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Sample records for group family day

  1. MSUD Family Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Group The MSUD Family Support Group is a non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization for those with MSUD ... Family Support Group is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with no paid staff. Funds are needed ...

  2. May 15-International Day of the Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    THIS year is the International Year of the Family which was designated to promote global cooperation on family issues. On May 15, which was named the International Day of the Family. the Ali-China Women’s Federation and the Women’s Federation of Beijing organized 18 districts and counties to set

  3. Family Day Care Zoning. Local Officials Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Abby; And Others

    This guide discusses city planning issues related to family day care zoning. The guide is divided into five sections. The first section discusses child care as a planning issue and focuses on changes in working patterns of families and in residential neighborhoods. The second section describes components of the child care delivery system, which…

  4. Family Day Care Zoning Advocacy Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Carol; And Others

    Designed to help family day care providers and the agencies that support them reform local zoning laws that make it difficult or impossible to legally care for children in their homes, this guide outlines the process of obtaining a use permit, changing local laws, and strategizing for the passage of state legislation that preempts local laws. A…

  5. Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonholo-Silva, E R; Takahashi, S I; Yoshinaga, L

    1994-03-01

    Familial dysautonomia, also known as Riley-Day syndrome, is a disorder of autonomic nervous system with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Reduction and/or loss of unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers is found, as reduction of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in blood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features: diminished lacrimation, insensitivity to pain, poor temperature control, abolished deep tendon reflexes, postural hypotension, vomiting attacks, poor motor coordination, and mental retardation. The treatment is symptomatic and many children die during the first years of life, usually as a result of repeated aspiration pneumonia. We report the case of a 1 year-old child with familial dysautonomia.

  6. Familial dysautonomy (Riley-Day syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Tonholo Silva

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Familial dysautonomia, also known as Riley-Day syndrome, is a disorder of autonomic nervous system with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Reduction and/or loss of unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers is found, as reduction of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in blood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features: diminished lacrimation, insensitivity to pain, poor temperature control, abolished deep tendon reflexes, postural hypotension, vomiting attacks, poor motor coordenation, and mental retardation. The treatment is symptomatic and many children die during the first years of life, usually as a result of repeated aspiration pneumonia. We report the case of a 1 year-old child with familial dysautonomia.

  7. Familial dysautonomy (Riley-Day syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Edward R. Tonholo Silva; Setsuko Ikeda Takahashi; Lucia Yoshinaga

    1994-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia, also known as Riley-Day syndrome, is a disorder of autonomic nervous system with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Reduction and/or loss of unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers is found, as reduction of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in blood. The diagnosis is based on clinical features: diminished lacrimation, insensitivity to pain, poor temperature control, abolished deep tendon reflexes, postural hypotension, vomiting attacks, poor motor coordenation, and me...

  8. [Riley-Day syndrome (familial dysautonomia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, K

    1992-04-01

    Riley-Day syndrome (RDS, familial dysautonomia) is reviewed from a viewpoint of autonomic disturbance. RDS shows pandysautonomia, including alacrima, orthostatic hypotension, gastrointestinal paresis, and paroxysmal hyperautonomic state, such as hypertension, vomiting crisis, and blotchy erythema. Sensory disturbances, including absence of taste and pain sensation, are common. Fungiform papillae on the tongue are sparse. Tests of autonomic function reveal postganglionic dysfunction. Sural nerve biopsy reveals depletion of small myelinated fibers and unmyelinated fibers, which corresponds well with the sensory and autonomic disturbances. As to the pathogenesis of RDS, dysgenesis of neurons from the neural crest or abnormality of nerve growth factor has been suggested, but this remains undetermined.

  9. Family Reconstruction: The Family within-a Group Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satir, Virginia; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents Virginia Satir's Family Reconstruction, a group therapy experience that blends and extends her 1982 process therapy and 1983 conjoint family therapy approaches. Describes the family reconstruction process, the review of family reconstruction data in the pregroup interview, the family reconstruction process in the counseling group, and the…

  10. Family Reconstruction: The Family within-a Group Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satir, Virginia; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents Virginia Satir's Family Reconstruction, a group therapy experience that blends and extends her 1982 process therapy and 1983 conjoint family therapy approaches. Describes the family reconstruction process, the review of family reconstruction data in the pregroup interview, the family reconstruction process in the counseling group, and the…

  11. Family Day Care Mothers Work Together to Improve Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, June Solnit

    1975-01-01

    Describes the history of Women Attentive to Children's Happiness (WATCH), a self-help organization of family day care mothers which has developed an effective method of producing developmental programs for children and families. (ED)

  12. Evaluation of an education day for families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Emily S; Ulster, Alissa A

    2011-09-01

    Children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may have chronic physical impairment in their affected upper extremity. Affected children and their families may benefit from psychosocial interventions including therapeutic relationships with health professionals, meeting other families living with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, support groups, and social work. One method of addressing psychosocial needs is through a support and education day. The purpose of this quality improvement project is to evaluate parental perceptions of a support and education day called the "Brachial Plexus Family Day." Families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy who attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day completed a questionnaire to evaluate the different programs offered during the day. The families also ranked the importance of different psychosocial supports offered in the clinic. Sixty-three out of 69 families completed the questionnaire. Each program of the Brachial Plexus Family Day was rated as good or excellent by the respondents. Ninety-seven percent of respondents rated meeting other families and children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy as helpful supports. Attending a Brachial Plexus Family day event (86%), followed by connecting with a doctor (60%), and physical or occupational therapist (59%) were the highest ranked supports reported by the families. The parents and caregivers that attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day rated the program highly. This group also valued the opportunity to connect with other families and children affected with the same condition.

  13. Quality Aspects of Swedish Family Day Care and Center Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerus, Kerstin

    This paper presents data concerning the use and costs of center and family day care programs in Sweden. The typical center provides full-time care and has 4 sections, each with 2 preschool teachers, 1 attendant, and up to 20 children. In the family day care system, municipalities employ caregivers and parents pay the municipality. This paper…

  14. 77 FR 60279 - Gold Star Mother's and Family's Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8872 of September 28, 2012 Gold Star Mother's and Family's Day, 2012 By the... loss of a child, spouses who carry an emptiness that cannot be filled, children who know sorrow that... upholding the sacred trust we share with our Gold Star families and the heroes we have laid to rest. Let...

  15. Discovering Family Groups in Passenger Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万怀宇; 王志伟; 林友芳; 贾旭光; 周元炜

    2015-01-01

    People usually travel together with others in groups for different purposes, such as family members for visiting relatives, colleagues for business, friends for sightseeing and so on. Especially, the family groups, as a kind of the most com-mon consumer units, have a considerable scale in the field of passenger transportation market. Accurately identifying family groups can help the carriers to provide passengers with personalized travel services and precise product recommendation. This paper studies the problem of finding family groups in the field of civil aviation and proposes a family group detection method based on passenger social networks. First of all, we construct passenger social networks based on their co-travel behaviors extracted from the historical travel records; secondly, we use a collective classification algorithm to classify the social relationships between passengers into family or non-family relationship groups; finally, we employ a weighted com-munity detection algorithm to find family groups, which takes the relationship classification results as the weights of edges. Experimental results on a real dataset of passenger travel records in the field of civil aviation demonstrate that our method can effectively find family groups from historical travel records.

  16. Physical activity levels among children attending family day care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kelly R; Trost, Stewart G

    2014-01-01

    To objectively measure the physical activity (PA) levels of children attending family day care programs. A total of 114 children from 47 family day care centers wore an accelerometer for the duration of their time in care. Time in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and total PA was calculated using previously validated cut points. Children accumulated 5.8 ± 3.2 minutes of MVPA and 10.4 ± 4.4 minutes of total PA per hour of attendance. Boys exhibited significantly higher levels of PA than girls. Among healthy weight children, 4- and 5-year-olds exhibited significantly higher levels of PA than 2- and 3-year-olds. Overweight and obese 4- and 5-year-olds exhibited significantly lower levels of PA than their healthy weight counterparts. Children attending family day care participate in low levels of PA during the child care day. The results highlight the need for effective programs to promote PA in family day care. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Family Therapy in a Women's Group: Integrating Marriage and Family Therapy and Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hildy G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a family therapy perspective can be integrated into group as a treatment modality. Concepts from family therapy are illustrated through a description of a specific women's group and case study. Techniques from family therapy applied in group are derived from multigenerational, experiential/humanistic, and cognitive-behavioral…

  18. [Multi-family group therapy in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Multi-family therapy, common group therapy with several families per one index patient, has been gaining popularity recently. This has occasioned an exploratory study of the status of implementation and common factors in all multi-family therapy programs in Germany. In a survey conducted across Germany, all providers of multi-family therapy interventions were requested to give a detailed description of their intervention. Quantitative data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, and verbal data were summarized categorically with qualitative content analysis. Of the 25 intervention programs examined 21 are directed at emotionally disturbed children and young people and their families; mainly with disturbances in social behavior. Over 4,000 families per year are treated in multi-family therapy, and five programs were systematically evaluated. MFT is characterized by systematically oriented group therapy methods. Those surveyed traced the effect of this form of intervention back to activating problems in the group, activating resources, changing perspective, learning models, experiencing self-efficacy, and the therapeutic relationship. Systematic studies of multi-family therapy in evaluations and in random controlled study designs are recommended.

  19. Salt conservation in familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, H; Friedman, J; Rösler, A; Moses, S W; Freier, T S; Rotem, Y; Rabinowitz, D

    1977-03-01

    In some patients with familial dysautonimia, plasma renin activity shows a paradoxical response to postural stimuli, i.e., levels of plasma renin activity are high when the patient is in the supine position and fall significantly during subsequent ambulation. Furthermore, there is no coordinated release of plasma renin activity and aldosterone. The aim of the present study was to determine whether these findings are accompanied by a disturbance of salt conservation. Six patients were studied in a summer camp while on normal and low-salt diets. Plasma and urinary aldosterone levels rose sharply and appropriately when four of the patients were placed on a low-sodium diet. In these subjects, urinary sodium output fell sharply although three of them failed to attain sodium equilibrium by the third day of the low-sodium regimen. Elevation of early morning plasma renin activity appeared to correlate with an inversion in the normal day-night rhythm in urinary volume.

  20. Diversification strategies in family and non-family groups: main differences according non-family group type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Hernández Trasobares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the interest for the study of ownership structure as a determinant of diversification arises. However, there is a lack of researches that analyze the influence of the nature of the ultimate owner in the level and type of diversification. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to analyze the diversification strategies used by the main Spanish business groups whose parent company is listed on the stock markets, and to study the differences between family and non-family business groups, considering in these last, the type of ultimate owner. In the study a sample of ninety-nine listed companies is used, where companies that constitute the business group are identified. In the paper are used as econometric methodologies the binomial logistic models and panel data models. The results show that family nature of business group positively influences in specialization and related diversification and negatively on unrelated diversification. Family groups differ most form those non-family groups where there is not a reference shareholder than can exercise effective control and ownership dispersion is higher, the groups referred as “non effective control”. The research allows further analysis of differences between family and non-family groups, considering the nature of the ultimate owner for non-family groups.

  1. Psychological changes in hundred-day remote Antarctic field groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J.; Lugg, D. J.; Hysong, S. J.; Harm, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Psychological adaptation to extreme environments has been examined from several perspectives. In this study, two Australian teams, each consisting of six male crew members, completed computer-administered questionnaires twice weekly during 100-day traverses around the Lambert Glacier Basin, Antarctica. Only small trends were noted when data were aggregated at the group level, which is consistent with the findings of others. Data were then analyzed using pooled time-series regression. These analyses incorporated personality characteristics, environmental factors, and interpersonal factors as predictors of Group Tensions, Personal Morale, Emotional State, Cognitive Readiness, and the Team's Work Life. Most of the psychological discomfort and problems that occurred appeared to be within the individual or between individuals. They did not affect all members of the group equally.

  2. Nonspinal orthopaedic problems in familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplaza, F J; Turajane, T; Axelrod, F B; Burke, S W

    2001-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease occurring in Ashkenazi Jews. It affects the autonomic, central, and peripheral nervous systems. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of orthopedic deformities, other than spinal deformities, in this population. A retrospective review of the medical records and radiographs of 182 patients was made. Three main groups of orthopaedic conditions were evaluated: (a) Fractures: 60% of the patients had one or more fractures; the average fracture rate was 1.4/patient. (b) Neuropathic joints: 11% of the cases had one or more neuropathic joints, the knee being the most common. (c) Other musculoskeletal deformities: 26% of the patients had one or more deformities. Lower extremity rotational problems and foot anomalies accounted for most of these deformities. Patients with FD have a higher prevalence of fractures and neuropathic joints than do their peers. The fracture pattern also is different, with a higher incidence of proximal femoral fractures.

  3. Family group conferences in youth justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Robin; Shemmings, David; Dugmore, Paul; Hyare, Mina

    2008-05-01

    This paper discusses part of an evaluation of the 'Family Group Conference (FGC) Project for Young People Who Offend' within a large social services department ('Exshire'). The evaluation covers all 30 family group conferences during a 15-month period from September 2000 to December 2001. This article presents the findings relating to young people along with changes in their psychosocial profile using a modified version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; Goodman 1997). The views of all participants were positive, with the majority saying they would recommend FGCs to others. FGC was felt by most participants to have brought about changes in the way young people view the world, partly by helping them to accept the reality of offending in a way that had not previously been possible. It provided victims with a unique opportunity to become involved in the youth justice system, recognising them as key stakeholders as a result of a crime. This process left most victims with a sense of satisfaction and resolution. Average SDQ scores were lower following FGC for the 12 young people who responded to follow-up interviews. Although there are a number of restorative justice projects using FGC in youth justice, we believe this project is among the first in the UK to establish the use of the New Zealand model with its emphasis on 'private family time' as an ongoing established service. Although the data were collected before 2002, the project contains unique features which we believe should be brought to the attention of the wider academic and practice community given that FGC is still a fairly new, unexplored and under-evaluated phenomenon in youth justice. There is currently a need for more research looking at the use of FGC in relation to young offenders.

  4. Family-Group Names In Coleoptera (Insecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Bouchard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names: Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. n. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae, Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae, Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae, Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae; Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein syn. n. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy syn. n. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae, Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein syn. n. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae, Sclerastes Gistel, 1856 (type species

  5. Family group conferencing: a theoretical underpinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metze, Rosalie N; Abma, Tineke A; Kwekkeboom, Rick H

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, Family Group Conferences (FGCs) have increasingly been used to help people and their networks deal with their problems. The FGC fits well with the call for equal rights and self-management coming from clients and client movements, as well as the economy-driven pressure towards more informal and less professional care coming from governments. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the underlying theory to explain how the FGC works. In this article, we aim to provide such a theoretical basis by examining how the concept of empowerment can be linked with the basic assumptions underlying the FGC. Can making a plan of their own indeed help to empower people and if so, how does the process of empowerment proceed? Empowerment is often mentioned as a goal of the FGC, but authors are not unanimous when it comes to the operationalisation of empowerment, especially on the relational level of the person in his or her social context. In the article, we use the concepts of relational autonomy and resilience to conceptualize empowerment on the relational and individual level.

  6. Recursos/Resources: A Bibliography of Spanish-Language Family Day Care Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This bibliography provides descriptions and contact information regarding resources produced by American and Canadian family day care training projects and other educational organizations for agencies working with Spanish-speaking family day care providers. Included are resources in the following areas: (1) "Recruitment Resources"; (2) "Family Day…

  7. The Old Days, Hot Groups, and Managers' Lib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Harold J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes Douglas McGregor's group at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 1940s and the group at Carnegie's Graduate School of Industrial Administration in the 1960s. Both showed the lively, task-obsessed characteristics of "hot groups." Both occupied participants' hearts and minds, held to high standards, and were extremely…

  8. [Evaluation of Treatment of Mothers at the Family Day Hospital in Münster, Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwinski, Timur; Romer, Georg; Müller, Jörg Michael

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of Treatment of Mothers at the Family Day Hospital in Münster, Germany. Mothers of preschool children have limited access to mental health treatment services. The Family Day Hospital for Preschool Children at the University Hospital Münster, Germany, offers therefore a specialized treatment for mothers with their preschool children. The therapy outcome of mothers is evaluated in effectiveness study by a pre-post-design. For mothers, therapy was composed of individual session and couple sessions with the partner, video-based parent-child-interaction therapy, and parent group sessions. We evaluated the psychiatric symptom burden of N = 103 mothers at admission and discharge with the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) above the clinical cut-off ≥ 0.57. After treatment the mothers showed significant improvement on the global severity index (GSI) with an average Cohen's d = 1.64 (p0.001). We identified the following positively associated moderator variables of maternal improvement by a multiple regression analysis: the initial symptom burden, the educational level of the mother, not restricted housing conditions, and the age of the child. We conclude that especially distressed parents benefit from the treatment in the Family Day Hospital for Preschool Children.

  9. 26 CFR 1.1366-3 - Treatment of family groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Treatment of family groups. 1.1366-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1366-3 Treatment of family groups. (a) In general. Under section 1366(e), if an individual, who is a member of the family of one or...

  10. CPAFFC Working Group Attends Kuwait’s National Day Celebrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai; Lin

    2014-01-01

    <正>February 25 and February 26 are respectively the National Day and Liberation Day of Kuwait.The year of 2014 marks the 53rd anniversary of the founding of Kuwait and 23rd anniversary of liberation of Kuwait from the Iraqi occupation.On February 25,all Kuwaiti people tend to go for an outing.Almost every car parading along the seaside boulevard in Kuwait City displayed the Kuwaiti national fl ag.Many young people and children with national fl ags painted on their faces and clutching national fl ags climbed up to the car roofs to cheer and used water pistols to spray

  11. The Family FIRO Model: The Integration of Group Theory and Family Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Nicholas; Doherty, William J.

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Family Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (Family FIRO) Model, an integration of small-group theory and family therapy. The model is offered as a framework for organizing family issues. Discusses three fundamental issues of human relatedness and their applicability to group dynamics. (Author/NB)

  12. Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome): when baroreceptor feedback fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2012-12-24

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary disorder caused by mutations within the gene that encodes for I-κ-B kinase complex associated protein (IKAP). A deficiency of IKAP affects the development of primary sensory neurons including those carrying baroreflex afferent volleys, a feature that explains their characteristic sensory loss and labile blood pressure. This review describes the history, the genotype of FD and the unusual cardiovascular autonomic phenotype of these patients. We outline the main consequences of a failure to receive information from arterial baroreceptors, including the characteristic "autonomic storms" and severe end-organ target damage.

  13. Spine deformity in familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, S A; Bobechko, W P

    1987-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia spanning a 30-year period reviewed retrospectively. The 16 patients identified included nine with spine deformities. Serious general medical problems were common. Spine deformities included kyphosis, scoliosis, or a combination of both. Brace treatment was attempted and was unsuccessful in three patients. Seven underwent surgical stabilization. Although all seven patients tolerated the surgical procedures, at least one postoperative complication was noted in each case. Follow-up ranged from 1 1/2 to 16 1/2 years. We recommend close observation of the deformities, early stabilization when disorders are progressive, and a high level of awareness of potential complications.

  14. The Riley-Day syndrome. Familial dysautonomy, central autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, J

    1977-01-01

    The Riley-Day syndrome is characterized by a dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system, sensory disturbances, neurological disorders, psychical anomalies and important ophthalmological symptoms, such as absence of tears, corneal anaesthesia, keratinized conjunctiva and cornea; myosis after instillation of methacholine. The diagnosis is based on the absence of fungiform papillae of the tongue and the absence of reaction after intradermic injection of histamine. The inheritance is autosomal recessive. The disease results probably from an enzymatic insufficiency.

  15. Recursos/Resources: A Bibliography of Spanish-Language Family Day Care Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This bibliography provides descriptions and contact information regarding resources produced by American and Canadian family day care training projects and other educational organizations for agencies working with Spanish-speaking family day care providers. Included are resources in the following areas: (1) "Recruitment Resources"; (2)…

  16. 78 FR 38996 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life... information technology. To Submit Comments and For Further Information: To obtain a copy of the data... days of the date of this publication. Proposed Collection: Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health,...

  17. Recursos/Resources: A Bibliography of Spanish-Language Family Day Care Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This bibliography provides descriptions and contact information regarding resources produced by American and Canadian family day care training projects and other educational organizations for agencies working with Spanish-speaking family day care providers. Included are resources in the following areas: (1) "Recruitment Resources"; (2)…

  18. ["Family groups" for relatives of patients with anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunswick, Astrid; Guy-Rubin, Aurore; Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa affects mainly young adults. During care, caregivers seek alliance with patients' friends and family to be able to relate to the patients' symptoms and also their environment. Collaborative work with families helps build confidence. The "family group" is an example of well-intended partnership.

  19. Khoa Trinh Huan Luyen Giu Tre Ban Ngay Tai Gia (Family Day Care Training Curriculum--Vietnamese).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train, in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses and licensing requirements for family day care, licensing…

  20. Using Family Sculpting and Choreography in a Student Growth Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of family sculpting and choreography in helping a group of university students to achieve a healthy emotional and psychological separation from their families of origin. Presents a case example, along with suggestions for future groups using a similar focus and format. (Author/KS)

  1. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  2. Children with Special Needs in Family Day Care Homes: A Handbook of Approaches and Activities for Family Day Care Home Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Brosse, Beatrice

    Practical information and sample teaching activities for child caregivers who work with young developmentally disabled children in family day care settings are provided in this manual. Each chapter shares a typical experience a caregiver may have with a particular child. Chapter 1 focuses on getting to know a new child, initial expectations, and…

  3. Day to Day Operations of Home School Families: Selecting from a Menu of Educational Choices to Meet Students' Individual Instructional Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Kenneth V.; Burroughs, Susie

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the day to day operations of home schools. The case study method was used with four families from a larger pool of families that held membership in a home school organization. Data was gathered using interviews, observations, and artifacts. Findings suggest that these families operated their home schools using traditional…

  4. Neonatal family care for 24 hours per day: effects on maternal confidence and breast-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataker, Heidi; Meberg, Alf; Nestaas, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    In family care (FC) program for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), parents are encouraged to reside together with their infant for 24 hours a day to actively be involved in the care. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of FC on maternal confidence and breast-feeding. Maternal confidence and rate of breast-feeding were assessed in 31 mothers offered FC that included special family rooms in the NICU, and in 30 mothers from a comparable NICU providing traditional care without such facilities. One week prior to hospital discharge, mothers in the FC group felt better informed regarding nursing issues and had more confidence in interpretation of the infants regarding feeding issues and in caregiving without staff attendance (P skill level for interpretation of the infant's signals and knowledge about breast-feeding (P < .05). Despite similar rate of breast-feeding at discharge, more infants in the FC group were breastfed 3 months after discharge (P < .05). An FC program in the NICU promoted better maternal confidence during the hospital stay and 3 months after discharge compared with traditional care.

  5. Contemporary perioperative management of adult familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew; Mon, Wint Yu; Down, James; Obichere, Austin; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-05-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) is a rare multisystem disorder associated with an excess risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Because life expectancy is limited, few reports consider the perioperative management of familial dysautonomia in adults with advanced disease and end-organ dysfunction. Here, we report on the management of an adult patient with familial dysautonomia, highlighting recent developments in perioperative technology and pharmacology of special relevance to this challenging population.

  6. Revisiting Executive Pay in Family-Controlled Firms: Family Premium in Large Business Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Cheong, Juyoung; Kim, Woochan

    2014-01-01

    According to the prior literature, family executives of family-controlled firms receive lower compensation than non-family executives. One of the key driving forces behind this is the existence of family members who are not involved in management, but own significant fraction of shares and closely monitor and/or discipline those involved in management. In this paper, we show that this assumption falls apart if family-controlled firm is part of a large business group, where most of the family ...

  7. The Politics of Family Day Care: Legislatively What Can Be Done.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elaine A.

    A questionnaire designed to measure a number of topical issues regarding child care providers and child care provision was sent to all licensed family day care home providers in the state of Connecticut. The questionnaire focused on six major areas of investigation: the service provider's history in the area of day care, issues surrounding…

  8. Some Structure Properties of the Cyclic Fuzzy Group Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hacl Akta(s); Naim (C)a(g)man

    2005-01-01

    In crisp environment, the notion of cyclic group on a set is well known. We study an extension of this classical notion to the fuzzy sets to define the concept of cyclic fuzzy subgroups. By using these cyclic fuzzy subgroups, we then define a cyclic fuzzy group family and investigate its structure properties.

  9. Strong Military Families Program: A Multifamily Group Approach to Strengthening Family Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Kate; Muzik, Maria; Waddell, Rachel; Thompson, Stephanie; Rosenberg, Lauren; Masini, Gabriella; Smith, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Military families frequently display remarkable resilience in the face of significant challenges, and yet deployment and parental separation are significant stressors for parents, particularly those with infants and young children. The Strong Military Families preventive intervention is a multifamily parenting and self-care skills group that aims…

  10. Strong Military Families Program: A Multifamily Group Approach to Strengthening Family Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Kate; Muzik, Maria; Waddell, Rachel; Thompson, Stephanie; Rosenberg, Lauren; Masini, Gabriella; Smith, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Military families frequently display remarkable resilience in the face of significant challenges, and yet deployment and parental separation are significant stressors for parents, particularly those with infants and young children. The Strong Military Families preventive intervention is a multifamily parenting and self-care skills group that aims…

  11. Families Helping Families: Implementing a Multifamily Therapy Group with Substance-Abusing Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, David W.; Orsbon, Sarah H.

    2002-01-01

    In treating a substance-abusing adolescent, the family is a key target of intervention. Multifamily therapy groups (MFTGs) have been used to involve families in treatment and have been found to be effective with a variety of populations. This article provides a theoretical overview of a MFTG model and describes the implementation of the model with…

  12. Renormalisation group improved leptogenesis in family symmetry models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Iain K., E-mail: ikc1g08@soton.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); King, Stephen F., E-mail: king@soton.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Luhn, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.luhn@durham.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-11

    We study renormalisation group (RG) corrections relevant for leptogenesis in the case of family symmetry models such as the Altarelli-Feruglio A{sub 4} model of tri-bimaximal lepton mixing or its extension to tri-maximal mixing. Such corrections are particularly relevant since in large classes of family symmetry models, to leading order, the CP violating parameters of leptogenesis would be identically zero at the family symmetry breaking scale, due to the form dominance property. We find that RG corrections violate form dominance and enable such models to yield viable leptogenesis at the scale of right-handed neutrino masses. More generally, the results of this paper show that RG corrections to leptogenesis cannot be ignored for any family symmetry model involving sizeable neutrino and {tau} Yukawa couplings.

  13. Toward High Quality Family Day Care for Infants and Toddlers. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Marian D.; Crowell, Doris C.

    Reported were the results of a project which established a cluster of family day care homes in Hawaii in which caregivers were selected, trained, and provided with supportive services and salaries. The primary objective of the program was to provide a replicable, high quality program for preschool children that would maximize social, emotional,…

  14. 78 FR 45257 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Family Self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Program AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian...

  15. Ethnic, Familial and Catholic Elements in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪小军

    2010-01-01

    In the plays of Eugene O'Neill. American's leading and foremost creative playwright, can be found the influence of his Irish and Catholic background. This paper attempts to explore the influence of O'Neill's ethnic, familial and religious background upon his thinly disguised autobiographical materpiece Long Day' s Journey Into Night.

  16. Researching family through the everyday lives of children across home and day care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    The article investigates family as a conflictual community with a specific starting point in exploring children's lives across day-care institution and home. Children's development is theorised in relation to taking part in different communities across different contexts. The article draws...... on an ethnographically inspired research project with 6 families living in a small town in Denmark. The analysis points to how the children's possibilities of participation are created across their different life contexts and that the social interplay and conflicts between the children in the day-care institution have...... impacts on the relation and interaction between parents and children. Parenting in that way reaches far beyond the family and includes taking into account various issues in the other places where the children spend their time. The children's developmental possibilities are shaped by the relations...

  17. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Matumoto, Silvia; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa; Camargo-Borges, Celiane; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins

    2013-01-01

    to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  18. AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 1: Energy outlook and presentation of the Areva Group; AREVA Technical Days (ATD) session 1: enjeux energetiques et presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    These technical days organized by the Areva Group aims to explain the group activities in a technological and economic point of view, to provide an outlook of worldwide energy trends and challenges and to present each of their businesses in a synthetic manner. This first session deals with energy challenges and nuclear, public acceptance of nuclear power, mining activities, chemistry activities, enrichment activities, fuel assembly, reactors and services activities, nuclear measurements activities, reprocessing and recycling activities, logistics activities and connectors activities. (A.L.B.)

  19. Family Environment, Coping, and Mental Health in Adolescents Attending Therapeutic Day Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Erin M.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Emerson, Erin; Wilson, Helen W.; Brown, Larry K.; Houck, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined associations among family environment, coping, and emotional and conduct problems in adolescents attending therapeutic day schools due to mental health problems. METHODS Adolescents (N=417; 30.2% female) ages 13–20 (M=15.25) reported on their family environment (affective involvement and functioning), coping (emotion-focused support-seeking, cognitive restructuring, avoidant actions), and emotional and conduct problems. RESULTS Poorer family environment was associated with less emotion-focused support-seeking and cognitive restructuring, and more emotional and conduct problems. Emotional problems were negatively associated with cognitive restructuring, and conduct problems were negatively associated with all coping strategies. Cognitive restructuring accounted for the relationship between family environment and emotional problems. Cognitive restructuring and emotion-focused support-seeking each partially accounted for the relationship between family functioning and conduct problems, but not the relationship between family affective involvement and conduct problems. CONCLUSIONS Findings implicate the role of coping in the relationship between family environment and adolescent mental health. PMID:25151645

  20. Lev Vygotsky’s ideas in family group logopsychotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpova, N.L.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available According to Lev Vygotsky’s theory, every bodily deficiency not only changes a person’s attitude to the world but also entails social consequences, which makes its social and psychological rehabilitation so important. The way in which problems of deformity compensation and supercompensation are solved, is largely determined by a patient`s motivation. The paper deals with stuttering (logoneurosis as an extreme form of broken communication; it analyses the peculiarities of stutteres and their families, and the specific features of treating this defect; it also dwells on issues involving family co-participation in social rehabilitation. The multilayered system of family group logo psychotherapy - treatment of stuttering children, teenagers and adults - is based on Yu.B. Nekrasova’s method of group logopsychotherapy. It also employs non-traditional techniques: Nekrasova’s dynamic psycho-therapeutic diagnostics and biblio-, kinesi-, symbol-, video- and cinema therapies. This system may serve as a model for forming motivational involvement and intragenic activity by patients and their relatives in social rehabilitation processes. The paper describes the levels and psychological structure of motivational involvement and mechanisms of its formation in logopsychotherapeutic processes. Motivational involvement is understood as a source of a subject’s intragenic (inner activity, the paper maps out strategies to form intragenic activity. The family group logopsychotherapeutic techniques may also help optimize communication between parent and child, doctor and patient, teacher and pupil, professor and student.

  1. An optimized group mating design and determination of the admixture rate in Nile tilapia families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Nile tilapia is the most productive and internationally traded food fish in the world. Many Nile tilapia families are needed to develop breeding programs for this species. The aim of this study was to develop Nile tilapia families using the Oreochromis species unique breeding characteristics (male territory establisher and female mouth brooders and determine the mixing rate within each family. Both male and female fish were cultured in one pond in the reproductive season and the female mouths were checked every 5–8 days. When embryos were present, they were removed and cultivated independently as a family. As a result, 45 families were developed from the 60 female fish sampled. The embryo survival rate in aerated water varied from 85.5 to 100.0%. Seven polymorphic microsatellite loci were selected from a set of 31 for paternity identification. The CPE (combined paternity exclusion probability of two microsatellite loci was higher than 0.93 and the CPE for the seven loci used in this study was as high as 0.9999. There were no unrelated individuals in five of the seven families analyzed and only one mixed individual in F29 and F30. The overall admixture rate was very low (2.2%. In this study, we developed an optimized group mating system. Furthermore, we verified that for group mating systems there were no mixed individuals in most families and the admixture rate of some families was very low according to the paternity analysis.

  2. THE MODERN-DAY IMPACT OF CULTURAL AND RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY: "MANAGING FAMILY JUSTICE IN DIVERSE SOCIETIES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Rautenbach

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with the modern-day impact of cultural and religious diversity and comments on some of the viewpoints to be found in Managing Family Justice in Diverse Societies.1 The topics dealt with in this publication create a greater awareness of the challenges family diversity presents, and illustrate that an attempt to adopt a single definite strategy to manage diversity would not be the right approach; rather that each and every situation should be managed according to its unique context.

  3. Growth of consanguineous populations: effect of family and group size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdjan Denic

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although inbreeding is detrimental to the offspring, consanguineous marriages still remain very common in many countries. To better understand this sociobiological puzzle, we compared the growth of isolated consanguineous versus non- consanguineous populations of varying sizes. Methods: In a computer, over five generations, we simulated first cousin marriages, family size, and offspring survival to find the effect on population growth. Results: In large groups, the practice of first cousin marriages decreased the population size due to an excessive number of deaths among the offspring. In small groups, however, first cousin marriages increased the population size; without first cousins, there is a relative shortage of marriageable potential spouses. Marriages to first cousins produced additional unions and a surplus of viable offspring despite excessive deaths caused by inbreeding. Consequently, small consanguineously marrying groups grew faster than small non-consanguineously marrying groups. Independently, family size directly affected the number of consanguineous marriages and inbreeding in consanguineous groups. Conclusions: In small groups, kin marriages, despite the harms of inbreeding, result in relatively faster population growth.

  4. A Family Day program enhances knowledge about medical school culture and necessary supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushing Herbert E

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Family Day program was implemented at Indiana University School of Medicine to educate the families and friends of in-coming medical students about the rigors of medical school and the factors that contribute to stress. Methods Surveys that assessed knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about medical school were administered to participants before and after the program. Results After the program, participants showed a significant improvement in their understanding of medical school culture and the importance of support systems for medical students. Post-test scores improved by an average of 29% (P Conclusions The inclusion of family members and other loved ones in pre-matriculation educational programs may serve to mitigate the stress associated with medical school by enhancing the students' social support systems.

  5. Disaster Day! Integrating Speech Skills though Impromptu Group Research and Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruim, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    Courses: Disaster Day (DD) is a single-class activity designed for public speaking classrooms, but could also be applied to courses addressing small group communication. Objectives: DD integrates fundamental skills of the basic speech course, fosters participation through group work, and introduces new concepts and skills. By the end of the…

  6. Disaster Day! Integrating Speech Skills though Impromptu Group Research and Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruim, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    Courses: Disaster Day (DD) is a single-class activity designed for public speaking classrooms, but could also be applied to courses addressing small group communication. Objectives: DD integrates fundamental skills of the basic speech course, fosters participation through group work, and introduces new concepts and skills. By the end of the…

  7. The Automorphism Groups of a Family of Maximal Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Guralnick, Robert; Pries, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The Hasse Weil bound restricts the number of points of a curve which are defined over a finite field; if the number of points meets this bound, the curve is called maximal. Giulietti and Korchmaros introduced a curve C_3 which is maximal over F_{q^6} and determined its automorphism group. Garcia, Guneri, and Stichtenoth generalized this construction to a family of curves C_n, indexed by an odd integer n greater than or equal to 3, such that C_n is maximal over F_{q^{2n}}. In this paper, we determine the automorphism group Aut(C_n) when n > 3; in contrast with the case n=3, it fixes the point at infinity on C_n. The proof requires a new structural result about automorphism groups of curves in characteristic p such that each Sylow p-subgroup has exactly one fixed point. MSC:11G20, 14H37.

  8. Comparative study of 5-day cefcapene-pivoxil and 10-day amoxicillin or cefcapene-pivoxil for treatment of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    In order to compare the bacteriological and clinical efficacy and safety of cefcapene-pivoxil (CFPN-PI) for 5 days, CFPN-PI for 10 days, and amoxicillin (AMPC) for 10 days for the treatment of pharyngitis due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GAS) in children, a prospective multicenter randomized open-label comparative study was performed with 12 pediatric clinics in Asahikawa between June 2006 and February 2007. Two hundred and fifty children (age range 6 months to 12 years) with signs and symptoms of acute pharyngitis were enrolled. All had a positive throat culture for GAS and were fully evaluable. Eighty-two patients received CFPN-PI 9-10 mg/kg/day three times a day for 5 days, 88 received CFPN-PI three times a day for 10 days, and 80 received AMPC three times a day for 10 days. The CFPN-PI for 5 days regimen, the CFPN-PI for 10 days regimen, and the AMPC for 10 days regimen produced bacteriological eradication at the end of treatment in 93.8%, 96.2%, and 91.7% of the patients, respectively. The clinical cure rate observed at the end of therapy was 100% of the patients in the three groups. Relapse rates were 1.3% in CFPN-PI for 5 days, 4.0% in CFPN-PI for 10 days, and 2.9% in AMPC for 10 days. There were no significant differences in eradication rate, clinical cure rate, and relapse rate between the three treatment groups. The only adverse effects were infrequent diarrhea in all three groups, and a rash which occurred in 6 patients (8.0%) of the AMPC treatment group. Five days of treatment with CFPN-PI was as efficacious in bacteriological eradication and clinical response as 10 days of CFPN-PI or AMPC treatment.

  9. [Development of nursing pratice in family medecine groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Danielle; Goudreau, Johanne; Hudon, Eveline; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Lamothe, Lise; Jobin, Guy; Gilbert, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the development of nursing practice in family medicine groups (FMGs). The two-year case study consisted of 73 semi-directed interviews ofnurses, physicians and managers in five FMGs. The findings led to three main observations: nursing practice varies considerably from one FMG to another, the development of nurses' practice seems to be associated with the development of a collaborative relationship, and the satisfaction of the professionals in the FMG, nurses in particular, depends on the type of practice. It is important to implement measures to encourage the optimal use ofnurses' skills in a FMG.

  10. Protocol group education for family caregivers of elderly dependents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anguita Carpio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Family is the main care source for the dependent person. The act of looking after somebody, involves the development of multiple tasks, apart from spending a lot of time. This implies a series of requirements that would be able to damage the family caregivers’ quality of life, and definitively, their health. Objetive: training for family caregivers to provide quality care, in order to succeed in this project, we establish three specific aims: improving the information and training, increase self-care abilities and focus on resources and support services for informal caregivers. Methods: We are going to implement an educative intervention in a group of 12 informal caregivers of people over 65 years, dependent on chronic diseases and develop home care. The program will be composed of 10 sessions, each one of two-hour-long. The first session will consist of an introduction and the last session will be reserved to solve doubts and to deal with the assessment of the program. Throughout the rest of sessions, contents about training, self, resources and assistance services for caregivers will be proposed. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the program, a multiple choice questionnaire will be taken both al the beginning and at the end of the different sessions. In order to evaluate the human resources and the applied methodology, another questionnaire will be passed.

  11. Psychiatric treatment outcomes of preschool children in a family day hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jörg Michael; Averbeck-Holocher, Marlies; Romer, Georg; Fürniss, Tilman; Achtergarde, Sandra; Postert, Christian

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the treatment outcomes of preschoolers with severe mental health problems who were treated at the child psychiatric family day hospital for preschool children in Münster, Germany. The eclectic multi-modal treatment combines behavioral and psychodynamic techniques for both parents and children in various settings within an intermittent attendance structure provided by a multi-disciplinary team. This study evaluated 185 children with the Caregiver-Teacher Report Form (C-TRF/1.5-5), which was completed by therapists, and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/1.5-5), which was completed by mothers, at admission and discharge. The mothers' ratings of their children were statistically adjusted for the distortion caused by their own psychopathology. After treatment, the patients showed significant improvement on the C-TRF/CBCL Total Problem score with an average Cohen's d = -0.50 based on therapists' ratings, d = -0.97 for the non-adjusted maternal ratings, and d = -0.68 for the adjusted maternal ratings. We conclude that specialized family day hospitals may successfully treat preschool psychiatric patients.

  12. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. Case report. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original “Synallactic collective image technique” (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.. The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Conclusion. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  13. Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome). Temporal bone findings and otolaryngological manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, N; Sekhar, H K; Sachs, M; Daly, J F

    1978-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia, or Riley-Day syndrome, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and occurs almost exclusively in Jewish families. This disorder is characterized by a smooth tongue devoid of fungiform papillae and of taste buds, and is clinically associated with poor taste discrimination. An unsteady gait and dizziness on change in position are also common presenting symptoms. This study reports the histopathological findings of eight temporal bones from four patients with documented familial dysautonomia. For the control series, 13 normal temporal bones were also studied. The most striking finding in the dysautonomic patients was an extreme paucity of geniculate ganglion cells (P less than 0.001). A statistically significant reduction in the number of neurons was also found both in the superior and in the inferior divisions of the vestibular nerve (P less than 0.001). The paucity of the geniculate ganglion cells correlates well with the impairment of the taste in dysautonomic individuals, since the afferent fibers leaving taste buds of the anterior two-thirds of the tongue run via the chorda tympani and have their cell bodies in the geniculate ganglion. Furthermore, the reduction in the number of Scarpa's ganglion cells observed in the dysautonomic patients studied here could account for a poor response to caloric test, positional vertigo and an unsteady gait in this condition.

  14. Using a Family Science Day Event to Engage Youth in Climate Change Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, C.; Brevik, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    Each fall, Dickinson State University organizes four Family Science Day events for elementary-aged children to increase their engagement in the sciences. Offered on Saturday afternoons, each event focuses on a different science-related theme. Families can attend these events free of charge, and the kids participate in a large variety of hands-on activities which center around the event's theme. This year, the November event focused on climate change and the roles soil plays in the climate system. The timing of this topic was carefully chosen. 2015 has been declared the International Year of Soil by the United Nations, and the Soil Science Society of America theme for the month of November was Soils and Climate. This public outreach event was an amazing opportunity to help the youth in our community learn about climate change and soil in a fun, interactive environment. The activities also helped the children learn how science is a process of discovery that allows them to better understand the world they live in. In addition to the hands-on activities, a planetarium show focusing on climate change was also offered during the event. The fully immersive, 360-degree show allowed the kids and their parents to personally observe phenomena that are otherwise difficult to visualize. All of the activities at the Family Science Day event were staffed by university students, and this proved to be a very valuable experience for them as well. Some of the students who helped are majoring in a science field, and for them, the experience taught public communication. They learned to break complicated concepts down into simpler terms that young kids can understand. Education majors who participated practiced communicating science concepts to children, and students in other majors who helped with this event gained experiences that reinforced various concepts they had learned in their general education science courses.

  15. Captive breeding programs based on family groups in polyploid sturgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscari, Elisa; Pujolar, Jose Martin; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Corradin, Riccardo; Congiu, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In species with long life cycles and discontinuous availability of individuals to reproduction, implementing a long-term captive breeding program can be difficult or impossible. In such cases, managing diversity among familiar groups instead of individuals could become a suitable approach to avoid inbreeding and increase the possibility to accomplish a breeding scheme. This is the case of several sturgeon species including the Adriatic sturgeon, whose recovery depends on the management of a few captive stocks directly descended from the same group of wild parents. In the present study, relatedness among 445 potential breeders was inferred with a novel software for pedigree reconstruction in tetraploids ("BreedingSturgeons"). This information was used to plan a breeding scheme considering familiar groups as breeding units and identifying mating priorities. A two-step strategy is proposed: a short-term breeding program, relying on the 13 remaining F0 individuals of certain wild origin; and a long-term plan based on F1 families. Simulations to evaluate the loss of alleles in the F2 generation under different pairing strategies and assess the number of individuals to breed, costs and logistical aquaculture constraints were performed. The strategy proposed is transferable to the several other tetraploid sturgeon species on the brink of extinction.

  16. Recurrent group A streptococcal vulvovaginitis in adult women: family epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Jack D; Funaro, Deana; Kaplan, Edward L

    2007-03-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) vulvovaginitis has been reported in prepubertal girls. In adult women, a vaginal carrier state has been described, but vulvovaginitis is rarely reported. We describe 2 cases of recurrent GAS vulvovaginitis in women whose husbands were gastrointestinal carriers of GAS. Characterization of the isolated strains demonstrated that identical emm types of GAS were shared by partners. Treatment of both partners resulted in resolution of vaginitis. On the basis of negative vaginal culture results obtained after treatment of each individual episode of vaginitis, we believe that the female patients were reinfected as a result of exposure to their husbands, with shedding likely to have occurred in bed. These cases reiterate the necessity for adequate screening of the patient's family and contacts in cases of recurrent GAS infection by culturing all potential areas of GAS carriage.

  17. Understanding of Adultery in Families Belonging to Different Ethnic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmadeeva E. V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a pilot study aimed at identifying and analyzing understanding of adultery in ethnically homogeneous families who are representatives of the Bashkir, Russian and Tatar of ethnic groups are presented. Within the framework of the psychological approach, family is regarded as the space of joint life activity, within which the specific needs of the people connected by ties of blood are satisfied. To achieve this goal, E. V. Akhmadeeva designed the inventory “My attitude to adultery”, in which respondents were asked to give the definition of adultery and to mention the reasons, based on which adultery may occur. Also, a modified version of the Rokeach Value Survey (RVS was used, allowing determining the spouses’ dominant values of a series of terminal and instrumental values. Marital satisfaction was detected with use of the marriage satisfaction questionnaire by V. V. Stolin, G. P. Butenko, T. L. Romanova. On the base of respondents’ answers in the questionnaire in order to define the level of satisfaction by marriage there have been distinguished three categories of people who consider their marriage to be successful, less successful and unsuccessful. Gender and age differences in understanding the adultery have been revealed. Having analyzed the works of outstanding psychologists there have been found out the psychological sense and meaning of “ethnic group”, “ethnic culture”, “sexual culture”, “adultery”. Identified dominant values of the spouses. The reasons of adultery commitment and non-commitment as respondents understand it have been found. As can be seen from this study, none ethnic group encourages adultery. However, the possibility of committing adultery is allowed, and there are differences in explaining the reasons for committing this action.

  18. Expert Group Meeting on Family Planning, Health and Family Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    As part of the preparations for the 1994 UN International Conference on Population and Development, an expert group meeting on family planning (FP), health, and family well-being was held in India on October 26-30, 1992. The group focused on the following issues: 1) society and FP, a review of existing FP programs, and the implementation of FP programs (including quality of services and human resources development, unreached populations, adolescent fertility, diffusion of innovative activities, community-based distribution systems and social marketing, and future contraceptive requirements and logistics management needs); 2) FP and health (including safe motherhood and child survival, the interdependence of services, sexually transmitted diseases [STDs], and AIDS); 3) FP and family well-being (including family size, family structure, child development, fertility decline, and family support systems); and 4) the involvement of people in FP programs (community participation, cost of supplies and service, contraceptive research and development, and a reexamination of the roles of various agencies). Both developed and developing countries were considered, with an emphasis on the latter. After reviewing the progress made in implementing the World Population Plan of Action adopted in Bucharest in 1974, the expert group drafted 35 recommendations to governments, donors, and other agencies. Governments are asked to support FP programs as a cost-effective component of a development strategy, to provide opportunities for women to participate in public policy processes, to support the family through public policies and programs, to increase investments in FP and reproductive and maternal and child health, to increase support to the health and education sectors to achieve basic human rights, to provide safe access to counseling and abortion services, and to include STD/HIV education and prevention in the work of FP programs. FP programs should receive support and funding and

  19. Cost-effectiveness of family-based group treatment for child and parental obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H; Paluch, Rocco A; Wrotniak, Brian H; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Kilanowski, Colleen; Wilfley, Denise; Finkelstein, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Obesity runs in families, and family-based behavioral treatment (FBT) is associated with weight loss in overweight/obese children and their overweight/obese parents. This study was designed to estimate the costs and cost-effectiveness of FBT compared to separate group treatments of the overweight/obese parent and child (PC). Fifty overweight/obese 8- to 12-year-old children with overweight/obese parents were randomly assigned to 12 months of either FBT or PC treatment program. Assessment of societal costs (payer plus opportunity costs) were completed based on two assumptions: (1) programs for parent and child were available on separate days (PC-1) or (2) interventions for parent and child were available in the same location at sequential times on the same day (PC-2). Cost-effectiveness was calculated based on societal cost per unit of change using percent overBMI for children and weight for parents. The average societal cost per family was $1,448 for FBT and $2,260 for PC-1 (p families with overweight/obese children and parents, FBT presents a lower cost per unit of weight loss for parents and children than treating the parent and child separately. Given the high rates of pediatric and adult obesity, FBT may provide a unique cost-effective platform for obesity intervention that alters weight in overweight/obese parents and their overweight/obese children.

  20. Building the capacity of family day care educators to promote children's social and emotional wellbeing: an exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims Margaret

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood mental health problems are highly prevalent, experienced by one in five children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged families. Although childcare settings, including family day care are ideal to promote children's social and emotional wellbeing at a population level in a sustainable way, family day care educators receive limited training in promoting children's mental health. This study is an exploratory wait-list control cluster randomised controlled trial to test the appropriateness, acceptability, cost, and effectiveness of "Thrive," an intervention program to build the capacity of family day care educators to promote children's social and emotional wellbeing. Thrive aims to increase educators' knowledge, confidence and skills in promoting children's social and emotional wellbeing. Methods/Design This study involves one family day care organisation based in a low socioeconomic area of Melbourne. All family day care educators (term used for registered carers who provide care for children for financial reimbursement in the carers own home are eligible to participate in the study. The clusters for randomisation will be the fieldworkers (n = 5 who each supervise 10-15 educators. The intervention group (field workers and educators will participate in a variety of intervention activities over 12 months, including workshops; activity exchanges with other educators; and focused discussion about children's social and emotional wellbeing during field worker visits. The control group will continue with their normal work practice. The intervention will be delivered to the intervention group and then to the control group after a time delay of 15 months post intervention commencement. A baseline survey will be conducted with all consenting educators and field workers (n = ~70 assessing outcomes at the cluster and individual level. The survey will also be administered at one month, six months and 12 months post

  1. Comparative Study of 5-Day and 10-Day Cefditoren Pivoxil Treatments for Recurrent Group A β-Hemolytic Streptococcus pharyngitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Kikuta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of short-course therapy with cephalosporins for treatment of group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS pharyngitis is still controversial. Subjects were 226 children with a history of at least one episode of GABHS pharyngitis. Recurrence within the follow-up period (3 weeks after initiation of therapy occurred in 7 of the 77 children in the 5-day treatment group and in 1 of the 149 children in the 10-day treatment group; the incidence of recurrence being significantly higher in the 5-day treatment group. Bacteriologic treatment failure (GABHS isolation without overt pharyngitis at follow-up culture was observed in 7 of the 77 children in the 5-day treatment group and 17 of the 149 children in the 10-day treatment group. There was no statistical difference between the two groups. A 5-day course of oral cephalosporins is not always recommended for treatment of GABHS pharyngitis in children who have repeated episodes of pharyngitis.

  2. Engaging Youth in Climate Change Issues with Family Science Day Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Corinne E.; Brevik, Eric C.; Steffan, Joshua J.

    2016-04-01

    Dickinson State University organizes four Family Science Day events each fall during the months of September, October, November, and December. Activities are geared toward elementary-aged children to increase student engagement in the sciences. Offered on Saturday afternoons, each event focuses on a different science-related theme. Families can attend these events free of charge, and the kids participate in a large variety of hands-on activities that center around the event's theme. This year, the November event focused on climate change, including an emphasis on the roles soil plays in the climate system. The timing of this topic was carefully chosen. 2015 has been declared the International Year of Soil by the United Nations, and the Soil Science Society of America theme for the month of November was Soils and Climate. This public outreach event was an amazing opportunity to help the youth in our community learn about climate change in a fun, interactive environment. Climate changes in the past, present, and future were emphasized. Activities including the Farming Game, painting with soils, taking Jello "cores", creating a cloud in a jar, and making a glacier in a bag helped children learn how science is a process of discovery that allows them to better understand the world they live in. In addition to the hands-on activities, a planetarium show focused on climate change was also offered during the event, surrounding the kids and their parents in a fully immersive, 360-degree show that allowed them to personally observe phenomena that are otherwise difficult to visualize. All of the activities at the Family Science Day event were staffed by university students, and this proved to be a very valuable experience for them as well. Some of the students who helped are majoring in a science field, and for them, the experience taught public communication. They learned to break complicated concepts down into simpler terms that young kids could understand. Education

  3. How To Start a Family Day Care = Como Iniciar una Guarderia en El Hogar. [Videotape and Viewer's Guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Doris; Weisman, Douglas

    Being a family day care provider is work that requires professional responsibilities and attention to the physical, emotional, and educational well-being of children; listening and responding to parents; and running a business. This videotape, in English- and Spanish-language versions, explores the elements involved in starting up a family day…

  4. The Shared Experience Help the Bereavement to Flow: A Family Support Group Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henoch, Ingela; Berg, Christina; Benkel, Inger

    2016-12-01

    When a family member dies, a bereavement period is taking place for all family members. The death of a parent during childhood is a highly stressful event. This study evaluates families' experiences of family support groups when a parent has died. Families were participate in groups for children, teenagers, young adults, and parents in seven sessions. The same topic which was discussed in all groups. The support groups were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The participants were satisfied with the groups and experienced that the shared experience facilitated bereavement to proceed. The results indicate that families' experiences is being more open about feelings in their own family. A support group can be one possibility to help the whole family in the bereavement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Familial Mediterranean fever (a periodic disease: The present-day view of the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Stanislavovich Fedorov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the most common classical autoinflammatory disease familial Mediterra-nean fever (FMF/periodic disease. This is a monogenic hereditary disease caused by mutations with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The most common types of mutations are given. Hyperactivation of innate (antigen-specific immunity is a basic pathogenic mechanism of the disease and IL-1ß is a leading mediator. FMF prominently occurs in certain ethnic groups (Sephardic Jews, Armenians, Turks, and Arabs. In spite of the fact that there may be multiple organ failure, 12-72-hour febrile fever episodes accompanied by the symptoms of peritonitis and/or pleuropericarditis. AA amyloidosis is the most serious complication of FMF. Colchicine therapy is a basic treatment for preventing this complication. In case of colchicine inef-fi-cacy/intolerance, other agents, including genetically engineered biological drugs (IL-1ß inhibitors, etc., may be used.

  6. Familial Mediterranean fever (a periodic disease: The present-day view of the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Stanislavovich Fedorov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the most common classical autoinflammatory disease familial Mediterra-nean fever (FMF/periodic disease. This is a monogenic hereditary disease caused by mutations with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The most common types of mutations are given. Hyperactivation of innate (antigen-specific immunity is a basic pathogenic mechanism of the disease and IL-1ß is a leading mediator. FMF prominently occurs in certain ethnic groups (Sephardic Jews, Armenians, Turks, and Arabs. In spite of the fact that there may be multiple organ failure, 12-72-hour febrile fever episodes accompanied by the symptoms of peritonitis and/or pleuropericarditis. AA amyloidosis is the most serious complication of FMF. Colchicine therapy is a basic treatment for preventing this complication. In case of colchicine inef-fi-cacy/intolerance, other agents, including genetically engineered biological drugs (IL-1ß inhibitors, etc., may be used.

  7. The influence of pre-Slavic ethnic groups on the hydronymy of present-day Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Krško

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on the influence of pre-Slavic ethnic groups on the hydronymy of present-day Slovakia. The migration of entire ethnic groups – especially after the dissolution of the Roman Empire – led to contact between native and incoming people. Ethnic contact also affected languages of these ethnic groups, as mutual influencing and borrowing of vocabulary occurred. Incoming ethnic groups had to find their way around in the new surroundings as well as identify and distinguish important landmarks, mainly hills, mountains and streams. We can approach the issue of pre-Slavic hydronyms from two points of view: one, by analyzing the names preserved from the time period before the arrival of Slavs in the territory of Slovakia, and two, by analyzing the names whose origin some authors consider to be pre-Slavic. The oldest name of a river from the Slovak region comes from the time period before the arrival of the Slavs. It was recorded by the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius in years 166–180 AD as Granoua. It is a record of the river Hron at which Roman legions fought against the Germanic tribes of the Marcomanni and Quadi. Several historians and linguists believe that besides the rivers Dunaj, Morava and Tisa, other names of big rivers date from before the arrival of Slavs in the central Europe. In the paper, we analyse the names Dunaj, Morava, Váh, Hron, Tisa, Nitra and Hornád.

  8. Applying the Codependency Model to a Group for Families of Obsessive-Compulsive People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Marlene

    1995-01-01

    Applies codependency group model to families of obsessive-compulsive people based on view that these families are normal, feeling people who are trying to cope with unremitting stress. Clinical vignettes illustrate how these families are similar to families of alcoholics in their management of emotions and in their dysfunctional behaviors. (JBJ)

  9. Applying the Codependency Model to a Group for Families of Obsessive-Compulsive People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Marlene

    1995-01-01

    Applies codependency group model to families of obsessive-compulsive people based on view that these families are normal, feeling people who are trying to cope with unremitting stress. Clinical vignettes illustrate how these families are similar to families of alcoholics in their management of emotions and in their dysfunctional behaviors. (JBJ)

  10. Intergenerational family solidarity: value differences between immigrant groups and generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Eva-Maria; Ozeke-Kocabas, Ezgi; Oort, Frans J; Schuengel, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Although immigrants may be more dependent on their immediate family for support, they may also experience a wider generation-gap in values regarding intergenerational solidarity, because of processes of acculturation. Based on large scale survey data (N = 2,028), differences between first and second generation immigrants in values regarding intergenerational solidarity were examined among family members in the Netherlands with an immigration background from Turkey, Morocco, Suriname, and The Dutch Antilles. Using a multilevel analytic approach, effects of family and individual characteristics on values regarding intergenerational solidarity were tested, considering the perspectives of two generations. It was found that immigrants with Moroccan and Turkish backgrounds scored higher on values with respect to intergenerational family solidarity than immigrants stemming from Suriname and The Antilles. First generation immigrants placed higher values on family solidarity compared to second generation immigrants. Additionally, religious denomination was a significant predictor of higher values with respect to intergenerational family solidarity. Immigration and acculturation may create great strains in migrant families. Policies to support the fabric of intergenerational solidarity should consider ethnic and religious background and immigration history.

  11. A New Calibrated Sunspot Group Series Since 1749: Statistics of Active Day Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Usoskin, I G; Lockwood, M; Mursula, K; Owens, M; Solanki, S K

    2015-01-01

    Although the sunspot-number series have existed since the mid-19th century, they are still the subject of intense debate, with the largest uncertainty being related to the "calibration" of the visual acuity of individual observers in the past. Daisy-chain regression methods are applied to inter-calibrate the observers which may lead to significant bias and error accumulation. Here we present a novel method to calibrate the visual acuity of the key observers to the reference data set of Royal Greenwich Observatory sunspot groups for the period 1900-1976, using the statistics of the active-day fraction. For each observer we independently evaluate their observational thresholds [S_S] defined such that the observer is assumed to miss all of the groups with an area smaller than S_S and report all the groups larger than S_S. Next, using a Monte-Carlo method we construct, from the reference data set, a correction matrix for each observer. The correction matrices are significantly non-linear and cannot be approximate...

  12. Family matters: examining a multi-family group intervention for women with BRCA mutations in the scope of genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Alvaro; Chiquelho, Raquel; Santos, Teresa Almeida; Sousa, Liliana

    2010-12-01

    The availability of family-centred services for women genetically at-risk for breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA) due to deleterious genetic mutations is still scarce, despite the distress that these women and their families may experience. This study describes a multi-family group intervention for women who tested positive for BRCA mutations and their families. Methods include a time-limited psycho-educational programme involving educational and support components and consisting of four semi-structured multi-family sessions. Three families (a total of nine people) attended the programme in genetic counselling for hereditary cancers at a Portuguese public hospital. A focus group interview was performed 1 month after the last session to assess both the practical and the psychosocial impacts and to collect suggestions from participants. The present paper focuses on the practical aspects of the intervention, its development and its evaluation. Participants reported that the programme is well-structured and that responds to the needs of patients and their families by improving coping skills and medical awareness in the adaptation to genetic illness. Results reinforce the need to integrate psychosocial and family-oriented interventions in genetic counselling, addressing the holistic experience of hereditary disease. Recommendations for enhancing the services available are provided. The multi-family discussion group, combining educative and supportive services with a family focus, can be successfully adapted in genetic counselling protocols.

  13. Group and individual sow behavior is altered in early gestation by space allowance in the days immediately following grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, E C; Plush, K J; van Wettere, W H E J; Hughes, P E

    2016-01-01

    Aggression between domestic sows is greatest when sows are first introduced to each other and hierarchies form. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a spacious "mixing pen" on sow aggression and stress. Sows were mixed into groups of 6 and allowed 2 (LOW; 8 groups and 48 sows), 4 (MED; 7 groups and 42 sows), or 6 m/sow (HIGH; 7 groups and 42 sows) for 4 d after mixing, at which point all pens were equalized to 2 m/sow. Salivary cortisol concentration and injury counts were measured on d -1, 0, 1, 3, and 4 relative to mixing, and behavior was also recorded on each of these days following mixing. Reproductive performance was assessed at farrowing. A linear mixed model was applied to the data. Data are presented as least squares means and standard error of the mean. Where transformations occurred, nontransformed adjusted means are presented in parentheses following the presentation of transformed data. In the primary analyses where measures were considered at the pen level, there were no effect of space allowance on fight number per sow, duration of fights, percentage of total time spent fighting, displacements, bites, knocks, and lunges ( > 0.05). These measures were higher on d 0 (i.e., fight number 1.0 ± 0.1 [13.8]) compared with d 1 (0.4 ± 0.1 [4.2]), 3 (0.7 ± 0.1 [5.3]), and 4 (0.7 ± 0.1 [5.5]; 0.05). There was increased percentage of time spent active (1.5 ± 0.02 [33.7] for LOW, 1.5 ± 0.02 [36.5] for MED, and 1.6 ± 0.02 [43.4] for HIGH) and time spent exploring (1.8 ± 0.1 [3.5] for LOW, 2.0 ± 0.1 [4.0] for MED, and 2.3 ± 0.1 [5.7] for HIGH) and number of nonaggressive sow-sow contacts (0.3 ± 0.09 [2.2] for LOW, 0.4 ± 0.07 [3.2] for MED, and 0.5 ± 0.07 [4.5] for HIGH) in HIGH compared with LOW ( 0.05). A secondary analysis was conducted that examined individual sow behavior within each pen, and this identified increased injury number in the lowest ranked sows (involved in no fights on d 0 and no displacements on d0 to d4) in LOW (9

  14. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393). © FPI, Inc.

  15. Religious Engagement in a Risky Family Model Predicting Health in Older Black and White Seventh-day Adventists

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Kelly R; Lee, Jerry W.; Haviland, Mark G.; Fraser, Gary E

    2012-01-01

    In a structural equation model, associations among latent variables – Child Poverty, Risky Family exposure, Religious Engagement, Negative Social Interactions, Negative Emotionality, and Perceived Physical Health – were evaluated in 6,753 Black and White adults aged 35–106 years (M = 60.5, SD = 13.0). All participants were members of the Seventh-day Adventist church surveyed in the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (BRHS). Child Poverty was positively associated with both Risky Family...

  16. Family group conferencing in youth care : characteristics of the decision making model, implementation and effectiveness of the Family Group (FG) plans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, Jessica J.; Dijkstra, Sharon; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.; Dekovic, Maja; Creemers, Hanneke E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The model of Family group-conferencing (FG-c) for decision making in child welfare has rapidly spread over the world during the past decades. Its popularity is likely to be caused by its philosophy, emphasizing participation and autonomy of families, rather than based on positive researc

  17. 3 CFR 8424 - Proclamation 8424 of September 28, 2009. Family Day, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... us to accomplish great things. Today, our children are confronting issues of drug and alcohol use... substance abuse among young people. The 21st century presents families with unprecedented challenges... families. At the same time, our youngest generation faces countless distractions in their social...

  18. Family Cohesion and its Relationship to Psychological Distress among Latino Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Fernando I; Guarnaccia, Peter J; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Lin, Julia Y; Torres, Maria; Alegria, Margarita

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of a representative sample of US Latinos (N=2540) to investigate whether family cohesion moderates the effects of cultural conflict on psychological distress. The results for the aggregated Latino group suggests a significant association between family cohesion and lower psychological distress and the combination of strong family cohesion with presence of family cultural conflict was associated with higher psychological distress. However, this association differed by Latino groups. We found no association for Puerto Ricans, Cuban results were similar to the aggregate group, family cultural conflict in Mexicans was associated with higher psychological distress, while family cohesion in Other Latinos was associated with higher psychological distress. Implications of these findings are discussed to unravel the differences in family dynamics across Latino subethnic groups.

  19. Family-group names in the scale insects (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea)--a supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D J

    2013-02-21

    Williams (1969) published a list of the family-group names in the Coccoidea (scale insects) recognised at that time. The present paper supplements this earlier list and includes all nominal genera that have had family-group names based on them, including those in the earlier paper, in case it is not readily available to some workers. Nominal genera and their family-group names are listed alphabetically in catalogue form. There are now 49 families generally recognised in the scale insects, of which 16 are only known as fossils. Furthermore, 180 nominal genera have now had family-group names based on them. As stated in the 1969 list, all categories in the family group are deemed to be of coordinate status in nomenclature.

  20. The Effectiveness of Transactional Analysis Group-counseling on the Improvement of Couples’ Family Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Ali Yahyaee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Family functioning is among the most important factors ensuring the mental health of family members. Disorder or disturbance in family functioning would cause many psychological problems for family members. Current study intended to examine the effectiveness of transactional analysis group counseling on the improvement of couple's family functioning. Materials & Methods: The design of the study is as semi experimental research with pretest and posttest with follow up and control group. Statistical population consists all couples referring to the psychological and counseling centers of Rasht city in 2012. Samples were selected at first by available sampling method and after completing family assessment  device, and obtaining score for enter to research, were placement using random sampling method in two experimental and control groups (N = 8 couples per group. The experimental group participated in 12 sessions of group counseling based on transactional analysis and control group received no intervention. The gathered data were analyzed using covariance analysis. Results: The results show that there are significant differences between the pre-test and post test scores of the experimental group. This difference is significant at the level of 0.05. Therefore it seems that transactional group therapy improved the dimensions of family functioning in couples. Conclusions: The results indicated that transactional analysis group counseling can improve the family functioning and use this approach to working with couples is recommended.

  1. Multi-Family Group Intervention for OEF/OIF Traumatic Brain Injury Survivors and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    parenthood and other significant life events experienced by this cohort, occurring in the context of cognitive impairments and separation from the...individual treatment or treatment as usual. 48 Impact of  Single ‐Family, Multiple‐Family, and  Combined Approaches on Relapse Rates in  Major

  2. Family Cohesion and its Relationship to Psychological Distress among Latino Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, Fernando I.; Guarnaccia, Peter J.; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Lin, Julia Y.; Torres, Maria; Alegria, Margarita

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of a representative sample of US Latinos (N=2540) to investigate whether family cohesion moderates the effects of cultural conflict on psychological distress. The results for the aggregated Latino group suggests a significant association between family cohesion and lower psychological distress and the combination of strong family cohesion with presence of family cultural conflict was associated with higher psychological distress. However, this association differed...

  3. The influence of day care centres designed for people with dementia on family caregivers - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretteteig, Signe; Vatne, Solfrid; Rokstad, Anne Marie Mork

    2017-01-05

    Dementia is one of the most challenging age-related illnesses for family caregivers, whose care-related burden is well known. Research indicates that day care centres (DCCs) can reduce the caregiver burden and help family caregivers to cope with demands; however, the current body of knowledge is still tentative and inconsistent, and more research is recommended. The aim of this study is to provide an extended understanding of the situation of family caregivers and to examine to what extent DCCs can meet their need for support and respite. This study has a qualitative descriptive design using in-depth interviews with 17 family caregivers of people with dementia attending DCCs. The data analysis was undertaken using systematic text condensation. Caregivers experience a complex role, with added responsibilities, new tasks, and emotional and relational challenges that are expressed through distressing emotions and demands for interaction. Additionally, the caregiving role leads to positive experiences, such as acceptance and adaptation, support and help, and positive changes in the relationship. Day care relieves family caregivers by meeting the person with dementia's needs for social community, nutrition, physical activity, and structure and variety in everyday life. Using a DCC led to a higher quality of time spent together and easier cooperation, but it also produced some hard feelings and challenging situations. DCCs gave the caregivers a feeling of freedom and increased the time available to be spent on their own needs, to be social and to work or do practical tasks undisturbed. DCCs for people with dementia can give family caregivers support and relief and have a positive impact on the relationship between the family caregiver and the person with dementia. A more individualized program, in addition to flexible opening hours, would make DCCs even more effective as a respite service, positively influencing the family caregiver's motivation and ability to care and

  4. THE CONCEPT OF A GROUP OF INVESTIGATION OF CRIMES AGAINST FAMILY AND MINORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuyemzhiyeva S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the concept of group methods of investigation of crimes against a family and minors. There was briefly investigated the concept of criminal – legal characteristics of specific offences against the family, which are common. The general positions for the questions about criminalistic characteristics were reviewed. We have justified the conclusion about the essence of a group technique of investigation of crimes against a family and minors

  5. Family group conferences in public mental health care : An exploration of opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Gideon; Schout, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Family group conferences are usually organized in youth care settings, especially in cases of (sexual) abuse of children and domestic violence. Studies on the application of family group conferences in mental health practices are scarce, let alone in a setting even more specific, such as public ment

  6. Family group conferences in public mental health care : An exploration of opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Gideon; Schout, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Family group conferences are usually organized in youth care settings, especially in cases of (sexual) abuse of children and domestic violence. Studies on the application of family group conferences in mental health practices are scarce, let alone in a setting even more specific, such as public ment

  7. Family group conferences in public mental health care : An exploration of opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Gideon; Schout, Gert

    Family group conferences are usually organized in youth care settings, especially in cases of (sexual) abuse of children and domestic violence. Studies on the application of family group conferences in mental health practices are scarce, let alone in a setting even more specific, such as public

  8. Hyperbolically embedded subgroups and rotating families in groups acting on hyperbolic spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dahmani, F; Osin, D

    2017-01-01

    The authors introduce and study the notions of hyperbolically embedded and very rotating families of subgroups. The former notion can be thought of as a generalization of the peripheral structure of a relatively hyperbolic group, while the latter one provides a natural framework for developing a geometric version of small cancellation theory. Examples of such families naturally occur in groups acting on hyperbolic spaces including hyperbolic and relatively hyperbolic groups, mapping class groups, Out(F_n), and the Cremona group. Other examples can be found among groups acting geometrically on CAT(0) spaces, fundamental groups of graphs of groups, etc. The authors obtain a number of general results about rotating families and hyperbolically embedded subgroups; although their technique applies to a wide class of groups, it is capable of producing new results even for well-studied particular classes. For instance, the authors solve two open problems about mapping class groups, and obtain some results which are n...

  9. Family Group Decision Making (FGDM) with Lakota families in two tribal communities: tools to facilitate FGDM implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcynyszyn, Lyscha A; Bear, Pete Small; Geary, Erin; Conti, Russ; Pecora, Peter J; Day, Priscilla A; Wilson, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an adapted Family Group Decision Making (FGDM) practice model for Native American communities, the FGDM family and community engagement process, and FGDM evaluation tools as one example for other native communities. Challenges and successes associated with the implementation and evaluation of these meetings are also described in the context of key historical and cultural factors, such as intergenerational grief and trauma, as well as past misuse of data in native communities.

  10. Comparison of familial and psychological factors in groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çengel-Kültür, S Ebru; Akdemir, Devrim; Saltık-Temizel, İnci N

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the differences between groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation. The Symptom Checklist- 90-Revised, the COPE Questionnaire, the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, the McMaster Family Assessment Device and the Parenting Style Scale were used to evaluate, respectively, maternal psychiatric symptoms, coping abilities, attachment style, family functioning and children's perceptions of parenting behaviors. Psychiatric diagnoses were evaluated using the K-SADS. A higher level of maternal psychiatric symptoms, impaired role and affective involvement functioning of the family and less psychological autonomy were observed in the group of encopresis patients with constipation than in the group of encopresis patients without constipation. No significant differences were found between the groups in psychiatric comorbidities, maternal coping abilities and attachment style. The two groups had a similar pattern of comorbid psychiatric disorders and maternal psychological factors, although some familial factors-related mainly to parental authority-were differentiated in the encopresis with constipation group.

  11. We Scrum Every Day: Using Scrum Project Management Framework for Group Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope-Ruark, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative group projects have documented learning benefits, yet collaboration is challenging for students because the educational system values individual achievement. This article explores Scrum, an approach to framing, planning, and managing group projects used in Web-software development. Designed for multi-faceted projects, this approach…

  12. We Scrum Every Day: Using Scrum Project Management Framework for Group Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope-Ruark, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative group projects have documented learning benefits, yet collaboration is challenging for students because the educational system values individual achievement. This article explores Scrum, an approach to framing, planning, and managing group projects used in Web-software development. Designed for multi-faceted projects, this approach…

  13. Thriving Children, Striving Families: A Blueprint for Streamlined Delivery of Child Day Care Collaboration Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Elissa J.; And Others

    Upcoming federal and state changes in welfare and social services will have a profound effect on the delivery of early childhood care and education in Illinois. In October, 1995, the Day Care Action Council of Illinois convened a meeting of early childhood experts and advocates. From this retreat, a vision for a new system of the delivery of child…

  14. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-24

    Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children's coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7-13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the "Ladder of life" which measures overall life satisfaction, and "Jag tycker jag är" (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale "Familjeklimat" (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from troubled families. This quasi-experimental study

  15. Action research on group consulting of family legal education for adolescent parents in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ying; Feng, Wei

    2012-08-09

    In this experimental study, we made an attempt to explore the approach and method to improve the legal cognition and family legal education level for adolescent parents. 10 parents of students of grade two in a middle school of Chongqing in China were provided with group consulting and training. We adopted action research method to make overall assessment on the needs, execution and results of group consulting and training activity about family legal education for adolescent parents. After educating intervention group training of action research, the legal cognition level and the mastery and utilization of family legal educational method of adolescent parents get rising. Through the assessment of action research, the group training manner is a useful group consulting manner to make family legal education for adolescent parents. The program was feasible; the method was effective; the intervention effect was obvious.

  16. Care Transitions and Adult Day Services Moderate the Longitudinal Links between Stress Biomarkers and Family Caregivers' Functional Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Almeida, David M; Rovine, Michael J; Zarit, Steven H

    2017-05-19

    Stress biomarkers have been linked to health and well-being. There are, however, few studies on how dysregulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system actually affects functional health of family caregivers of persons with dementia. Further, it is not clear whether and how factors affecting caregiving stressor exposures such as care transitions and adult day services (ADS) use may affect such association. First, to examine the association of daily stress biomarkers and functional health over time among family caregivers of persons with dementia. Second, to examine effects of care transitions and ADS use on the association between baseline stress biomarkers and functional health over time. At baseline, caregivers provided 5 saliva samples each day during an 8-day diary study, where all caregivers were having a varying number of ADS days per week. There were 2 longitudinal follow-ups at 6 and 12 months on ADS use, care transitions, and caregivers' functional health. The average daily total output across days was computed at baseline for salivary cortisol, the sulfated form of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA-s), and salivary alpha amylase (sAA), which were used as predictors of caregivers' longitudinal functional limitation trajectories. Care transitions and total number of ADS days per week at baseline were considered as moderators of the associations between stress biomarkers and health over time. The associations between functional limitation trajectories and daily total outputs of cortisol and sAA were modified by ADS use and care transitions. Among caregivers who experienced a transition, and who used less than average ADS days per week, lower daily cortisol total output and lower daily sAA total output were associated with increasing functional limitations. Caregivers who experienced a transition but used greater than average ADS days per week did not show such patterns of association. No significant effect was found for DHEA

  17. Multi-Family Group Intervention for OEF/OIF Traumatic Brain Injury Survivors and their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    often results in a roller coaster of emotional, financial and health concerns. Very few families can go through this type of experience without...When You Need It • This type of injury results in a roller coaster of emotional, financial and health concerns. • No one can go through this type...results in a roller coaster of emotional, financial and health concerns. • No one can go through this type of experience without help on multiple

  18. Multi-Family Group Intervention for OEF/OIF Traumatic Brain Injury Survivors and their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    physician, mental health care (including treatment for PTSD and/or depression), speech therapy, vocational counseling or rehabilitation, acupuncture (for...consistent with the original MFG model, but in the TBI cohort, more activity in this role is needed. To address stigma concerns, the therapist can help...2002) paradigm, where the therapist , veteran, and family member explore the pros and cons of engaging in the treatment and “change talk” is elicited

  19. The Use of Guided Imagery in Family of Origin Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pare, Timothy J.; Shannon-Brady, Dustin T.

    1996-01-01

    Describes use of guided imagery in a family of origin group. Outlines three stages in the process of differentiation from family: identification, integration, and activation of the individual's thoughts, feelings and behaviors. Use of guided imagery is highlighted as a means for accessing the unconscious and increasing the clients' awareness of…

  20. Integration Processes of a Romanian Group in a Huelva Village through Family Life Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Reales, Antonia-María; Aguaded-Gómez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the integration of Romanian immigrants in Lucena del Puerto (Huelva, Spain) through the life stories of two families of Romanian origin. The experiences of the groups presented in this study were analyzed. Both families were in the town for work, to grow and harvest strawberries. We observed a contrast between idealistic views…

  1. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  2. Hospital Experiences of Older People with Intellectual Disability: Responses of Group Home Staff and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Ruth; Bowers, Barbara; Bigby, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study reports on the hospitalisation experiences of older adults with intellectual disability living in group homes. Methods: Grounded dimensional analysis was used to guide data collection and analysis. Group home residents were tracked prospectively over a 3-year period. Interviews were conducted with family, group home, and…

  3. A randomised controlled trial of carer-focussed multi-family group psychoeducation in bipolar disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madigan, K

    2012-05-01

    In a RCT of family psychoeducation, 47 carers of 34 patients were allocated to one of three groups; Multifamily Group Psychoeducation, Solution Focussed Group Therapy or Treatment as Usual. Carers in both the MFGP intervention and the SFGP arm demonstrated greater knowledge and reduction in burden than those in the TAU arm.

  4. Hospital Experiences of Older People with Intellectual Disability: Responses of Group Home Staff and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Ruth; Bowers, Barbara; Bigby, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study reports on the hospitalisation experiences of older adults with intellectual disability living in group homes. Methods: Grounded dimensional analysis was used to guide data collection and analysis. Group home residents were tracked prospectively over a 3-year period. Interviews were conducted with family, group home, and…

  5. The Role of Conformity in Relation to Cohesiveness and Intimacy in Day-Hospital Groups of Patients with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il Ho; Park, Sun Young; Choi, Sulkee; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2017-07-01

    Conformity is defined as the act of adjusting one's behavior to match the social responses of others. Patients with schizophrenia often adjust their maladaptive behaviors by conforming in group treatment settings. This study aimed to examine whether the opinions of group members influence conformity of patients with schizophrenia who attend day-hospital programs. Nineteen patients with schizophrenia from four different day-hospital programs and 23 healthy controls from four different social clubs completed the homographic meaning choice task under conditions of prior exposure to the pseudo-opinions of their group members, strangers, and unknown information sources. Group influences on conformity were observed when the level of group cohesiveness was high and the level of intimacy was low across participant groups. Controls did not exhibit a significant effect of group influence on conformity, whereas patients were significantly influenced by their group members when making conformity-based decisions despite significantly lower intimacy and cohesiveness levels. These findings suggest that unlike controls, patients with schizophrenia tend to respond with conformity when influenced by the opinions of their affiliated group. In patients with schizophrenia group conformity may be used to select a more accurate decision and to enhance feelings of affiliation among them.

  6. Aspects of spinal deformity in familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, L; Margulies, J Y; Kadari, A; Floman, Y; Robin, G C

    1997-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease occurring in Jews of Ashkenazi descent, with only some 500 recognized cases. The causative gene was identified on chromosome 9. FD is of considerable orthopedic interest, because of the prevalence of skeletal deformity. About 90% of surviving dysautonomic children will develop a spinal curvature, commonly a scoliosis. The scoliotic curve is usually kyphotic rather than lordotic, and appears during the first decade of life. Fifty-one of the 90 reported cases of familial dysautonomia in Israel involved patients who were seen at the scoliosis clinic for assessment and treatment of their spinal deformities. Most of the patients presented with a scoliotic deformity associated in 37 cases with an increased thoracic kyphosis. In our series orthotic treatment and physiotherapy were found to be minimally successful at best. Surgical treatment of the spine was performed in 13 of 51 patients in this series. A retrospective review of these patients' charts and radiographs was carried out. Six years of follow-up are reported. The primary indication for surgery was progression of the spinal curve. Only posterior spinal fusions were performed. Anterior transthoracic procedures were avoided in spite of the significance of the kyphotic deformity, because of the frequency of pulmonary complications. Harrington distraction and compression instrumentation was used. Three-millimeter compression rods were used in a distraction mode in thin, young children. "Harri-Luque" segmental sublaminar wiring technique and Wisconsin spinous process segmental wiring was used in some. In all cases, the spine fusion was supplemented by bank bone only, to avoid the additional trauma of graft removal. We believe that surgical intervention is advantageous, if done early in the evolution of spinal deformity. Greater technical difficulties and a higher complication rate were encountered in this series relative to the problems usually seen

  7. DIVERSIFICATION AND FAMILY CONTROL AS DETERMINANTS OF PERFORMANCE: A STUDY OF LISTED BUSINESS GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Trasobares, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study analyses the individual and joint impact of family control and diversification on the perfor-mance of major Spanish corporations, considering the nature of the ltimate owner of non-family groups.The study uses a sample of ninety-nine Spanish corporations, each comprising a parent company listed onthe stock exchange and a set of subsidiaries. Heckman’s two-step correction is used to eliminate selectionbias and the endogeneity of family ownership. Different models are contemplated in which we alysethe impact of both diversification and the family nature of a business on performance, established asTobin’s q-value. The results show how family control has a egative impact on Tobin’s q-value, and thatdifferences are greater between family groups and non-family groups controlled by banks and/or foreignagents. They also show ow diversification does not affect the creation of value either individually orconsidering the possible moderating effect of family ownership.

  8. Family Group Psychotherapy to Support the Disclosure of HIV Status to Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Storace, Cinzia; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Mango, Carmela; Liguoro, Ilaria; Guarino, Alfredo; Officioso, Annunziata

    2013-01-01

    Disclosure of the HIV status to infected children is often delayed due to psychosocial problems in their families. We aimed at improving the quality of life in families of HIV-infected children, thus promoting disclosure of the HIV status to children by parents. Parents of 17 HIV-infected children (4.2–18 years) followed at our Center for pediatric HIV, unaware of their HIV status, were randomly assigned to the intervention group (8 monthly sessions of family group psychotherapy, FGP) or to t...

  9. Africa's 9th malaria day celebration in 2009 and its bearing on most vulnerable groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Godwin T Jombo; Emmanuel M Mbaawuaga; Sebastin T Anongu; DanieZ Egah; Maximus N Enenebeaku; Emmanuel E Okwori; Chuks G Ejezie; Ima Bassey; Friday Odey

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the incidence of malaria and anaemia among children after the ninth malaria day celebration.Methods: Children attending primary healthcare centres in Makurdi for routine immunization purposes were recruited between September and November 2008 into the study. Thick and thin blood films from arterial blood were stained with Giemsa's stain and examined microscopically; packed cell volume (PCV) was measured using haematocrit machine and body temperatures with the aid of paediatric thermometers; other anthropometric measurements were also taken. Other relevant information on the children and their parents were obtained with the aid of a structured questionnaire. Data obtained was analysed using Epi Info statistical software,P values ≤0.05 were considered significant.Results: The incidence ofPlasmodium falciparum parasitaemia was 32.3% among the 502 children; 85.9% (n=139) of children with malaria parasites were anaemic and 88.9% (8/9) of the children with fever had malaria. Infections were commoner in children aged one year and above (P0.05). Educational level of mothers had no significant impact on the incidence of malaria among the children (P>0.05), while occupation had (P< 0.05).Conclusions:Malaria and anaemia are still major health problems in Makurdi city as in several other parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Supply of ITNs and massive health education at the grass root should be stepped up, and possibly supply of facilities for rapid malaria diagnosis to the community should be considered.

  10. To whom do national days matter? A comparison of national belonging across generations and ethnic groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coopmans, Manja; Lubbers, Marcel; Meuleman, Roza

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies to what extent participating in days for national commemoration and celebration is associated with feelings of national belonging, and to what extent this is comparable across generations and ethnic groups. Utilizing data from a national survey (N = 4,505), three major national da

  11. Functional and Evolutionary Characterization of the CONSTANS Gene Family in Short-Day Photoperiodic Flowering in Soybean

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    CONSTANS (CO) plays a central role in photoperiodic flowering control of plants. However, much remains unknown about the function of the CO gene family in soybean and the molecular mechanisms underlying short-day photoperiodic flowering of soybean. We identified 26 CO homologs (GmCOLs) in the soybean genome, many of them previously unreported. Phylogenic analysis classified GmCOLs into three clades conserved among flowering plants. Two homeologous pairs in Clade I, GmCOL1a/GmCOL1b and GmCOL2a...

  12. You and your kin: Neural signatures of family-based group perception in the subgenual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Bado, Patricia; Zahn, Roland; Bramati, Ivanei E; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Attachment to one's kin as an in-group emerges from a fundamental human motivation and is vital for human survival. Despite important recent advances in the field of social neuroscience, the neural mechanisms underlying family-related in-group perception remain obscure. To examine the neural basis of perceiving family-related in-group boundaries in response to written kinship scenarios, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 27 healthy adults and obtained self-report ratings of family-related entitativity, which measures to what degree participants perceive their family as a coherent and distinct group in society. We expected that activity in the subgenual cingulate cortex and septo-hypothalamic region would track individual differences in entitativity. Perceiving one's family as a distinct and cohesive group (high entitativity) was associated with increased subgenual cortex response to kinship scenarios. The subgenual cingulate cortex may represent a key link between kin-related emotional attachment and group perception, providing a neurobiological basis for group belongingness.

  13. Quality standards in a rheumatology Day-Care Hospital Unit. The proposal of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Day Hospitals' Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vicuña, Rosario; Montoro, María; Egües Dubuc, César Antonio; Bustabad Reyes, Sagrario; Gómez-Centeno, Antonio; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago; Pérez Pampín, Eva; Román Ivorra, Jose Andrés; Balsa, Alejandro; Loza, Estíbaliz

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the Rheumatology Day-Care Hospital Units (DHU have undergone extensive development. However, the quality standards are poorly documented and mainly limited to structure items rather than including broad and specific areas of this specialty. To develop specific quality standards for Rheumatology DHU. After a systematic review of the literature and related documents, a working group (WG) involving 8 DHU-experienced rheumatologists developed an initial proposal of the quality standards, under the supervision of an expert methodologist. A second round was held by the WG group to review the initial proposal and to consider further suggestions. Once the content was agreed upon by consensus, a final report was prepared. 17 structure standards, 25 process standards and 10 results standards were defined, with special emphasis on specific aspects of the Rheumatology DHU. The proposal includes: 1) essential standards to 2) excellent standards, 3) a Rheumatology DHU services portfolio and 4) performance criteria. The proposed quality standards are the basis for developing the indicators and other management tools for Rheumatology DHU, thereby ensuring a patient-oriented practice based on both the evidence and the experience. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Illness and Prevention: Self-Help Groups for Families Faced with Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what kinds of people are motivated to join a medical self-help group and whether and in what areas of psychological and social functioning such self-help groups have positive benefits for adolescents and their families. Extensive survey questionnaires were sent throughout the United States to all former…

  15. Family group psychotherapy to support the disclosure of HIV status to children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Storace, Cinzia; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Mango, Carmela; Liguoro, Ilaria; Guarino, Alfredo; Officioso, Annunziata

    2013-06-01

    Disclosure of the HIV status to infected children is often delayed due to psychosocial problems in their families. We aimed at improving the quality of life in families of HIV-infected children, thus promoting disclosure of the HIV status to children by parents. Parents of 17 HIV-infected children (4.2-18 years) followed at our Center for pediatric HIV, unaware of their HIV status, were randomly assigned to the intervention group (8 monthly sessions of family group psychotherapy, FGP) or to the control group not receiving psychotherapy. Changes in the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB-I) and in the Short-Form State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Sf-STAI), as well as the HIV status disclosure to children by parents, were measured. Ten parents were assigned to the FGP group, while 7 parents to the controls. Psychological well-being increased in 70% of the FGP parents and none of the control group (p=0.017), while anxiety decreased in the FGP group but not in controls (60% vs. 0%, p=0.03). HIV disclosure took place for 6/10 children of the intervention group and for 1/7 of controls. Family group psychotherapy had a positive impact on the environment of HIV-infected children, promoting psychological well-being and the disclosure of the HIV status to children.

  16. On several families of elliptic curves with arbitrary large Selmer groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we calculate the ()-Selmer groups S()(E/Q) and S()(E/Q) of elliptic curves y2 = x(x + εpD)(x + εqD) via the descent method.In particular,we show that the Selmer groups of several families of such elliptic curves can be arbitrary large.

  17. Illness and Prevention: Self-Help Groups for Families Faced with Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what kinds of people are motivated to join a medical self-help group and whether and in what areas of psychological and social functioning such self-help groups have positive benefits for adolescents and their families. Extensive survey questionnaires were sent throughout the United States to all former…

  18. Analytic parameter dependence of Harish-Chandra modules for real reductive Lie groups - a family affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Noort, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is written in the subfield of mathematics known as representation theory of real reductive Lie groups. Let G be a Lie group in the Harish-Chandra class with maximal compact subgroup K and Lie algebra g. Let Omega be a connected complex manifold. By a family of G-representations parametri

  19. Analytic parameter dependence of Harish-Chandra modules for real reductive Lie groups - a family affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Noort, V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837768

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is written in the subfield of mathematics known as representation theory of real reductive Lie groups. Let G be a Lie group in the Harish-Chandra class with maximal compact subgroup K and Lie algebra g. Let Omega be a connected complex manifold. By a family of G-representations parametri

  20. Fermat Surface and Group Theory in Symmetry of Rapidity Family in Chiral Potts Model

    CERN Document Server

    Roan, Shi-shyr

    2013-01-01

    The present paper discusses various mathematical aspects about the rapidity symmetry in chiral Potts model (CPM) in the context of algebraic geometry and group theory . We re-analyze the symmetry group of a rapidity curve in $N$-state CPM, explore the universal group structure for all $N$, and further enlarge it to modular symmetries of the complete rapidity family in CPM. As will be shown in the article that all rapidity curves in $N$-state CPM constitute a Fermat hypersurface in $\\PZ^3$ of degree 2N as the natural generalization of the Fermat K3 elliptic surface $(N=2)$, we conduct a thorough algebraic geometry study about the rapidity fibration of Fermat surface and its reduced hyperelliptic fibration via techniques in algebraic surface theory. Symmetries of rapidity family in CPM and hyperelliptic family in $\\tau^{(2)}$-model are exhibited through the geometrical representation of the universal structural group in mathematics.

  1. A Multi-Family Group Intervention for Adolescent Depression: The BEST MOOD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lucinda A; Lewis, Andrew J; Toumbourou, John W; Knight, Tess; Bertino, Melanie D; Pryor, Reima

    2017-06-01

    Depression is the most common mental disorder for young people, and it is associated with educational underachievement, self-harm, and suicidality. Current psychological therapies for adolescent depression are usually focused only on individual-level change and often neglect family or contextual influences. The efficacy of interventions may be enhanced with a broader therapeutic focus on family factors such as communication, conflict, support, and cohesion. This article describes a structured multi-family group approach to the treatment of adolescent depression: Behaviour Exchange Systems Therapy for adolescent depression (BEST MOOD). BEST MOOD is a manualized intervention that is designed to address both individual and family factors in the treatment of adolescent depression. BEST MOOD adopts a family systems approach that also incorporates psychoeducation and elements of attachment theories. The program consists of eight multifamily group therapy sessions delivered over 2 hours per week, where parents attend the first four sessions and young people and siblings join from week 5. The program design is specifically aimed to engage youth who are initially resistant to treatment and to optimize youth and family mental health outcomes. This article presents an overview of the theoretical model, session content, and evaluations to date, and provides a case study to illustrate the approach. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  2. Genetic predisposition to chikungunya – a blood group study in chikungunya affected families

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishna Vadde; Sarojamma Vemula; Sudarsanareddy Lokireddy

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of CHIKV virus infected Aedes mosquitoes. During monsoon outbreak of chikungunya fever, we carried out the genetic predisposition to chikungunya in disease affected 100 families by doing blood group (ABO) tests by focusing on individuals who were likely to have a risk of chikungunya and identified the blood group involved in susceptibility/resistance to chikungunya. In the present study, based on blood group antig...

  3. The impact of intra-group processes on family business success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Farrington

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal ties and intra-group processes influence the ability of people to work together effectively as teams. In the context of the family business team, intra-group processes describe the interaction that takes place between the family members and the resultant psychological climate that exists in the family business. Given the increasing number of sibling teams among family businesses, as well as the challenges they face as team members, this study focuses on sibling teams in family businesses and the intra-group processes that influence their success. Consequently, the primary objective of this study is to identify and empirically test the intra-group processes influencing the effectiveness of sibling partnerships. A structured questionnaire was distributed to 1323 sibling partner respondents. The respondents were identified by means of a convenience snowball sampling technique, and the data were collected from 371 usable questionnaires. The empirical findings of this study show that the sibling relationship and fairness are important determinants of sibling team effectiveness.

  4. The Role of Family Influences on Adolescent Smoking in Different Racial/Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Gordon, Judith S.; Khoury, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Although differing levels of family influences may explain some of the varying racial/ethnic trends in adolescent smoking behavior, clarification of which influences are protective against smoking may aid in the development of future ethnic-specific smoking prevention interventions. We sought to identify and compare the association of family influences on adolescent smoking among Black, Hispanic, and White adolescents in a cross-sectional national sample. Methods: Data from 6,426 parent–child dyads from Round 1 of the National Survey of Parents and Youth were analyzed. The association of family influences with ever-smokers and recent smokers was evaluated. Multinomial logistic regression using SUDAAN software was used. Results: While all measures of family influences except for parent–adolescent activities and intention to monitor were significantly protective against recent smoking and ever smoking among Whites, ethnic-specific family influence predictors of smoking were found in Blacks and Hispanics. Higher parental monitoring, higher intention to monitor, and higher connectedness were protective among Hispanics, while higher parental punishment and favorable attitude toward monitoring were protective against smoking among Blacks. For family influences significantly associated with protection against smoking, consistently greater protection was afforded against recent smoking than against ever smoking. Conclusions: Higher levels of family influences are protective against smoking among all racial/ethnic groups. There are consistencies in family influences on youth smoking; however, there may be specific family influences that should be differentially emphasized within racial/ethnic groups in order to protect against smoking behavior. Our results offer insight for designing strategies for preventing smoking in youth of different racial/ethnic backgrounds. PMID:22180584

  5. Working with children from substance-affected families: the community-based group intervention TRAMPOLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Bröning

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children from substance-affected families show an elevated risk for developing own substance-related or other mental disorders. Frequently, they experience violence, abuse and neglect in their families. Therefore, they are an important target group for preventive efforts. In Germany it is estimated that approx. 2.65 million children are affected by parental substance abuse or dependence. Only ten percent of them receive treatment when parents are treated. To date, no evaluated program for children from substance-affected families exists in Germany. Methods: A new group intervention for children from substance-affected families was developed and is currently being evaluated in a randomized-controlled multicenter study funded by the German Ministry of Health. The development process was simultaneously guided by theory, existing research knowledge and expert opinion. Promoting resilience in children affected by parental substance abuse is a key goal of the program. Results: The TRAMPOLINE manual describes a 9-session addiction-focused, modular group program for children aged 8 to 12 years with at least one substance-using parent. Weekly sessions last for 90 minutes and combine psychoeducational elements with exercises and role play. A two-session parent intervention component is also integrated in the program. Content, structure and theoretical background of the intervention are described. Discussion: TRAMPOLINE is a new interventive effort targeting children from substance-affected families. It is grounded in theory and practice. The results of the research in progress will provide fundamental information on the effectiveness of a structured group prevention program for German children from substance-abusing families. Thus, the study will contribute to creating a broader and more effective system of preventive help for this high-risk target group.

  6. Assessment of marital and family expectations of a group of urban single young adults

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    Henry J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The lack of baseline understanding of what young adults′ needs and expectations are from marital and family life is the context in which this study has evolved. The author believes that the findings from this study could fee into the contents of a more relevant and useful Family Life Education program for young adults in urban India. Aims: To explore and analyze the needs and expectations of single young adults with respect to marital and family life. Materials and Methods: A college in Bangalore with students from graduate and post-graduate courses in the age group of 18 to 25 years. A semi-structure interview schedule prepared by the author was administered on 100 students. Qualitative and Quantitative. Results and Conclusion: The results showed that a large number of the participants had very specific emotional, cognitive and physiological expectations from marital and family life. They also expressed an active need for education on mate selection, sexuality, parenting, interpersonal relationships, intimacy, conflict resolution, among other areas of need. The findings from this study would find great relevance in the preparation of a relevant and practical Family Life Education program for single young adults which in turn would be useful in colleges, workplaces, family counseling centers or any platform where single young adults wish to access such family base services.

  7. Implications of smart wear technology for family caregiving relationships: focus group perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S; Kandiah, Jayanthi; Saiki, Diana; Nam, Jinhee; Harden, Amy; Park, Soonjee

    2014-10-01

    Technological advances in monitoring vulnerable care-recipients are on the rise. Recent and future development of Smart Wear technology (devices integrated into clothing that monitor care-recipients) might assist family caregivers with tasks related to caring for young children, relatives with disabilities, and frail spouses or parents. However, the development and use of this technology in family caregiving contexts is in its infancy. Focus group interviews of family caregivers were conducted to explore perspectives regarding the potential integration of Smart Wear technology into their family caregiving. Responses were analyzed qualitatively for themes related to perceptions of how Smart Wear could impact relationships between caregivers and care-recipients. Three major themes emerged: quality and quantity of interaction, boundary issues, and implications for anxiety. Implications and recommendations are discussed regarding maximizing the potential benefits of Smart Wear technology in ways that promote and protect healthy relationships among caregivers and care-recipients.

  8. Risk factors for development of lameness in gestating sows within the first days after moving to group housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluym, Liesbet M; Maes, Dominiek; Van Weyenberg, Stephanie; Van Nuffel, Annelies

    2017-02-01

    Lameness in sows is an important welfare issue that is affected by housing conditions and is thought to be influenced by hierarchical fights within the first days after mixing sows in groups. A longitudinal study in 15 randomly selected herds was performed to investigate the incidence of sow lameness and possible risk factors within the first days of group housing. Each herd was visited just before and again 3-5 days after the sows were moved to group housing. The floor characteristics and dimensions of the group housing facilities were assessed. Locomotion ability, body condition, skin lesions and degree of faecal soiling were recorded for all sows. Additional information on housing and management was obtained using a questionnaire. Amongst the 810 sows included in the study, the mean lameness incidence was 13.1% (95% confidence interval 10.9-15.6%). Following binomial logistic regression analysis, sows with >10% of the body covered with faeces had an increased risk for development of lameness (odds ratio, OR = 2.33, P = 0.001). An increase in space allowance from 1.7 m(2) to 3.0 m(2) (OR = 0.40, P = 0.03) and of herd size from 144 to 750 sows per herd (OR = 0.71, P = 0.02) decreased the risk of development of lameness. Neither the degree of aggression, indicated by skin lesions, nor the floor characteristics influenced the development of lameness. These results indicate that sows can benefit from a larger floor area. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Approaching confidentiality at a familial level in genomic medicine: a focus group study with healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheensa, Sandi; Fenwick, Angela; Lucassen, Anneke

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Clinical genetics guidelines from 2011 conceptualise genetic information as confidential to families, not individuals. The normative consequence of this is that the family's interest is the primary consideration and genetic information is shared unless there are good reasons not to do so. We investigated healthcare professionals' (HCPs') views about, and reasoning around, individual and familial approaches to confidentiality and how such views influenced their practice. Method 16 focus groups with 80 HCPs working in/with clinical genetics services were analysed, drawing on grounded theory. Results Participants raised seven problems with, and arguments against, going beyond the individual approach to confidentiality. These problems fell into two overlapping categories: ‘relationships’ and ‘structures’. Most participants had never considered ways to—or thought it was impossible to—treat familial genetic information and personal information differently. They worried that putting the familial approach into practice could disrupt family dynamics and erode patient trust in the health service. They also thought they had insufficient resources to share information and feared that sharing might change the standard of care and make them more vulnerable to liability. Conclusions A familial approach to confidentiality has not been accepted or adopted as a standard, but wider research suggests that some of the problems HCPs perceived are surmountable and sharing in the interest of the family can be achieved. However, further research is needed to explore how personal and familial genetic information can be separated in practice. Our findings are relevant to HCPs across health services who are starting to use genome tests as part of their routine investigations. PMID:28159847

  10. Genomic analysis of the TRIM family reveals two groups of genes with distinct evolutionary properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanella Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TRIM family is composed of multi-domain proteins that display the Tripartite Motif (RING, B-box and Coiled-coil that can be associated with a C-terminal domain. TRIM genes are involved in ubiquitylation and are implicated in a variety of human pathologies, from Mendelian inherited disorders to cancer, and are also involved in cellular response to viral infection. Results Here we defined the entire human TRIM family and also identified the TRIM sets of other vertebrate (mouse, rat, dog, cow, chicken, tetraodon, and zebrafish and invertebrate species (fruitfly, worm, and ciona. By means of comparative analyses we found that, after assembly of the tripartite motif in an early metazoan ancestor, few types of C-terminal domains have been associated with this module during evolution and that an important increase in TRIM number occurred in vertebrate species concomitantly with the addition of the SPRY domain. We showed that the human TRIM family is split into two groups that differ in domain structure, genomic organization and evolutionary properties. Group 1 members present a variety of C-terminal domains, are highly conserved among vertebrate species, and are represented in invertebrates. Conversely, group 2 is absent in invertebrates, is characterized by the presence of a C-terminal SPRY domain and presents unique sets of genes in each mammal examined. The generation of independent sets of group 2 genes is also evident in the other vertebrate species. Comparing the murine and human TRIM sets, we found that group 1 and 2 genes evolve at different speeds and are subject to different selective pressures. Conclusion We found that the TRIM family is composed of two groups of genes with distinct evolutionary properties. Group 2 is younger, highly dynamic, and might act as a reservoir to develop novel TRIM functions. Since some group 2 genes are implicated in innate immune response, their evolutionary features may account for

  11. Using Focus Groups to Identify Rural Participant Needs in Balancing Work and Family Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Stephen F.; Marotz-Baden, Ramona

    1999-01-01

    Six focus groups with 49 rural residents identified concerns about balancing work and family (time, energy, conflicting demands, child care), causes of imbalance, and types of help needed. Results were used to plan programs on time and resource management, meal planning, and relationship skills. (SK)

  12. Impact of an Educational Support Group on Family Participants Who Take Care of Their Schizophrenic Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowitz, Ira A.; Coursey, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Compared participants (N=24) in six-session educational support group offering family caregivers information about schizophrenia, training in problem-solving skills for managing patient behavior, and greater access to social support and community resources with matched controls (N=24). Participant caregivers reported significantly reduced anxiety…

  13. Are multi family groups appropriate for patients with first episode psychosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossberg, Jan Ivar; Johannessen, J O; Klungsoyr, O

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare outcome over 5 years for patients who participated in multi family groups (MFGs) to those who refused or were not offered participation. METHOD: Of 301 first episode psychotic patients aged 15-65 years, 147 participated in MFGs. Outcome was measured by drop-out rates, positive...

  14. Hitting Closer to Home: A Multiple Family Prevention Group for Adolescent Disordered Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Colleen E.; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an innovative multiple family psychoeducational group for the prevention of disordered eating among adolescent females. An overview of the concerns facing adolescents today is presented, including sociocultural norms, body dissatisfaction associated with pubertal changes, teasing regarding weight and shape, and family…

  15. Family Experiences, the Motivation for Science Learning and Science Achievement of Different Learner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Salomé; Lemmer, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    Science education is particularly important for both developed and developing countries to promote technological development, global economic competition and economic growth. This study explored the relationship between family experiences, the motivation for science learning, and the science achievement of a group of Grade Nine learners in South…

  16. Multiple Family Groups for Child Behavior Difficulties Retention Among Child Welfare-Involved Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Geetha; Fuss, Ashley; Wisdom, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Among children who remain at home with their permanent caregivers following a child welfare investigation, few who manifest emotional and behavioral difficulties actually engage in mental health treatment. The Multiple Family Group service delivery model to reduce childhood disruptive behavior disorders (MFG) has shown promise in engaging child welfare-involved families. This qualitative study examines caregiver perceptions of factors that influence retention in MFGs among child welfare-involved families. Twenty-five predominantly Black and Hispanic adult (ages 26-57) female caregivers with child welfare services involvement participated in individual, in-depth interviews about their experience with MFGs. Transcribed interview data were thematically coded guided by grounded theory methodology. Emergent themes were subsequently organized into a conceptual framework. Within the overarching influence of child welfare services involvement, specific components of MFGs influencing retention included the quality of interaction among group members, group facilitators' attentive approach with caregivers, supports designed to overcome logistical barriers (i.e., child care, transportation expenses, meals), and perceptions of MFG content and activities as fun and helpful. Caregiver factors, including their mental health and personal characteristics, as well as children's behavior, (i.e., observed changes in behavioral difficulties) were also associated with retention. High acceptability suggest utility for implementing MFGs within settings serving child welfare involved families, with additional modifications to tailor to setting and client features.

  17. Multiple Family Groups for Child Behavior Difficulties Retention Among Child Welfare–Involved Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Geetha; Fuss, Ashley; Wisdom, Jennifer P.

    2013-01-01

    Among children who remain at home with their permanent caregivers following a child welfare investigation, few who manifest emotional and behavioral difficulties actually engage in mental health treatment. The Multiple Family Group service delivery model to reduce childhood disruptive behavior disorders (MFG) has shown promise in engaging child welfare-involved families. This qualitative study examines caregiver perceptions of factors that influence retention in MFGs among child welfare-involved families. Methods Twenty-five predominantly Black and Hispanic adult (ages 26–57) female caregivers with child welfare services involvement participated in individual, in-depth interviews about their experience with MFGs. Transcribed interview data were thematically coded guided by grounded theory methodology. Emergent themes were subsequently organized into a conceptual framework. Results Within the overarching influence of child welfare services involvement, specific components of MFGs influencing retention included the quality of interaction among group members, group facilitators’ attentive approach with caregivers, supports designed to overcome logistical barriers (i.e., child care, transportation expenses, meals), and perceptions of MFG content and activities as fun and helpful. Caregiver factors, including their mental health and personal characteristics, as well as children’s behavior, (i.e., observed changes in behavioral difficulties) were also associated with retention. Conclusions High acceptability suggest utility for implementing MFGs within settings serving child welfare involved families, with additional modifications to tailor to setting and client features. PMID:26527856

  18. Learning dementia care in three contexts: practical training in day-care, group dwelling and nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, M; Negussie, B; Grafström, M

    2000-07-01

    During the period 1996-1999, 18 licensed practical nurses (LPNs) received specialized training to become caregivers and mentors in the field of dementia care at the Silvia Home Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden. The aim of the study was to illuminate how the trainees utilized their practical training to learn about dementia care. The trainees gained practical training within three care models for elderly persons with dementia. The three forms of care and the context for practical training included the school's integrated day-care, a group dwelling and a nursing home. The findings show that the trainees made use of each training context in a similar fashion but there were differences between the contexts. A perspective of human dignity characterized the day-care. This was an opportunity for the nursing philosophy taught by the programme to be put to practical use, and for reflection and experiences pertaining to the individual patient to be developed. In the group dwelling, the trainees encountered patients with different forms of dementia and studied how the care-giving could be adapted to the individual patient's symptoms - the disease perspective. In the nursing home, the trainees chose a staff perspective in which they focused on organization, management and working conditions as well as staff attitudes and the effects of these factors on patient care.

  19. Outcome of radioiodine therapy without, on or 3 days off carbimazole: a prospective interventional three-group comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Martin A. [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); University Hospital Basel, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Mueller, Beat [University Hospital Basel, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Basel (Switzerland); Schindler, Christian [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland)

    2006-06-15

    Carbimazole ameliorates hyperthyroidism but reduces radioiodine uptake and adversely affects the outcome of simultaneous radioiodine therapy. We explored whether withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days can restore the outcome of radioiodine treatment without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. By generating three groups with comparable radioiodine uptake, we also investigated whether the effect of carbimazole depends on the radioiodine uptake. Stratified by a radioiodine uptake >30%, 227 consecutive adult patients were prospectively assigned to radioiodine therapy (target dose 200 Gy) without, on or 3 days off carbimazole. Patients were clinically (Crooks-Wayne score) and biochemically (T{sub 3}, fT{sub 4}, TSH) followed up after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint was outcome 12 months after radioiodine therapy. A total of 207 patients completed follow-up (toxic nodular goitre, n=117; Graves' disease, n=90). The overall success rate was 71.5%. Patients without and 3 days off carbimazole had similar biochemical (81.4% and 83.3%, respectively; p=0.82) and clinical outcomes [median (range) Crooks-Wayne score 0 (0-16) and 1 (0-10), respectively; p=0.73], which were both higher than in patients on carbimazole [42.6%, p<0.001; Crooks-Wayne score 3 (0-30), p<0.03]. Time to achieve cure was delayed on carbimazole. No changes in thyroid hormone levels occurred after 3 days' discontinuation of carbimazole. Logistic regression revealed that all observed cure rates were independent of entity, sex, age, thyroid volume, radioiodine uptake, radioiodine half-life, fT{sub 4}, T{sub 3} and TSH. (orig.)

  20. Women's status and family planning: results from a focus group survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, B; Xie, Z

    1994-02-01

    Focus group discussions were conducted in China's Pingluo County, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, and Sihui County, Guangdong Province among reproductive age women with only daughters, mothers-in-law, unmarried women aged 23 years and older, and women business persons and cadres. The topic of discussion was the status of women, gender differences in employment, education, marriage, family life, childbearing, and elderly care in counties that have above average fertility rates. There were also several groups of men, mixed gender groups with husbands working away from home, local family planning workers, and rural intellectuals. The findings showed that there is more access to education for girls and a higher employment rate for young women. Daughters receive education to the highest level affordable. Enrollments are equal for boys and girls. Women's employment is not challenged by husbands, and work is available in a variety of locations. Business ownership and operation is encouraged. By middle age, women generally do not work in enterprises, but at home or on contracted farmland. Equal rights within the family are generally accepted. Husbands turn over their salary to wives for family expenses. Girls receive the same care after birth as boys. Women's status is improving. Improvements in social status have also involved sacrifices. Women complained that the workload on the farm has increased with adult males away working in cities. Women bear the burden of family planning, including in some cases side effects from oral pills and recovery from sterilizations. One women remarked that there were burdens in bearing children, taking oral pills, having IUD insertions, and having induced abortions; men should bear 50% of the responsibility. The burden of women without sons is harder, and women may also feel inferior as the last in their family line. One family with 6 daughters accepted the fine of RMB 7000 yuan for having another child, which turned out to be a son. One

  1. Multi-family group therapy for adolescent Internet addiction: exploring the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin-Xue; Fang, Xiao-Yi; Yan, Ni; Zhou, Zong-Kui; Yuan, Xiao-Jiao; Lan, Jing; Liu, Chao-Ying

    2015-03-01

    Internet addiction is one of the most common problems among adolescents and effective treatment is needed. This research aims to test the effectiveness and underlying mechanism of multi-family group therapy (MFGT) to reduce Internet addiction among adolescents. A total of 92 participants consisting of 46 adolescents with Internet addiction, aged 12-18years, and 46 their parents, aged 35-46years, were assigned to the experimental group (six-session MFGT intervention) or a waiting-list control. Structured questionnaires were administered at pre-intervention (T1), post-intervention (T2) and a three-month follow-up (T3). There was a significant difference in the decline both in the average score and proportion of adolescents with Internet addiction in MFGT group at post-intervention (MT1=3.40, MT2=2.46, pInternet use was partially explained by the satisfaction of their psychological needs and improved parent-adolescent communication and closeness. The six-session multi-family group therapy was effective in reducing Internet addiction behaviors among adolescents and could be implemented as part of routine primary care clinic services in similar populations. As family support system is critical in maintaining the intervention effect, fostering positive parent-adolescent interaction and addressing adolescents' psychological needs should be included in preventive programs for Internet addiction in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of zoo exhibits by family groups to learn science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Loran Carleton

    In the last twenty years, research about science learning in informal contexts such as museums, science centers, zoos and aquariums has proliferated. Many studies have created detailed descriptions of learning as it occurs in informal contexts. Science education researchers have defined learning in several different ways. The selection of a conceptual framework through which to view science learning determines the questions that a researcher can explore. My study applied Roth and Lee's (2002) understanding of science learning as a collective praxis to the context of informal science learning at a community zoo. This conceptual framework is rooted in the view of learning as situated cognition as described by Lave and Wenger (1991). My research explored the interaction of the sociocultural and physical contexts for informal learning as defined by Falk (2000) and investigates how family groups collaborate to learn science at zoo exhibits and how they incorporate the physical features of the exhibit into their collaboration. My interpretations of each family's discourse yielded a variety of genres or accepted patterns used to learn science. All families engaged in highly parent-directed discourse during their visit. For one family parent-controlled, directed explanation was present in all science learning events; the other families' science learning events were a mixture of directed explanation and more collaborative genres of discourse. All the families in this study used exhibit text in two different ways: as a way of framing or guiding their interaction with the exhibit or as a resource in the context of the Family's own frame. For all of the families in this study, each exhibit was a separate learning event---none of the families applied or linked ideas or explanations created at one exhibit to ideas or explanations created at another exhibit. Implications of this study include more longitudinal research on the role of zoo visits on family learning and more

  3. ROLES OF INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES IN AN EMERGING COUNTRY: CONTROL AND COORDINATION IN FAMILY BUSINESS GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Ataay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maman (1999 proposed that, in countries in which business groups are dominant forms for organizing economic activities, the interlocking directorate is a managerial tool that can be prioritized to control and coordinate activities of their affiliated firms within the same groups and align their business objectives. This organizational connection appears to be an intentional strategy on the part of the groups‟ headquarters. In order to study the interlocking ties in Turkish family business groups (FBG, this study focused on interlocking directorates among listed firms in Turkey. The findings of preliminary study reveal that almost all of the interlocking ties were within the business groups (BG in our sample. This is the result of assignment of familyaffiliated and/or professional inside directors to the various boards of companies in the BG. We also found that compare to vertical ties; business groups are using more horizontal interlocking connections to bond their affiliated companies together.

  4. [Serological Characteristics and Family Survey of 3 Cases of H-deficient Blood Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Wei; Gao, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Lin-Wei

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the serological characteristics and the genetic status of the family of H-deficient blood group in Jining area of Shandong province in China. ABO, H, and Lewis blood groups in 3 probands were screened out by the serological method, and saliva testing was performed on all the individuals. The presence of weak A or B on the RBC was confirmed by using the adsorption-elution procedure. Three cases of H-deficient blood group were identified to be para-Bombay blood group (secretor), out of 3 cases, 2 cases were Bh, 1 case was Ah, and anti-H or anti-HI antibody was detected in their serum. Three cases of H-deficerent blood group are para-Bombay phenotype, among them one proband's parents have been confirmed to be consanguineous relationship.

  5. A NEW FAMILY OF FILTRATION s+6 IN THE STABLE HOMOTOPY GROUPS OF SPHERES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiugui

    2006-01-01

    In the year 2002, Lin detected a nontrivial family in the stable homotopy groups of spheres πt-6S which is represented by hngo~γ3 ∈ Ext6,tA(Zp, Zp) in the Adams spectral sequence, where t = 2pn(p - 1) + 6(p2 +p+ 1)(p - 1) and p ≥ 7 is a prime number.This article generalizes the result and proves the existence of a new nontrivial family of filtration s + 6 in the stable homotopy groups of spheres πt1-s-6S which is represented by hngo(~,γ)s+3 ∈ Exts+6,t1A (Zp, Zp) in the Adams spectral sequence, where n ≥ 4, 0 ≤ s < p - 4,t1 = 2pn(p - 1) + 2(p - 1)((s + 3)p2 + (s + 3)p + (s + 3)) + s.

  6. Study on occupational therapy groups for caregivers of families with schizophrenia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica da Silva Araujo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know the main aspects featuring the experience of caring for a family member who is schizophrenic and discuss the possible therapeutic benefits which arise from the participation of caregivers in occupational therapy groups. Methodological procedures: Qualitative-descriptive study, performed in a mental health ambulatory at a general hospital in the state of São Paulo. Data was collected through audio-recording in occupational therapy groups which counted on the participation of 10 family-caregivers of schizophrenic patients with follow-up treatment at this ambulatory. The data were analyzed through the thematic content analysis of Lawrence Bardin. Results: Caregivers of schizophrenic patients face daily difficulties arising from living together with their beloved ones and coping with their behaviors. These caregivers stress the importance of groups as a possible opportunity to have contact with other experiences of people under similar conditions, which not only enables them to clear doubts concerning the illness and the provided care, but also to reflect on the importance of taking care of themselves. Conclusions: There is great need for new studies that address this issue and develop continuous therapeutic interventions that offer caregivers the possibility to be heard about their experiences and to share information, aiming to prepare them to offer a more effective care for the schizophrenic family member and others with mental disorders. The importance of evaluating such interventions is therefore highlighted.

  7. The impact of Centering Pregnancy Group Prenatal Care on postpartum family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Nathan; Picklesimer, Amy H; Billings, Deborah L; Covington-Kolb, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of group prenatal care (GPNC) on postpartum family-planning utilization. A retrospective cohort of women continuously enrolled in Medicaid for 12 months (n = 3637) was used to examine differences in postpartum family-planning service utilization among women participating in GPNC (n = 570) and those receiving individual prenatal care (IPNC; n = 3067). Propensity scoring methods were used to derive a matched cohort for additional analysis of selected outcomes. Utilization of postpartum family-planning services was higher among women participating in GPNC than among women receiving IPNC at 4 points in time: 3 (7.72% vs 5.15%, P planning visits were highest among non-Hispanic black women at each interval, peaking with 31.84% by 12 months postpartum. After propensity score matching, positive associations between GPNC and postpartum family-planning service utilization remained consistent by 6 (odds ratio [OR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.92), 9 (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.08-1.90), and 12 (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.10-1.90) months postpartum. These findings demonstrate the potential that GPNC has to positively influence women's health outcomes after pregnancy and to improve the utilization rate of preventive health services. Utilization of postpartum family-planning services was highest among non-Hispanic black women, further supporting evidence of the impact of GPNC in reducing health disparities. However, despite continuous Medicaid enrollment, postpartum utilization of family-planning services remained low among all women, regardless of the type of prenatal care they received. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. AN ECONOMIC RELIABILITY EFFICIENT GROUP ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING PLANS FOR FAMILY PARETO DISTRIBUTIONS

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    Muhammad Ismail

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research article deals with an economic reliability efficient group acceptance sampling plan for time truncated tests which are based on the total number of failures assuming that the life time of a product follows the family for Pareto distribution. This research is proposed when a multiple number of products as a group can be observed simultaneously in a tester. The minimum termination time required for a given group size and acceptance number is determined such that the producer and consumer risks are satisfied for specific standard of quality level, while the number of groups and the number of testers are pre-assumed. Comparison studies are made between the proposed plan and the existing plan on the basis of minimum termination time. Two real examples are also discussed.

  9. [Communication in the coordination practices of socioeducational groups in family health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Líliam Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the forms of communication used by coordinators in socioeducational groups in family health programmes. This qualitative, descriptive and exploratory study was conducted with 25 coordinators of groups in eight basic health units from Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Data collection comprised non-participant observation and semistructured interviews with the coordinators. The theoretical basis for research was Bakhtin's formulations and references on communication and health. The gathered information showed that the body, health and disease triad was communicated in groups through different channels and at different levels of discourse. Our conclusion is that coordinators must adopt an approach that values the expression of participants, not just regarding the physical dimensions of health, but also the life of each participant, and should use various forms of communication to foster dialogical educational actions and means for interaction in groups.

  10. ‘All the days of their lives’, Women, business and family in eighteenth-century Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonton, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    bakery business, which was clearly long-standing and central to the commercial area of Aberdeen. This enables us to examine the dynamic of the business as a partnership of the couple, while she as a widow continued to successfully operate the bakery. It captures elements of how such a firm operated, how...... the family moved in economic and political circles and ultimately how women and the family interacted. Numerous other women shared in family businesses in Aberdeen, and their stories enrich our understanding of women's activities in other types of family enterprises. While like many women they continued...... the businesses as widows, their role during their husbands' lives was more obscured, but there is little doubt that they had been active partners in the bakery, printing and innkeeping family enterprises. Otherwise they could not have operated with such confidence as widows. Through business families...

  11. Clinical and genetic features of International Collaborative Group-hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families and suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁瑛; 叶俊; 郑树

    2004-01-01

    Background Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPPC) is one of the most common genetic syndrome related with mutation of human mismatch repair genes. This study was to evaluate the clinical significance of suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (sHNPCC) criteria I and the clinical and genetic features of International Collaborative Group-HNPCC (ICG-HNPCC) and sHNPCC families.Methods Twenty-nine ICG-HNPCC families fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria and 34 sHNPCC families fulfilling the sHNPCC criteria I were collected. PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing analysis were employed to screen the germline mutations of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes in these families.Results The ICG group had more colorectal cancer (CRC) patients per family than did the suspected group (P0.05), mutation type, and mutation distribution. Comparison of the families with and without mutation showed no significant difference in CRC patients per family, Lynch classification, and tumor spectrum.Conclusions ICG-HNPCC and sHNPCC families that have similar clinical manifestations and genetic basis indicate a similar nature for cancer development. The application of sHNPCC criteria I will facilitate clinical diagnosis and treatment of small families.

  12. Parafunctional oral habits and its relationship with family structure in a mexican preschoolers group, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Murrieta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Habit is any act acquired through experience and performed regularly and unconsciously. Parafunctional habits are resulting from the perversion of a normal function, acquired by repeated practice of an act that is not functional or necessary, may be signs of adjustment problems or inappropriate emotional expression. Its importance lies in the fact that they can interfere with the development of dental occlusion. Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of parafunctional oral habits and their possible association with the type of family, in a group of preschool children from eastern Mexico City. Methodology. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study was carrying on. Preschool children group and their parents were surveyed before an examiner calibration (k =0.87, p=0.001. The detection of different parafunctional habits was conducted in two stages: 1 application of a parent questionnaire and 2 clinical assessment of the child. Results and discussion. 57.7% of the studied population had at least one parafunctional oral habit. Onycophagia habit was the most prevalent. The relationship between prevalence of parafunctional habits with family type was significant (X2=87.439, p=0.0001. Conclusions. The prevalence of parafunctional habits was high which was associated with family type also the most frequent parafunctional habit onycophagia.

  13. Immigrant families' perceptions on walking to school and school breakfast: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busby Katie

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immigrant children face an increased risk of being overweight. Little is known about how immigrant families perceive school programs that may help prevent obesity, such as walking to school and school breakfast. Methods Six focus groups (n = 53 were conducted with immigrant parents of school-aged children, two each in three languages: Vietnamese, Spanish, and Somali. A facilitator and translator conducted the focus groups using a script and question guide. Written notes and audio transcripts were recorded in each group. Transcripts were coded for themes by two researchers and findings classified according to an ecological model. Results Participants in each ethnic group held positive beliefs about the benefits of walking and eating breakfast. Barriers to walking to school included fear of children's safety due to stranger abductions, distrust of neighbors, and traffic, and feasibility barriers due to distance to schools, parent work constraints, and large families with multiple children. Barriers to school breakfast participation included concerns children would not eat due to lack of appealing/appropriate foods and missing breakfast due to late bus arrival or lack of reminders. Although some parents acknowledged concerns about child and adult obesity overall, obesity concerns did not seem personally relevant. Conclusion Immigrant parents supported the ideals of walking to school and eating breakfast, but identified barriers to participation in school programs across domains of the ecological model, including community, institution, and built environment factors. Schools and communities serving immigrant families may need to address these barriers in order to engage parents and children in walking and breakfast programs.

  14. The TrmB family: a versatile group of transcriptional regulators in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindner, Antonia; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Microbes are organisms which are well adapted to their habitat. Their survival depends on the regulation of gene expression levels in response to environmental signals. The most important step in regulation of gene expression takes place at the transcriptional level. This regulation is intriguing in Archaea because the eu-karyotic-like transcription apparatus is modulated by bacterial-like transcription regulators. The transcriptional regulator of mal operon (TrmB) family is well known as a very large group of regulators in Archaea with more than 250 members to date. One special feature of these regulators is that some of them can act as repressor, some as activator and others as both repressor and activator. This review gives a short updated overview of the TrmB family and their regulatory patterns in different Archaea as a lot of new data have been published on this topic since the last review from 2008.

  15. A family of affine quantum group invariant integrable extensions of the Hubbard Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, A. [Erevanskij Fizicheskij Inst., Erevan (Armenia); Hakobyan, T. [Erevanskij Fizicheskij Inst., Erevan (Armenia); Sedrakyan, A. [Erevanskij Fizicheskij Inst., Erevan (Armenia)

    1997-04-21

    We construct a family of spin chain Hamiltonians, which have the affine quantum group symmetry U{sub q}g. Their eigenvalues coincide with the eigenvalues of the usual spin chain Hamiltonians, but have the degeneracy of levels, corresponding to the affine U{sub q}g. The space of states of these spin chains is formed by the tensor product of the fully reducible representations of the quantum group. The fermionic representations of the constructed spin chain Hamiltonians show that we have obtained new extensions of the Hubbard Hamiltonians. All of them are integrable and have the affine quantum group symmetry. The exact ground state of such type of model is presented, exhibiting superconducting behavior via the {eta}-pairing mechanism. (orig.).

  16. Agrupamentos preferenciais e não-preferenciais e arranjos espaciais em creches Preferential and no preferential groups and spatial arrangements in day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara I. Campos-de-Carvalho

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Para verificar o impacto do arranjo espacial para ocorrência de agrupamentos preferenciais e não-preferenciais, analisou-se a ocupação do espaço por crianças de 2-3 anos de duas creches da região de Ribeirão Preto (SP, que atendem famílias de baixa renda. Os dados foram obtidos por duas câmeras fotográficas automáticas, ativadas a cada 30 segundos, em três fases: I - arranjo aberto: habitual (4 sessões; II - arranjo aberto: introdução de estantes nas laterais (6 sessões; III - arranjo semi-aberto: montagem de duas zonas circunscritas (6 sessões. Proximidade física foi utilizada para registrar os agrupamentos, verificando-se: maior estruturação espacial acarretou aumento significativo nos agrupamentos, especialmente com três ou mais crianças; maior ocorrência de agrupamentos nas áreas das estantes (FII e nas zonas circunscritas (FIII, sendo significativa para os não-preferenciais; maior ocupação da zona do adulto na fase inicial, significativa para os não-preferenciais. Concluindo, há evidências da relevância do arranjo espacial para ocorrência de agrupamentos, principalmente para os não-preferenciais.The role of spatial arrangement in the occurrence of preferential and no preferential groups is examined. The spatial distribution of 2- to 3-year-old children from two day care centers serving low income families in the Ribeirão Preto (SP area was analyzed. Data were collected by two automatic photographic cameras shooting at every 30 seconds, in three phases: I - open arrangement: the usual space (4 sessions; II - open arrangement: inclusion of shelves along the periphery of the space (6 sessions; III - semi-open arrangement: formation of two circumscribed zones (6 sessions. Physical proximity was used to record the peer groups. The analysis showed: a significant increase in the occurrence of peer groups with increased spatial structure, especially with three or more children; a preferential occurrence of peer

  17. The Rise in Cortisol in Family Day Care: Associations with Aspects of Care Quality, Child Behavior, and Child Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnar, Megan R.; Kryzer, Erin; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the increase in salivary cortisol from midmorning to midafternoon in 151 children (3.0-4.5 years) in full-time home-based day care. Compared to cortisol levels at home, increases were noted in the majority of children (63%) at day care, with 40% classified as a stress response. Observations at day care revealed that intrusive,…

  18. The Rise in Cortisol in Family Day Care: Associations with Aspects of Care Quality, Child Behavior, and Child Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnar, Megan R.; Kryzer, Erin; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the increase in salivary cortisol from midmorning to midafternoon in 151 children (3.0-4.5 years) in full-time home-based day care. Compared to cortisol levels at home, increases were noted in the majority of children (63%) at day care, with 40% classified as a stress response. Observations at day care revealed that intrusive,…

  19. Peer-support writing group in a community family medicine teaching unit: Facilitating professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Imari, Lina; Yang, Jaisy; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Aspiring physician writers need an environment that promotes self-reflection and can help them improve their skills and confidence in writing. To create a peer-support writing group for physicians in the Markham-Stouffville community in Ontario to promote professional development by encouraging self-reflection and fostering the concept of physician as writer. The program, designed based on a literature review and a needs assessment, was conducted in 3 sessions over 6 months. Participants included an emergency physician, 4 family physicians, and 3 residents. Four to 8 participants per session shared their projects with guest physician authors. Eight pieces of written work were brought to the sessions, 3 of which were edited. A mixed quantitative and qualitative evaluation model was used with preprogram and postprogram questionnaires and a focus group. This program promoted professional development by increasing participants' frequency of self-reflection and improving their proficiency in writing. Successful elements of this program include creating a supportive group environment and having a physician-writer expert facilitate the peer-feedback sessions. Similar programs can be useful in postgraduate education or continuing professional development. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  20. Relative contribution of effects included in contemporary groups for adjusted and actual 120-day and 210-day weights in Nelore cattle in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Pascoa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to estimate the relative magnitude of effects included in contemporary groups (CG and their interactions with adjusted and actual 120 d and 210 d weights in 72, 731 male and female Nelore calves born from 1985 to 2005 in 40 herds from PMGRN (Genetic Improvement Program of Nelore. Ten models with different CG structures were compared. The analyses were done using the general linear models (GLM procedure run in SAS software. All of the effects included in the CG for each model were significant (p < 0.001 for the four traits analyzed. Inclusion of semester or trimester of birth as part of a CG was more appropriate than its use as an independent effect in the model because it accounted for interactions with the other effects in the CG. Calf sex (CS and dam age at calving (DAC had similar effects across the models, which suggested independence from other effects in these models. The corresponding age deviation effect had a larger impact on actual weight at 120 d than any other effect in all of the models tested. The use of actual weights in models with no CS effect in CG provides an alternative that would allow better genetic connectedness among CGs and greater accuracy in genetic evaluations.

  1. [The odysseys of Ulysses. A study of tales in a normal working day of the family doctor in Paraguay, Mexico, Peru, and Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Montiel, Brenda Beatriz; Gutiérrez-Islas, Elizabeth; Bolaños-Maldonado, Margarita; Samarín, Elena; Turabián, José Luis

    2014-02-01

    To examine the professional profile of the family doctor in different countries and the social welfare context where their work is carried out. Qualitative Methodology of production of field diaries of a normal day. Primary Heath Care of Toledo and Tenerife in Spain, and Paraguay, Mexico, and Peru. Non-random sampling, intentional, followed by snowball sample until data saturation. Participants wrote a diary of a typical day's work, their circumstances and socio-health context, and were studied by content analysis. Techniques to control the biases were used the check the participants and the triangulation between the obtained results and the existing bibliography, and data found on the Internet daily. We performed a mental map to transcribe the results graphically and in a comprehensive form. A total of 24 diaries of a normal day were obtained (9 doctors in Spain, 7 in Mexico, 4 in Paraguay, and 4 in Peru). We found some similarities, but many differences between countries. In contexts of humble but spirited, rural, with traditional roots and undemanding, there was a wider range of tasks of the family doctor, the coexistence of public and private work, and modern and traditional medicine, with greater presence of family and community care, more physician satisfaction and better patient-physician relationship. The professional profile of the family doctor is diverse and a context-dependent variable, and is not derived directly from external theory of family medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. A NEW FAMILY OF FILTRATION S+5 IN THE STABLE HOMOTOPY GROUPS OF SPHERES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yuyu

    2008-01-01

    In this article, by the algebraic method, the author proves the existence of a new nontrivial family of filtration s+5 in the stable homotopy groups of spheres πrS, which is represented by 0≠γs+3hmhm ∈ Exts+5,A t(zp, Zp) in the Adams spectral sequence, where r=q(pm + pn + (s + 3)p2 + (s + 2)p + (s + 1)) - 5, t = pmq + pnq + (s + 3)p2q + (s+2)pq+(s+1)q+s,p>7, mn+25,0

  3. O cotidiano das famílias de crianças e adolescentes portadores de anemia falciforme The day-to-day life of families with children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. R. Guimarães

    2009-02-01

    study aims at describing the day-to-day life of families with children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia. This was a descriptive, exploratory, qualitative investigation. Data collection was achieved by recording semi-structured interviews with relatives of ten under 18-year-old patients with sickle cell anemia attended in the Hemope Clinic in October 2006. The selection criteria of interviewees were that they lived with and were first degree relatives of the patient. The exclusion criterion was that the patient was at risk of death. The sample size followed the criteria of saturation discussed by Mynaio. The technique of "Analysis of Content" described by Bardin was used in the evaluation. The interviews were completely transcribed and grouped according to their similarities, searching for relevant feelings originating from codes and themes: 1. Theme: Involvement of the family (Exclusiveness of attention; codes: overprotection, relinquishing other roles, overload of mother, learning with the illness; 2: Theme: Impact of the illness (chronic illness affecting family; codes: non-acceptance, fear of death; 3. Theme: Facing challenges (Support networks, Healthcare services; codes: spiritual, professional, and family support; hospital structure. We verified difficulties in the acceptance of the illness by the family and the burden of the mother with necessary patient care. In conclusion, healthcare assistance models should allow the family to act as a co-participant in the care of the patient in order to facilitate the patient's adaptation to the disease.

  4. Family Life and the Impact of Previous and Present Residential and Day Care Support for Children with Major Cognitive and Behavioural Challenges: A Dilemma for Services and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. I.; Geider, S.; Primrose, A.; Jokinen, N. S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Since the development of inclusion and integration, parents have increasingly become the major, and sometimes the only, carers of their children with disabilities. Many families speak of stress and frustration with service and community support, and some have turned to residential and specialised day care services to overcome…

  5. Promoting and recovering health: meanings produced in community groups within the family health program context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celiane Camargo-Borges

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Public Healthcare in Brazil has tended to reflect major changes in the healthcare model. New tendencies point to the importance of actions being built up from their context and focused on specific communities. The objective of this study is to describe the meanings of health / illness as produced by community groups within the context of a Family Healthcare Program. Five groups had their single-session discussions taped and recorded, under the coordination of the first author. This material was transcribed and, coupled with field notes, formed the database for this study. The analysis described the meanings of the ideas on which new healthcare proposals are being based, providing visibility for the multiplicity of meanings and denaturalizing fixed lines of discourse on healthcare / illness. The final thoughts, developed from the point of view of social constructionism, indicate that healthcare practices based on the process of constant conversation and negotiation between all the social actors involved is a fertile ground.

  6. The Effects of Group Psychoeducational Programme on Attitude toward Mental Illness in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family members often play a vital role as caregivers in the lives of individuals with schizophrenia. Results of the studies showed that family invironment is the most important determinint of patients outcomes like as quality of life, relapse, adherence. This study aimed to determine the effect of group psychoeducational programme on attitude towards mental illness in families of patients with schizophrenia. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 74 families who have schizophrenic patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards during sampling were selected by convenience sampling method. Then the sample was randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The families of experimental group received 8 continuous 90-minute 3 times a week psychoeducational sessions. Family attitude towards mental illness was measured using the questionnaire of Opinion about Mental Illnesses (OMI before and after intervention. Data analysis was conducted using 2 test, independent t-test, and paired t-test on SPSS software version 13. Results: The results showed that majority of the families had negative attitude towards mental illness (88.90%. In addition, the results showed that there was significant difference between different dimensions of attitude towards mental illness before and after psychoeducation in the experimental group. The mean score of families' post-test in the experimental group increased compared to control group 108.86 (14.9, vs. 88.86 (7.5. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that psychoeducation improves family attitude towards mental illness. Training methods like group psych education for the families of mental patients can be effective on their attitudes towards mental illness.

  7. Days La Familia community drug and alcohol prevention program: Family-centered model for working with inner-city Hispanic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, L P; Lucero, E

    1996-03-01

    Substance abuse among Hispanics is on the increase despite national efforts toward reducing it. Researchers and service providers have recognized the specific need for better prevention models that address the issues of poor Hispanics. La Familia is a community-based ATOD prevention program that targets Hispanic families with high-risk youth from 6 to 11 years old, and attempts to reduce identified risk factors while building on culturally relevant protective factors. During the 2 years, the program has enrolled 219 youth and their families utilizing existing community networks and aggressive outreach. The program resulted in a 92% retention rate and over 80% attendance per session. As a result of the program, families became more willing to discuss ATOD issues openly and made positive steps toward empowerment.

  8. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-01

    .... They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment...

  9. A Model for Dimerization of the SOX Group E Transcription Factor Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsook, Sarah N; Ni, Joyce; Shahangian, Shokofeh; Vakiloroayaei, Ana; Khan, Naveen; Kwan, Jamie J; Donaldson, Logan W

    2016-01-01

    Group E members of the SOX transcription factor family include SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10. Preceding the high mobility group (HMG) domain in each of these proteins is a thirty-eight amino acid region that supports the formation of dimers on promoters containing tandemly inverted sites. The purpose of this study was to obtain new structural insights into how the dimerization region functions with the HMG domain. From a mutagenic scan of the dimerization region, the most essential amino acids of the dimerization region were clustered on the hydrophobic face of a single, predicted amphipathic helix. Consistent with our hypothesis that the dimerization region directly contacts the HMG domain, a peptide corresponding to the dimerization region bound a preassembled HMG-DNA complex. Sequence conservation among Group E members served as a basis to identify two surface exposed amino acids in the HMG domain of SOX9 that were necessary for dimerization. These data were combined to make a molecular model that places the dimerization region of one SOX9 protein onto the HMG domain of another SOX9 protein situated at the opposing site of a tandem promoter. The model provides a detailed foundation for assessing the impact of mutations on SOX Group E transcription factors.

  10. Unmet need for family planning among married women of reproductive age group in urban Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini M Bhattathiry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Unmet need for family planning (FP, which refers to the condition in which there is the desire to avoid or post-pone child bearing, without the use of any means of contraception, has been a core concept in the field of international population for more than three decades. Objectives: The very objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of "unmet need for FP" and its socio-demographic determinants among married reproductive age group women in Chidambaram. Materials and Methods: The study was a community-based cross-sectional study of married women of the reproductive age group, between 15 and 49 years. The sample size required was 700. The cluster sampling method was adopted. Unmarried, separated, divorced and widows were excluded. Results: The prevalence of unmet need for FP was 39%, with spacing as 12% and limiting as 27%. The major reason for unmet need for FP among the married group was 18%, for low perceived risk of pregnancy, 9%, feared the side effects of contraception 5% lacked information on contraceptives, 4% had husbands who opposed it and 3% gave medical reasons. Higher education, late marriage, more than the desired family size, poor knowledge of FP, poor informed choice in FP and poor male participation were found to be associated with high unmet need for FP. Conclusion: Unmet need for younger women was spacing of births, whereas for older women, it was a limitation of births. Efforts should be made to identify the issues in a case by case approach. Male participation in reproductive issues should be addressed.

  11. Pedagogical Work, Stress Regulation and Work-Related Well-Being among Early Childhood Professionals in Integrated Special Day-Care Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nislin, Mari A.; Sajaniemi, Nina K.; Sims, Margaret; Suhonen, Eira; Maldonado Montero, Enrique F.; Hirvonen, Ari; Hyttinen, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between early childhood professionals' (ECPs) stress regulation (using salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase [AA] measurements), work engagement and the quality of their pedagogical work in integrated special day-care groups. Participants were 89 ECPs from 21 integrated special day-care…

  12. Pedagogical Work, Stress Regulation and Work-Related Well-Being among Early Childhood Professionals in Integrated Special Day-Care Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nislin, Mari A.; Sajaniemi, Nina K.; Sims, Margaret; Suhonen, Eira; Maldonado Montero, Enrique F.; Hirvonen, Ari; Hyttinen, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between early childhood professionals' (ECPs) stress regulation (using salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase [AA] measurements), work engagement and the quality of their pedagogical work in integrated special day-care groups. Participants were 89 ECPs from 21 integrated special day-care…

  13. Factors affecting unmet need for family planning in married women of reproductive age group in urban slums of Lucknow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Pal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unmet need for family planning signifies the gap between the reproductive intentions of couples and their actual contraceptive behaviour. The National Family Health Surveys carried out in India in 1992-93, 1998-99 and 2004-2005 have revealed that for a sizable proportion of the population in the reproductive age group, the need for contraceptive services are not met with despite the existence of a National Policy on family planning since 1983. This study was carried out to assess the extent of unmet need for family planning among married women of reproductive age group in urban slums of Lucknow and identify the various factors affecting it. Study design: Cross sectional Setting: four urban slums of Lucknow Participants: 414 married women in the age group of 15- 44 years Study variables: age, education, occupation, religion, parity Statistical analysis: chi- square test, logistic regression analysis, fisher’s exact test Results: the extent of unmet need among married women of reproductive age group was 53.1%. The unmet need was found to be significantly associated with age, number of living sons, discussion of family planning with husband, perception of husband’s view on family planning and husbands’ behaviour towards use of family planning method. Logistic regression analysis of unmet need showed that the lower age of the woman, lesser number of living sons and husband’s discouragement towards the use of FP method were correlated with the unmet need for Family Planning.

  14. An online monogenic diabetes discussion group: supporting families and fueling new research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Marie E; Carmody, David; Philipson, Louis H; Greeley, Siri Atma W

    2015-11-01

    Many online support groups are available for patients with rare disorders, but scant evidence is available on how effectively such groups provide useful information or valuable psychosocial support to their participants. It is also unclear to what extent physicians and researchers may learn more about these disorders by participating in such groups. To formally assess the utility of the Kovler Monogenic Diabetes Registry online discussion group for patients and families affected by KATP channel-related monogenic neonatal diabetes in providing psychosocial and informational support and in identifying concerns unique to patients with this rare form of diabetes. We qualitatively analyzed all 1,410 messages from the online group that consisted of 64 participants affected by KATP channel monogenic diabetes and 11 researchers. We utilized the Social Behavior Support Code to assign each message to a support category and deductive thematic analysis to identify discussion topics addressed by each message. 44% of messages provided/requested informational support, whereas 31.4% of the messages contained psychosocial/emotional support. The most popular topics of postings to the forums were diabetes treatment (503 messages) and neurodevelopmental concerns (472 messages). Participation in the discussion led researchers to modify survey instruments and design new studies focusing on specific topics of concern, such as sleep. We demonstrate that an online support group for a monogenic form of diabetes is an effective informational tool that also provides psychosocial support. Participation by researchers and care providers can inform future research directions and highlight issues of patient concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in the EnviroAtlas, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water per day...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community domestic water use was calculated using local domestic water use per capita in gallons of water per day (GPD),...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in the EnviroAtlas, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water per day...

  18. All in a Day's Work: Job Experiences, Self-Esteem, and Fathering in Working-Class Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm-Thomas, Karen; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    1994-01-01

    Examined how working-class fathers' job experiences affected their self-esteem and parenting styles. Conducted home interviews with 59 working-class fathers in dual-earner families and their target child, who was aged 8 to 12 years. Found that more positive fathers' work experiences, higher their self-esteem, which predicted more accepting…

  19. Reconstruction of Oomycete Genome Evolution Identifies Differences in Evolutionary Trajectories Leading to Present-Day Large Gene Families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, M.F.; Ackerveken, van den G.; Govers, F.; Snel, B.

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomic class of oomycetes contains numerous pathogens of plants and animals but is related to nonpathogenic diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes have flexible genomes comprising large gene families that play roles in pathogenicity. The evolutionary processes that shaped the gene content have no

  20. All in a Day's Work: Job Experiences, Self-Esteem, and Fathering in Working-Class Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm-Thomas, Karen; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    1994-01-01

    Examined how working-class fathers' job experiences affected their self-esteem and parenting styles. Conducted home interviews with 59 working-class fathers in dual-earner families and their target child, who was aged 8 to 12 years. Found that more positive fathers' work experiences, higher their self-esteem, which predicted more accepting…

  1. Reconstruction of Oomycete Genome Evolution Identifies Differences in Evolutionary Trajectories Leading to Present-Day Large Gene Families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, M.F.; Ackerveken, van den G.; Govers, F.; Snel, B.

    2012-01-01

    The taxonomic class of oomycetes contains numerous pathogens of plants and animals but is related to nonpathogenic diatoms and brown algae. Oomycetes have flexible genomes comprising large gene families that play roles in pathogenicity. The evolutionary processes that shaped the gene content have

  2. Nurses' views of factors affecting sleep for hospitalized children and their families: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremler, Robyn; Adams, Sherri; Dryden-Palmer, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Light, noise, and interruptions from hospital staff lead to frequent awakenings and detrimental changes to sleep quantity and quality for children who are hospitalized and their parents who stay with them overnight. An understanding of nurses' views on how care affects sleep for the hospitalized child and parent is crucial to the development of strategies to decrease sleep disturbance in hospital. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to gain an understanding of nurses' views on their role in and influence on sleep for families; perceived barriers and facilitators of patient and parent sleep at night; strategies nurses use to preserve sleep; the distribution, between parent and nurse, of care for the child at night; views of the parent as a recipient of nursing care at night; and the nature of interactions between nurses and families at night. Thirty registered nurses from general pediatric and critical care units participated in one of four semi-structured focus groups. Four main influences on sleep were identified: child factors; environmental factors; nurse-parent interaction factors; and nursing care factors. Some of these restricted nurses' ability to optimize sleep, but many factors were amenable to intervention. Balancing strategies to preserve sleep with the provision of nursing assessment and intervention was challenging and complicated by the difficult nature of work outside of usual waking hours. Nurses highlighted the need for formal policy and mentoring related to provision of nursing care at night in pediatric settings.

  3. INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF HOME GROUPS AND PEASANT FAMILIES IN THE LOWLANDS OF GUANAJUATO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Ruiz Rueda

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of Vicente Fox in the year 2000 to thepresidency openly imposed the exercise of “a governmentof business men and for business men”, whose impact in thelowlands of Guanajuato was translated into a higher level ofunderstanding of neoliberal farming policies. In front of aneconomical bankrupt of grains production imposed by thosepolicies, the peasants had intensify the migration, mainly inthe US, which originated a varied process of socialstructure, that goes beyond, the one that points out that inthe rural communities only lives women, old people andchildren. It´s precisely this process of social structure,which will be analyzed in this work. To do this, will beaddressed the case of study of a village from theMunicipality of Irapuato, Guanajuato, where would bepossible to identify the different types of social structurearound the families and peasant home groups, taking countthat Guanajuato, and in particular the lowlands, is theregion that most migrants send to US.

  4. The Effectiveness of Group Therapy on the Family Functioning of Individuals under Methadone Treatment: A Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaaddini, Hassan; Ebrahim-Nejad, Batoul; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of opioid-dependent patients in Iran are now being treated by methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). One of the social complications of substance dependency is family disorganization and a decrease in marital satisfaction. This study aimed to determine the effect of group therapy based on the transtheoretical model of change on family functioning of the patients under MMT. In this open clinical trial, 48 married people who were between the ages of 19 and 40, and under methadone maintenance therapy had been assigned to two random groups of test and control. In the intervention group, group therapy was held based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change, for 29 sessions (two times a week). To assess the overall health and pathology of the family, the two questionnaires Family Assessment Device (FAD) and Marital Conflict Questionnaire (MCQ), both with approved reliability and validity, were used. A total of 24 patients in the control group and 23 patients in the intervention group (one person withdrew from the study in the early meetings) were evaluated. The mean ± SD of age of the control and intervention groups, respectively, were 33.9 ± 4.8 and 32.8 ± 4.3 (P = 0.40). Before the intervention began the average score of FAD and MCQ questionnaires between the two groups was comparable. After the intervention was over the score of each of the two questionnaires, with the adjustment of the baseline score, was lower in the treatment group than the control group, the difference was marginally significant (P family functioning of the MMT treated patients showed improvement. Therefore, with the use of stage-of-change and group therapy, steps can be taken for improving family functioning of these patients. Due to the relatively long duration and frequency of treatment sessions the feasibility of this intervention needs further research.

  5. Prevalence of Behavior Disorder and Disturbance to Family and Staff in a Sample of Adult Day Health Care Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresi, Jeanne A.; Holmes, Douglas; Dichter, Elizabeth; Koren, Mary Jane; Ramirez, Mildred; Fairchild, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the prevalence of behavior disorders in a sample of residents (N=360) in adult day health care programs. Findings indicate relatively high rates of behavior disorders. Most prevalent were the affective disorders (seeking reassurance, depression, crying) and verbal-vocal agitation. Differences between formal and informal caregivers'…

  6. Is the Balanced School Day Truly Balanced? A Review of the Impacts on Children, Families, and School Food Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Theresa F.; Macaskill, Lesley A.; Salvadori, Marina I.; Dworatzek, Paula D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Balanced School Day (BSD) is a scheduling policy that has the potential to impact children's food behaviors because students are provided with two 20-minute eating opportunities versus the traditional 20-minute lunch. Methods: We aim to raise awareness of this grassroots academic policy and its potential consequences to inform…

  7. Newcomers to Al-Anon family groups: Who stays and who drops out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timko, Christine; Laudet, Alexandre; Moos, Rudolf H

    2014-06-01

    Al-Anon Family Groups (Al-Anon), a 12-step mutual-help program for people concerned about another's drinking, is the most widely used form of help for concerned others (COs) in the US. This study assessed the prevalence of dropout, and predictors of dropout, in the six months following newcomers' initial attendance at Al-Anon meetings. Al-Anon's World Service Office mailed a random sample of groups, which subsequently yielded a sample of 251 newcomers who completed surveys at baseline and 6 months later. At the 6-month follow-up, 57% of newcomers at baseline had dropped out (had not attended any Al-Anon meetings during the past month). At baseline, individuals who later dropped out of Al-Anon were less likely to have been referred to Al-Anon by their drinker's health care provider, and reported less severe problems than individuals who continued to attend, but dropouts were more often concerned about their drinker's psychological health; newcomers with these concerns may have found them incompatible with Al-Anon's philosophy. Dropouts reported high rates of problems, suggesting that COs who drop out of Al-Anon would benefit from ongoing help and support.

  8. Group Counseling in the Schools: Considerations for Child and Family Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Tony D.; Gustafson, Amy L.; Borges, Silvia M.

    2006-01-01

    School psychologists are increasingly being confronted with a wide spectrum of psychological, psychosocial, familial, and home-school issues impacting child development. With one in six children raised in alcoholic families, with divorce impacting approximately 60% of families, and with such issues as teenage pregnancy, parental neglect, as well…

  9. Some Influences of Family Group Therapy on the Rehabilitation Potential of Clients. A Delgado Research Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, John P.; Goldstein, Harris K.

    The Delgado Rehabilitation Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, conducted this study to determine the influence of family therapy on clients receiving rehabilitation services at the Center. An experimental group of randomly selected relatives of 33 clients received group therapy while 39 other randomly selected relatives served as controls. Criteria…

  10. Should Family and Friends Be Involved in Group-Based Rehabilitation Programs for Adults with Low Vision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, G.; Saw, C.; Larizza, M.; Lamoureux, E.; Keeffe, J.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates the views of clients with low vision and vision rehabilitation professionals on the involvement of family and friends in group-based rehabilitation programs. Both groups outlined advantages and disadvantages to involving significant others, and it is essential that clients are given the choice. Future work is…

  11. Men Who Are Abusive to Their Female Intimate Partners: Incorporating Family of Origin Work into Group Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick-Neily, Erin Francess; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines and provides a rationale for incorporating past victimization into group treatment for men who have been abusive to their female intimate partners. It begins with providing a general overview of the issue of family violence in Canada and in the U.S including statistics and an overview of group treatment effectiveness overall.…

  12. The effects of adult day services on family caregivers' daily stress, affect, and health: outcomes from the Daily Stress and Health (DaSH) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarit, Steven H; Kim, Kyungmin; Femia, Elia E; Almeida, David M; Klein, Laura C

    2014-08-01

    We examine the effects of use of adult day service (ADS) by caregivers of individuals with dementia (IWD) on daily stressors, affect, and health symptoms. Participants were interviewed for 8 consecutive days. On some days, the IWD attended an ADS program and on the other days caregivers provide most or all of the care at home. Participants were 173 family caregivers of IWDs using an ADS program. Daily telephone interviews assessed care-related stressors, noncare stressors, positive events, affect, and health symptoms. Multilevel models with data nested within persons were used to examine effects of ADS use on daily stressor exposure, affect, and health symptoms. Caregivers had lower exposure to care-related stressors on ADS days, more positive experiences, and more noncare stressors. ADS use lowered anger and reduced the impact of noncare stressors on depressive symptoms. The findings demonstrate that stressors on caregivers are partly lowered, and affect is improved on ADS days, which may provide protection against the effects of chronic stress associated with caregiving. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Fewer re-admissions and bed days following an intensive transitional post-discharge aftercare programme for a mixed diagnostic group of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Maria; Mir, Shazia; Larsen, Jens Knud;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The organization of aftercare is important for a successful outcome; still the optimal organization has not been fully explored. An intensive transitional post-discharge aftercare (TA) programme, for a mixed group of non-psychotic patients, was recently developed. Patients with non......), receiving less intensive outpatient aftercare. METHODS: Number of re-admissions, bed days and emergency visits after 10 weeks, 6 months and 1 year was retrospectively collected from electronic patient registers. Descriptive statistics, independent samples T-tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance...... was used to compare the groups. RESULTS: The majority of patients in both groups suffered from affective disorders, followed by personality disorders and a small number of other psychiatric diagnoses. Service use in the TA group was lower than in the RC group with fewer bed days after 10 weeks (P = 0...

  14. [Antibiotic therapy against acute tonsillopharyngitis in children due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococci: comparison of clinical efficacy, the bactericidal effects, and effects on oral flora between cefditoren pivoxil for 5 days and amoxicillin for 10 days].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumura, Naoki; Nagai, Kensuke; Hidaka, Hidenobu; Otsu, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yuhei; Ikezawa, Shigeru; Honma, Shinichi; Shindo, Shizuo; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2011-06-01

    We compared the clinical efficacy, the bactericidal effects, effect on the oral microbial flora, and adverse reactions between cefditoren pivoxil (CDTR-PI) for 5 days and amoxicillin (AMPC) for 10 days in children with acute group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) tonsillopharyngitis, and simultaneously examined the emm genotype and drug susceptibility of the isolated GAS. The results showed that the clinical efficacy was 100% for CDTR-PI and 97.9% for AMPC, with no difference between the two groups, and the bacterial elimination rate was 100% in both groups. No serious adverse event was noted in either group. On the other hand, concerning changes in the oral microbial flora between before and after treatment, the amount of bacteria showed no change in the CDTR-PI group (p = 0.5761) but clearly decreased in the AMPC group (p = 0.0049). This indicates that CDTR-PI does not disturb the oral microbial flora compared with AMPC. Also, the emm types determined in the 112 GAS strains isolated in this study were similar to those that have recently been isolated frequently in Japan. Concerning the drug resistance, none of the isolates showed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, but 45% of them were resistant to macrolides. The advantages of short-term treatment are considered to include a lower cost, improvement in drug compliance, decrease in the frequency of the occurrence of adverse reactions, decrease in the frequency of the appearance of drug-resistant strains, and alleviation of the psychological burden of patients and their parents. For these reasons, we conclude that CDTR-PI for 5 days is a useful option for the treatment of acute GAS tonsillopharyngitis in children.

  15. Screening families of patients with premature coronary heart disease to identify avoidable cardiovascular risk: a cross-sectional study of family members and a general population comparison group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Helen J; Pell, Alastair Ch; Anderson, Judith; Chow, Clara K; Pell, Jill P

    2010-05-11

    Primary prevention should be targeted at individuals with high global cardiovascular risk, but research is lacking on how best to identify such individuals in the general population. Family history is a good proxy measure of global risk and may provide an efficient mechanism for identifying high risk individuals. The aim was to test the feasibility of using patients with premature cardiovascular disease to recruit family members as a means of identifying and screening high-risk individuals. We recruited family members of 50 patients attending a cardiology clinic for premature coronary heart disease (CHD). We compared their cardiovascular risk with a general population control group, and determined their perception of their risk and current level of screening. 103 (36%) family members attended screening (27 siblings, 48 adult offspring and 28 partners). Five (5%) had prevalent CHD. A significantly higher percentage had an ASSIGN risk score >20% compared with the general population (13% versus 2%, p family members were aware they were at increased risk and only 50% had had their blood pressure and serum cholesterol level checked in the previous three years. Patients attending hospital for premature CHD provide a mechanism to contact family members and this can identify individuals with a high global risk who are not currently screened.

  16. Mortality experience, 30-days and 365-days after admission, for the 20 most frequent DRG groups among Medicare inpatients aged 65 or older in Connecticut hospitals, fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennen, J; Krumholz, H M; Radford, M J

    1995-03-01

    This report presents mortality rates following inpatient admissions for the 20 most frequent DRG categories among Medicare inpatients aged > or = 65 years at Connecticut acute-care hospitals during the three-year period from fiscal year 1991 to fiscal year 1993. We provide frequency distributions of the 30-day and 365-day mortality rates among these 20 DRG categories. Among the 199,680 discharges of elderly Medicare beneficiaries within the 20 most frequent DRG categories in the three-year study period, the crude 30-day mortality rate was 9.51%; the crude 365-day mortality rate was 28.40%. By gender, the crude 30-day mortality rate for women was 8.78%; the corresponding rate for men was 10.48%. This gender mortality differential occurred despite a significant age differential; on average, the females were 2.5 years older than the males. By age group, the crude mortality rates were: age 65-74 years, 6.66%; age 75-84 years, 9.80%; age > or = 85 years, 15.25%. The crude mortality rates for the DRG categories were found to be stable over the three-year study period.

  17. Being a 'good mother': Dietary governmentality in the family food practices of three ethnocultural groups in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristovski-Slijepcevic, Svetlana; Chapman, Gwen E; Beagan, Brenda L

    2010-09-01

    In this qualitative study with three ethnocultural groups in two regions of Canada, we explore how official dietary guidelines provide particular standards concerning 'healthy eating' that marginalize other understandings of the relationship between food and health. In families where parents and youth held shared ways of understanding healthy eating, the role of 'good mother' was constructed so as to include healthy eating expertise. Mothers expressed a perceived need to be personally responsible for providing skills and knowledge about healthy eating as well as guarding children against negative nutritional influences. Governing of family eating practices to conform to official nutritional advice occurred through information provision, monitoring in shopping and meal preparation, restricting and guiding food purchases, and directly translating expert knowledges into family food practices. In families where parents and youth held differing understandings of healthy eating, primarily families from ethnocultural minority groups, mothers often did not employ the particular western-originating strategies of conveying healthy eating information, or mentoring healthy meal preparation, nor did they regulate or restrict children's food consumption. Western dietary guidelines entered into the family primarily through the youth, emphasizing the nutritional properties of food, often devaluing 'traditional' knowledge about healthy eating. These processes exemplify techniques of governmentality which simultaneously exercise control over people's behaviour through normalizing some family food practices and marginalizing others.

  18. The nuclear receptor gene family in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, contains a novel subfamily group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeler, Susanne; Galloway, Tamara S; Lyons, Brett P; Bean, Tim P

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of transcription factors important in key biological, developmental and reproductive processes. Several of these receptors are ligand- activated and through their ability to bind endogenous and exogenous ligands, are potentially vulnerable to xenobiotics. Molluscs are key ecological species in defining aquatic and terrestrial habitats and are sensitive to xenobiotic compounds in the environment. However, the understanding of nuclear receptor presence, function and xenobiotic disruption in the phylum Mollusca is limited. Here, forty-three nuclear receptor sequences were mined from the genome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. They include members of NR0-NR5 subfamilies, notably lacking any NR6 members. Phylogenetic analyses of the oyster nuclear receptors have been conducted showing the presence of a large novel subfamily group not previously reported, which is named NR1P. Homologues to all previous identified nuclear receptors in other mollusc species have also been determined including the putative heterodimer partner retinoid X receptor, estrogen receptor and estrogen related receptor. C. gigas contains a highly diverse set of nuclear receptors including a novel NR1 group, which provides important information on presence and evolution of this transcription factor superfamily in invertebrates. The Pacific oyster possesses two members of NR3, the sex steroid hormone receptor analogues, of which there are 9 in humans. This provides increasing evidence that steroid ligand specific expansion of this family is deuterostome specific. This new knowledge on divergence and emergence of nuclear receptors in C. gigas provides essential information for studying regulation of molluscan gene expression and the potential effects of xenobiotics.

  19. Cuidado de Ninos con Necesidades Especiales en el Hogar: Manual de Estrategias y Actividades para Proveedores que Cuidan Ninos en Sus Hogares (Children with Special Needs in Family Day Care Homes: A Handbook of Approaches and Activities for Family Day Care Home Providers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Brosse, Beatrice

    Practical information and sample teaching activities for child caregivers who work with young developmentally disabled children in family day care settings are provided in this manual. Each chapter shares a typical experience a caregiver may have with a particular child. Chapter 1 focuses on getting to know a new child, initial expectations, and…

  20. Multiple Family Groups to reduce child disruptive behavior difficulties: moderating effects of child welfare status on child outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Geetha; Small, Latoya; Fuss, Ashley; Bowman, Melissa; Jackson, Jerrold; Marcus, Sue; Chacko, Anil

    2015-08-01

    Children who remain at home with their permanent caregivers following a child welfare (CW) involvement (e.g., investigation, out-of-home placement) manifest high rates of behavioral difficulties, which is a risk factor for further maltreatment and out-of-home placement if not treated effectively. A recently tested Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery model to treat youth Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBDs) has demonstrated effectiveness in improving child behavior difficulties among hard-to-engage, socioeconomically disadvantaged families by addressing parenting skills, parent-child relationships, family communication and organization, social support, and stress. This exploratory study examines whether child behavioral outcomes for MFG differ for families with self-reported lifetime involvement in CW services compared to other families, as families with CW involvement struggle with additional stressors that can diminish treatment success. Youth (aged 7-11) and their families were assigned to MFG or services as usual (SAU) using a block comparison design. Caregivers reported on child behavior, social skills, and functional impairment. Mixed effects regression modeled multilevel outcomes across 4 assessment points (i.e., baseline, mid-test, post-test, 6-month follow-up). Among CW-involved families, MFG participants reported significantly reduced child oppositional defiant disorder symptoms at 6-month follow-up compared with SAU participants. No other differences were found in the effect of MFG treatment between CW and non-CW involved families. Findings suggest that MFG may be as effective in reducing child behavior difficulties for both CW and non-CW involved families. As a short-term, engaging, and efficient intervention, MFG may be a particularly salient service offering for families involved in the CW system.

  1. Emotion-Focused Family Therapy for Eating Disorders Across the Lifespan: A Pilot Study of a 2-Day Transdiagnostic Intervention for Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrance Robinson, Adèle; Dolhanty, Joanne; Stillar, Amanda; Henderson, Katherine; Mayman, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Emotion-focused family therapy is a transdiagnostic approach that affords parents and caregivers a significant role in their loved one's recovery from an eating disorder. A 2-day intervention was developed on the basis of emotion-focused family therapy principles and delivered to 33 parents of adolescent and adult children. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention. Through education and skills practice, parents were taught strategies with respect to meal support and symptom interruption as well as emotion coaching. Parents were also supported to identify and work through their own emotional blocks that could interfere with their supportive efforts. Analyses revealed a significant increase in parental self-efficacy, a positive shift in parents' attitudes regarding their role as emotion coach and a reduction in the fears associated with their involvement in treatment, including a decrease in self-blame. Overall, this broad-based, low-cost intervention shows promise, and future research is warranted. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. A low-cost, intensive emotion-focused family therapy intervention shows promise for parents of individuals with an eating disorder, regardless of their loved one's age, symptom profile or involvement in treatment. Working with parents' emotions and emotional reactions to their child's struggles has the potential to improve supportive efforts. An emotion-focused family therapy intervention for parents yields high satisfaction rates, improves parental self-efficacy and reduces fears regarding their involvement, including self-blame. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ayudando a los Ninos a Amarse a Si Mismos y a Otros: Una guia profesional para el cuidado infantil en el hogar (Helping Children Love Themselves and Others: A Professional Handbook for Family Day Care).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, Sandra; And Others

    This Spanish-language guide presents an anti-bias, multicultural approach to family day care. Part A provides a rationale for such an approach. Subsections of this part concern: (1) family day care as a site for the transmission of bias; (2) characteristics of an anti-bias, multicultural approach; (3) language and stereotypes; (4) developmental…

  3. The influence of dynamic vegetation on the present-day simulation and future projections of the South Asian summer monsoon in the HadGEM2 family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G. M.; Levine, R. C.

    2012-11-01

    Various studies have shown the importance of Earth System feedbacks in the climate system and the necessity of including these in models used for making climate change projections. The HadGEM2 family of Met Office Unified Model configurations combines model components which facilitate the representation of many different processes within the climate system, including atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, and Earth System components including the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle and tropospheric chemistry. We examine the climatology of the Asian summer monsoon in present-day simulations and in idealised climate change experiments. Members of the HadGEM2 family are used, with a common physical framework (one of which includes tropospheric chemistry and an interactive terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle), to investigate whether such components affect the way in which the monsoon changes. We focus particularly on the role of interactive vegetation in the simulations from these model configurations. Using an atmosphere-only HadGEM2 configuration, we investigate how the changes in land cover which result from the interaction between the dynamic vegetation and the model systematic rainfall biases affect the Asian summer monsoon, both in the present-day and in future climate projections. We demonstrate that the response of the dynamic vegetation to biases in regional climate, such as lack of rainfall over tropical dust-producing regions, can affect both the present-day simulation and the response to climate change forcing scenarios.

  4. The effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregiver burden of patients with mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navidian Ali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brief family intervention may have a positive impact on family caregivers for patients with mental disorders. We assessed the effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregivers for patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. Methods This randomized controlled trial was performed on 100 caregivers for patients with mental disorders attending the Isfahan Behavioral Sciences Research Center (IBSRC, in Isfahan, Iran. One hundred family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia (n = 50 and mood disorders (n = 50 were selected and assigned randomly to either a psycho-educational group intervention or routine care in each diagnosis category. The caregivers were followed for 3 months. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview Results The mean scores of the Zarit caregiver burden decreased significantly for the group that participated in the psycho-educational program, while scores in the control group did not change significantly. Conclusions This group intervention program was effective to reduce the caregiver burden for both categories of mental disorders in the Iranian population. This group intervention program may improve the quality of life of patients and caregivers by improving the standards of care giving. Trial registration RCT registration number: IRCT138804272200N

  5. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Methods Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3 and without (n = 1 a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2, and diabetes patients (n = 2. All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Results Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. Conclusion The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment

  6. The Relation of Family and School Attachment to Adolescent Deviance in Diverse Groups and Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, Sanford M.; Erickson, Kristan Glasgow; Laird, Jennifer; Wong, Carol A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether attachments to family and school reduced five forms of adolescent deviance (smoking, drinking, marijuana use, delinquency, and violent behavior). Found that adolescent attachments to family and school reduced overall frequency, prevalence, and intensity of deviant involvement, regardless of community context, gender, or ethnic…

  7. Cohesion to the Group and Its Association with Attendance and Early Treatment Response in an Adult Day-Hospital Program for Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crino, Natalie; Djokvucic, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Treatment outcome studies demonstrate that day-hospital programs are effective in the treatment of eating disorders. Few descriptions are available on the specifics of treatment, particularly the process of therapy. The group therapy modality is thought to provide important therapeutic benefits. The present study aimed to examine the association…

  8. Effectiveness of a psychoeducational parenting group on child, parent, and family behavior: a pilot study in a family practice clinic with an underserved population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Law, David D; Johnson, Jennifer; Wells, M Gawain

    2010-09-01

    Although integrated care for adults in primary care has steadily increased over the last several decades, there remains a paucity of research regarding integrated care for children in primary care. To report results of a pilot study testing initial feasibility of a parenting psychoeducational group targeting child behavioral problems within a primary care clinic. The participants (n = 35) were parents representing an underserved population from an inner-city primary care clinic. Participants attended a 12-week psychoeducational parenting group and reported pre- and post-measures of family functioning, child misbehavior and dyadic functioning. Paired t-tests and effects sizes are reported. Participants reported statistically significant improvement in family functioning, child misbehavior, and couple functioning after participating in the parenting psychoeducational group. Results suggest initial feasibility of a parenting psychoeducational group within a primary care clinic with an underserved population. This intervention may be useful for other primary care clinics seeking to offer more integrative care options for children and their families.

  9. Individual, demographic, and family correlates of romantic attachments in a group of American young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Thomas W; Holman, Thomas B; Grandy, Shannon R; Blake, Whitney W

    2008-12-01

    Relationship avoidance and anxiety scores were obtained for 590 American young adults (M age = 23.1 yr.). Canonical correlation yielded two orthogonal patterns between the avoidance and anxiety scores with individual, demographic, and family variables. Relationship avoidance was most parsimoniously related to unresolved issues with one's family of origin, having been sexually abused, and being male (canonical correlation = .33). Relationship anxiety was most parsimoniously related to unresolved issues with one's family of origin, lack of personal income, having a strong libido, being young, and being female (canonical correlation = .25). Relationship avoidance was also correlated with not having affectionate and available parents, not having a secure and loving family, high parental conflict, low parental education and income, not having grown up with both parents, family violence, and low libido. Relationship anxiety was also correlated with low personal education. Marital status, ethnicity, and religious denomination were unrelated to either construct.

  10. Importance of Group Therapeutic Support for Family Members of Children with Alopecia Areata: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbeck, Kelly A; McFarland, Sarah L; Hordinsky, Maria K; Lindgren, Bruce R; Farah, Ronda S

    2017-07-01

    The psychological effect of alopecia areata (AA) is well documented, but group interaction may help lessen this burden. We aimed to determine factors that draw patients with AA and their families to group events. Surveys were administered at the annual alopecia areata bowling social in 2015 and 2016. This event is a unique opportunity for children with AA and their families to meet others with the disease and connect with local support group resources from the Minnesota branch of the National Alopecia Areata Foundation. Data from 2015 and 2016 were combined. Comparisons of subgroups were performed using Fisher exact tests for response frequencies and percentages and two-sample t tests for mean values. An equal number of men and women participated in the study (n = 13 each). The average age was 41.1 years. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in survey responses based on respondent age or sex. Twenty-three (88.5%) attendees sought to connect with others with AA and met three or more people during the event. Seventeen (65.4%) also attended other support group events. Twelve respondents (46.2%) came to support a friend or family member. One hundred percent of attendees identified socializing with others with AA as important. Group interaction is an important source of therapeutic support for people with AA and their families. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Sensitivity to reinforcement and family factors as predictors of psychological health problems in different age groups of children and teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kuznetsova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The follow-up study was designed to assess and to compare the effects of sensitivity to reward, sensitivity to punishment and family environment on internalizing and externalizing problems in a community sample of 477 children and adolescents aged 3-18 (50% female. The level of problem behavior at Time 1 in all age groups was the best predictor of corresponding type of problem level at Time 2; the residual variance in problem behavior was also predicted by sensitivity to reinforcement. Family factors contributed for change in externalizing problems and hyperactivity in preschool and middle childhood children; living in the urban environment was significant factor for peer problem. The study showed that individual differences interact with the family factors in the process of development, and family environment could strengthen or mitigate the influence of biological factors on children and adolescents’ adjustment.

  12. Multiple Family Group Service Model for Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Child Outcomes at Post-Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Anil; Gopalan, Geetha; Franco, Lydia; Dean-Assael, Kara; Jackson, Jerrold; Marcus, Sue; Hoagwood, Kimberly; McKay, Mary

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the benefits of a multiple family group (MFG) service delivery model compared with services as usual (SAU) in improving the functioning of youth with oppositional defiant/conduct disorder in families residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged communities. Participants included 320 youth aged 7 to 11 and their families who were referred to participating outpatient clinics. Participants were assigned to the MFG or the SAU condition, with parent report of child oppositional behavior, social competence, and level of youth impairment as primary outcomes at post-treatment. Family engagement to MFG was measured by attendance to each group session. Caregivers of youth in the MFG service delivery model condition reported significant improvement in youth oppositional behavior and social competence compared with youth in the SAU condition. Impairment improved over time for both groups with no difference between treatment conditions. The MFG led to greater percentage of youth with clinically significant improvements in oppositional behavior. Attendance to the MFG was high, given the high-risk nature of the study population. The MFG service delivery model offers an efficient and engaging format to implement evidence-based approaches to improving functioning of youth with oppositional defiant and/or conduct disorder in families from socioeconomically disadvantaged communities.

  13. Whole-genome phylogenies of the family Bacillaceae and expansion of the sigma factor gene family in the Bacillus cereus species-group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyer David W

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group consists of six species (B. anthracis, B. cereus, B. mycoides, B. pseudomycoides, B. thuringiensis, and B. weihenstephanensis. While classical microbial taxonomy proposed these organisms as distinct species, newer molecular phylogenies and comparative genome sequencing suggests that these organisms should be classified as a single species (thus, we will refer to these organisms collectively as the Bc species-group. How do we account for the underlying similarity of these phenotypically diverse microbes? It has been established for some time that the most rapidly evolving and evolutionarily flexible portions of the bacterial genome are regulatory sequences and transcriptional networks. Other studies have suggested that the sigma factor gene family of these organisms has diverged and expanded significantly relative to their ancestors; sigma factors are those portions of the bacterial transcriptional apparatus that control RNA polymerase recognition for promoter selection. Thus, examining sigma factor divergence in these organisms would concurrently examine both regulatory sequences and transcriptional networks important for divergence. We began this examination by comparison to the sigma factor gene set of B. subtilis. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the Bc species-group utilizing 157 single-copy genes of the family Bacillaceae suggests that several taxonomic revisions of the genus Bacillus should be considered. Within the Bc species-group there is little indication that the currently recognized species form related sub-groupings, suggesting that they are members of the same species. The sigma factor gene family encoded by the Bc species-group appears to be the result of a dynamic gene-duplication and gene-loss process that in previous analyses underestimated the true heterogeneity of the sigma factor content in the Bc species-group. Conclusions Expansion of the sigma factor gene family

  14. Impact of support group intervention on family system strengths of rural caregivers of stroke patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malini, M Hema

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of support group intervention on family system strengths of rural caregivers of stroke patients. True experimental pretest and post-test design was adopted for the study. The study was conducted in Kattankulathur Block, a rural area in Kancheepuram district, India. Two hundred forty caregivers of stroke patients were selected by simple random sampling technique. Enrolment in self-help groups and attending meetings were used as the interventional strategy for the purpose of this study. The main outcome of the study was to evaluate the impact of support group intervention on family system strengths of rural caregivers of stroke patients. Following intervention, the mean score and the standard deviation of the experimental group increased to 44.73 and 5.83, respectively, the control group mean score remained at 22.08 and the standard deviation was 3.07 at t = 37.58. P value was 0.001, which is statistically significant at the confidence interval of 39.45%. It was found that there was a significant and positive increase in the family system strengths of caregivers who participated in the self-help group meetings, thereby suggesting that support group intervention programs are an effective nursing strategy that can be employed for improving the overall well-being of the caregivers of stroke patients. © 2014 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  15. Effectiveness of self-esteem and social skills group therapy in adolescent eating disorder patients attending a day hospital treatment programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, L; Font, E; Moreno, E; Calvo, R; Vila, M; Andrés-Perpiñá, S; Canalda, G; Martínez, E; Castro-Fornieles, J

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate self-esteem and social skills in adolescent eating disorder patients before and after specific group therapy as part of a Day Hospital Programme. One hundred and sixty adolescent eating disorder patients, classified as anorexia nervosa and related disorders (AN-rd) (N = 116) or bulimia nervosa and related disorders (BN-rd) (N = 44) received structured group therapy for developing self-esteem and social skills. BN-rd patients had poorer perceptions of some self-esteem and social skills variables. After group therapy, both groups presented significant improvements in their perceptions of physical appearance, their self-concept related to weight and shape and to others, happiness and satisfaction, social withdrawal and leadership. BN-rd patients presented more changes on many of the variables. Specific self-esteem and social skills group therapy in patients with eating disorders can be useful in improving certain core features. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. Some Ways in Which Neighborhoods, Nuclear Families, Friendship Groups, and Schools Jointly Affect Changes in Early Adolescent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Thomas D.; Herman, Melissa R.; Phillips, Meredith; Settersten, Richard A., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed how schools, neighborhoods, nuclear families, and friendship groups jointly contribute to positive change during early adolescence. Analyses showed that the four context indices modestly intercorrelated at the individual student level, but clustered more tightly at the school and neighborhood levels. Joint influence of all four…

  17. The Role of Community, Family, Peer, and School Factors in Group Bullying: Implications for School-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael J.; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Smith, Megan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although an ecological perspective suggests the importance of multiple levels of intervention, most bullying research has emphasized individual- and school-focused strategies. This study investigated community and family factors that influence school efforts to reduce odds of group bullying behavior and victimization. Methods: We used…

  18. Parent Training with High-Risk Immigrant Chinese Families: A Pilot Group Randomized Trial Yielding Practice-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna S.; Fung, Joey J.; Ho, Lorinda Y.; Liu, Lisa L.; Gudino, Omar G.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the efficacy and implementation outcomes of a culturally responsive parent training (PT) program. Fifty-four Chinese American parents participated in a wait-list controlled group randomized trial (32 immediate treatment, 22 delayed treatment) of a 14-week intervention designed to address the needs of high-risk immigrant families.…

  19. Friends and Family: A Literature Review on How High School Social Groups Influence Advanced Math and Science Coursetaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael; Owens, Ann; Williams, Darryl; Kim, Hui Yon; Musto, Michela

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized the literature on how informal contexts, namely friends and family social groups, shape high school students' likelihood of pursuing advanced math and science coursework. Extending scholarly understandings of STEM education, we turned to the body of literature with three guiding questions: (1) What influence do…

  20. Perceptions of stakeholder groups about the participation of African American family forest landowners in federal landowner assistance programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puneet Dwivedi; Arundhati Jagadish; John Schelhas

    2016-01-01

    This study examines perceptions of three stakeholder groups (African American Family Forest Landowner, Government Agency, and Nonprofit) regarding federal landowner assistance programs in the southern United States by combining a SWOT (strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat) analysis with the AHP (analytical hierarchy process). Factors with the highest priority...

  1. The Impact of Tourette's Syndrome in the School and the Family: Perspectives from Three Stakeholder Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Navarro, Jesús; Cubo, Esther; Almazán, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the perceptions of Spanish health professionals, children with Tourette's Syndrome (TS) and their parents about social, school and family problems related to the disorder. A qualitative research methodology was used involving Focus Groups (FGs) made up of children with TS (× 2 FGs), parents/caregivers of persons with TS…

  2. Breaking through Marginalisation in Public Mental Health Care with Family Group Conferencing : Shame as Risk and Protective Factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Gideon; Schout, Gert

    2013-01-01

    From January 2011 until December 2012, forty Family Group Conferences (FGCs) will be studied in the public mental health care (PMHC) setting in the province of Groningen, the Netherlands. Research should yield an answer to whether FGCs are valuable for clients in PMHC as a means to generate social s

  3. Breaking through marginalisation in public mental health care with Family Group Conferencing: shame as risk and protective factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Gideon de; Schout, Gert

    2013-01-01

    From January 2011 until December 2012, forty Family Group Conferences (FGCs) will be studied in the public mental health care (PMHC) setting in the province of Groningen, the Netherlands. Research should yield an answer to whether FGCs are valuable for clients in PMHC as a means to generate social s

  4. The Influence of the Family, the School, and the Group on the Environmental Attitudes of European Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rosa; Escario, José-Julián; Sanagustín, María-Victoria

    2017-01-01

    The attitudes of young people arise from an intense interaction with their social groups of reference, and in this work we examine the extent to which this background conditions the individual environmental attitudes of the young. Using data provided by the PISA 2006 survey for the European Union, we test for the influence of the family, the…

  5. The Influence of the Family, the School, and the Group on the Environmental Attitudes of European Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rosa; Escario, José-Julián; Sanagustín, María-Victoria

    2017-01-01

    The attitudes of young people arise from an intense interaction with their social groups of reference, and in this work we examine the extent to which this background conditions the individual environmental attitudes of the young. Using data provided by the PISA 2006 survey for the European Union, we test for the influence of the family, the…

  6. Family planning education: working with target groups in the South Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, M

    1992-07-01

    Family planning education programs are commonly designed by expert educators who are far removed, in location and experience, from their target audiences. Educators operate on the premise that their job is simply to develop strategies to successfully transfer their knowledge to the target audience. Judgements are often colored by a determination not to offend local sensibilities, which can lead educators to uncritically adopt the local wisdom about what is and is not culturally acceptable. A proper exploration of sexuality is absent from most family planning programs. Usual features of expert-designed family planning programs are an admonishment about people having too many children (the stick), a clear rationale for having fewer children (the carrot), the provision of detailed contraceptive information (the means), and the encouragement of individuals to exercise some personal control over their fertility (the ends). This standard model, although widely used throughout the Pacific, was not adopted by the Family Planning Federation of Australia in its regional family planning education work. The Federation, in conjunction with the independent Family Planning Association in the South Pacific, has taken a more participatory, learner-focused approach that values the contribution of the audience in all phases of the program. There is a huge need to target men, particularly young, unmarried men. The Federation found that not only did Pacific men want to view and discuss the women's documentary video Taboo Talk about family planning issues, they wanted their own men's version. The Federation soon discovered that attempts to meet the requests can easily flounder on the issue of language. The Federation has worked with the target audience to develop a lexicon of acceptable words for reproductive health education.

  7. Detection of Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy Carriers in a Group of Iranian Families by Linkage Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardeen Ali Malayeri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study determines the value of linkage analysis using six RFLP markers for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in familial DMD/BMD cases and their family members for the first time in the Iranian population. We studied the dystrophin gene in 33 unrelated patients with clinical diagnosis of DMD or BMD. Subsequently, we determined the rate of heterozygosity for six intragenic RFLP markers in the mothers of patients with dystrophin gene deletions. Finally, we studied the efficiency of linkage analysis by using RFLP markers for carrier status detection of DMD/BMD. In 63.6% of the patients we found one or more deletions. The most common heterozygous RFLP marker with 57.1% heterozygosity was pERT87.15Taq1. More than 80% of mothers in two groups of familial or non-familial cases had at least two heterozygous markers. Family linkage analysis was informative in more than 80% of the cases, allowing for accurate carrier detection. We found that linkage analysis using these six RFLP markers for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis is a rapid, easy, reliable, and inexpensive method, suitable for most routine diagnostic services. The heterozygosity frequency of these markers is high enough in the Iranian population to allow carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of DMD/BMD in more than 80% of familial cases in Iran.

  8. Long-term-stability of relationship structure in family groups of common marmosets, and its link to proactive prosociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Christa; Burkart, Judith M

    2017-05-01

    Cooperatively breeding, group-living common marmosets show differentiated relationships, where more strongly bonded dyads within a group engage more in affiliative interactions than less strongly bonded ones. Intriguingly, recent results suggest that strong bonds do not only occur between breeding partners but between individuals from any sex or status, and that strong-bond partners exhibit correlated oxytocin fluctuations (dyadic oxytocin synchrony, OTS) over a period of six weeks. To date, it is unclear whether such relationships are stable over time and whether they are also reflected in higher partner-specific proactive prosociality. To assess the long-term stability of the relationship structure of common marmoset family groups, we investigated whether hormonal and behavioral markers of group structure (dyadic OTS, dyadic affiliation, and individual group integration) in common marmoset families remained stable over a period of six months. We collected baseline urinary OT and social behavior of 36 dyads from three family groups in a non-reproductive period (period A), and again six months later, around the birth of new infants (period B). Patterns of dyadic OTS, dyadic affiliation, and individual group integration were consistent between the two study periods. Oxytocin data from a fourth group (10 dyads), collected in two non-reproductive periods separated by a period of more than five years, could replicate this finding. Furthermore, OTS was also correlated with proactive prosociality that was assessed experimentally for 38 dyads during an earlier study. These results suggest that differentiated relationships are stable over time, even between group members other than the breeding pair, and that more strongly bonded partners also show higher levels of proactive prosociality. Future studies are necessary to identify whether these relationships have an adaptive function, perhaps with regard to positive consequences on cooperativeness.

  9. [Evaluation of guided conversation groups for family caregivers of dementia. Results of the GENA project in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenselt, R; Danielzik, A; Waack, K

    2004-10-01

    The GeNA project (Gerontopsychiatric network of work with family caregivers Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) has focused basically on the support of family caregivers of demented old people in guided conversation groups along with setting up a supporting network for this target group within the framework of the Federal Ministry for Senior Citizens, Family and Youth model program "Future Structures of Old People's Welfare".The integrative counselling approach developed for the preservation and restoration of the family balance and for the reduction of care burden was investigated with regard to its effectiveness in case of meaningful indicators in a pre-post-design at ten locations. For the entire sample, the expected burden reductions were found only occasionally and with just a slight downward trend in the fields "physical exhaustion", "health trouble", "deficiency in the realm of social relations" and "utilization of professional support". There are only a few changes according to the measured personality traits out of the construct realm of filial maturity.A differentiating analysis of the caregivers' assessments defines two types of family caregivers (filial more mature vs. filial more immature caregivers) from the inquiry data of the beginning of group participation which differ from each other most significantly concerning the changes of interest during the progress of intervention:Whereas the emotional more independent family caregivers seem to profit less by the participation of this type of a guided conversation group, the caregivers, who show problematic filial patterns of ties with the care recipients to a higher degree, are able to use the participation for a distinct decrease of care burden. This contrary effect of group participation of the two types of personalities of caregivers can possibly be seen as a diagnostic indication for the selection of potential participants of similar group support offers. In view of the small sample size these results should be

  10. Multiple-Family Group Intervention for Incarcerated Male Adolescents Who Sexually Offend and Their Families: Change in Maladaptive Emotion Regulation Predicts Adaptive Change in Adolescent Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiley, Margaret K; Zaremba-Morgan, Ali; Datubo-Brown, Christiana; Pyle, Raven; Cox, Milira

    2015-07-01

    The multiple-family group intervention is an effective, yet affordable, 8-week treatment that is conducted in a juvenile correctional institution in Alabama with adolescents who sexually offend and their families. Data from 115 incarcerated male adolescents and their male and female caregivers collected at pre-, post-, and 1-year follow-up were used to determine that problem behaviors (internalizing, externalizing) decreased over pre- and posttest and the significant decreases in maladaptive emotion regulation predicted those changes. Adolescent-reported anxiety over abandonment and attachment dependence on parents increased significantly; these changes were predicted by decreases in maladaptive emotion regulation. Linear growth models were also fit over the 3 time points and indicate decreases in adolescent problem behavior and maladaptive emotion regulation.

  11. Value of Family and Group Counseling Models where Grandparents Function as Parents to Their Grandchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Oliver W.; Ray, Shannon L.

    2010-01-01

    Those involved in circumstances in which children are raised by their grandparents often encounter serious problems that require assistance from counselors. Research suggests that grandparents and parents in these families typically experience heightened stress and psychosocial distress. Additionally, the children often encounter behavioral,…

  12. The Public Law Outline and Family Group Conferences in Childcare Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carly Anne

    2011-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, the Children Act (1989) states that children are best brought up with their families. However, if a child is suffering from or likely to suffer from significant harm, then the local authorities may initiate care proceedings under section 31 of the Children Act (1989). The Public Law Outline is a judicial case management tool…

  13. An attempt to assess the accepted model of family in a group of Polish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Brodziak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The authors in their subsequent study on the causes of the fall in the birth rate, based on data obtained by means of questionnaires attempt to verify their next hypotheses, concerning low fertility, observed in most European countries. Material and methods. Data were collected by means of a set of open questions concerning the preferred model of family, and then the characteristic types of responses were identified. Also short complementary questionnaires were used by means of which we tried to assess the pessimistic attitude, low resourcefulness and lack of energy and engagement as well as the intensity of the so-called type D personality pattern. Results. The results led the authors to conclude that young people in Poland are not convinced of the benefits from any specific pattern of the family. The various possible arguments against having children or against having two children discourage easily young couples. Conclusions. The authors think that today there is no “source” of message convincing young people of the proper model of the family in Poland. Theoretically, desirable model of the family (parents + 2 children is not convincingly promoted by any sources such as parents, school, neighbours or media.

  14. Predicting Civic and Political Engagement: Family Socialization and Age-Group Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrolyn P. Carter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Scholars suggest that there has been a significant decline in civic and political engagement among recent generations. Using data from the 2006 Civic and Political Health of the Nation survey, it is found that education, socioeconomic status and family socialization predict civic and political engagement during adulthood. In addition, a higher percentage of adults volunteer and vote more than young adults.

  15. Mother’s Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萍

    2009-01-01

    Mother’s Day is a day for each family to honor (尊敬,给……以光荣) its mother ,celebrated (庆祝)on various days in many places around the world.It complements (补足,补充) Father’s Day,the celebration

  16. A Collaboratively Designed Child Mental Health Service Model: Multiple Family Groups for Urban Children with Conduct Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Mary McKernan; Gopalan, Geetha; Franco, Lydia; Assael, Kara Dean; Chacko, Anil; Jackson, Jerrold; Fuss, Ashley

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents preliminary outcomes associated with an experimental, longitudinal study of a Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery approach set within thirteen urban outpatient clinics serving children and their families living in inner-city, primarily African American and Latino communities. Specifically, this paper focuses on parent reports of child oppositional behavior and parenting stress over time. MFG is a flexible, protocol-driven approach designed to address the most common reason for referral to outpatient child mental health clinics, childhood behavioral difficulties. The MFG also aims to enhance family-level engagement and retention in ongoing care. Further, the service delivery model was collaboratively developed with intensive input from parents rearing children with conduct difficulties, parent advocates, community-based child mental health providers and services research staff in order to ultimately expand the number of effective service models that can be situated within "real world," urban child mental health settings.

  17. Children's sugar-sweetened beverages consumption: associations with family and home-related factors, differences within ethnic groups explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Gaar, V M; van Grieken, A; Jansen, W; Raat, H

    2017-02-14

    The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) may contribute to the development of overweight among children. The present study aimed to evaluate associations between family and home-related factors and children's SSB consumption. We explored associations within ethnic background of the child. Cross-sectional data from the population-based 'Water Campaign' study were used. Parents (n = 644) of primary school children (6-13 years) completed a questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, family and home-related factors and child's SSB intake. The family and home-related factors under study were: cognitive variables (e.g. parental attitude, subjective norm), environmental variables (e.g. availability of SSB, parenting practices), and habitual variables (e.g. habit strength, taste preference). Regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between family and home-related factors and child's SSB intake (p children was 9.4 years (SD: 1.8) and 54.1% were girls. The child's average SSB intake was 0.9 litres (SD: 0.6) per day. Child's age, parents' subjective norm, parenting practices, and parental modelling were positively associated with the child's SSB intake. The availability of SSB at home and school and parental attitude were negatively associated with the child's SSB intake. The associations under study differed according to the child's ethnic background, with the explained variance of the full models ranging from 8.7% for children from Moroccan or Turkish ethnic background to 44.4% for children with Dutch ethnic background. Our results provide support for interventions targeting children's SSB intake focussing on the identified family and home-related factors, with active participation of parents. Also, the relationships between these factors and the child's SSB intake differed for children with distinct ethnic backgrounds. Therefore, we would recommend to tailor interventions taking into account the ethnic background of the family

  18. Obesity prevention in the family day care setting: impact of the Romp & Chomp intervention on opportunities for children's physical activity and healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva-Sanigorski, A; Elea, D; Bell, C; Kremer, P; Carpenter, L; Nichols, M; Smith, M; Sharp, S; Boak, R; Swinburn, B

    2011-05-01

    The Romp & Chomp intervention reduced the prevalence of overweight/obesity in pre-school children in Geelong, Victoria, Australia through an intervention promoting healthy eating and active play in early childhood settings. This study aims to determine if the intervention successfully created more health promoting family day care (FDC) environments. The evaluation had a cross-sectional, quasi-experimental design with the intervention FDC service in Geelong and a comparison sample from 17 FDC services across Victoria. A 45-item questionnaire capturing nutrition- and physical activity-related aspects of the policy, socio-cultural and physical environments of the FDC service was completed by FDC care providers (in 2008) in the intervention (n= 28) and comparison (n= 223) samples. Select results showed intervention children spent less time in screen-based activities (P= 0.03), organized active play (P health literacy of care providers is required to extend and sustain the improvements. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. INGUINAL HERNIA SURGERY UNDER LOCAL ANAESTHESIA, AS DAY CARE SURGERY AND COMPARISON AMONG THREE GROUP OF PATIENTS CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO TYPE OF MESH USED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most commonly performed operations worldwide . This study was done to evaluate , local anesthesia as choice of procedure for inguinal hernia as day care surgery including both regular & comorbidity associated patients , to know which mesh is suitable smallpore ( H eavy weight or largepore ( L igh t weight and to know if use of absorbable suture is better than non - absorbable suture for fixation of mesh. METHODS: We prospectively studied 69 patients with a primary unilateral inguinal hernia. The study group was randomized to Lichtenstein repair afte r taking full informed consent. Pain was assessed by visual analogue scale , Quality of life was assessed by responses to a health questionnaire administered to post - operative patients . RESULTS: The highest contraction rate was found in polypropylene small pore mesh (28.76% , followed by polypropylene large pore mesh (23.9% and the least contraction seen in knitted composite mesh (17.2%. Quality of life was assessed at 1 month and 3 month have shown significant difference among three groups. CONCLUSION: Mos t of the inguinal hernia surgery can be carried out smoothly in local anesthesia , as day care procedure. It is choice of procedure also in patients with comorbidity. Use of absorbable suture for Lichtenstein hernia repair did not affect recurrence rate. Qu ality of life is better with knitted composite group , than pp large pore group , than Polypropylene small pore mesh.

  20. Influence of the number of meals taken per day on cardiovascular risk factors and the energy and nutrient intakes of a group of elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, M R; Ortega, R M; Zamora, M J; Quintas, M E; López-Sobaler, A M; Andrés, P; Gaspar, M J

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to analyse the influence of the number of meals per day on a range of cardiovascular risk factors and on the energy and nutrient intakes of a group of elderly people. The participants in this study were 150 elderly people (64 men and 86 women) from Madrid. Food intake was followed over a period of 5 days. "Precise individual weighing" was used to determine the intake of institutionalized subjects (n = 58) whilst "food intake records" were used to register the same for independent subjects (n = 92). The nutrient and energy intake of the studied population was then determined from these data. The number of meals taken was also recorded. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were determined using enzymatic methods. In this population, the meal most frequently omitted was breakfast. No subject took only one meal per day, though 7.4% took only two. 56.6% took three meals and 36% took four. No subject took more than four meals per day. As the number of meals taken increased, so too the covering of theoretical energy expenditure, and the intakes of a range of nutrients became closer to those recommended e.g. proteins, fibre, vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, magnesium and iodine. As the number of meals taken per day increased, carbohydrate intake (in g/1000 Kcal and as % of energy) also increased, and approached recommended levels more closely. As observed in other studies, blood cholesterol levels were seen to be negatively correlated with increasing number of meals (r = -0.2297, p energy intake over the day as a method of improving nutritional status and as a factor that might improve blood lipid profiles.

  1. Familial Risk of IBD is more pronounced in the younger age groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Jess, Tine; Andersen, Vibeke;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohns Disease (CD) are caused by complex gene-environment interactions and the risk is increased in family members. We investigated whether the risk of IBD in relatives to IBD patients changes by age of the relatives....... This information was used to establish kinship in the entire population. Individuals receiving a diagnosis of IBD during the time period (n=69,915) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis....... Results The age stratified rates of IBD in 1st degree relatives to an IBD affected case, after controlling for the overall effect of age, appear from Table 1. The rate ratio of CD in individuals with two or more 1st degree relatives with IBD is 1-2 fold increased in relatives aged 60+ years, whereas...

  2. Perceived Family Climate and Self-Esteem in Adolescents With ADHD: A Study With a Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Halit Necmi; Eray, Şafak; Vural, Ayşe Pınar; Kocael, Ömer

    2017-04-01

    In this study, our objective is to assess the perception of family environments by adolescents with ADHD based on perceived expressed emotion (EE) and the self-esteem of the adolescents. Uludag University Medical Faculty Hospital completed this study with 41 adolescents with ADHD and 35 control group participants who were matched based on age and gender. The total scores of perceived EE, described as a lack of emotional support, irritability, and intrusiveness, were significantly higher in ADHD group than in the control group. The group with ADHD also showed significantly lower self-esteem. There was a negative correlation between self-esteem scores and total perceived EE scores in the ADHD group and the control group. This study showed that the adolescents with ADHD perceive less emotional support and higher levels of intrusiveness, with patients also describing their families as more irritating. Other results in this study show that adolescents with less emotional support possess lower self-esteem, as do adolescents with more irritable parents.

  3. In which group of children and adolescents should a family doctor look for metabolic syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Maria Banaś; Paweł Krzysztof Lewek; Przemysław Kardas

    2016-01-01

    Background. The asymptomatic course, early genesis, multifactorial onset, and the lack of a single definition of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents make it difficult to assess its prevalence. Metabolic syndrome developed in childhood increases cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Objectives. The evaluation of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome based on age, sex, weight and abdominal obesity in a population of children and adolescents in a family doctor’s practice. Mat...

  4. Scale insect genus-group names and their families (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Douglas J; Denno, Barbara D

    2014-06-05

    Genus names of the scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) are listed with their current families. The list includes all generic names that are currently valid with synonyms, unjustified emendations, homonyms, nomia nuda and misspellings. The list has been compiled from many sources as discussed in the introduction. This is the first list to be prepared in recent years of all generic names and it is in alphabetical order.

  5. The Oligopeptide Transporters: A Small Gene Family with a Diverse Group of Substrates and Functions?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Lubkowitz

    2011-01-01

    T Genes in the Oligopeptide Transport family encode integral membrane proteins that are believed to translocate their substrates from either the extracellular environment or an organelle into the cytosol. Phylogenetic analyses of plant transporters have revealed two distant clades: the Yellow Stripe-Like (YSL) proteins and the so-called Oligopeptide Transporters (OPTs), for which the family was named. Three categories of substrates have been identified for this family: small peptides, secondary amino acids bound to metals, and glutathione. Notably, the YSL transporters are involved in metal homeostasis through the translocation of metal-chelates, indicating a level of conservation both in biological function as well as substrates. In contrast, the functions of OPT proteins seem to be less defined and, in this review, I will examine the supporting and contradictory evidence for the proposed roles of OPTs in such diverse functions as long-distance sulfur distribution, nitrogen mobilization, metal homeostasis, and heavy metal sequestration through the transport of glutathione, metal-chelates, and peptides.

  6. Delivering a very brief psychoeducational program to cancer patients and family members in a large group format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A J; Edmonds, C V; Williams, D

    1999-01-01

    It is well established that brief psychoeducational programs for cancer patients will significantly improve mean quality of life. As this kind of adjunctive treatment becomes integrated into general cancer management, it will be necessary to devise cost-effective and efficacious programs that can be offered to relatively large numbers of patients. We have developed a very brief 4-session program that provides this service to 40-80 patients and family members per month (and seems capable of serving much larger numbers, depending on the capacity of the facility in which they assemble). Patients meet in a hospital auditorium for a large group, lecture-style program that offers training in basic coping skills: stress management, relaxation training, thought monitoring and changing, mental imagery and goal setting. Over the first year we have treated 363 patients and 150 family members. Improvements were assessed by changes in the POMS-Short Form, and both patients and family members were found to improve significantly over the course of the program. While this is not a randomized comparison, it suggests that the benefits gained from a large group in a classroom are not substantially less than the improvements that have been documented in the usual small group format, where more interactive discussions are possible.

  7. Day to day with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    COPD - day to day; Chronic obstructive airways disease - day to day; Chronic obstructive lung disease - day to ... Having COPD can sap your energy. These simple changes can make your days easier and preserve your strength. Ask ...

  8. Beyond the Family: The Influence of Premigration Group Status on the Educational Expectations of Immigrants' Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    Understanding how immigrants' children form educational expectations may yield insights into the causes of eventual ethnic disparities in socioeconomic attainments. This article examines how the average relative premigration educational status of the immigrant group and the immigrant group's average postmigration SES shape the educational…

  9. A re-evaluation of the stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Day Point Formation (Chazy Group): A new look at old reefs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenberg, J.; Mehrtens, C.J. (Vermont Univ., Burlington, VT (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Day Point Formation (Chazy Group, Middle Ordovician) outcrops in the Champlain Valley of New York and Vermont. The stratigraphy of the Day Point Formation is complex, containing lithologic sequences that are unique at different localities around the Champlain Valley. The formation exhibits complex lateral interfingering of seven lithofacies: (1) Highly bioturbated sandstone with symmetrical and bifurcating ripples. (2) Bioturbated, brachiopod rich, wackestone facies. (3) Planar cross-bedded, interlayered sand and sandy packstone. (4) Interlayered sand and shale grading into sand and limestone layers. (5) Grainstone which, at some localities, contains mound-shaped bryozoan reefs, at other localities thin non-reefal sheet-like layers are present. The grainstone also has planar laminated and cross stratified beds. (6) Fine-grained, calcareous sandstone with planar and herringbone cross bedding, which in places contains small bryozoan reefs and thin sheet-reefs. (7) Planar cross bedded packstone containing bryozoan reefs and thin sheet-like non-reefal layers. The thin reefal layers are found where the mound-shaped reefs are absent. The sand units are found only in the lower portion of the Day Point Formation. The bryozoan reefs and non-reefal layers are associated with the sand beds in the lower portion of the Day Point Formation, and either live within the sand or on top of it. The bryozoans that form the non-reefal layers, found in the limestones, are contained within thin layers of sand. In contrast, no sand is found in the upper section of the Day Point Formation, yet the bryozoan reefs flourish.

  10. Good care in group home living for people with dementia. Experiences of residents, family and nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zadelhoff, Ezra; Verbeek, Hilde; Widdershoven, Guy; van Rossum, Erik; Abma, Tineke

    2011-09-01

    To investigate experiences of residents, their family caregivers and nursing staff in group living homes for older people with dementia and their perception of the care process. Traditional nursing homes for people with dementia have several shortcomings related to depersonalisation, passivity, loss of skills and use of physical restraints. Group living homes are seen as an alternative to regular nursing homes, but experiences with this new care setting have rarely been investigated. The study followed a naturalistic design. Qualitative data were collected over a period of 6 months in two group living homes located in the southern part of the Netherlands. Systematic participatory observations were carried out during daily life, care and activities in both homes. In addition, semi-structured interviews were held with residents, their family and nursing staff. These data were inductively analysed and related to Tronto's care ethical framework. According to all parties, group living homes create structural opportunities for individualised care and attention to the residents' personal needs. The increased attentiveness and responsiveness for residents' well-being was seen as a sign of good care and fits with the phases of caring about and receiving care of Tronto's care ethical model. However, tensions occurred relating to the phases of taking responsibility and carrying out care. Not all residents and family members want or are able to take responsibility and perform self-care. Group living homes create conditions for good care and stimulate attentiveness and responsiveness. Tensions in these homes may relate to the new division of responsibilities and tasks.   Values of attention to needs and responsiveness are of high importance for nursing staff to provide good care for people with dementia in a nursing home setting. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Support groups for dementia caregivers - Predictors for utilisation and expected quality from a family caregiver's point of view: A questionnaire survey PART I*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luttenberger Katharina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support groups have proved to be effective in reducing the burden on family caregivers of dementia patients. Nevertheless, little is known about the factors that influence utilisation or quality expectations of family caregivers. These questions are addressed in the following paper. Methods The cross-sectional study was carried out as an anonymous written survey of family caregivers of dementia patients in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative data from 404 caregivers were analysed using content analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. Results The only significant predictor for utilisation is assessing how helpful support groups are for the individual care situation. Family caregivers all agree that psycho-educative orientation is a priority requirement. Conclusions In order to increase the rate of utilisation, family caregivers must be convinced of the relevant advantages of using support groups. Support groups which offer an exchange of experiences, open discussion, information and advice meet the requirements of family caregivers.

  12. Music listening in families and peer groups: benefits for young people's social cohesion and emotional well-being across four cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Diana; Abubakar, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Families are central to the social and emotional development of youth, and most families engage in musical activities together, such as listening to music or talking about their favorite songs. However, empirical evidence of the positive effects of musical family rituals on social cohesion and emotional well-being is scarce. Furthermore, the role of culture in the shaping of musical family rituals and their psychological benefits has been neglected entirely. This paper investigates musical rituals in families and in peer groups (as an important secondary socialization context) in two traditional/collectivistic and two secular/individualistic cultures, and across two developmental stages (adolescence vs. young adulthood). Based on cross-sectional data from 760 young people in Kenya, the Philippines, New Zealand, and Germany, our study revealed that across cultures music listening in families and in peer groups contributes to family and peer cohesion, respectively. Furthermore, the direct contribution of music in peer groups on well-being appears across cultural contexts, whereas musical family rituals affect emotional well-being in more traditional/collectivistic contexts. Developmental analyses show that musical family rituals are consistently and strongly related to family cohesion across developmental stages, whereas musical rituals in peer groups appear more dependent on the developmental stage (in interaction with culture). Contributing to developmental as well as cross-cultural psychology, this research elucidated musical rituals and their positive effects on the emotional and social development of young people across cultures. The implications for future research and family interventions are discussed.

  13. Systematic analysis of finite family symmetry groups and their application to the lepton sector

    CERN Document Server

    Ludl, Patrick Otto

    2009-01-01

    In this work we will investigate Lagrangians of the standard model extended by three right-handed neutrinos, and the consequences of invariance under finite groups G for lepton masses and mixing matrices are studied. The main part of this thesis is the systematic analysis of finite subgroups of SU(3). The analysis of these groups may act as a toolkit for future model building.

  14. Analysis of fish assemblages in sectors along a salinity gradient based on species, families and functional groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina dos Passos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we test the effects of the east-west salinity gradient in the subtropical Paranaguá Bay Estuarine Complex (PEC on the structure of shallow water fish fauna, determined according to taxonomic (families and species and functional composition metrics. A total of 152 species were observed. The families with the largest number of species were the Sciaenidae, Carangidae, Haemulidae and Gobiidae. The most abundant species were Atherinella brasiliensis, Harengula clupeola, Anchoa januaria and Anchoa tricolor. Marine stragglers dominated in number of species, followed by marine migrants and estuarine species. Most species were zoobenthivores, followed by piscivores and zooplanktivores. Families and species more frequently associated with estuarine conditions dominated in the mesohaline sector, and those more frequently associated with marine conditions dominated in the euhaline sector. The fish assemblages along the estuarine salinity gradient were found to be better characterized by taxonomic metrics than by functional ones. This is most likely because individuals of all functional groups inhabit all salinity sectors, and thus these metrics are not useful for differentiating assemblages along salinity gradients. Our results differ from those of other studies in tropical and subtropical estuaries, which have emphasized the importance of functional groups in determining fish assemblages along salinity gradients.

  15. Parasite-stress promotes in-group assortative sociality: the cases of strong family ties and heightened religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy

    2012-04-01

    Throughout the world people differ in the magnitude with which they value strong family ties or heightened religiosity. We propose that this cross-cultural variation is a result of a contingent psychological adaptation that facilitates in-group assortative sociality in the face of high levels of parasite-stress while devaluing in-group assortative sociality in areas with low levels of parasite-stress. This is because in-group assortative sociality is more important for the avoidance of infection from novel parasites and for the management of infection in regions with high levels of parasite-stress compared with regions of low infectious disease stress. We examined this hypothesis by testing the predictions that there would be a positive association between parasite-stress and strength of family ties or religiosity. We conducted this study by comparing among nations and among states in the United States of America. We found for both the international and the interstate analyses that in-group assortative sociality was positively associated with parasite-stress. This was true when controlling for potentially confounding factors such as human freedom and economic development. The findings support the parasite-stress theory of sociality, that is, the proposal that parasite-stress is central to the evolution of social life in humans and other animals.

  16. Expression of bcl-2 gene family during resection induced liver regeneration:Comparison between hepatectomized and sham groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamil Can Akcali; Aydin Dalgic; Ahmet Ucar; Khemaeis Ben Haj; Dilek Guvenc

    2004-01-01

    AIM: During liver regeneration cellular proliferation and apoptosis result in tissue remodeling to restore normal hepatic mass and structure. Main regulators of the apoptotic machinery are the Bcl-2 family proteins but their roles are not well defined throughout the liver regeneration. We aimed to analyze the expression levels of bcl-2gene family members during resection induced liver regeneration.METHODS: We performed semi-quantitative RT-PCR to examine the expression level of bak, bax, bcl-2 and bcl-xL in 70% hepatectomized rat livers during the whole regeneration process and compared to that of the sham and normal groups.RESULTS: The expression of bakand baxwas decreased whereas that of bcl-2and bcl-XL was increased in hepatectomized animals compared to normal liver at most time points. We also reported for the first time that sham group of animals had statistically significant higher expression of bakand bax than hepatectomized animals. In addition, the area under the curve (AUC) values of these genes was larger in sham groups than the hepatectomized groups.CONCLUSION: The expression changes of bak, bax, bcl-2 and bcl-,XL genes are altered not only due to regeneration,but also due to effects of surgical operations.

  17. Characteristics and Behavioral Outcomes for Youth in Group Care and Family-Based Care: A Propensity Score Matching Approach Using National Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sigrid; Roesch, Scott; Zhang, Jin Jin

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to answer two questions: (a) Given expected differences in children who are placed in group care compared to those in family-based settings, is it possible to match children on baseline characteristics? (b) Are there differences in behavioral outcomes for youth with episodes in group care versus those in family-based care? Using…

  18. A randomized controlled study of 5 and 10 days treatment with phenoxymethylpenicillin for pharyngotonsillitis caused by streptococcus group A - a protocol study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Gunilla; Edlund, Charlotta; Giske, Christian G; Mölstad, Sigvard; Norman, Christer; Sundvall, Pär-Daniel; Hedin, Katarina

    2016-09-13

    In 2014 the Swedish government assigned to The Public Health Agency of Sweden to conduct studies to evaluate optimal use of existing antibiotic agents. The aim is to optimize drug use and dosing regimens to improve the clinical efficacy. The present study was selected following a structured prioritizing process by independent experts. This phase IV study is a randomized, open-label, multicenter study with non-inferiority design regarding the therapeutic use of penicillin V with two parallel groups. The overall aim is to study if the total exposure with penicillin V can be reduced from 1000 mg three times daily for 10 days to 800 mg four times daily for 5 days when treating Streptococcus pyogenes (Lancefield group A) pharyngotonsillitis. Patients will be recruited from 17 primary health care centers in Sweden. Adult men and women, youth and children ≥6 years of age who consult for sore throat and is judged to have a pharyngotonsillitis, with 3-4 Centor criteria and a positive rapid test for group A streptococci, will be included in the study. The primary outcome is clinical cure 5-7 days after discontinuation of antibiotic treatment. Follow-up controls will be done by telephone after 1 and 3 months. Throat symptoms, potential relapses and complications will be monitored, as well as adverse events. Patients (n = 432) will be included during 2 years. In the era of increasing antimicrobial resistance and the shortage of new antimicrobial agents it is necessary to revisit optimal usage of old antibiotics. Old antimicrobial drugs are often associated with inadequate knowledge on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and lack of optimized dosing regimens based on randomized controlled clinical trials. If a shorter and more potent treatment regimen is shown to be equivalent with the normal 10 day regimen this can imply great advantages for both patients (adherence, adverse events, resistance) and the community (resistance, drug costs). EudraCT number 2015

  19. Short-term intensive psychodynamic group therapy versus cognitive-behavioral group therapy in day treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszek, Hubert; Holas, Paweł; Wyrzykowski, Tomasz; Lorentzen, Steinar; Kokoszka, Andrzej

    2015-07-29

    Psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral group therapies are frequently applied in day hospitals for the treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive or personality disorders in Poland and other Eastern European countries. Yet there is not enough evidence as to their effectiveness in this environment; this study addresses this gap. The aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of these two kinds of day treatment care consisting of intensive, short-term group psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral therapy, for patients with anxiety disorders and/or comorbid depressive or personality disorders. Our objectives are to: 1) show the effectiveness of each treatment in a day-care setting relative to the wait-list control group; 2) demonstrate the relative short- and long-term effectiveness of the two active treatments; 3) carry out a preliminary examination of the predictors and moderators of treatment response; 4) carry out a preliminary examination of the mediators of therapeutic change; and 5) compare the impact of both methods of treatment on the outcome of the measures used in this study. In this randomized controlled trial, a total of 199 patients with anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive and/or personality disorders will be assigned to one of three conditions: 1) psychodynamic group therapy; 2) cognitive-behavioral group therapy; or 3) wait-list control group. The therapy will last 12 weeks. Both treatments will be manualized (the manuals will address comorbidity). Primary outcome measures will include self-reported symptoms of anxiety, observer-rated symptoms of anxiety, global improvement, and recovery rate. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of pathological personality traits, depression, self-esteem, defense mechanisms, beliefs about self and others, interpersonal problems, object relations, parental bonding, meta-cognition, and quality of life. Measures will be taken at baseline, post-treatment, and at six months following

  20. On the Mordell-Weil group of elliptic curves induced by families of Diophantine triples

    OpenAIRE

    Mikić, Miljen

    2015-01-01

    The problem of the extendibility of Diophantine triples is closely connected with the Mordell-Weil group of the associated elliptic curve. In this paper, we examine Diophantine triples $\\{k-1,k+1,c_l(k)\\}$ and prove that the torsion group of the associated curves is $\\mathbb{Z}/2\\mathbb{Z} \\times \\mathbb{Z}/2\\mathbb{Z}$ for $l=3,4$ and $l\\equiv 1$ or $2 \\pmod{4}$. Additionally, we prove that the rank is greater than or equal to 2 for all $l\\ge2$. This represents an improvement of previous res...

  1. The Effect of Participation in Support Groups on Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Family Caregivers of People with Alzheimers: Randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Taati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine the effect of participation in support groups on the depression, anxiety and stress level of caregivers of patients with Alzheimer. This study was a single blind randomized clinical controlled trial (RCT with 80 family caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s (per group=40. The intervention group participated in eight sessions 1.5- 2 hours in support groups. The tool used in this study was the DASS-21 questionnaire for measuring depression, anxiety and stress level of the caregivers, analysis of parametric data, using SPSS version 21. Findings showed, participation in support groups showed no significant difference on depression, anxiety and stress in family caregivers of Alzheimer patients in the control group and the intervention group. Given that caring for these patients by their family members are very sensitive and costly issues for policy makers and health service providers, community and families of these patients.

  2. [Influence of family environment and social group on smoking among Brazilian youth aged 15 to 24 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Mery Natali Silva; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2011-07-01

    To estimate the prevalence of smoking among Brazilian youth, examining individual, family, and social group factors associated with this habit. Data from youth aged 15 to 24 years living in 17 Brazilian state capitals and the Federal District, obtained from the Household Survey on Risk Factors for Chronic Diseases and Reported Morbidity carried out in 2002 and 2003 by the National Cancer Institute was analyzed. Individual variables (sex, age, schooling, alcohol consumption, self-rated health, physical activity, current school attendance), family variables (age and education of head of household and father, mother, or sibling smoking), and social group variables (best friend smoking, most friends smoking, boyfriend/girlfriend smoking) were analyzed. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach to evaluate the factors associated with smoking were used. Considering the effect of the sampling design, smoking prevalence was 12.8%, ranging from 6.8% in Aracaju to 24.1% in Porto Alegre. The following factors were predictors of smoking: male sex, older age, less schooling, not attending school at the time of the survey, poorer health perception, and alcohol consumption. Peer smoking (friends or boyfriend/girlfriend) and smoking among family members (father/mother or sibling) were associated with smoking. There was an effect of parental birth cohort on smoking, with a higher prevalence of smoking among youth whose parents were born in the 1930s. Individual characteristics and the influence of peers and family were relevant for smoking by the youth. Increasing the dialogue among teenagers, school, schoolmates, friends, and parents could lead to a reduction of substance use among youth.

  3. "My YAP Family": Analysis of a Facebook Group for Young Adults Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaysynsky, Anna; Romansky-Poulin, Kathryn; Arpadi, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Little research exists regarding the use of social networking sites, like Facebook, for improving patient well-being. The aim of this study was to evaluate a private Facebook group established for members of an HIV clinic's young adult program. This study employed directed content analysis to examine the types and frequencies of interactions observable in the 3,838 posts and comments that appeared on the Facebook group page between March 1, 2011 and July 1, 2012. Analysis revealed that a large percentage (41.7 %) of the content was classified as "administrative/engagement in group" and functioned to enhance the operations of the program as a whole. Additionally, positive interactions were frequently observed, especially socializing (24.8 %), banter (20.2 %), and offers of social support (15.1 %). Emotional support was the most frequent type of support requested, while esteem support was the most commonly provided form of support. The results of this study demonstrate that a Facebook group can be a means of providing patients with social support and positive social interaction and can improve services for young adults with HIV.

  4. An Evaluation of an Educational Group for Children of Divorced Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Susan S.; Scherman, Avraham

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a 6-week school-based intervention program for children of divorce. Children's school behavior problems, attitudes and beliefs about divorce, self-concept, academic performance, and measures of group support were evaluated. Participants consisted of 127 fourth and fifth graders randomly assigned to…

  5. Using Group Work to Rebuild Family and Community Ties among Displaced African Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsulure-Smith, Adeyinka M.

    2012-01-01

    The number of refugees and asylum seekers admitted to the United States has grown, with significant numbers arriving from sub-Saharan Africa. Given this reality, it is important that mental health professionals are equipped to provide culturally relevant services. This article describes the development and implementation of a group treatment model…

  6. An adaptation of family-based behavioral pediatric obesity treatment for a primary care setting: group health family wellness program pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Karin R; Lozano, Paula; Mohelnitzky, Amy; Rudnick, Sarah; Richards, Julie

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of family-based group pediatric obesity treatment in a primary care setting, to obtain an estimate of its effectiveness, and to describe participating parents' experiences of social support for healthy lifestyle changes. We adapted an evidence-based intervention to a group format and completed six 12- to 16-week groups over 3 years. We assessed program attendance and completion, changes in child and parent body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), and changes in child quality of life in a single-arm before-and-after trial. Qualitative interviews explored social support for implementing healthy lifestyle changes. Thirty-eight parent-child pairs enrolled (28% of the 134 pairs invited). Of those, 24 (63%) completed the program and another 6 (16%) attended at least 4 sessions but did not complete the program. Children who completed the program achieved a mean change in BMI Z-scores (Z-BMI) of -0.1 (0.1) (p treatment of pediatric obesity is feasible and acceptable in a primary care setting. Change in child and parent BMI outcomes and child quality of life among completers were promising despite the pilot's low intensity. Parent experiences with lack of social support suggest possible ways to improve retention and adherence.

  7. hsphase: an R package for pedigree reconstruction, detection of recombination events, phasing and imputation of half-sib family groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of recombination events and which chromosomal segments contributed to an individual is useful for a number of applications in genomic analyses including haplotyping, imputation, signatures of selection, and improved estimates of relationship and probability of identity by descent. Genotypic data on half-sib family groups are widely available in livestock genomics. This structure makes it possible to identify recombination events accurately even with only a few individuals and it lends itself well to a range of applications such as parentage assignment and pedigree verification. Results Here we present hsphase, an R package that exploits the genetic structure found in half-sib livestock data to identify and count recombination events, impute and phase un-genotyped sires and phase its offspring. The package also allows reconstruction of family groups (pedigree inference), identification of pedigree errors and parentage assignment. Additional functions in the package allow identification of genomic mapping errors, imputation of paternal high density genotypes from low density genotypes, evaluation of phasing results either from hsphase or from other phasing programs. Various diagnostic plotting functions permit rapid visual inspection of results and evaluation of datasets. Conclusion The hsphase package provides a suite of functions for analysis and visualization of genomic structures in half-sib family groups implemented in the widely used R programming environment. Low level functions were implemented in C++ and parallelized to improve performance. hsphase was primarily designed for use with high density SNP array data but it is fast enough to run directly on sequence data once they become more widely available. The package is available (GPL 3) from the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) or from http://www-personal.une.edu.au/~cgondro2/hsphase.htm. PMID:24906803

  8. Important components of a short-term family group programme. From the Danish National Multicenter Schizophrenia Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buksti, Ann Staerk; Munkner, Runa; Gade, Inger Lise

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians from three psychiatric departments have established family groups as a specific intervention for the relatives of patients with first-episode psychosis. The intervention manual is combining the psychoeducational model with psychodynamic understanding and principles. The aim of this study...... system and other public institutions; 3) the possibility of sharing thoughts, feelings and problems; and 4) dealing with feelings of guilt and shame and the possibility of altering the relationship with the mentally ill relative. Thirty-five relatives of 26 patients filled in the questionnaire consisting...

  9. Resolving the phylogeny of a speciose spider group, the family Linyphiidae (Araneae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Ballesteros, Jesus A; Hormiga, Gustavo; Chesters, Douglas; Zhan, Yongjia; Sun, Ning; Zhu, Chaodong; Chen, Wei; Tu, Lihong

    2015-10-01

    For high-level molecular phylogenies, a comprehensive sampling design is a key factor for not only improving inferential accuracy, but also for maximizing the explanatory power of the resulting phylogeny. Two standing problems in molecular phylogenies are the unstable placements of some deep and long branches, and the phylogenetic relationships shown by robust supported clades conflict with recognized knowledge. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that increasing taxon sampling is expected to ameliorate, if not resolve, both problems; however, sometimes neither the current taxonomic system nor the established phylogeny can provide sufficient information to guide additional sampling design. We examined the phylogeny of the spider family Linyphiidae, and selected ingroup species based on epigynal morphology, which can be reconstructed in a phylogenetic context. Our analyses resulted in seven robustly supported clades within linyphiids. The placements of four deep and long branches are sensitive to variations in both outgroup and ingroup sampling, suggesting the possibility of long branch attraction artifacts. Results of ancestral state reconstruction indicate that successive state transformations of the epigynal plate are associated with early cladogenetic events in linyphiid diversification. Representatives of different subfamilies were mixed together within well supported clades and examination revealed that their defining characters, as per traditional taxonomy, are homoplastic. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that increasing taxon sampling produced a more informative framework, which in turn helps to study character evolution and interpret the relationships among linyphiid lineages. Additional defining characters are needed to revise the linyphiid taxonomic system based on our phylogenetic hypothesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Importance of support groups for intersex (disorders of sex development) patients, families and the medical profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, M L; Simmonds, M

    2010-09-01

    Taboo still surrounds intersex/disorders of sex development, in spite of more openness in society regarding sex. Peer support is valuable in providing information and emotional support to those affected. Support groups also work with clinicians to promote better care, to assist with research studies and to increase clinical awareness and expertise by helping to stage symposia. They also foster greater public understanding via media involvement and training videos; and play an advocacy role, providing one voice to channel the concerns of a scattered population with these rare conditions.

  11. How Does Group Affiliation Affect The Diversification Performance Of Family-Controlled Firms In Malaysia? – A Governance Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ng Sin Huei

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the roles of business group affiliations and whether the size and ownership structure of business groups influence the performance outcomes of diversification among family-controlled firms in Malaysia. It presents evidence that agency-driven and thus performance-diminishing firm diversification is more likely to take place in firms affiliated with a family-controlled business group than in independent firms. The findings support the hypothesis that if the benefits of diver...

  12. How Does Group Affiliation Affect The Diversification Performance Of Family-Controlled Firms In Malaysia? – A Governance Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ng Sin Huei

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the roles of business group affiliations and whether the size and ownership structure of business groups influence the performance outcomes of diversification among family-controlled firms in Malaysia. It presents evidence that agency-driven and thus performance-diminishing firm diversification is more likely to take place in firms affiliated with a family-controlled business group than in independent firms. The findings support the hypothesis that if the benefits of diver...

  13. Important components of a short-term family group programme. From the Danish National Multicenter Schizophrenia Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buksti, Ann Staerk; Munkner, Runa; Gade, Inger Lise;

    2006-01-01

    was to identify the special elements of the programme that were the most important to the relatives. A questionnaire was developed for the participants of the groups in order to establish their satisfaction concerning 1) The actual knowledge received; 2) improvement in ability to cooperate with the therapeutic......Clinicians from three psychiatric departments have established family groups as a specific intervention for the relatives of patients with first-episode psychosis. The intervention manual is combining the psychoeducational model with psychodynamic understanding and principles. The aim of this study...... system and other public institutions; 3) the possibility of sharing thoughts, feelings and problems; and 4) dealing with feelings of guilt and shame and the possibility of altering the relationship with the mentally ill relative. Thirty-five relatives of 26 patients filled in the questionnaire consisting...

  14. Cohesion group approach for evolutionary analysis of TyrA, a protein family with wide-ranging substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Carol A; Disz, Terrence; Hwang, Kaitlyn; Song, Jian; Vonstein, Veronika; Overbeek, Ross; Jensen, Roy A

    2008-03-01

    Many enzymes and other proteins are difficult subjects for bioinformatic analysis because they exhibit variant catalytic, structural, regulatory, and fusion mode features within a protein family whose sequences are not highly conserved. However, such features reflect dynamic and interesting scenarios of evolutionary importance. The value of experimental data obtained from individual organisms is instantly magnified to the extent that given features of the experimental organism can be projected upon related organisms. But how can one decide how far along the similarity scale it is reasonable to go before such inferences become doubtful? How can a credible picture of evolutionary events be deduced within the vertical trace of inheritance in combination with intervening events of lateral gene transfer (LGT)? We present a comprehensive analysis of a dehydrogenase protein family (TyrA) as a prototype example of how these goals can be accomplished through the use of cohesion group analysis. With this approach, the full collection of homologs is sorted into groups by a method that eliminates bias caused by an uneven representation of sequences from organisms whose phylogenetic spacing is not optimal. Each sufficiently populated cohesion group is phylogenetically coherent and defined by an overall congruence with a distinct section of the 16S rRNA gene tree. Exceptions that occasionally are found implicate a clearly defined LGT scenario whereby the recipient lineage is apparent and the donor lineage of the gene transferred is localized to those organisms that define the cohesion group. Systematic procedures to manage and organize otherwise overwhelming amounts of data are demonstrated.

  15. An educative support group for female family caregivers: impact on caregivers psychological distress and patient's neuropsychiatry symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadpour, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Laaya; Bahredar, Mohammad Jafar

    2009-05-01

    In developing world most patients with dementia live in the community. And female family caregivers are the primary source to delivering care to patients. Educating and supporting the careers may reduce psychological distress and the challenging behavior as well. We run a non pharmacological intervention focusing on education regarding dementia, behavioral problems and interactive self support group. Twenty nine female family caregivers were assigned and divided in two groups of 15 and 14. Two hours weekly sessions were conducted for 8 weeks. Baseline and outcome measures were assessed using neuropsychiatry Inventory (NPI), general health questionnaire and perceived stress scale (PSS). Initial co relational analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between GHQ and total NPI scores but not for PSS. Paired sample test revealed significant change from baseline and at the end in both GHQ score and neuropsychiatry symptoms. This study supports the use of a non-pharmacologic intervention focusing on education in a feasible and cost benefit setting for dementia caregivers. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Adult Day Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Adult Day Services Association. 2. U.S. Health Care Costs: Background Brief , The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (2008) (www.kaiseredu.org); excerpt from Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Industry Profile , First Research ( ...

  17. Control groups in paediatric epilepsy research: do first-degree cousins show familial effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Melissa; Morrison, Blaise; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Almane, Dace; Seidenberg, Michael; Zhao, Qianqian; Rathouz, Paul J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether first-degree cousins of children with idiopathic focal and genetic generalized epilepsies show any association across measures of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The presence/absence of associations addresses the question of whether and to what extent first-degree cousins may serve as unbiased controls in research addressing the cognitive, psychiatric, and neuroimaging features of paediatric epilepsies. Participants were children (aged 8-18) with epilepsy who had at least one first-degree cousin control enrolled in the study (n=37) and all enrolled cousin controls (n=100). Participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging (cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar volumes), and parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Data (based on 42 outcome measures) from cousin controls were regressed on the corresponding epilepsy cognitive, behavioural, and imaging measures in a linear mixed model and case/control correlations were examined. Of the 42 uncorrected correlations involving cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging measures, only two were significant (p0.25). Similar results held for the cognition/behaviour and brain imaging measures separately. Given the lack of association between cases and first-degree cousin performances on measures of cognition, behaviour, and neuroimaging, the results suggest a non-significant genetic influence on control group performance. First-degree cousins appear to be unbiased controls for cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging research in paediatric epilepsy.

  18. Community-based family-style group homes for children orphaned by AIDS in rural China: an ethnographic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Li

    2015-09-01

    As the number of children orphaned by AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) has reached 17.3 million, most living in resource-poor settings, interest has grown in identifying and evaluating appropriate care arrangements for them. In this study, we describe the community-based family-style group homes ('group homes') in rural China. Guided by an ecological framework of children's wellbeing, we conducted a series of ethnographic observations, in-depth interviews and group discussions in the rural areas of Henan Province, which has been severely impacted by the AIDS endemic through commercial blood collection. Based on our observations and discussions, group homes appear to provide stable and safe living environments for children orphaned by AIDS. Adequate financial support from non-government organizations (NGOs) as well as the central and provincial governments has ensured a low child-caregiver ratio and attention to the basic needs of the children at group homes. The foster parents were selected from the local community and appear to have adequate qualifications and dedication. They receive a monthly stipend, periodical evaluation and parenting consultation from supporting NGOs. The foster parents and children in the group homes have formed strong bonds. Both children and foster parents reported positively on health and education. Characteristics of community-based group homes can be replicated in other care arrangements for AIDS orphans in resource-poor settings for the optimal health outcomes of those vulnerable children. We also call for capacity building for caregivers and communities to provide sustainable and supportive living environment for these children. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  19. Crystal families and systems in higher dimensions, and geometrical symbols of their point groups. I. Crystal families in five-dimensional space with two-, three-, four- and sixfold symmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysseyre, R; Weigel, D; Phan, Th

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper and of the following one [Weigel, Phan & Veysseyre (2008). Acta Cryst. A64, 687-697] is to complete the list of the Weigel-Phan-Veysseyre (WPV) symbols of the point groups of space E5 that was started in previous papers and in two reports of an IUCr Subcommittee on the Nomenclature of n-Dimensional Crystallography. In this paper, some crystal families of space E5 are studied. The cells of these are right hyperprisms with as a basis either two squares, or two hexagons, or a square and a hexagon. If the basis is made up of two squares, the two families are the (monoclinic di squares)-al family (No. XVI) and the (di squares)-al family (No. XIX). If the basis is made up of two hexagons, the two families are the (monoclinic di hexagons)-al family (No. XVII) and the (di hexagons)-al family (No. XXI). If the basis is made up of one square and one hexagon, the family is the (square hexagon)-al family (No. XX). In order to link space E5 to spaces E2, E3 and E4, some results published in previous papers are recalled. In fact, most of the symbols of the point groups of space E5 can be deduced from the symbols of the four, six and 23 crystal families of spaces E2, E3 and E4, respectively.

  20. Summary of Contributions to GAW Group 15: Family-Based Samples Are Useful in Identifying Common Polymorphisms Associated with Complex Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Stacey; Uh, Hae-Won; Martinez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, family-based samples have been used for genetic analyses of single-gene traits caused by rare but highly penetrant risk variants. The utility of family-based genetic data for analyzing common complex traits is unclear and contains numerous challenges. To assess the utility as well as to address these challenges, members of Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 Group 15 analyzed Framingham Heart Study data using family-based designs ranging from parent–offspring trios to large pedigrees....

  1. The NLP toxin family in Phytophthora sojae includes rapidly evolving groups that lack necrosis-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Suomeng; Kong, Guanghui; Qutob, Dinah; Yu, Xiaoli; Tang, Junli; Kang, Jixiong; Dai, Tingting; Wang, Hai; Gijzen, Mark; Wang, Yuanchao

    2012-07-01

    Necrosis- and ethylene-inducing-like proteins (NLP) are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic plant pathogens and are considered to be important virulence factors. We identified, in total, 70 potential Phytophthora sojae NLP genes but 37 were designated as pseudogenes. Sequence alignment of the remaining 33 NLP delineated six groups. Three of these groups include proteins with an intact heptapeptide (Gly-His-Arg-His-Asp-Trp-Glu) motif, which is important for necrosis-inducing activity, whereas the motif is not conserved in the other groups. In total, 19 representative NLP genes were assessed for necrosis-inducing activity by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Surprisingly, only eight genes triggered cell death. The expression of the NLP genes in P. sojae was examined, distinguishing 20 expressed and 13 nonexpressed NLP genes. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicate that most NLP are highly expressed during cyst germination and infection stages. Amino acid substitution ratios (Ka/Ks) of 33 NLP sequences from four different P. sojae strains resulted in identification of positive selection sites in a distinct NLP group. Overall, our study indicates that expansion and pseudogenization of the P. sojae NLP family results from an ongoing birth-and-death process, and that varying patterns of expression, necrosis-inducing activity, and positive selection suggest that NLP have diversified in function.

  2. Child Day Care Centers, Child Day Cares as provided by the Department of Children and Family in Miami-Dade - points, Published in 2012, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Miami-Dade County, Information Technology Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2012. It is described as 'Child...

  3. Music listening in families and peer groups: Benefits for young people's social cohesion and emotional well-being across four cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eBoer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Families are central to the social and emotional development of youth, and most families engage in musical activities together, such as listening to music or talking about their favorite songs. However, empirical evidence of the positive effects of musical family rituals on social cohesion and emotional well-being is scarce. Furthermore, the role of culture in the shaping of musical family rituals and their psychological benefits has been neglected entirely. This paper investigates musical rituals in families and in peer groups (as an important secondary socialization context in two traditional/collectivistic and two secular/individualistic cultures, and across two developmental stages (adolescence vs. young adulthood. Based on cross-sectional data from 760 young people in Kenya, the Philippines, New Zealand and Germany, our study revealed that across cultures music listening in families and in peer groups contributes to family and peer cohesion respectively. Furthermore, the direct contribution of music in peer groups on well-being appears across cultural contexts, whereas musical family rituals affect emotional well-being in more traditional/collectivistic contexts. Developmental analyses show that musical family rituals are consistently and strongly related to family cohesion across developmental stages, whereas musical rituals in peer groups appear more dependent on the developmental stage (in interaction with culture. Contributing to developmental as well as cross-cultural psychology, this research elucidated musical rituals and their positive effects on the emotional and social development of young people across cultures. The implications for future research and family interventions are discussed.

  4. May Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳

    2009-01-01

    For Teacher: May Day occurs in May 1 and refers to any of several public holidays.In many countries, May Day is synonymous(同义词的)with International Workers' Day, or Labor Day, which celebrates the social and economic achievements(成就)of the labor movement.

  5. The CesA gene family of barley. Quantitative analysis of transcripts reveals two groups of co-expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Rachel A; Shirley, Neil J; King, Brendon J; Harvey, Andrew J; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2004-01-01

    Sequence data from cDNA and genomic clones, coupled with analyses of expressed sequence tag databases, indicate that the CesA (cellulose synthase) gene family from barley (Hordeum vulgare) has at least eight members, which are distributed across the genome. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction has been used to determine the relative abundance of mRNA transcripts for individual HvCesA genes in vegetative and floral tissues, at different stages of development. To ensure accurate expression profiling, geometric averaging of multiple internal control gene transcripts has been applied for the normalization of transcript abundance. Total HvCesA mRNA levels are highest in coleoptiles, roots, and stems and much lower in floral tissues, early developing grain, and in the elongation zone of leaves. In most tissues, HvCesA1, HvCesA2, and HvCesA6 predominate, and their relative abundance is very similar; these genes appear to be coordinately transcribed. A second group, comprising HvCesA4, HvCesA7, and HvCesA8, also appears to be coordinately transcribed, most obviously in maturing stem and root tissues. The HvCesA3 expression pattern does not fall into either of these two groups, and HvCesA5 transcript levels are extremely low in all tissues. Thus, the HvCesA genes fall into two general groups of three genes with respect to mRNA abundance, and the co-expression of the groups identifies their products as candidates for the rosettes that are involved in cellulose biosynthesis at the plasma membrane. Phylogenetic analysis allows the two groups of genes to be linked with orthologous Arabidopsis CesA genes that have been implicated in primary and secondary wall synthesis.

  6. Stereodivergent and Protecting-Group-Free Synthesis of the Helicascolide Family: A Rhodium-Catalyzed Atom-Economical Lactonization Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydl, Alexander M; Berthold, Dino; Spreider, Pierre A; Breit, Bernhard

    2016-05-04

    Natural products of polyketide origin, in particular small-sized lactones often possess a very broad range of impressive biological activities. An efficient way to demonstrate the concise access to six-membered lactones was emphasized as part of a stereodivergent and protecting-group-free synthesis of all three representatives of the helicascolide family. This strategy features an atom-economical and highly diastereoselective rhodium-catalyzed "head-to-tail" lactonization by an intramolecular addition of ω-allenyl-substituted carboxylic acids to terminal allenes, including the selective construction of a new stereocenter in the newly formed core structures. The excellent selectivities with which the helicascolide precursors were obtained are remarkable, thus resulting in an expeditious and highly efficient natural product synthesis.

  7. May Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳

    2009-01-01

    For Teachers: May Day occurs on May 1 and refers to any of several public holidays. In many coun- tries, May Day is synonymous (同义词的) with International Workers' Day, or Labor Day, which celebrates the social and economic achievements (成就) of the labor movement. As a day of celebration, the holiday has an- cient origins (起源), and it can relate to many customs that have survived into modem times.

  8. A Bibliography of Canadian Day Care Research. Report of the Task Force on Child Care: Series 6 = Bibliographie des etudes sur la garde des enfants au Canada. Rapport du groupe d'etude sur la garde des enfants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Alan R.

    Part of an effort to provide detailed analyses of issues of special relevance to child care and parental leave policies and the effects of these issues on the changing Canadian family, this volume, the last in a series of six, provides a bibliography of Canadian day care research. (RH)

  9. Day Care for Working Families Act of 1987. Hearing on S. 1271 To Provide Comprehensive Federal Assistance for Day Care, before the Subcommittee on Labor of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    Recognizing the importance of the need for quality day care for children of working mothers, handicapped children, and children of low income families, the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Labor and Human Resources met to address this issue in the Child Care Center of Owens Technical College, in Toledo, Ohio. The Subcommittee interviewed or heard…

  10. Structural abnormalities of the myenteric (Auerbach's) plexus in familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) as demonstrated by flat-mount preparation of the esophagus and stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, I; Wells, T R

    1985-01-01

    The esophageal and gastric myenteric (Auerbach's) plexus were studied by a flat-mount preparation in 3 patients with familial dysautonomia. In 1 patient a typical esophageal network was found in the stomach. In another patient both esophageal and gastric plexus patterns were significantly different from normal. These changes, by producing abnormal nervous stimulation, may explain disturbed motility of the esophagus and stomach in familial dysautonomia.

  11. The role of support groups in facilitating families in coping with a genetic condition and in discussion of genetic risk information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumridge, Gillian; Metcalfe, Alison; Coad, Jane; Gill, Paramjit

    2012-09-01

      Giving children and young people information about genetic conditions and associated risk has been shown to be important to their identity, coping and decision making. Parents, however, find talking to their children difficult, and support from health professionals is often not available to them.   To explore the role of support groups in family coping, and in assisting parents' communication about risk with children in families affected by an inherited genetic condition.   Semi-structured interviews analysed using grounded theory and informed by models focusing on aspects of family communication.   Affected and unaffected children and their parents, from families affected by one of six genetic conditions, that represent different patterns of inheritance, and variations in age of onset, life expectancy and impact on families.   Parents often sought support they did not receive elsewhere from support groups. They identified benefits, but also potential disadvantages to this involvement. These related to the specific condition and also whether groups were run solely by parents or had professional input. Support groups rarely helped directly with family communication, but attendance often stimulated family discussion, and they provided information that improved parents' confidence in discussing the condition.   Support groups should be seen only as additional to the support offered by health and social care professionals. An increased understanding of the role of support groups in assisting families with genetic conditions has been highlighted, but further work is needed to explore more fully how this may be made more sustainable and far-reaching. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Nutrition and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Four Age Groups of Female Individuals: The PEP Family Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schwandt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Assessment of nutritional habits and associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors in four age groups of women partici-pating in the Prevention Education Program, Family Heart Study.Methods: Anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP, lipoproteins, glucose and insulin were measured in 141 children, 211 adolescents, 151 women 3 times more common in adolescents. Thirty six percent of junior women were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m² and 21% had central adiposity obese. Sixty eight year-old women had a far more adverse risk profile than 35 year-old women. In terms of energy consumption, 14 year-old women had the lowest fat intake and the highest consumption of carbohydrates whereas intake of protein was lowest in 10 year-old girls. Intake of unsaturated fat was lower in youths than in adults amounting to 37 g unsaturated fat respectively 53.4% of total fat consumption. The asso-ciation between energy consumption and overweight was significant and calorie intake was associated with clustering of ≥3 cardiovascular risk factors (OR :4.72; 95% CI 1.22-18.33.Conclusions: The prevalence of CVD risk factors increased continuously from girls and adolescents to junior and senior women. However, dietary intake was different in the four age groups. Caloric intake was associated with overweight and clustering of risk factors in adult women.

  13. THE KNOWLEDGE LEVEL OF A GROUP OF STUDENTS IN CELAL BAYAR UNIVERSITY ABOUT FAMILY PLANNING AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar ERBAY DUNDAR

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Young adulthood is a period when concepts like family planning (FP and sexually transmitted diseases (STD?s become important. This cross-sectional study was performed to measure the knowledge level of Biology and Turkish Language / Literature students of Manisa Celal Bayar University about FP and STD?s. The questionnaire measures knowledge level of FP-STD?s and sociodemographic variables was performed to 299 students (73 % of the population undar observation. The data is evaluated by chi square test and Student?s t test in SPSS 10.0 statistics program. The mean age of the study group is 21.3±1.9, 31.8% get informed about FP by friends, 95.4% of girls know about oral contraseptives (oc?s and 88.3% of girls know about IUD?s; 96.1% of boys know about oc?s and 79.4% of them know about condom. The mean knowledge point of FP is 11.2±3.7 of girls, 9.0±3.9 of boys (p0.05. The effective variables of STD?s knowledge is age group.Medico-social section of universities is a very important places for consulting FP and STD?s to the students. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(2.000: 66-78

  14. Methods and design of a 10-week multi-component family meals intervention: a two group quasi-experimental effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Catherine; Anderson, Sarah E; Dollahite, Jamie S; Hill, Tisa F; Holloman, Chris; Miller, Carla K; Pratt, Keeley J; Gunther, Carolyn

    2017-01-09

    Given the ongoing childhood obesity public health crisis and potential protective effect of family meals, there is need for additional family meals research, specifically experimental studies with expanded health outcomes that focus on the at-risk populations in highest need of intervention. Future research, specifically intervention work, would also benefit from an expansion of the target age range to include younger children, who are laying the foundation of their eating patterns and capable of participating in family meal preparations. The purpose of this paper is to address this research gap by presenting the objectives and research methods of a 10-week multi-component family meals intervention study aimed at eliciting positive changes in child diet and weight status. This will be a group quasi-experimental trial with staggered cohort design. Data will be collected via direct measure and questionnaires at baseline, intervention completion (or waiting period for controls), and 10-weeks post-intervention. Setting will be faith-based community center. Participants will be 60 underserved families with at least 1, 4-10 year old child will be recruited and enrolled in the intervention (n = 30) or waitlist control group (n = 30). The intervention (Simple Suppers) is a 10-week family meals program designed for underserved families from racial/ethnic diverse backgrounds. The 10, 90-min program lessons will be delivered weekly over the dinner hour. Session components include: a) interactive group discussion of strategies to overcome family meal barriers, plus weekly goal setting for caregivers; b) engagement in age-appropriate food preparation activities for children; and c) group family meal for caregivers and children. Main outcome measures are change in: child diet quality; child standardized body mass index; and frequency of family meals. Regression models will be used to compare response variables results of intervention to control group, controlling for

  15. Characteristics of the Family Caregivers Who Did Not Benefit From a Successful Psychoeducational Group Intervention During Palliative Cancer Care: A Prospective Correlational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Maja; Årestedt, Kristofer; Carlander, Ida; Wengström, Yvonne; Öhlen, Joakim; Alvariza, Anette

    Although there has been a steady increase in intervention studies aimed toward supporting family caregivers in palliative cancer care, they often report modest effect sizes and there is a lack of knowledge about possible barriers to intervention effectiveness. The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics of family caregivers who did not benefit from a successful psychoeducational group intervention compared with the characteristics of those who did. A psychoeducational intervention for family caregivers was delivered at 10 palliative settings in Sweden. Questionnaires were used to collect data at baseline and following the intervention. The Preparedness for Caregiving Scale was the main outcome for the study and was used to decide whether or not the family caregiver had benefited from the intervention (Preparedness for Caregiving Scale difference score ≤ 0 vs ≥ 1). A total of 82 family caregivers completed the intervention and follow-up. Caregivers who did not benefit from the intervention had significantly higher ratings of their preparedness and competence for caregiving and their health at baseline compared with the group who benefited. They also experienced lower levels of environmental burden and a trend toward fewer symptoms of depression. Family caregivers who did not benefit from the intervention tended to be less vulnerable at baseline. Hence, the potential to improve their ratings was smaller than for the group who did benefit. Determining family caregivers in cancer and palliative care who are more likely to benefit from an intervention needs to be explored further in research.

  16. Genome-wide identification and characterization of the superoxide dismutase gene family in Musa acuminata cv. Tianbaojiao (AAA group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Lai, Zhongxiong; Lin, Yuling; Lai, Gongti; Lian, Conglong

    2015-10-20

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an essential enzyme of the plant antioxidant system that responds to oxidative stresses caused by adverse conditions. Banana is an important staple and economic crop in tropical and subtropical regions. However, its growth and yield are constantly affected by various abiotic stresses. To analyze the roles of distinct SOD genes under various stresses, a detailed characterization and analysis of the SOD gene family in Cavendish banana is indispensable. The presence and structure of the SOD family genes were experimentally verified using 5'/3' RACE-PCR, reverse transcription PCR and PCR. Then, their syntenic relationships, conserved motifs and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed using software. Cis-elements present in the promoters were predicted via PlantCARE. And the expression levels under abiotic and hormonal stresses were determined using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In total, 25 'Tianbaojiao' SOD cDNAs (MaSODs), which encoded six Cu/ZnSODs, four MnSODs and two FeSODs, were cloned. The 12 MaSOD genes were divided into four groups based on their conserved motifs, which corroborated their classifications based on gene-structure patterns and subcellular localizations. Eleven MaSOD promoters were isolated and found to contain many cis-acting elements involved in stress responses. Gene expression analysis showed that 11 out of the 12 MaSODs were expressed in all tested tissues (leaf, pseudostem and root), whereas MaCSD2B was expressed only in leaves and roots. Specific MaSOD members exhibited different expression patterns under abiotic and hormonal treatments. Among the 12 MaSOD genes, MaCSD1D was the only one that responded to all eight treatments, suggesting that this gene plays a predominant role in reactive oxygen species scavenging caused by various stresses in banana. A genome-wide analysis showed that the 'Tianbaojiao' banana harbored an expanded SOD gene family. Whole genome duplication, segmental

  17. Syllabus Outline on Child Care for Day Care Teachers at Family Life Teacher Training Centre in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation No. 103.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumina M.

    Five day care centers in Mogadiscio, the capital city of Somalia, were studied to (1) identify problems encountered in teaching a course in child care; (2) observe teaching methods and assess their effectiveness; (3) ascertain reasons for the lack of preservice training for day care teachers; and (4) develop a new syllabus for a course in child…

  18. The Integration of Family and Group Therapy as an Alternative to Juvenile Incarceration: A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation Using Parenting with Love and Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Eli A; Sterrett, Emma M; Kiaer, Lynn

    2017-06-01

    The current study employed a quasi-experimental design using both intent-to-treat and protocol adherence analysis of 155 moderate- to high-risk juvenile offenders to evaluate the effectiveness of Parenting with Love and Limits® (PLL), an integrative group and family therapy approach. Youth completing PLL had significantly lower rates of recidivism than the comparison group. Parents also reported statistically significant improvements in youth behavior. Lengths of service were also significantly shorter for the treatment sample than the matched comparison group by an average of 4 months. This study contributes to the literature by suggesting that intensive community-based combined family and group treatment is effective in curbing recidivism among high-risk juveniles. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  19. Schools to the Rescue: Educators Are Finding Ways to Make the Lives of Poor Students and Their Families Better Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    For many schools, the most pressing concern is helping families meet basic needs. Between 2007 and 2009, according to the Brookings Institution, the number of people who live in poverty increased by 4.9 million. Brookings reported that between 1999 and 2009, two thirds of the increase in poverty occurred in the suburbs. With poverty and social…

  20. Genetic insights into family group co-occurrence in Cryptocercus punctulatus, a sub-social woodroach from the southern Appalachian Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Garrick

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus Scudder (Blattodea: Cryptocercidae is an important member of the dead wood (saproxylic community in montane forests of the southeastern United States. However, its population biology remains poorly understood. Here, aspects of family group co-occurrence were characterized to provide basic information that can be extended by studies on the evolution and maintenance of sub-sociality. Broad sampling across the species’ range was coupled with molecular data (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences. The primary questions were: (1 what proportion of rotting logs contain two or more different mtDNA haplotypes and how often can this be attributed to multiple families inhabiting the same log, (2 are multi-family logs spatially clustered, and (3 what levels of genetic differentiation among haplotypes exist within a log, and how genetically similar are matrilines of co-occurring family groups? Multi-family logs were identified on the premise that three different mtDNA haplotypes, or two different haplotypes among adult females, is inconsistent with a single family group founded by one male–female pair. Results showed that of the 88 rotting logs from which multiple adult C. punctulatus were sampled, 41 logs (47% contained two or more mtDNA haplotypes, and at least 19 of these logs (22% overall were inferred to be inhabited by multiple families. There was no strong evidence for spatial clustering of the latter class of logs. The frequency distribution of nucleotide differences between co-occurring haplotypes was strongly right-skewed, such that most haplotypes were only one or two mutations apart, but more substantial divergences (up to 18 mutations, or 1.6% uncorrected sequence divergence do occasionally occur within logs. This work represents the first explicit investigation of family group co-occurrence in C. punctulatus, providing a valuable baseline for follow-up studies.

  1. Exclusion of linkage between alcoholism and the MNS blood group region on chromosome 4q in multiplex families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neiswanger, K.; Kaplan, B.; Hill, S.Y. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Polymorphic DNA markers on the long arm of chromosome 4 were used to examine linkage to alcoholism in 20 multiplex pedigrees. Fifteen loci were determined for 124 individuals. Lod scores were calculated assuming both dominant and recessive disease modes of inheritance, utilizing incidence data by age and gender that allow for correction for variable age of onset and frequency of the disorder by gender. Under the assumption that alcoholism is homogeneous in this set of pedigrees, and that a recessive mode with age and gender correction is the most appropriate, the total lod scores for all families combined were uniformly lower than -2.0. This suggests an absence of linkage between the putative alcoholism susceptibility gene and markers in the region of the MNS blood group (4q28-31), a region for which we had previously found suggestive evidence of linkage to alcoholism. The 100 cM span of chromosome 4 studied includes the class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) loci. Using the recessive mode, no evidence for linkage to alcoholism was found for the markers tested, which spanned almost the entire long arm of chromosome 4. Under the dominant mode, no evidence for linkage could be found for several of the markers. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. CEMI Days

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  3. Dinosaur Day!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  4. PGC-1beta is downregulated by training in human skeletal muscle: no effect of training twice every second day vs. once daily on expression of the PGC-1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Plomgaard, Peter; Fischer, Christian P;

    2007-01-01

    be observed in the acute response to endurance exercise. Furthermore, we hypothesized that expression levels of the PGC-1 family differ with muscular fiber-type composition. Thus, before and after 10 wk of knee extensor endurance training, training one leg once daily and the other leg twice daily every second...... endurance training, whereas PGC-1beta did not change. The mRNA levels of the PGC-1 family were examined in different types of human skeletal muscle (triceps, soleus, and vastus lateralis; n = 7). Only the expression level of PGC-1beta differed and correlated inversely with percentage of type I fibers......We hypothesized that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) family of transcriptional coactivators (PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta, and PRC) is differentially regulated by training once daily vs. training twice daily every second day and that this difference might...

  5. Family Strengths and Adaptation to Army Life: A Focus of Variations in Family Values and Expectations Across Racial/Ethnic Groups and Rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-22

    is vital that chaplains provide viable opportunities for premarital counseling for Army members contemplating marriage. An important focus should be...chaplains as well as other human service providers with a clinical screening instrument for assessing marital and family systems and for planning

  6. Correlation of CYP1A1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms and environmental factors to familial aggregation of esophageal cancer among the Kazakh ethnic group in Xinjiang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, M; Lv, Y; Wang, H F; Yiguli, H A; Zhang, J R; Yisikandaer, A

    2015-12-29

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation of CYP1A1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms and environmental factors to familial aggregation of esophageal cancer (EC) among the Kazakh ethnic group in Xinjiang. CYP1A1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms were detected using peripheral blood from 86 subjects belonging to families with EC and 82 control subjects. Additionally, a questionnaire survey was conducted to ascertain environmental risk factors. Combined effects of CYP1A1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms and environmental factors in familial aggregation of EC were evaluated. Distribution frequencies of CYP1A1 MspI and GSTM1 genotypes between EC and control families showed significant differences (P = 0.002, P = 0.001). Contribution of interaction between CYP1A1 MspI mutant and GSTM1 deletion polymorphisms to familial aggregation of EC was significant, with OR = 3.571 (95%CI = 1.738-3.346). Logistic multivariate analysis indicated that familial aggregation of EC is correlated with 3 factors: drinking water, intake of fresh vegetables and fruits, and CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism (P = 0.005, P = 0.013, and P = 0.001). Sufficient intake of fresh vegetables and fruits (OR = 0.278, 95%CI = 0.137-0.551) protected against familial aggregation of EC, while drinking water (OR = 3.468, 95%CI = 1.562-6.551) and CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism (OR = 2.732, 95%CI = 1.741-3.886) were the risk factors. In conclusion, CYP1A1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms affect familial aggregation of EC among the Kazakh ethnic group in Xinjiang. River water intake and CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism were risk factors that likely contributed to high incidence of EC among families.

  7. Fruits and vegetables as a healthier snack throughout the day among families with older children: findings from a survey of parent-child dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Teresa M; Pinard, Courtney A; Byker Shanks, Carmen; Wethington, Holly; Blanck, Heidi M; Yaroch, Amy L

    2015-04-01

    Most U.S. youth fail to eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables (FV) however many consume too many calories as added sugars and solid fats, often as snacks. The aim of this study was to assess factors associated with serving FV as snacks and with meals using parent-child dyads. A cross-sectional sample of U.S. children aged 9 to 18, and their caregiver/parent (n=1522) were part of a Consumer Panel of households for the 2008 YouthStyles mail survey. Chi-square test of independence and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess associations between serving patterns of FV as snacks with variations in serving patterns, and covariates including dietary habits. Most parents (72%) reported serving FV at meals and as snacks. Fruit was most frequently served as a snack during the day (52%) and vegetables were most frequently served as a snack during the day (22%) but rarely in the morning. Significant differences in child FV intake existed among FV as a snack serving patterns by parents. Compared to children whose parents served FV only at meals, children whose parents reported serving FV as snacks in addition to meals were significantly more likely to have consumed FV the day before (using a previous day screener), Psnacks, may increase FV intake among older children and adolescents.

  8. Low carbohydrate diets in family practice: what can we learn from an internet-based support group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Mary C

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Active Low-Carber Forums (ALCF is an on-line support group started in 2000 which currently has more than 86,000 members. Data collected from posts to the forum and from an on-line survey were used to determine the behavior and attitudes of people on low carbohydrate diets. Members were asked to complete a voluntary 27-item questionnaire over the internet. Our major findings are as follows: survey respondents, like the membership at large, were mostly women and mostly significantly overweight, a significant number intending to and, in many cases, succeeding at losing more than 100 lbs. The great majority of members of ALCF identify themselves as following the Atkins diet or some variation of it. Although individual posts on the forum and in the narrative part of our survey are critical of professional help, we found that more than half of respondents saw a physician before or during dieting and, of those who did, about half received support from the physician. Another 28 % found the physician initially neutral but supportive after positive results were produced. Using the same criteria as the National Weight Registry (without follow-up – 30 lbs or more lost and maintained for more than one year – it was found that more than 1400 people had successfully used low carb methods. In terms of food consumed, the perception of more than half of respondents were that they ate less than before the diet and whereas high protein, high fat sources replaced carbohydrate to some extent, the major change indicated by survey-takers is a large increase in green vegetables and a large decrease in fruit intake. Government or health agencies were not sources of information for dieters in this group and a collection of narrative comments indicates a high level of satisfaction, indeed enthusiasm for low carbohydrate dieting. The results provide both a tabulation of the perceived behavior of a significant number of dieters using low carbohydrate

  9. Low carbohydrate diets in family practice: what can we learn from an internet-based support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Richard D; Vernon, Mary C; Westman, Eric C

    2006-10-02

    The Active Low-Carber Forums (ALCF) is an on-line support group started in 2000 which currently has more than 86,000 members. Data collected from posts to the forum and from an on-line survey were used to determine the behavior and attitudes of people on low carbohydrate diets. Members were asked to complete a voluntary 27-item questionnaire over the internet. Our major findings are as follows: survey respondents, like the membership at large, were mostly women and mostly significantly overweight, a significant number intending to and, in many cases, succeeding at losing more than 100 lbs. The great majority of members of ALCF identify themselves as following the Atkins diet or some variation of it. Although individual posts on the forum and in the narrative part of our survey are critical of professional help, we found that more than half of respondents saw a physician before or during dieting and, of those who did, about half received support from the physician. Another 28 % found the physician initially neutral but supportive after positive results were produced. Using the same criteria as the National Weight Registry (without follow-up)--30 lbs or more lost and maintained for more than one year--it was found that more than 1400 people had successfully used low carb methods. In terms of food consumed, the perception of more than half of respondents were that they ate less than before the diet and whereas high protein, high fat sources replaced carbohydrate to some extent, the major change indicated by survey-takers is a large increase in green vegetables and a large decrease in fruit intake. Government or health agencies were not sources of information for dieters in this group and a collection of narrative comments indicates a high level of satisfaction, indeed enthusiasm for low carbohydrate dieting. The results provide both a tabulation of the perceived behavior of a significant number of dieters using low carbohydrate strategies as well as a collection of

  10. Which outcomes are most important to people with aphasia and their families? an international nominal group technique study framed within the ICF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sarah J; Worrall, Linda; Rose, Tanya; Le Dorze, Guylaine; Cruice, Madeline; Isaksen, Jytte; Kong, Anthony Pak Hin; Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Scarinci, Nerina; Gauvreau, Christine Alary

    2017-07-01

    To identify important treatment outcomes from the perspective of people with aphasia and their families using the ICF as a frame of reference. The nominal group technique was used with people with aphasia and their family members in seven countries to identify and rank important treatment outcomes from aphasia rehabilitation. People with aphasia identified outcomes for themselves; and family members identified outcomes for themselves and for the person with aphasia. Outcomes were analysed using qualitative content analysis and ICF linking. A total of 39 people with aphasia and 29 family members participated in one of 16 nominal groups. Inductive qualitative content analysis revealed the following six themes: (1) Improved communication; (2) Increased life participation; (3) Changed attitudes through increased awareness and education about aphasia; (4) Recovered normality; (5) Improved physical and emotional well-being; and (6) Improved health (and support) services. Prioritized outcomes for both participant groups linked to all ICF components; primary activity/participation (39%) and body functions (36%) for people with aphasia, and activity/participation (49%) and environmental factors (28%) for family members. Outcomes prioritized by family members relating to the person with aphasia, primarily linked to body functions (60%). People with aphasia and their families identified treatment outcomes which span all components of the ICF. This has implications for research outcome measurement and clinical service provision which currently focuses on the measurement of body function outcomes. The wide range of desired outcomes generated by both people with aphasia and their family members, highlights the importance of collaborative goal setting within a family-centred approach to rehabilitation. These results will be combined with other stakeholder perspectives to establish a core outcome set for aphasia treatment research. Implications for Rehabilitation Important

  11. Functional feeding groups of aquatic insect families in Latin America: a critical analysis and review of existing literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Alonso; Gutiérrez-Fonseca, Pablo E

    2014-04-01

    Aquatic macroinvertebrates are involved in numerous processes within aquatic ecosystems. They often have important effects on ecosystem processes such as primary production (via grazing), detritus breakdown, and nutrient mineralization and downstream spiraling. The functional feeding groups (FFG) classification was developed as a tool to facilitate the incorporation of macroinvertebrates in studies of aquatic ecosystems. This classification has the advantage of combining morphological characteristics (e.g., mouth part specialization) and behavioral mechanisms (e.g., way of feeding) used by macroinvertebrates when consuming resources. Although recent efforts have greatly advanced our ability to identify aquatic macroinvertebrates, there is limited information on FFG assignment. Furthermore, there has been some variation in the use of the FFG classification, in part due to an emphasis on using gut content analysis to assign FFG, which is more appropriate for assigning trophic guilds. Thus, the main goals of this study are to (1) provide an overview of the value of using the FFG classification, (2) make an initial attempt to summarize available information on FFG for aquatic insects in Latin America, and (3) provide general guidelines on how to assign organisms to their FFGs. FFGs are intended to reflect the potential effects of organisms in their ecosystems and the way they consume resources. Groups include scrapers that consume resources that grow attached to the substrate by removing them with their mouth parts; shredders that cut or chew pieces of living or dead plant material, including all plant parts like leaves and wood; collectors-gatherers that use modified mouth parts to sieve or collect small particles (< 1 mm) accumulated on the stream bottom; filterers that have special adaptations to remove particles directly from the water column; and predators that consume other organisms using different strategies to capture them. In addition, we provide details on

  12. Systematic Investigation of FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Poaceae Gene Families Identifies the Short-Day Expressed Flowering Pathway Gene, TaFT3 in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Joanna; Borrill, Philippa; Gordon, Anna; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw; Pagano, Marina L.; Saccomanno, Benedetta; Bentley, Alison R.; Uauy, Cristobal; Cockram, James

    2016-01-01

    To date, a small number of major flowering time loci have been identified in the related Triticeae crops, bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), durum wheat (T. durum), and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Natural genetic variants at these loci result in major phenotypic changes which have adapted crops to the novel environments encountered during the spread of agriculture. The polyploid nature of bread and durum wheat means that major flowering time loci in which recessive alleles confer adaptive advantage in related diploid species have not been readily identified. One such example is the PPD-H2 flowering time locus encoded by FLOWERING LOCUS T 3 (HvFT3) in the diploid crop barley, for which recessive mutant alleles confer delayed flowering under short day (SD) photoperiods. In autumn-sown barley, such alleles aid the repression of flowering over the winter, which help prevent the development of cold-sensitive floral organs until the onset of inductive long day (LD) photoperiods the following spring. While the identification of orthologous loci in wheat could provide breeders with alternative mechanisms to fine tune flowering time, systematic identification of wheat orthologs of HvFT3 has not been reported. Here, we characterize the FT gene families in six Poaceae species, identifying novel members in all taxa investigated, as well as FT3 homoeologs from the A, B and D genomes of hexaploid (TaFT3) and tetraploid wheat. Sequence analysis shows TaFT3 homoeologs display high similarity to the HvFT3 coding region (95–96%) and predicted protein (96–97%), with conservation of intron/exon structure across the five cereal species investigated. Genetic mapping and comparative analyses in hexaploid and tetraploid wheat find TaFT3 homoeologs map to the long arms of the group 1 chromosomes, collinear to HvFT3 in barley and FT3 orthologs in rice, foxtail millet and brachypodium. Genome-specific expression analyses show FT3 homoeologs in tetraploid and hexaploid wheat are upregulated

  13. Effects of 20-day litter weight on weaned piglets’ fighting behavior after group mixing and on heart rate variability in an isolation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, YaNan; Lian, XinMing; Bo, YuKun; Guo, YuGuang; Yan, PeiShi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 20-day litter weight on behavior and heart rate variability (HRV) of piglets under stress. Methods Forty four original litters were categorized as high litter weight (HW) litters (n = 22) and low litter weight (LW) litters (n = 22) by 20-day litter weight. From each original HW litter, three males and three females were randomly selected after weaning and the 12 piglets from two original litters with similar age of days were regrouped into one new high litter weight (NHW) litter (11 NHW litters in total). The original LW litters were treated with a same program, so that there were 11 new low litter weight (NLW) litters as well. The latencies to first fighting, fighting frequencies and duration within three hours were recorded after regrouping and the lesions on body surface within 48 hours were scored. Besides, HR (heart rate, bpm, beats per minute) and activity count (ACT), time domain indexes and frequency domain indexes of the piglets were measured in an isolation trial to analyze the discrepancy in coping with stress between the original HW and LW litters. Results The results exhibited that piglets from the HW litters launched fighting sooner and got statistically higher skin lesion score than those from the LW litters (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Regarding the HRV detection, compared with the HW litters, the LW litters exhibited a lower mean HR (p<0.05). In the isolation test, a highly significant higher ACT value was observed between the HW litters, compared to the LW litters (p<0.01). Significant differences were observed in standard deviation of R-R intervals, standard deviation of all normal to normal intervals, and most frequency-domain indicators: very low-frequency, low-frequency, and high frequency between the HW and LW litters as well. The difference in LF:HF was not significant (p = 0.779). Conclusion This study suggests that compared with litters of low 20-day litter

  14. INTERACCIONES ENTRE FAMILIAS Y GRUPOS ARMADOS ILEGALES EN LAS zONAS RURALES DE ANTIOQUIA -- INTERACTIONS AMONG FAMILIES AND ILLEGAL ARMED GROUPS IN COUNTRY AREAS FROM ANTIOQUIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIME ALBERTO CARMONA PARRA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we explore the point of view of 21 girls disentailed from the guerrilla and paramilitar groups from Antioquia, in relation to the interactions they perceived between their families and these groups, as well as the performed role by these interactions in their decision to bind to them. The theoretical focus used is the symbolic interactionism, according to which, family, seen as version of the generalized “other”, becomes an interactional escenary, basic to the subjective constitution and referent in a definition of the world. Based on this family role, it is identified on the girls, and the people in general, the ability to interpret the contexts and situations, which, at the same time, condition their reactions and decisions.

  15. Psicoterapia de grupo de apoio multifamiliar (PGA em hospital-dia (HD psiquiátrico Multifamily support group psychotherapy for relatives (SGR in a psychiatric day hospital program (DH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Onildo B. Contel

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O familiar é a ponte, entre o ambiente da casa do paciente e o ambiente terapêutico do hospital-dia (HD, onde o paciente permanece das 7h30 às 15h30, de segunda a sexta-feira. A complexidade para a integração do exercício dessa tarefa e suas conseqüências para o tratamento em HD, levou-nos a criar a Psicoterapia de Grupo de Apoio multifamiliar (PGA para facilitar o exame das vissicitudes desta via de duas mãos entre a residência e o HD. OBJETIVOS: As características, liderança e fatores terapêuticos de Yalom nessa PGA serão objetos do presente trabalho MÉTODO: A PGA é um grupo aberto com 1 h e 15 minutos de duração, de freqüência semanal e com coordenação, em coterapia, de um psicoterapeuta de grupo e de uma enfermeira psiquiátrica. RESULTADOS E DISCUSSÃO: Os resultados foram obtidos pelo exame de 20 grupos sucessivos, tanto após cada sessão, pelos coterapeutas e observador mudo, durante 20-30 min, como pela análise de conteúdo de 20 sessões transcritas. A presença sempre foi maior que 80% dos familiares esperados, com predomínio de mulheres, especialmente mães de pacientes. A estrutura oferecida pela liderança apressou a obtenção de resultados no curto prazo, entre 4 a 6 sessões. A Coesão Grupal de Yalom apareceu em situações comuns e criou um senso de união entre todos. CONCLUSÃO: A adesão de familiares à PGA facilita e abrevia a terapia em HD. Questiona-se quanto, no futuro, a família orientada assumirá na condução do tratamento dos seus pacientes.INTRODUCTION: The relative is the bridge between the patient's home environment and the therapeutic environment of the day-hospital (DH. The difficulties for the relative to play this task gave birth to the multi-family support group therapy (SGR. To describe the features, leadership and Yalom's therapeutic factors in the SGR is the aim of this paper. METHOD: The SGR is an open group that last for one hour and 15 minutes, meets once weekly

  16. PGC-1beta is downregulated by training in human skeletal muscle: no effect of training twice every second day vs. once daily on expression of the PGC-1 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Plomgaard, Peter; Fischer, Christian P; Hansen, Anne K; Pilegaard, Henriette; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2007-11-01

    We hypothesized that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) family of transcriptional coactivators (PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta, and PRC) is differentially regulated by training once daily vs. training twice daily every second day and that this difference might be observed in the acute response to endurance exercise. Furthermore, we hypothesized that expression levels of the PGC-1 family differ with muscular fiber-type composition. Thus, before and after 10 wk of knee extensor endurance training, training one leg once daily and the other leg twice daily every second day, keeping the total amount of training for the legs equal, skeletal muscle mRNA expression levels of PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta, and PRC were determined in young healthy men (n = 7) in response to 3 h of acute exercise. No significant difference was found between the two legs, suggesting that regulation of the PGC-1 family is independent of training protocol. Training decreased PGC-1beta in both legs, whereas PGC-1alpha was increased, but not significantly, in the leg training once daily. PRC did not change with training. Both PGC-1alpha and PRC were increased by acute exercise both before and after endurance training, whereas PGC-1beta did not change. The mRNA levels of the PGC-1 family were examined in different types of human skeletal muscle (triceps, soleus, and vastus lateralis; n = 7). Only the expression level of PGC-1beta differed and correlated inversely with percentage of type I fibers. In conclusion, there was no difference between training protocols on the acute exercise and training response of the PGC-1 family. However, training caused a decrease in PGC-1beta mRNA levels.

  17. MAY DAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佳

    2009-01-01

    @@ May 1 is Intemational Labour Day.It is a great holiday for the working class.On this day working people all over the world demonstrate(显示)their power and solidarity(团结).It has its origins(起因,起源)in the struggle for shorter working hours.In 1884,eight Labour Unions of the United States and Canada held a convention(集会)in Chicago(芝加哥).Here it was decided to wage(开展)a united struggle to win the eight-hour day.A resolution(决议) was adopted (通过)fixing May1,1886,for a great nationwide(全国性的)demonstration(示威).

  18. Frequency of ABO and Rh (D) Blood Groups and Hemoglobin Threshold among Pregnant Women in Family Guidance Association, Mekelle Model Clinic, North Ethiopia.

    OpenAIRE

    Megbaru Alemu; Guesh Abrha; Gessessew Bugssa; Kiros Tedla

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the frequency of ABO and Rh blood group patterns and hemoglobin threshold among pregnant women screened at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia, North Area Mekelle model clinic. Checklists were prepared to collect data from laboratory registration books of five years to undergo this retrospective study. Those registration books were reviewed for ABO blood group, Rh profiles and hemoglobin threshold of the pregnant women screened during the specified per...

  19. School Counselors' Experiences with a Summer Group Curriculum for High-Potential Children from Low-Income Families: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jean Sunde

    2013-01-01

    School counselors facilitated group guidance for children from low-income families and assisted in classrooms with a full economic range during a summer academic program for young gifted children in order to increase knowledge about giftedness. This qualitative study explored how the counselors experienced being immersed with gifted children. The…

  20. School Counselors' Experiences with a Summer Group Curriculum for High-Potential Children from Low-Income Families: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jean Sunde

    2013-01-01

    School counselors facilitated group guidance for children from low-income families and assisted in classrooms with a full economic range during a summer academic program for young gifted children in order to increase knowledge about giftedness. This qualitative study explored how the counselors experienced being immersed with gifted children. The…

  1. A one-day couple group intervention to enhance sexual recovery for surgically treated men with prostate cancer and their partners: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Daniela; He, Chang; Mitchell, Staci; Wood, David P; Hola, Victor; Thelen-Perry, Steve; Montie, James E

    2013-01-01

    Researchers evaluated the acceptance and effectiveness of a group intervention that provided education about post-prostatectomy sexual recovery and peer support for couples. Couples valued the intervention and retained the information. Partners became accepting of erectile dysfunction and communicated more openly about upsetting topics.

  2. "How We Survived the Good Old Days." Memories of Hackney before and after the Second World War by the Kingshold Oral History Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huby, Guro, Ed.

    This book presents the memories of a group of old people about life in Hackney, England, from the beginning of this century up until today. A particular emphasis is placed on what good and bad health has meant to people over the years and the sort of people and institutions they have turned to when ill health has struck. The contributors are from…

  3. Single-dose extended-release oral azithromycin vs. 3-day azithromycin for the treatment of group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis/tonsillitis in adults and adolescents: a double-blind, double-dummy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, D M

    2009-12-01

    The azithromycin immediate-release formulation (AZ-IR) provides effective treatment for group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis in adults. Single-dose therapy with a novel azithromycin extended-release (AZ-ER) formulation could reduce treatment failure and eliminate non-compliance contributing to antimicrobial resistance. A randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicentre trial was conducted comparing AZ-ER (single oral 2-g dose) with AZ-IR (3 days, 500 mg once daily) for the treatment of group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis/tonsillitis in adults and adolescents (n = 598). The primary endpoint was bacteriological eradication at test -of-cure (TOC; day 24-28) in the bacteriological per-protocol population (n = 420). Bacteriological eradication was achieved in 85.4% (175/205) and 81.4% (175/215) of subjects in the AZ-ER and AZ-IR groups, respectively (95% CI -3.1-11.1). Clinical cure at TOC occurred in 99.0% of subjects in the AZ-ER group and in 96.7% in the AZ-IR group. At long-term follow-up, bacteriological recurrence was observed in 5.5% (9/163) and 7.7% (12/156), respectively. Both treatments were well tolerated; and most adverse events (AEs) were mild to moderate in intensity. The most frequent treatment-related AE was diarrhoea, or loose stools, in 11% of both treatment groups. AZ-ER-treated and AZ-IR-treated subjects had AE burdens (AE days/patient-year) of 7.6 days and 9.2 days, respectively. A similar trend in favour of AZ-ER was noted for treatment-related diarrhoea burden (1.9 days vs. 2.5 days). A single 2-g dose of AZ-ER is as effective and well tolerated as 3 days of AZ-IR (500 mg once daily) for treating group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis/tonsillitis in adults and adolescents.

  4. Maryland Day Care Voucher System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Joan M.

    This manual was written to assist States and other governmental units wishing to replicate the Maryland Day Care Voucher Program, a system of providing child care subsidies to eligible families. Chapter I provides brief histories of day care in Maryland and that State's grant to demonstrate the viability of a day care voucher system. Chapter II…

  5. Thanksgiving Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙刚

    2004-01-01

    Fourth Thursday in November almost every culture in the world has held celebrations of thanks for a plentiful harvest.The American thanksgiving in the early days of the American colonies almost four hundred years ago.On that date in 1621,the European settlers in Plymouth,Massachusetts,gave their thanks to god for letting them survive their first year in the new world.They celebrated by having a large feast or dinner.

  6. Relations among School Assets, Individual Resilience, and Student Engagement for Youth Grouped by Level of Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Jill D.; You, Sukkyung; Schnoebelen, Katrina

    2008-01-01

    Given the importance of student engagement for healthy outcomes, research needs to investigate whether school-based assets promote student engagement beyond individual and family influences. Unfortunately, such research has been limited by a lack of valid instrumentation. After examining the psychometrics of the California Healthy Kids Survey…

  7. Caring for Others: Internet Video-Conferencing Group Intervention for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Elsa; Donahue, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to evaluate the effects of an innovative, Internet-based psychosocial intervention for family caregivers of older adults with neurodegenerative disease. Design and Methods: After receiving signed informed consent from each participant, we randomly assigned 66 caregivers to an Internet-based…

  8. Familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy : A single syndromic classification for a group of pedigrees bearing common features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, AF; van Schaik, IN; van den Maagdenberg, AMJM; Koelman, JHTM; Callenbach, PMC; Tijssen, MAJ

    2005-01-01

    Fifty Japanese and European families with cortical myoclonic tremor and epilepsy have been reported under various names. Unfamiliarity with the syndrome often leads to an initial misdiagnosis of essential tremor or progressive myoclonus epilepsy. A detailed overview of the literature is lacking and

  9. A Cold Case and a Warm Conversation: A Discourse Analysis of Focus Groups on Large-scale DNA Familial Searching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarenbeek, Annette; Renes, Reint Jan

    2013-01-01

    In this case study, we want to gain insight into how residents of three municipalities communicate about the new murder scenario of the cold case of Marianne Vaatstra and the possibility of a large-scale DNA familial searching. We investigate how stakeholders shape their arguments in conversation wi

  10. A Cold Case and a Warm Conversation. : A Discourse Analysis of Focus Groups on Large-scale DNA Familial Searching.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarenbeek, Annette; Renes, Reint-Jan

    2013-01-01

    In this case study, we want to gain insights into how residents of three municipalities communicate about the new murder scenario of the cold case of Marianne Vaatstra and the possibility of a large-scale DNA familial searching. We investigate how stakeholders shape their arguments in conversation w

  11. The "Living with Dysarthria" Group: Implementation and Feasibility of a Group Intervention for People with Dysarthria Following Stroke and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Paton, Gillian; Kelly, Shona; Brady, Marian; Muir, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Background: The broad life implications of acquired dysarthria are recognized, but they have received little attention in stroke management. Reports of group therapy, which may be a suitable approach to intervention, are not available for stroke-related dysarthria. Aims: To examine the operational feasibility of and response to a new eight-session…

  12. May Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙继山

    2005-01-01

    May Day is of course the traditional worldwide holiday for workers. Be sure, even though the market economy is by now the prevalent economic modus operandi in sodalist as well as capitalist countries, the workers movement has not lost a bit of its importance. The workers are those who keep the economy on track. And the workers are also the consumers, Without consumers, as every first term economy student at any university knows by now, there is no national economic growth. Therefore, the second long holiday of the year will certainly- be conducive to the economy.

  13. Summary of contributions to GAW Group 15: family-based samples are useful in identifying common polymorphisms associated with complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Stacey; Uh, Hae-Won; Martinez, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, family-based samples have been used for genetic analyses of single-gene traits caused by rare but highly penetrant risk variants. The utility of family-based genetic data for analyzing common complex traits is unclear and contains numerous challenges. To assess the utility as well as to address these challenges, members of Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 Group 15 analyzed Framingham Heart Study data using family-based designs ranging from parent--offspring trios to large pedigrees. We investigated different methods including traditional linkage tests, family-based association tests, and population-based tests that correct for relatedness between subjects, and tests to detect parent-of-origin effects. The analyses presented an assortment of positive findings. One contribution found increased power to detect epistatic effects through linkage using ascertainment of sibships based on extreme quantitative values or presence of disease associated with the quantitative value. Another contribution found four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing a maternal effect, two SNPs with an imprinting effect, and one SNP having both effects on a binary high blood pressure trait. Finally, three contributions illustrated the advantage of using population-based methods to detect association to complex binary or quantitative traits. Our findings highlight the contribution of family-based samples to the genetic dissection of complex traits. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Social support, posttraumatic cognitions, and PTSD: The influence of family, friends, and a close other in an interpersonal and non-interpersonal trauma group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Matthew J; Eddinger, Jasmine; Henschel, Aisling V; Dodson, Thomas S; Tran, Han N; Beck, J Gayle

    2015-10-01

    Research has suggested that social support can shape posttraumatic cognitions and PTSD. However, research has yet to compare the influence of separate domains of support on posttraumatic cognitions. Multiple-group path analysis was used to examine a model in a sample of 170 victims of intimate partner violence and 208 motor vehicle accident victims in which support from friends, family, and a close other were each predicted to influence posttraumatic cognitions, which were in turn predicted to influence PTSD. Analyses revealed that support from family and friends were each negatively correlated with posttraumatic cognitions, which in turn were positively associated with PTSD. Social support from a close other was not associated with posttraumatic cognitions. No significant differences in the model were found between trauma groups. Findings identify which relationships are likely to influence posttraumatic cognitions and are discussed with regard to interpersonal processes in the development and maintenance of PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effectiveness of Group Family Training About the Principles of Harm Reduction Approach on Marital Satisfaction of Spouses of Patients Under Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjat, Seyed Kaveh; Rezaei, Mahdi; Hatami, Seyed Esmaeil; Kohestani, Mina; Norozi Khalili, Mina

    2017-01-02

    One of the most important problems in treatment of drug dependence is the cooperation of the patient's family. Many families do not look at drug dependence as a chronic and relapsing disorder and expect a quick and definite recovery of the disease. These families, including wives, are unfamiliar with the concept of harm reduction as a realistic approach. The aim of this study was to educate the spouses of patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) on the different aspects of harm reduction approach and assess the impact of this training on marital satisfaction and relapse rate. This study was a pretest-posttest study with control group. The sample consisted of 50 MMT patients and their wives in private methadone maintenance treatment clinics in the city of Bojnurd, located in the northeastern region of Iran. The experimental group received eight group training sessions run by a psychiatrist. The content of the training sessions was based on harm reduction programs for families of patients with high-risk behaviors. Two groups are compared in terms of marital satisfaction and relapse rate. A paired t test was used to compare changes before and after the training. The results of this study showed that harm reduction education and efforts for changing wives' views toward MMT are effective in increasing their marital satisfaction. However, the conducted training showed no effect on relapse rate in the six-month follow-up. Regarding the fact that this type of training has not been paid enough attention in the national protocol, the proposed training program of this research can be considered in MMT clinics.

  16. INTEDISCIPLINARITY IN SUPPORT GROUPS TO THE FAMILY AND TO THE PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR TAKING CARE OF THE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE CARRIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Miranda Fonseca

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a reflexive study about the intedisciplinarity in support groups to the family and to the person responsible for taking care of the Alzheimer’s Disease carrier. As health professionals, researchers and social subjects who transform the reality by scientific investigations we have responsibilities and try to make thoughtful studies which benefit society and nursering. Those studies have as main focus the care ruled on prevention, promotion e recovery of the population’s health.

  17. Feasibility and short-term impact of the "case study in-house group training program for family nursing" at medical facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Akemi; Tsumura, Akemi; Mine, Hiroko; Kimura, Chisato; Soeda, Akemi; Odatsu, Kazumi; Kiwado, Wataru

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and short-term impact of case study training in family nursing care targeting midlevel nursing professionals. The intervention group participated in four 90-minute case study training sessions over 6 months, while the control group participated in two 90-minute lectures. Using primary outcome variables as evaluation indexes, we measured the participants' total scores on the Family Importance in Nursing Care Scale and 4 subitems 3 times (before, immediately after and 1 month after training) from May 2014 to March 2015 and then conducted 2-way repeated-measure analysis of variance. We asked the participants and training planners/managers to provide feedback on their evaluation and then performed content analysis on their responses. Although the primary impact due to the different measurement times was significant, no significant difference was observed in the interaction between measurement time and training differences. Of the 4 subitems, significant interactions because of measurement time and training differences were observed only in Fam-B. Feedback data showed all participants felt that their understanding of the importance of family nursing care was strengthened, and participants in the intervention group specifically described how they were utilizing what they had learned from training in practice.

  18. Helping Children Exposed to War and Violence: Perspectives from an International Work Group on Interventions for Youth and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletter, Hilit; Rialon, Rebecca A.; Laor, Nathaniel; Brom, Daniel; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Shaheen, Mohammed; Hamiel, Daniel; Chemtob, Claude; Weems, Carl F.; Feinstein, Carl; Lieberman, Alicia; Reicherter, Daryn; Song, Suzan; Carrion, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This paper outlines conclusions from a three-day workgroup hosting the eight authors as well as others with expertise in the evaluation and treatment of youth exposed to war and violence. Objective: The purpose of this meeting was to bring multiple perspectives together to identify components that comprise effective psychosocial…

  19. Croisement d’échelles : la famille, la localité et le groupe professionnel Scale crossing : family, locality and professional group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Mazaud

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cet article défend le choix de la variation d’échelles comme seul moyen méthodologique et analytique de comprendre un moment singulier de trajectoires individuelles, à savoir, l’installation dans l’artisanat, observée ici à partir de cas issus du secteur automobile. La coexistence de profils variés de professionnels (entre homme de métier traditionnel et chef d’entreprise et de modes d’accès différents au statut d’artisan (cheminement artisanal classique ou reconversion professionnelle ne s’explique en effet qu’en se référant à des contextes variés, c’est-à-dire en choisissant des focales différentes, adaptées à chaque cas. Trois cas d’installation sont étudiés ici à travers trois échelles différentes, elles-mêmes associées à des temps distincts : d’abord la dimension familiale, ou plus précisément conjugale, associée au temps d’une vie, puis le contexte local et sa temporalité communautaire ; enfin le contexte socio-économique et institutionnel global attaché au temps long de l’histoire du groupe professionnel.This article defends scale variation as being the only methodological and analytical way to grasp a given moment in social trajectories, namely setting oneself up in a craft, observed here thanks to cases in the car industry. The coexistence of diverse professional profiles (between traditional craftsman and entrepreneur and various modes of access to the status of craftsman (either the classical road to the craft industry or retraining can be explained by referring to various contexts, i.e. by choosing different focal lengths, tailored to each case. Three cases are studied on three different scales, themselves related to different times : first of all, the domestic dimension, or more precisely conjugal, associated with the life span, then the local context and its community temporality, and finally the global socioeconomic and institutional context attached to the long time

  20. Mura days

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symon, K.R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the technical developments in which the MURA group participated, as recalled at this time by the author. Andrew Sessler contributed to many of these developments. Early work at MURA included the development of fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) accelerators, the radial sector FFAG model, the spiral sector model, the development of the theory of rf acceleration in circular accelerators including beam stacking, and the development of colliding beams as a practical experimental goal. Theoretical studies also included nonlinear orbit computations, space charge limits, and analysis of the negative mass and other instabilities. Experimental studies of many of these phenomena used the FFAG models. The cascade synchrotron, developed during the 1959 MURA Summer Study, was the basis for most modern accelerators.{copyright}{ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. 日间病房癌症患者和家属健康教育需求调查%Investigation on demands of health education on cancer patients and families in intra day ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆惠玉; 刘爱琴; 张莹娟

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨日间病房癌症患者和家属的健康教育需求。方法 采用自行设计的量表对105例日间病房化疗患者和家属进行调查。结果 日间病房癌症患者和家属对护理健康教育有广泛的需求,但是需求程度有所不同。院外紧急情况指导迫切需要最为突出,其次是药物不良反应指导、用药指导、饮食、休息和功能锻炼、心理指导等方面。在健康教育形式上,最受欢迎的健康教育形式是医院自行编制的针对日间病房的科普手册、与医护人员交谈和病友交流。结论 日间病房癌症患者和家属有着广泛的护理健康教育需求,应采取针对性的护理健康教育,提高癌症患者的自理能力及生活质量。%Objective To discuss the demands of health education on cancer patients and faimilies in intra day ward.Methods By self-designed questionnaire 105 cancer patients and their families were investigated.Results Nursing health education was comprehensively demanded by cancer patients and families in intra day ward.However, the urgent degree of each demand was different.Outside hospital emergency instruction was demanded most urgently, followed by drug adverse reaction instruction, drug usage instruction, diet instruction, rest and exercises instruction, psychological counseling.Most welcomed health education methods included special propaganda handbooks, interviews with doctors and nurses and communication with fellow patients.Conclusions Nursing health education was comprehensively and especially demanded by cancer patients and families in intra day ward.The argeted nursing health education should be adopted to enhance cancer patients'self-care ability and quality of life.

  2. Breast cancer screening in women at increased risk according to different family histories: an update of the Modena Study Group experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortesi Laura

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer (BC detection in women with a genetic susceptibility or strong family history is considered mandatory compared with BC screening in the general population. However, screening modalities depend on the level of risk. Here we present an update of our screening programs based on risk classification. Methods We defined different risk categories and surveillance strategies to identify early BC in 1325 healthy women recruited by the Modena Study Group for familial breast and ovarian cancer. Four BC risk categories included BRCA1/2 carriers, increased, intermediate, and slightly increased risk. Women who developed BC from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 2005 (N = 44 were compared with the number of expected cases matched for age and period. BRCA1/2 carriers were identified by mutational analysis. Other risk groups were defined by different levels of family history for breast or ovarian cancer (OC. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR was used to evaluate the observed and expected ratio among groups. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results After a median follow-up of 55 months, there was a statistically significant difference between observed and expected incidence [SIR = 4.9; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.6 to 7.6; p P P P = 0.0018 was higher than expected, while the difference between observed and expected among women at slightly increased risk was not statistically significant (SIR = 2.4, 95% CI = 0.9 to 8.3; P = .74. Conclusion The rate of cancers detected in women at high risk according to BRCA status or strong family history, as defined according to our operational criteria, was significantly higher than expected in an age-matched general population. However, we failed to identify a greater incidence of BC in the slightly increased risk group. These results support the effectiveness of the proposed program to identify and monitor individuals at high risk, whereas prospective trials are needed for

  3. Breast cancer screening in women at increased risk according to different family histories: an update of the Modena Study Group experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Laura; Turchetti, Daniela; Marchi, Isabella; Fracca, Antonella; Canossi, Barbara; Rachele, Battista; Silvia, Ruscelli; Rita, Pecchi Anna; Pietro, Torricelli; Massimo, Federico

    2006-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) detection in women with a genetic susceptibility or strong family history is considered mandatory compared with BC screening in the general population. However, screening modalities depend on the level of risk. Here we present an update of our screening programs based on risk classification. Methods We defined different risk categories and surveillance strategies to identify early BC in 1325 healthy women recruited by the Modena Study Group for familial breast and ovarian cancer. Four BC risk categories included BRCA1/2 carriers, increased, intermediate, and slightly increased risk. Women who developed BC from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 2005 (N = 44) were compared with the number of expected cases matched for age and period. BRCA1/2 carriers were identified by mutational analysis. Other risk groups were defined by different levels of family history for breast or ovarian cancer (OC). The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was used to evaluate the observed and expected ratio among groups. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results After a median follow-up of 55 months, there was a statistically significant difference between observed and expected incidence [SIR = 4.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6 to 7.6; p < 0.001]. The incidence observed among BRCA carriers (SIR = 20.3; 95% CI = 3.1 to 83.9; P < 0.001), women at increased (SIR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.5 to 8.3; P < 0.001) or intermediate risk (SIR = 7.0, 95% CI = 2.0 to 17.1; P = 0.0018) was higher than expected, while the difference between observed and expected among women at slightly increased risk was not statistically significant (SIR = 2.4, 95% CI = 0.9 to 8.3; P = .74). Conclusion The rate of cancers detected in women at high risk according to BRCA status or strong family history, as defined according to our operational criteria, was significantly higher than expected in an age-matched general population. However, we failed to identify a greater incidence of BC in

  4. When School and Family Convey Different Cultural Messages: The Experience of Turkish Minority Group Members in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Aelenei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present studies aim to compare the cultural values promoted by the French educational system and the Turkish families living in France to their youngsters. Because of their collectivist background Turkish immigrants may convey less individualistic values to their children compared to French parents and teachers. However, Turkish students may become more individualistic as they are socialized in the school system. In study 1 (N = 119, French school teachers, French parents, and Turkish-origin parents had to resolve six dilemmas by choosing either an individualistic or a collectivistic response-option. As expected, French teachers emphasized individualism more than Turkish parents, but not more than French parents. In Study 2 (N = 159, similar dilemmas were presented to French and Turkish-origin pupils. In elementary school, Turkish children were less individualistic than French-born children, but this gap was reduced in high school.

  5. 75 FR 60563 - Family Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... health and happiness of all our Nation's children. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the... strive to succeed in school and resist pressures to use dangerous substances that can affect their...

  6. Nutrition and cardiovascular risk factors in four age groups of female individuals: The pep family heart study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schwandt

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of CVD risk factors increased con-tinuously from girls and adolescents to junior and senior women. However, dietary intake was different in the four age groups. Ca-loric intake was associated with overweight and clustering of risk factors in adult women.

  7. Family Forest Landowners' Interest in Forest Carbon Offset Programs: Focus Group Findings from the Lake States, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristell A.; Snyder, Stephanie A.; Kilgore, Mike A.; Davenport, Mae A.

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, focus groups were organized with individuals owning 20+ acres in the Lake States region of the United States (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) to discuss various issues related to forest carbon offsetting. Focus group participants consisted of landowners who had responded to an earlier mail-back survey (2010) on forest carbon offsets. Two focus groups were held per state with an average of eight participants each (49 total). While landowner participant types varied, overall convergence was reached on several key issues. In general, discussion results found that the current payment amounts offered for carbon credits are not likely, on their own, to encourage participation in carbon markets. Landowners are most interested in other benefits they can attain through carbon management (e.g., improved stand species mix, wildlife, and trails). Interestingly, landowner perceptions about the condition of their own forest land were most indicative of prospective interest in carbon management. Landowners who felt that their forest was currently in poor condition, or did not meet their forest ownership objectives, were most interested in participating. While the initial survey sought landowner opinions about carbon markets, a majority of focus group participants expressed interest in general carbon management as a means to achieve reduced property taxes.

  8. Experimental Transmission of Karshi (Mammalian Tick-Borne Flavivirus Group Virus by Ornithodoros Ticks >2,900 Days after Initial Virus Exposure Supports the Role of Soft Ticks as a Long-Term Maintenance Mechanism for Certain Flaviviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Turell

    Full Text Available Members of the mammalian tick-borne flavivirus group, including tick-borne encephalitis virus, are responsible for at least 10,000 clinical cases of tick-borne encephalitis each year. To attempt to explain the long-term maintenance of members of this group, we followed Ornithodoros parkeri, O. sonrai, and O. tartakovskyi for >2,900 days after they had been exposed to Karshi virus, a member of the mammalian tick-borne flavivirus group.Ticks were exposed to Karshi virus either by allowing them to feed on viremic suckling mice or by intracoelomic inoculation. The ticks were then allowed to feed individually on suckling mice after various periods of extrinsic incubation to determine their ability to transmit virus by bite and to determine how long the ticks would remain infectious. The ticks remained efficient vectors of Karshi virus, even when tested >2,900 d after their initial exposure to virus, including those ticks exposed to Karshi virus either orally or by inoculation.Ornithodoros spp. ticks were able to transmit Karshi virus for >2,900 days (nearly 8 years after a single exposure to a viremic mouse. Therefore, these ticks may serve as a long-term maintenance mechanism for Karshi virus and potentially other members of the mammalian tick-borne flavivirus group.

  9. 《长日入夜行》会话分析%Conflicting Family Dynamics---Long Dayˊs Journey into Night from the Perspective of Conversation Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张靖

    2014-01-01

    话轮转换是话语分析的重要范畴和新兴的研究方法。本文运用话轮转换模式,对《长日入夜行》中的人物对话的语言结构进行分析,同时结合对该剧的故事情节、人物性格塑造等方面的语境分析,发现蒂龙家庭中存在着一种家庭对抗机制,而这种家庭对抗机制主要表现在人物之间的宏观矛盾冲突之中。%Turn-taking analysis is a major and new-emerging method to study drama stylistics. According to the turn-taking analysis and the contextual analysis,this paper studies the linguistic structure of conversations a-mong characters in Long Dayˊs Journey into Night,as well as analyzing its plot and characterization,and as a result the conflicting family dynamics among the four Tyrones are spotted,and the family dynamics can be interpreted from the conflicts of both interpersonal and intrapersonal at macro and micro levels.

  10. The Rafita asteroid family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljbaae, S.; Carruba, V.; Masiero, J. R.; Domingos, R. C.; Huaman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Rafita asteroid family is an S-type group located in the middle main belt, on the right side of the 3J:-1A mean-motion resonance. The proximity of this resonance to the family left side in semi-major axis caused many former family members to be lost. As a consequence, the family shape in the (a, 1/D) domain is quite asymmetrical, with a preponderance of objects on the right side of the distribution. The Rafita family is also characterized by a leptokurtic distribution in inclination, which allows the use of methods of family age estimation recently introduced for other leptokurtic families such as Astrid, Hansa, Gallia, and Barcelona. In this work we propose a new method based on the behavior of an asymmetry coefficient function of the distribution in the (a, 1/D) plane to date incomplete asteroid families such as Rafita. By monitoring the time behavior of this coefficient for asteroids simulating the initial conditions at the time of the family formation, we were able to estimate that the Rafita family should have an age of 490 ± 200 Myr, in good agreement with results from independent methods such as Monte Carlo simulations of Yarkovsky and Yorp dynamical induced evolution and the time behaviour of the kurtosis of the sin (i) distribution. Asteroids from the Rafita family can reach orbits similar to 8% of the currently known near Earth objects. ≃1% of the simulated objects are present in NEO-space during the final 10 Myr of the simulation, and thus would be comparable to objects in the present-day NEO population.

  11. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  12. An exploration of lifestyle beliefs and lifestyle behaviour following stroke: findings from a focus group study of patients and family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paton Gillian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a major cause of disability and family disruption and carries a high risk of recurrence. Lifestyle factors that increase the risk of recurrence include smoking, unhealthy diet, excessive alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. Guidelines recommend that secondary prevention interventions, which include the active provision of lifestyle information, should be initiated in hospital, and continued by community-based healthcare professionals (HCPs following discharge. However, stroke patients report receiving little/no lifestyle information. There is a limited evidence-base to guide the development and delivery of effective secondary prevention lifestyle interventions in the stroke field. This study, which was underpinned by the Theory of Planned Behaviour, sought to explore the beliefs and perceptions of patients and family members regarding the provision of lifestyle information following stroke. We also explored the influence of beliefs and attitudes on behaviour. We believe that an understanding of these issues is required to inform the content and delivery of effective secondary prevention lifestyle interventions. Methods We used purposive sampling to recruit participants through voluntary sector organizations (29 patients, including 7 with aphasia; 20 family members. Using focus group methods, data were collected in four regions of Scotland (8 group discussions and were analysed thematically. Results Although many participants initially reported receiving no lifestyle information, further exploration revealed that most had received written information. However, it was often provided when people were not receptive, there was no verbal reinforcement, and family members were rarely involved, even when the patient had aphasia. Participants believed that information and advice regarding healthy lifestyle behaviour was often confusing and contradictory and that this influenced their behavioural intentions. Family

  13. Síndrome de Down: visión y perspectiva desde el contexto familiar en el círculo infantil especial Down syndrome: vision and perspective from the family context in the special day care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy J Pineda Pérez

    2008-06-01

    sus hijos.INTRODUCTION: Down syndrome is a genetic disease due to chromosomal aberration. Although it is still a health problem with a great social and family impact, the family is considerably misinformed about important elements and there are different criteria about the possibilities and achievements of these children. OBJECTIVE: to determine the knowledge of the parents about the evolution and future possibilities of the children carriers of this genetic disease, the difficulties of the neuropsychomotor development and the different types of disability. METHODS: a quasiexperimental interventional research with a before-after study design was conducted in a non-equivalent group at "Zunzún" Special Day Care Centre, in Playa municipality, Havana City, from March to June, 2007. The universe was composed of all the mothers or fathers of the children with Down syndrome enrolled in this institution. The sample consisted of all the mothers or fathers of the children of the universe. There were 34 mothers and 4 fathers that lived in various municipalities of Havana City. The research had 3 stages and 3 workshops were conducted. The data obtained were tabulated by the simple count method and they were expressed in percentages and reflected in tables. RESULTS: before the workshops the parents recognized the disabilities in their children. The most frequent were speech disorders, difficulties in self-validism and to obey orders, and to believe in the possibility of the reintegration to society. After the workshops, the recognition of these incapacities, as well as the need to receive information to encourage the child, and the parents' hope in their children increased. CONCLUSIONS: the workshops conducted proved to be effective to improve the knowledge and education of parents about the disease, and the parents' expectations in the future of their children rose.

  14. A NEW FAMILY OF ELEMENTS IN THE STABLE HOMOTOPY GROUPS OF SPHERES%球面稳定同伦群中的一族新元素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉玉; 王俊丽

    2015-01-01

    本文研究了球面稳定同伦群中元素的非平凡性。利用May谱序列,证明了在Adams谱序列E2项中存在乘积元素收敛到球面稳定同伦群的一族阶为p的非零元,此非零元具有更高维数的滤子。%In this paper, we study the non-triviality of the elements in the stable homotopy groups of spheres. Using the May spectral sequence, the authors show that there exists a new product in the E2-term of the Adams spectral sequence, which converges to a family of homotopy elements with order p and higher filtration in the stable homotopy groups of spheres.

  15. Open Days in 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    CERN will be organising two Open Days in 2008, one for CERN employees and their families on Saturday, 5 April, and another for the general public on Sunday, 6 April. This is the one last chance to see the LHC and its experiments. In addition to the surface facilities, visitors will be able to go underground to see the accelerator and will have acces to the experiment caverns. Exceptionally, most of the points along the ring will be open. We need a large number of volunteers to ensure the success of these two very special days. Full details of the events will be published in the first January edition of the Bulletin. Volunteers will be able to register by completing an electronic form and an information session will be organised.

  16. Developmentally regulated expression, alternative splicing and distinct sub-groupings in members of the Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like (SmVAL gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Ralf

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sperm-coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS domain is found across phyla and is a major structural feature of insect allergens, mammalian sperm proteins and parasitic nematode secreted molecules. Proteins containing this domain are implicated in diverse biological activities and may be important for chronic host/parasite interactions. Results We report the first description of an SCP/TAPS gene family (Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like (SmVALs in the medically important Platyhelminthes (class Trematoda and describe individual members' phylogenetic relationships, genomic organization and life cycle expression profiles. Twenty-eight SmVALs with complete SCP/TAPS domains were identified and comparison of their predicted protein features and gene structures indicated the presence of two distinct sub-families (group 1 & group 2. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this group 1/group 2 split is zoologically widespread as it exists across the metazoan sub-kingdom. Chromosomal localisation and PCR analysis, coupled to inspection of the current S. mansoni genomic assembly, revealed that many of the SmVAL genes are spatially linked throughout the genome. Quantitative lifecycle expression profiling demonstrated distinct SmVAL expression patterns, including transcripts specifically associated with lifestages involved in definitive host invasion, transcripts restricted to lifestages involved in the invasion of the intermediate host and transcripts ubiquitously expressed. Analysis of SmVAL6 transcript diversity demonstrated statistically significant, developmentally regulated, alternative splicing. Conclusion Our results highlight the existence of two distinct SCP/TAPS protein types within the Platyhelminthes and across taxa. The extensive lifecycle expression analysis indicates several SmVAL transcripts are upregulated in infective stages of the parasite, suggesting that these particular protein products may be linked

  17. Social structure in a family group of Guanaco (Lama guanicoe, Ungulate): is female hierarchy based on 'prior attributes' or 'social dynamics'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Loreto A; Zapata, Beatriz; Samaniego, Horacio; Soto-Gamboa, Mauricio

    2013-09-01

    Social life involves costs and benefits mostly associated with how individuals interact with each other. The formation of hierarchies inside social groups has evolved as a common strategy to avoid high costs stemming from social interactions. Hierarchical relationships seem to be associated with different features such as body size, body condition and/or age, which determine dominance ability ('prior attributes' hypothesis). In contrast, the 'social dynamic' hypothesis suggests that an initial social context is a determinant in the formation of the hierarchy, more so than specific individual attributes. Hierarchical rank places individuals in higher positions, which presumably increases resource accessibility to their benefit, including opportunities for reproduction. We evaluate the maintenance of hierarchy in a family group of guanacos (Lama guanicoe) and evaluate the possible mechanisms involved in the stability of these interactions and their consequences. We estimate the linearity of social hierarchy and their dynamics. We find evidence of the formation of a highly linear hierarchy among females with males positioned at the bottom of the hierarchy. This hierarchy is not affected by physical characteristics or age, suggesting that it is established only through intra-group interactions. Rank is not related with calves' weight gain either; however, subordinated females, with lower rank, exhibit higher rates of allosuckling. We found no evidence of hierarchical structure in calves suggesting that hierarchical relationship in guanacos could be established during the formation of the family group. Hence, our results suggest that hierarchical dynamics could be related more to social dynamics than to prior attributes. We finally discuss the importance of hierarchies established by dominance and their role in minimizing social costs of interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential associations between Social Anxiety Disorder, family cohesion, and suicidality across racial/ethnic groups: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent (NCS-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Amy M; Lau, Anna; Chavira, Denise A

    2016-09-20

    The proposed research seeks to introduce a novel model relating Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and suicide outcomes (i.e., passive suicidal ideation, active suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts) in diverse adolescents. This model posits that family cohesion is one pathway by which suicide risk is increased for socially anxious youth, and predicts that the relationships between these variables may be of different strength in Latino and White subgroups and across gender. Data from a sample of Latino (n=1922) and non-Hispanic White (hereafter referred to as White throughout) (n=5648) male and female adolescents who participated in the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent were used for this study. Analyses were conducted using generalized structural equation modeling. Results showed that the mediation model held for White females. Further examination of direct pathways highlighted SAD as a risk factor unique to Latinos for active suicidal ideation and suicide attempt, over and above comorbid depression and other relevant contextual factors. Additionally, family cohesion showed a strong association with suicide outcomes across groups, with some inconsistent findings for White males. Overall, it appears that the mechanism by which SAD increases risk for suicidality is different across groups, indicating further need to identify relevant mediators, especially for racial/ethnic minority youth.

  19. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): use of a small group reading activity run by persons with dementia in adult day health care and long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrajner, Michael J; Camp, Cameron J

    2007-01-01

    Six persons in the early to middle stages of dementia ("leaders") were trained in Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP) to lead a reading activity for 22 persons with more advanced dementia ("participants") in an adult day health center (ADHC) and a special care unit (SCU) in a skilled nursing facility. Researchers assessed the leaders' abilities to learn and follow the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with their roles. In addition, participants' engagement and affect were measured, both during standard activities programming and during client-led activities. Results of this study suggest that persons with dementia can indeed successfully lead small group activities, if several important prerequisites are met. Furthermore, the engagement and affect of participants was more positive in client-led activities than in standard activities programming.

  20. Reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family carers: pragmatic eight-centre randomised trial of joint reminiscence and maintenance versus usual treatment: a protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orrell Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing number of people with dementia, and the increasing cost of care, provides a major incentive to develop and test methods of supporting them in the community for longer. Most attention has been given to pharmacological interventions, but there is increasing recognition that psychosocial interventions may be equally effective, even preferable where medication has negative side-effects. Reminiscence groups, run by professionals and volunteers, which use photographs, recordings and other objects to trigger personal memories are probably the most popular therapeutic approach to working with people with dementia, but there is little evidence for their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. The recent inclusion of family carers in groups with people with dementia, notably in our own pilot studies, has generated informal evidence that this joint approach improves relationships between people with dementia and their carers, and benefits both. Design and methods This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family care-givers has two parallel arms – an intervention group and a control group who receive care as usual. The intervention consists of joint reminiscence groups held weekly for twelve consecutive weeks, followed by monthly maintenance sessions for a further seven months. The primary outcome measures are the quality of life of people with dementia, as assessed by QoL-AD, and their care-givers' mental health as assessed by the GHQ-28. Secondary outcomes include: the autobiographical memories of people with dementia; the quality of the relationship between them and their care-givers; and the levels of depression and anxiety felt by them and their care-giver. Using a 5% significance level, comparison of 200 pairs attending joint reminiscence groups with 200 pairs receiving usual treatment

  1. Post-breeding movements of Ancient Murrelet Synthliboramphus antiquus family groups, subsequent migration of adults and implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuriko; Wilson, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    Increased shipping in British Columbia (BC) waters poses risks for marine birds from marine oil spills. Ancient Murrelets (Synthliboramphus antiquus), small marine diving birds of which half of the world’s population breeds in BC, are especially susceptible to oiling immediately after departing from their breeding colonies, as their offspring are flightless, constraining their parents to remain with them. In 2014 we deployed geolocator loggers on Ancient Murrelets at four breeding colonies, two on the east and two on the west coast of Haida Gwaii to investigate patterns of post-breeding dispersal and subsequent migratory movements. Birds from east coast colonies moved south and east after leaving their colonies, remaining in Queen Charlotte Sound and adjacent waters for 4–6 weeks, whereas those from west coast colonies moved steadily north and west, so that they left BC waters earlier than those from east coast colonies. These movements were consistent with being driven by surface currents. In June, all birds moved rapidly to the eastern Aleutians, SE Bering Sea, and waters off Kamchatka, where they probably moulted. In August, most moved north, some passing through Bering Straits into the Chukchi Sea. In October-November some birds returned to waters off western N America (33%) and the remainder carried on westwards to waters off Japan, Korea and NE China. For the former group the movement to the Bering Sea in June constituted a moult migration and, as such, is the first described for an auk. Those birds wintering in Asia began moving east in February and arrived off BC in March, when observations at colonies show that burrow visits begin in Haida Gwaii. Our data suggest that, immediately after colony departure, birds from the east coast colonies (about half the population of Haida Gwaii) are at higher risk from potential oil spills in northern British Columbia waters than those breeding on the west coast. PMID:28235033

  2. FAMILY PLATYSTOMATIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Lisiane Dilli

    2016-06-14

    Platystomatidae (Signal Flies) are one of the largest families of Tephritoidea, with about 1200 species and four subfamilies, worldwide distributed. However, Platystomatidae are not well represented in the New World, and in the Neotropical Region only four genera and 26 species, belonging to Platystomatinae, are recorded. The family is a group understudied in Colombia and only one species is recorded to the country.

  3. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  4. The Arabidopsis Plant Intracellular Ras-group LRR (PIRL Family and the Value of Reverse Genetic Analysis for Identifying Genes that Function in Gametophyte Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy R. Forsthoefel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana has proven a powerful system for developmental genetics, but identification of gametophytic genes with developmental mutants can be complicated by factors such as gametophyte-lethality, functional redundancy, or poor penetrance. These issues are exemplified by the Plant Intracellular Ras-group LRR (PIRL genes, a family of nine genes encoding a class of leucine-rich repeat proteins structurally related to animal and fungal LRR proteins involved in developmental signaling. Previous analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants showed that two of these genes, PIRL1 and PIRL9, have an essential function in pollen formation but are functionally redundant. Here, we present evidence implicating three more PIRLs in gametophyte development. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that disruption of either PIRL2 or PIRL3 results in a low frequency of pollen morphological abnormalities. In addition, molecular analysis of putative pirl6 insertion mutants indicated that knockout alleles of this gene are not represented in current Arabidopsis mutant populations, suggesting gametophyte lethality may hinder mutant recovery. Consistent with this, available microarray and RNA-seq data have documented strongest PIRL6 expression in developing pollen. Taken together, these results now implicate five PIRLs in gametophyte development. Systematic reverse genetic analysis of this novel LRR family has therefore identified gametophytically active genes that otherwise would likely be missed by forward genetic screens.

  5. Frequency of ABO and Rh (D Blood Groups and Hemoglobin Threshold among Pregnant Women in Family Guidance Association, Mekelle Model Clinic, North Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megbaru Alemu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine the frequency of ABO and Rh blood group patterns and hemoglobin threshold among pregnant women screened at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia, North Area Mekelle model clinic. Checklists were prepared to collect data from laboratory registration books of five years to undergo this retrospective study. Those registration books were reviewed for ABO blood group, Rh profiles and hemoglobin threshold of the pregnant women screened during the specified period. A total of 5987 pregnant women have been found to be screened and the predominant phenotype in this study was O (41.5% followed by phenotype A (28%, Phenotype B (25% and phenotype AB (5.5%. Regarding Rh (D system, 91.2% (5458/5987 women were positive for rhesus D antigen while the remaining 8.8% (529/5987 women were negative for the antigen. Blood grouping studies should be done in every region of the nation so that national transfusion policies can be drafted and supplying blood to the needy patients during emergency will be easier.

  6. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA.

  7. 汉代家族内部犯罪试探%The Exploration of Crimes within Family Groups in Han Dynasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付志杰; 王晓影; 李俊方

    2011-01-01

    The crimes within family groups in Han Dynasty consist of the infringement among the relatives and the infringement between couples.The former contain the non-filial,the murder,the steal,the adultery,the suing between relatives and the violation to the mo%汉代家族内部犯罪的主要内容为亲属相犯与夫妻相犯。前者包括不孝罪、亲属间杀伤、相盗、相奸、相告、服丧期间有违伦常。有关后者的法律在保障夫权的同时,对妻子的权利也有保障性规定。

  8. Family of measures on a space of curves that are quasi-invariant with respect to some action of diffeomorphisms group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Evgenii Dmitrievich

    2016-08-01

    A family of quasi-invariant measures on the special functional space of curves in a finite-dimensional Euclidean space with respect to the action of diffeomorphisms is constructed. The main result is an explicit expression for the Radon-Nikodym derivative of the transformed measure relative to the original one. The stochastic Ito integral allows to express the result in an invariant form for a wider class of diffeomorphisms. These measures can be used to obtain irreducible unitary representations of the diffeomorphisms group which will be studied in future research. A geometric interpretation of the action considered together with a generalization to the multidimensional case makes such representations applicable to problems of quantum mechanics.

  9. Effect of a 14-day course of foscarnet on cytomegalovirus (CMV) blood markers in a randomized study of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with persistent CMV viremia. Agence National de Recherche du SIDA 023 Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon-Céron, D; Fillet, A M; Aboulker, J P; Gérard, L; Houhou, N; Carrière, I; Ostinelli, J; Vildé, J L; Brun-Vézinet, F; Leport, C

    1999-04-01

    A randomized open-label phase 2 trial compared the virological and clinical effects on cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of a 14-day course of intravenous foscarnet (100 mg/[kg x 12 h]) or no treatment in 42 HIV-infected patients with virus load rapidly increased. The probability of CMV disease at 6 months was 43% in both groups. Patients who had or who achieved a negative blood culture at any time had a reduced risk of CMV disease (RR = 2.64; 95% CI = 1.24-5.62; P = .02). This study suggests that sequential courses of intravenous foscarnet might not be a good strategy for preemptive therapy in this population and that in patients with a positive blood marker, treatment able to induce and maintain negative CMV blood cultures could constitute an effective intervention.

  10. Day Camp Manual: Administration. Book I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, William

    The first book in a 5-book manual on day camping focuses on summer day camp administration. The book defines day camps as organized group experiences in outdoor living on a day-by-day basis and under trained leadership. It includes a philosophy of day camping, noting benefits to the campers. The book is divided into further chapters that describe…

  11. Day of Arts Philanthropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Jørgensen, Ida

    For the Day of Arts Philanthropy I will reflect on the instrumentalisation of art support in Denmark based on the findings from my thesis work (Jørgensen, 2016) investigating the underlyinglegitimations and institutional logics of two of the most significant foundations supporting visual art......, in Denmark, the private New Carlsberg Foundation and public Danish Arts Foundation.Drawing inspiration from neo-institutional theory (Friedland & Alford, 1991) and French pragmatic sociology (Boltanski & Thévenot, 2006), the thesis identifies the most central logics of legitimationunderlying art support......; the industrial, market, inspired, family, renown, civic, projective, emotional and temporal. The most prominent and consistently invoked instrumentalisations identified are theprofessional (industrial), artistic (inspired) and civic purposes of art support. The thesis shows that the instrumentalisations invoked...

  12. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  13. Young people's perspectives on the adoption of preventive measures for HIV/AIDS, malaria and family planning in South-West Uganda: focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffy, Jonathan; Goodhart, Clare; Sennett, Karen; Kamusiime, Gloria; Tukamushaba, Herbert

    2012-11-22

    Despite the possibility of preventing many cases of HIV, malaria and unplanned pregnancy, protective measures are often not taken by those at risk in Uganda. The study aim was to explore young people's perspectives on the reasons why this is so. Focus groups were conducted with 100 secondary school and college students in Kanungu, Uganda in 2011. Three parallel groups considered HIV, malaria and family planning, and common messages were then explored jointly in a workshop based on the RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance). Participants identified various reasons why preventive action was not always taken. They worried about the effectiveness and side effects of several key interventions: condoms, antiretroviral treatment, various contraceptives and impregnated mosquito nets. Cost, rural isolation and the quality and availability of health services also limited the extent to which people were able to follow health advice. Although there was respect for policy supporting abstinence and fidelity, it was seen as hard to follow and offering inadequate protection when gender imbalance put pressure on women to have sex. There is an opportunity to improve the uptake of preventive measures by tackling the misconceptions and fears that participants reported with clear, evidence-based messages. This should be done in a way that encourages more open communication about reproductive health between men and women, that reaches out to isolated communities, that draws on both voluntary and government services and enlists young people so that they can shape their future.

  14. Young people’s perspectives on the adoption of preventive measures for HIV/AIDS, malaria and family planning in South-West Uganda: focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graffy Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the possibility of preventing many cases of HIV, malaria and unplanned pregnancy, protective measures are often not taken by those at risk in Uganda. The study aim was to explore young people’s perspectives on the reasons why this is so. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 100 secondary school and college students in Kanungu, Uganda in 2011. Three parallel groups considered HIV, malaria and family planning, and common messages were then explored jointly in a workshop based on the RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance. Results Participants identified various reasons why preventive action was not always taken. They worried about the effectiveness and side effects of several key interventions: condoms, antiretroviral treatment, various contraceptives and impregnated mosquito nets. Cost, rural isolation and the quality and availability of health services also limited the extent to which people were able to follow health advice. Although there was respect for policy supporting abstinence and fidelity, it was seen as hard to follow and offering inadequate protection when gender imbalance put pressure on women to have sex. Conclusions There is an opportunity to improve the uptake of preventive measures by tackling the misconceptions and fears that participants reported with clear, evidence-based messages. This should be done in a way that encourages more open communication about reproductive health between men and women, that reaches out to isolated communities, that draws on both voluntary and government services and enlists young people so that they can shape their future.

  15. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  16. Day care for pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoritch, B; Roberts, I; Oakley, A

    2000-01-01

    The debate about how, where and by whom young children should be looked after is one which has occupied much social policy and media attention in recent years. Mothers undertake most of the care of young children. Internationally, out-of-home day-care provision ranges widely. These different levels of provision are not simply a response to different levels of demand for day-care, but reflect cultural and economic interests concerning the welfare of children, the need to promote mothers' participation in paid work, and the importance of socialising children into society's values. At a time when a decline in family values is held responsible for a range of social problems, the day-care debate has a special prominence. To quantify the effects of out-of-home day-care for preschool children on educational, health and welfare outcomes for children and their families. Randomised controlled trials of day-care for pre-school children were identified using electronic databases, hand searches of relevant literature, and contact with authors. Studies were included in the review if the intervention involved the provision of non-parental day care for children under 5 years of age, and the evaluation design was that of a randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trial. A total of eight trials were identified after examining 920 abstracts and 19 books. The trials were assessed for methodological quality. Day-care increases children's IQ, and has beneficial effects on behavioural development and school achievement. Long-term follow up demonstrates increased employment, lower teenage pregnancy rates, higher socio-economic status and decreased criminal behaviour. There are positive effects on mothers' education, employment and interaction with children. Effects on fathers have not been examined. Few studies look at a range of outcomes spanning the health, education and welfare domains. Most of the trials combined non-parental day-care with some element of parent training or education

  17. Disparities in drinking patterns and risks among ethnic majority and minority groups in China: The roles of acculturation, religion, family and friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianhui; Assanangkornchai, Sawitri; Cai, Le; McNeil, Edward

    2016-02-01

    Studies investigating alcohol consumption related factors have rarely focused on the relationship between acculturation, religion and drinking patterns. The objective of this study is to explore the predictors of drinking patterns and their mutual relationships, especially acculturation, ethnicity and religion. A cross-sectional household survey using a multistage systematic sampling technique was conducted in Yunnan Province of China. A revised Vancouver Index of Acculturation (VIA) and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) Chinese version were used to measure acculturation and drinking patterns. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore the structures of how predictors affect drinking patterns. A total of 977 subjects aged 12-35 years were surveyed. A higher percentage of binge drinking was found among Lisu people. However, the proportion of drinking until intoxication was highest among Han. Gender and enculturation had both direct (standardized β=-0.193, -0.079) and indirect effects (standardized β=-0.126, 0.033) on risky drinking pattern; perceived risk of alcohol consumption (-0.065), family drinking environment (0.061), and friend drinking environment (0.352) affected risky drinking pattern directly, while education level (0.066), ethnicity (-0.038), acculturation (0.012), religious belief (-0.038), and age group (0.088) had indirect effects. Risky drinking pattern was associated with gender and aboriginal culture enculturation both directly and indirectly, and related to mainstream culture acculturation and religious belief indirectly. Other demographic (such as education level) and social family factors (friend drinking environment for example) also had effects on risky drinking pattern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Establishment of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line stably over-expressing human TOX high mobility group box family member 3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cuicui; Yue, Liling; Yang, Ying; Jian, Baiyu; Ma, Liwei; Liu, Jicheng

    2014-11-01

    To construct the lentiviral expression vector of human TOX high mobility group box family member 3 (TOX3) gene and the MDA-MB-231 cell line which stably over-expresses TOX3 gene. TOX3 gene was synthesized by the gene synthesis method and amplified by PCR, and then cloned into pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro vector to construct pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro-TOX3 lentiviral vector. After restriction enzyme analysis and sequence identification, the lentiviral vector was packaged and the titer was detected. The human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with the recombinant lentiviral vector and cultured selectively by puromycin to acquire stably transfected cells. MDA-MB-231 cells which expressed GFP were observed by fluorescence microcopy. And the expression levels of TOX3 mRNA and protein in transfected MDA-MB-231 cells were detected by real-time quantitative PCR(qRT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. Restriction enzyme digestion and sequence analysis demonstrated that the lentiviral expression vectors of pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro and pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro-TOX3 were successfully constructed, and the viral titers were respectively 2×10(8) TU/mL and 1×10(8) TU/mL after lentiviral packaging. And after being transfected, more than 95% cells expressed GFP under a fluorescence microscope. The results of qRT-PCR and Western blotting showed that, when compared with the MDA-MB-231-NC negative control group, the expression of TOX3 mRNA and protein significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231-TOX3 group. The study successfully constructed lentiviral expression vector of TOX3 gene and obtained MDA-MB-231 cell line stably over-expressing TOX3 gene by transfection with the recombinant vector.

  19. Evaluation of congenital dysautonomia other than Riley-Day syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, E; Ferrer, T; Pérez-Conde, C; López-Terradas, J M; Pérez-Jiménez, A; Ramos, M J

    1996-02-01

    We report on four children, from different families, who suffer from a congenital autonomic disorder, presumably inherited. Three of them have a sensory neuropathy but do not fit any described hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy. All four were examined along with some of their immediate family members. We assessed the cardiovagal, sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic functions with a battery of non-invasive tests. Results demonstrated that sudomotor and cardiovascular orthostatic regulation exhibited the greatest abnormalities, pointing to a predominant impairment of sympathetic components, both cholinergic and adrenergic. The overall examination showed a heterogeneous group of congenital dysautonomia, exclusive of Riley-Day or other recognized hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. We emphasize the importance of studying whole family groups to diagnose subclinical impairment and to provide correct genetic counselling.

  20. Quality of life as medicine III. A qualitative analysis of the effect of a five-day intervention with existential holistic group therapy or a quality of life course as a modern rite of passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Clausen, Birgitte; Langhorn, Maja; Kromann, Maximilian; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2004-03-04

    Existential group therapy seems to be a very efficient way of inducing the holistic state of healing, described in the holistic process theory of healing. We have designed a series of four quality of life (QOL) and health courses of 5-days duration called "Philosophy of Life that Heals--Courses in QOL and Personal Development". The four courses are meant to be taken over four consecutive years. They contain training in philosophy of life and existential theory as well as exercises in holding: awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment, and acceptance. The courses teach the participants respect, love, and intimacy; help them to draw on their seemingly unlimited hidden resources; and inspire them to take more responsibility for their own life. Exercises are accomplished with a partner chosen at the course as: (1) a person you like, (2) a person you do not know already, or (3) a person to whom you want to give help, support, and holding more than you want to get help from him or her. Pilot studies with 5-day quality of life interventions that combine training in quality of life philosophy with psychotherapy and bodywork have proved effective on patients with chronic pain and alcoholism. The present design aims to take this a step further and engage the patients in a process of personal growth that will last for years. The aim is to lead them to a stabile state of quality of life, health, and ability, from where they will not again fall into sickness and unhappiness. The focus of these courses is as much on prevention as is it on healing. The existential group therapy induces spontaneous healing of body, mind, and soul that seems to be highly efficient with hopefully lasting results. Every course is intended to give an immediate improvement in the quality of life, so its efficiency can be measured with the square curve paradigm. We have studied the participant"s accounts from their experience with the courses and have analyzed the remarkably large, qualitative changes in

  1. Day Care in the Community. Action Research in Family and Early Childhood. UNESCO Education Sector Monograph = Accueil des jeunes enfants dans la communaute. Recherche-action sur la famille et la petite enfance. UNESCO Secteur de l'education monographie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    Noting demographic pressures and increased poverty most countries experience, this report shows how parents and family members can work in their communities in developing countries to provide low-cost and efficient child care facilities for very young children and explains how such community-based early childhood programs benefit whole families.…

  2. Day Care in the Community. Action Research in Family and Early Childhood. UNESCO Education Sector Monograph = Accueil des jeunes enfants dans la communaute. Recherche-action sur la famille et la petite enfance. UNESCO Secteur de l'education monographie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    Noting demographic pressures and increased poverty most countries experience, this report shows how parents and family members can work in their communities in developing countries to provide low-cost and efficient child care facilities for very young children and explains how such community-based early childhood programs benefit whole families.…

  3. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  4. Perceived effective and feasible strategies to promote healthy eating in young children: focus groups with parents, family child care providers and daycare assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweghe, Laura; Moens, Ellen; Braet, Caroline; Van Lippevelde, Wendy; Vervoort, Leentje; Verbeken, Sandra

    2016-10-04

    The aim of the current study is to identify strategies to promote healthy eating in young children that can be applied by caregivers, based on their own perceptions of effectiveness and feasibility. Whereas previous research mainly focused on parental influences on children's eating behavior, the growing role of other caregivers in the upbringing of children can no longer be denied. Four focus groups were conducted with three types of caregivers of post-weaning children under 6 years old: parents (n = 14), family child care providers (n = 9), and daycare assistants (n = 10). The audiotaped focus group discussions were transcribed and imported into Nvivo 10.0 for thematic analysis. The behaviors put forward by the caregivers were categorized within three broad dimensions: global influences, general behaviors, and specific feeding practices. Perceived effective strategies to promote healthy eating behavior in children included rewards, verbal encouragement, a taste-rule, sensory sensations, involvement, variation, modeling, repeated exposure, and a peaceful atmosphere. Participants mainly disagreed on the perceived feasibility of each strategy, which largely depended on the characteristics of the caregiving setting (e.g. infrastructure, policy). Based on former research and the current results, an intervention to promote healthy eating behaviors in young children should be adapted to the caregiving setting or focus on specific feeding practices, since these involve simple behaviors that are not hindered by the limitations of the caregiving setting. Due to various misconceptions regarding health-promoting strategies, clear instructions about when and how to use these strategies are necessary.

  5. Expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A1 and high mobility group box 1 in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in association with survival time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xu; Coordes, Annekatrin; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Albers, Andreas E

    2016-11-01

    Despite the development of novel multimodal treatment combinations in advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), outcomes remain poor. The identification of specifically validated biomarkers is required to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, to evaluate treatment efficiency and to develop novel therapeutic targets. The present study, therefore, examined the presence of aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A1 (ALDH1A1) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression in primary OSCC and analyzed the impact on survival time. In 59 patients with OSCC, the expression of ALDH1A1, p16 and HMGB1, and their clinicopathological data were analyzed. HMGB1 positivity was significantly increased in patients with T1-2 stage disease compared with T3-4 stage disease (P<0.001), whereas ALDH1A1 positivity was not. ALDH1A1(+) tumors showed significantly lower differentiation than ALDH1A1(-) tumors (P=0.018). Multivariate analysis showed that ALDH1A1 positivity (P=0.041) and nodal status (N2-3) (P=0.036) predicted a poor prognosis. In this patient cohort, ALDH1A1 and nodal status were identified as independent predictors of a shorter overall survival time. The study results, therefore, provide evidence of the prognostic value of ALDH1A1 as a marker for cancer stem cells and nodal status in OSCC patients.

  6. Konferencja grupy rodzinnej jako metoda pracy z rodzinami zagrożonymi wykluczeniem społecznym (wyniki działalności Powiatowego Centrum Pomocy Rodzinie w Bytowie/ The Conference of the Family Group (KGR as a Method of theWorking with the Families in Danger of Social Exclusion (results of the work District Centre of the Family Help in Bytów

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIESŁAW LESNER

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Conference of the family group (KGR is a method of the work with the family leading families in functioning to positive changes, giving the possibility of constructive and effective solving her problems. The specificity of this method causes employing the wide circle of members of a family, as well as other persons important for the child: of acquaintances, of neighbors, of friends; on the established forum discussion is being entered into with the possibility of using the participation of professionals, granting technical consultation; plans concerning solving difficult situations of the child and the family are being formulated. The KGR method is applied in final years in, bringing unprecedented beneficial results. Thanks to conducting fifteen conferences of the family group in the district of Bytów over twenty children missed to institutions social and behavioral, and it stayed in related and unrelated foster families and around their families. Moreover the families received the psychological support, possibility to use the services of the assistant of the family and the assistant of the personwith disabilities.Drawing fifteen social contracts up was a final result of held conferences. All members of a family are becoming involved in the problem solving, behind taken decisions lives concerning them have a sense of responsibility, they are establishing positive reports with employees of the system of the welfare. Apart from that a number of children is reducing at institutions social and behavioral, a time of staying foster children in substitute forms of the care is undergoing shortening, also a number of institutional intervention is reducing in families.

  7. Clustering of serotypes in a longitudinal study of Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage in three day care centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanskanen Antti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus causes a wide range of clinical manifestations that together constitute a major burden of disease worldwide. The main route of pneumococcal transmission is through asymptomatic colonisation of the nasopharynx. Studies of transmission are currently of general interest because of the impact of the new conjugate-polysaccharide vaccines on nasopharyngeal colonisation (carriage. Here we report the first longitudinal study of pneumococcal carriage that records serotype specific exposure to pneumococci simultaneously within the two most important mixing groups, families and day care facilities. Methods We followed attendees (N = 59 with their family members (N = 117 and the employees (N = 37 in three Finnish day care centres for 9 months with monthly sampling of nasopharyngeal carriage. Pneumococci were cultured, identified and serotyped by standard methods. Results Children in day care constitute a core group of pneumococcal carriage: of the 36 acquisitions of carriage with documented exposure to homologous pneumococci, the attendee had been exposed in her/his day care centre in 35 cases and in the family in 9 cases. Day care children introduce pneumococci to the family: 66% of acquisitions of a new serotype in a family were associated with simultaneous or previous carriage of the same type in the child attending day care. Consequently, pneumococcal transmission was found to take place as micro-epidemics driven by the day care centres. Each of the three day care centres was dominated by a serotype of its own, accounting for 100% of the isolates of that serotype among all samples from the day care attendees. Conclusion The transmission of pneumococci is more intense within than across clusters defined by day care facilities. The ensuing micro-epidemic behaviour enhances pneumococcal transmission.

  8. Quality of Life as Medicine III. A Qualitative Analysis of the Effect of a Five-Day Intervention with Existential Holistic Group Therapy or a Quality of Life Course as a Modern Rite of Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    The courses teach the participants respect, love, and intimacy; help them to draw on their seemingly unlimited hidden resources; and inspire them to take more responsibility for their own life. Exercises are accomplished with a partner chosen at the course as: (1 a person you like, (2 a person you do not know already, or (3 a person to whom you want to give help, support, and holding more than you want to get help from him or her. Pilot studies with 5-day quality of life interventions that combine training in quality of life philosophy with psychotherapy and bodywork have proved effective on patients with chronic pain and alcoholism. The present design aims to take this a step further and engage the patients in a process of personal growth that will last for years. The aim is to lead them to a stabile state of quality of life, health, and ability, from where they will not again fall into sickness and unhappiness. The focus of these courses is as much on prevention as is it on healing. The existential group therapy induces spontaneous healing of body, mind, and soul that seems to be highly efficient with hopefully lasting results. Every course is intended to give an immediate improvement in the quality of life, so its efficiency can be measured with the square curve paradigm. We have studied the participant’s accounts from their experience with the courses and have analyzed the remarkably large, qualitative changes in the state of being, quality of life, health, and consciousness, which many participants experience during the course. The long-term and preventative effects of the courses have yet to be documented.

  9. Family history of cancer and seizures in young children with brain tumors: a report from the Childrens Cancer Group (United States and Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijten, R R; Strom, S S; Rorke, L B; Boesel, C P; Buckley, J D; Meadows, A T; Bunin, G R

    1993-09-01

    The occurrence of cancer and neurological disorders in first- and second-degree relatives of children in the United States and Canada diagnosed with brain tumor before age six was investigated. A pair-matched case-control study with 155 astrocytoma and 166 primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) cases was performed. Cases were identified through the Childrens Cancer Group. Controls were selected by random-digit dialing and matched to cases on age, race, and telephone area code and exchange. Childhood cancers were more common in PNET relatives compared with the general population (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 2.5, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.8, P = 0.02) and with control relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 3.0, CI = 0.5-30, P = 0.29). For astrocytoma, nonsignificant excesses of brain tumor, leukemia/lymphoma, and childhood cancer occurred among case relatives compared with control relatives, but not compared with the general population. Astrocytoma cases were significantly more likely than controls to have a relative with seizures (OR = 2.5, CI = 1.2-4.9, P = 0.009), especially childhood seizures (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.2-12, P = 0.02), epilepsy (OR = 3.0, CI = 0.9-13, P = 0.08), and febrile convulsions (OR = 4.5, CI = 0.9-43, P = 0.07). A family history of stroke was not a risk factor for either type of brain tumor. These results suggest that some childhood brain tumors may result from a genetic susceptibility and that some risk factors may affect childhood astrocytoma and PNET differently.

  10. Patient information leaflets: informing or frightening? A focus group study exploring patients' emotional reactions and subsequent behavior towards package leaflets of commonly prescribed medications in family practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herber, Oliver Rudolf; Gies, Verena; Schwappach, David; Thürmann, Petra; Wilm, Stefan

    2014-10-02

    The purpose of patient information leaflets (PILs) is to inform patients about the administration, precautions and potential side effects of their prescribed medication. Despite European Commission guidelines aiming at increasing readability and comprehension of PILs little is known about the potential risk information has on patients. This article explores patients' reactions and subsequent behavior towards risk information conveyed in PILs of commonly prescribed drugs by general practitioners (GPs) for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension or hypercholesterolemia; the most frequent cause for consultations in family practices in Germany. We conducted six focus groups comprising 35 patients which were recruited in GP practices. Transcripts were read and coded for themes; categories were created by abstracting data and further refined into a coding framework. Three interrelated categories are presented: (i) The vast amount of side effects and drug interactions commonly described in PILs provoke various emotional reactions in patients which (ii) lead to specific patient behavior of which (iii) consulting the GP for assistance is among the most common. Findings show that current description of potential risk information caused feelings of fear and anxiety in the reader resulting in undesirable behavioral reactions. Future PILs need to convey potential risk information in a language that is less frightening while retaining the information content required to make informed decisions about the prescribed medication. Thus, during the production process greater emphasis needs to be placed on testing the degree of emotional arousal provoked in patients when reading risk information to allow them to undertake a benefit-risk-assessment of their medication that is based on rational rather than emotional (fearful) reactions.

  11. Facilitating organisational development using a group-based formative assessment and benchmarking method: design and implementation of the International Family Practice Maturity Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Tapp, Laura; Edwards, Adrian; Newcombe, Robert; Eriksson, Tina; Braspenning, Jozé; Kuch, Christine; Adzic, Zlata Ozvacic; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; Cvetko, Tatjana; In 't Veld, Kees; Karotsis, Antonis; Kersnik, Janko; Lefebvre, Luc; Mecini, Ilir; Petricek, Goranka; Pisco, Luis; Thesen, Janecke; Turón, José María; van Rossen, Edward; Grol, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Well-organised practices deliver higher-quality care. Yet there has been very little effort so far to help primary care organisations achieve higher levels of team performance and to help them identify and prioritise areas where quality improvement efforts should be concentrated. No attempt at all has been made to achieve a method which would be capable of providing comparisons--and the stimulus for further improvement--at an international level. The development of the International Family Practice Maturity Matrix took place in three phases: (1) selection and refinement of organisational dimensions; (2) development of incremental scales based on a recognised theoretical framework; and (3) testing the feasibility of the approach on an international basis, including generation of an automated web-based benchmarking system. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of developing an organisational assessment tool for primary care organisations that is sufficiently generic to cross international borders and is applicable across a diverse range of health settings, from state-organised systems to insurer-based health economies. It proved possible to introduce this assessment method in 11 countries in Europe and one in Africa, and to generate comparison benchmarks based on the data collected. The evaluation of the assessment process was uniformly positive with the view that the approach efficiently enables the identification of priorities for organisational development and quality improvement at the same time as motivating change by virtue of the group dynamics. We are not aware of any other organisational assessment method for primary care which has been 'born international,' and that has involved attention to theory, dimension selection and item refinement. The principal aims were to achieve an organisational assessment which gains added value by using interaction, engagement comparative benchmarks: aims which have been achieved. The next step is to achieve wider

  12. Two days of films

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The Chinese community at CERN and the CERN CineClub, on the occasion of the Chinese New Year, invite everyone to two days of films Thursday 3 February 2011 at 20:30 - CERN Council Chamber Eat drink man woman Directed by Ang LEE (Taiwan, 1994) 122 min. With Sihung Lung, Yu-Wen Wang, Chien-Lien Wu, Kuei-Mei Yang Senior Master Chef Chu lives in a large house in Taipei with his three unmarried daughters, Jia-Jen, a chemistry teacher converted to Christianity, Jia-Chien, an airline executive, and Jia-Ning, a student who also works in a fast food restaurant. Life in the house revolves around the ritual of an elaborate dinner each Sunday, and the love lives of all the family members. Original version Mandarin with English subtitles Friday 4 February 2011 at 19:30 - CERN Council Chamber Adieu, ma concubine Directed by Chen KAIGE (China / Hong Kong, 1993) 171 min. With Leslie Cheung, Fengyi Zhang, Li Gong "Farewell, My Concubine" is a movie with two parallel, intertwined stories. It is the story of two performers in t...

  13. Families in Transition .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  14. Interpersonal relationships and group A streptococcus spread in a Mexican day-care center Relaciones interpersonales y diseminación del estreptococo del grupo A (EGA en una guardería de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Villaseñor-Sierra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of different degrees of centrality on the carrying of identical group A streptococcus (GAS clones in the nasopharynx of children from a Mexican public day-care center. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nasopharyngeal cultures were performed in children from rooms B (RB (n = 35 and C (RC (n = 37. The Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP patterns were compared among GAS isolates. A social networks questionnaire was filled out for each child and 10 classmates. Structure coefficients were compared among children with and without GAS. RESULTS: Four GAS clones were identified; clone I in five children from RC; clone II in two from RC and one from RB; clone III in one from RB and one from RC; and clone IV in one from RC. Social network structure: Density of RB and RC = 0.40 (± 0.87 and 0.35 (± 0.80, respectively. In RB, the homophily pattern of interaction was different in carriers (0.00, non-carriers (0.47 and both (0.47 p = 0.35. In RC, the homophily pattern was also different in carriers (0.46, non-carriers (0.68 and mixed (0.19, p = .001. In 4/5 with clone I, the values of degree, closeness and betweenness were above the group mean. In 3/3 with clone II, the values of degree and betweenness were also above the mean. In contrast, in those with clone III and IV, the values of degree, closeness and betweenness were below the group mean. CONCLUSION: The spread of specific GAS clones was associated with groups of children having a high proportion of ties and a high centrality level. This is evidence that spread of GAS strains among children attending day-care centers is not random but dependent on the degree of communication and physical contact between pairs.OBJETIVO: Evaluar el efecto de grados diferentes de centralidad con la presencia de clonas idénticas de estreptococo del grupo A (EGA en la nasofaringe de niños de una guardería pública de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se realizaron cultivos nasofaríngeos en ni

  15. A Day For Love

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Young couples drive Valentine’s Day booms in China It is not clear when Chinese couplesstarted celebrating Valentine’s Day,but it has now firmly established itself as an important day around the Spring Festival,

  16. Multi-faith Britain and family life : changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, and divorce among different faith groups 1983–2005

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Leslie J.; Williams, Emyr; Village, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of a question on religious affiliation in the decennial census for England and Wales, and for Scotland, for the first time in 2001 acknowledged that adequate profiling and interpretation of the contemporary multi-cultural landscape of Britain depended as much upon mapping religious identity as upon charting ethnic origin. Taking marital status as a key indicator of family life and family values in Britain, this study draws on the British Social Attitudes Survey data, collected a...

  17. A day to celebrate

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    After several weeks of preparations and hard work on the part of many people, the events to mark International Women's Day at CERN on 8 March were a genuine success. They were followed with great interest by the outside world, judging by the flurry of activity on twitter, various blogs and the media coverage they generated.   Women on shift in the CERN control rooms. Women were overwhelmingly in the majority at the controls of the experiments and accelerators throughout the day, as well as acting as the guides for all official visits. There was no shortage of enthusiasm! "I'm very happy that CERN has supported the project, and I'm especially encouraged by the enthusiastic response from everyone who's taken part", says Pauline Gagnon, a physicist from the Indiana University group and a member of the ATLAS collaboration, who was behind the idea. "I hope that this kind of initiative will help to show that women have a place in science and that young women thinkin...

  18. A Community Day Care Programme for Psychiatric Patients: The Role of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradad, Akanksha; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the need for and role of occupational therapy in the organization and functioning of a community day care center for psychiatric patients in India. The occupational therapy program involves client evaluation, determination of therapeutic activities, physical exercise, recreational activities, group sessions, family involvement,…

  19. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic ...

  20. An Unforgettable Mid—autumn Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小萍

    2005-01-01

    That was a traditional(传统的) Chinese festival Mid-autumn day. As Senior 3 students, we had classes that day. Some families were sitting around the table, eating delicious mooncakes. Some were wandering in the moonlight, talking about pleasant things. Daughters and sons were on their way back home.

  1. 75 FR 26875 - Mother's Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... two parents, a single mother, two mothers, a step-mom, a grandmother, or a guardian. Mother's Day... 8517 of May 7, 2010 Mother's Day, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Generations of mothers have labored tirelessly and selflessly to support and guide their children and families...

  2. TWO SPECIES OF PROFUSULINELLA (P. ALJUTOVICA AND P. OVATA, EARLY MOSCOVIAN (PENNSYLVANIAN FUSULINES FROM SOUTHERN TURKEY AND SUBDIVISION OF PRIMITIVE GROUPS OF THE FAMILY FUSULINIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FUMIO KOBAYASHI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Early Moscovian (Pennsylvanian fusulines, Profusulinella aljutovica and Profusulinella ovata, from the Hadim area, southern Turkey are described systematically. They are contained in the bedded limestone (algal fusuline grainstone of the Yaricak Formation of the Aladag Unit in the Tauride Block. Morphologic analysis of these and similar species suggests: (1 Aljutovella should be synonymous with Profusulinella; (2 Ovatella, Depratina, Staffellaeformes, Aljutovella (Elongatella, Tikhonovichiella, Skelnevatella, and Priscoidella proposed in 1980’s and 1990’s are also synonymous with Profusulinella; and (3 the families Profusulinellidae and Aljutovellidae are not necessary and Profusulinella is included in the subfamily Fusulinellinae placed under the family Fusulinidae. 

  3. Valentine’s Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>February 14 is a day for people who have fallen in love.On this day, these men and women give gifts(presents) and cards to each other for Valentine’s Day(情人节). This day has been popular with people in love for a long time.At first,this holiday was called Lupercalia. Then the name of the day was changed to Saint Valentine’s Day.The man named Saint Valentine was killed on February 14,270 AD,because he was a Christian(基督教徒).

  4. Empowering Head Start African American and Latino Families: Promoting Strengths-Based Parenting Characteristics through Child Parent Relationship Training--An Evidence-Based Group Parenting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely-Moore, Angela I.; Ceballos, Peggy L.

    2011-01-01

    With the tendency of low-income African American and Latino children identified at-risk for school readiness and school success compared to their early-childhood counterparts, Head Start personnel are challenged to examine the role of family strengths in the promotion of academic success for these populations. This article provides a rationale for…

  5. Self-management by family caregivers to manage changes in the behavior and mood of their relative with dementia: an online focus group study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis in het Veld, J.; Verkaik, R.; Meijel, B. van; Verkade, P.J.; Werkman, W.; Hertogh, C.; Francke, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-management is important for family caregivers of people with dementia, especially when they face changes in their relative’s behavior and mood, such as depression, apathy, anxiety, agitation and aggression. The aim of this study is to give insight into why these cha

  6. Children’s sugar-sweetened beverages consumption: associations with family and home-related factors, differences within ethnic groups explored

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M.J. Kruitwagen - van de Gaar (Vivian); A. van Grieken (Amy); W. Jansen (Wilma); H. Raat (Hein)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) may contribute to the development of overweight among children. The present study aimed to evaluate associations between family and home-related factors and children’s SSB consumption. We explored associations within

  7. FAST and the arms race: the interaction of group aggression and the families and schools together program in the aggressive and delinquent behaviors of inner-city elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Keith; Moberg, D Paul; McDonald, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    This study applies a multi-player arms race model to peer contagion in the aggressive and delinquent behaviors of inner-city elementary school students. Because this model of peer contagion differs from the usual model based on positive reinforcement of delinquent behavior, it raises the possibility that the persistent finding of iatrogenic effects of group treatment might not apply to group treatment of elementary school children if the possibility of aggressive behavior in the group is limited. One way of limiting aggressive behavior is to include parents in the groups. The study therefore applies the model to groups of elementary school students assigned to Families and Schools Together (FAST; a group treatment that includes parental participation) or to an intervention focused on individual families. The model effectively describes the relationship between group averages of aggressive behavior in the classroom and aggressive and delinquent behavior outside the classroom for those students assigned to the individual intervention. The model fits those children assigned to FAST less well, suggesting that FAST may make it less likely that aggressive and delinquent behavior is generalized outside of aggressive classroom settings. Editors' Strategic Implications: The authors draw on evolutionary biology, developmental psychology, sociology, and learning theory to present an innovative prevention model and test the promising FAST program. Using longitudinal data from 403 children, their parents, and their teachers, the authors describe how FAST may interfere with the process of escalating aggression.

  8. Day-to-day reproducibility of Holter beat-by-beat analysis of repolarisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Rafał; Popławska, Wanda; Buchner, Teodor; Chojnowska, Lidia; Rydlewska-Sadowska, Wanda

    2003-06-01

    Reproducibility of Holter QT analysis is not well established and has been assessed only in one study. We evaluated the day-to-day reproducibility of different QT parameters--mean and max (four beats basis) 24h QT and QTc (Bazett formula), QT for heart rate 55-60 [QT60], 75-80 [QT80] and 95-100 [QT100] beats/min and QT/RR slope (calculated in moving window of 3000 beats in 50 beat steps). QT intervals were measured from 48h digital ECG (sampled at 256 Hz) recordings using Del Mar Medical's QT software in beat-to-beat fashion. The analysed group consisted of 6 women and 24 men--13 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 5 healthy family members of the patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 7 patients with CAD and 5 with other diseases (hypertension, arrhythmia, aborted sudden death without organic heart disease). Reproducibility was analysed with the methods proposed by Bland and Altman. The overall reproducibility of repolarisation parameters was acceptable. Coefficient of reproducibility for mean 24h QT was 24ms, mean QTc 12ms, max QT 22ms, max QTc 24ms. The best reproducibility was observed for QT60, QT80 and QT100 - 12ms, respectively. The poorest day-to-day reproducibility was recorded for the QT/RR slope parameters, which was related to lower heart rate reproducibility. We can conclude that day-to-day reproducibility of Holter repolarisation analysis is acceptable. QT measurement in narrow heart rate windows has the best reproducibility. Accurate QT analysis requires good quality recording, T wave amplitude above 0.2mV and an interactive QT measurement tool which includes verification, editing abilities.

  9. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  10. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort.......Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  11. Tehnical day: solar energy

    OpenAIRE

    Carli, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents an example of planning and carrying out a technical activity day in the field of solar energy in primary school grades 7 and 9. Firstly, we briefly present technical activity days, the goals and criteria for the planning of technical days, and the topics and devices connected to the technical day in question and were needed in the execution of the experiments. We have selected four simple experiments in the field of solar energy and prepared the needed worksheets fo...

  12. April Fools’ Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abby

    2009-01-01

    April Fools’ Day,the day when mischief-makers(恶作剧的人)are ever so indulged(纵容),falls on April 1 every year.On that day,various pranks(恶作剧)are played on one another,and everybody has to be

  13. A Day to Celebrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Participating countries at the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai can choose a day as their National Pavilion Day.The day is usually celebrated with ceremonies and performances,which bring the nation’s culture and its character to life.

  14. Valentine’s Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓玲

    2009-01-01

    Valentine’s Day, which falls on February 14, is one of the most popular festivals of western society and even the whole world. It is a day for lovers, a day when people present chocolates, cards and candies to their beloved (心爱的人).

  15. Slimmed May Day Holiday

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinwen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Last November the State Council of China decided to renew its holiday system by reducing the seven-day Mav Dav holiday to three days and introducing three new one-day public holidays,namely the Qingming Festival,Dragon Boat Festival and Moon Festival.BY doing so,the three golden-week holidays that were introduced in 1999,namely the Spring Festival,Mav Dav and National Day,could be better distributed.The New Year's Eve holiday would remain one day.The new holiday plan was supposed to take effect in 2008.

  16. A família e o doente mental usuário do hospital-dia: estudo de um caso La familia y el enfermo mental usuário del hospital/día: estudo de un caso The family and the mentally-ill user of day-hospitals: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ruth Macêdo Monteiro

    2000-12-01

    este estudio son bastante significativas para la construcción de nuevas posibilidades en la atención a la familia del enfermo mental.The day-hospital, as a modality of psychiatric care, provides families with the possibility to experience greater contact with their mentally-ill relative during treatment and leads them to searching, together with such relative, for ways to facilitate the adaptation process of interaction in the family. This study aims at understanding how families and the users of day-hospitals interact out of their homes and at describing the experience narrated by a family. The family in this study was selected from one of the users of a day-hospital who had a previous history of hospital admissions for psychiatric treatment. Five members of the family under study were interviewed. Based on the experiences described by the subjects, two great thematic categories emerged: the family experiencing the day-hospital with its family member and the family-user relationships. The experiences narrated by the subjects in this study are rather significant for the construction of new possibilities in caring for the mentally-ill person's family.

  17. The fate of tandemly duplicated genes assessed by the expression analysis of a group of Arabidopsis thaliana RING-H2 ubiquitin ligase genes of the ATL family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hernández, Victor; Guzmán, Plinio

    2014-03-01

    Gene duplication events exert key functions on gene innovations during the evolution of the eukaryotic genomes. A large portion of the total gene content in plants arose from tandem duplications events, which often result in paralog genes with high sequence identity. Ubiquitin ligases or E3 enzymes are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system that function during the transfer of the ubiquitin molecule to the substrate. In plants, several E3s have expanded in their genomes as multigene families. To gain insight into the consequences of gene duplications on the expansion and diversification of E3s, we examined the evolutionary basis of a cluster of six genes, duplC-ATLs, which arose from segmental and tandem duplication events in Brassicaceae. The assessment of the expression suggested two patterns that are supported by lineage. While retention of expression domains was observed, an apparent absence or reduction of expression was also inferred. We found that two duplC-ATL genes underwent pseudogenization and that, in one case, gene expression is probably regained. Our findings provide insights into the evolution of gene families in plants, defining key events on the expansion of the Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura family of E3 ligases.

  18. Phase I Clinical Trial of a Day-1, -3, -5 Every 3 WeeksPhase I Clinical Trial of Day-1, -3, -5 Every 3 Weeks Schedule with Titanocene Dichloride (MKT 5) in Patients with Advanced Cancer. (Phase I Study Group of the AIO of the German Cancer Society).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mross, K.; Robben-Bathe, P.; Edler, L.; Baumgart, J.; Berdel, W.E.; Fiebig, H.; Unger, C.

    2000-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Titanocene dichloride (TD) is an organometallic compound with antiproliferative properties in vitro and promising antitumor activity in preclinical in vivo models. The drug interferes with DNA, blocks the S/G(2) phase of the cell cycle and shows antiangiogenic properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of a 'split' dose administration schedule (days 1, 3, 5 q 3 weeks). PATIENTS AND METHOD: Patients with progressive advanced cancer and a creatinine clearance > 60 ml/min qualified for a treatment with TD after standard therapies (radio-, chemo-, hormone therapy) failed. A total of 10 patients (4 females, 6 males) with a median age of 58 (range 49-68) years were treated with 80 mg/m(2) TD at days 1, 3 and 5 (repeated at day 22). The drug was administered as light-protected infusion within 1 h. RESULTS: Significant side effects were as follows: nausea/vomiting, appetite loss, renal toxicity (elevation of serum creatinine and proteinuria) and liver toxicity (bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase elevation), but no myelosuppression. At the starting dose (3 x 80 = 240 mg/m(2) TD), renal (3 patients) or liver toxicity (1 patient) of grade 3 was judged as DLT. No further dose escalation was possible. No objective tumor remission was observed. CONCLUSION: The tolerability of TD cannot be improved by splitting the total dose in to three treatments every other day. Compared to previous phase I data using a 3-weekly and a 1-weekly schedule, the 'split' dose administration allowed no further increase of the total drug dose per treatment cycle. Thus, dose intensification by alterations of the application mode does not seem to be possible. Copyright 2000 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  19. First Report of Three Cases of a Rare Blood Group Oh “Bombay Phenotype” in a Family in Yazd, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Javadzadeh Shahshahani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bombay (Oh Phenotype is a rare blood group. Phenotypes of this group lack H antigens on their red blood cell membrane and have strongly reactive anti-H in the serum for which patients can receive only autologus or Bombay phenotype red blood cells. We report three cases with Bombay blood group in the city of Yazd to emphasize the transfusion challenges in such patients.

  20. Experiences of a Community-Based Lymphedema Management Program for Lymphatic Filariasis in Odisha State, India: An Analysis of Focus Group Discussions with Patients, Families, Community Members and Program Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Tali; Worrell, Caitlin M.; Little, Kristen; Prakash, Aishya; Patra, Inakhi; Rout, Jonathan; Fox, LeAnne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally 68 million people are infected with lymphatic filariasis (LF), 17 million of whom have lymphedema. This study explores the effects of a lymphedema management program in Odisha State, India on morbidity and psychosocial effects associated with lymphedema. Methodology/Principal Findings Focus groups were held with patients (eight groups, separated by gender), their family members (eight groups), community members (four groups) and program volunteers (four groups) who had participated in a lymphedema management program for the past three years. Significant social, physical, and economic difficulties were described by patients and family members, including marriageability, social stigma, and lost workdays. However, the positive impact of the lymphedema management program was also emphasized, and many family and community members indicated that community members were accepting of patients and had some improved understanding of the etiology of the disease. Program volunteers and community members stressed the role that the program had played in educating people, though interestingly, local explanations and treatments appear to coexist with knowledge of biomedical treatments and the mosquito vector. Conclusions/Significance Local and biomedical understandings of disease can co-exist and do not preclude individuals from participating in biomedical interventions, specifically lymphedema management for those with lymphatic filariasis. There is a continued need for gender-specific psychosocial support groups to address issues particular to men and women as well as a continued need for improved economic opportunities for LF-affected patients. There is an urgent need to scale up LF-related morbidity management programs to reduce the suffering of people affected by LF. PMID:26849126

  1. A comparison of fish communities of subtidal seagrass beds and sandy seabeds in 13 marine embayments of a Caribbean island, based on species, families, size distribution and functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, I.; van der Velde, G.

    2004-08-01

    Differences in fish community structure between different estuaries, lagoons and bays can be very large, and generalisations are complicated by the use of a wide variety of sampling methods. In the present study, fish communities of subtidal seagrass beds and sandy seabeds in 13 marine embayments of a single Caribbean island were therefore sampled using a uniform method. The objective of the study was to determine whether the seagrass and sandy seabed habitats of various embayments are characterised by typical fish assemblages which differ in terms of taxa (species, families), size classes (life stages) and functional groups (ecological species groups, feeding time and diet). This was linked to the hypothesis that differences in fish assemblages between habitats in different embayments are larger at taxonomic levels than at the level of functional groups. A second objective was to determine the most useful discriminating features between the two habitat types. The above hypothesis was rejected, since differences in fish assemblages from different seagrass and sandy seabed sites did not increase from functional to taxonomic level, but from size class to diet/species to family/feeding time to ecological species group. However, the seagrass and sandy seabed habitats could each be characterised by typical fish assemblages which differed in taxonomical and functional group composition, irrespective of differences in environmental and biotic variables between the embayments in which these habitats were situated. The two habitat types could be best characterised on the basis of fish family, ecological species group, feeding time and size distribution. Seagrass beds mainly harboured nocturnally active nursery species (Haemulidae, Lutjanidae, etc.), whose relative abundance was related to vegetation (mainly seagrass) cover. Sandy seabeds mainly harboured diurnally active bay species (Gerreidae, etc.) whose relative abundance was related to cover of bare sand. Similarities

  2. The Effects of Group Counseling on Single-parent Family Children%单亲家庭儿童团体心理咨询干预的效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢宇; 杨继宇; 陈发祥

    2015-01-01

    目的:对单亲家庭儿童的心理健康水平进行团体心理咨询干预,比较单亲家庭儿童和正常家庭儿童的差异. 方法:选取单亲家庭儿童24名,参与7次、约14小时的团体心理咨询,使用《心理健康诊断测验》( MHT)对干预效果进行评估. 结果:干预前,单亲家庭儿童和正常家庭儿童在对人焦虑、孤独倾向、冲动倾向有显著差异(t=2.800,2.210,2.091;P<0.05);干预后,单亲家庭儿童和正常家庭儿童仅在对人焦虑有显著差异( t=2.168,P<0.05);单亲家庭儿童在对人焦虑、过敏倾向、身体症状、恐怖倾向、冲动倾向的前测和后测得分差异显著( t =2.598,2.304,2.769,2.145,2.892;P<0.05). 结论:团体心理咨询可以有效改善单亲家庭儿童心理健康水平.%Objective:To study the effects of group counseling on single -parent family children ,and to compare the difference between single -parent family children and normal family children.Methods:24 single-parent family children participated in 7 times,about 14 hours group counseling.Mental Health Test( MHT) was used to evaluate the effects of group counseling.Results:Before intervening ,there existed significant differences at anxiety tendency,loneliness tendency,impulsion tendency(t =2.800,2.210, 2.091;P<0.05) between single -parent family children and normal family children;After intervening, there was only one difference at loneliness tendency between single -parent family children and normal family children(t=2.168,P<0.05);There were significant differences at anxiety tendency ,sensitivity tendency ,body symptom ,horror tendency ,impulsion tendency between before intervening and after inter-vening on single-parent family children(t=2.598,2.304,2.769,2.145,2.892;P<0.05).Conclu-sion:Group counseling can significantly improve the level of mental health on single -parent family chil-dren.

  3. Observation of Curative Effect of Group Psychotherapy on Psychology of Family Members of Patients with Stroke%团体心理治疗对脑卒中患者家属心理状况的影响∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱达斌; 林秀瑶; 许云辉; 蔡耿辉; 王景峰; 汪流

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the curative effect on psychology of group psychotherapy to family members of patients with stroke.Methods:Sixty family members of patients with stroke were randomized into a treatment group and a control group.Treatment group give group psychotherapy.Both two groups are contrasted by SDS,SAS and sat-isfaction of medical service after twelve treatments,and compare the prevalence rate of two groups.Results:Through the group psychotherapy,the treatment group is obviously superior to control group in SDS and SAS (P <0.05),im-prove satisfaction level of medical service.Conclusion:The group psychotherapy is effective in curing psychology of fam-ily members of patients with stroke,improving satisfaction level of medical service.%目的::探讨团体心理治疗对脑卒中患者家属心理状况的影响。方法:60例脑卒中患者家属按随机卡法分为治疗组和对照组,各30例。对照组未进行干预,观察组给予团体心理治疗干预,共计12次。比较两组家属干预前、后抑郁自评量表(SDS)、焦虑自评量表(SAS)评分和住院满意度情况。结果:两组患者家属 SDS 和 SAS 评分均明显高于正常参考值(P <0.05);观察组干预前、后的 SDS 和 SAS 评分比较差异有统计学意义(P <0.05),患者家属对住院治疗的满意度提高。结论:对脑卒中患者家属进行团体心理治疗干预,利于改善家属的不良心理,对患者的疾病恢复起到积极主动的影响,并能提高家属对医院治疗的满意度。

  4. Childhood Obesity and Interpersonal Dynamics During Family Meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Seth; Trofholz, Amanda; Hanson, Carrie; Rueter, Martha; MacLehose, Richard F.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Family meals have been found to be associated with a number of health benefits for children; however, associations with obesity have been less consistent, which raises questions about the specific characteristics of family meals that may be protective against childhood obesity. The current study examined associations between interpersonal and food-related family dynamics at family meals and childhood obesity status. METHODS: The current mixed-methods, cross-sectional study included 120 children (47% girls; mean age: 9 years) and parents (92% women; mean age: 35 years) from low-income and minority communities. Families participated in an 8-day direct observational study in which family meals were video-recorded in their homes. Family meal characteristics (eg, length of the meal, types of foods served) were described and associations between dyadic (eg, parent-child, child-sibling) and family-level interpersonal and food-related dynamics (eg, communication, affect management, parental food control) during family meals and child weight status were examined. RESULTS: Significant associations were found between positive family- and parent-level interpersonal dynamics (ie, warmth, group enjoyment, parental positive reinforcement) at family meals and reduced risk of childhood overweight. In addition, significant associations were found between positive family- and parent-level food-related dynamics (ie, food warmth, food communication, parental food positive reinforcement) and reduced risk of childhood obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Results extend previous findings on family meals by providing a better understanding of interpersonal and food-related family dynamics at family meals by childhood weight status. Findings suggest the importance of working with families to improve the dyadic and family-level interpersonal and food-related dynamics at family meals. PMID:25311603

  5. Childhood obesity and interpersonal dynamics during family meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Rowley, Seth; Trofholz, Amanda; Hanson, Carrie; Rueter, Martha; MacLehose, Richard F; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-11-01

    Family meals have been found to be associated with a number of health benefits for children; however, associations with obesity have been less consistent, which raises questions about the specific characteristics of family meals that may be protective against childhood obesity. The current study examined associations between interpersonal and food-related family dynamics at family meals and childhood obesity status. The current mixed-methods, cross-sectional study included 120 children (47% girls; mean age: 9 years) and parents (92% women; mean age: 35 years) from low-income and minority communities. Families participated in an 8-day direct observational study in which family meals were video-recorded in their homes. Family meal characteristics (eg, length of the meal, types of foods served) were described and associations between dyadic (eg, parent-child, child-sibling) and family-level interpersonal and food-related dynamics (eg, communication, affect management, parental food control) during family meals and child weight status were examined. Significant associations were found between positive family- and parent-level interpersonal dynamics (ie, warmth, group enjoyment, parental positive reinforcement) at family meals and reduced risk of childhood overweight. In addition, significant associations were found between positive family- and parent-level food-related dynamics (ie, food warmth, food communication, parental food positive reinforcement) and reduced risk of childhood obesity. Results extend previous findings on family meals by providing a better understanding of interpersonal and food-related family dynamics at family meals by childhood weight status. Findings suggest the importance of working with families to improve the dyadic and family-level interpersonal and food-related dynamics at family meals. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Impact of Group Counseling on Self and Other Acceptance and Persistence with Rural Disadvantaged Student Families. Counseling Services Report No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, Herbert A.; Conrad, Rowan W.

    The current study examined the effectiveness of a theme-centered developmental group model focusing on communications and on the differential effects of two group settings for counseling delivery. The subjects were 32 young, disadvantaged adults, consisting of 15 married couples and two divorced females, who were randomly assigned to spouse…

  7. General Rushes Open Days Day II

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General Footage during the Open Days 2013 (Day 2 -29/09/2013) Images: Antoine Nouel, Clément Sbaffe, Victor Prunier, David Guerazzi, Basile Manent, Réemi Richarme, Noemi Caraban 00:00:00 00:08:56 Interviews 00:08:56 00:20:47 ALICE 00:20:47 00:26:52 ATLAS 00:26:52 00:28:07 Workshops 00:28:07 00:33:13 Crystal Lab 00:33:13 00:44:19 Superconductivity 00:44:19 01:04:42 Cryogenics 01:04:42 01:12:39 Transports 01:12:39 01:16:30 LEIR 01:16:30 01:18:28 LMF 01:18:28 01:19:50 Vacuum 01:19:50 01:36:39 Superconducting magnets (F1) 01:36:39 01:46:06 The idea filled world of vacuum (F2) 01:46:06 01:49:55 CCC 01:49:55 01:52:41 Safety Training Center 01:52:41 01:55:00 COMPASS 01:55:00 02:09:19 Robotics 02:09:19 02:18:36 LHC Point 6 (with DG) 02:18:36 02:25:16 LHC Point 4 02:25:16 02:29:29 LHCb 02:29:29 02:33:12 Control Center 02:33:12 02:39:57 Streets

  8. [Can family meals protect adolescents from obesity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Izabela; Jodkowska, Maria; Oblacińska, Anna; Mikiel-Kostyra, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the relationship between the frequency of family meals and the body weight of 13-year-olds and its selected determinants. The study was conducted in 2008 as the last stage in a prospective cohort study of 605 children. Questionnaires containing questions about the frequency of family meals, the general regularity of meals, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity and the number of hours spent watching television or at the computer were sent to 13-year-olds by mail. School nurses performed anthropometric measurements of the pupils' weight and height. Statistical analyses were performed, i.e. Pearson's correlations, the two-step cluster analysis and the logistic regression analysis. Most of the young people (80-90%) eat each of the main meals in the company of their parents at least once a week, 21% have breakfast with their parents every day, 41% - dinner, and 45% - supper. The frequency of family meals correlated negatively with the girls' BMI and the number of hours they spent watching television or at the computer, while positively with physical activity, regular meals and vegetable consumption in adolescents of both genders. The lowest mean values of BMI were found in a group of adolescents often eating family meals, the highest - in the group of young people who rarely ate family meals (over 20% of young people in this group were overweight), but the differences were statistically significant only for girls (p=0.025). The probability of less than 2 hours of sedentary behaviour daily, physical activity of at least 60 minutes per day and everyday vegetable and fruit consumption is twice as high in adolescents often consuming meals with their parents, and with the daily consumption of all the meals in this way - more than fourfold higher than in other groups. Family meals treated as a predictor of a healthy lifestyle can indirectly protect adolescents from overweight and obesity. Promoting family meals should be an important method of

  9. The Effects of an Interdependent Group Oriented Contingency and Performance Feedback on the Praise Statements of Pre-Service Teachers during a Summer Day-Camp for Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clinton; Bicard, David F.; Casey, Laura B.; Bicard, Sara C.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher praise is one of the most important elements of teaching and learning. Behavioral consultation with and without performance has been shown to be an effective method for increasing instructional praise. The authors used an ABCBC design to investigate the effects of an interdependent group oriented contingency (GC) and the GC plus…

  10. Open Day at SHMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosova, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the World Meteorological Day there has been preparing "Open Day" at Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute. This event has more than 10 years traditions. "Open Day" is one of a lot of possibilities to give more information about meteorology, climatology, hydrology too to public. This "Day" is executed in whole Slovakia. People can visit the laboratories, the forecasting room....and meteo and clima measuring points. The most popular is visiting forecasting room. Visitors are interested in e.g. climatologic change in Slovakia territory, preparing weather forecasting, dangerous phenomena.... Every year we have more than 500 visitors.

  11. General Rushes Open Days Day I

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General Footage during Open Days 2013 (Day 1 -28/09/2013) Images: Cameramen: Antoine Nouel, Clément Sbaffe, Victor Prunier, David Guerazzi, Basile Manent, Réemi Richarme, Noemi Caraban 00:00:00 00:03:40 Interviews 00:03:40 00:06:54 Beam Instrumentation 00:06:54 00:07:16 Globe 00:07:16 00:10:28 Microcosme 00:10:28 00:12:59 Lectures 00:12:59 00:27:52 Fun with physics 00:27:52 00:28:19 International Village 00:28:19 00:34:18 Fun Zone 00:34:18 00:47:50 ATLAS Surface 00:47:50 00:56:57 ATLAS underground 00:56:57 00:58:53 Detector technologies 00:58:53 01:04:39 CLIC 01:04:39 01:05:56 CMS surface 01:05:56 01:09:32 LINAC 2-3 01:09:32 01:15:29 LINAC 4 01:15:29 01:20:41 Computer Center 01:20:41 01:25:53 Clubs 01:25:53 01:31:49 Beam Instrumentation 01:31:49 01:35:27 Music Festival 01:35:27 01:37:31 SPS 01:37:31 01:46:13 CCC 01:46:13 01:48:24 Safety Trainig Center 01:48:24 01:52:38 COMPASS 01:52:38 01:56:09 EHN1 01:56:09 02:01:42 AMS 02:01:42 02:10:52 Robotics 02:10:52 02:22:48 LHC Point 4 02:22:48 02:23:48 Control Cent...

  12. “Good Day! My name is Martin and I am Danish citizen”: problem-solving, knowledge-sharing, and trust in online interaction ‒ the case of family reunification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Jensen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on opportunities for citizens to interact with public organisations in the processing of individual cases and how this interaction is facilitated by the Internet. We analysed a string of messages from the online forum of the non-governmental organisation Marriage without Borders, which offers dialogue-based advice to members looking for help prior with the complex application process in relation to family reunification visas in Denmark. The trajectory of the problem-solving interaction clearly demonstrates the Internet’s potential for dynamic online interaction, emphasising the timeliness of a joint accomplishment. Our findings also emphasise the potential of non-governmental web forums to address the needs of member publics and to serve as equalisers in relation to the power gap between the more powerful public authorities and the less powerful individuals. A recurrent theme running through these posts is that you trust the members of the community to help as best they can and that expertise is not allocated to the authorities alone.

  13. Valentine's Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓玲

    2009-01-01

    Valentine’s Day,which falls on February14,is one of the most popular festivals of western society and even the whole world.It is a day for lovers,a day when people present chocolates,cards and can-dies to their beloved(心爱的人).

  14. Science Challenge Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  15. NO TOBACCO DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service is joining in with the world no tobacco day, which takes place on 31 May 2002. We encourage you to take this opportunity to stop smoking for good. Nurses and Doctors will be present on that day to give out information on methods to stop smoking and to assist you in your efforts.

  16. A Perfect Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOREMICHELUT

    2004-01-01

    THERE are days where not a thing goes wrong. There's not a glitch. Everything you expect happens, and then more comes along, not because you ask, but because it just does. It's the way life is supposed to be when life is perfect. Memory is what names that day perfect and analyzes it in order to create another, just like it.

  17. Family Therapy for the "Truncated" Nuclear Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated nuclear family consists of a two-generation group in which conflict has produced a polarization of values. The single-parent family is at special risk. Go-between process enables the therapist to depolarize sharply conflicted values and reduce pathogenic relating. (Author)

  18. Dissolved families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The situation in the family preceding a family separation is studied here, to identify risk factors for family dissolution. Information registers covering prospective statistics about health aspects, demographic variables, family violence, self-destructive behaviour, unemployment, and the spousal...

  19. Dissolved families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The situation in the family preceding a family separation is studied here, to identify risk factors for family dissolution. Information registers covering prospective statistics about health aspects, demographic variables, family violence, self-destructive behaviour, unemployment, and the spousal...

  20. Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... your outlook on the future. Friends and adult family members The effects of cancer on your relationships ...

  1. That Rainy Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴洪

    2000-01-01

    Many things have happened since I began to remember things. Pleasant or sad, they've left some impressions on my mind. Some are fading from my memory while others are and will be remembered for ever as if they had happened yesterday, and the scene on that rainy day is just one of such memories. It was on July 7th, 1990, the first day of the 3-day college entrance examination. I got up early that morning, feeling so excited and nervous that I lost all my appetite. What's worse, it began raining, adding vexat...

  2. Message On the International Day Of Peace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ban; Ki-moon

    2014-01-01

    <正>23rdSeptember 2014Today is the International Day of Peace.Each year,on this day,the United Nations calls for a global ceasefire.We ask combatants to put down their arms so all can breathe the air of peace.Armed conflict causes untold grief to families,communities and entire countries.Too many are suffering today at the brutal hands of wvarmongers and terrorists.

  3. Bioinformatics Challenge Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    participant) to late career professionals. • A large number of participants were present from both academia and industry . • BCD2 was very successful...project groups/teaming 12:30 PM Lunch served (groups can continue to work) 3:30 PM Snack (groups can continue to work) 7:00 PM Results submitted by...45 AM Coffee/Break into project groups 12:30 PM Lunch served (groups can continue to work) 3:30 PM Snack (groups can continue to work) 6:30 PM

  4. "They Were a Little Family": An Exploratory Study of Parental Involvement in Nurture Groups--From a Practitioner and Parent Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The approach taken by nurture groups emphasises that difficult early experiences can be modified through creating opportunities to develop security and attachment from alternative sources other than parents. Despite previous research indicating the positive impact parental involvement can have on both parents and children, research into parental…

  5. Days of Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN

    2004-01-01

    FROM last October 1 st to 3rd, at the foot of Fragrant Hill, a suburban Beijing resort famous for its flaming maple leaves in autumn, more than 20,000 rock fans indulged themselves in music for three days.

  6. My Happiest Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚晶晶; 万正芬

    2002-01-01

    Yesterday I was fourteen years old. Of course, it was my birlhday. My parents were both at home, I wanted to have o birthday party, so they helped me get everything ready for the biilhday the day before yesterday.

  7. Open Day: General Information

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ With 50 visit points, including theatre performances, debates and visits to installations that have never before been opened to the public, CERN's 50th anniversary Open Day is set to be a day to remember. Seven hundred volunteers have signed up to help for the day. The Open Day team truly appreciates this wonderful show of support! The Open Day would not be possible without their help. Car parking and Access Cars with a CERN sticker can access all CERN sites as normal. However, to avoid congestion on Meyrin site, we ask you to park in areas that will not be open to the public (see below) and to use the shuttle services wherever possible for your transport during the day. Private cars on the French side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverted to a car park area in the Prévessin site. There is a shuttle service connecting the Meyrin and Prévessin sites via SM18 every 20 minutes. Private cars on the Swiss side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverte...

  8. An extended day program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ševkušić-Mandić Slavica G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a pilot project evaluation, carried out as an action investigation whose aim was to provide a better quality extended day for primary school students. The project included the training of teachers involved in extended day program, designing of special activities performed by teachers with children once a week as well as changes and equipping of premises where children stay. The aims of the program were conception and performance of activities in a less formal way than during regular instructional days, linking of learning at school and acquired knowledge to everyday experiences, and work on contents contributing to the development of child's interests and creativity. The program was accomplished in a Belgrade primary school during the 2001/2002 academic year, comprising students of 1st and 2nd grades (N=77. The effects of the program were monitored throughout the academic year (observation and teachers' reports on accomplished workshops and at the end of the academic year (teachers and students' opinions of the program, academic achievement and creativity of students attending the extended day program compared with students not attending it. Findings about positive effects of the program on students' broadening of interests and willingness to express themselves creatively, indicate unequivocally that there is a need for developing special extended day programs. The extended day program is an opportunity for school to exert greater educational influence that has yet to be tapped.

  9. Enhanced Co-Worker Social Support in Isolated Work Groups and Its Mitigating Role on the Work-Family Conflict-Depression Loss Spiral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley P. McTernan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a loss spiral model (i.e., reciprocal relationships between work-family conflict and depression, moderated by co-worker support. We expected that the moderation effect due to co-worker support would be evident among those working in isolation (i.e., mining workers due to a greater level of intragroup attraction and saliency attributable to the proximity effects. We used a two wave panel study and data from a random population sample of Australian employees (n = 2793, [n = 112 mining, n = 2681 non-mining]. Using structural equation modelling we tested the reciprocal three way interaction effects. In line with our theory, co-worker support buffered the reciprocal relationship between WFC and depression, showing a protective effect in both pathways. These moderation effects were found in the mining industry only suggesting a proximity component moderates the social support buffer hypothesis (i.e., a three way interaction effect. The present paper integrates previous theoretical perspectives of stress and support, and provides insight into the changing dynamics of workplace relationships.

  10. Enhanced Co-Worker Social Support in Isolated Work Groups and Its Mitigating Role on the Work-Family Conflict-Depression Loss Spiral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTernan, Wesley P; Dollard, Maureen F; Tuckey, Michelle R; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2016-03-29

    This paper examines a loss spiral model (i.e., reciprocal relationships) between work-family conflict and depression, moderated by co-worker support. We expected that the moderation effect due to co-worker support would be evident among those working in isolation (i.e., mining workers) due to a greater level of intragroup attraction and saliency attributable to the proximity effects. We used a two wave panel study and data from a random population sample of Australian employees (n = 2793, [n = 112 mining, n = 2681 non-mining]). Using structural equation modelling we tested the reciprocal three way interaction effects. In line with our theory, co-worker support buffered the reciprocal relationship between WFC and depression, showing a protective effect in both pathways. These moderation effects were found in the mining industry only suggesting a proximity component moderates the social support buffer hypothesis (i.e., a three way interaction effect). The present paper integrates previous theoretical perspectives of stress and support, and provides insight into the changing dynamics of workplace relationships.

  11. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The workshop continued a series of Oberwolfach meetings on algebraic groups, started in 1971 by Tonny Springer and Jacques Tits who both attended the present conference. This time, the organizers were Michel Brion, Jens Carsten Jantzen, and Raphaël Rouquier. During the last years, the subject...... of algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group......-theorists, and to stimulate contacts between participants. Each of the first four days was dedicated to one area of research that has recently seen decisive progress: \\begin{itemize} \\item structure and classification of wonderful varieties, \\item finite reductive groups and character sheaves, \\item quantum cohomology...

  12. Lifting the weight of a diagnosis-related groups family change: a comparison between refined and non-refined DRG systems for top-down cost accounting and efficiency indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Cuchi, Miguel Alfaro; Pérez Pérez, Maria Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Public healthcare providers in all Spanish Regions - Autonomous Communities (ACs) use All Patients Diagnosis-Related Groups (AP-DRGs) for billing non-insured patients, cost accounting and inpatient efficiency indicators. A national migration to All Patients Refined Diagnosis-Related Groups (APR-DRGs) has been scheduled for 2016. The analysis was performed on 202,912 inpatient care episodes ranging from 2005 to 2010. All episodes were grouped using AP-DRG v25.0 and APR-DRG v24.0. Normalised DRG weight variations for an AP-DRG to APR-DRG migration scenario were calculated and compared. Major differences exist between normalised weights for inpatient episodes depending on the DRGs family used. The usage of the APR-DRG system in Spain without any adjustments, as it was developed in the United States, should be approached with care. In order to avoid reverse incentives and provider financial risks, coding practices should be reviewed and structural differences between DRG families taken into account.

  13. Effectiveness of Satir-Informed Family-Therapy on the Codependency of Drug Dependents' Family Members in Iran: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad-Abadi, Fatemeh Karimi; Maarefvand, Masoomeh; Aghaei, Hakimeh; Hosseinzadeh, Samaneh; Abbasi, Mahboubeh; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2017-01-01

    Social workers in substance abuse treatment settings are responsible for involving families in treatment program to improve family functioning. The effectiveness of available interventions in treating codependency of family members of drug users in Iran is not well explored. We evaluated the effectiveness of the Satir communication family therapy (CFT) in healing codependency of drug dependents' family members in Tehran, Iran. The intervention group participants (n = 27) received a seven-session social work intervention with CFT approach and the control group (n = 26) received treatment as usual. We used the Holyoake Codependency Index to measure participants' codependency at baselines, end of intervention, and 90 days post intervention. Codependents enrolled in the intervention had a significantly lower codependency score than controls at the end of intervention and 90 days post intervention. CFT is an effective strategy to reduce codependency in Iranian population and can be explored as a population-based strategy.

  14. Loosely coupled class families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    are expressed using virtual classes seem to be very tightly coupled internally. While clients have achieved the freedom to dynamically use one or the other family, it seems that any given family contains a xed set of classes and we will need to create an entire family of its own just in order to replace one......Families of mutually dependent classes that may be accessed polymor- phically provide an advanced tool for separation of concerns, in that it enables client code to use a group of instances of related classes safely without depending on the exact classes involved. However, class families which...... of the members with another class. This paper shows how to express class families in such a manner that the classes in these families can be used in many dierent combinations, still enabling family polymorphism and ensuring type safety....

  15. Bifurcation Diagrams and Quotient Topological Spaces Under the Action of the Affine Group of a Family of Planar Quadratic Vector Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerba Diaconescu, Oxana; Schlomiuk, Dana; Vulpe, Nicolae

    In this article, we consider the class QSL4{u +vc+w^c, ∞ } of all real quadratic differential systems (dx)/(dt) = p(x, y), (dy)/(dt) = q(x, y) with gcd(p, q) = 1, having invariant lines of total multiplicity four and two complex and one real infinite singularities. We first construct compactified canonical forms for the class QSL4{u +vc+w^c, ∞ } so as to include limit points in the 12-dimensional parameter space of this class. We next construct the bifurcation diagrams for these compactified canonical forms. These diagrams contain many repetitions of phase portraits and we show that these are due to many symmetries under the group action. To retain the essence of the dynamics we finally construct the quotient spaces under the action of the group G = Aff(2, ℝ) × ℝ* of affine transformations and time homotheties and we place the phase portraits in these quotient spaces. The final diagrams retain only the necessary information to capture the dynamics under the motion in the parameter space as well as under this group action. We also present here necessary and sufficient conditions for an affine line to be invariant of multiplicity k for a quadratic system.

  16. Two major open days this spring

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN will be organising two Open Days in April 2008, one for CERN employees and their families from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, 5 April, and another for the general public from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday, 6 April.

  17. Positive Education Program's Day Treatment Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecser, Frank A.

    2003-01-01

    The Positive Education Program in Cleveland, Ohio, is grounded in the Re-EDucation philosophy and serves more than 700 students with emotional and behavioral disorders in eight day treatment centers. The centers blend special education with mental health in a school environment in which students and families are both supported and challenged as…

  18. 4th Optimization Day

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhard, Andrew; Ralph, Daniel; Glover, Barney M

    1999-01-01

    Although the monograph Progress in Optimization I: Contributions from Aus­ tralasia grew from the idea of publishing a proceedings of the Fourth Optimiza­ tion Day, held in July 1997 at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, the focus soon changed to a refereed volume in optimization. The intention is to publish a similar book annually, following each Optimization Day. The idea of having an annual Optimization Day was conceived by Barney Glover; the first of these Optimization Days was held in 1994 at the University of Ballarat. Barney hoped that such a yearly event would bring together the many, but widely dispersed, researchers in Australia who were publishing in optimization and related areas such as control. The first Optimization Day event was followed by similar conferences at The University of New South Wales (1995), The University of Melbourne (1996), the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (1997), and The University of Western Australia (1998). The 1999 conference will return to Ballarat ...

  19. 75 FR 63753 - Family Offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... family, provides advice to a broader group of clients and much more resembles the business model common... investment advisory business, and not a family managing its own wealth. 2. Ownership and Control We propose... feature helped distinguish these family offices from the family-run investment advisory businesses...

  20. AAS 227: Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  1. My Favorite Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李峰

    2008-01-01

    It’s Friday, November 14th. I’m happy today. In1 8 o’clock I have Chinese. I like it because it’s fun. Then I have math and art. In2 this day I can have P.E. in the afternoon. That’s my favorite subject. I play football and basketball. Then I have a two-days3 holiday. At 6 o’clock p.m. I can swimming4 for an hour. In5 Friday evening I have a party with my friends.

  2. WITHDRAWN: Day care for pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoritch, Bozhena; Roberts, Ian; Oakley, Ann

    2016-10-11

    The debate about how, where and by whom young children should be looked after is one which has occupied much social policy and media attention in recent years. Mothers undertake most of the care of young children. Internationally, out-of-home day-care provision ranges widely. These different levels of provision are not simply a response to different levels of demand for day-care, but reflect cultural and economic interests concerning the welfare of children, the need to promote mothers' participation in paid work, and the importance of socialising children into society's values. At a time when a decline in family values is held responsible for a range of social problems, the day-care debate has a special prominence. To quantify the effects of out-of-home day-care for preschool children on educational, health and welfare outcomes for children and their families. Randomised controlled trials of day-care for pre-school children were identified using electronic databases, hand searches of relevant literature, and contact with authors. Studies were included in the review if the intervention involved the provision of non-parental day care for children under 5 years of age, and the evaluation design was that of a randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trial. A total of eight trials were identified after examining 920 abstracts and 19 books. The trials were assessed for methodological quality. Day-care increases children's IQ, and has beneficial effects on behavioural development and school achievement. Long-term follow up demonstrates increased employment, lower teenage pregnancy rates, higher socio-economic status and decreased criminal behaviour. There are positive effects on mothers' education, employment and interaction with children. Effects on fathers have not been examined. Few studies look at a range of outcomes spanning the health, education and welfare domains. Most of the trials combined non-parental day-care with some element of parent training or education

  3. Divergence in the plasminogen-binding group a streptococcal M protein family: functional conservation of binding site and potential role for immune selection of variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson-Smith, Martina; Batzloff, Michael; Sriprakash, Kabada S; Dowton, Mark; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J

    2006-02-10

    Group A streptococci (GAS) display receptors for the human zymogen plasminogen on the cell surface, one of which is the plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM). Characterization of PAM genes from 12 GAS isolates showed significant variation within the plasminogen-binding repeat motifs (a1/a2) of this protein. To determine the impact of sequence variation on protein function, recombinant proteins representing five naturally occurring variants of PAM, together with a recombinant M1 protein, were expressed and purified. Equilibrium dissociation constants for the interaction of PAM variants with biotinylated Glu-plasminogen ranged from 1.58 to 4.99 nm. Effective concentrations of prototype PAM required for 50% inhibition of plasminogen binding to immobilized PAM variants ranged from 0.68 to 22.06 nm. These results suggest that although variation in the a1/a2 region of the PAM protein does affect the comparative affinity of PAM variants, the functional capacity to bind plasminogen is conserved. Additionally, a potential role for the a1 region of PAM in eliciting a protective immune response was investigated by using a mouse model for GAS infection. The a1 region of PAM was found to protect immunized mice challenged with a PAM-positive GAS strain. These data suggest a link between selective immune pressure against the plasminogen-binding repeats and the functional conservation of the binding domain in PAM variants.

  4. Family Dinners. For Parents Particularly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Helen Altman

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that family dinners deserve attention as a positive contributor to children's well-being. Maintains that family dinners give stability to a potentially confusing day, present a place for children to express themselves, and provide children's first community. Includes ideas for helping families identify their own dinner patterns and…

  5. Alcoolismo e fam��lia: a vivência de mulheres participantes do grupo de autoajuda Al-Anon Alcoholism and family: the experience of women members who participate in self-help group Al-Anon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lúcia Alves Filzola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Compreender a vivência de familiares que frequentam o grupo de apoio Al-Anon diante da experiência do alcoolismo. MÉTODO: A pesquisa foi realizada com 6 mulheres, das 10 convidadas, que frequentam o grupo de autoajuda Al-Anon. A coleta de dados se deu através de entrevistas semiestruturadas. Os referenciais teórico e metodológico que embasaram a análise qualitativa foram o Interacionismo Simbólico e a Teoria Fundamentada nos Dados, em seus passos iniciais. RESULTADOS: Os dados resultaram em 3 categorias conceituais: 1 Negando o alcoolismo e sofrendo suas consequências; 2 Buscando ajuda, aprendendo com o grupo; e 3 Esperando a cura, experimentando a sobriedade e enfrentando as recaídas. Além do apoio da própria família e da religião, as mulheres apontaram a importância do grupo de autoajuda para ampará-las no enfrentamento dos problemas decorrentes do alcoolismo. CONCLUSÃO: Esperamos que os resultados desta pesquisa possam contribuir para a valorização do suporte oferecido pelo Al-Anon, estimular novos estudos na área e fortalecer, entre os profissionais de saúde, o reconhecimento do grupo como recurso importante de apoio efetivo às famílias.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the experience of family members who participate in Al-Anon support group in relation to alcoholism. METHOD: The research was accomplished with 6 women, 10 invited, attending the group of self-help Al-Anon. The data collection was through semi-structured interviews. The theoretical and methodological reference to the qualitative analysis was based on Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory in Data, in its initial steps. RESULTS: The data resulted in 3 conceptual categories: 1 Denying alcoholism and suffering yours consequences; 2 Searching for help, learning with the support group; 3 Waiting for cure, experiencing sobriety and facing relapses. Besides the support of family and religion, women pointed to the importance of self-help group to support

  6. CERN openlab Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Purcell, Andrew Robert

    2015-01-01

    The CERN openlab Open Day took place on 10 June, 2015. This was the first in a series of annual events at which research and industrial teams from CERN openlab can present their projects, share achievements, and collect feedback from their user communities.

  7. Governing To‐day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Governing To-day denotes a domain of research, and what the thesis undertakes is a theoretical discussion of some questions of method vis-à-vis researching this domain. There are two aspects to the title that enfold one another. Firstly, “governing to-day” signposts that it is to!day that is to b...... of departure in the research and writing of the French philosopher and historian, Michel Foucault. It is primarily within the writings of Foucault that the thesis seeks to find a workaround to the problem thrown forth by the aforementioned questions of method.......Governing To-day denotes a domain of research, and what the thesis undertakes is a theoretical discussion of some questions of method vis-à-vis researching this domain. There are two aspects to the title that enfold one another. Firstly, “governing to-day” signposts that it is to...... in time, in the present!day, in this time that is our own, and so forth, that forms the object of enquiry. Accordingly, “governing to!day” denotes both a government of the present and government in the present. In working through said questions of method, the thesis sketches out an approach that takes...

  8. 90-Day Cycle Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sandra; Takahashi, Sola

    2013-01-01

    90-Day Cycles are a disciplined and structured form of inquiry designed to produce and test knowledge syntheses, prototyped processes, or products in support of improvement work. With any type of activity, organizations inevitably encounter roadblocks to improving performance and outcomes. These barriers might include intractable problems at…

  9. European Antibiotic Awareness Day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earnshaw, S; Mancarella, G; Mendez, A;

    2014-01-01

    Awareness Day (EAAD) on 18 November as platform to support national campaigns across Europe. This article provides an overview of EAAD tools, materials, and activities developed during the first five years. It shows that EAAD has been successful due to good cooperation between ECDC and national institutions...

  10. Radiochemistry days; Journees radiochimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This document provides the 44 papers (transparencies used during the presentations and posters) presented at the Radiochemistry Days, held September 3-4, 1998 in Nantes, France. The main studied topics were problematic questions concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and in particular the management, storage of radioactive wastes and the environmental impact. (O.M.)

  11. Orthopaedics in day surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orthopaedics surgery, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 52507-00200, Nairobi, Kenya and M.A. Odhiambo, KRN,. KRM, BSc ... processing of day cases is separate, more efficient and cases of ... centre is by rule of the medicare and accreditation.

  12. Olympus and Earth Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Let your gaze rest upon the poster for Earth Day on April 22. A small polar bear clings tightly to the stem of an aero-vane. Staring at the vanishing floating ice on the wild sea, his eyes are full of panic and fear.

  13. National hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 12th of June 2003 Is the French National Hearing Day. The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to come and have an ear test at the infirmary. Bld. 57, ground floor, between 9h00 and 16h00 Tel. 73802

  14. World Heart Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    For World Heart Day, learn more about what heart-healthy steps you can take in the workplace.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  15. NATIONAL HEARING DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 12th of June 2003 Is the French National Hearing Day. The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to come and have an ear test at the infirmary. Bld. 57, ground floor, between 9h00 and 16h00 Tel. 73802

  16. Scheduling: Seven Period Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Driven by stable or declining financial resources many school districts are considering the costs and benefits of a seven-period day. While there is limited evidence that any particular scheduling model has a greater impact on student learning than any other, it is clear that the school schedule is a tool that can significantly impact teacher…

  17. April Fool's Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ While popular in the U.S., the April Fool's Day tradition is even more popular in European countries, such as France and Great Britain. Although the roots(起源) of the traditional tricks (恶作剧) are unclear, the French and the British both have claims(声称) on the origin(起源) of the celebration.

  18. "A Day Without Immigrants"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Benita

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This article considers the debates surrounding the "Day Without Immigrants" protests organized in major U.S. cities on 1 May 2006, prompted by H.R. 4437, the Border Protection, Anti-Terrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005, from the multiple perspectives of scholars, pundit...

  19. Associations of Family and Peer Experiences with Masculinity Attitude Trajectories at the Individual and Group Level in Adolescent and Young Adult Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcell, Arik V; Eftim, Sorina E; Sonenstein, Freya L; Pleck, Joseph H

    2011-11-01

    Data were drawn from 845 males in the National Survey of Adolescent Males who were initially aged 15-17, and followed-up 2.5 and 4.5 years later, to their early twenties. Mixed-effects regression models (MRM) and semiparametric trajectory analyses (STA) modeled patterns of change in masculinity attitudes at the individual and group levels, guided by gender intensification theory and cognitive-developmental theory. Overall, men's masculinity attitudes became significantly less traditional between middle adolescence and early adulthood. In MRM analyses using time-varying covariates, maintaining paternal coresidence and continuing to have first sex in uncommitted heterosexual relationships were significantly associated with masculinity attitudes remaining relatively traditional. The STA modeling identified three distinct patterns of change in masculinity attitudes. A traditional-liberalizing trajectory of masculinity attitudes was most prevalent, followed by traditional-stable and nontraditional-stable trajectories. Implications for gender intensification and cognitive-developmental approaches to masculinity attitudes are discussed.

  20. Comparison of ectopic pregnancy risk among transfers of embryos vitrified on day 3, day 5, and day 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tong; Chen, Hong; Fu, Rong; Chen, Qiuju; Wang, Yun; Mol, Ben W; Kuang, Yanping; Lyu, Qifeng

    2017-07-01

    To compare ectopic pregnancy risk among transfers of embryos vitrified on day 3, day 5, and day 6. Retrospective cohort study. Academic tertiary-care medical center. A total of 10,736 pregnancies after 23,730 frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) cycles of in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection from March 2003 to May 2015. The ectopic pregnancy rate was compared among pregnancies resulting from transfers of embryos vitrified on day 3, day 5, and day 6. Generalized estimation equation regression models were used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between ectopic pregnancy and selected patient and treatment characteristics. We studied this association in both the group that achieved pregnancy and the group that underwent an FET cycle. Odds of ectopic pregnancy. The overall rate of ectopic pregnancy was 2.8% (304/10,736). Ectopic pregnancy rates after day-3, day-5, and day-6 vitrified embryo transfers were 3.1% (287/9,224), 2.0% (11/562), and 0.6% (6/950), respectively. After adjusting for confounders, the risks of ectopic pregnancy in day-3 and day-5 vitrified embryo transfers were both significantly higher than in day-6 vitrified embryo transfers. The associations were similar when we did calculations per cycle. In women undergoing FET, day-6 vitrified embryo transfer is associated with a significantly lower risk of ectopic pregnancy than both day-3 and day-5 vitrified embryo transfers. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.