quality of reconstructed images.

  6. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Dyrda, J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mennerdahl, D. [E Mennerdahl Systems EMS, Starvaegen 12, 18357 Taeby (Sweden); Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE, 1, Bondarenko sq., 249033 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety KINS, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, Grenoble (France); Patel, A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, M.S. 6170, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F. [OECD/NEA, 12, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  7. Platinum-Group Minerals and Other Accessory Phases in Chromite Deposits of the Alapaevsk Ophiolite, Central Urals, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Zaccarini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An electron microprobe study has been carried out on platinum-group minerals, accessory phases, and chromite in several chromite deposits of the Alapaevsk ophiolite (Central Urals, Russia namely the Bakanov Kluch, Kurmanovskoe, Lesnoe, 3-d Podyony Rudnik, Bol’shaya Kruglyshka, and Krest deposits. These deposits occur in partially to totally serpentinized peridotites. The microprobe data shows that the chromite composition varies from Cr-rich to Al-rich. Tiny platinum-group minerals (PGM, 1–10 µm in size, have been found in the chromitites. The most abundant PGM is laurite, accompanied by minor cuproiridsite and alloys in the system Os–Ir–Ru. A small grain (about 20 μm was found in the interstitial serpentine of the Bakanov Kluch chromitite, and its calculated stoichiometry corresponds to (Ni,Fe5P. Olivine, occurring in the silicate matrix or included in fresh chromite, has a mantle-compatible composition in terms of major and minor elements. Several inclusions of amphibole, Na-rich phlogopite, and clinopyroxene have been identified. The bimodal Cr–Al composition of chromite probably corresponds to a vertical distribution in the ophiolite sequence, implying formation of Cr-rich chromitites in the deep mantle, and Al-rich chromitites close to the Moho-transition zone, in a supra-subduction setting. The presence of abundant hydrous silicate inclusions, such as amphibole and phlogopite, suggests that the Alapaevsk chromitites crystallized as a result of the interaction between a melt enriched in fluids and peridotites. Laurite and cuproiridsite are considered to be magmatic in origin, i.e., entrapped as solid phases during the crystallization of chromite at high temperatures. The sulfur fugacity was relatively high to allow the precipitation of Ir-bearing sulfides, but below the Os–OsS2 buffer. The alloys in the system Os–Ir–Ru are classified as secondary PGM, i.e., formed at low temperature during the serpentinization process. The

  8. Three-phase Interstellar Medium in Galaxies Resolving Evolution with Star Formation and Supernova Feedback (TIGRESS): Algorithms, Fiducial Model, and Convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2017-09-01

    We introduce TIGRESS, a novel framework for multi-physics numerical simulations of the star-forming interstellar medium (ISM) implemented in the Athena MHD code. The algorithms of TIGRESS are designed to spatially and temporally resolve key physical features, including: (1) the gravitational collapse and ongoing accretion of gas that leads to star formation in clusters; (2) the explosions of supernovae (SNe), both near their progenitor birth sites and from runaway OB stars, with time delays relative to star formation determined by population synthesis; (3) explicit evolution of SN remnants prior to the onset of cooling, which leads to the creation of the hot ISM; (4) photoelectric heating of the warm and cold phases of the ISM that tracks the time-dependent ambient FUV field from the young cluster population; (5) large-scale galactic differential rotation, which leads to epicyclic motion and shears out overdense structures, limiting large-scale gravitational collapse; (6) accurate evolution of magnetic fields, which can be important for vertical support of the ISM disk as well as angular momentum transport. We present tests of the newly implemented physics modules, and demonstrate application of TIGRESS in a fiducial model representing the solar neighborhood environment. We use a resolution study to demonstrate convergence and evaluate the minimum resolution {{Δ }}x required to correctly recover several ISM properties, including the star formation rate, wind mass-loss rate, disk scale height, turbulent and Alfvénic velocity dispersions, and volume fractions of warm and hot phases. For the solar neighborhood model, all these ISM properties are converged at {{Δ }}x≤slant 8 {pc}.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 76 - Phase I Affected Coal-Fired Utility Units With Group 1 or Cell Burner Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Units With Group 1 or Cell Burner Boilers A Appendix A to Part 76 Protection of Environment... 1 or Cell Burner Boilers Table 1—Phase I Tangentially Fired Units State Plant Unit Operator ALABAMA... Vertically fired boiler. 2 Arch-fired boiler. Table 3—Phase I Cell Burner Technology Units State Plant Unit...

  10. A Draft Science Management Plan for Returned Samples from Mars: Recommendations from the International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltigin, T.; Lange, C.; Mugnuolo, R.; Smith, C.

    2018-04-01

    This paper summarizes the findings and recommendations of the International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Working Group, an international team comprising 38 members from 16 countries and agencies.

  11. Self-controlled feedback facilitates motor learning in both high and low activity individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Jeffrey T; Laughlin, David D; Nguyen, Timothy V

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if high and low activity individuals differed in terms of the effects of self-controlled feedback on the performance and learning of a movement skill. The task consisted of a blindfolded beanbag toss using the non-preferred arm. Participants were pre-screened according to their physical activity level using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. An equal number of high activity (HA) and low activity (LA) participants were assigned to self-control (SC) and yoked (YK) feedback conditions, creating four groups: Self-Control-High Activity; Self-Control-Low Activity; Yoked-High Activity; and Yoked-Low Activity. SC condition participants were provided feedback whenever they requested it, while YK condition participants received feedback according to a schedule created by their SC counterpart. Results indicated that the SC condition was more accurate than the YK condition during acquisition and transfer phases, and the HA condition was more accurate than the LA condition during all phases of the experiment. A post-training questionnaire indicated that participants in the SC condition asked for feedback mostly after what they perceived to be "good" trials; those in the YK condition indicated that they would have preferred to receive feedback after "good" trials. This study provided further support for the advantages of self-controlled feedback when learning motor skills, additionally showing benefits for both active and less active individuals. The results suggested that the provision of self-controlled feedback to less active learners may be a potential avenue to teaching motor skills necessary to engage in greater amounts of physical activity.

  12. Self-controlled feedback facilitates motor learning in both high and low activity individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T. Fairbrother

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if high and low activity individuals differed in terms of the effects of self-controlled feedback on the performance and learning of a movement skill. The task consisted of a blindfolded beanbag toss using the non-preferred arm. Participants were pre-screened according to their physical activity level using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. An equal number of high activity (HA and low activity (LA participants were assigned to self-control (SC and yoked (YK feedback conditions, creating four groups: Self-Control High Activity (SC-HA; Self-Control Low Activity (SC-LA; Yoked High Activity (YK-HA; and Yoked Low Activity (YK-LA. SC condition participants were provided feedback whenever they requested it, while YK condition participants received feedback according to a schedule created by their SC counterpart. Results indicated that the SC condition was more accurate than the YK condition during acquisition and transfer phases, and the HA condition was more accurate than the LA condition during all phases of the experiment. A post-training questionnaire indicated that participants in the SC condition asked for feedback mostly after what they perceived to be good trials; those in the YK condition indicated that they would have preferred to receive feedback after good trials. This study provided further support for the advantages of self-controlled feedback when learning motor skills, additionally showing benefits for both active and less active individuals. The results suggested that the provision of self-controlled feedback to less active learners may be a potential avenue to teaching motor skills necessary to engage in greater amounts of physical activity.

  13. The Phase of Aggressive Behavior, Deprivation among the Inmates Age Group of Nigerian Prisons: A Survey of Sokoto Central Prison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Yusuf

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the phase of aggressive behavior, deprivation, among the inmate's age group of Nigerian prison. However, the study elaborated the meaning of aggressive behavior; factors contributed to aggressive behavior, theory of aggressive behavior, literature review, method of information collection and data analysis. Therefore, prison setting can instigate aggressive behaviors, especially in Nigeria, where inmates are deprived of their particular right and are treated brutality in some instances studies shows, that Nigerian prisons are not adequately organized and made do as such, inmates are exposed to all kinds of atrocity. It should be noted that a condition of privation and lack of societal well-being especially among people being in an isolated environment as in the case with most prisons in Nigeria can degenerate to frustration and aggression which in turn can result in dangerous situations such as riots/ violence in the prisons. Aggression can lead to violence that may be adaptive under certain conditions regarding natural selection. That is most obviously the case regarding attacking prey to obtain food, or in anti-predator defense. The results showed that there is significant difference between the levels of aggressiveness with respect to the classes of age groups. Recommendation will be discussed further.

  14. The effect of concurrent bandwidth feedback on learning the lane-keeping task in a driving simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Stefan; de Winter, Joost C F; López García, José Manuel; Mulder, Max; Wieringa, Peter A

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether concurrent bandwidth feedback improves learning of the lane-keeping task in a driving simulator. Previous research suggests that bandwidth feedback improves learning and that off-target feedback is superior to on-target feedback. This study aimed to extend these findings for the lane-keeping task. Participants without a driver's license drove five 8-min lane-keeping sessions in a driver training simulator: three practice sessions, an immediate retention session, and a delayed retention session I day later. There were four experimental groups (n=15 per group): (a) on-target, receiving seat vibrations when the center of the car was within 0.5 m of the lane center; (b) off-target, receiving seat vibrations when the center of the car was more than 0.5 m away from the lane center; (c) control, receiving no vibrations; and (d) realistic, receiving seat vibrations depending on engine speed. During retention, all groups were provided with the realistic vibrations. During practice, on-target and off-target groups had better lane-keeping performance than the nonaugmented groups, but this difference diminished in the retention phase. Furthermore, during late practice and retention, the off-target group outperformed the on-target group.The off-target group had a higher rate of steering reversal and higher steering entropy than the nonaugmented groups, whereas no clear group differences were found regarding mean speed, mental workload, or self-reported measures. Off-target feedback is superior to on-target feedback for learning the lane-keeping task. This research provides knowledge to researchers and designers of training systems about the value of feedback in simulator-based training of vehicular control.

  15. Evaluation of a two-phase experimental study of a small group (“MultiLit” reading intervention for older low-progress readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Buckingham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study reported here examined the efficacy of a small group (Tier 2 in a three-tier Response to Intervention model literacy intervention for older low-progress readers (in Years 3–6. This article focuses on the second phase of a two-phase, crossover randomized control trial involving 26 students. In Phase 1, the experimental group (E1 received the 1 h literacy intervention daily for three school terms. The control group received regular classroom instruction. In Phase 2, the original control group received the intervention (E2. At the end of Phase 1, there was a statistically significant difference between groups and a large treatment effect on one of five measures—the Martin and Pratt Non-word Reading Test of phonological recoding. At the end of Phase 2, the large effect on phonological recoding was confirmed for the second experimental group, and there were also statistically significant differences with moderate or large effect sizes on four other measures—single word reading, fluency, passage reading accuracy, and comprehension.

  16. Sonification and haptic feedback in addition to visual feedback enhances complex motor task learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Roland; Rauter, Georg; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Concurrent augmented feedback has been shown to be less effective for learning simple motor tasks than for complex tasks. However, as mostly artificial tasks have been investigated, transfer of results to tasks in sports and rehabilitation remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, the effect of different concurrent feedback was evaluated in trunk-arm rowing. It was then investigated whether multimodal audiovisual and visuohaptic feedback are more effective for learning than visual feedback only. Naïve subjects (N = 24) trained in three groups on a highly realistic virtual reality-based rowing simulator. In the visual feedback group, the subject's oar was superimposed to the target oar, which continuously became more transparent when the deviation between the oars decreased. Moreover, a trace of the subject's trajectory emerged if deviations exceeded a threshold. The audiovisual feedback group trained with oar movement sonification in addition to visual feedback to facilitate learning of the velocity profile. In the visuohaptic group, the oar movement was inhibited by path deviation-dependent braking forces to enhance learning of spatial aspects. All groups significantly decreased the spatial error (tendency in visual group) and velocity error from baseline to the retention tests. Audiovisual feedback fostered learning of the velocity profile significantly more than visuohaptic feedback. The study revealed that well-designed concurrent feedback fosters complex task learning, especially if the advantages of different modalities are exploited. Further studies should analyze the impact of within-feedback design parameters and the transferability of the results to other tasks in sports and rehabilitation.

  17. Augmented feedback in autistic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salome Geertsema

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Children with autistic disorder (AD display atypical eye contact and struggle with the social imitation of eye contact. Impaired social imitation may be indicative of disruptions in motor learning processes. The application of specific motor learning principles, such as external feedback, may suggest which variables will result in positive change in eye contact. The study aimed to determine the effects of knowledge of performance (KP and knowledge of results (KR as types of feedback on the frequency and duration of elicited and spontaneous eye contact in children with AD. A two-phase multiple-probe, multi-treatment (cross-over, singleparticipant design with a withdrawal component was used. Mixed treatment effects were obtained. Overall effects suggest that KR results in the greatest positive change over a short period of time regarding frequency and duration for both elicited and spontaneous eye contact. This type of feedback seems to be the most effective for spontaneous eye contact. The provision of KP, after elicited and spontaneous eye contact, produced positive effects for duration only. The current Phase 1 evidence suggests that KR (which is goal-directed with fewer additional instructions may be more beneficial to children with AD. These findings are in accordance with the limb motor learning literature and may therefore support preliminary evidence for disrupted motor learning during eye contact imitation in children with AD.

  18. INDIRECT WRITTEN CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK, REVISION, AND LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Poorebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrective feedback, the necessity of providing it, and how it should be provided has been one of the hot topics in the area of ELT. Amid continuing controversies over whether providing feedback helps L2 learners improve their writing accuracy, many research studies have been undertaken to compare the relative effectiveness of different types of feedback. However, the difference between two types of indirect corrective feedback, namely indication and indication plus location, have not been properly examined yet. Motivated to narrow this gap, this study is designed to compare two groups of Iranian learners, each revising their papers based on one of the aforementioned options. For data analysis, a series of independent samples t tests were employed. The results revealed that the difference between the two groups in their reduction of errors from the original draft to the revision of each task followed a growing trend and became significant. Nonetheless, the difference in accuracy of new pieces of writing fell short of significance. Finally, it was found that error reduction in revision stage cannot be considered as learning. The results of the study, discussed in relation to that of others, implicate that the purpose for which feedback is provided is essential in determining the type of feedback; more explicit feedback is better for revising purposes while more implicit feedback is good for learning purposes.

  19. Data for improvement and clinical excellence: protocol for an audit with feedback intervention in long-term care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalm Corinne

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable evidence about the effectiveness of audit coupled with feedback, although few audit with feedback interventions have been conducted in long-term care (LTC settings to date. In general, the effects have been found to be modest at best, although in settings where there has been little history of audit and feedback, the effects may be greater, at least initially. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence (DICE Long-Term Care project is to assess the effects of an audit with feedback intervention delivered monthly over 13 months in four LTC facilities. The research questions we addressed are: 1. What effects do feedback reports have on processes and outcomes over time? 2. How do different provider groups in LTC and home care respond to feedback reports based on data targeted at improving quality of care? Methods/design The research team conducting this study comprises researchers and decision makers in continuing care in the province of Alberta, Canada. The intervention consists of monthly feedback reports in nine LTC units in four facilities in Edmonton, Alberta. Data for the feedback reports comes from the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI version 2.0, a standardized instrument mandated for use in LTC facilities throughout Alberta. Feedback reports consist of one page, front and back, presenting both graphic and textual information. Reports are delivered to all staff working in the four LTC facilities. The primary evaluation uses a controlled interrupted time series design both adjusted and unadjusted for covariates. The concurrent process evaluation uses observation and self-report to assess uptake of the feedback reports. Following the project phase described in this protocol, a similar intervention will be conducted in home care settings in Alberta. Depending on project findings, if they are judged useful by decision makers participating in this research

  20. Data for improvement and clinical excellence: protocol for an audit with feedback intervention in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Anne E; Schalm, Corinne

    2010-10-13

    There is considerable evidence about the effectiveness of audit coupled with feedback, although few audit with feedback interventions have been conducted in long-term care (LTC) settings to date. In general, the effects have been found to be modest at best, although in settings where there has been little history of audit and feedback, the effects may be greater, at least initially. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence (DICE) Long-Term Care project is to assess the effects of an audit with feedback intervention delivered monthly over 13 months in four LTC facilities. The research questions we addressed are:1. What effects do feedback reports have on processes and outcomes over time?2. How do different provider groups in LTC and home care respond to feedback reports based on data targeted at improving quality of care? The research team conducting this study comprises researchers and decision makers in continuing care in the province of Alberta, Canada. The intervention consists of monthly feedback reports in nine LTC units in four facilities in Edmonton, Alberta. Data for the feedback reports comes from the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI) version 2.0, a standardized instrument mandated for use in LTC facilities throughout Alberta. Feedback reports consist of one page, front and back, presenting both graphic and textual information. Reports are delivered to all staff working in the four LTC facilities. The primary evaluation uses a controlled interrupted time series design both adjusted and unadjusted for covariates. The concurrent process evaluation uses observation and self-report to assess uptake of the feedback reports. Following the project phase described in this protocol, a similar intervention will be conducted in home care settings in Alberta. Depending on project findings, if they are judged useful by decision makers participating in this research team, we plan dissemination and spread of the feedback

  1. Follower-Centered Perspective on Feedback: Effects of Feedback Seeking on Identification and Feedback Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Zhenxing; Li, Miaomiao; Qi, Yaoyuan; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    In the formation mechanism of the feedback environment, the existing research pays attention to external feedback sources and regards individuals as objects passively accepting feedback. Thus, the external source fails to realize the individuals’ need for feedback, and the feedback environment cannot provide them with useful information, leading to a feedback vacuum. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of feedback-seeking by different strategies on the supervisor-feedback environme...

  2. Short structured feedback training is equivalent to a mechanical feedback device in two-rescuer BLS: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavo, Noemi; Goliasch, Georg; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Stumpf, Dominik; Haugk, Moritz; Breckwoldt, Jan; Ruetzler, Kurt; Greif, Robert; Fischer, Henrik

    2016-05-13

    Resuscitation guidelines encourage the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) feedback devices implying better outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest. Whether effective continuous feedback could also be given verbally by a second rescuer ("human feedback") has not been investigated yet. We, therefore, compared the effect of human feedback to a CPR feedback device. In an open, prospective, randomised, controlled trial, we compared CPR performance of three groups of medical students in a two-rescuer scenario. Group "sCPR" was taught standard BLS without continuous feedback, serving as control. Group "mfCPR" was taught BLS with mechanical audio-visual feedback (HeartStart MRx with Q-CPR-Technology™). Group "hfCPR" was taught standard BLS with human feedback. Afterwards, 326 medical students performed two-rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8 min. CPR quality parameters, such as "effective compression ratio" (ECR: compressions with correct hand position, depth and complete decompression multiplied by flow-time fraction), and other compression, ventilation and time-related parameters were assessed for all groups. ECR was comparable between the hfCPR and the mfCPR group (0.33 vs. 0.35, p = 0.435). The hfCPR group needed less time until starting chest compressions (2 vs. 8 s, p feedback or by using a mechanical audio-visual feedback device was similar. Further studies should investigate whether extended human feedback training could further increase CPR quality at comparable costs for training.

  3. Phase I remedial investigation report of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.E.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents the activities and findings of the first phase of a three-phase remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and updates the scope and strategy for WAG-2-related efforts. WAG 2 contains White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, White Oak Creek Embayment on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This report includes field activities completed through October 1992. The remediation of WAG 2 is scheduled to follow the cessation of contaminant input from hydrologically upgradient WAGs. While upgradient areas are being remediated, the strategy for WAG 2 is to conduct a long-term monitoring and investigation program that takes full advantage of WAG 2's role as an integrator of contaminant fluxes from other ORNL WAGs and focuses on four key goals: (1) Implement, in concert with other programs, long-term, multimedia environmental monitoring and tracking of contaminants leaving other WAGs, entering WAG 2, and being transported off-site. (2) Provide a conceptual framework to integrate and develop information at the watershed-level for pathways and processes that are key to contaminant movement, and so support remedial efforts at ORNL. (3) Provide periodic updates of estimates of potential risk (both human health and ecological) associated with contaminants accumulating in and moving through WAG 2 to off-site areas. (4) Support the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program efforts to prioritize, remediate, and verify remedial effectiveness for contaminated sites at ORNL, through long-term monitoring and continually updated risk assessments

  4. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.; Ruffer, James; Rhodes, Harker; Paulus, Rebecca; Murray, Kevin; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m 2 /3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m 2 /3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10

  5. Oxytocin selectively facilitates learning with social feedback and increases activity and functional connectivity in emotional memory and reward processing regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiehui; Qi, Song; Becker, Benjamin; Luo, Lizhu; Gao, Shan; Gong, Qiyong; Hurlemann, René; Kendrick, Keith M

    2015-06-01

    In male Caucasian subjects, learning is facilitated by receipt of social compared with non-social feedback, and the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) facilitates this effect. In this study, we have first shown a cultural difference in that male Chinese subjects actually perform significantly worse in the same reinforcement associated learning task with social (emotional faces) compared with non-social feedback. Nevertheless, in two independent double-blind placebo (PLC) controlled between-subject design experiments we found OXT still selectively facilitated learning with social feedback. Similar to Caucasian subjects this OXT effect was strongest with feedback using female rather than male faces. One experiment performed in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that during the response, but not feedback phase of the task, OXT selectively increased activity in the amygdala, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and putamen during the social feedback condition, and functional connectivity between the amygdala and insula and caudate. Therefore, OXT may be increasing the salience and reward value of anticipated social feedback. In the PLC group, response times and state anxiety scores during social feedback were associated with signal changes in these same regions but not in the OXT group. OXT may therefore have also facilitated learning by reducing anxiety in the social feedback condition. Overall our results provide the first evidence for cultural differences in social facilitation of learning per se, but a similar selective enhancement of learning with social feedback under OXT. This effect of OXT may be associated with enhanced responses and functional connectivity in emotional memory and reward processing regions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Real-time feedback can improve infant manikin cardiopulmonary resuscitation by up to 79%--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Philip; Theobald, Peter; Kemp, Alison; Maguire, Sabine; Maconochie, Ian; Jones, Michael

    2013-08-01

    European and Advanced Paediatric Life Support training courses. Sixty-nine certified CPR providers. CPR providers were randomly allocated to a 'no-feedback' or 'feedback' group, performing two-thumb and two-finger chest compressions on a "physiological", instrumented resuscitation manikin. Baseline data was recorded without feedback, before chest compressions were repeated with one group receiving feedback. Indices were calculated that defined chest compression quality, based upon comparison of the chest wall displacement to the targets of four, internationally recommended parameters: chest compression depth, release force, chest compression rate and compression duty cycle. Baseline data were consistent with other studies, with <1% of chest compressions performed by providers simultaneously achieving the target of the four internationally recommended parameters. During the 'experimental' phase, 34 CPR providers benefitted from the provision of 'real-time' feedback which, on analysis, coincided with a statistical improvement in compression rate, depth and duty cycle quality across both compression techniques (all measures: p<0.001). Feedback enabled providers to simultaneously achieve the four targets in 75% (two-finger) and 80% (two-thumb) of chest compressions. Real-time feedback produced a dramatic increase in the quality of chest compression (i.e. from <1% to 75-80%). If these results transfer to a clinical scenario this technology could, for the first time, support providers in consistently performing accurate chest compressions during infant CPR and thus potentially improving clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multisource feedback to graduate nurses: a multimethod study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Samantha; Phillips, Nicole M; Ockerby, Cherene; Hutchinson, Alison M

    2017-11-01

    (1) To explore graduate nurses' perceptions of the influence of multisource feedback on their performance and (2) to explore perceptions of Clinical Nurse Educators involved in providing feedback regarding feasibility and benefit of the approach. Graduate registered nurses are expected to provide high-quality care for patients in demanding and unpredictable clinical environments. Receiving feedback is essential to their development. Performance appraisals are a common method used to provide feedback and typically involve a single source of feedback. Alternatively, multisource feedback allows the learner to gain insight into performance from a variety of perspectives. This study explores multisource feedback in an Australian setting within the graduate nurse context. Multimethod study. Eleven graduates were given structured performance feedback from four raters: Nurse Unit Manager, Clinical Nurse Educator, preceptor and a self-appraisal. Thirteen graduates received standard single-rater appraisals. Data regarding perceptions of feedback for both groups were obtained using a questionnaire. Semistructured interviews were conducted with nurses who received multisource feedback and the educators. In total, 94% (n = 15) of survey respondents perceived feedback was important during the graduate year. Four themes emerged from interviews: informal feedback, appropriateness of raters, elements of delivery and creating an appraisal process that is 'more real'. Multisource feedback was perceived as more beneficial compared to single-rater feedback. Educators saw value in multisource feedback; however, perceived barriers were engaging raters and collating feedback. Some evidence exists to indicate that feedback from multiple sources is valued by graduates. Further research in a larger sample and with more experienced nurses is required. Evidence resulting from this study indicates that multisource feedback is valued by both graduates and educators and informs graduates

  8. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  9. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  10. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedba...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work....

  11. Policy Feedback System (PFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Policy Feedback System (PFS) is a web application developed by the Office of Disability Policy Management Information (ODPMI) team that gathers empirical data...

  12. Feedback stabilization initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  13. Feedback stabilization initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes

  14. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  15. Tailored instructor feedback leads to more effective virtual-reality laparoscopic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschold, M; Huber, T; Zeißig, S R; Lang, H; Kneist, Werner

    2014-03-01

    Laparoscopic novices begin at different performance levels, and studies on tailored training concepts are warranted. The effect of verbal instructor feedback has been investigated with varying results, and its effectiveness in virtual-reality laparoscopic (VRL) simulations still is unclear. This study aimed to determine whether laparoscopic novices with lower initial performance statuses may profit from training with intensive instructor feedback. A prospective, single-blinded study was performed within a week-long curricular course. In this study, 20 medical students performed a complex bimanual maneuver on a VRL simulator. There was a division in performance levels, with a high-performer group (HPG) that received a better median score and a low-performer group (LPG). During the training phase, only the initial LPG received standardized instructor feedback in a one-to-one setting. The final assessment of skills for both groups involved performing the task without feedback at the end of the course. The HPG and LPG showed significantly different initial performance levels according global and categorized (time, economics, error) scores (p training concept with instructor feedback limited to the LPG. The tailored training was effective and economic for the laparoscopic novices and their teachers.

  16. TFTR plasma feedback systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hojsak, W.; Marsala, R.J.; Mueller, D.; Rauch, W.; Tait, G.D.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor employs feedback control systems for four plasma parameters, i.e. for plasma current, for plasma major radius, for plasma vertical position, and for plasma density. The plasma current is controlled by adjusting the rate of change of current in the Ohmic Heating (OH) coil system. Plasma current is continuously sensed by a Rogowski coil and its associated electronics; the error between it and a preprogrammed reference plasma current history is operated upon by a ''proportional-plusintegral-plus-derivative'' (PID) control algorithm and combined with various feedforward terms, to generate compensating commands to the phase-controlled thyristor rectifiers which drive current through the OH coils. The plasma position is controlled by adjusting the currents in Equilibrium Field and Horizontal Field coil systems, which respectively determine the vertical and radial external magnetic fields producing J X B forces on the plasma current. The plasma major radius position and vertical position, sensed by ''B /sub theta/ '' and ''B /sub rho/ '' magnetic flux pickup coils with their associated electronics, are controlled toward preprogrammed reference histories by allowing PID and feedforward control algorithms to generate commands to the EF and HF coil power supplies. Plasma density is controlled by adjusting the amount of gas injected into the vacuum vessel. Time-varying gains are used to combine lineaveraged plasma density measurements from a microwave interferometer plasma diagnostic system with vacuum vessel pressure measurements from ion gauges, with various other measurements, and with preprogrammed reference histories, to determine commands to piezoelectric gas injection valves

  17. Feedback is good or bad? Medical residents’ points of view on feedback in clinical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEILA BAZRAFKAN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Feedback is very important in education and can help quality in the training process and orient the trainees in clinical contexts. This study aimed to assess the residents’ points of view about feedback in clinical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The sample of this study included 170 medical residents attending medical workshops in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The residents filled a valid and reliable questionnaire containing 21 items on their perceptions of the feedback they got throughout the workshops. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 14. Results: The study revealed that residents, generally, have a positive perception of feedback in their training. The highest score belonged to the items such as “feedback was applicable to future work”, “feedback corrected my behavior”, “feedback worked as a motivation for education” and “feedback was specific in one subject”. Residents who had a negative feedback experience also increased their efforts to learn. The Surgery residents acquired the highest scores while radiology residents got the lowest. The difference between these groups was statistically significant (P = 0.000. Conclusion: The highest mean score belonged to internal medicine residents. This shows that residents believe that obstetrics & gynecology ward is a ward in which the formative assessment is much more powerful in comparison to the other three major wards. The surgery ward received the lowest score for formative assessment and this shows that the feedback in surgery ward is very low.

  18. Gas-phase formaldehyde adsorption isotherm studies on activated carbon: correlations of adsorption capacity to surface functional group density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ellison M; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E; Ramirez, David

    2011-08-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) adsorption isotherms were developed for the first time on three activated carbons representing one activated carbon fiber (ACF) cloth, one all-purpose granular activated carbon (GAC), and one GAC commercially promoted for gas-phase HCHO removal. The three activated carbons were evaluated for HCHO removal in the low-ppm(v) range and for water vapor adsorption from relative pressures of 0.1-0.9 at 26 °C where, according to the IUPAC isotherm classification system, the adsorption isotherms observed exhibited Type V behavior. A Type V adsorption isotherm model recently proposed by Qi and LeVan (Q-L) was selected to model the observed adsorption behavior because it reduces to a finite, nonzero limit at low partial pressures and it describes the entire range of adsorption considered in this study. The Q-L model was applied to a polar organic adsorbate to fit HCHO adsorption isotherms for the three activated carbons. The physical and chemical characteristics of the activated carbon surfaces were characterized using nitrogen adsorption isotherms, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Boehm titrations. At low concentrations, HCHO adsorption capacity was most strongly related to the density of basic surface functional groups (SFGs), while water vapor adsorption was most strongly influenced by the density of acidic SFGs.

  19. Stereotype threat engenders neural attentional bias toward negative feedback to undermine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Chad E; Leitner, Jordan B

    2014-10-01

    Stereotype threat, a situational pressure individuals experience when they fear confirming a negative group stereotype, engenders a cascade of physiological stress responses, negative appraisals, and performance monitoring processes that tax working memory resources necessary for optimal performance. Less is known, however, about how stereotype threat biases attentional processing in response to performance feedback, and how such attentional biases may undermine performance. Women received feedback on math problems in stereotype threatening compared to stereotype-neutral contexts while continuous EEG activity was recorded. Findings revealed that stereotype threatened women elicited larger midline P100 ERPs, increased phase locking between anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (two regions integral for attentional processes), and increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback compared to positive feedback and women in stereotype-neutral contexts. Increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback predicted underperformance on the math task among stereotype threatened women only. Women in stereotype-neutral contexts exhibited the opposite trend. Findings suggest that in stereotype threatening contexts, neural networks integral for attention and working memory are biased toward negative, stereotype confirming feedback at very early speeds of information processing. This bias, in turn, plays a role in undermining performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improvement in chest compression quality using a feedback device (CPRmeter): a simulation randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buléon, Clément; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Halbout, Laurent; Arrot, Xavier; De Facq Régent, Hélène; Chelarescu, Dan; Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac arrest survival depends on celerity and efficiency of life support action. Guidelines emphasized the chest compression (CC) quality and feedback devices are encouraged. The purpose is to study the impact of the CPRmeter feedback device on resuscitation performed by untrained rescuers. This is a prospective randomized crossover study on manikins (Resusci Anne). One hundred and forty four students inexperienced in cardiopulmonary resuscitation representing untrained rescuers were included. Participants performed 2 minutes of CC without interruption with (group G) or without (group B) feedback. Four months passed between the 2 crossover phases to avoid resilience effect. Data collected by the CPRmeter device were: CC rate, depth and release. Efficient CC rate ([simultaneous and correct CC rate, depth and release] primary outcome) (absolute difference [95% CI]) was significantly improved in group G (71%) compared to group B (26%; [45 {36-55}]; P 38 mm) was significantly improved in group G (85%) compared to group B (43%; [42 {33-52}]; P < .0001). Adequate CC rate (90-120/min) was significantly improved in group G (81%) compared to group B (56%; [25 {15-35}]; P < .0001). The average CC rate and depth in group G were significantly less dispersed around the mean compared to group B (test of variance P < .007; P < .015 respectively). The use of the CPRmeter significantly improved CC quality performed by students inexperienced in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. © 2013.

  1. Effects of feedback reliability on feedback-related brain activity: A feedback valuation account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2018-04-06

    Adaptive decision making relies on learning from feedback. Because feedback sometimes can be misleading, optimal learning requires that knowledge about the feedback's reliability be utilized to adjust feedback processing. Although previous research has shown that feedback reliability indeed influences feedback processing, the underlying mechanisms through which this is accomplished remain unclear. Here we propose that feedback processing is adjusted by the adaptive, top-down valuation of feedback. We assume that unreliable feedback is devalued relative to reliable feedback, thus reducing the reward prediction errors that underlie feedback-related brain activity and learning. A crucial prediction of this account is that the effects of feedback reliability are susceptible to contrast effects. That is, the effects of feedback reliability should be enhanced when both reliable and unreliable feedback are experienced within the same context, as compared to when only one level of feedback reliability is experienced. To evaluate this prediction, we measured the event-related potentials elicited by feedback in two experiments in which feedback reliability was varied either within or between blocks. We found that the fronto-central valence effect, a correlate of reward prediction errors during reinforcement learning, was reduced for unreliable feedback. But this result was obtained only when feedback reliability was varied within blocks, thus indicating a contrast effect. This suggests that the adaptive valuation of feedback is one mechanism underlying the effects of feedback reliability on feedback processing.

  2. Feedback stabilization of electrostatic reactive instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    A general theory for the feedback stabilization of electrostatic reactive instabilities is developed which includes the effects of dissipation in the plasma and frequency dependence in the sensor-suppressor elements and in the external feedback circuit. This theory is compared to experiments involving particular reactive instability, an interchange mode, found in a magnetic mirror device; these results are found to be in good agreement with theory. One noteworthy result is that a frequency dependence in the overall gain and phase shift of the feedback loop can cause destabilization at large gain. Multimode feedback stabilization is studied using the spatial variation of two interchange modes to separate them such that each can be acted upon individually by the feedback system. The transfer function of the plasma is also examined. This analysis is used for mode identification and location of the pole positions. As an example of using feedback as a diagnostic tool, instability induced transport is studied. Here feedback is used to control the amplitude of fluctuations at saturation

  3. Feedback For Helpers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromer, Walter F.

    1975-01-01

    The author offers some feedback to those in the helping professions in three areas: (1) forms and letters; (2) jumping to conclusions; and (3) blaming and belittling, in hopes of stimulating more feedback as well as more positive ways of performing their services. (HMV)

  4. 'Peer feedback' voor huisartsopleiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damoiseaux, R A M J; Truijens, L

    2016-01-01

    In medical specialist training programmes it is common practice for residents to provide feedback to their medical trainers. The problem is that due to its anonymous nature, the feedback often lacks the specificity necessary to improve the performance of trainers. If anonymity is to be abolished,

  5. Feedback og interpersonel kommunikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Som interpersonel kommunikationsform handler feedback om at observere, mærke og italesætte det, som handler om relationen mellem samtaleparterne mere end om samtaleemnet. Her er fokus på, hvad der siges og hvordan der kommunikeres sammen. Feedback er her ikke en korrigerende tilbagemelding til...

  6. Computational wavelength resolution for in-line lensless holography: phase-coded diffraction patterns and wavefront group-sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkovnik, Vladimir; Shevkunov, Igor; Petrov, Nikolay V.; Egiazarian, Karen

    2017-06-01

    In-line lensless holography is considered with a random phase modulation at the object plane. The forward wavefront propagation is modelled using the Fourier transform with the angular spectrum transfer function. The multiple intensities (holograms) recorded by the sensor are random due to the random phase modulation and noisy with Poissonian noise distribution. It is shown by computational experiments that high-accuracy reconstructions can be achieved with resolution going up to the two thirds of the wavelength. With respect to the sensor pixel size it is a super-resolution with a factor of 32. The algorithm designed for optimal superresolution phase/amplitude reconstruction from Poissonian data is based on the general methodology developed for phase retrieval with a pixel-wise resolution in V. Katkovnik, "Phase retrieval from noisy data based on sparse approximation of object phase and amplitude", http://www.cs.tut.fi/ lasip/DDT/index3.html.

  7. Theoretical Design of a Depolarized Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscope (IFOG on SMF-28 Single-Mode Standard Optical Fiber Based on Closed-Loop Sinusoidal Phase Modulation with Serrodyne Feedback Phase Modulation Using Simulation Tools for Tactical and Industrial Grade Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón José Pérez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents, by means of computational simulation tools, a full analysis and design of an Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscope (IFOG prototype based on a closed-loop configuration with sinusoidal bias phase- modulation. The complete design of the different blocks, optical and electronic, is presented, including some novelties as the sinusoidal bias phase-modulation and the use of an integrator to generate the serrodyne phase-modulation signal. The paper includes detailed calculation of most parameter values, and the plots of the resulting signals obtained from simulation tools. The design is focused in the use of a standard single-mode optical fiber, allowing a cost competitive implementation compared to commercial IFOG, at the expense of reduced sensitivity. The design contains an IFOG model that accomplishes tactical and industrial grade applications (sensitivity ≤ 0.055 °/h. This design presents two important properties: (1 an optical subsystem with advanced conception: depolarization of the optical wave by means of Lyot depolarizers, which allows to use a sensing coil made by standard optical fiber, instead by polarization maintaining fiber, which supposes consequent cost savings and (2 a novel and simple electronic design that incorporates a linear analog integrator with reset in feedback chain, this integrator generating a serrodyne voltage-wave to apply to Phase-Modulator (PM, so that it will be obtained the interferometric phase cancellation. This particular feedback design with sawtooth-wave generated signal for a closed-loop configuration with sinusoidal bias phase modulation has not been reported till now in the scientific literature and supposes a considerable simplification with regard to previous designs based on similar configurations. The sensing coil consists of an 8 cm average diameter spool that contains 300 m of standard single-mode optical-fiber (SMF-28 type realized by quadrupolar winding. The working

  8. Theoretical Design of a Depolarized Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscope (IFOG) on SMF-28 Single-Mode Standard Optical Fiber Based on Closed-Loop Sinusoidal Phase Modulation with Serrodyne Feedback Phase Modulation Using Simulation Tools for Tactical and Industrial Grade Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Ramón José; Álvarez, Ignacio; Enguita, José María

    2016-04-27

    This article presents, by means of computational simulation tools, a full analysis and design of an Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscope (IFOG) prototype based on a closed-loop configuration with sinusoidal bias phase- modulation. The complete design of the different blocks, optical and electronic, is presented, including some novelties as the sinusoidal bias phase-modulation and the use of an integrator to generate the serrodyne phase-modulation signal. The paper includes detailed calculation of most parameter values, and the plots of the resulting signals obtained from simulation tools. The design is focused in the use of a standard single-mode optical fiber, allowing a cost competitive implementation compared to commercial IFOG, at the expense of reduced sensitivity. The design contains an IFOG model that accomplishes tactical and industrial grade applications (sensitivity ≤ 0.055 °/h). This design presents two important properties: (1) an optical subsystem with advanced conception: depolarization of the optical wave by means of Lyot depolarizers, which allows to use a sensing coil made by standard optical fiber, instead by polarization maintaining fiber, which supposes consequent cost savings and (2) a novel and simple electronic design that incorporates a linear analog integrator with reset in feedback chain, this integrator generating a serrodyne voltage-wave to apply to Phase-Modulator (PM), so that it will be obtained the interferometric phase cancellation. This particular feedback design with sawtooth-wave generated signal for a closed-loop configuration with sinusoidal bias phase modulation has not been reported till now in the scientific literature and supposes a considerable simplification with regard to previous designs based on similar configurations. The sensing coil consists of an 8 cm average diameter spool that contains 300 m of standard single-mode optical-fiber (SMF-28 type) realized by quadrupolar winding. The working wavelength will be

  9. Velocity Feedback Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient response such as ringing in a control system can be reduced or removed by velocity feedback. It is a useful control technique that should be covered in the relevant engineering laboratory courses. We developed velocity feedback experiments using two different low cost technologies, viz., operational amplifiers and microcontrollers. These experiments can be easily integrated into laboratory courses on feedback control systems or microcontroller applications. The intent of developing these experiments was to illustrate the ringing problem and to offer effective, low cost solutions for removing such problem. In this paper the pedagogical approach for these velocity feedback experiments was described. The advantages and disadvantages of the two different implementation of velocity feedback were discussed also.

  10. Feedback i matematik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hartberg, Dobson, & Gran, 2012; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Wiliam, 2015). Dette på trods af, at flere forskere påpeger, at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende...... (Hattie & Gan, 2011), og nogle endda viser, at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). Artiklen vil undersøge disse tilsyneladende modstridende resultater ved at stille spørgsmålet: Under hvilke forudsætninger virker feedback i matematik læringsfremmende......? Dette gøres ved at dykke ned i forskningslitteraturen omhandlende feedback ud fra en række temaer for på den måde at besvare ovenstående spørgsmål....

  11. Dependency Analysis Guidance. Nordic/German Working Group on Common cause Failure analysis. Phase 1 project report: Comparisons and application to test cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Guenter (RISA Sicherheitsanalysen GmbH (DE)); Jaenkaelae, Kalle (Fortum Nuclear Services Oy (FI)); Johanson, Gunnar; Lindberg, Sandra (ES Konsult, Stockholm (SE)); Knochenhauer, Michael (Relcon Scandpower AB, Stockholm (SE)); Schubert, Bernd (Vattenfall Europe (DE)); Vaurio, Jussi (Prometh Solutions (FI)); Wohlstein, Ralf (E.ON Kernkraft, Maschinentechnik (DE))

    2007-10-15

    This report is part of the reporting from the European Working Group on CCF analysis (EWG), including members from Finland, Germany and Sweden. The project is planned in two phases with a reporting and progress evaluation before initiation of the second phase. Phase 1: Comparisons and application to test cases (2006). Phase 2: Development of harmonized approach and applications (2007). This report summarizes the work during the 1st phase of the project, which included the following main tasks: Task 1: Survey of databases, Task 2: Survey of methods for classification and quantification of CCF-events and description of these methods. Task 3: Classify events for application, using different approaches as recommended above. Task 4: Draw conclusions for harmonization

  12. Dependency Analysis Guidance. Nordic/German Working Group on Common cause Failure analysis. Phase 1 project report: Comparisons and application to test cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Guenter; Jaenkaelae, Kalle; Johanson, Gunnar; Lindberg, Sandra; Knochenhauer, Michael; Sc hubert, Bernd; Vaurio, Jussi; Wohlstei n, Ralf

    2007-10-01

    This report is part of the reporting from the European Working Group on CCF analysis (EWG), including members from Finland, Germany and Sweden. The project is planned in two phases with a reporting and progress evaluation before initiation of the second phase. Phase 1: Comparisons and application to test cases (2006). Phase 2: Development of harmonized approach and applications (2007). This report summarizes the work during the 1st phase of the project, which included the following main tasks: Task 1: Survey of databases, Task 2: Survey of methods for classification and quantification of CCF-events and description of these methods. Task 3: Classify events for application, using different approaches as recommended above. Task 4: Draw conclusions for harmonization

  13. Trend in coral-algal phase shift in the Mandapam group of islands, Gulf of Mannar Marine Biosphere Reserve, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machendiranathan, M.; Senthilnathan, L.; Ranith, R.; Saravanakumar, A.; Thangaradjou, T.; Choudhry, S. B.; Sasamal, S. K.

    2016-12-01

    The present study revealed proliferation of macro-algae modifying coral reef ecosystems in a different manner due to diseases and sedimentations in the Mandapam group of islands in the Gulf of Mannar. Benthic surveys were conducted with major attack of seven coral reefs diseases with high sedimentation rate, nine species of fleshy macro-algae ( Turbinaria ornata, Turbinaria conaides, Caulerpa scalpelliformis, Caulerpa racemosa, Kappaphycus alvarezii, Padina gymnosphora, Sargassum wightii, Ulva reticulata and Calurpa lentillifera) proliferation against major corals life forms (Acropora branching, Acropora digitate, Acropora tabulate, coral massive, coral submassive, coral foliose and coral encrusting). The results confirm that diseased corals most favor to macro-algae growth (15.27%) rather than the sedimentation covered corals (8.24 %). In the degradation of coral life forms, massive corals were more highly damaged (7.05%) than any other forms. Within a short period of time (May to September), coral coverage shrank to 17.4% from 21.9%, macro-algae increased 23.51% and the average sedimentation rate attained 77.52 mg cm-2d-1 with persisting coral reef diseases of 17.59%. The Pearson correlation showed that the coral cover decreased with increasing macro-algae growth, which was statistically significant ( r = -0.774, n = 100, P K. alvarezii, P. gymnosphora and C. lentillifera increased with percentages of 6.0, 5.8, 5.7, 4.9, 4.2, 3.7, 2.7 and 1.9, respectively. If this trend continues, the next generation of new recruit corals will undoubtedly lead to a phase shift in Gulf of Mannar corals.

  14. A Combination of Outcome and Process Feedback Enhances Performance in Simulations of Child Sexual Abuse Interviews Using Avatars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pompedda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Simulated interviews in alleged child sexual abuse (CSA cases with computer-generated avatars paired with feedback improve interview quality. In the current study, we aimed to understand better the effect of different types of feedback in this context. Feedback was divided into feedback regarding conclusions about what happened to the avatar (outcome feedback and feedback regarding the appropriateness of question-types used by the interviewer (process feedback. Forty-eight participants each interviewed four different avatars. Participants were divided into four groups (no feedback, outcome feedback, process feedback, and a combination of both feedback types. Compared to the control group, interview quality was generally improved in all the feedback groups on all outcome variables included. Combined feedback produced the strongest effect on increasing recommended questions and correct conclusions. For relevant and neutral details elicited by the interviewers, no statistically significant differences were found between feedback types. For wrong details, the combination of feedback produced the strongest effect, but this did not differ from the other two feedback groups. Nevertheless, process feedback produced a better result compared to outcome feedback. The present study replicated previous findings regarding the effect of feedback in improving interview quality, and provided new knowledge on feedback characteristics that maximize training effects. A combination of process and outcome feedback showed the strongest effect in enhancing training in simulated CSA interviews. Further research is, however, needed.

  15. Operation of the transverse feedback system at the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, R.; Louwerse, R.; Mourier, J.; Vos, L.

    1987-01-01

    To prevent transverse instabilities at high beam intensity in the SPS, the transverse feedback system for damping the betatron oscillations has been upgraded for larger damping decrements and for increased system's bandwidth. The feedback loop now contains a digital delay line cancellor, so that the damper works with a velocity feedback Δx/Δt, unaffected by the closed orbit position x at the pick-up station. The digital processing of the feedback signal facilitates nonlinear feedback techniques such as antidamping and ''band-bang'' feedback. The ''bang-bang'' feedback provides the maximum possible damping rate of the injection oscillations in the SPS-collider, in order to minimize the emittance increase caused by filamentation. The antidamping nonlinearity provides small continuous beam oscillations of 50 μm amplitude for tracking the machine tune Q with a phase locked loop

  16. Social provocation modulates decision making and feedback processing: Examining the trajectory of development in adolescent participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L. Pincham

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, research is turning to the ways in which social context impacts decision making and feedback processing in adolescents. The current study recorded electroencephalography to examine the trajectory of development across adolescence, with a focus on how social context impacts cognition and behaviour. To that end, younger (10–12 years and older (14–16 years adolescents played a modified Taylor Aggression Paradigm against two virtual opponents: a low-provoker and a high-provoker. During the task's decision phase (where participants select punishment for their opponent, we examined two event-related potentials: the N2 and the late positive potential (LPP. During the outcome phase (where participants experience win or loss feedback, we measured the feedback related negativity (FRN. Although N2 amplitudes did not vary with provocation, LPP amplitudes were enhanced under high provocation for the younger group, suggesting that emotional reactivity during the decision phase was heightened for early adolescents. During the outcome phase, the FRN was reduced following win outcomes under high provocation for both groups, suggesting that a highly provocative social opponent may influence the reward response. Collectively, the data argue that social context is an important factor modulating neural responses in adolescent behavioural and brain development.

  17. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Casal

    Full Text Available Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  18. Feedback - fra et elevperspektiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Benedikte Vilslev; Pedersen, Bent Sortkær

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hattie og Timperley, 2007). Andre studier er dog inde på at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende og nogle viser endda at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i...... forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). I forsøget på at forklare hvordan og hvorfor feedback virker (forskelligt), er der undersøgt flere dimensioner og forhold omkring feedback (se bl.a. Black og Wiliam, 1998; Hattie og Timperley, 2007; Shute, 2008). Dog er der få studier der undersøger...... hvordan feedback opleves fra et elevperspektiv (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013). Samtidig er der i feedbacklitteraturen en mangel på kvalitative studier, der kommer tæt på fænomenet feedback, som det viser sig i klasserummet (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013) i naturlige omgivelser (Black og Wiliam, 1998), og hvordan...

  19. Improving quality in the preanalytical phase through innovation, on behalf of the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    process remain, especially in the preanalytical phase ranging from test ordering to obtaining and managing the biological specimens. The Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE) of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has planned many activities aimed...... at mitigating the vulnerability of the preanalytical phase, including the organization of three European meetings in the past 7 years. Hence, this collective article follows the previous three opinion papers that were published by the EFLM WGPRE on the same topic, and brings together the summaries...

  20. Adaptive Feedfoward Feedback Control Framework, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel approach is proposed for the suppression of the aircraft's structural vibration to increase the resilience of the flight control law in the presence of the...

  1. RF feedback simulation results for PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tighe, R.; Corredoura, P.

    1995-06-01

    A model of the RF feedback system for PEP-II has been developed to provide time-domain simulation and frequency-domain analysis of the complete system. The model includes the longitudinal beam dynamics, cavity fundamental resonance, feedback loops, and the nonlinear klystron operating near saturation. Transients from an ion clearing gap and a reference phase modulation from the longitudinal feedback system are also studied. Growth rates are predicted and overall system stability examined

  2. Training effectiveness feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggin, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    A formal method of getting feedback about the job performance of employees is a necessary part of all the authors training programs. The formal process may prove to be inadequate if it is the only process in use. There are many ways and many opportunities to get good feedback about employee performance. It is important to document these methods and specific instances to supplement the more formalized process. The key is to identify them, encourage them, use them, and document the training actions that result from them. This paper describes one plant's method of getting feedback about performance of technicians in the field

  3. Feedback System Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    R 2. GOVT A $ SION NO. 3 RIEqLPýIVT’S.;TALOG NUMBER r/ 4. TITLE (and wbiFflT, -L M4 1 , FEEDBACK SYSTEM THEORY ~r Inter in- 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...ANNUAL REPORT FEEDBACK SYSTEM THEORY AFOSR GRANT NO. 76-2946B Air Force Office of Scientific Research for year ending October 31, 1978 79 02 08 L|I...re less stringent than in other synthesis techniques which cannot handle significant parameter uncertainty. _I FEEDBACK SYSTEM THEORY 1. Introduction

  4. Brugbar peer feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Helle; Heger, Stine

    Studerende kan være medskabere af undervisning i akademisk skrivning, når de modtager og giver feedback til hinandens ufærdige akademiske tekster. Det ser vi i et udviklingsprojekt, hvor vi afprøver kollektive vejledningsformater. Vi har dog erfaret: 1. at studerende mangler træning i at give og ...... modtage feedback 2. at den manglende træning kan stå i vejen for realiseringen af læringspotentialet ved peer feedback....

  5. Towards a Complete Classification of Symmetry-Protected Topological Phases for Interacting Fermions in Three Dimensions and a General Group Supercohomology Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Rui; Gu, Zheng-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    The classification and construction of symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases in interacting boson and fermion systems have become a fascinating theoretical direction in recent years. It has been shown that (generalized) group cohomology theory or cobordism theory gives rise to a complete classification of SPT phases in interacting boson or spin systems. The construction and classification of SPT phases in interacting fermion systems are much more complicated, especially in three dimensions. In this work, we revisit this problem based on an equivalence class of fermionic symmetric local unitary transformations. We construct very general fixed-point SPT wave functions for interacting fermion systems. We naturally reproduce the partial classifications given by special group supercohomology theory, and we show that with an additional B ˜H2(Gb,Z2) structure [the so-called obstruction-free subgroup of H2(Gb,Z2) ], a complete classification of SPT phases for three-dimensional interacting fermion systems with a total symmetry group Gf=Gb×Z2f can be obtained for unitary symmetry group Gb. We also discuss the procedure for deriving a general group supercohomology theory in arbitrary dimensions.

  6. Predicting the start and maximum amplitude of solar cycle 24 using similar phases and a cycle grouping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jialong; Zong Weiguo; Le Guiming; Zhao Haijuan; Tang Yunqiu; Zhang Yang

    2009-01-01

    We find that the solar cycles 9, 11, and 20 are similar to cycle 23 in their respective descending phases. Using this similarity and the observed data of smoothed monthly mean sunspot numbers (SMSNs) available for the descending phase of cycle 23, we make a date calibration for the average time sequence made of the three descending phases of the three cycles, and predict the start of March or April 2008 for cycle 24. For the three cycles, we also find a linear correlation of the length of the descending phase of a cycle with the difference between the maximum epoch of this cycle and that of its next cycle. Using this relationship along with the known relationship between the rise-time and the maximum amplitude of a slowly rising solar cycle, we predict the maximum SMSN of cycle 24 of 100.2 ± 7.5 to appear during the period from May to October 2012. (letters)

  7. Phase equilibria modelling and zircon dating for Precambrian metapelites from Xinghuadukou Group in Lvlin Forest of Erguna Massif, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiulei; Zheng, Changqing; Tajcmanova, Lucie; Zhong, Xin; Xu, Xuechun; Han, Xiaomeng; Wang, Zhaoyuan

    2017-04-01

    Xinghuadukou Group, the basement metamorphic complex of Erguna Massif in NE China, is considered to be Mesoproterozoic with Sm-Nd age of 1157±32 Ma. However, the new zircon data from these metamorphic supracrustal rocks in Lvlin Forest show that they formed in Neoproterozoic with the age of 800 Ma. Old zircon age with 2.5 Ga, 2.0 Ga and 1.8 Ga, indicate that the Erguna Massif had an affinity to both Columbia and Rodinia continents. Furthermore, we also present 500 Ma metamorphic age in micashists and 500 Ma age of adjacent granitoids that might have thermally influenced its surrounding. No detailed studies have been undertaken on the metamorphic evolution of the Xinghuadukou Complex. The typical paragneissic mineral assemblage of garnet sillimanite mica schist is Grt+Sil+Bt+Mus+Qtz±Kfs. (Zhou et al., 2011) proposed that the Xinghuadukou Complex appears to have undergone similar granulite facies metamorphic conditions based on the similarity of mineral assemblages to the Mashan Complex in the Jiamusi Massif, NE China. However, the new phase equilibria modelling result shows that these rocks are high amphibolite facies product with 650℃. We can easily find K-feldspar formed by partial melting due to the consuming of muscovite. Also the remaining muscovite is directly connected with a fluid channel in thin sections which indicate that the remaining muscovite formed from retrograde with the existence of fluid. The zoned garnet has low MgO and high CaO content in rims and high MgO and low CaO content in core. It seems that this garnet has high pressure and low temperature (HP-LT) in rims and low pressure and high temperature (LP-HT) in core which would point to an anti-clockwise metamorphic evolution. Zhou, J.B., Wilde, S.A., Zhang, X.Z., Zhao, G.C., Liu, F.L., Qiao, D.W., Ren, S.M. and Liu, J.H., 2011b. A> 1300km late Pan-African metamorphic belt in NE China: new evidence from the Xing'an block and its tectonic implications. Tectonophysics, 509(3): 280-292.

  8. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners’ responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability. PMID:25946173

  9. Ambulatory Feedback System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Herbert; Weeks, Bill

    1985-01-01

    This presentation discusses instrumentation that will be used for a specific event, which we hope will carry on to future events within the Space Shuttle program. The experiment is the Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment (AFTE) scheduled for Spacelab 3, currently scheduled to be launched in November, 1984. The objectives of the AFTE are to determine the effectiveness of autogenic feedback in preventing or reducing space adaptation syndrome (SAS), to monitor and record in-flight data from the crew, to determine if prediction criteria for SAS can be established, and, finally, to develop an ambulatory instrument package to mount the crew throughout the mission. The purpose of the Ambulatory Feedback System (AFS) is to record the responses of the subject during a provocative event in space and provide a real-time feedback display to reinforce the training.

  10. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  11. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  12. A Tetrazine-Labile Vinyl Ether Benzyloxycarbonyl Protecting Group (VeZ): An Orthogonal Tool for Solid-Phase Peptide Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staderini, Matteo; Gambardella, Alessia; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Bradley, Mark

    2018-06-01

    The vinyl ether benzyloxycarbonyl (VeZ) protecting group is selectively cleaved by treatment with tetrazines via an inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction. This represents a new orthogonal protecting group for solid-phase peptide synthesis, with Fmoc-Lys(VeZ)-OH as a versatile alternative to Fmoc-Lys(Alloc)-OH and Fmoc-Lys(Dde)-OH, as demonstrated by the synthesis of two biologically relevant cyclic peptides.

  13. Progress Report Phase I: Use, access, and fire/fuels management attitudes and preferences of user groups concerning the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) and adjacent areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt F. Anschuetz; Carol B. Raish

    2010-01-01

    This document represents a progress report of activities completed during Phase I of the study titled, Use, Access, and Fire/Fuels Management Attitudes and Preferences of User Groups Concerning the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) and Adjacent Areas, and the preliminary findings of this work.

  14. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    % vs 49%; P = 0.004). Men used less time (in minutes) than women (P = 0.037), but no sex difference was observed for repetitions (P = 0.20). Participants in the intervention group had higher self-perception regarding surgical skills after the trial (P = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS:: Instructor feedback...... increases the efficiency when training a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator; time and repetitions used to achieve a predefined proficiency level were significantly reduced in the group that received instructor feedback compared with the control group. Trial registration number: NCT......OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the impact of instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback when training a complex operational task on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. BACKGROUND:: Simulators are now widely accepted as a training tool, but there is insufficient knowledge about how much...

  15. Systematic, digital student feedback for differentiated teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, Stefan Ting; Carlsen, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    The article reports results from a qualitative study of Elevbaro, a prototype of a digital tool for student feedback developed in connection with the demonstration school project, inclusion, and differentiated teaching in digital learning environments. At the same time the study represents...... the first step of validating Elevbaro as a systematic feedback tool. There is general consensus that feedback is central to the quality of teaching, but the focus on and the exploration of systematic student feedback is an overlooked topic. Especially as regards differentiated teaching and complex teaching...... patterns, there is a need for supplementary and digital monitoring of a group of students and of individual students. The article examines how students and teachers understand and use Elevbaro, which is built on frequent ratings of five set statements in connection with teaching over a certain period...

  16. Correlation Among the Variant Group, Effective Grain Size, and Elastic Strain Energy During the Phase Transformation in 9Ni Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Hidenori; Moriguchi, Koji; Tomio, Yusaku; Yamagishi, Hideki; Morito, Shigekazu

    2017-12-01

    The effect of carbon content on the density of variant-pair boundaries was investigated in 9Ni steel using an electron backscatter diffraction patterns method. The changes in the density of variant-pair boundaries were correlated with the nondestructive measured values of shear modulus of the austenite phase at the phase transformation point. Furthermore, the effective grain size was correlated with the shear modulus and the density of variant-pair boundaries. These relations are discussed from the viewpoint of self-accommodation of elastic strain energy and the nucleation event in the bainite and martensitic transformations.

  17. Young Children's Analogical Reasoning: The Role of Immediate Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shuhui; Alexander, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a computerized measure, Interactive Analogical Measure (IAM), was developed and used to assess young children's ability to reason analogically. The IAM was equipped to provide corrective feedback and the effects of that feedback were tested for experimental and control groups. A group of 5-year-olds (N = 80) participated in the…

  18. Modification of tokamak edge turbulence using feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, B.; Uckan, T.; Wootton, A.J.; Carreras, B.A.; Bengtson, R.D.; Hurwitz, P.; Li, G.X.; Lin, H.; Rowan, W.L.; Tsui, H.Y.W.; Sen, A.K.; Uglum, J.

    1994-01-01

    Using active feedback, the turbulent fluctuation levels have been reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in the edge of the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) [K. W. Gentle, Nucl. Fusion Technol. 1, 479 (1981)]. A probe system was used to drive a suppressor wave in the TEXT limiter shadow. A decrease in the local turbulence-induced particle flux has been seen, but a global change in the particle transport at the present time has not been observed. By changing the phase shift and gain of the feedback network, the amplitude of the turbulence was increased by a factor of 10

  19. Developing effective automated feedback in temporal bone surgery simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewickrema, Sudanthi; Piromchai, Patorn; Zhou, Yun; Ioannou, Ioanna; Bailey, James; Kennedy, Gregor; O'Leary, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    We aim to test the effectiveness, accuracy, and usefulness of an automated feedback system in facilitating skill acquisition in virtual reality surgery. We evaluate the performance of the feedback system through a randomized controlled trial of 24 students allocated to feedback and nonfeedback groups. The feedback system was based on the Melbourne University temporal bone surgery simulator. The study was conducted at the simulation laboratory of the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne. The study participants were medical students from the University of Melbourne, who were asked to perform virtual cortical mastoidectomy on the simulator. The extent to which the drilling behavior of the feedback and nonfeedback groups differed was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Its accuracy was determined through a postexperiment observational assessment of recordings made during the experiment by an expert surgeon. Its usability was evaluated using students' self-reports of their impressions of the system. A Friedman's test showed that there was a significant improvement in the drilling performance of the feedback group, χ(2)(1) = 14.450, P feedback (when trainee behavior was detected) 88.6% of the time and appropriate feedback (accurate advice) 84.2% of the time. Participants' opinions about the usefulness of the system were highly positive. The automated feedback system was observed to be effective in improving surgical technique, and the provided feedback was found to be accurate and useful. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  20. A pediatric phase 1 trial of vorinostat and temozolomide in relapsed or refractory primary brain or spinal cord tumors: a Children's Oncology Group phase 1 consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Trent R; Wagner, Lars; Ahern, Charlotte; Fouladi, Maryam; Reid, Joel M; McGovern, Renee M; Ames, Matthew M; Gilbertson, Richard J; Horton, Terzah; Ingle, Ashish M; Weigel, Brenda; Blaney, Susan M

    2013-09-01

    We conducted a pediatric phase I study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLT), and pharmacokinetic properties of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, when given in combination with temozolomide in children with refractory or recurrent CNS malignancies. Vorinostat, followed by temozolomide approximately 1 hour later, was orally administered, once daily, for 5 consecutive days every 28 days at three dose levels using the rolling six design. Studies of histone accumulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were performed on Day 1 at 0, 6, and 24 hours after vorinostat dosing. Vorinostat pharmacokinetics (PK) and serum MGMT promoter status were also assessed. Nineteen eligible patients were enrolled and 18 patients were evaluable for toxicity. There were no DLTs observed at dose level 1 or 2. DLTs occurred in four patients at dose level 3: thrombocytopenia (4), neutropenia (3), and leucopenia (1). Non-dose limiting grade 3 or 4 toxicities related to protocol therapy were also hematologic and included neutropenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, and leucopenia. Three patients exhibited stable disease and one patient had a partial response. There was no clear relationship between vorinostat dosage and drug exposure over the dose range studied. Accumulation of acetylated H3 histone in PBMC was observed after administration of vorinostat. Five-day cycles of vorinostat in combination with temozolomide are well tolerated in children with recurrent CNS malignancies with myelosuppression as the DLT. The recommended phase II combination doses are vorinostat, 300 mg/m(2) /day and temozolomide, 150 mg/m(2) /day. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. False feedback and beliefs influence name recall in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland-Hughes, Carla M; West, Robin Lea; Smith, Kimberly A; Ebner, Natalie C

    2017-09-01

    Feedback is an important self-regulatory process that affects task effort and subsequent performance. Benefits of positive feedback for list recall have been explored in research on goals and feedback, but the effect of negative feedback on memory has rarely been studied. The current research extends knowledge of memory and feedback effects by investigating face-name association memory and by examining the potential mediation of feedback effects, in younger and older adults, through self-evaluative beliefs. Beliefs were assessed before and after name recognition and name recall testing. Repeated presentation of false positive feedback was compared to false negative feedback and a no feedback condition. Results showed that memory self-efficacy declined over time for participants in the negative and no feedback conditions but was sustained for those receiving positive feedback. Furthermore, participants who received negative feedback felt older after testing than before testing. For name recall, the positive feedback group outperformed the negative feedback and no feedback groups combined, with no age interactions. The observed feedback-related effects on memory were fully mediated by changes in memory self-efficacy. These findings advance our understanding of how beliefs are related to feedback in memory and inform future studies examining the importance of self-regulation in memory.

  2. The Effects of Post-observational Feedback Modes on Teaching Beliefs : Peer vs. Teacher-Mediated Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlknur Yuksel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether the pre-service teachers' language teaching beliefs changed as a result of two different post-observational reşective feedback modes; teacher mediated and peer feedback, during their teaching practice. For each post-observational feedback mode, two groups of eight Turkish pre-service language teachers attending to the final year at English Language Teaching Department at Anadolu University, totally 16 pre-service teachers participated in the study. The qualitative and quantitative data was collected at the beginning and end of the different feedback treatments from each group. The results indicated that the feedback modes on pre-service teachers’ teaching practice could influence their beliefs about teaching. Peer feedback had a potential to change the teachers’ beliefs through critical reşection skills that were fostered as a result of collaboration within the peer group

  3. The Effect of Combination of Video Feedback and Audience Feedback on Social Anxiety: Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwen; Mak, Rebecca; Fujita, Satoko

    2015-09-01

    Although video feedback (VF) is shown to improve appraisals of social performance in socially anxious individuals, its impact on state anxiety during a social situation is mixed. The current study investigated the effect of combined video feedback and audience feedback (AF) on self-perceptions of performance and bodily sensations as well as state anxiety pertaining to a speech task. Forty-one socially anxious students were randomly allocated to combined video feedback with audience feedback (VF + AF), video feedback only (VF), audience feedback only (AF), or a control condition. Following a 3-min speech, participants in the VF + AF, VF, and AF conditions watched the videotape of their speech with cognitive preparation in the presence of three confederates who served as audience, and/or received feedback from the confederates, while the control group watched their videotaped speech without cognitive preparation. Both VF + AF and AF conditions improved distorted appraisal of performance and bodily sensations as well as state anxiety. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. A JASTRO study group report. A randomized phase III trial of hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy for superficial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide

    1998-01-01

    Result of study about local effect of hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy for superficial tumors was reported. The irradiation was more than 90% isodose for lesion, and total dose was 60 Gy in cases with anamnesis and 40-50 Gy and without anamnesis at a rate of five times a week and 2 Gy at one time. Hyperthermia was carried out four times; once a week, at 42.5 degrees on tumor side edge, and for 40 minutes. Total 53 cases (neck lymph node metastasis 30 cases, relapse breast cancer 11, advanced breast cancer 1, other superficial tumor 11) were divided into 2 groups. Radiotherapy without hyperthermia (group R) was 27 cases, radiotherapy with hyperthermia (group H) was 26 cases. CR and CR+PR within 2 months after treatment were as follows: Group R: 50%, 85%, Group H: 64%, 100%. The CR+PR was superior in group H (p=0.0497). The CR at maximum effect after treatment was 65% of group R and 86% of group H (p=0.17). The local control rate after CR was not different in both groups. (K.H.)

  5. The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-11-01

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How Residents Learn From Patient Feedback: A Multi-Institutional Qualitative Study of Pediatrics Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogetz, Alyssa L; Orlov, Nicola; Blankenburg, Rebecca; Bhavaraju, Vasudha; McQueen, Alisa; Rassbach, Caroline

    2018-04-01

    Residents may view feedback from patients and their families with greater skepticism than feedback from supervisors and peers. While discussing patient and family feedback with faculty may improve residents' acceptance of feedback and learning, specific strategies have not been identified. We explored pediatrics residents' perspectives of patient feedback and identified strategies that promote residents' reflection on and learning from feedback. In this multi-institutional, qualitative study conducted in June and July 2016, we conducted focus groups with a purposive sample of pediatrics residents after their participation in a randomized controlled trial in which they received written patient feedback and either discussed it with faculty or reviewed it independently. Focus group transcripts were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed for themes using the constant comparative approach associated with grounded theory. Thirty-six of 92 (39%) residents participated in 7 focus groups. Four themes emerged: (1) residents valued patient feedback but felt it may lack the specificity they desire; (2) discussing feedback with a trusted faculty member was helpful for self-reflection; (3) residents identified 5 strategies faculty used to facilitate their openness to and acceptance of patient feedback (eg, help resident overcome emotional responses to feedback and situate feedback in the context of lifelong learning); and (4) residents' perceptions of feedback credibility improved when faculty observed patient encounters and solicited feedback on the resident's behalf prior to discussions. Discussing patient feedback with faculty provided important scaffolding to enhance residents' openness to and reflection on patient feedback.

  7. Global climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  8. A study on the students feedback on the foundation course in first year MBBS curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srimathi T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: To study the students feedback on the short orientation course in first year MBBS curriculum, which was introduced in the institution as per the recommendations of Medical Council of India for the Foundation course. Methodology: 250 First year MBBS students were divided into 7 small groups of 35 to 36 each. They attended a short orientation course over a period of 8 days on a rotation basis. The skills taught include Stress and Time Management, language, communication, use of information technology, National health policies, Biohazard safety, Introduction to the preclinical subjects, Medical literature search, First Aid and Basic life support, Medical ethics and professionalism. The results were analyzed on the 8th day by student’s feedback and debate sessions. Results: Positive feedback of 88.5 to 98.5% was recorded regarding the objectives of the course, contents, presentation, future value of the course in the student’s career by a Questionnaire issued to the students. Remedial measures undertaken for negative Feedback. The course enabled self directed learning of the subjects. Conclusion: The Foundation Course at the beginning of the First phase of the course enables the First year students to acquire the basic knowledge and skills required for all the subsequent phases in MBBS course and later on their medical practice and career.

  9. Choosing the polarity of the phase-encoding direction in diffusion MRI: Does it matter for group analysis?

    OpenAIRE

    Kennis, M.; van Rooij, S.J.H.; Kahn, R.S.; Geuze, E.; Leemans, A.

    2016-01-01

    Notorious for degrading diffusion MRI data quality are so-called susceptibility-induced off-resonance fields, which cause non-linear geometric image deformations. While acquiring additional data to correct for these distortions alleviates the adverse effects of this artifact drastically – e.g., by reversing the polarity of the phase-encoding (PE) direction – this strategy is often not an option due to scan time constraints. Especially in a clinical context, where patient comfort and safety ar...

  10. Feedback Conversations: Creating Feedback Dialogues with a New Textual Tool for Industrial Design Student Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Mathias; van Diggelen, Migchiel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe how a study of a large database of written university teacher feedback in the department of Industrial Design led to the development of a new conceptual framework for feedback and the design of a new feedback tool. This paper focuses on the translation of related work in the area of feedback mechanisms for…

  11. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...... theoretical textual analysis method. Asynchronous written dialogue from an online master’s course at Aalborg University forms the empirical basis of the study. The findings suggests in general that students play an essential role in SFF and that students and educators are equal in the COP, but holds different...

  12. Impact of tissue atrophy on high-pass filtered MRI signal phase-based assessment in large-scale group-comparison studies: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweser, Ferdinand; Dwyer, Michael G.; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.; Zivadinov, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The assessment of abnormal accumulation of tissue iron in the basal ganglia nuclei and in white matter plaques using the gradient echo magnetic resonance signal phase has become a research focus in many neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease. A common and natural approach is to calculate the mean high-pass-filtered phase of previously delineated brain structures. Unfortunately, the interpretation of such an analysis requires caution: in this paper we demonstrate that regional gray matter atrophy, which is concomitant with many neurodegenerative diseases, may itself directly result in a phase shift seemingly indicative of increased iron concentration even without any real change in the tissue iron concentration. Although this effect is relatively small results of large-scale group comparisons may be driven by anatomical changes rather than by changes of the iron concentration.

  13. Phase I Recommendations by the Air Quality Management Work Group to the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recommendations to the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee by Air Quality Management Work Group addressing the recommendations made by the National Research Council to improve the U.S. air quality management system.

  14. Feedback in the OSCE: What Do Residents Remember?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Mihok, Marika; Pugh, Debra; Touchie, Claire; Halman, Samantha; Wood, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The move to competency-based education has heightened the importance of direct observation of clinical skills and effective feedback. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is widely used for assessment and affords an opportunity for both direct observation and feedback to occur simultaneously. For feedback to be effective, it should include direct observation, assessment of performance, provision of feedback, reflection, decision making, and use of feedback for learning and change. If one of the goals of feedback is to engage students to think about their performance (i.e., reflection), it would seem imperative that they can recall this feedback both immediately and into the future. This study explores recall of feedback in the context of an OSCE. Specifically, the purpose of this study was to (a) determine the amount and the accuracy of feedback that trainees remember immediately after an OSCE, as well as 1 month later, and (b) assess whether prompting immediate recall improved delayed recall. Internal medicine residents received 2 minutes of verbal feedback from physician examiners in the context of an OSCE. The feedback was audio-recorded and later transcribed. Residents were randomly allocated to the immediate recall group (immediate-RG; n = 10) or the delayed recall group (delayed-RG; n = 8). The immediate-RG completed a questionnaire prompting recall of feedback received immediately after the OSCE, and then again 1 month later. The delayed-RG completed a questionnaire only 1 month after the OSCE. The total number and accuracy of feedback points provided by examiners were compared to the points recalled by residents. Results comparing recall at 1 month between the immediate-RG and the delayed-RG were also studied. Physician examiners provided considerably more feedback points (M = 16.3) than the residents recalled immediately after the OSCE (M = 2.61, p feedback points recalled upon completion of the OSCE (2.61) compared to 1 month later (M = 1

  15. Developing a patient-led electronic feedback system for quality and safety within Renal PatientView.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Sally J; Reynolds, Caroline; Heyhoe, Jane; Armitage, Gerry

    2017-03-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that patients can provide direct feedback about the quality and safety of their care through patient reporting systems. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of patients, healthcare professionals and researchers working in partnership to develop a patient-led quality and safety feedback system within an existing electronic health record (EHR), known as Renal PatientView (RPV). Phase 1 (inception) involved focus groups (n = 9) and phase 2 (requirements) involved cognitive walkthroughs (n = 34) and 1:1 qualitative interviews (n = 34) with patients and healthcare professionals. A Joint Services Expert Panel (JSP) was convened to review the findings from phase 1 and agree the core principles and components of the system prototype. Phase 1 data were analysed using a thematic approach. Data from phase 1 were used to inform the design of the initial system prototype. Phase 2 data were analysed using the components of heuristic evaluation, resulting in a list of core principles and components for the final system prototype. Phase 1 identified four main barriers and facilitators to patients feeding back on quality and safety concerns. In phase 2, the JSP agreed that the system should be based on seven core principles and components. Stakeholders were able to work together to identify core principles and components for an electronic patient quality and safety feedback system in renal services. Tensions arose due to competing priorities, particularly around anonymity and feedback. Careful consideration should be given to the feasibility of integrating a novel element with differing priorities into an established system with existing functions and objectives. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  16. Comparing the effects of positive and negative feedback in information-integration category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedberg, Michael; Glass, Brian; Filoteo, J Vincent; Hazeltine, Eliot; Maddox, W Todd

    2017-01-01

    Categorical learning is dependent on feedback. Here, we compare how positive and negative feedback affect information-integration (II) category learning. Ashby and O'Brien (2007) demonstrated that both positive and negative feedback are required to solve II category problems when feedback was not guaranteed on each trial, and reported no differences between positive-only and negative-only feedback in terms of their effectiveness. We followed up on these findings and conducted 3 experiments in which participants completed 2,400 II categorization trials across three days under 1 of 3 conditions: positive feedback only (PFB), negative feedback only (NFB), or both types of feedback (CP; control partial). An adaptive algorithm controlled the amount of feedback given to each group so that feedback was nearly equated. Using different feedback control procedures, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that participants in the NFB and CP group were able to engage II learning strategies, whereas the PFB group was not. Additionally, the NFB group was able to achieve significantly higher accuracy than the PFB group by Day 3. Experiment 3 revealed that these differences remained even when we equated the information received on feedback trials. Thus, negative feedback appears significantly more effective for learning II category structures. This suggests that the human implicit learning system may be capable of learning in the absence of positive feedback.

  17. Effect of coexistent hydrogen isotopes on tracer diffusion of tritium in alpha phase of group-V metal-hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kan; Hashizume, Kenichi; Sugisaki, Masayasu

    2009-01-01

    Tracer diffusion coefficients of tritium in the alpha phase of group-V metal-hydrogen systems, α-MH(D)xTy (M=V and Ta; x>>y), were measured in order to clarify the effects of coexistent hydrogen isotopes on the tritium diffusion behavior. The hydrogen concentration dependence of such behavior and the effects of the coexistent hydrogen isotopes (protium and deuterium) were determined. The results obtained in the present (for V and Ta) and previous (for Nb) studies revealed that tritium diffusion was definitely dependent on hydrogen concentration but was not so sensitive to the kind of coexistent hydrogen isotopes. By summarizing those data, it was found that the hydrogen concentration dependence of the tracer diffusion coefficient of tritium in the alpha phase of group-V metals could be roughly expressed by a single empirical curve. (author)

  18. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Distributed Wireless Power Transfer With Energy Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Zhang, Rui

    2017-04-01

    Energy beamforming (EB) is a key technique for achieving efficient radio-frequency (RF) transmission enabled wireless energy transfer (WET). By optimally designing the waveforms from multiple energy transmitters (ETs) over the wireless channels, they can be constructively combined at the energy receiver (ER) to achieve an EB gain that scales with the number of ETs. However, the optimal design of EB waveforms requires accurate channel state information (CSI) at the ETs, which is challenging to obtain practically, especially in a distributed system with ETs at separate locations. In this paper, we study practical and efficient channel training methods to achieve optimal EB in a distributed WET system. We propose two protocols with and without centralized coordination, respectively, where distributed ETs either sequentially or in parallel adapt their transmit phases based on a low-complexity energy feedback from the ER. The energy feedback only depends on the received power level at the ER, where each feedback indicates one particular transmit phase that results in the maximum harvested power over a set of previously used phases. Simulation results show that the two proposed training protocols converge very fast in practical WET systems even with a large number of distributed ETs, while the protocol with sequential ET phase adaptation is also analytically shown to converge to the optimal EB design with perfect CSI by increasing the training time. Numerical results are also provided to evaluate the performance of the proposed distributed EB and training designs as compared to other benchmark schemes.

  20. Credit Market Information Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanyan, Lakshmi; Craig, Ben R.; Thomson, James B.; Zaman, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    We examine how a combination of credit market and asset quality information can jointly be used in assessing bank franchise value. We find that expectations of future credit demand and future asset quality explain contemporaneous bank franchise value, indicative of the feedback in credit market information and its consequent impact on bank franchise value.

  1. Continuous feedback fluid queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.; van Foreest, N.D.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a fluid buffer which is modulated by a stochastic background process, while the momentary behavior of the background process depends on the current buffer level in a continuous way. Loosely speaking the feedback is such that the background process behaves `as a Markov process' with

  2. Feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Preben Olund

    2015-01-01

    undervisningsdifferentiering, feedback på læreprocesser, formativ og summativ evaluering, observationer og analyse af undervisning samt lærernes teamsamarbejde herom. Praktikken udgør et særligt læringsrum i læreruddannelsen. Samspillet mellem studerende, praktiklærere og undervisere giver den studerende en unik mulighed...

  3. Portfolio, refleksion og feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Jørgen; Qvortrup, Ane; Christensen, Inger-Marie F.

    2017-01-01

    Denne leder definerer indledningsvist begrebet portfolio og gør rede for anvendelsesmuligheder i en uddannelseskontekst. Dernæst behandles portfoliometodens kvalitet og effekt for læring og undervisning og de centrale begreber refleksion, progression og feedback præsenteres og diskuteres. Herefter...

  4. In vitro phase I metabolism of gamabufotalin and arenobufagin: Reveal the effect of substituent group on metabolic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yujie; Wang, Chao; Tian, Xiangge; Huo, Xiaokui; Feng, Lei; Sun, Chengpeng; Ge, Guangbo; Yang, Ling; Ning, Jing; Ma, Xiaochi

    2017-09-01

    Bufadienolides are a major class of bioactive compounds derived from amphibian skin secretion. Gamabufotalin (GB) and arenobufagin (AB) are among the top of the intensively investigated natural bufadienolides for their outstanding biological activities. This study aimed to characterize the phase I metabolism of GB and AB with respect to the metabolic profiles, enzymes involved, and catalytic efficacy, thereafter tried to reveal substituent effects on metabolism. Two mono-hydroxylated products of GB and AB were detected in the incubation mixtures, and they were accurately identified as 1- and 5-hydroxylated bufadienolides by NMR and HPLC-MS techniques. Reaction phenotyping studies demonstrated that CYP3A mediated the metabolism of the two bufadienolides with a high specific selectivity. Further kinetic evaluation demonstrated that the metabolism stability of GB and AB were better than other reported bufadienolides. Additionally, the CYP3A5 preference for hydroxylation of AB was observed, which was different to the selectivity of CYP3As for bufadienolides suggested by our previous report. This study can provide important data for elucidating the phase I metabolism of GB and AB and can lead to a better understanding of the bufadienolide-CYP3A interaction which is helpful for preclinical development and rational use of bufadienolides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phase I study of temozolomide in paediatric patients with advanced cancer. United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estlin, E. J.; Lashford, L.; Ablett, S.; Price, L.; Gowing, R.; Gholkar, A.; Kohler, J.; Lewis, I. J.; Morland, B.; Pinkerton, C. R.; Stevens, M. C.; Mott, M.; Stevens, R.; Newell, D. R.; Walker, D.; Dicks-Mireaux, C.; McDowell, H.; Reidenberg, P.; Statkevich, P.; Marco, A.; Batra, V.; Dugan, M.; Pearson, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    A phase I study of temozolomide administered orally once a day, on 5 consecutive days, between 500 and 1200 mg m(-2) per 28-day cycle was performed. Children were stratified according to prior craniospinal irradiation or nitrosourea therapy. Sixteen of 20 patients who had not received prior craniospinal irradiation or nitrosourea therapy were evaluable. Myelosuppression was dose limiting, with Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurring in one of six patients receiving 1000 mg m(-2) per cycle, and two of four patients treated at 1200 mg m(-2) per cycle. Therefore, the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) was 1000 mg m(-2) per cycle. The MTD was not defined for children with prior craniospinal irradiation because of poor recruitment. Plasma pharmacokinetic analyses showed temozolomide to be rapidly absorbed and eliminated, with linear increases in peak plasma concentrations and systemic exposure with increasing dose. Responses (CR and PR) were seen in two out of five patients with high-grade astrocytomas, and one patient had stable disease. One of ten patients with diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma achieved a long-term partial response, and a further two patients had stable disease. Therefore, the dose recommended for phase II studies in patients who have not received prior craniospinal irradiation or nitrosoureas is 1000 mg m(-2) per cycle. Further evaluation in diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas and other high-grade astrocytomas is warranted. Images Figure 5 p658-b Figure 6 p659-b PMID:9744506

  6. Phase and group velocity tracing analysis of projected wave packet motion along oblique radar beams – qualitative analysis of QP echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Kuo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The wave packets of atmospheric gravity waves were numerically generated, with a given characteristic wave period, horizontal wave length and projection mean wind along the horizontal wave vector. Their projection phase and group velocities along the oblique radar beam (vpr and vgr, with different zenith angle θ and azimuth angle φ, were analyzed by the method of phase- and group-velocity tracing. The results were consistent with the theoretical calculations derived by the dispersion relation, reconfirming the accuracy of the method of analysis. The RTI plot of the numerical wave packets were similar to the striation patterns of the QP echoes from the FAI irregularity region. We propose that the striation range rate of the QP echo is equal to the radial phase velocity vpr, and the slope of the energy line across the neighboring striations is equal to the radial group velocity vgr of the wave packet; the horizontal distance between two neighboring striations is equal to the characteristic wave period τ. Then, one can inversely calculate all the properties of the gravity wave responsible for the appearance of the QP echoes. We found that the possibility of some QP echoes being generated by the gravity waves originated from lower altitudes cannot be ruled out.

  7. Development of bunch by bunch transverse feedback system at Hefei light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junhua; Zheng Kai; Li Weimin; Yang Yongliang; Huang Longjun; Chen Yuanbo; Zhou Zeran; Wang Lin; Liu Zeping; Sun Baogen; Ma Li; Cao Jianshe; Yue Junhui; Liu Dekang; Ye Kairong

    2008-01-01

    This paper has introduced the development of the transverse bunch-by-bunch measurement and feedback system, including the experiment of damping the coupled bunch instability. Some key technologies on the system have been introduced: the vector calculation module as a signal processing module used to adjust the phase of the feedback signals, the feedback kicker cavity and the notch filter used to filter the DC component and revolution frequencies component in a signal and save the feedback power. The result of the feedback experiment is mentioned: the instability oscillation was damped when the feedback system was on. (authors)

  8. Beam bunch feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertson, G.

    1995-09-01

    When the electromagnetic fields that are excited by the passage of a bundle of charged particles persist to act upon bunches that follow, then the motions of the bunches are coupled. This action between bunches circulating on a closed orbit can generate growing patterns of bunch excursions. Such growth can often be suppressed by feedback systems that detect the excursion and apply corrective forces to the bunches. To be addressed herein is feedback that acts on motions of the bunch body centers. In addition to being useful for suppressing the spontaneous growth of coupled-bunch motions, such feedback can be used to damp transients in bunches injected into an accelerator or storage ring; for hadrons which lack strong radiation damping, feedback is needed to avoid emittance growth through decoherence. Motions excited by noise in magnetic fields or accelerating rf can also be reduced by using this feedback. Whether the action is on motions that are transverse to the closed orbit or longitudinal, the arrangement is the same. Bunch position is detected by a pickup and that signal is processed and directed to a kicker that may act upon the same bunch or some other portion of the collective beam pattern. Transverse motion is an oscillation with angular frequency ν perpendicular ω o where ω o is the orbital frequency 2π line-integral o. Longitudinal synchrotron oscillation occurs at frequency ω s = ν s ω o . The former is much more rapid, ν perpendicular being on the order of 10 while ν s is typically about 10 minus 1 to 10 minus 2

  9. Requirements for active resistive wall mode (RWM) feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Y; Kim, J S; Chu, M S; Jackson, G L; La Haye, R J; Strait, E J; Liu, Y Q; Marrelli, L; Okabayashi, M; Reimerdes, H

    2010-01-01

    The requirements for active resistive wall mode (RWM) feedback control have been systematically investigated and established using highly reproducible current-driven RWMs in ohmic discharges in DIII-D. The unambiguous evaluation of active RWM feedback control was not possible in previous RWM studies primarily due to the variability of the onset of the pressure-driven RWMs; the stability of the pressure-driven RWM is thought to be sensitive to various passive stabilization mechanisms. Both feedback control specifications and physics requirements for RWM stabilization have been clarified using the current-driven RWMs in ohmic discharges, when little or no passive stabilization effects are present. The use of derivative gain on top of proportional gain is found to be advantageous. An effective feedback control system should be equipped with a power supply with bandwidth greater than the RWM growth rate. It is beneficial to apply a feedback field that is toroidally phase-shifted from the measured RWM phase in the same direction as the plasma current. The efficacy of the RWM feedback control will ultimately be determined by the plasma fluctuations on internal diagnostics, as well as on external magnetics. The proximity of the feedback coils to the plasma appears to be an important factor in determining the effectiveness of the RWM feedback coils. It is desirable that an RWM feedback control system simultaneously handles error field correction at a low frequency, along with direct RWM feedback at a high frequency. There is an indication of the influence of a second least stable RWM, which had been theoretically predicted but never identified in experiments. A preliminary investigation based on active MHD spectroscopic measurement showed a strong plasma response around 400 Hz where the typical plasma response associated with the first least stable RWM was expected to be negligible. Present active feedback control requirements are based on a single mode assumption, so the

  10. Defining a roadmap for harmonizing quality indicators in Laboratory Medicine: a consensus statement on behalf of the IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Error and Patient Safety" and EFLM Task and Finish Group "Performance specifications for the extra-analytical phases".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, Laura; Panteghini, Mauro; Lippi, Giuseppe; Sumarac, Zorica; Cadamuro, Janne; Galoro, César Alex De Olivera; Pino Castro, Isabel Garcia Del; Shcolnik, Wilson; Plebani, Mario

    2017-08-28

    The improving quality of laboratory testing requires a deep understanding of the many vulnerable steps involved in the total examination process (TEP), along with the identification of a hierarchy of risks and challenges that need to be addressed. From this perspective, the Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" (WG-LEPS) of International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) is focusing its activity on implementation of an efficient tool for obtaining meaningful information on the risk of errors developing throughout the TEP, and for establishing reliable information about error frequencies and their distribution. More recently, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has created the Task and Finish Group "Performance specifications for the extra-analytical phases" (TFG-PSEP) for defining performance specifications for extra-analytical phases. Both the IFCC and EFLM groups are working to provide laboratories with a system to evaluate their performances and recognize the critical aspects where improvement actions are needed. A Consensus Conference was organized in Padova, Italy, in 2016 in order to bring together all the experts and interested parties to achieve a consensus for effective harmonization of quality indicators (QIs). A general agreement was achieved and the main outcomes have been the release of a new version of model of quality indicators (MQI), the approval of a criterion for establishing performance specifications and the definition of the type of information that should be provided within the report to the clinical laboratories participating to the QIs project.

  11. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI based neuroprostheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Ramos-Murguialday

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1 motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2 motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3 passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery and (4 active (overt movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants. Group 1 (n = 9 received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements, group 2 (n = 8 contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements and group 3 (n = 7 sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements. We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and

  12. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI) based neuroprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Schürholz, Markus; Caggiano, Vittorio; Wildgruber, Moritz; Caria, Andrea; Hammer, Eva Maria; Halder, Sebastian; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1) motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2) motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3) passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery) and (4) active (overt) movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants). Group 1 (n = 9) received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements), group 2 (n = 8) contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements) and group 3 (n = 7) sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements). We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements) improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and passive

  13. Theoretical predictions of properties and gas-phase chromatography behaviour of carbonyl complexes of group-6 elements Cr, Mo, W, and element 106, Sg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, V; Anton, J

    2013-05-07

    Fully relativistic, four-component density functional theory electronic structure calculations were performed for M(CO)6 of group-6 elements Cr, Mo, W, and element 106, Sg, with an aim to predict their adsorption behaviour in the gas-phase chromatography experiments. It was shown that seaborgium hexacarbonyl has a longer M-CO bond, smaller ionization potential, and larger polarizability than the other group-6 molecules. This is explained by the increasing relativistic expansion and destabilization of the (n - 1)d AOs with increasing Z in the group. Using results of the calculations, adsorption enthalpies of the group-6 hexacarbonyls on a quartz surface were predicted via a model of physisorption. According to the results, -ΔHads should decrease from Mo to W, while it should be almost equal--within the experimental error bars--for W and Sg. Thus, we expect that in the future gas-phase chromatography experiments it will be almost impossible--what concerns ΔHads--to distinguish between the W and Sg hexacarbonyls by their deposition on quartz.

  14. The effects of individualized actigraph feedback on fatigue management in railroad engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A total of twenty-one participants completed the three-month study designed to assess the functionality of improving individual sleep habits with Actigraph Performance Feedback. There were eleven participants in the feedback group and ten participant...

  15. "I Really Need Feedback to Learn:" Students' Perspectives on the Effectiveness of the Differential Feedback Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnevich, Anastasiya A.; Smith, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined students' perceptions of the effects of different forms of instructional feedback on their performance, motivation, and emotion. Forty-nine students attending an eastern US university participated in focus group discussions. The groups explored students' reactions to grades, praise, and computer versus instructor…

  16. Phase II trial of cisplatin in advanced or recurrent cancer of the vagina: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, J T; Blessing, J A; Homesley, H D; Berek, J S; Creasman, W T

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with advanced or recurrent cancer of the vagina no longer amenable to control with surgery and/or radiotherapy were entered into a phase II study of cisplatin 50 mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks. Two were deemed ineligible because of a primary site of origin other than vagina. Two were deemed inevaluable, one because of the lack of measurable disease and the other because she never received drug. The remaining 22 included a variety of histologies (16 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 adenosquamous carcinomas, 1 clear cell carcinoma, 1 leiomyosarcoma, and 2 carcinomas not otherwise specified). One complete responder was observed among the 16 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Adverse effects were tolerable and were essentially those reported in other series. These results suggest that cisplatin has insignificant activity in advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina at least at the dose and schedule tested. No comment can be made regarding the activity of cisplatin in other histologies.

  17. Spin- and valley-dependent electrical conductivity of ferromagnetic group-IV 2D sheets in the topological insulator phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Bui Dinh; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen; Mirabbaszadeh, Kavoos; Habibiyan, Hamidreza

    2018-03-01

    In this work, based on the Kubo-Greenwood formalism and the k . p Hamiltonian model, the impact of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on electronic band structure and electrical conductivity of spin-up and spin-down subbands in counterparts of graphene, including silicene, stanene, and germanene nanosheets has been studied. When Rashba coupling is considered, the effective mass of Dirac fermions decreases significantly and no significant change is caused by this coupling for the subband gaps. All these nanosheets are found to be in topological insulator quantum phase at low staggered on-site potentials due to the applied perpendicular external electric field. We point out that the electrical conductivity of germanene increases gradually with Rashab coupling, while silicene and stanene have some fluctuations due to their smaller Fermi velocity. Furthermore, some critical temperatures with the same electrical conductivity values for jumping to the higher energy levels are observed at various Rashba coupling strengths. For all structures, a broad peak appears at low temperatures in electrical conductivity curves corresponding to the large entropy of systems when the thermal energy reaches to the difference between the energy states. Finally, we have reported that silicene has the larger has the larger electrical conductivity than two others.

  18. Use of Videotape Feedback with Severely Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jane; Blitstein, Sheldon

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the design and effects of a group therapy project using videotape feedback with seriously disturbed adolescents. Offers anecdotal evidence that the feedback facilitated the correction of the participants' distorted body images, low self-esteem, lack of capacity for self-observation, and poor peer relationships. (SS)

  19. Effects of feedback on residential electricity demand—Findings from a field trial in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, Joachim; Klobasa, Marian; Gölz, Sebastian; Brunner, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of providing feedback on electricity consumption in a field trial involving more than 1500 households in Linz, Austria. About half of these households received feedback together with information about electricity-saving measures (pilot group), while the remaining households served as a control group. Participation in the pilot group was random, but households were able to choose between two types of feedback: access to a web portal or written feedback by post. Results from cross section OLS regression suggest that feedback provided to the pilot group corresponds with electricity savings of around 4.5% for the average household. Our results from quantile regressions imply that for households in the 30th to the 70th percentile of electricity consumption, feedback on electricity consumption is statistically significant and effects are highest in absolute terms and as a share of electricity consumption. For percentiles below or above this range, feedback appears to have no effect. Finally, controlling for a potential endogeneity bias induced by non random participation in the feedback type groups, we find no difference in the effects of feedback provided via the web portal and by post. - Highlights: • We estimate the effects of feedback on household electricity use in a field trial in Linz, Austria. • Providing feedback on electricity use corresponds with average savings of around 4.5%. • Effects of feedback are most pronounced in the 30th to the 70th percentile. • Feedback provided via a web portal and by post appears equally effective

  20. Physician Perceptions of Performance Feedback in a Quality Improvement Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Aimee R; Hansen, Elizabeth; Hagen, Michael D; Peterson, Lars E

    2017-10-01

    Physician performance and peer comparison feedback can affect physician care quality and patient outcomes. This study aimed to understand family physician perspectives of the value of performance feedback in quality improvement (QI) activities. This study analyzed American Board of Family Medicine open-ended survey data collected between 2004 and 2014 from physicians who completed a QI module that provided pre- and post-QI project individual performance data and peer comparisons. Physicians made 3480 comments in response to a question about this performance feedback, which were generally positive in nature (86%). Main themes that emerged were importance of accurate feedback data, enhanced detail in the content of feedback, and ability to customize peer comparison groups to compare performance to peers with similar patient populations or practice characteristics. Meaningful and tailored performance feedback may be an important tool for physicians to improve their care quality and should be considered an integral part of QI project design.

  1. Cloud CCN feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Cloud microphysics affects cloud albedo precipitation efficiency and the extent of cloud feedback in response to global warming. Compared to other cloud parameters, microphysics is unique in its large range of variability and the fact that much of the variability is anthropogenic. Probably the most important determinant of cloud microphysics is the spectra of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which display considerable variability and have a large anthropogenic component. When analyzed in combination three field observation projects display the interrelationship between CCN and cloud microphysics. CCN were measured with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) instantaneous CCN spectrometer. Cloud microphysical measurements were obtained with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Lockheed Electra. Since CCN and cloud microphysics each affect the other a positive feedback mechanism can result

  2. Classroom observation and feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana GOREA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Classroom observation is a didactic activity from which both the observer and the observed teacher are to win. The present article comments on and discusses the aims of observation, the stages of observation, the methodological recommendations of offering feedback and the need to introduce a system of classroom observation at institutional or even national level, which would contribute to improving the teaching/learning process.

  3. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  4. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  5. Feedback, Incentives and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback about relative performan...... behind, and frontrunners do not slack off....

  6. Bunch by bunch feedback systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiyama, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Outlines of bunch-by-bunch feedback systems for suppressing multibunch instabilities in electron/positron storage rings are presented. The design principles and functions of the feedback components are reviewed. Recent topics of applying very fast and dense FPGA as feedback signal processor are also shown. (author)

  7. Det ved vi om Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Vibeke; Bærenholdt, Jørgen

    Præsentation af forskningsviden om feedback i forskellige personkonstellationer i undervisningen: Feedback fra lærer til elev, fra elever til lærer, fra elev til elev og elevens eget arbejde med feedback til sig selv. De præsenterede forskningsresultater er udvalgt dels inden for en kognitivistisk...

  8. A Journey towards Sustainable Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Allyson; Young, Charlotte; Davey, Tamzyn; Fitzgerald, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Meeting students' expectations associated with the provision of feedback is a perennial challenge for tertiary education. Efforts to provide comprehensive, timely feedback within our own first year undergraduate public health courses have not always met students' expectations. In response, we sought to develop peer feedback activities to support…

  9. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Hidefumi, E-mail: mimura@marianna-u.ac.jp [St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki, E-mail: arai-y3111@mvh.biglobe.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com; Takeuchi, Yoshito, E-mail: yotake62@qg8.so-net.ne.jp [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Miki, Tsuneharu, E-mail: tmiki@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Urology (Japan); Gobara, Hideo, E-mail: gobara@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sakuhara, Yusuke, E-mail: yusaku@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamamoto, Takanobu, E-mail: tyamamot@tcc.pref.tochigi.lg.jp [Tochigi Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sato, Yozo, E-mail: ysato@aichi-cc.jp [Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu, E-mail: susumu@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  10. Phase I/II Study of Radiofrequency Ablation for Malignant Renal Tumors: Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group 0701

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Hidefumi; Arai, Yasuaki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Sone, Miyuki; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Miki, Tsuneharu; Gobara, Hideo; Sakuhara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Sato, Yozo; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThis multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for small malignant renal tumors.MethodsThirty-three patients were enrolled in the study. A single session of RFA was performed in patients with a renal tumor of 1–3 cm in greatest diameter, with the exception of lesions adjacent to the renal hilum. The primary endpoint was the safety of renal RFA, and the secondary endpoints were its feasibility and initial efficacy for local control, as well as the incidence and grade of adverse events. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by CT scans within 1 week and at a further 4 weeks after the procedure using the criteria adapted from the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.ResultsThe RFA procedure was completed in 100 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 89–100 %) of all 33 patients. There were no severe adverse events (0 % [95 % CI 0–11 %]). Among the 33 patients, a complete response, partial response, progressive disease, and stable disease were seen in 28 (85 %), 0 (0 %), one (3 %), and one (3 %) patient(s), respectively, with a tumor response rate of 85 % [95 % CI 68–95 %]). Three patients (9 %), including one ineligible patient (3 %), were not evaluable. Out of 30 evaluable patients, a complete response was achieved in 28 (93 %).ConclusionThe current multicenter trial revealed that RFA is a safe, feasible, and effective treatment for small malignant renal tumors in patients who are not candidates for surgery.

  11. Solid-phase extraction of the alcohol abuse biomarker phosphatidylethanol using newly synthesized polymeric sorbent materials containing quaternary heterocyclic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Mariana; Jagadeesan, Kishore Kumar; Billing, Johan; Yilmaz, Ecevit; Laurell, Thomas; Ekström, Simon

    2017-10-13

    Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) is an interesting biomarker finding increased use for detecting long term alcohol abuse with high specificity and sensitivity. Prior to detection, sample preparation is an unavoidable step in the work-flow of PEth analysis and new protocols may facilitate it. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) is a versatile sample preparation method widely spread in biomedical laboratories due to its simplicity of use and the possibility of automation. In this work, SPE was used for the first time to directly extract PEth from spiked human plasma and spiked human blood. A library of polymeric SPE materials with different surface functionalities was screened for PEth extraction in order to identify the surface characteristics that control PEth retention and recovery. The plasma samples were diluted 1:10 (v/v) in water and spiked at different concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 5μM. The library of SPE materials was then evaluated using the proposed SPE method and detection was done by LC-MS/MS. One SPE material efficiently retained and recovered PEth from spiked human plasma. With this insight, four new SPE materials were formulated and synthesized based on the surface characteristics of the best SPE material found in the first screening. These new materials were tested with spiked human blood, to better mimic a real clinical sample. All the newly synthetized materials outperformed the pre-existing commercially available materials. Recovery values for the new SPE materials were found between 29.5% and 48.6% for the extraction of PEth in spiked blood. A material based on quaternized 1-vinylimidazole with a poly(trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) backbone was found suitable for PEth extraction in spiked blood showing the highest analyte recovery in this experiment, 48.6%±6.4%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pre-Feedback Risk Expectancies and Reception of Low-Risk Health Feedback: Absolute and Comparative Lack of Reassurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamp, Martina; Renner, Britta

    2016-11-01

    Personalised health-risk assessment is one of the most common components of health promotion programs. Previous research on responses to health risk feedback has commonly focused on the reception of bad news (high-risk feedback). The reception of low-risk feedback has been comparably neglected since it is assumed that good news is reassuring and readily received. However, field studies suggest mixed responses to low-risk health feedback. Accordingly, we examine whether pre-feedback risk expectancies can mitigate the reassuring effects of good news. In two studies (N = 187, N = 565), after assessing pre-feedback risk expectancies, participants received low-risk personalised feedback about their own risk of developing (the fictitious) Tucson Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (TCFS). Study 2 also included peer TCFS risk status feedback. Afterwards, self- and peer-related risk perception for TCFS was assessed. In both studies, participants who expected to be at high risk but received good news (unexpected low-risk feedback) showed absolute lack of reassurance. Specifically, they felt at significantly greater TCFS risk than participants who received expected good news. Moreover, the unexpected low-risk group even believed that their risk was as high as (Study 1) or higher (Study 2) than that of their peers (comparative lack of reassurance). Results support the notion that high pre-feedback risk expectancies can mitigate absolute and comparative reassuring effects of good news. © 2016 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  13. Gibbs free energy of transfer of a methylene group on {UCON + (sodium or potassium) phosphate salts} aqueous two-phase systems: Hydrophobicity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverio, Sara C.; Rodriguez, Oscar; Teixeira, Jose A.; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2010-01-01

    The Gibbs free energy of transfer of a suitable hydrophobic probe can be regarded as a measure of the relative hydrophobicity of the different phases. The methylene group (CH 2 ) can be considered hydrophobic, and thus be a suitable probe for hydrophobicity. In this work, the partition coefficients of a series of five dinitrophenylated-amino acids were experimentally determined, at 23 o C, in three different tie-lines of the biphasic systems: (UCON + K 2 HPO 4 ), (UCON + potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7), (UCON + KH 2 PO 4 ), (UCON + Na 2 HPO 4 ), (UCON + sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7), and (UCON + NaH 2 PO 4 ). The Gibbs free energy of transfer of CH 2 units were calculated from the partition coefficients and used to compare the relative hydrophobicity of the equilibrium phases. The largest relative hydrophobicity was found for the ATPS formed by dihydrogen phosphate salts.

  14. High-order-harmonic generation from solids: The contributions of the Bloch wave packets moving at the group and phase velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tao-Yuan; Huang, Xiao-Huan; Bian, Xue-Bin

    2018-01-01

    We study numerically the Bloch electron wave-packet dynamics in periodic potentials to simulate laser-solid interactions. We introduce an alternative perspective in the coordinate space combined with the motion of the Bloch electron wave packets moving at group and phase velocities under the laser fields. This model interprets the origins of the two contributions (intra- and interband transitions) in the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) processes by investigating the local and global behaviours of the wave packets. It also elucidates the underlying physical picture of the HHG intensity enhancement by means of carrier-envelope phase, chirp, and inhomogeneous fields. It provides a deep insight into the emission of high-order harmonics from solids. This model is instructive for experimental measurements and provides an alternative avenue to distinguish mechanisms of the HHG from solids in different laser fields.

  15. [Preventing cardiovascular diseases through a screening modelling applicable to wide population groups: results from the first phase of the project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Antonio; Cinquetti, Sandro; Moro, Alessandro; Siddu, Andrea; Trimarchi, Antonino; Penon, Maria Gabriella; Pavan, Pierpaolo; Camillotto, Raffaella; Rossetto, Luca; Volpe, Valter; Zevrain, Simone; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    evaluate, through active call, lifestyles of an asymptomatic population in order to identify hyperglycaemic subjects and/or high-blood pressure sufferers to dispatch to their GP to perform suitable checking, and subjects to invite to a cardiovascular disease prevention programme because of their lifestyles. between January 2009 and July 2012, all healthy residents in the Local Health Authority of Este (ULSS 17 Este) aged 45-59 years were invited to join a cardiovascular disease prevention programme. all participants were evaluated through an administered lifestyle questionnaire. Parameters such as blood pressure (BP), glycaemia, waist circumference and body mass index were collected and recorded. Participants also received counseling, informational materials on lifestyle and were invited to individual or group health promotion initiatives in relation to personal risk factors. among the invited, 55.5% (3,922/7,071) adhered. Women (58.8%) responded significantly better than men (51.9%) (p diseases.

  16. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde; Winkel, Per; Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg; Ringsted, Charlotte; Gluud, Christian; Grantcharov, Teodor; Ottesen, Bent; Sorensen, Jette Led

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the impact of instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback when training a complex operational task on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. : Simulators are now widely accepted as a training tool, but there is insufficient knowledge about how much feedback is necessary, which is useful for sustainable implementation. A randomized trial complying with CONSORT Statement. All participants had to reach a predefined proficiency level for a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator. The intervention group received standardized instructor feedback a maximum of 3 times. The control group did not receive instructor feedback. Participants were senior medical students without prior laparoscopic experience (n = 99). Outcome measures were time, repetitions, and performance score to reach a predefined proficiency level. Furthermore, influence of sex and perception of own surgical skills were examined. Time (in minutes) and repetitions were reduced in the intervention group (162 vs 342 minutes; P less time (in minutes) than women (P = 0.037), but no sex difference was observed for repetitions (P = 0.20). Participants in the intervention group had higher self-perception regarding surgical skills after the trial (P = 0.011). Instructor feedback increases the efficiency when training a complex operational task on a virtual reality simulator; time and repetitions used to achieve a predefined proficiency level were significantly reduced in the group that received instructor feedback compared with the control group. NCT01497782.

  17. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  18. Combination of electromembrane extraction and liquid-phase microextraction in a single step: Simultaneous group separation of acidic and basic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chuixiu; Seip, Knut Fredrik; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    at high concentration. This approach was further investigated from human plasma. Extraction recoveries were strongly dependent on dilution of plasma with buffer and on extraction time. Finally, this simultaneous EME/LPME approach was evaluated in combination with liquid chromatography (LC......Electromembrane extraction (EME) and liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) were combined in a single step for the first time to realize simultaneous and clear group separation of basic and acidic drugs. Using 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether as the supported liquid membrane (SLM) for EME and dihexyl ether...

  19. Modeling and simulation of Indus-2 RF feedback control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, D.; Bagduwal, P.S.; Tiwari, N.; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source has four RF stations along with their feedback control systems. For higher beam energy and current operation amplitude and phase feedback control systems of Indus-2 are being upgraded. To understand the behaviour of amplitude and phase control loop under different operating conditions, modelling and simulation of RF feedback control system is done. RF cavity baseband I/Q model has been created due to its close correspondence with actual implementation and better computational efficiency which makes the simulation faster. Correspondence between cavity baseband and RF model is confirmed by comparing their simulation results. Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback control system simulation is done using the same cavity baseband I/Q model. Error signals are intentionally generated and response of the closed loop system is observed. Simulation will help us in optimizing parameters of upgraded LLRF system for higher beam energy and current operation. (author)

  20. Feedback på arbejdspladser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Feedback på arbejdspladser er vigtig. Men feedback er også et populært begreb mange taler med om uden dog at vide sig helt sikker på hvad det er. Formålet med denne bog er at bidrage til en bedre forståelse af hvad feedback er, hvordan det fungerer og dermed hvordan arbejdspladser bedst muligt bør...... understøtte feedback. Med udgangspunkt i forskningen identificeres centrale udfordringer ved feedback, bl.a. hvorfor det kan være svært at give præcis feedback, hvordan forholdet mellem lederen og den ansatte påvirker den feedback der gives, og hvad der kendetegner en feedback kultur. Bogen er skrevet til...... undervisere og studerende på videregående uddannelser samt praktikere der ønsker en systematisk og forskningsbaseret forståelse af feedback på arbejdspladser. Bogen er således ikke en kogebog til bedre feedback, men en analyse og diskussion af hvad forskningen ved om feedback, og bidrager med inspiration og...

  1. The evolution of different forms of sociality: behavioral mechanisms and eco-evolutionary feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J van der Post

    Full Text Available Different forms of sociality have evolved via unique evolutionary trajectories. However, it remains unknown to what extent trajectories of social evolution depend on the specific characteristics of different species. Our approach to studying such trajectories is to use evolutionary case-studies, so that we can investigate how grouping co-evolves with a multitude of individual characteristics. Here we focus on anti-predator vigilance and foraging. We use an individual-based model, where behavioral mechanisms are specified, and costs and benefits are not predefined. We show that evolutionary changes in grouping alter selection pressures on vigilance, and vice versa. This eco-evolutionary feedback generates an evolutionary progression from "leader-follower" societies to "fission-fusion" societies, where cooperative vigilance in groups is maintained via a balance between within- and between-group selection. Group-level selection is generated from an assortment that arises spontaneously when vigilant and non-vigilant foragers have different grouping tendencies. The evolutionary maintenance of small groups, and cooperative vigilance in those groups, is therefore achieved simultaneously. The evolutionary phases, and the transitions between them, depend strongly on behavioral mechanisms. Thus, integrating behavioral mechanisms and eco-evolutionary feedback is critical for understanding what kinds of intermediate stages are involved during the evolution of particular forms of sociality.

  2. Visual feedback alters force control and functional activity in the visuomotor network after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek B. Archer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulating visual feedback may be a viable option to improve motor function after stroke, but the neurophysiological basis for this improvement is not clear. Visual gain can be manipulated by increasing or decreasing the spatial amplitude of an error signal. Here, we combined a unilateral visually guided grip force task with functional MRI to understand how changes in the gain of visual feedback alter brain activity in the chronic phase after stroke. Analyses focused on brain activation when force was produced by the most impaired hand of the stroke group as compared to the non-dominant hand of the control group. Our experiment produced three novel results. First, gain-related improvements in force control were associated with an increase in activity in many regions within the visuomotor network in both the stroke and control groups. These regions include the extrastriate visual cortex, inferior parietal lobule, ventral premotor cortex, cerebellum, and supplementary motor area. Second, the stroke group showed gain-related increases in activity in additional regions of lobules VI and VIIb of the ipsilateral cerebellum. Third, relative to the control group, the stroke group showed increased activity in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex, and activity in this region did not vary as a function of visual feedback gain. The visuomotor network, cerebellum, and ipsilateral primary motor cortex have each been targeted in rehabilitation interventions after stroke. Our observations provide new insight into the role these regions play in processing visual gain during a precisely controlled visuomotor task in the chronic phase after stroke.

  3. Effects of optical feedback in a birefringence-Zeeman dual frequency laser at high optical feedback levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Wei; Zhang Shulian

    2007-01-01

    Optical feedback effects are studied in a birefringence-Zeeman dual frequency laser at high optical feedback levels. The intensity modulation features of the two orthogonally polarized lights are investigated in both isotropic optical feedback (IOF) and polarized optical feedback (POF). In IOF, the intensities of both beams are modulated simultaneously, and four zones, i.e., the e-light zone, the o-light and e-light zone, the o-light zone, and the no-light zone, are formed in a period corresponding to a half laser wavelength displacement of the feedback mirror. In POF, the two orthogonally polarized lights will oscillate alternately. Strong mode competition can be observed, and it affects the phase difference between the two beams greatly. The theoretical analysis is presented, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The potential use of the experimental results is also discussed

  4. Photoionization-induced water migration in the amide group of trans-acetanilide-(H2O)1 in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Kenji; Harada, Satoshi; Shimazaki, Yuiga; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2011-02-10

    IR-dip spectra of trans-acetanilide-water 1:1 cluster, AA-(H(2)O)(1), have been measured for the S(0) and D(0) state in the gas phase. Two structural isomers, where a water molecule binds to the NH group or the CO group of AA, AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1) and AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1), are identified in the S(0) state. One-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization, (1 + 1) RE2PI, of AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1) via the S(1)-S(0) origin generates [AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1)](+) in the D(0) state, however, photoionization of [AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1)] does not produce [AA(CO)-(H(2)O)(1)](+), leading to [AA(NH)-(H(2)O)(1)](+). This observation explicitly indicates that the water molecule in [AA-(H(2)O)(1)](+) migrates from the CO group to the NH group in the D(0) state. The reorganization of the charge distribution from the neutral to the D(0) state of AA induces the repulsive force between the water molecule and the CO group of AA(+), which is the trigger of the water migration in [AA-(H(2)O)(1)](+).

  5. Amount of kinematic feedback affects learning of speech motor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Smith, Heather D; Paramatmuni, Divija; McCabe, Patricia; Theodoros, Deborah G; Murdoch, Bruce E

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of Performance (KP) feedback, such as biofeedback or kinematic feedback, is used to provide information on the nature and quality of movement responses for the purpose of guiding active learning or rehabilitation of motor skills. It has been proposed that KP feedback may interfere with long-term learning when provided throughout training. Here, twelve healthy English-speaking adults were trained to produce a trilled Russian [r] in words with KP kinematic feedback using electropalatography (EPG) and without KP (noKP). Five one-hour training sessions were provided over one week with testing pretraining and one day and one week posttraining. No group differences were found at pretraining or one day post training for production accuracy. A group by time interaction supported the hypothesis that providing kinematic feedback continually during skill acquisition interferes with retention.

  6. Positive Feedback From Male Authority Figures Boosts Women's Math Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lora E; Kondrak, Cheryl L; Ward, Deborah E; Streamer, Lindsey

    2018-03-01

    People often search for cues in the environment to determine whether or not they will be judged or treated negatively based on their social identities. Accordingly, feedback from gatekeepers-members of majority groups who hold authority and power in a field-may be an especially important cue for those at risk of experiencing social identity threat, such as women in math settings. Across a series of studies, women who received positive ("Good job!") versus objective (score only) feedback from a male (vs. female) authority figure in math reported greater confidence; belonging; self-efficacy; more favorable Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) attitudes/identification/interest; and greater implicit identification with math. Men were affected only by the type of math feedback they received, not by the source of feedback. A meta-analysis across studies confirmed results. Together, these findings suggest that positive feedback from gatekeepers is an important situational cue that can improve the outcomes of negatively stereotyped groups.

  7. Black hole feedback on the first galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Myoungwon; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Greif, Thomas H.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljević, Miloš; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-09-01

    We study how the first galaxies were assembled under feedback from the accretion onto a central black hole (BH) that is left behind by the first generation of metal-free stars through selfconsistent, cosmological simulations. X-ray radiation fromthe accretion of gas onto BH remnants of Population III (Pop III) stars, or from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), again involving Pop III stars, influences the mode of second generation star formation. We track the evolution of the black hole accretion rate and the associated X-ray feedback startingwith the death of the Pop III progenitor star inside a minihalo and following the subsequent evolution of the black hole as the minihalo grows to become an atomically cooling galaxy. We find that X-ray photoionization heating from a stellar-mass BH is able to quench further star formation in the host halo at all times before the halo enters the atomic cooling phase. X-ray radiation from a HMXB, assuming a luminosity close to the Eddington value, exerts an even stronger, and more diverse, feedback on star formation. It photoheats the gas inside the host halo, but also promotes the formation of molecular hydrogen and cooling of gas in the intergalactic medium and in nearby minihalos, leading to a net increase in the number of stars formed at early times. Our simulations further show that the radiative feedback from the first BHs may strongly suppress early BH growth, thus constraining models for the formation of supermassive BHs.

  8. Driver feedback mobile APP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriguera Marti, F.; Miralles Miquel, E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper faces the human factor in driving and its consequences for road safety. It presents the concepts behind the development of a smartphone app capable of evaluating drivers’ performance. The app provides feedback to the driver in terms of a grade (between 0 and 10) depending on the aggressiveness and risks taken while driving. These are computed from the cumulative probability distribution function of the jerks (i.e. the time derivative of acceleration), which are measured using the smartphones’ accelerometer. Different driving contexts (e.g. urban, freeway, congestion, etc.) are identified applying cluster analysis to the measurements, and treated independently. Using regression analysis, the aggressiveness indicator is related to the drivers' safety records and to the probability of having an accident, through the standard DBQ - Driving Behavior Questionnaire. Results from a very limited pilot test show a strong correlation between the 99th percentile of the jerk measurements and the DBQ results. A linear model is fitted. This allows quantifying the safe driving behavior only from smartphone measurements. Finally, this indicator is translated into a normalized grade and feedback to the driver. This feedback will challenge the driver to train and to improve his performance. The phone will be blocked while driving and will incorporate mechanisms to prevent bad practices, like competition in aggressive driving. The app is intended to contribute to the improvement of road safety, one of the major public health problems, by tackling the human factor which is the trigger of the vast majority of traffic accidents. Making explicit and quantifying risky behaviors is the first step towards a safer driving. (Author)

  9. The Endogenous Feedback Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustenborg, Claudia Carrara

    2010-01-01

    proposals, it will first be considered the extents of their reciprocal compatibility, tentatively shaping an integrated, theoretical profile of consciousness. A new theory, the Endogenous Feedback Network (EFN) will consequently be introduced which, beside being able to accommodate the main tenets...... of the reviewed theories, appears able to compensate for the explanatory gaps they leave behind. The EFN proposes consciousness as the phenomenon emerging from a distinct network of neural paths broadcasting the neural changes associated to any mental process. It additionally argues for the need to include a 5th...

  10. Beyond individualism: professional culture and its influence on feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher; Driessen, Erik; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Vanstone, Meredith; Lingard, Lorelei

    2013-06-01

    Although feedback is widely considered essential to learning, its actual influence on learners is variable. Research on responsivity to feedback has tended to focus on individual rather than social or cultural influences on learning. In this study, we explored how feedback is handled within different professional cultures, and how the characteristics and values of a profession shape learners' responses to feedback. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we conducted 12 focus groups and nine individual interviews (with a total of 50 participants) across three cultures of professional training in, respectively, music, teacher training and medicine. Constant comparative analysis for recurring themes was conducted iteratively. Each of the three professional cultures created a distinct context for learning that influenced how feedback was handled. Despite these contextual differences, credibility and constructiveness emerged as critical constants, identified by learners across cultures as essential for feedback to be perceived as meaningful. However, the definitions of credibility and constructiveness were distinct to each professional culture and the cultures varied considerably in how effectively they supported the occurrence of feedback with these critical characteristics. Professions define credibility and constructiveness in culturally specific ways and create contexts for learning that may either facilitate or constrain the provision of meaningful feedback. Comparison with other professional cultures may offer strategies for creating a productive feedback culture within medical education. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Identification of ortho-Substituted Benzoic Acid/Ester Derivatives via the Gas-Phase Neighboring Group Participation Effect in (+)-ESI High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blincoe, William D; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Saurí, Josep; Pierson, Nicholas A; Joyce, Leo A; Mangion, Ian; Sheng, Huaming

    2018-04-01

    Benzoic acid/ester/amide derivatives are common moieties in pharmaceutical compounds and present a challenge in positional isomer identification by traditional tandem mass spectrometric analysis. A method is presented for exploiting the gas-phase neighboring group participation (NGP) effect to differentiate ortho-substituted benzoic acid/ester derivatives with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS 1 ). Significant water/alcohol loss (>30% abundance in MS 1 spectra) was observed for ortho-substituted nucleophilic groups; these fragment peaks are not observable for the corresponding para and meta-substituted analogs. Experiments were also extended to the analysis of two intermediates in the synthesis of suvorexant (Belsomra) with additional analysis conducted with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), density functional theory (DFT), and ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) studies. Significant water/alcohol loss was also observed for 1-substituted 1, 2, 3-triazoles but not for the isomeric 2-substituted 1, 2, 3-triazole analogs. IMS-MS, NMR, and DFT studies were conducted to show that the preferred orientation of the 2-substituted triazole rotamer was away from the electrophilic center of the reaction, whereas the 1-subtituted triazole was oriented in close proximity to the center. Abundance of NGP product was determined to be a product of three factors: (1) proton affinity of the nucleophilic group; (2) steric impact of the nucleophile; and (3) proximity of the nucleophile to carboxylic acid/ester functional groups. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Local orbit feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Critically aligned experiments are sensitive to small changes in the electron beam orbit. At the NSLS storage rings, the electron beam and photon beam motions have been monitored over the past several years. In the survey conducted in 1986 by the NSLS Users Executive Committee, experimenters requested the vertical beam position variation and the vertical angle variation, within a given fill, remain within 10 μm and 10 μr, respectively. This requires improvement in the beam stability by about one order of magnitude. At the NSLS and SSRL storage rings, the beam that is originally centered on the position monitor by a dc orbit correction is observed to have two kinds of motion: a dc drift over a storage period of several hours and a beam bounce about its nominal position. These motions are a result of the equilibrium orbit not being held perfectly stable due to time-varying errors introduced into the magnetic guide field by power supplies, mechanical vibration of the magnets, cooling water temperature variations, etc. The approach to orbit stabilization includes (1) identifying and suppressing as many noise sources on the machine as possible, (2) correcting the beam position globally (see Section 6) by controlling a number of correctors around the circumference of the machine, and (3) correcting the beam position and angle at a given source location by position feedback using local detectors and local orbit bumps. The third approach, called Local Orbit Feedback will be discussed in this section

  13. Phospholipids chiral at phosphorus. Dramatic effects of phosphorus chirality on the deuterium NMR properties of the choline head group of phospholipids in the liquid crystalline phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loffredo, W.M.; Jiang, Rutai; Tsai, Mingdaw

    1990-01-01

    To probe the motional and conformational propertis of the choline head group of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-thiophosphocholine (DPPsC), the R p , S p , and R p + S p isomers of [α-D 2 ]DPPsC, [β-D 2 ]DPPsC, and [δ-D 9 ]DPPsC in the subgel, gel, and liquid crystalline phases were investigated with deuterium NMR, and the results were compared with those of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) labeled at the same positions. In the subgel phase (5 degree C) all isomers of [α-D 2 ]DPPsC and [β-D 2 ]DPPsC displayed amorphous line shapes characteristic of a restricted and disordered motional environment, whereas [δ-D 9 ]DPPsC showed narrower and symmetric line shapes indicating substantial motions. For all three labeled positions the apparent line width of the R p isomer is larger than those of S p and R p + S p isomers, and the amorphous line shape of the R p isomer also persists at 25 and 35 degree C. These results indicate that the motional and conformational properties of the C α -C β segment of DPPsC is very sensitive to the configuration at phosphorus. Structurally, this provides strong support for noncovalent interactions between the quaternary ammonium group of choline and the phosphate group of a neighboring molecule in the bilayers of phosphatidylcholine and suggests that such interactions are important to the motion of the choline chain

  14. GIVING AND RECEIVING CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ірина Олійник

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article scrutinizes the notion of feedback applicable in classrooms where team teaching is provided. The experience of giving and receiving feedback has been a good practice in cooperation between a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer and a Ukrainian counterpart. Giving and receiving feedback is an effective means of classroom observation that provides better insight into the process of teaching a foreign language. The article discusses the stages of feedback and explicates the notion of sharing experience between two teachers working simultaneously in the same classroom. The guidelines for giving and receiving feedback have been provided as well as the most commonly used vocabulary items have been listed. It has been proved that mutual feedback leads to improving teaching methods and using various teaching styles and techniques.

  15. Emotional feedback for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Seebode, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the functional adequacy as well as the affective impression made by feedback messages on mobile devices. It presents an easily adoptable experimental setup to examine context effects on various feedback messages, and applies it to auditory, tactile and auditory-tactile feedback messages. This approach provides insights into the relationship between the affective impression and functional applicability of these messages as well as an understanding of the influence of unimodal components on the perception of multimodal feedback messages. The developed paradigm can also be extended to investigate other aspects of context and used to investigate feedback messages in modalities other than those presented. The book uses questionnaires implemented on a Smartphone, which can easily be adopted for field studies to broaden the scope even wider. Finally, the book offers guidelines for the design of system feedback.

  16. Hvad siger forskningen om feedback?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Feedback skal serveres ligesom en gammeldags sandwich. Først lidt brød, så det lidt sejere kød og til sidst igen til lidt brød”. Sådan nogenlunde lyder en pragmatisk løsning på udfordringerne ved at give feedback. Når medarbejdere skal have negativ feedback, skal denne altså pakkes ind, så...... feedbacken indledes med let fordøjeligt positiv feedback, derefter kommer den negative – og noget sværere fordøjelige – feedback, og til sidst afrundes feedbacken med en god udgangsreplik, nemlig den positive feedback....

  17. Does an Observer's Content Knowledge Influence the Feedback Offered about Mathematics Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Duane C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, feedback from 3 different groups of observers: math content specialists, content specialists in areas other than mathematics, and building principals, was analyzed using an inductive approach to identify themes within the feedback. Second, differences in the feedback offered by participants of the 3…

  18. PLS beam position measurement and feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.Y.; Lee, J.; Park, M.K.; Kim, J.H.; Won, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    A real-time orbit correction system is proposed for the stabilization of beam orbit and photon beam positions in Pohang Light Source. PLS beam position monitoring system is designed to be VMEbus compatible to fit the real-time digital orbit feedback system. A VMEbus based subsystem control computer, Mil-1553B communication network and 12 BPM/PS machine interface units constitute digital part of the feedback system. With the super-stable PLS correction magnet power supply, power line frequency noise is almost filtered out and the dominant spectra of beam obtit fluctuations are expected to appear below 15 Hz. Using DSP board in SCC for the computation and using an appropriate compensation circuit for the phase delay by the vacuum chamber, PLS real-time orbit correction system is realizable without changing the basic structure of PLS computer control system. (author)

  19. A web-based feedback study on optimization-based training and analysis of human decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Engelhart

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The question “How can humans learn efficiently to make decisions in a complex, dynamic, and uncertain environment” is still a very open question. We investigate what effects arise when feedback is given in a computer-simulated microworld that is controlled by participants. This has a direct impact on training simulators that are already in standard use in many professions, e.g., for flight simulators for pilots, and a potential impact on a better understanding of human decision making in general. Our study is based on a benchmark microworld with an economic framing, the IWR Tailorshop. N=94 participants played four rounds of the microworld, each 10 months, via a web interface. We propose a new approach to quantify performance and learning, which is based on a mathematical model of the microworld and optimization. Six participant groups receive different kinds of feedback in a training phase, then results in a performance phase without feedback are analyzed. As a main result, feedback of optimal solutions in training rounds improved model knowledge, early learning, and performance, especially when this information is encoded in a graphical representation (arrows.

  20. Dynamics of nonlinear feedback control

    OpenAIRE

    Snippe, H.P.; Hateren, J.H. van

    2007-01-01

    Feedback control in neural systems is ubiquitous. Here we study the mathematics of nonlinear feedback control. We compare models in which the input is multiplied by a dynamic gain (multiplicative control) with models in which the input is divided by a dynamic attenuation (divisive control). The gain signal (resp. the attenuation signal) is obtained through a concatenation of an instantaneous nonlinearity and a linear low-pass filter operating on the output of the feedback loop. For input step...

  1. Multi-bunch Feedback Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lonza, M.; Schmickler, H.

    2016-01-01

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. Advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides importa...

  2. Particle tracking code of simulating global RF feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.

    1991-09-01

    It is well known in the ''control community'' that a good feedback controller design is deeply rooted in the physics of the system. For example, when accelerating the beam we must keep several parameters under control so that the beam travels within the confined space. Important parameters include the frequency and phase of the rf signal, the dipole field, and the cavity voltage. Because errors in these parameters will progressively mislead the beam from its projected path in the tube, feedback loops are used to correct the behavior. Since the feedback loop feeds energy to the system, it changes the overall behavior of the system and may drive it to instability. Various types of controllers are used to stabilize the feedback loop. Integrating the beam physics with the feedback controllers allows us to carefully analyze the beam behavior. This will not only guarantee optimal performance but will also significantly enhance the ability of the beam control engineer to deal effectively with the interaction of various feedback loops. Motivated by this theme, we developed a simple one-particle tracking code to simulate particle behavior with feedback controllers. In order to achieve our fundamental objective, we can ask some key questions: What are the input and output parameters? How can they be applied to the practical machine? How can one interface the rf system dynamics such as the transfer characteristics of the rf cavities and phasing between the cavities? Answers to these questions can be found by considering a simple case of a single cavity with one particle, tracking it turn-by-turn with appropriate initial conditions, then introducing constraints on crucial parameters. Critical parameters are rf frequency, phase, and amplitude once the dipole field has been given. These are arranged in the tracking code so that we can interface the feedback system controlling them

  3. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-01-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies

  4. Phase I trial of erlotinib with radiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group protocol N0177

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Brown, Paul D.; Ballman, Karla V.; Fiveash, John B.; Uhm, Joon H.; Giannini, Caterina; Jaeckle, Kurt A.; Geoffroy, Francois J.; Nabors, L. Burt; Buckner, Jan C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of erlotinib plus radiation therapy (RT) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a multicenter phase I trial. Methods and Materials: Patients were stratified on the basis of the use of enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (EIACs). After resection or biopsy, patients were treated with erlotinib for 1 week before concurrent erlotinib and 6 weeks (60 Gy) of RT and maintained on erlotinib until progression. The erlotinib dose was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 100 mg/day. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 were evaluable for the MTD and efficacy endpoints. Of these patients, 14 were males and 5 were females, with a median age of 54 years. Seven had undergone biopsy only, 5 had subtotal resections, and 7 had gross total resections. The highest dose level was 150 mg/day erlotinib for patients not on EIACs (Group 1) and 200 mg/day for patients on EIACs (Group 2). MTD was not reached in either group. In Group 1 at 100 mg (n = 6) and at 150 mg (n = 4), only 1 dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) occurred (stomatitis at 100 mg). No DLTs have occurred in Group 2 at 100 mg (n = 3), 150 mg (n = 3), and 200 mg (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 52 weeks, progression was documented in 16 patients and 13 deaths occurred. Median time to progression was 26 weeks, and median survival was 55 weeks. Conclusion: Toxicity is acceptable at the current doses of erlotinib plus RT. The study was modified to include concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, and accrual is in progress

  5. Intrinsic gas-phase reactivity toward methanol of trinuclear tungsten W(3)S(4) complexes bearing W-X (X = Br, OH) groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, Cristian; Feliz, Marta; Llusar, Rosa

    2008-12-11

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry is used to investigate the gas-phase dissociation of trinuclear sulfide W(3)S(4) complexes containing three diphosphane ligands and three terminal bromine atoms, namely, [W(3)S(4)(dmpe)(3)(Br)(3)](+) (1(+)) or hydroxo groups, [W(3)S(4)(dmpe)(3)(OH)(3)](+) (2(+)) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphanyl)ethane). Sequential evaporation of two diphosphane ligands is the sole fragmentation channel for the 1(+) cation that yields product ions with one or two unsaturated W-Br functional groups, respectively. Conversely, evaporation of one diphosphane ligand followed by two water molecules is observed for cation 2(+). Complementary deuterium-labeling experiments in conjunction with computational studies provide deep insight into the thermodynamically favored product ion structures found along the fragmentation pathways. From these results, the formation of a series of cluster cations with WBr, WOH, and WO functional groups either on saturated or unsaturated metal sites is proposed. The effect of the properties of these cluster cations, among them chemical composition and coordinative saturation, on their reactivity toward methanol is discussed.

  6. Feedback and starbursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiklind, T.

    1987-01-01

    A simple phenomenological model of the regulatory coupling between the star formation rate and the molecular gas fraction is presented. The model can in a qualitative way explain both the constant star formation rate observed in most galaxies and the starbursting behaviour seen in some systems. Formation of massive stars are thought to have both a positive and a negative feedback on further stellar formation. A sudden increase in the gas available for star formation will cause a strong increase in the star formation rate lasting for ∼ 3.10 7 yrs. Both the star formation rate and the molecular gas friction will then perform damped oscillations over a period of a few x 10 8 yrs. This general behaviour is valid for a large range of parameter values

  7. Reviewing operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide detailed supplementary guidance to OSART experts to aid in the evaluation of operational experience feedback (OEF) programmes at nuclear power plants. The document begins by describing the objectives of an OEF programme. It goes on to indicate preparatory work and investigatory guidance for the expert. Section 5 describes attributes of an excellent OEF programme. Appended to these guidelines are examples of OEF documents from various plants. These are intended to help the expert by demonstrating the actual implementation of OEF in practice. These guidelines are in no way intended to conflict with existing national regulations and rules. A comprehensive OEF programme, as described in Section 2, would be impossible to evaluated in detail in the amount of time typically allocated for assessing OEF in an OSART review. The expert must use his or her time wisely by concentrating on those areas that appear to be the weakest

  8. FEEDBACK AND LOGISTICS CONTROLLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehesne Berek Szilvia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The following things led to that the feedback, the supervision and improvement of the processes have become more pronounced: continuous rise in the importance of logistics; increase in complexity of its content; its activity becoming more complex. These activities are necessary for the optimum information supply. The intensification of market competition requires the corporations to possess exact and up-to-date information about their activities. Complexity of the logistics system presumes a parallel application of an effective feedback, supervision and management system simultaneously with the given logistics system. The indispensability of logistics is also proved by the fact that it can be found sporadically (in the form of logistics departments or in a complex way in case of each organization. The logistical approach means a huge support in the management since it contains the complexity, the handling as a unit in order to ensure a harmony of the different corporate departments and part activities. In addition to the professional application of a logistics system, there is an opportunity to coordinate the relations inside an organization as well as between the organizations and to handle them as a unit. The sine qua non of the success of logistical processes is a harmony of the devices applied. The controlling system is a device for feeding back the processes of a corporate system. By means of the checkpoints intercalated into the processes, the logistics controlling provides information for the leadership which contributes even more to the complex approach of logistics system. By dint of the logistics controlling, the monitoring and coordination of every logistical part activity become possible with the help of information supply ensured by the logistics controlling. The logistics controlling reviews, assesses and coordinates; these activities have an effect on the cost and income management. Its reason is to be searched in the built

  9. DIRECT CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK ON STUDENTS‟WRITING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testiana Deni Wijayatiningsih

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching writing genre especially recount, narrative, and descriptive need brief and detail correction. Moreover, students aware about their mistakes in writing genre clearly. So, they can revise themselves. Based on the background above, this research aimed to know students‘achievement differences between using direct corrective feedback and indirect corrective feedback. The subject of this research was the fourth semester of English Department of Universitas Muhammadiyah Semarang. It employed quasi experiment and one group pre test post test design to analyze the students‘ writing achievement. The result showed that there is a significant differences between direct corrective feedback and indirect corrective feedback. Hopefully this research gives benefit for lecturers to use direct corrective feedback in their teaching writing process .

  10. Feedback matters current feedback practices in the EFL classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Reitbauer, Margit; Mercer, Sarah; Schumm-Fauster, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This varied collection of papers is concerned with feedback in the language learning context. With its blend of theoretical overviews, action research-based empirical studies and practical implications, this will be a valuable resource for all academics and practitioners concerned with generating feedback that matters.

  11. What higher education students do with teacher feedback: Feedback ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Writing pedagogy research has constantly maintained that feedback is 'an essential component of virtually every model of the writing process' (Hall, 1990: 43) as it motivates writers to improve their next draft. Feedback during the writing process improves not only student attitude to writing but writing performance if students ...

  12. Physician performance feedback in a Canadian academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Dennis; Worthington, James; McGuire, Shaun; Burgetz, Stephanie; Forster, Alan J; Patey, Andrea; Gerin-Lajoie, Caroline; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Roth, Virginia

    2017-10-02

    Purpose This paper aims at the implementation and early evaluation of a comprehensive, formative annual physician performance feedback process in a large academic health-care organization. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods approach was used to introduce a formative feedback process to provide physicians with comprehensive feedback on performance and to support professional development. This initiative responded to organization-wide engagement surveys through which physicians identified effective performance feedback as a priority. In 2013, physicians primarily affiliated with the organization participated in a performance feedback process, and physician satisfaction and participant perceptions were explored through participant survey responses and physician leader focus groups. Training was required for physician leaders prior to conducting performance feedback discussions. Findings This process was completed by 98 per cent of eligible physicians, and 30 per cent completed an evaluation survey. While physicians endorsed the concept of a formative feedback process, process improvement opportunities were identified. Qualitative analysis revealed the following process improvement themes: simplify the tool, ensure leaders follow process, eliminate redundancies in data collection (through academic or licensing requirements) and provide objective quality metrics. Following physician leader training on performance feedback, 98 per cent of leaders who completed an evaluation questionnaire agreed or strongly agreed that the performance feedback process was useful and that training objectives were met. Originality/value This paper introduces a physician performance feedback model, leadership training approach and first-year implementation outcomes. The results of this study will be useful to health administrators and physician leaders interested in implementing physician performance feedback or improving physician engagement.

  13. Strategies in probabilistic feedback learning in Parkinson patients OFF medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellebaum, C; Kobza, S; Ferrea, S; Schnitzler, A; Pollok, B; Südmeyer, M

    2016-04-21

    Studies on classification learning suggested that altered dopamine function in Parkinson's Disease (PD) specifically affects learning from feedback. In patients OFF medication, enhanced learning from negative feedback has been described. This learning bias was not seen in observational learning from feedback, indicating different neural mechanisms for this type of learning. The present study aimed to compare the acquisition of stimulus-response-outcome associations in PD patients OFF medication and healthy control subjects in active and observational learning. 16 PD patients OFF medication and 16 controls were examined with three parallel learning tasks each, two feedback-based (active and observational) and one non-feedback-based paired associates task. No acquisition deficit was seen in the patients for any of the tasks. More detailed analyses on the learning strategies did, however, reveal that the patients showed more lose-shift responses during active feedback learning than controls, and that lose-shift and win-stay responses more strongly determined performance accuracy in patients than controls. For observational feedback learning, the performance of both groups correlated similarly with the performance in non-feedback-based paired associates learning and with the accuracy of observed performance. Also, patients and controls showed comparable evidence of feedback processing in observational learning. In active feedback learning, PD patients use alternative learning strategies than healthy controls. Analyses on observational learning did not yield differences between patients and controls, adding to recent evidence of a differential role of the human striatum in active and observational learning from feedback. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Remote video auditing with real-time feedback in an academic surgical suite improves safety and efficiency metrics: a cluster randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdyk, Frank J; Dowling, Oonagh; Newman, Sheldon; Glatt, David; Chester, Michelle; Armellino, Donna; Cole, Brandon; Landis, Gregg S; Schoenfeld, David; DiCapua, John F

    2016-12-01

    Compliance with the surgical safety checklist during operative procedures has been shown to reduce inhospital mortality and complications but proper execution by the surgical team remains elusive. We evaluated the impact of remote video auditing with real-time provider feedback on checklist compliance during sign-in, time-out and sign-out and case turnover times. Prospective, cluster randomised study in a 23-operating room (OR) suite. Surgeons, anaesthesia providers, nurses and support staff. ORs were randomised to receive, or not receive, real-time feedback on safety checklist compliance and efficiency metrics via display boards and text messages, followed by a period during which all ORs received feedback. Checklist compliance (Pass/Fail) during sign-in, time-out and sign-out demonstrated by (1) use of checklist, (2) team attentiveness, (3) required duration, (4) proper sequence and duration of case turnover times. Sign-in, time-out and sign-out PASS rates increased from 25%, 16% and 32% during baseline phase (n=1886) to 64%, 84% and 68% for feedback ORs versus 40%, 77% and 51% for no-feedback ORs (pauditing with feedback improves surgical safety checklist compliance for all cases, and turnover time for scheduled cases, but not for unscheduled cases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Timing matters: The impact of immediate and delayed feedback on artificial language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram Opitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present experiment, we used event-related potentials (ERP to investigate the role of immediate and delayed feedback in an artificial grammar learning task. Two groups of participants were engaged in classifying non-word strings according to an underlying rule system, not known to the participants. Visual feedback was provided after each classification either immediately or with a short delay of one second. Both groups were able to learn the artificial grammar system as indicated by an increase in classification performance. However, the gain in performance was significantly larger for the group receiving immediate feedback as compared to the group receiving delayed feedback. Learning was accompanied by an increase in P300 activity in the ERP for delayed as compared to immediate feedback. Irrespective of feedback delay, both groups exhibited learning related decreases in the feedback-related positivity (FRP elicited by positive feedback only. The feedback-related negativity (FRN, however, remained constant over the course of learning. These results suggest, first, that delayed feedback is less effective for artificial grammar learning as task requirements are very demanding, and second, that the FRP elicited by positive prediction errors decreases with learning while the FRN to negative prediction errors is elicited in an all-or-none fashion by negative feedback throughout the entire experiment.

  16. Theoretical predictions of properties and gas-phase chromatography behaviour of bromides of group-5 elements Nb, Ta, and element 105, Db.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, V; Anton, J

    2012-01-21

    Fully relativistic, four-component density functional theory electronic structure calculations were performed for MBr(5), MOBr(3), MBr(6)(-), KMBr(6), and MBr(5)Cl(-) of group-5 elements Nb, Ta, and element 105, Db, with the aim to predict adsorption behaviour of the bromides in gas-phase chromatography experiments. It was shown that in the atmosphere of HBr/BBr(3), the pentabromides are rather stable, and their stability should increase in the row Nb Ta > Db. This sequence is in agreement with the one observed in the "one-atom-at-a-time" chromatography experiments. Some other scenarios, such as surface oxide formation were also considered but found to be irrelevant. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  17. Rationalizing Oral Corrective Feedback in Sudanese EFL Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Abuelnour Elbashir Hussein

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is primarily investigating teachers’ perceptions about the application of oral corrective feedback in Sudanese EFL classrooms. It attempts to explore and rationalize the application of oral feedback in an EFL context, specifically in Sudan. For this purpose, a questionnaire was designed and distributed to (70 EFL secondary school teachers. An observation checklist was also used during class visits to further support the qualitative data. The results showed that EFL teachers have different views about giving oral corrective feedback. The findings also revealed that recast is the most commonly used approach, followed by elicitation and metalinguistic feedback, respectively. Clarification requests were found to be the least commonly used approach. Regarding teaching language systems, it was found that recasts is the most common approach used in teaching vocabulary and pronunciation whereas metalinguistic is highly preferred in teaching grammar. The study concluded with some relevant recommendations: First, it is the responsibility of the concerned authorities to make the school environment a better place for learning; class size and learning aids are important to help facilitate the role of the teacher in offering good quality teaching where feedback is provided for every learner. Second, educators and experts should hold regular seminars and conferences, issue magazines and periodicals on feedback and other relevant ELT topics. Moreover, teachers should be trained on how to give feedback on oral production. Finally, teachers should push students towards pair/group work because by doing so this will provide opportunities for ST-ST and T-ST feedback.

  18. Evaluation of feedback given to trainees in medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Tony Ck; Burr, Bill; Boohan, Mairead

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of feedback provided to specialty trainees (ST3 or higher) in medical specialties during their workplace-based assessments (WBAs). The feedback given in WBAs was examined in detail in a group of 50 ST3 or higher trainees randomly selected from those taking part in a pilot study of changes to the WBA system conducted by the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board. They were based in Health Education Northeast (Northern Deanery) and Health Education East of England (Eastern Deanery). Thematic analysis was used to identify commonly occurring themes. Feedback was mainly positive but there were differences in quality between specialties. Problems with feedback included insufficient detail, such that it was not possible to map the progression of the trainee, insufficient action plans made and the timing of feedback not being contemporaneous (feedback not being given at the time of assessment). Recommendations included feedback should be more specific; there need to be more options in the feedback forms for the supervisor to compare the trainee's performance to what is expected and action plans need to be made. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-bunch Feedback Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonza, M; Schmickler, H

    2014-01-01

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. Advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. We first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities, analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedback systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback systems. The main components of a feedback system and the related issues will also be analysed. Finally, we shall focus on digital feedback systems, their characteristics, and features, as well as on how they can be concretely exploited for both the optimization of feedback performance and for beam dynamics studies

  20. Feedback Systems for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an integral part of the design. Feedback requirements for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at high bandwidth and fast response. To correct for the motion of individual bunches within a train, both feedforward and feedback systems are planned. SLC experience has shown that feedback systems are an invaluable operational tool for decoupling systems, allowing precision tuning, and providing pulse-to-pulse diagnostics. Feedback systems for the NLC will incorporate the key SLC features and the benefits of advancing technologies

  1. Fast feedback in classroom practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmett, K.M.; Klaassen, K.; Eijkelhof, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 Aust. Sci. Teach. J. 28–34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to

  2. Dynamics of nonlinear feedback control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, H.P.; Hateren, J.H. van

    Feedback control in neural systems is ubiquitous. Here we study the mathematics of nonlinear feedback control. We compare models in which the input is multiplied by a dynamic gain (multiplicative control) with models in which the input is divided by a dynamic attenuation (divisive control). The gain

  3. Student Interpretations of Diagnostic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assessment is increasingly being recognized as a potentially beneficial tool for teaching and learning (Jang, 2012). There have been calls in the research literature for students to receive diagnostic feedback and for researchers to investigate how such feedback is used by students. Therefore, this study examined how students…

  4. Videoer om feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Nexø

    2017-01-01

    I denne video bliver du introduceret til en måde at praktisere og rammesætte klyngevejledning på i bachelorundervisning. Klyngefeedbackformen til de studerende er valgt, da de studerende lærer meget af både at give og om modtage feedback fra medstuderende. Fokus på feedback ligger derfor primært i...

  5. Designing feedback: multimodality and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; Sugiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Now that many of us carry around devices that are equipped with sensors (e.g., smartphones with accelerometers) we can use these sensors to measure behavior. The data thus captured can be used to give someone feedback about this behavior. These feedback mechanisms are often used in so called smart

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare e-Feedback Versus "Standard" Face-to-Face Verbal Feedback to Improve the Acquisition of Procedural Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Elsharif, Mohamed; Anderson, Melanie; Chan, Phillip; Beard, Jonathan; Nawaz, Shah

    Constructive feedback plays an important role in learning during surgical training. Standard feedback is usually given verbally following direct observation of the procedure by a trained assessor. However, such feedback requires the physical presence of expert faculty members who are usually busy and time-constrained by clinical commitments. We aim to evaluate electronic feedback (e-feedback) after video observation of surgical suturing in comparison with standard face-to-face verbal feedback. A prospective, blinded, randomized controlled trial comparing e-feedback with standard verbal feedback was carried out in February 2015 using a validated pro formas for assessment. The study participants were 38 undergraduate medical students from the University of Sheffield, UK. They were recorded on video performing the procedural skill, completed a self-evaluation form, and received e-feedback on the same day (group 1); observed directly by an assessor, invited to provide verbal self-reflection, and then received standard verbal feedback (group 2). In both groups, the feedback was provided after performing the procedure. The participants returned 2 days later and performed the same skill again. Poststudy questionnaire was used to assess the acceptability of each feedback among the participants. Overall, 19 students in group 1 and 18 students in group 2 completed the study. Although there was a significant improvement in the overall mean score on the second performance of the task for all participants (first performance mean 11.59, second performance mean 15.95; p ≤ 0.0001), there was no difference in the overall mean improvement score between group 1 and group 2 (4.74 and 3.94, respectively; p = 0.49). The mean overall scores for the e-feedback group at baseline recorded by 2 independent investigators showed good agreement (mean overall scores of 12.84 and 11.89; Cronbach α = 0.86). Poststudy questionnaire demonstrated that both e-feedback and standard verbal feedback

  7. SCOTCH: a program for solution of the one-dimensional, two-group, space-time neutron diffusion equations with temperature feedback of multi-channel fluid dynamics for HTGR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezaki, Masahiro; Mitake, Susumu; Ozawa, Tamotsu

    1979-06-01

    The SCOTCH program solves the one-dimensional (R or Z), two-group reactor kinetics equations with multi-channel temperature transients and fluid dynamics. Sub-program SCOTCH-RX simulates the space-time neutron diffusion in radial direction, and sub-program SCOTCH-AX simulates the same in axial direction. The program has about 8,000 steps of FORTRAN statement and requires about 102 kilo-words of computer memory. (author)

  8. A transimpedance amplifier using a novel current mode feedback loop

    CERN Document Server

    Anghinolfi, Francis; Delagnes, E; Jarron, Pierre; Scharfetter, L H H

    1995-01-01

    We present a transimpedance amplifier stage based on a novel current mode feedback topology. This circuit employs NMOS and PMOS transistors exclusively and requires neither capacitor for stabilizing the transimpedance loop nor resistor for the transresistance feedback and transistor loading. This amplifier circuit is fully compatible with submicron digital CMOS processes. The active feedback network consists of two grounded-gate MOS devices which split the output current in both the feedback and output branches. The transresistance and the phase margin are adjustable through external DC signals. The measured rise time of the impulse response of the amplifier implemented in an industrial 0,7µm CMOS process is 18 ns for a transresistance of 180 k‡ and 30 ns for a transresistance of 560 k‡. The measured Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) is 800 rms e¯ for an input capacitance of 20 pF with the transresistance adjusted to 560 k‡.

  9. Multi-bunch feedback systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M

    2008-01-01

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. The advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. The lecture will first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedbacks systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback sy...

  10. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  11. Multi-bunch Feedback Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M.

    2014-12-19

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. Advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. We first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities, analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedback systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback systems. The main co...

  12. The effect of video-assisted oral feedback versus oral feedback on surgical communicative competences in undergraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesseler, M; Sterz, J; Bender, B; Hoefer, S; Walcher, F

    2017-08-01

    Feedback can significantly improve future performance. Reviewing one's performance by video is discussed as useful adjunct to debriefing, particularly for non-technical skills. Communicative competencies are an essential part of daily clinical practice; thus should be taught and assessed during undergraduate training. The aim of this study was to compare the educational value of video-assisted feedback versus oral feedback in communicative competencies in the surgical context. Fourth-year medical students completed a 210-min training unit of 'taking patient's history and obtaining informed consents prior to surgery' using role plays. Oral feedback was received directly thereafter using agenda-led, outcome-based guidelines (ALOBA). In the study group, the role plays were video-taped and reviewed thereafter. Afterwards, students completed two OSCE stations, where they were assessed regarding their communicative competencies and the content of the clinical scenario. One-hundred students (49 receiving video-assisted feedback, 51 oral) participated in the study. Those receiving video-assisted feedback performed significantly better in overall score in both OSCE stations (p feedback offered a significant educational benefit over oral feedback alone during a simulated patient encounter in a surgical context.

  13. Moving Feedback Forward: Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsmond, Paul; Maw, Stephen J.; Park, Julian R.; Gomez, Stephen; Crook, Anne C.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial research interest in tutor feedback and students' perception and use of such feedback. This paper considers some of the major issues raised in relation to tutor feedback and student learning. We explore some of the current feedback drivers, most notably the need for feedback to move away from simply a monologue from a tutor to…

  14. Understanding feedback: A learning theory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2018-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review’s scope also includes feedback in class- rooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory

  15. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of…

  16. Medical Student Perceptions of Learner-Initiated Feedback Using a Mobile Web Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Robertson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Feedback, especially timely, specific, and actionable feedback, frequently does not occur. Efforts to better understand methods to improve the effectiveness of feedback are an important area of educational research. This study represents preliminary work as part of a plan to investigate the perceptions of a student-driven system to request feedback from faculty using a mobile device and Web-based application. We hypothesize that medical students will perceive learner-initiated, timely feedback to be an essential component of clinical education. Furthermore, we predict that students will recognize the use of a mobile device and Web application to be an advantageous and effective method when requesting feedback from supervising physicians. Focus group data from 18 students enrolled in a 4-week anesthesia clerkship revealed the following themes: (1 students often have to solicit feedback, (2 timely feedback is perceived as being advantageous, (3 feedback from faculty is perceived to be more effective, (4 requesting feedback from faculty physicians poses challenges, (5 the decision to request feedback may be influenced by the student’s clinical performance, and (6 using a mobile device and Web application may not guarantee timely feedback. Students perceived using a mobile Web-based application to initiate feedback from supervising physicians to be a valuable method of assessment. However, challenges and barriers were identified.

  17. Feedback Augmented Sub-Ranging (FASR) Quantizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilligan, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is intended to reduce the size, power, and complexity of pipeline analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) that require high resolution and speed along with low power. Digitizers are important components in any application where analog signals (such as light, sound, temperature, etc.) need to be digitally processed. The innovation implements amplification of a sampled residual voltage in a switched capacitor amplifier stage that does not depend on charge redistribution. The result is less sensitive to capacitor mismatches that cause gain errors, which are the main limitation of such amplifiers in pipeline ADCs. The residual errors due to mismatch are reduced by at least a factor of 16, which is equivalent to at least 4 bits of improvement. The settling time is also faster because of a higher feedback factor. In traditional switched capacitor residue amplifiers, closed-loop amplification of a sampled and held residue signal is achieved by redistributing sampled charge onto a feedback capacitor around a high-gain transconductance amplifier. The residual charge that was sampled during the acquisition or sampling phase is stored on two or more capacitors, often equal in value or integral multiples of each other. During the hold or amplification phase, all of the charge is redistributed onto one capacitor in the feedback loop of the amplifier to produce an amplified voltage. The key error source is the non-ideal ratios of feedback and input capacitors caused by manufacturing tolerances, called mismatches. The mismatches cause non-ideal closed-loop gain, leading to higher differential non-linearity. Traditional solutions to the mismatch errors are to use larger capacitor values (than dictated by thermal noise requirements) and/or complex calibration schemes, both of which increase the die size and power dissipation. The key features of this innovation are (1) the elimination of the need for charge redistribution to achieve an accurate closed-loop gain of two

  18. Dependency Analysis Guidance Nordic/German Working Group on Common Cause Failure analysis. Phase 2, Development of Harmonized Approach and Applications for Common Cause Failure Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Guenter; Johanson, Gunnar; Lindberg, Sandra; Vaurio, Jussi

    2009-03-15

    The Regulatory Code SSMFS 2008:1 of Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) includes requirements regarding the performance of probabilistic safety assessments (PSA), as well as PSA activities in general. Therefore, the follow-up of these activities is part of the inspection tasks of SSM. According to the SSMFS 2008:1, the safety analyses shall be based on a systematic identification and evaluation of such events, event sequences and other conditions which may lead to a radiological accident. The research report Nordic/German Working Group on Common cause Failure analysis. Phase 2 project report: Development of Harmonized Approach and Applications for Common Cause Failure Quantification has been developed under a contract with the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG) and its German counterpart VGB, with the aim to create a common experience base for defence and analysis of dependent failures i.e. Common Cause Failures CCF. Phase 2 in this project if a deepened data analyses of CCF events and a demonstration on how the so called impact vectors can be constructed and on how CCF parameters are estimated. The word Guidance in the report title is used in order to indicate a common methodological guidance accepted by the NPSAG, based on current state of the art concerning the analysis of dependent failures and adapted to conditions relevant for Nordic sites. This will make it possible for the utilities to perform cost effective improvements and analyses. The report presents a common attempt by the authorities and the utilities to create a methodology and experience base for defence and analysis of dependent failures. The performed benchmark application has shown how important the interpretation of base data is to obtain robust CCF data and data analyses results. Good features were found in all benchmark approaches. The obtained experiences and approaches should now be used in harmonised procedures. A next step could be to develop and agree on event and formula driven impact vector

  19. Dependency Analysis Guidance Nordic/German Working Group on Common Cause Failure analysis. Phase 2, Development of Harmonized Approach and Applications for Common Cause Failure Quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Guenter; Johanson, Gunnar; Lindberg, Sandra; Vaurio, Jussi

    2009-03-01

    The Regulatory Code SSMFS 2008:1 of Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) includes requirements regarding the performance of probabilistic safety assessments (PSA), as well as PSA activities in general. Therefore, the follow-up of these activities is part of the inspection tasks of SSM. According to the SSMFS 2008:1, the safety analyses shall be based on a systematic identification and evaluation of such events, event sequences and other conditions which may lead to a radiological accident. The research report Nordic/German Working Group on Common cause Failure analysis. Phase 2 project report: Development of Harmonized Approach and Applications for Common Cause Failure Quantification has been developed under a contract with the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG) and its German counterpart VGB, with the aim to create a common experience base for defence and analysis of dependent failures i.e. Common Cause Failures CCF. Phase 2 in this project if a deepened data analyses of CCF events and a demonstration on how the so called impact vectors can be constructed and on how CCF parameters are estimated. The word Guidance in the report title is used in order to indicate a common methodological guidance accepted by the NPSAG, based on current state of the art concerning the analysis of dependent failures and adapted to conditions relevant for Nordic sites. This will make it possible for the utilities to perform cost effective improvements and analyses. The report presents a common attempt by the authorities and the utilities to create a methodology and experience base for defence and analysis of dependent failures. The performed benchmark application has shown how important the interpretation of base data is to obtain robust CCF data and data analyses results. Good features were found in all benchmark approaches. The obtained experiences and approaches should now be used in harmonised procedures. A next step could be to develop and agree on event and formula driven impact vector

  20. How Attributes of the Feedback Message affect Subsequent Feedback Seeking: The interactive effects of feedback sign and type

    OpenAIRE

    Medvedeff, Megan; Gregory, Jane Brodie; Levy, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the interactive effects of feedback type and sign on feedback-seeking behaviour, as well as the moderating role of regulatory focus. Using a behavioural measure of feedback seeking, we demonstrated a strong interaction between feedback type and sign, such that individuals subsequently sought the most feedback after they were provided with negative process feedback. Additionally, results suggested that an individual's chronic regulatory focus has implications ...

  1. Misonidazole and unconventional radiation in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: a phase II study of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ydrach, A.A.; Marcial, V.A.; Parsons, J.; Concannon, J.; Asbell, S.O.; George, F.

    1982-01-01

    This is a report on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Protocol78-32, a Phase I/II prospective study aimed at determining tolerance, tumor response, and survival of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus treated with unorthodox fractionation radiotherapy combined with misonidazole. Misonidazole was administered by mouth 4 to 6 hr prior to radiation, at a dose of 1.0 to 1.25 Gm/.m 2 ; blood levels were measured at about 4 hr after intake of the drug and reported in micrograms/ml. Radiotherapy was administered at 4 to 6 hr post-misonidazole dose and given with 400 rad fractions, alternating 2 or 3 times/week, up to 4,800 rad. A total of 43 patients were entered; 26 are evaluated for survival at 1 year post accession. Thirty patients (88%) received the planned radiation course. Twenty-eight patients (78%) received the planned misonidazole dosage. Tumor response, evaluated in 18 patients, showed a complete regression (C.R.) in only 2 patients (11%); and partial response (P.R.) in 6 patients (33%). Eight patients (44%) showed no tumor response to planned therapy. Toxicity was acceptable and in 38 evaluated patients only 4 reported (11%) nausea and vomiting, 7 reported mild paresthesias (18%). The median survival was only five months. In 26 patients evaluated for 1 year survival determination, only 1 survived (3.8%) this period. In view of the poor tumor response and low survival observed, we do not recommend that this particular fractionation regimen with misonidazole be used in a Phase III randomized trial in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

  2. Feedback on students' clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Marianne; Mårtensson, Lena

    2015-08-01

    Feedback on clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education is regarded as vital in occupational therapy students' professional development. The nature of supervisors' feedback however, could be confirmative and/or corrective and corrective feedback could be with or without suggestions on how to improve. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of supervisors' feedback on final-year occupational therapy students' clinical reasoning skills through comparing the nature of feedback with the students' subsequent clinical reasoning ability. A mixed-method approach with a convergent parallel design was used combining the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. From focus groups and interviews with students, data were collected and analysed qualitatively to determine how the students experienced the feedback they received from their supervisors. By quantitatively comparing the final practical exam grades with the nature of the feedback, their fieldwork End-of-Term grades and average academic performance it became possible to merge the results for comparison and interpretation. Students' clinical reasoning skills seem to be improved through corrective feedback if accompanied by suggestions on how to improve, irrespective of their average academic performance. Supervisors were inclined to underrate high performing students and overrate lower performing students. Students who obtained higher grades in the final practical examinations received more corrective feedback with suggestions on how to improve from their supervisors. Confirmative feedback alone may not be sufficient for improving the clinical reasoning skills of students. © 2015 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Occupational Therapy Australia.

  3. Overcoming Addictions, a Web-Based Application, and SMART Recovery, an Online and In-Person Mutual Help Group for Problem Drinkers, Part 2: Six-Month Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial and Qualitative Feedback From Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William; Hester, Reid K; Lenberg, Kathryn L; Delaney, Harold D

    2016-10-04

    Despite empirical evidence supporting the use of Web-based interventions for problem drinking, much remains unknown about factors that influence their effectiveness. We evaluated the performance of 2 resources for people who want to achieve and maintain abstinence: SMART Recovery (SR) and Overcoming Addictions (OA). OA is a Web application based on SR. We also examined participant and intervention-related factors hypothesized to impact clinical outcomes of Web-based interventions. We recruited 189 heavy drinkers through SR's website and in-person meetings throughout the United States. We began by randomly assigning participants to (1) SR meetings alone, (2) OA alone, and (3) OA and SR (OA+SR). Recruitment challenges compelled us to assign participants only to SR (n=86) or OA+SR (n=102). The experimental hypotheses were as follows: (1) Both groups will reduce their drinking and alcohol-related consequences at follow-up compared with their baseline levels, and (2) The OA+SR condition will reduce their drinking and alcohol or drug-related consequences more than the SR only condition. Additionally, we derived 3 groups empirically (SR, OA, and OA+SR) based on the participants' actual use of each intervention and conducted analyses by comparing them. Primary outcome measures included percent days abstinent (PDA), mean drinks per drinking day (DDD), and alcohol or drug-related consequences. Postbaseline assessments were conducted by phone at 3 and 6 months. Secondary analyses explored whether clinical issues (eg, severity of alcohol problems, level of distress, readiness to change) or intervention-related factors (eg, Internet fluency, satisfaction with site) affected outcomes. Both intent-to-treat analyses and the actual-use analyses showed highly significant improvement from baseline to follow-ups for all 3 groups. Mean within-subject effect sizes were large (d>0.8) overall. There was no significant difference between groups in the amount of improvement from baseline to

  4. Theoretical treatment of transverse feedback systems with memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.; Wang, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The differential equation of the dipole moment of coherent oscillations in the presence of a feedback system is derived. The analysis, which starts in the time domain, is extended to the frequency domain; this allows a straightforward derivation of the damping rate for both coasting and bunched beams. The damping rate is expressed in terms of the transfer function of the feedback system and in a general form which takes into account the β-function and betatron phase modulation along the beam trajectory, the effect of memory arising from the finiteness of the system bandwidth, the effect of the time delay and of the betatron phase advance between detector and kicker. Some examples of the dependence of the damping rate on the feedback parameters are given

  5. Styrket feedback gennem studerendes selvevaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    Studerende er ofte utilfredse med såvel kvaliteten som kvantiteten af feedback på skriftligt arbejde. Ligeledes kan det som underviser være svært at afgive feedback, der tager udgangspunkt i de studerendes respektive læringssituationer, hvis man ikke har andet afsæt end opgavetekster. Denne artikel...... beskriver derfor to eksperimenter med brug af selvevaluering som kvalificerende mellemled i ekstern feedback på skriveøvelser. Eksperimenternes formål er at styrke den formative læring ved skriftligt arbejde. I det første eksperiment bestod feedbacken af underviser-feedback, mens det andet eksperiment...... indebar peer-feedback og fælles feedback. I begge tilfælde blev selvevalueringen foretaget med udgangspunkt i en kriteriebaseret retteguide. Eksperimenterne medførte, at den eksterne feedback blev målrettet og kvalificeret i forhold til den enkelte studerende, mens selve skriveprocessen mod forventning...

  6. Teaching leadership in trauma resuscitation: Immediate feedback from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool shows long-term improvement in resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Shea C; Heffernan, Daithi S; Connolly, Michael D; Stephen, Andrew H; Leuckel, Stephanie N; Harrington, David T; Machan, Jason T; Adams, Charles A; Cioffi, William G

    2016-10-01

    Limited data exist on how to develop resident leadership and communication skills during actual trauma resuscitations. An evaluation tool was developed to grade senior resident performance as the team leader during full-trauma-team activations. Thirty actions that demonstrated the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies were graded on a Likert scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (exceptional). These actions were grouped by their respective core competencies on 5 × 7-inch index cards. In Phase 1, baseline performance scores were obtained. In Phase 2, trauma-focused communication in-services were conducted early in the academic year, and immediate, personalized feedback sessions were performed after resuscitations based on the evaluation tool. In Phase 3, residents received only evaluation-based feedback following resuscitations. In Phase 1 (October 2009 to April 2010), 27 evaluations were performed on 10 residents. In Phase 2 (April 2010 to October 2010), 28 evaluations were performed on nine residents. In Phase 3 (October 2010 to January 2012), 44 evaluations were performed on 13 residents. Total scores improved significantly between Phases 1 and 2 (p = 0.003) and remained elevated throughout Phase 3. When analyzing performance by competency, significant improvement between Phases 1 and 2 (p competencies (patient care, knowledge, system-based practice, practice-based learning) with the exception of "communication and professionalism" (p = 0.56). Statistically similar scores were observed between Phases 2 and 3 in all competencies with the exception of "medical knowledge," which showed ongoing significant improvement (p = 0.003). Directed resident feedback sessions utilizing data from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool have allowed us to improve our residents' abilities to lead trauma resuscitations over a 30-month period. Given pressures to maximize clinical educational opportunities among work-hour constraints, such a model may help

  7. Packetized Media Streaming with Comprehensive Exploitation of Feedback Information

    OpenAIRE

    De Vleeschouwer, C.; Frossard, P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of streaming packetized media over a lossy packet network, with sender-driven (re)transmission using acknowledgement feedback. The different transmission scenarios associated to a group of interdependent media data units are abstracted in terms of a finite alphabet of policies, for each single data unit. A rate-distortion optimized markovian framework is proposed, which supports the use of comprehensive feedback information. Contrarily to previous works in rat...

  8. Beam stability in synchrotrons with digital transverse feedback systems in dependence on beam tunes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhabitskij, V.M.

    2011-01-01

    The beam stability problem in synchrotrons with a digital transverse feedback system (TFS) is studied. The TFS damper kicker (DK) corrects the transverse momentum of a bunch in proportion to its displacement from the closed orbit measured at the location of the beam position monitor (BPM). It is shown that the area and configuration of the beam stability separatrix depend on the beam tune, the feedback gain, the phase balance between the phase advance from BPM to DK and the phase response of the feedback chain at the betatron frequency

  9. Optimal allocation of reviewers for peer feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Jensen, Ulf Aslak; Jørgensen, Rasmus Malthe

    2017-01-01

    feedback to be effective students should give and receive useful feedback. A key challenge in peer feedback is allocating the feedback givers in a good way. It is important that reviewers are allocated to submissions such that the feedback distribution is fair - meaning that all students receive good......Peer feedback is the act of letting students give feedback to each other on submitted work. There are multiple reasons to use peer feedback, including students getting more feedback, time saving for teachers and increased learning by letting students reflect on work by others. In order for peer...... indicated the quality of the feedback. Using this model together with historical data we calculate the feedback-giving skill of each student and uses that as input to an allocation algorithm that assigns submissions to reviewers, in order to optimize the feedback quality for all students. We test...

  10. A randomized phase III study of accelerated hyperfractionation versus standard in patients with unresected brain metastases: a report of the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) 9104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Kevin J.; Scott, Charles; Greenberg, Harvey M.; Emami, Bahman; Seider, Michael; Vora, Nayana L.; Olson, Craig; Whitton, Anthony; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare 1-year survival and acute toxicity rates between an accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) radiotherapy (1.6 Gy b.i.d.) to a total dose of 54.4 Gy vs. an accelerated fractionation (AF) of 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions in patients with unresected brain metastasis. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) accrued 445 patients to a Phase III comparison of accelerated hyperfractionation vs. standard fractionation from 1991 through 1995. All patients had histologic proof of malignancy at the primary site. Brain metastasis were measurable by CT or MRI scan and all patients had a Karnofsky performance score (KPS) of at least 70 and a neurologic function classification of 1 or 2. For AH, 32 Gy in 20 fractions over 10 treatment days (1.6 Gy twice daily) was delivered to the whole brain. A boost of 22.4 Gy in 14 fractions was delivered to each lesion with a 2-cm margin. Results: The average age in both groups was 60 years; nearly two-thirds of all patients had lung primaries. Of the 429 eligible and analyzable patients, the median survival time was 4.5 months in both arms. The 1-year survival rate was 19% in the AF arm vs. 16% in the AH arm. No difference in median or 1-year survival was observed among patients with solitary metastasis between treatment arms. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classes have previously been identified and patients with a KPS of 70 or more, a controlled primary tumor, less than 65 years of age, and brain metastases only (RPA class I), had a 1-year survival of 35% in the AF arm vs. 25% in the AH arm (p = 0.95). In a multivariate model, only age, KPS, extent of metastatic disease (intracranial metastases only vs. intra- and extracranial metastases), and status of primary (controlled vs. uncontrolled) were statistically significant (at p < 0.05). Treatment assignment was not statistically significant. Overall Grade III or IV toxicity was equivalent in both arms, and one fatal toxicity at 44 days secondary

  11. Voluntarily controlled but not merely observed visual feedback affects postural sway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Tomohisa; Hiromitsu, Kentaro; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Online stabilization of human standing posture utilizes multisensory afferences (e.g., vision). Whereas visual feedback of spontaneous postural sway can stabilize postural control especially when observers concentrate on their body and intend to minimize postural sway, the effect of intentional control of visual feedback on postural sway itself remains unclear. This study assessed quiet standing posture in healthy adults voluntarily controlling or merely observing visual feedback. The visual feedback (moving square) had either low or high gain and was either horizontally flipped or not. Participants in the voluntary-control group were instructed to minimize their postural sway while voluntarily controlling visual feedback, whereas those in the observation group were instructed to minimize their postural sway while merely observing visual feedback. As a result, magnified and flipped visual feedback increased postural sway only in the voluntary-control group. Furthermore, regardless of the instructions and feedback manipulations, the experienced sense of control over visual feedback positively correlated with the magnitude of postural sway. We suggest that voluntarily controlled, but not merely observed, visual feedback is incorporated into the feedback control system for posture and begins to affect postural sway. PMID:29682421

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; van Gijn, W; Muller, E W; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C B M; Fokstuen, T; Gelderblom, H; Kapiteijn, E; Leer, J W H; Marijnen, C A M; Martijn, H; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E; Nagtegaal, I D; Påhlman, L; Punt, C J A; Putter, H; Roodvoets, A G H; Rutten, H J T; Steup, W H; Glimelius, B; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-04-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial recruited patients from 52 hospitals. Patients with histologically proven stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned (1:1) to observation or adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME. Radiotherapy consisted of 5 × 5 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 25 × 1.8-2 Gy combined with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/LV (PROCTOR) or eight courses capecitabine (SCRIPT). Randomization was based on permuted blocks of six, stratified according to centre, residual tumour, time between last irradiation and surgery, and preoperative treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Of 470 enrolled patients, 437 were eligible. The trial closed prematurely because of slow patient accrual. Patients were randomly assigned to observation (n = 221) or adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 216). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 5-year overall survival was 79.2% in the observation group and 80.4% in the chemotherapy group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.39; P = 0.73]. The HR for disease-free survival was 0.80 (95% CI 0.60-1.07; P = 0.13). Five-year cumulative incidence for locoregional recurrences was 7.8% in both groups. Five-year cumulative incidence for distant recurrences was 38.5% and 34.7%, respectively (P = 0.39). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial could not demonstrate a significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME on overall survival, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate. However, this trial did not complete

  13. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors

  14. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system. US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Mikazu; Ishikawa, Hirohisa; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Hioki, Kazumasa; Naito, Morimasa; Makino, Hitoshi; Oda, Chie; Tachi, Yukio; Mitsui, Seiichiro; Shibata, Masahiro; Watanabe, Atsuo; Yoshino, Kyoji; Seo, Toshihiro; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Nutt, Mark; Peters, Mark; Bresee, James; Lesica, Sue; Schwab, Patrick; Gomberg, Steve; Jones, Jay; Halsey, Bill; Marra, John; Vienna, John; Gombert, Drik; McMahon, Kevin; James, Scott; Caporuscio, Florie

    2010-05-01

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors

  15. Numerical investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of a hybrid acousto-optic Bragg cell with a variable feedback gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Zhou, Hao

    2014-09-01

    Since around 1979, the operation of an acousto-optic Bragg cell under positive first-order feedback via amplification and delay in the loop has been studied extensively by several groups [1-3]. In recent work, the analysis of the nonlinear dynamics (NLD) of the system was extended to include bistable maps and Lyapunov exponents, and application of the chaos for signal encryption and decryption for uniform plane waves. The present work originated with the problem of a variable photodetector aperture opening relative to the first-order light. This potentially complex problem is simplified by assuming instead a variable feedback gain ( β ~ (t)), which leads to considerably different NLD. This paper examines initially the NLD versus the (DC) bias voltage for different variable- β ~ conditions, including slow and fast rates of change of the gain with time in relation to the feedback delay. It is found that the response depends critically on the rate of rise of the feedback gain, and also that the resulting chaotic regimes are generally significantly different from those for fixed values of β ~ . We have generated constant feedback gain and the variable feedback gain (t) chaos characteristics of the hybrid A-O network. Chaos as an equivalent carrier has been used to encrypt messages for both fixed and variable β ~ . The transmitted signal is detected from the encrypted carrier using a heterodyne method, using a slave Bragg cell with matched keys to generate local chaos followed by a low pass filter and a phase inverter. Results between variable- and fixed-gain systems are compared in terms of advantages and disadvantages.

  16. The Influence of Peer Feedback on the Acquisition of Physical-Examination Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Martineau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested that having students observe peers while acquiring physical-examination (PE skills fosters the acquisition of the psychomotor skills required to conduct a PE. One difficulty, however, has been to disentangle the effect of peer observation from peer feedback, both of which occur when students learn in groups. This study investigated the influence of peer feedback on learning the neurolocomotor physical exam for low-back pain. 120 second-year medical students were randomly assigned to a peer-feedback group (n=61 or a no-peer-feedback group (n=53, during a regular learning activity with a standardized-patient instructor. Students first practised the NLE in groups of three, with or without peer feedback, depending on the group to which they were assigned. Subsequently, the members of both groups performed the NLE individually. The final NLE was videotaped and assessed later. Peer feedback had a positive effect on the acquisition of PE skills (87.9% vs. 90.8%, p=0.023, despite the fact that students had an initial preference for instructor feedback compared with peer feedback. These results support the use of group activities that give students the opportunity to provide feedback to their peers while learning PE skills.

  17. Individualized feedback during simulated laparoscopic training:a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Liv; Weurlander, Maria; Hedman, Leif; Nisel, Henry; Lindqvist, Pelle G; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Enochsson, Lars

    2015-07-29

    This study aimed to explore the value of individualized feedback on performance, flow and self-efficacy during simulated laparoscopy. Furthermore, we wished to explore attitudes towards feedback and simulator training among medical students. Sixteen medical students were included in the study and randomized to laparoscopic simulator training with or without feedback. A teacher provided individualized feedback continuously throughout the procedures to the target group. Validated questionnaires and scales were used to evaluate self-efficacy and flow. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate differences between groups regarding laparoscopic performance (instrument path length), self-efficacy and flow. Qualitative data was collected by group interviews and interpreted using inductive thematic analyses. Sixteen students completed the simulator training and questionnaires. Instrument path length was shorter in the feedback group (median 3.9 m; IQR: 3.3-4.9) as compared to the control group (median 5.9 m; IQR: 5.0-8.1), pfeedback group were more concentrated on the task and also more anxious. Both groups had high ambitions to succeed and also expressed the importance of getting feedback. The authenticity of the training scenario was important for the learning process. This study highlights the importance of individualized feedback during simulated laparoscopy training. The next step is to further optimize feedback and to transfer standardized and individualized feedback from the simulated setting to the operating room.

  18. Enhancing Productivity Through Feedback and Goal Setting. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Robert D.; And Others

    A field test was conducted to research the effects of feedback and goal-setting techniques on increasing productivity. Subjects were regular employees of two autonomous clerical-type units in a credit card and payment processing center of a Southwestern oil company. The study desiqn had three phases--baseline period and two experimental conditions…

  19. Phase II trial of paclitaxel and cisplatin in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Trial 9430.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Mauer, Ann M; Hodgson, Lydia D; Herndon, James E; Lynch, Thomas J; Green, Mark R; Vokes, Everett E

    2008-11-01

    Cancer and Leukemia Group B trial 9430 was a randomized phase II trial which investigated the safety and activity of four novel doublets in untreated extensive stage small cell lung cancer. The results of the paclitaxel and cisplatin arm have not been reported. Patients received paclitaxel 230 mg/m followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m on day 1 every 21 days. All patients received granulocyte colony stimulating factor 5 microg/kg/d beginning on day 3 of each cycle. The patient characteristics of the 34 patients assigned to this treatment arm were: median age 61.5 years (range 41-82), male (76%), performance status 0 (41%), 1 (32%), and 2 (26%). An objective response was observed in 23 patients (68%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 49-83%); 2 complete responses (6%) and 21 partial responses (62%). Median progression-free survival time was 5.6 months (95% CI: 4.8-7.1 month), and median overall survival time was 7.7 months (95% CI: 7.2-12.6 months). The 1-year survival rate observed was 29% (95% CI: 15-45%). Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia was observed in 5 (15%) and 4 (12%) patients, respectively. Two patients developed febrile neutropenia including one patient who died of neutropenic sepsis. Grade 3/4 nonhematologic observed were: sensory neuropathy in eight patients (24%); and hyperglycemia, malaise and nausea were all observed in four patients (12%). Cancer and Leukemia Group B will not pursue further investigation of paclitaxel and cisplatin due to the modest activity and the toxicity observed on this trial.

  20. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  1. Assessing the impact of safety monitoring on the efficacy analysis in large Phase III group sequential trials with non-trivial safety event rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yanqiu; Palesch, Yuko Y; DeSantis, Stacia M; Zhao, Wenle

    2016-01-01

    In Phase III clinical trials for life-threatening conditions, some serious but expected adverse events, such as early deaths or congestive heart failure, are often treated as the secondary or co-primary endpoint, and are closely monitored by the Data and Safety Monitoring Committee (DSMC). A naïve group sequential design (GSD) for such a study is to specify univariate statistical boundaries for the efficacy and safety endpoints separately, and then implement the two boundaries during the study, even though the two endpoints are typically correlated. One problem with this naïve design, which has been noted in the statistical literature, is the potential loss of power. In this article, we develop an analytical tool to evaluate this negative impact for trials with non-trivial safety event rates, particularly when the safety monitoring is informal. Using a bivariate binary power function for the GSD with a random-effect component to account for subjective decision-making in safety monitoring, we demonstrate how, under common conditions, the power loss in the naïve design can be substantial. This tool may be helpful to entities such as the DSMCs when they wish to deviate from the prespecified stopping boundaries based on safety measures.

  2. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  3. NAIP 2017 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2017 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2017 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  4. Feedback and household energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauser, G A; Kendall, K W; Filiatrault, P

    1979-06-01

    The literature is reviewed relevant to the use of (a) information campaigns through the mass media; and (b) immediate feedback about the results of consumer behavior, to influence consumer energy use. The study focuses on residential energy use. (MHR)

  5. Feedback stabilization of plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cap, F.F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the theoretical and experimental aspects of feedback stabilization. After giving an outline of a general theoretical model for electrostatic instabilities the author provides a theoretical analysis of the suppression of various types of instability. Experiments which have been carried out on the feedback stabilization of various types of plasma instability are reported. An extensive list of references is given. (B.R.H.)

  6. Neural activations associated with feedback and retrieval success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Andersson, Micael; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2017-11-01

    There is substantial behavioral evidence for a phenomenon commonly called "the testing effect", i.e. superior memory performance after repeated testing compared to re-study of to-be-learned materials. However, considerably less is known about the underlying neuro-cognitive processes that are involved in the initial testing phase, and thus underlies the actual testing effect. Here, we investigated functional brain activity related to test-enhanced learning with feedback. Subjects learned foreign vocabulary across three consecutive tests with correct-answer feedback. Functional brain-activity responses were analyzed in relation to retrieval and feedback events, respectively. Results revealed up-regulated activity in fronto-striatal regions during the first successful retrieval, followed by a marked reduction in activity as a function of improved learning. Whereas feedback improved behavioral performance across consecutive tests, feedback had a negligable role after the first successful retrieval for functional brain-activity modulations. It is suggested that the beneficial effects of test-enhanced learning is regulated by feedback-induced updating of memory representations, mediated via the striatum, that might underlie the stabilization of memory commonly seen in behavioral studies of the testing effect.

  7. Phase 1 testing of detoxified LPS/group B meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine with and without synthetic CPG 7909 adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alan S; Greenberg, Nancy; Billington, Melissa; Zhang, Lei; DeFilippi, Christopher; May, Ryan C; Bajwa, Kanwaldeep K

    2015-11-27

    Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) are a leading cause of nosocomial infection and sepsis. Increasing multi-antibiotic resistance has left clinicians with fewer therapeutic options. Antibodies to GNB lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin) have reduced morbidity and mortality as a result of infection and are not subject to the resistance mechanisms deployed by bacteria against antibiotics. In this phase 1 study, we administered a vaccine that elicits antibodies against a highly conserved portion of LPS with and without a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist as adjuvant. A vaccine composed of the detoxified LPS (dLPS) from E. coli O111:B4 (J5 mutant) non-covalently complexed to group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP). Twenty healthy adult subjects received three doses at 0, 29 and 59 days of antigen (10 μg dLPS) with or without CPG 7909 (250 or 500 μg). Subjects were evaluated for local and systemic adverse effects and laboratory findings. Anti-J5 LPS IgG and IgM antibody levels were measured by electrochemiluminesence. Due to premature study termination, not all subjects received all three doses. All vaccine formulations were well-tolerated with no local or systemic events of greater than moderate severity. The vaccine alone group achieved a ≥ 4-fold "responder" response in IgG and IgM antibody in only one of 6 subjects. In contrast, the vaccine plus CPG 7909 groups appeared to have earlier and more sustained (to 180 days) responses, greater mean-fold increases, and a higher proportion of "responders" achieving ≥ 4-fold increases over baseline. Although the study was halted before all enrolled subjects received all three doses, the J5dLPS/OMP vaccine, with or without CpG adjuvant, was safe and well-tolerated. The inclusion of CpG increased the number of subjects with a ≥ 4-fold antibody response, evident even after the second of three planned doses. A vaccine comprising J5dLPS/OMP antigen with CpG adjuvant merits further investigation. Clinical

  8. LHC beam stability and feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhagen, Ralph

    2007-07-20

    This report presents the stability and the control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The aim of this report is to contribute to a safe and reliable LHC commissioning and machine operation. The first part of the analysis gives an estimate of the expected sources of orbit and energy perturbations that can be grouped into environmental sources, machine-inherent sources and machine element failures: the slowest perturbation due to ground motion, tides, temperature fluctuations of the tunnel and other environmental influences are described in this report by a propagation model that is both qualitatively and quantitatively supported by geophone and beam motion measurements at LEP and other CERN accelerators. The second part of this analysis deals with the control of the two LHC beams' orbit and energy through automated feedback systems. Based on the reading of the more than 1056 beam position monitors (BPMs) that are distributed over the machine, a central global feedback controller calculates new deflection strengths for the more than 1060 orbit corrector magnets (CODs) that are suitable to correct the orbit and momentum around their references. this report provides an analysis of the BPMs and CODs involved in the orbit and energy feedback. The BPMs are based on a wide-band time normaliser circuit that converts the transverse beam position reading of each individual particle bunch into two laser pulses that are separated by a time delay and transmitted through optical fibres to an acquisition card that converts the delay signals into a digital position. A simple error model has been tested and compared to the measurement accuracy of LHC type BPMs, obtained through beam-based measurements in the SPS. The average beam position is controlled through 1060 superconducting and individually powered corrector dipole magnets. The proposed correction in 'time-domain' consists of a

  9. LHC beam stability and feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhagen, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the stability and the control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The aim of this report is to contribute to a safe and reliable LHC commissioning and machine operation. The first part of the analysis gives an estimate of the expected sources of orbit and energy perturbations that can be grouped into environmental sources, machine-inherent sources and machine element failures: the slowest perturbation due to ground motion, tides, temperature fluctuations of the tunnel and other environmental influences are described in this report by a propagation model that is both qualitatively and quantitatively supported by geophone and beam motion measurements at LEP and other CERN accelerators. The second part of this analysis deals with the control of the two LHC beams' orbit and energy through automated feedback systems. Based on the reading of the more than 1056 beam position monitors (BPMs) that are distributed over the machine, a central global feedback controller calculates new deflection strengths for the more than 1060 orbit corrector magnets (CODs) that are suitable to correct the orbit and momentum around their references. this report provides an analysis of the BPMs and CODs involved in the orbit and energy feedback. The BPMs are based on a wide-band time normaliser circuit that converts the transverse beam position reading of each individual particle bunch into two laser pulses that are separated by a time delay and transmitted through optical fibres to an acquisition card that converts the delay signals into a digital position. A simple error model has been tested and compared to the measurement accuracy of LHC type BPMs, obtained through beam-based measurements in the SPS. The average beam position is controlled through 1060 superconducting and individually powered corrector dipole magnets. The proposed correction in 'time-domain' consists of a proportional

  10. Feedback control of edge turbulence in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Zhai; Yi-zhi, Wen; Chang-xuan, Yu; Wan-dong, Liu; Chao, Wang; Ge, Zhuang; Kan, Zhai; Zhi-Zhan, Yu

    1997-01-01

    An experiment on feedback control of edge turbulence has been undertaken on the KT-5C tokamak. The results indicate that the edge turbulence could be suppressed or enhanced depending on the phase shift of the feedback network. In a typical case of 90 degree phase shift feedback, the turbulence amplitudes of both T e and n e were reduced by about 25% when the gain of the feedback network was 15. Correspondingly the radial particle flux decreased to about 75% level of the background. Through bispectral analysis it is found that there exists a substantial nonlinear coupling between various modes comprised in edge turbulence, especially in the frequency range from about 10 kHz to 100 kHz, which contains the large part of the edge turbulence energy in KT-5C tokamak. In particular, by actively controlling the turbulence amplitude using feedback, a direct experimental evidence of the link between the nonlinear wave-wave coupling over the whole spectrum in turbulence, the saturated turbulence amplitude, and the radial particle flux was provided. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  11. The Effect of Concurrent Visual Feedback on Controlling Swimming Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepan Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developing the ability to control the speed of swimming is an important part of swimming training. Maintaining a defined constant speed makes it possible for the athlete to swim economically at a low physiological cost. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of concurrent visual feedback transmitted by the Leader device on the control of swimming speed in a single exercise test. Material and methods. The study involved a group of expert swimmers (n = 20. Prior to the experiment, the race time for the 100 m distance was determined for each of the participants. In the experiment, the participants swam the distance of 100 m without feedback and with visual feedback. In both variants, the task of the participants was to swim the test distance in a time as close as possible to the time designated prior to the experiment. In the first version of the experiment (without feedback, the participants swam the test distance without receiving real-time feedback on their swimming speed. In the second version (with visual feedback, the participants followed a beam of light moving across the bottom of the swimming pool, generated by the Leader device. Results. During swimming with visual feedback, the 100 m race time was significantly closer to the time designated. The difference between the pre-determined time and the time obtained was significantly statistically lower during swimming with visual feedback (p = 0.00002. Conclusions. Concurrently transmitting visual feedback to athletes improves their control of swimming speed. The Leader device has proven useful in controlling swimming speed.

  12. Truncated predictor feedback for time-delay systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Bin

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a systematic approach to the design of predictor based controllers for (time-varying) linear systems with either (time-varying) input or state delays. Differently from those traditional predictor based controllers, which are infinite-dimensional static feedback laws and may cause difficulties in their practical implementation, this book develops a truncated predictor feedback (TPF) which involves only finite dimensional static state feedback. Features and topics: A novel approach referred to as truncated predictor feedback for the stabilization of (time-varying) time-delay systems in both the continuous-time setting and the discrete-time setting is built systematically Semi-global and global stabilization problems of linear time-delay systems subject to either magnitude saturation or energy constraints are solved in a systematic manner Both stabilization of a single system and consensus of a group of systems (multi-agent systems) are treated in a unified manner by applying the truncated pre...

  13. Horizon feedback inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Markkanen, Tommi; Rodriguez Roman, David

    2018-04-01

    We consider the effect of the Gibbons-Hawking radiation on the inflaton in the situation where it is coupled to a large number of spectator fields. We argue that this will lead to two important effects - a thermal contribution to the potential and a gradual change in parameters in the Lagrangian which results from thermodynamic and energy conservation arguments. We present a scenario of hilltop inflation where the field starts trapped at the origin before slowly experiencing a phase transition during which the field extremely slowly moves towards its zero temperature expectation value. We show that it is possible to obtain enough e-folds of expansion as well as the correct spectrum of perturbations without hugely fine-tuned parameters in the potential (albeit with many spectator fields). We also comment on how initial conditions for inflation can arise naturally in this situation.

  14. Using focus groups in the consumer research phase of a social marketing program to promote moderate-intensity physical activity and walking trail use in Sumter County, South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Ericka; Peck, Lara E; Sharpe, Patricia A; Granner, Michelle L; Bryant, Carol A; Fields, Regina

    2006-01-01

    The use of social marketing approaches in public health practice is increasing. Using marketing concepts such as the "four Ps" (product, price, place, and promotion), social marketing borrows from the principles of commercial marketing but promotes beneficial health behaviors. Consumer research is used to segment the population and develop a strategy based on those marketing concepts. In a community-based participatory research study, 17 focus groups were used in consumer research to develop a social marketing program to promote walking and other moderate-intensity physical activities. Two phases of focus groups were conducted. Phase 1 groups, which included both men and women, were asked to respond to questions that would guide the development of a social marketing program based on social marketing concepts. Phase 1 also determined the intervention's target audience, which was irregularly active women aged 35 to 54. Phase 2 groups, composed of members of the target audience, were asked to further define the product and discuss specific promotion strategies. Phase 1 participants determined that the program product, or target behavior, should be walking. In addition, they identified price, place, and promotion strategies. Phase 2 participants determined that moderate-intensity physical activity is best promoted using the term exercise and offered suggestions for marketing walking, or exercise, to the target audience. There have been few published studies of social marketing campaigns to promote physical activity. In this study, focus groups were key to understanding the target audience in a way that would not have been accomplished with quantitative data alone. The group discussions generated important insights into values and motivations that affect consumers' decisions to adopt a product or behavior. The focus group results guided the development of a social marketing program to promote physical activity in the target audience in Sumter County, South Carolina.

  15. Iterative group splitting algorithm for opportunistic scheduling systems

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Haewoon; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2014-01-01

    An efficient feedback algorithm for opportunistic scheduling systems based on iterative group splitting is proposed in this paper. Similar to the opportunistic splitting algorithm, the proposed algorithm adjusts (or lowers) the feedback threshold

  16. Burnout is associated with changes in error and feedback processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Patrick D; Boden, Sylvia; Freude, Gabriele; Potter, Guy G; Falkenstein, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Burnout is a pattern of complaints in individuals with emotionally demanding jobs that is often seen as a precursor of depression. One often reported symptom of burnout is cognitive decline. To analyze cognitive control and to differentiate between subclinical burnout and mild to moderate depression a double-blinded study was conducted that investigates changes in the processing of performance errors and feedback in a task switching paradigm. Fifty-one of 76 employees from emotionally demanding jobs showed a sufficient number of errors to be included in the analysis. The sample was subdivided into groups with low (EE-) and high (EE+) emotional exhaustion and no (DE-) and mild to moderate depression (DE+). The behavioral data did not significantly differ between the groups. In contrast, in the EE+ group, the error negativity (Ne/ERN) was enhanced while the error positivity (Pe) did not differ between the EE+ and EE- groups. After negative feedback the feedback-related negativity (FRN) was enhanced, while the subsequent positivity (FRP) was reduced in EE+ relative to EE-. None of these effects were observed in the DE+ vs. DE-. These results suggest an upregulation of error and negative feedback processing, while the later processing of negative feedback was attenuated in employees with subclinical burnout but not in mild to moderate depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamics of nonlinear feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snippe, H P; van Hateren, J H

    2007-05-01

    Feedback control in neural systems is ubiquitous. Here we study the mathematics of nonlinear feedback control. We compare models in which the input is multiplied by a dynamic gain (multiplicative control) with models in which the input is divided by a dynamic attenuation (divisive control). The gain signal (resp. the attenuation signal) is obtained through a concatenation of an instantaneous nonlinearity and a linear low-pass filter operating on the output of the feedback loop. For input steps, the dynamics of gain and attenuation can be very different, depending on the mathematical form of the nonlinearity and the ordering of the nonlinearity and the filtering in the feedback loop. Further, the dynamics of feedback control can be strongly asymmetrical for increment versus decrement steps of the input. Nevertheless, for each of the models studied, the nonlinearity in the feedback loop can be chosen such that immediately after an input step, the dynamics of feedback control is symmetric with respect to increments versus decrements. Finally, we study the dynamics of the output of the control loops and find conditions under which overshoots and undershoots of the output relative to the steady-state output occur when the models are stimulated with low-pass filtered steps. For small steps at the input, overshoots and undershoots of the output do not occur when the filtering in the control path is faster than the low-pass filtering at the input. For large steps at the input, however, results depend on the model, and for some of the models, multiple overshoots and undershoots can occur even with a fast control path.

  18. Object discrimination using electrotactile feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Tapas J; Hasse, Brady A; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2018-04-09

    A variety of bioengineering systems are being developed to restore tactile sensations in individuals who have lost somatosensory feedback because of spinal cord injury, stroke, or amputation. These systems typically detect tactile force with sensors placed on an insensate hand (or prosthetic hand in the case of amputees) and deliver touch information by electrically or mechanically stimulating sensate skin above the site of injury. Successful object manipulation, however, also requires proprioceptive feedback representing the configuration and movements of the hand and digits. Therefore, we developed a simple system that simultaneously provides information about tactile grip force and hand aperture using current amplitude-modulated electrotactile feedback. We evaluated the utility of this system by testing the ability of eight healthy human subjects to distinguish among 27 objects of varying sizes, weights, and compliances based entirely on electrotactile feedback. The feedback was modulated by grip-force and hand-aperture sensors placed on the hand of an experimenter (not visible to the subject) grasping and lifting the test objects. We were also interested to determine the degree to which subjects could learn to use such feedback when tested over five consecutive sessions. The average percentage correct identifications on day 1 (28.5%  ±  8.2% correct) was well above chance (3.7%) and increased significantly with training to 49.2%  ±  10.6% on day 5. Furthermore, this training transferred reasonably well to a set of novel objects. These results suggest that simple, non-invasive methods can provide useful multisensory feedback that might prove beneficial in improving the control over prosthetic limbs.

  19. Safety and efficacy of high-dose tamoxifen and sulindac for desmoid tumor in children: results of a Children's Oncology Group (COG) phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X; Anderson, James R; Hill, D Ashley; Henry, David; Spunt, Sheri L; Meyer, William; Kao, Simon; Hoffer, Fredric A; Grier, Holcombe E; Hawkins, Douglas S; Raney, R Beverly

    2013-07-01

    Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumor, DT) is a soft tissue neoplasm prone to recurrence despite complete surgical resection. Numerous small retrospective reports suggest that non-cytotoxic chemotherapy using tamoxifen and sulindac may be effective for DT. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of tamoxifen and sulindac in a prospective phase II study within the Children's Oncology Group. Eligible patients were <19 years of age who had measurable DT that was recurrent or not amenable to surgery or radiation. The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received tamoxifen and sulindac daily for 12 months or until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Fifty-nine eligible patients were enrolled from 2004 to 2009; 78% were 10-18 years old. Twenty-two (38%) were previously untreated; 15 (41%) of the remaining 37 enrolling with recurrent DT had prior systemic chemotherapy and six (16%) had prior radiation. No life-threatening toxicity was reported. Twelve (40%) of 30 females developed ovarian cysts, which were asymptomatic in 11 cases. Ten patients completed therapy without disease progression or discontinuing treatment. Responses included four partial and one complete (5/59, 8%). The estimated 2-year PFS and survival rates were 36% (95% confidence interval: 0.23-0.48) and 96%, respectively. All three deaths were due to progressive DT. Tamoxifen and sulindac caused few serious side effects in children with DT, although ovarian cysts were common. However, the combination showed relatively little activity as measured by response and PFS rates. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Safety and Efficacy of High-Dose Tamoxifen and Sulindac for Desmoid Tumor in Children: Results of a Children’s Oncology Group (COG) Phase II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X.; Anderson, James R.; Hill, D. Ashley; Henry, David; Spunt, Sheri L.; Meyer, William; Kao, Simon; Hoffer, Fredric A.; Grier, Holcombe E.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Raney, R. Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Background Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumor, DT) is a soft tissue neoplasm prone to recurrence despite complete surgical resection. Numerous small retrospective reports suggest that non-cytotoxic chemotherapy using tamoxifen and sulindac may be effective for DT. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of tamoxifen and sulindac in a prospective phase II study within the Children’s Oncology Group. Procedures Eligible patients were <19 years of age who had measurable DT that was recurrent or not amenable to surgery or radiation. The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received tamoxifen and sulindac daily for 12 months or until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. Response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results Fifty-nine eligible patients were enrolled from 2004 to 2009; 78% were 10–18 years old. Twenty-two (38%) were previously untreated; 15 (41%) of the remaining 37 enrolling with recurrent DT had prior systemic chemotherapy and six (16%) had prior radiation. No life-threatening toxicity was reported. Twelve (40%) of 30 females developed ovarian cysts, which were asymptomatic in 11 cases. Ten patients completed therapy without disease progression or discontinuing treatment. Responses included four partial and one complete (5/59, 8%). The estimated 2-year PFS and survival rates were 36% (95% confidence interval: 0.23–0.48) and 96%, respectively. All three deaths were due to progressive DT. Conclusions Tamoxifen and sulindac caused few serious side effects in children with DT, although ovarian cysts were common. However, the combination showed relatively little activity as measured by response and PFS rates. PMID:23281268

  1. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Barbara J., E-mail: barbara.fisher@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Hu, Chen [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Macdonald, David R. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lesser, Glenn J. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Coons, Stephen W. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Brachman, David G. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Junfeng [GCE Solutions, Inc., Bloomington, Illinois (United States); Chakravarti, Arnab [The Ohio State University, The James, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh [University of Maryland Medical Systems, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  2. A long-term self-managed handwriting intervention for people with Parkinson's disease: results from the control group of a phase II randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Johnny; Franssen, Marloes; Winward, Charlotte; Izadi, Hooshang; Meaney, Andy; Mahmoud, Wala; Bogdanovic, Marko; Tims, Martin; Wade, Derick; Dawes, Helen

    2017-12-01

    To report on the control group of a trial primarily designed to investigate exercise for improving mobility in people with Parkinson's disease (pwP). The control group undertook a handwriting intervention to control for attention and time spent practising a specific activity. Secondary analysis of a two-arm parallel phase II randomized controlled trial with blind assessment. Community. PwP able to walk ⩾100 m and with no contraindication to exercise were recruited from the Thames Valley, UK, and randomized (1:1) to exercise or handwriting, via a concealed computer-generated list. Handwriting was undertaken at home and exercise in community facilities; both were delivered through workbooks with monthly support visits and involved practice for 1 hour, twice weekly, over a period of six months. Handwriting was assessed, at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months, using a pangram giving writing speed, amplitude (area) and progressive reduction in amplitude (ratio). The Movement Disorder Society (MDS)-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) item 2.7 measured self-reported handwriting deficits. In all, 105 pwP were recruited (analysed: n  = 51 handwriting, n  = 54 exercise). A total of 40 pwP adhered to the handwriting programme, most completing ⩾1 session/week. Moderate effects were found for amplitude (total area: d = 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.11 to 0.7; P = 0.13) in favour of handwriting over a period of12 months; effects for writing speed and ratio parameters were small ≤0.11. Self-reported handwriting difficulties also favoured handwriting (UPDRS 2.7: odds ratio (OR) = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.91; P = 0.02). No adverse effects were reported. PwP generally adhere to self-directed home handwriting which may provide benefit with minimal risk. Encouraging effects were found in writing amplitude and, moreover, perceived ability.

  3. Prospective randomized phase II study of FOLFIRI versus FOLFOX7 in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: a Chinese Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu; Wen, Feng; Zhou, Chengya; Qiu, Meng; Liu, Jiyan; Chen, Jing; Yi, Cheng; Li, Zhiping; Luo, Deyun; Xu, Feng; Cai, Xiaohong; Bi, Feng

    2017-11-17

    Until now, no standard chemotherapy has been widely accepted for advanced gastric cancer (GC). The current research aimed to compare folinic acid, fluorouracil with irinotecan (mFOLFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX7) as first-line treatments in patients with locally advanced GC in an open, randomized, phase II study. Previously untreated metastatic or recurrent GC patients with measurable disease received mFOLFIRI (arm A) or mFOLFOX7 (arm B) every 2 weeks. The defined second-line treatment was mFOLFOX7 for arm A and mFOLFIRI for arm B. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease control rate (DCR) and toxicity. The evaluable population consisted of 128 patients (54 in arm A; 74 in arm B). Median PFS of arm A was 2.9 months (m) (95% confidence interval, CI , 1.9 to 4.1 m) versus 4.1 m (95% CI , 3.2 to 4.8 m) for arm B ( p = 0.109). Median OS was 9.9 months (95% CI , 6.0 to 13.5 m) for arm A versus 12.0 m for arm B (95% CI , 10.3 to 13.7m; p = 0.431). DCRs for arm A and arm B were 59.3% and 66.3%, respectively ( p = 0.850). In subgroup analysis of the patients who completed both treatment lines per protocol, the median first-line PFS was 2.1 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7arm versus 8.0 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI arm ( p = 0.053), and the median second-line PFS values were 1.2 m versus 5.1 m ( p = 0.287). Total PFS and OS were 8.1m and 11.0 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7 group compared with 12.2m and 20.2 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI group ( p = 0.008, p = 0.030). Both regimens were well-tolerated with acceptable and manageable toxicities. Hence, there was no significant difference in the PFS or DCR. However, mFOLFOX7 followed by mFOLFIRI might have a better OS.

  4. Characteristics of a reactor with power reactivity feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengyu; Zhang Yusheng; Zhang Guangfu; Liu Ying

    2008-01-01

    The point-reactor model with power reactivity feedback becomes a nonlinear system. Its dynamic characteristic shows great complexity. According to the mathematic definition of stability in differential equation qualitative theory, the model of a reactor with power reactivity feedback is judged unstable. The equilibrium point is a saddle-node point. A portion of the trajectory in the neighborhood of the equilibrium point is parabolic fan curve, and the other is hyperbolic fan curve. Based on phase locus near the equilibrium point, it is pointed out that the model is still stable within physical limits. The difference between stabilities in the mathematical sense and in the physical sense is indicated. (authors)

  5. The effect of performance feedback on drivers' hazard perception ability and self-ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horswill, Mark S; Garth, Megan; Hill, Andrew; Watson, Marcus O

    2017-04-01

    Drivers' hazard perception ability has been found to predict crash risk, and novice drivers appear to be particularly poor at this skill. This competency appears to develop only slowly with experience, and this could partially be a result of poor quality performance feedback. We report an experiment in which we provided high-quality artificial feedback on individual drivers' performance in a validated video-based hazard perception test via either: (1) a graph-based comparison of hazard perception response times between the test-taker, the average driver, and an expert driver; (2) a video-based comparison between the same groups; or (3) both. All three types of feedback resulted in both an improvement in hazard perception performance and a reduction in self-rated hazard perception skill, compared with a no-feedback control group. Video-based and graph-based feedback combined resulted in a greater improvement in hazard perception performance than either of the individual components, which did not differ from one another. All three types of feedback eliminated participants' self-enhancement bias for hazard perception skill. Participants judged both interventions involving video feedback to be significantly more likely to improve their real-world driving than the no feedback control group. While all three forms of feedback had some value, the combined video and graph feedback intervention appeared to be the most effective across all outcome measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimizing the Timing of Expert Feedback During Simulation-Based Spaced Practice of Endourologic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason Young; McDougall, Elspeth M; Lineberry, Matthew; Tekian, Ara

    2016-08-01

    Provision of expert feedback is widely acknowledged to be an essential component of simulation-based training. However, little is known about the most effective and efficient ways to provide feedback to novices. Optimizing the timing of expert feedback may improve outcomes while reducing resource requirements. The main objective of this study was to determine the impact of providing early versus late expert feedback to novice learners engaged in a flexible ureteroscopy (fURS) training curriculum. Senior medical students were recruited to participate in this study. Each student participated in a comprehensive fURS training curriculum that included 3 deliberate, independent practice sessions. Baseline and postcourse fURS skill was assessed for each student using a standardized fURS test task. Each student was randomized to either an early feedback group (EFG) or late feedback group (LFG). The EFG participants were provided expert feedback immediately after the baseline skill test, whereas LFG participants were given feedback before their final deliberate, independent practice session. Eighteen senior medical students completed the study (9 EFG and 9 LFG participants). There were no discernible demographic differences between the groups at baseline. When controlling for pretest performance, early rather than late feedback was associated with both shorter postcourse time to completion of the task (19.2 vs. 21.5 minutes, P feedback when learning a novel skill. Further study is required.

  7. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  8. Leadership in Libraries--Feedback as Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Dianne H.

    This paper focuses on the role of feedback in effective communication and ways in which feedback can assist library managers at all levels in performing their role as leaders. The various kinds and sources of feedback are discussed, and the relationship between feedback and goal setting are considered, as well as the effects of goal setting and…

  9. Sustainable feedback: students’ and tutors’ perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitz, Gerry; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Feedback has been shown to substantially influence students’ learning. However, not everything characterized as feedback is effective. Sustainable feedback places students in an active role in which they generate and use feedback from peers, self or others and aims at developing lifelong learning

  10. Feedback process responsible for the suppression of ENSO activity during the mid-Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Soon-Il; Bong, Hayoung

    2018-05-01

    Using the output of 12 models from the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project Phase 3, we investigate the feedback process responsible for changes in El Niño-Southern Oscillation activity during the mid-Holocene based on a linear stability index (Bjerknes stability index; BJ index) analysis. The multi-model ensemble mean (MME) variance of the Niño-3.4 index (sea surface temperature anomalies averaged over 5°S-5°N, 170°-120°W) simulated for 6000 years ago (6 kya) was 13% lower than that for the pre-industrial era (0 kya), while changes in the MME BJ index were negligible. This is due to a balance between enhanced damping by anomalous thermal advection by mean currents (MA) and enhanced positive thermocline feedback (TH). Seven of the models show that MME variance of the Niño-3.4 and BJ indexes for the 6 kya run is 21 and 70% lower, respectively, than the 0 kya run. However, two models show the opposite change. Interestingly, MA in both model groups increases, especially due to the mean meridional current associated with enhanced trade winds, indicating a robust mechanism. The opposite tendency between the two groups is mainly due to large TH in the second group 6 kya, as a result of enhanced air-sea coupling and strongly reduced ocean stratification due to subsurface warming, which led to increased sensitivity of the zonal thermocline contrast to surface zonal wind stress.

  11. Feedback på tekst i grupper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Helle; Heger, Stine

    2017-01-01

    med temaet Feedback på tekst i grupper er via aktiviteter at gøre de studerende bevidste om, at feedback er noget, de skal lære, og noget, de skal øve sig på. De forskellige aktiviteter sætter de studerende i gang med at skabe rammer for feedback, at træne feedback og at give og modtage feedback på...... hinandens tekster. Temaet er bygget op omkring 2 forskellige elementer: 1) forberedelse af feedback og 2) udførelse af feedback....

  12. Effects of visual feedback-induced variability on motor learning of handrim wheelchair propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leving, Marika T; Vegter, Riemer J K; Hartog, Johanneke; Lamoth, Claudine J C; de Groot, Sonja; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that a higher intra-individual variability benefits the motor learning of wheelchair propulsion. The present study evaluated whether feedback-induced variability on wheelchair propulsion technique variables would also enhance the motor learning process. Learning was operationalized as an improvement in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique, which are thought to be closely related during the learning process. 17 Participants received visual feedback-based practice (feedback group) and 15 participants received regular practice (natural learning group). Both groups received equal practice dose of 80 min, over 3 weeks, at 0.24 W/kg at a treadmill speed of 1.11 m/s. To compare both groups the pre- and post-test were performed without feedback. The feedback group received real-time visual feedback on seven propulsion variables with instruction to manipulate the presented variable to achieve the highest possible variability (1st 4-min block) and optimize it in the prescribed direction (2nd 4-min block). To increase motor exploration the participants were unaware of the exact variable they received feedback on. Energy consumption and the propulsion technique variables with their respective coefficient of variation were calculated to evaluate the amount of intra-individual variability. The feedback group, which practiced with higher intra-individual variability, improved the propulsion technique between pre- and post-test to the same extent as the natural learning group. Mechanical efficiency improved between pre- and post-test in the natural learning group but remained unchanged in the feedback group. These results suggest that feedback-induced variability inhibited the improvement in mechanical efficiency. Moreover, since both groups improved propulsion technique but only the natural learning group improved mechanical efficiency, it can be concluded that the improvement in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique do not always appear

  13. Expert monitoring and verbal feedback as sources of performance pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, John J; Park, Inchon; Chen, Jing; Mehta, Ranjana K; McCulloch, Austin; Rhee, Joohyun; Wright, David L

    2018-05-01

    The influence of monitoring-pressure and verbal feedback on the performance of the intrinsically stable bimanual coordination patterns of in-phase and anti-phase was examined. The two bimanual patterns were produced under three conditions: 1) no-monitoring, 2) monitoring-pressure (viewed by experts), and 3) monitoring-pressure (viewed by experts) combined with verbal feedback emphasizing poor performance. The bimanual patterns were produced at self-paced movement frequencies. Anti-phase coordination was always less stable than in-phase coordination across all three conditions. When performed under conditions 2 and 3, both bimanual patterns were performed with less variability in relative phase across a wide range of self-paced movement frequencies compared to the no-monitoring condition. Thus, monitoring-pressure resulted in performance stabilization rather than degradation and the presence of verbal feedback had no impact on the influence of monitoring pressure. The current findings are inconsistent with the predictions of explicit monitoring theory; however, the findings are consistent with studies that have revealed increased stability for the system's intrinsic dynamics as a result of attentional focus and intentional control. The results are discussed within the contexts of the dynamic pattern theory of coordination, explicit monitoring theory, and action-focused theories as explanations for choking under pressure. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Wikis for Group Work: Encouraging Transparency, Benchmarking, and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdekhodaee, Amir; Chase, Anne-Marie; Ross, Bella

    2017-01-01

    Technology is recognised as playing a part in the changing landscape in higher education; altering delivery modes and providing flexible opportunities for learning. Research into the use of wikis has shown that they provide many opportunities for student learning and the development of twenty-first century skills, however, there has been limited…

  15. Computer modelling of bunch-by-bunch feedback for the SLAC B-factory design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, D.; Fox, J.D.; Hosseini, W.; Klaisner, L.; Morton, P.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Thompson, K.A.; Lambertson, G.

    1991-05-01

    The SLAC B-factory design, with over 1600 high current bunches circulating in each ring, will require a feedback system to avoid coupled-bunch instabilities. A computer model of the storage ring, including the RF system, wave fields, synchrotron radiation loss, and the bunch-by-bunch feedback system is presented. The feedback system model represents the performance of a fast phase detector front end (including system noise and imperfections), a digital filter used to generate a correction voltage, and a power amplifier and beam kicker system. The combined ring-feedback system model is used to study the feedback system performance required to suppress instabilities and to quantify the dynamics of the system. Results are presented which show the time development of coupled bunch instabilities and the damping action of the feedback system. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Analysis of Feedback in after Action Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    CONNTSM Page INTRODUCTIUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Perspective on Feedback. . ....... • • ..... • 1 Overviev of %,•urrent Research...part of their training program . The AAR is in marked contrast to the critique method of feedback which is often used in military training. The AAR...feedback is task-inherent feedback. Task-inherent feedback refers to human-machine interacting systems, e.g., computers , where in a visual tracking task

  17. Recognition of boundary feedback systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A system that has been the object of intense research is outlined. In view of that and recent progress of the theory of pseudodifferential boundary operator calculus, the author describes some features that could prove to be interesting in connection with the problems of boundary feedback stabili...... stabilizability. It is shown that it is possible to use the calculus to consider more general feedback systems in a variational setup.......A system that has been the object of intense research is outlined. In view of that and recent progress of the theory of pseudodifferential boundary operator calculus, the author describes some features that could prove to be interesting in connection with the problems of boundary feedback...

  18. Perceived Insider Status and Feedback Reactions: A Dual Path of Feedback Motivation Attribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijiong Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have evaluated how the characteristics of feedback receiver, feedback deliverer and feedback information influence psychological feedback reactions of the feedback receiver while largely neglecting that feedback intervention is a kind of social interaction process. To address this issue, this study proposes that employees’ perceived insider status (PIS, as a kind of employee-organization relationship, could also influence employees’ reactions to supervisory feedback. In particular, this study investigates the influence of PIS focusing on affective and cognitive feedback reactions, namely feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Surveys were conducted in a machinery manufacturing company in the Guangdong province of China. Samples were collected from 192 employees. Data analysis demonstrated that PIS and feedback utility possessed a U-shaped relationship, whereas PIS and feedback satisfaction exhibited positively linear relationships. The analysis identified two kinds of mediating mechanisms related to feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Internal feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction but failed to do the same with respect to the relationship between PIS and feedback utility. In contrast, external feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback utility while failing to mediate the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of the findings are discussed at the end of the paper.

  19. Stabilization of self-mode-locked quantum dash lasers by symmetric dual-loop optical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Haroon; Wei, Wei; Kumar, Pramod; Sooudi, Ehsan; McInerney, John. G.

    2018-02-01

    We report experimental studies of the influence of symmetric dual-loop optical feedback on the RF linewidth and timing jitter of self-mode-locked two-section quantum dash lasers emitting at 1550 nm. Various feedback schemes were investigated and optimum levels determined for narrowest RF linewidth and low timing jitter, for single-loop and symmetric dual-loop feedback. Two symmetric dual-loop configurations, with balanced and unbalanced feedback ratios, were studied. We demonstrate that unbalanced symmetric dual loop feedback, with the inner cavity resonant and fine delay tuning of the outer loop, gives narrowest RF linewidth and reduced timing jitter over a wide range of delay, unlike single and balanced symmetric dual-loop configurations. This configuration with feedback lengths 80 and 140 m narrows the RF linewidth by 4-67x and 10-100x, respectively, across the widest delay range, compared to free-running. For symmetric dual-loop feedback, the influence of different power split ratios through the feedback loops was determined. Our results show that symmetric dual-loop feedback is markedly more effective than single-loop feedback in reducing RF linewidth and timing jitter, and is much less sensitive to delay phase, making this technique ideal for applications where robustness and alignment tolerance are essential.

  20. Feedforward/feedback control synthesis for performance and robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Liu, Qiang

    1990-01-01

    Both feedforward and feedback control approaches for uncertain dynamical systems are investigated. The control design objective is to achieve a fast settling time (high performance) and robustness (insensitivity) to plant modeling uncertainty. Preshapong of an ideal, time-optimal control input using a 'tapped-delay' filter is shown to provide a rapid maneuver with robust performance. A robust, non-minimum-phase feedback controller is synthesized with particular emphasis on its proper implementation for a non-zero set-point control problem. The proposed feedforward/feedback control approach is robust for a certain class of uncertain dynamical systems, since the control input command computed for a given desired output does not depend on the plant parameters.