WorldWideScience

Sample records for group contingency management

  1. Interdependent Group Contingency Management for Cocaine-Dependent Methadone Maintenance Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Kimberly C.; Kerwin, MaryLouise E.; Carpenedo, Carolyn M.; Rosenwasser, Beth J.; Gardner, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) for drug abstinence has been applied to individuals independently even when delivered in groups. We developed a group CM intervention in which the behavior of a single, randomly selected, anonymous individual determined reinforcement delivery for the entire group. We also compared contingencies placed only on cocaine…

  2. Prize reinforcement contingency management for cocaine dependence: integration with group therapy in a methadone clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Martin, Bonnie; Simcic, Francis

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated a low-cost contingency management (CM) procedure for reducing cocaine use and enhancing group therapy attendance in 77 cocaine-dependent methadone patients. Patients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of standard treatment or standard treatment with CM, in which patients earned the opportunity to win prizes ranging from $1 to $100 for submitting cocainenegative samples and attending therapy. Patients in the CM condition submitted more cocaine-negative samples and attended more groups than patients in standard treatment. The best predictor of cocaine abstinence at follow-up was duration of abstinence during treatment. On average, patients in the CM condition earned $117 in prizes. Data from this study suggest that some aspects of reinforcement can be implemented in group therapy in community-based clinics.

  3. A Group Contingency plus Self-Management Intervention Targeting At-Risk Secondary Students' Class-Work and Active Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino-Maack, Sylvia I.; Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to show that an independent group contingency (GC) combined with self-management strategies and randomized-reinforcer components can increase the amount of written work and active classroom responding in high school students. Three remedial reading classes and a total of 15 students participated in this study.…

  4. A Group Contingency Plus Self-Management Intervention Targeting At-Risk Secondary Students' Class-Work and Active Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino-Maack, Sylvia I; Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to show that an independent group contingency (GC) combined with self-management strategies and randomized-reinforcer components can increase the amount of written work and active classroom responding in high school students. Three remedial reading classes and a total of 15 students participated in this study. Students used self-management strategies during independent reading time to increase the amount of writing in their reading logs. They used self-monitoring strategies to record whether or not they performed expected behaviors in class. A token economy using points and tickets was included in the GC to provide positive reinforcement for target responses. The results were analyzed through visual inspection of graphs and effect size computations and showed that the intervention increased the total amount of written words in the students' reading logs and overall classroom and individual student academic engagement.

  5. A Review of the Use of Group Contingencies in Preschool Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorski, Elizabeth A.; Barton, Erin E.; Ledford, Jennifer R.

    2017-01-01

    Individual contingency management systems have been used successfully to improve behaviors in school settings--including preschools--but often come with associated challenges in time and personnel management. Group contingencies, in the form of independent, interdependent, and dependent contingencies, have been used in preschools to address these…

  6. A Review of the Use of Group Contingencies in Preschool Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorski, Elizabeth A.; Barton, Erin E.; Ledford, Jennifer R.

    2017-01-01

    Individual contingency management systems have been used successfully to improve behaviors in school settings--including preschools--but often come with associated challenges in time and personnel management. Group contingencies, in the form of independent, interdependent, and dependent contingencies, have been used in preschools to address these…

  7. Contingency management: perspectives of Australian service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jacqui; Ritter, Alison

    2007-03-01

    Given the very positive and extensive research evidence demonstrating efficacy and effectiveness of contingency management, it is important that Australia explore whether contingency management has a role to play in our own treatment context. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 experienced alcohol and drug practitioners, service managers and policy-makers in Victoria. Interviewees were selected to represent the range of drug treatment services types and included rural representation. A semi-structured interview schedule, covering their perceptions and practices of contingency management was used. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using N2 qualitative data analysis program. The majority of key informants were positively inclined toward contingency management, notwithstanding some concerns about the philosophical underpinnings. Concerns were raised in relation to the use of monetary rewards. Examples of the use of contingency management provided by key informants demonstrated an over-inclusive definition: all the examples did not adhere to the key principles of contingency management. This may create problems if a structured contingency management were to be introduced in Australia. Contingency management is an important adjunctive treatment intervention and its use in Australia has the potential to enhance treatment outcomes. No unmanageable barriers were identified in this study.

  8. Contingency Management and Stuttering in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Bruce P.

    2004-01-01

    This is a review of the contingency management literature and current related treatment programs for stuttering in childhood: the Lidcombe Program, Gradual Increase in Length and Complexity of Utterance (GILCU), and Prolongation (PS). Treatment efficacy research has shown these treatments to be effective and efficient for children, but there…

  9. The Efficacy of Contingency Models of Reinforcement on Group Expectations and Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Valerie Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Social learning theory contends that group contingent reinforcement can be used as a means of shaping problematic behavior in both academic and nonacademic settings. Prior research has focused on contingent management of academic behaviors with older populations at the college level and younger students both with and without disabilities in the…

  10. A systematic evidence review of school-based group contingency interventions for students with challenging behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggin, Daniel M; Johnson, Austin H; Chafouleas, Sandra M; Ruberto, Laura M; Berggren, Melissa

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to synthesize the research underlying group contingency interventions to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to support their use for managing the classroom behavior of students with behavioral difficulties. An application of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) procedures for evaluating single-subject research revealed that the research investigating group contingencies demonstrated sufficient rigor, evidence, and replication to label the intervention as evidence-based. These findings were further supported across five quantitative indices of treatment effect. The results associated with the application of the WWC procedures and quantitative evaluations were supplemented with additional systematic coding of methodological features and study characteristics to evaluate the populations and conditions under which the effects of the group contingency best generalize. Findings associated with this coding revealed that the lack of detailed reporting across studies limited our ability to determine for whom and under what conditions group contingencies are best suited.

  11. Automated Contingency Management for Advanced Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Impact Technologies LLC, in cooperation the Georgia Institute of Technology, proposes to develop and demonstrate an innovative Automated Contingency Management (ACM)...

  12. Automated Contingency Management for Propulsion Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Increasing demand for improved reliability and survivability of mission-critical systems is driving the development of health monitoring and Automated Contingency...

  13. Contingency Response Groups: An Analysis of Maintenance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    understanding through the multiple TDYs and the demands of the ASAM program. Thank you for your encouragement and motivation. vi...Advanced Study of Air Mobility ( ASAM )__________________ Status: [X ] Student [ ] Faculty [ ] Staff [ ] Other Optimal Media Outlet...www.heritageflightacademy.com/americanairman/apcourse.html>. Carrabba, Peter. "Contingency Response Group Topics for ASAM ." Expeditionary Center, McGuire AFB, NJ. May 2010

  14. Designing and Implementing Group Contingencies in the Classroom: A Teacher's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jason C.; Gilmour, Allison F.

    2016-01-01

    Group contingencies are a positive, proactive classroom management technique that works well as Tier 1 of a multi-tiered system of behavior support. These programs are adaptable to student and classroom needs and work well to support the behavior of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. Off-the-shelf programs exist, but…

  15. Self-Aware Aerospace Vehicle Contingency Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences, with Agent Oriented Software, proposes to develop a contingency management system that dynamically performs decision-making based on both...

  16. Contingency Management and deliberative decision-making processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Regier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Contingency Management is an effective treatment for drug addiction. The current explanation for its success is rooted in alternative reinforcement theory. We suggest that alternative reinforcement theory is inadequate to explain the success of Contingency Management and produce a model based on demand curves that show how little the monetary rewards offered in this treatment would affect drug use. Instead, we offer an explanation of its success based on the concept that it accesses deliberative decision-making processes. We suggest that Contingency Management is effective because it offers a concrete and immediate alternative to using drugs, which engages deliberative processes, improves the ability of those deliberative processes to attend to non-drug options, and offsets more automatic action-selection systems. This theory makes explicit predictions that can be tested, suggests which users will be most helped by Contingency Management, and suggests improvements in its implementation.

  17. Contingency Management and Deliberative Decision-Making Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Paul S; Redish, A David

    2015-01-01

    Contingency management is an effective treatment for drug addiction. The current explanation for its success is rooted in alternative reinforcement theory. We suggest that alternative reinforcement theory is inadequate to explain the success of contingency management and produce a model based on demand curves that show how little the monetary rewards offered in this treatment would affect drug use. Instead, we offer an explanation of its success based on the concept that it accesses deliberative decision-making processes. We suggest that contingency management is effective because it offers a concrete and immediate alternative to using drugs, which engages deliberative processes, improves the ability of those deliberative processes to attend to non-drug options, and offsets more automatic action-selection systems. This theory makes explicit predictions that can be tested, suggests which users will be most helped by contingency management, and suggests improvements in its implementation.

  18. Automated Contingency Management for Advanced Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Automated Contingency Management (ACM), or the ability to confidently and autonomously adapt to fault conditions with the goal of still achieving mission objectives,...

  19. Contingency Management and Deliberative Decision-Making Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Regier, Paul S.; Redish, A. David

    2015-01-01

    Contingency management is an effective treatment for drug addiction. The current explanation for its success is rooted in alternative reinforcement theory. We suggest that alternative reinforcement theory is inadequate to explain the success of contingency management and produce a model based on demand curves that show how little the monetary rewards offered in this treatment would affect drug use. Instead, we offer an explanation of its success based on the concept that it accesses deliberat...

  20. Contingency Management and deliberative decision-making processes

    OpenAIRE

    Regier, Paul S.; David Redish, A.

    2015-01-01

    Contingency Management is an effective treatment for drug addiction. The current explanation for its success is rooted in alternative reinforcement theory. We suggest that alternative reinforcement theory is inadequate to explain the success of Contingency Management and produce a model based on demand curves that show how little the monetary rewards offered in this treatment would affect drug use. Instead, we offer an explanation of its success based on the concept that it accesses deliberat...

  1. A Comparison of Cost and Reward Procedures With Interdependent Group Contingencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathryn; Penrod, Becky; Price, Jenifer N

    2016-06-07

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of two variations of a token economy for reducing disruptive behavior within a general education classroom. One variation involved a group contingency in which tokens were removed contingent on disruptive behavior (response cost), and the other variation involved a group contingency in which tokens were gained according to a differential reinforcement of other behavior schedule. Two elementary school teachers and their students participated. Results indicated that both procedures were effective in reducing the overall number of students disrupting; however, both teachers and students indicated a greater preference for the response cost condition. Implications for the use of these behavior management strategies in the classroom are discussed in terms of effectiveness and ease of implementation.

  2. Towards a contingency theory of Operations Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boer, Harry; Boer, Henrike Engele Elisabeth; Demeter, Krisztina

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of papers addressing relationships between context, OM practice and performance, published in IJOPM and JOM over the last 25 years. The analysis suggest that the field is highly scattered, still quite immature, but growing. Suggestions for further analysis of exist...... of existing, and directions for future, research are formulated, aimed at furthering the development of OM contingency theory....

  3. Effects of Individual and Group Contingency Interventions on Attendance in Adolescent Part-Time Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovits, Shira Melody; Sturmey, Peter; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of individual and group monetary contingencies on the attendance of adolescent part-time employees. Attendance increased in both individual and group contingency phases; however staff questionnaire responses indicated a preference for the individual contingencies. Future research should consider staff acceptability…

  4. School management and contingency theory: an emerging perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, E M

    1979-01-01

    In an article written for educational administrators, Hanson explains the assumptions, framework, and application of contingency theory. The author sees contingency theory as a way for organizations to adapt to uncertainty by developing a strategic plan with alternative scenarios. He urges school administrators to join businessmen and public managers in using a technique described as "the most powerful current sweeping over the organizational field." The theory assumes that: (1) a maze of goals govern the development of events; (2) different management approaches may be appropriate within the same organization; and (3) different leadership styles suit different situations. Contingency planning helps the organization to respond to uncertainty in the external environment by identifying possible events that may occur and by preparing alternative stratgies to deal with them. Hanson describes the purpose of this process as providing "a more effective match between an organization and its environment." He explains that contingency theory analyzes the internal adjustments of the organization (e.g., decision making process, structure, technology, instructional techniques) as it seeks to meet the shifting demands of its external or internal environments. According to the author, the intent of contingency theory is to establish an optimal "match" between environmental demands (and support) and the response capabilities of the organization including its structure, planning process, and leadership style.

  5. Getting help quickly: older people and community worker perspectives of contingency planning for falls management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Kimberly; Murray, Carolyn M; Kumar, Saravana

    2016-11-10

    Older people living in the community need to plan for getting help quickly if they have a fall. In this paper planning for falls is referred to as contingency planning and is not a falls prevention strategy but rather a falls management strategy. This research explored the perspectives of older people and community workers (CWs) about contingency planning for a fall. Using a qualitative descriptive approach, participants were recruited through a community agency that supports older people. In-depth interviews were conducted with seven older people (67-89 years of age) and a focus group was held with seven workers of mixed disciplines from the same agency. Older people who hadn't fallen were included but were assumed to be at risk of falls because they were in receipt of services. Thematic analysis and concept mapping combined the data from the two participant groups. Four themes including preconceptions about planning ahead for falling, a fall changes perception, giving, and receiving advice about contingency plans and what to do about falling. Both CWs and older people agree contingency planning requires understanding of individual identity and circumstances. CWs have limited knowledge about contingency planning and may be directive, informative, or conservative. Implications for Rehabilitation Falls can result in serious consequences for older people. There is an evidence-practice gap as availability of and access to contingency planning does not necessarily mean older people will use it in a falls emergency. Older people prefer community workers to be directive or informative about contingency planning options but they do want choice and control. Increased community workers knowledge of, and collaborative decision-making about, contingency planning may promote patient-centered services and assist in closing the evidence-practice gap.

  6. Internet-based contingency management to promote smoking cessation: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallery, Jesse; Raiff, Bethany R; Grabinski, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated an Internet-based contingency management intervention to promote smoking cessation. Participants in the contingent group (n = 39) earned vouchers contingent on video confirmation of breath carbon monoxide (CO) ≤ 4 parts per million (ppm). Earnings for participants in the noncontingent group (n = 38) were independent of CO levels. Goals and feedback about smoking status were provided on participants' homepages. The median percentages of negative samples during the intervention in the noncontingent and contingent groups were 25% and 66.7%, respectively. There were no significant differences in absolute CO levels or abstinence at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Compared to baseline, however, participants in both groups reduced CO by an estimated 15.6 ppm during the intervention phases. The results suggest that the contingency for negative COs promoted higher rates of abstinence during treatment, and that other elements of the system, such as feedback, frequent monitoring, and goals, reduced smoking.

  7. Resource Management and Contingencies in Aerospace Concurrent Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpati, Gabe; Hyde, Tupper; Peabody, Hume; Garrison, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    significant concern in designing complex systems implementing new technologies is that while knowledge about the system is acquired incrementally, substantial financial commitments, even make-or-break decisions, must be made upfront, essentially in the unknown. One practice that helps in dealing with this dichotomy is the smart embedding of contingencies and margins in the design to serve as buffers against surprises. This issue presents itself in full force in the aerospace industry, where unprecedented systems are formulated and committed to as a matter of routine. As more and more aerospace mission concepts are generated by concurrent design laboratories, it is imperative that such laboratories apply well thought-out contingency and margin structures to their designs. The first part of this publication provides an overview of resource management techniques and standards used in the aerospace industry. That is followed by a thought provoking treatise on margin policies. The expose presents the actual flight telemetry data recorded by the thermal discipline during several recent NASA Goddard Space Flight Center missions. The margins actually achieved in flight are compared against pre-flight predictions, and the appropriateness and the ramifications of having designed with rigid margins to bounding stacked worst case conditions are assessed. The second half of the paper examines the particular issues associated with the application of contingencies and margins in the concurrent engineering environment. In closure, a discipline-by-discipline disclosure of the contingency and margin policies in use at the Integrated Design Center at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center is made.

  8. A Comparative Study of Group Contingencies and Randomized Reinforcers to Reduce Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Lea A.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    The present investigation employed an alternating treatments design to (1) examine the efficacy of group contingencies in the reduction of disruptive behavior, and (2) compare the effects of independent, interdependent, and dependent group contingencies in the reduction of disruptive behavior in adolescent males identified with serious emotional…

  9. Contingency Management for Cocaine Treatment: Cash vs. Vouchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Kirby, Kimberly C.; Seymour, Brittany L.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of contingency management (CM) for treating drug abuse is well supported. The most widely used form of CM is voucher-based reinforcement therapy (VBRT), where clients receive an escalating schedule of vouchers that can be redeemed for goods and services for meeting treatment goals. Though generally rejected due to concerns about potential harms to drug using participants, research suggests that cash may be a more effective reinforcer. This three-group randomized trial compared the efficacy of cash-based reinforcement therapy (CBRT) to VBRT and a non-CM condition on cocaine abstinence and treatment attendance; and examined whether CBRT resulted in greater levels of harm than VBRT. Findings indicated that the CBRT was as effective as VBRT when compared to the non-CM condition and that it did not increase rates of drug use, cravings, or high-risk behaviors. Future research should examine potential cost savings associated with a cash-based CM approach as this could have important implications for the wider adoption of the CM model. PMID:24746956

  10. Contingency management for cocaine treatment: cash vs. vouchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Kirby, Kimberly C; Seymour, Brittany L

    2014-08-01

    The efficacy of contingency management (CM) for treating drug abuse is well supported. The most widely used form of CM is voucher-based reinforcement therapy (VBRT), where clients receive an escalating schedule of vouchers that can be redeemed for goods and services for meeting treatment goals. Though generally rejected due to concerns about potential harms to drug using participants, research suggests that cash may be a more effective reinforcer. This three-group randomized trial compared the efficacy of cash-based reinforcement therapy (CBRT) to VBRT and a non-CM condition on cocaine abstinence and treatment attendance; and examined whether CBRT resulted in greater levels of harm than VBRT. Findings indicated that the CBRT was as effective as VBRT when compared to the non-CM condition and that it did not increase rates of drug use, cravings, or high-risk behaviors. Future research should examine potential cost savings associated with a cash-based CM approach as this could have important implications for the wider adoption of the CM model.

  11. Integrating Structural Health Management with Contingency Control for Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Goebel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbine blades with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  12. Contingency management for cigarette smokers with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secades-Villa, Roberto; Vallejo-Seco, Guillermo; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; López-Núñez, Carla; Weidberg, Sara; González-Roz, Alba

    2015-10-01

    Despite depressive symptoms being very common among smokers from the general population, few studies have examined the effects of depressive symptoms on smoking treatment outcomes, and even less research has been carried out in the context of contingency management (CM). The authors conducted a secondary analysis to assess the interrelation between treatment condition, depressive symptoms and treatment outcomes among treatment-seeking smokers. The sample was made up of 147 treatment-seeking smokers who were randomly allocated 2 treatment conditions: cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT; n = 74), or CBT + CM (n = 73). CBT was applied in 1-hr group-based sessions over 6 weeks. The CM protocol was voucher-based with maximum earnings of €300 (US$339). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Smoking abstinence was verified though cotinine and carbon monoxide. Several analyses were conducted to explore the effect of treatment condition and baseline depressive symptoms on treatment outcomes, as well as the effect of treatment condition and smoking status on depressive symptoms. The CBT + CM condition was more effective than CBT, independent of depressive symptoms. The presence of depressive symptoms decreased the number of days of continuous smoking abstinence. Participants with a greater number of days of continuous smoking abstinence had fewer depressive symptoms than those with fewer days of continuous smoking abstinence. Findings suggest that health care providers should consider encouraging their patients with depressive symptoms to seek smoking cessation services that include both smoking cessation protocols and behavioral activation for mood management, thus maximizing both smoking and depressive outcomes.

  13. Motivation and Contingency Management Treatments for Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Kimberly N; Petry, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) is a highly efficacious psychosocial treatment for substance use disorders based on the principles of behavioral analysis. CM involves delivering a tangible positive reinforcer following objective evidence of submission of a drug-negative urine sample. Although CM interventions primarily involve applying extrinsic rewards, a patient's intrinsic motivation to change substance use behavior may also be impacted by CM. This chapter provides an introduction to CM interventions for substance use disorders and examines the impact of CM on intrinsic motivation . It also addresses applications of this intervention to other conditions and patient populations.

  14. The reduction of stealing in second graders using a group contingency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, E B; Deal, T E; Bailey, J S

    1977-01-01

    Three clases of second graders served as subjects in this study of the effects of two types of intervention programs upon stealing: (1) an antistealing lecture with no specific contingency implied, and (2) a direct group contingency applied, whereby children were rewarded with (a) extra free time for no thefts, (b) allowed normal free time if stolen items were returned, and (c) punished with lost of free if stolen items were not returned. A multiple-baseline design across the three classes showed the group contingency to be effective in reducing stealing behavior; the anti-stealing lecture was ineffective.

  15. Comments on contingency management and conditional cash transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stephen T

    2010-10-01

    This essay discusses research on incentive-based interventions to promote healthy behavior change, contingency management (CM) and conditional cash transfers (CCT). The overarching point of the essay is that CM and CCT are often treated as distinct areas of inquiry when at their core they represent a common approach. Some potential bi-directional benefits of recognizing this commonality are discussed. Distinct intellectual traditions probably account for the separate paths of CM and CCT to date, with the former being rooted in behavioral psychology and the latter in microeconomics. It is concluded that the emerging field of behavioral economics, which is informed by and integrates principles of each of those disciplines, may provide the proper conceptual framework for integrating CM and CCT.

  16. Outsourcing, managing, supervising, and regulating private military companies in contingency operations

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the utilization of private military companies (PMCs) by government agencies of the United States in contingency operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the roles that PMCs play in current contingency operations, and to analyze how PMCs can become more useful instruments in contingency operations if they are properly outsourced, managed, supervised, and regulated. In this regar...

  17. Integrating Prognostics in Automated Contingency Management Strategies for Advanced Aircraft Controls Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Automated Contingency Management (ACM) is an emerging and game-changing area of engineering and scientific research that integrates prognostics and health management...

  18. A KBE genetic-causal cost modelling methodology for manufacturing cost contingency management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curran, R.; Gilmour, M.; McAlleean, C.; Kelly, P.

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides validated evidence of a robust methodology for the management of lean manufacturing cost contingency, with a particular focus on contingency regarding recurring work content. A truly concurrent engineering process is established by capturing a range of knowledge from the design, m

  19. A KBE genetic-causal cost modelling methodology for manufacturing cost contingency management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curran, R.; Gilmour, M.; McAlleean, C.; Kelly, P.

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides validated evidence of a robust methodology for the management of lean manufacturing cost contingency, with a particular focus on contingency regarding recurring work content. A truly concurrent engineering process is established by capturing a range of knowledge from the design,

  20. Newborn birth-weight of pregnant women on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance treatment: A national contingency management approach trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peles, Einat; Sason, Anat; Schreiber, Shaul; Adelson, Miriam

    2017-03-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is the gold standard for pregnant women with opioid use disorders. Still, low birth-weights were reported, in particular of mothers who became pregnant before admission to MMT. We studied whether an escalating incentive contingency-management approach may contribute to better newborn birth-weights. A nationwide controlled randomized trial among all Israeli methadone/buprenorphine maintenance treatment (MBMT), newly or already in treatment pregnant women was performed. A modified contingency-management protocol with coupons of escalating value depending upon reduction of drug use, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption was compared to standard care arm. Drugs in urine, smoking (Fagerstrom score), alcohol use, and depression were monitored. Thirty-five women had 46 pregnancies. In their first pregnancy, 19 from the contingency-management and 16 from the standard care arms were studied. Contingency-management group as compared to the standard care arm included more newly admitted women (36.8% vs. 6.3%, p = .05), with benzodiazepine and cannabis onset at a younger age, and higher proportion of any drug abuse while pregnant (100% vs. 68.8%, p = .01). Fifteen of the contingency-management and 14 of the control arm gave birth (78.9% vs. 87.5%, p = .3) with similar proportions of normal (>2,500 g) birth-weight (71.4% vs. 61.5%, p = .8). Newborns' birth-weight was comparable among the two study arms indicating no contribution of the contingency-management approach. Small sample and baseline differences between arms might have influenced results. Intensive intervention should be evaluated on a larger scale of participants. (Am J Addict 2017;26:167-175). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  1. A developmental perspective on neuroeconomic mechanisms of contingency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Catherine; Budney, Alan J; Bickel, Warren K

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides a developmental overview of relevant theory and research on delay discounting and neuroeconomics, and their implications for contingency management (CM) approaches to treatment. Recent advances in the neuroscience of decision making have the potential to inform treatment development for adolescent substance use in general, and CM treatments in particular. CM interventions may be informed by research on delay discounting, a type of decision making that reflects how individuals value immediate versus delayed rewards. Delay discounting reliably distinguishes substance abusers from nonabusers and is a significant predictor of individual differences in response to substance use treatments. Discounting may also be important in predicting response to CM, as CM attempts to directly influence this decision-making process, shifting the preference from the immediate rewards of use to delayed rewards for choosing not to use. Multiple neural processes underlie decision making, and those processes have implications for adolescent substance abuse. There are significant neurodevelopmental processes that differentiate adolescents from adults. These processes are implicated in delay discounting, suggesting that adolescence may reflect a period of plasticity in temporal decision making. Understanding the neural mechanisms of delay discounting has led to promising working memory interventions directly targeting the executive functions that underlie individual choices. These interventions may be particularly helpful in combination with CM interventions that offer immediate rewards for brief periods of abstinence, and may show particular benefit in adolescence due to the heightened neural plasticity of systems that underlie temporal discounting in adolescence.

  2. Prize contingency management for smoking cessation: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledgerwood, David M; Arfken, Cynthia L; Petry, Nancy M; Alessi, Sheila M

    2014-07-01

    Adjunctive behavioral smoking cessation treatments have the potential to improve outcomes beyond standard care. The present study had two aims: (1) compare standard care (SC) for smoking (four weeks of brief counseling and monitoring) to SC plus prize-based contingency management (CM), involving the chance to earn prizes on days with demonstrated smoking abstinence (carbon monoxide (CO) ≤6 ppm); and (2) compare the relative efficacy of two prize reinforcement schedules-one a traditional CM schedule, and the second an early enhanced CM schedule providing greater reinforcement magnitude in the initial week of treatment but equal overall reinforcement. Participants (N=81 nicotine-dependent cigarette smokers) were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. Prize CM resulted in significant reductions in cigarette smoking relative to SC. These reductions were not apparent at follow-up. We found no meaningful differences between the traditional and enhanced CM conditions. Our findings reveal that prize CM leads to significant reductions in smoking during treatment relative to a control intervention, but the benefits did not extend long-term. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Simulation-based Design and Validation of Automated Contingency Management for Propulsion Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper introduces a novel Prognostics-enhanced Automated Contingency Management (or ACM+P) paradigm based on both current health state (diagnosis) and future...

  4. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: Effects of Group Contingency Programs in Urban Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard P.; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Laylin, Jeff; Szoke, Carolyn; Petrillo, Tai; Culey, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program, a group contingency intervention for whole classes, and for students with disruptive behaviors who are at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). The CW-FIT program includes four elements designed from…

  5. A Group Contingency Program to Improve the Behavior of Elementary School Students in a Cafeteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Karmazin, Karen; Kreher, Joanne; Panahon, Carlos J.; Carlson, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Studies of behavior modification interventions for disruptive behavior in schools have generally focused on classroom behavior with less research directed toward child behavior in other school settings (e.g., cafeterias). The present report documents the effect of a group contingency intervention with a random reward component, targeting…

  6. Effectiveness of a Universal, Interdependent Group Contingency Program on Children's Academic Achievement: A Countywide Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Robert; Osborne, Karen J.; Dean, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a universal prevention program designed to increase academic engagement and to decrease disruptive behavior in elementary school-age children. Teachers and other school personnel use interdependent group contingencies to improve students' behavior in the classroom. Previous research indicates the GBG is efficacious…

  7. Effects of an Interdependent Group Contingency on Engagement in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Shanna Eisner; Healy, Sean; Judge, Joann P.; Lloyd, John Wills

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether a group contingency increased engagement during elementary school physical education sessions. The intervention employed procedures (explicit instruction, goal setting, and reinforcement) drawn from the first tier of classwide function-related intervention teams (CW-FIT; Wills et al., 2009). Results showed salutary increases in…

  8. Effects of a Group Contingency Strategy on Middle School Physical Education Students' Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Carla; Azevedo, Liane; Eberline, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a dependent group contingency on eighth-grade students' heart rates. Participants were 18 male and female students. A multielement research design was used to examine the intervention effects. The intervention consisted of: (a) teacher explanation about effort; (b) students' suggestions to…

  9. A Comparison of Punishment and Positive Reinforcement Group Contingencies in the Modification of Inappropriate Classroom Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonewille, Jack; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Measures the relative effectiveness of a short-term punishment versus a snort-term positive reinforcement contingency system for reducing the frequency of specific inappropriate behaviors of a group of senior elementary students. Students were directly involved in identifying the different types of discipline so that they might help determine the…

  10. Differential Effectiveness of Interdependent and Dependent Group Contingencies in Reducing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kelsey; Gresham, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Disruptive behavior in the classroom negatively affects all students' academic engagement, achievement, and behavior. Group contingencies have been proven effective in reducing disruptive behavior as part of behavior interventions in the classroom. The Good Behavior Game is a Tier 1 classwide intervention that utilizes an interdependent group…

  11. A Group Contingency Program to Improve the Behavior of Elementary School Students in a Cafeteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Karmazin, Karen; Kreher, Joanne; Panahon, Carlos J.; Carlson, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Studies of behavior modification interventions for disruptive behavior in schools have generally focused on classroom behavior with less research directed toward child behavior in other school settings (e.g., cafeterias). The present report documents the effect of a group contingency intervention with a random reward component, targeting…

  12. Using a Random Dependent Group Contingency to Increase On-Task Behaviors of High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Brenda D.; Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2009-01-01

    Group contingencies have the advantages of encouraging individual students to collectively feel responsible for appropriate and inappropriate classroom behaviors and have shown effectiveness in improving students' behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a random dependent group contingency on the on-task behaviors of…

  13. Group Contingencies, Randomization of Reinforcers, and Criteria for Reinforcement, Self-Monitoring, and Peer Feedback on Reducing Inappropriate Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Brenda Anne; Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable research has demonstrated the effectiveness of interdependent and unknown dependent group contingencies on reducing inappropriate classroom behavior. Several investigators have focused on the addition of self-monitoring and peer feedback to these interdependent and unknown dependent group contingencies in order to further improve…

  14. REDUCTION OF CLASSROOM NOISE LEVELS USING GROUP CONTINGENCIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ring, Brandon M; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Eubanks, Sean L.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic workplace is an employment-based abstinence reinforcement intervention for unemployed drug users where trainees receive on-the-job employment skills training in a classroom setting. The study is an extension of prior therapeutic workplace research, which suggested that trainees frequently violated noise standards. Participants received real-time graphed feedback of noise levels and had the opportunity to earn monetary group reinforcement for maintaining a low number of noise v...

  15. Development of a Contingency Capillary Wastewater Management Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Personal Body .Attached Liquid Liquidator (PBALL) is conceived as a passive, capillary driven contingency wastewater disposal device. In this contingency scenario, the airflow system on the NASA Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is assumed to have failed, leaving only passive hardware and vacuum vent to dispose of the wastewater. To meet these needs, the PBALL was conceived to rely on capillary action and urine wetting design considerations. The PBALL is designed to accommodate a range of wetting conditions, from 0deg wastewater to vacuum while minimizing cabin air loss. A sub-scale PBALL test article was demonstrated on NASA's reduced gravity aircraft in April, 2010.

  16. Strategic management accounting practices in Palestinian companies: application of contingency theory perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ojra, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    This study uses a quantitative methodology to explore the impact of contingency factors on use of strategic management accounting techniques (SMA), and combined impact of SMA Usage and contingency factors on organisational performance in a less developed country (LDC) context. The exploratory framework included two main dependent variables, namely SMA Usage and organisational performance. For the former, this study gauged the impact of perceived environmental uncertainty (competitive inten...

  17. Pinellas Plant contingency plan for the hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-04-01

    Subpart D of Part 264 (264.50 through .56) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations require that each facility maintain a contingency plan detailing procedures to {open_quotes}minimize hazards to human health or the environment from fires, explosions, or any unplanned sudden or non-sudden release of hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents to air, soil, or surface water.{close_quotes}

  18. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  19. An Effectiveness Trial of Contingency Management in a Felony Preadjudication Drug Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Arabia, Patricia L.; Kirby, Kimberly C.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated a contingency management (CM) program in a drug court. Gift certificates for compliance were delivered at 4- to 6-week intervals (total value = $390.00). Participants in one condition earned gift certificates that escalated by $5.00 increments. Participants in a second condition began earning higher magnitude gift…

  20. Assessing the Feasibility of Using Contingency Management to Modify Cigarette Smoking by Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Many smokers initiate this dangerous behavior during adolescence. This report describes a contingency management intervention designed to initate and maintain a period of abstinence from cigarettes by adolescent smokers. Results suggest that the intervention was…

  1. Assessing the Feasibility of Using Contingency Management to Modify Cigarette Smoking by Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Many smokers initiate this dangerous behavior during adolescence. This report describes a contingency management intervention designed to initate and maintain a period of abstinence from cigarettes by adolescent smokers. Results suggest that the intervention was…

  2. Contingency Management Improves Abstinence and Quality of Life in Cocaine Abusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Hanson, Tressa

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) treatments enhance drug abstinence. This study evaluated whether CM also improves quality of life and if these effects are mediated by abstinence. Across 3 independent trials, cocaine abusers in intensive outpatient treatment (n = 387) were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of standard treatment as usual or standard…

  3. Using the Experience Sampling Method in the Context of Contingency Management for Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husky, Mathilde M.; Mazure, Carolyn M.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Barry, Danielle; Petry, Nancy M.

    2008-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) treatments have been shown to be effective in reducing substance use. This manuscript illustrates how the experience sampling method (ESM) can depict behavior and behavior change and can be used to explore CM treatment mechanisms. ESM characterizes idiosyncratic patterns of behavior and offers the potential to determine…

  4. Preliminary Examination of Adolescent Spending in a Contingency Management-Based Smoking-Cessation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Dana A.; Nich, Charla; Schepis, Ty S.; Smith, Anne E.; Liss, Thomas B.; McFetridge, Amanda K.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2010-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) utilizing monetary incentives is efficacious in enhancing abstinence in an adolescent smoking-cessation program, but how adolescents spend their money has not been examined. We assessed spending habits of 38 adolescent smokers in a CM-based smoking-cessation project prior to quitting and during treatment using a…

  5. Statewide Adoption and Initial Implementation of Contingency Management for Substance-Abusing Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henggeler, Scott W.; Chapman, Jason E.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A.; Randall, Jeff; Shackelford, Jennifer; Schoenwald, Sonja K.

    2008-01-01

    Four hundred thirty-two public sector therapists attended a workshop in contingency management (CM) and were interviewed monthly for the following 6 months to assess their adoption and initial implementation of CM to treat substance-abusing adolescent clients. Results showed that 58% (n = 131) of the practitioners with at least one…

  6. An Analysis of Organizational Behavior Management Research in Terms of the Three-Contingency Model of Performance Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, Nicholas L.; Malott, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    The three-contingency model of performance management (Malott, 1992, 1993, 1999) was used to analyze interventions in the "Journal of Organizational Behavior Management (JOBM)" from the years 1990 through 2005 (Volume 11[1]-Volume 25[4]). The current article extends previous reviews (Malott, Shimamune, & Malott, 1992; Otto & Malott, 2004) by…

  7. An Analysis of Organizational Behavior Management Research in Terms of the Three-Contingency Model of Performance Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, Nicholas L.; Malott, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    The three-contingency model of performance management (Malott, 1992, 1993, 1999) was used to analyze interventions in the "Journal of Organizational Behavior Management (JOBM)" from the years 1990 through 2005 (Volume 11[1]-Volume 25[4]). The current article extends previous reviews (Malott, Shimamune, & Malott, 1992; Otto & Malott, 2004) by…

  8. Blowing in the (social) wind: implications of extrinsic esteem contingencies for terror management and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jamie; Cox, Cathy R; Goldenberg, Jamie L; Vess, Matthew; Routledge, Clay; Cooper, Douglas P; Cohen, Florette

    2009-06-01

    In 4 studies, the role of extrinsic esteem contingencies in adjusting to shifting health-relevant standards when managing existential fears was examined. Study 1 demonstrated that after reminders of death, higher dispositional focus on extrinsic self-esteem contingencies predicted greater interest in tanning. Using a more domain-specific approach, Study 2 showed that, after being reminded of death, the more individuals smoke for social esteem reasons, the more compelling they find an antismoking commercial that exposes adverse social consequences of smoking. Study 3 explored how situational factors (i.e., priming a contingent relational schema) that implicate extrinsic contingencies facilitated the impact of shifting standard primes on tanning intentions after mortality salience. Finally, Study 4 found that mortality salience led to increased endorsement of exercise as a basis of self-worth when participants who derive self-esteem from extrinsic sources visualized someone who exercises. Together, these studies demonstrate that reminders of death interact with prevalent social standards to influence everyday health decisions.

  9. The effects of contingency factors on management control systems: an empirical study at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Paaso, Ilkka

    Contingency theory and management control systems research offer avenues for investigating how contextual factors in organizations affect performance. This quantitative case study investigates how the context of CERN internal services influences the performance consciousness of functional service managers. A literature review recognized four contingency factors relevant for performance consciousness: interdependence, scope, standardization and variation. Data from these factors was measured empirically using a cross-sectional electronic survey and supplemented by data gathered from CERN internal documentation. A quantitative analysis of the data was performed using structural equation modelling. The main findings were congruent with existing literature indicating that a.) high interdependence between work units is associated with decreased variation, increased standardization and increased performance consciousness. b.) high scope is related to increased variation and decreased standardization. Overall, a bet...

  10. Contingency Base Camp Operations and Management: Staffing and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    preparing contract scopes of work, and electrical safety and power management ( McCracken 2011). 3.3.1.5 FOB Lindsey FOB Lindsey is a smaller base camp...Commandant). 2011. Experience as MHG Camp Leatherneck, 2010-11. Interviews by Garth Anderson, Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan, 22 January 11. McCracken

  11. Stimulating environmental management performance. Towards a contingency approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, D.J.; Bremmers, H.J.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This article aims to provide an analysis of the joint impact of the business network and the company's internal resources on the level of environmental management (EM) deployment. Design/methodology/approach – Correlation, regression and cluster analyses of data gathered in 2005 in the Dut

  12. A feasibility study of home-based contingency management with adolescent smokers of rural Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brady; Harris, Millie; Slone, Stacey A; Shelton, Brent J; Dallery, Jesse; Stoops, William; Lewis, Russell

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking among adolescents remains a significant public health concern. This problem is compounded in regions such as rural Appalachia where rates of smoking are consistently higher than national averages and access to treatments is limited. The current research evaluated a home-based contingency management program completed over the Internet with adolescent smokers recruited from rural Appalachia. Participants (N = 62) submitted 3 video recordings per day showing their breath carbon monoxide (CO) levels using a handheld CO monitor. Participants were assigned to either an active treatment condition (AT; n = 31) in which reductions in breath CO were reinforced or a control treatment condition (CT; n = 31) in which providing timely video recordings were reinforced with no requirement to reduce breath CO. Results revealed that participants in the AT condition reduced their breath CO levels significantly more so during treatment than participants in the CT condition. Within-group comparisons revealed that participants in both conditions significantly reduced their breath CO, self-reported smoking, and nicotine dependence ratings during treatment. However, only participants in the AT condition significantly reduced urinary cotinine levels during treatment, and only participants in this condition maintained all reductions until 6-week post treatment. Participants in the CT condition only maintained self-reported smoking reductions until posttreatment assessments. These results support the feasibility and initial efficacy of this incentive-based approach to smoking cessation with adolescent smokers living in rural locations.

  13. Investigating reinforcer magnitude and reinforcer delay: a contingency management analog study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Robert R; Howell, Donelle N; McPherson, Sterling; Roll, John M

    2012-08-01

    The influence of reinforcer magnitude and reinforcer delay on smoking abstinence was studied using an analog model of contingency management. Participants (N = 103, 74% men) visited our laboratory 3 times daily for 5 days and received money for providing a breath sample that indicated smoking abstinence (carbon monoxide level ≤6 parts per million). Using a factorial design, we assigned participants randomly to 1 of 4 groups that could earn a total of either $207.50 (high-magnitude condition) or $70.00 (low-magnitude condition), and received earnings either at each visit (no-delay condition) or in a single lump sum 1 week following the study (delay condition). High-magnitude reinforcement, regardless of delay, was associated with higher rates of abstinence than was low-magnitude reinforcement. High magnitude of reinforcement provided immediately but in incremental amounts was associated with longer intervals to relapse during treatment in comparison with high-magnitude reinforcement provided in a single lump sum after a delay. Low rates of responding in the low-magnitude conditions made interpretation of the impact of delay in those conditions difficult. These findings further demonstrate that high magnitude of reinforcement results in better outcomes than does low magnitude of reinforcement, and that a delay to reinforcement can be detrimental-even when a high magnitude of reinforcement is provided.

  14. Effects on Homework Completion and Accuracy of Varied and Constant Reinforcement within an Interdependent Group Contingency System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Newman-Eig, Lynne M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the efficacy of an interdependent group contingency program on increasing homework completion and accuracy rates in fourth grade students in an elementary school. In addition, the present study attempted to determine whether randomized reinforcement was more effective than constant reinforcement. Overall, the…

  15. Fair Play Game: A Group Contingency Strategy to Increase Students' Active Behaviours in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Carla; Lee, Chang-Hung; Azevedo, L. B.

    2014-01-01

    A dependent group contingency strategy called Fair Play Game was applied to promote increase in number of steps during physical education classes for sixth-grade students. Results from a multiple baseline design across three classes showed that the mean number of steps for baseline vs. intervention were: Class 1: 43 vs. 64 steps/minute; Class 2:…

  16. Real-Time Fault Contingency Management for Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Impact Technologies, with support from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Honeywell, propose to develop and demonstrate a suite of real-time Fault Contingency...

  17. The Efficacy of Contingency Management on Cocaine Craving, using Prize-based Reinforcement of Abstinence in Cocaine Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnia, Bijan; Tabatabaei, Seyed Kazem Rasoulzadeh; Tavallaii, Abbas; Soleimani, Ali Akbar; Pirnia, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Contingency management (CM) is one of the most common therapies in the domain of drug addiction. This study has been carried out with the purpose of evaluating the efficacy of contingency management intervention. Method In an experimental design, between December 15, 2014 and November 20, 2015, fifty men (between 18 and 31 with an average age of 24.6) with a history of cocaine use, were selected voluntarily and were randomly assigned into two groups of CM and control group. The CM group were awarded coupons for negative urine tests, over a period of twelve weeks. The urine tests were taken from the participants twice per week, with cutoff concentrations for positive set at 300 ng/ml and self-reporting index of cocaine craving (response rate = 96%) were evaluated in two phase, through pretest and posttest measures. The data were analyzed by parametric covariance test. Additionally, the qualitative data, resulted from demographic measures, were coded and were analyzed with the help of an analysis instrument of qualitative data i.e. ATLAS.ti-5.2. Results The primary outcome was the number of negative urine tests and the secondary outcome included the cocaine usage craving index over twelve weeks. The mean of (95% of confidence) number of negative cocaine urine tests was 15.4 (13.1–17.8) in the CM group and 19.7 (17.7–21.6) in the control group (P = 0.049). Also, results showed that CM has a significant effect on reducing craving (p<0.01). Conclusion The findings of this study, while having practical aspects in this domain, can be valuable in planning remedial procedures. PMID:28070254

  18. Investigation of joint costs management practices of dairy industry: a contingency approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Costa da Silva Zonatto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The research has investigated the adoption of administration practices in the set of costs in dairy product industries in the Southwest Region in Parana State, as well as, the contingency factors which has influenced the system in the management control at these companies. The explore research was developed through a study on data in quantitative approach in forty- three dairies. From these, just twenty-three produce milk and the other twenty cheese and its derivatives. According to the study these companies are concerned on how to check their costs on production. However, just the dairies which produce cheese and its derivatives are managing costs based on data in a planning and control process. The way used to determine the costs is based on the method of market value. These organizations stand out by the development of control systems of computerized costs where the aims are related to right identification of the costs and the prices for sale, as well. The main outside elements which have affected the organizations are the market needs and the goods availability. In relation to the model  of the manage control in these organizations, it was  checked that these are different from the others in the strategies structure, complexity in the production process, level of computerization and the aims of the use. It was concluded that the administration practices in those researched dairies are influenced by contingency factors.

  19. Randomization of Group Contingencies and Reinforcers To Reduce Classroom Disruptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Lea A.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Jenson, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of randomizing both contingencies for reinforcement and reinforcers to decrease classroom disruptive behavior in five adolescent students with serious emotional disorder. Results reveal that the percentage of observed intervals of disruptive behaviors decreased immediately and dramatically in all students. (Contains 24…

  20. Moving toward a "third generation" of contingency management studies in the abuse treatment field: comment on Silverman et al. (2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, A T

    2001-02-01

    The power of positively reinforced contingency management procedures has been definitively proven in the drug abuse field-even among the most severely affected clients. This study by K. Silverman, D. Svikis, E. Robles, M. L. Stitzer, and G. E. Bigelow (2001) and other studies like it have clearly moved the contingency management work out of controlled, contrived settings and into the real world. Suggestions are offered for moving the next generation of studies toward less complicated populations and using more robust reinforcements within the constraints of contemporary financial and administrative boundaries.

  1. State-of-the-art risk-based approach to spill contingency planning and risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt Etkin, Dagmar [Environmental Research Consulting (United States)], email: etkin@environmental-research.com; Reilly, Timothy [Lighthouse Technical Consultants, Inc (United States); French McCay, Deborah [Applied Science Associates, Inc (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The paper proposes incorporating a comprehensive examination of spill risk into risk management and contingency planning, and applying state-of-the-art modeling tools to evaluate various alternatives for appropriate spill response measures and optimize protective responses. The approach allows spill contingency planners and decision-makers to determine the types of spill scenarios that may occur in a particular location or from a particular source and calculate the probability distribution of the various scenarios. The spill probability information is useful in assessing and putting into perspective the various costs options for spill control systems that will be recommended ultimately. Using advanced modeling tools helps in estimating the potential environmental and socioeconomic consequences of each spill scenario based on location-specific factors over a range of stochastic possibilities, simulating spill scenarios and determining optimal responses and protection strategies. The benefits and costs of various response alternatives and variations in response time can be calculated and modeling tools for training and risk allocation/transfer purposes used.

  2. Contingency management treatment in substance abusers with and without legal problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M.; Rash, Carla J.; Easton, Caroline J.

    2013-01-01

    Drug and alcohol abusers frequently have legal difficulties, and the legal system often provides negative reinforcers for substance abuse treatment involvement. In contrast, contingency management (CM) treatments utilize positive reinforcement procedures to improve patient outcomes. This study evaluated whether substance abusing patients with legal problems at treatment entry had differential outcomes in general, and in response to CM, compared to those without legal problems. Data from three randomized CM trials (n = 393) were used in an evaluation of main and interactive effects of legal status and treatment condition, with respect to retention and abstinence. Compared with patients without legal difficulties, those with legal problems remained in treatment for shorter durations and achieved shorter periods of abstinence. CM was positively and significantly associated with longer durations of abstinence, regardless of legal status. Results suggest that substance abusers with legal problems have generally poor outcomes but that CM is effective regardless of patients’ legal status. PMID:21908754

  3. Contingency management is effective across cocaine-dependent outpatients with different socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secades-Villa, Roberto; García-Fernández, Gloria; Peña-Suárez, Elsa; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Sánchez-Hervás, Emilio; Fernández-Hermida, José Ramón

    2013-03-01

    Contingency management (CM) has demonstrated its efficacy for treating cocaine dependence, but there is still some controversy with regard to its dissemination. Understanding how individual differences affect CM outcomes is important for detecting barriers to its dissemination. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of socioeconomic variables in cocaine-dependent outpatients on the effectiveness of CM in a community setting. Cocaine-dependent outpatients (N=118) were randomized to community reinforcement approach (CRA) treatment or a CRA plus vouchers program. The impact of baseline economic variables, alone and in combination with treatment conditions, on abstinence and retention outcomes after 6 months of treatment was assessed. Results showed that income had no effect on retention or abstinence outcomes after 6 months of treatment in either treatment condition. The addition of a CM component was beneficial for individuals with any socioeconomic status. These results support the generalizability of CM strategies with patients of different socioeconomic status in community settings.

  4. Contingency Management for Patients with Cooccurring Disorders: Evaluation of a Case Study and Recommendations for Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Adams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that contingency management (CM has potential to improve a number of outcomes (e.g. substance use, treatment attendance, quality of life among individuals with substance use and cooccurring disorders. However, multiple factors must be considered on a case-by-case basis in order to promote optimal treatment effects. The present study describes an individualized CM protocol for a US Veteran with substance dependence and cooccurring severe mental illness. CM targeted attendance at outpatient appointments and appropriate use of hospital resources. Effects of CM were assessed by comparing the 3-month baseline and CM periods. The CM intervention marginally reduced unnecessary hospital admissions, resulting in cost savings to the medical center of over $5,000 in three months for this individual. However, CM did not affect outpatient attendance. Several complications arose, highlighting challenges in using CM in populations with substance use and cooccurring disorders. Practical suggestions are offered for maximizing the effects of CM.

  5. Contingency management treatment in substance abusers with and without legal problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Rash, Carla J; Easton, Caroline J

    2011-01-01

    Drug and alcohol abusers frequently have legal difficulties, and the legal system often provides negative reinforcement for substance abuse treatment. In contrast, contingency management (CM) treatments utilize positive reinforcement procedures to improve patient outcomes. This study evaluated whether substance-abusing patients with legal problems at treatment entry had differential outcomes, in general and in response to CM, compared with those without legal problems. Data from three randomized CM trials (n = 393) were used in an evaluation of main and interactive effects of legal status and treatment condition, with respect to retention and abstinence. Compared with patients without legal difficulties, those with legal problems remained in treatment for shorter durations and achieved shorter periods of abstinence. CM was positively and significantly associated with longer durations of abstinence, regardless of legal status. Results suggest that substance abusers with legal problems have generally poor outcomes, but that CM is effective regardless of the patient's legal status.

  6. A multilevel approach to predicting community addiction treatment attitudes about contingency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Bryan; Donovan, Dennis M; Tillotson, Carrie J; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Doyle, Suzanne R; McCarty, Dennis

    2012-03-01

    Adoption of contingency management (CM) by the addiction treatment community is limited to date despite much evidence for its efficacy. This study examined systemic and idiographic staff predictors of CM adoption attitudes via archival data collected from treatment organizations affiliated with the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Multilevel modeling analyses evaluated potential predictors from organizational, treatment unit, and workforce surveys. Among these were individual and shared perceptions of staff concerning aspects of their clinic culture and climate. Modeling analyses identified three systemic predictors (clinic provision of opiate agonist services, national accreditation, and lesser shared perception of workplace stress) and five idiographic predictors (staff with a graduate degree, longer service tenure, managerial position, e-communication facility, and openness to change in clinical procedures). Findings are discussed as they relate to extant literature on CM attitudes and established implementation science constructs, and their practical implications are discussed.

  7. A Randomized Trial Adapting Contingency Management Targets Based on Initial Abstinence Status of Cocaine-Dependent Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M.; Barry, Danielle; Alessi, Sheila M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Contingency management (CM) reduces drug use, but questions remain regarding optimal targets and magnitudes of reinforcement. We evaluated the efficacy of CM reinforcing attendance in patients who initiated treatment with cocaine-negative samples, and of higher magnitude abstinence-based CM in patients who began treatment positive.…

  8. Using a contingent valuation approach for improved solid waste management facility: evidence from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Rafia; Masud, Muhammad Mehedi

    2011-04-01

    This study employed contingent valuation method to estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) of the households to improve the waste collection system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The objective of this study is to evaluate how household WTP changes when recycling and waste separation at source is made mandatory. The methodology consisted of asking people directly about their WTP for an additional waste collection service charge to cover the costs of a new waste management project. The new waste management project consisted of two versions: version A (recycling and waste separation is mandatory) and version B (recycling and waste separation is not mandatory). The households declined their WTP for version A when they were asked to separate the waste at source although all the facilities would be given to them for waste separation. The result of this study indicates that the households were not conscious about the benefits of recycling and waste separation. Concerted efforts should be taken to raise environmental consciousness of the households through education and more publicity regarding waste separation, reducing and recycling.

  9. Implementing the Contingent Valuation Method for supporting decision making in the waste management sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglias, A; Mirasgedis, S; Tourkolias, C; Georgopoulou, E

    2016-07-01

    This study presents an application of the Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) for valuing the environmental impacts associated with the operation of landfills for residues following waste treatment and depicts how the results of the analysis can be used for decision making in the field of waste management. The survey was conducted in Ikaria, Greece, a medium-sized island in the northern Aegean Sea, with a view to estimate the amount of compensatory benefits that are socially acceptable to be attributed to the hosting community of a new landfill for residues. The results showed that the mean willingness to pay per household to create a fund for financing social and environmental programs in the community that will host the landfill in question was estimated at €6.5-6.7 per 2-month and household taking into account all households of the sample. This estimate is at the same order of magnitude but at the lower band compared to the results of other relevant studies showing that the public in Ikaria is aware for the relatively limited environmental burdens associated with the operation of landfills for residues following an integrated waste management treatment.

  10. A Remotely-Delivered CBT and Contingency Management Therapy for Substance Using People with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brent A; Rosen, Marc I; Wang, Yan; Shen, Jie; Ablondi, Karen; Sullivan, Anna; Guerrero, Mario; Siqueiros, Lisa; Daar, Eric S; Liu, Honghu

    2015-06-01

    Substance using HIV patients are at risk for non-adherence, and most prior interventions in this population have had only modest effects on adherence. Contingency management (CM) is a promising intervention. The Centralized Off-site Adherence Enhancement (CARE) program involved 12 telephone-delivered substance and adherence-targeted cognitive behavior therapy sessions coupled with CM for adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and counseling participation. CM involved 6 weeks of escalating reinforcement for taking prescribed doses followed by 6 weeks of tapering variable rate reinforcement, and separate reinforcement for counseling ($806 possible). Participants' adherence was measured by devices which wirelessly provided real-time notification of device-opening. HIV infected patients on ART (N = 10) with recent stimulant or alcohol use completed 10.2 of 12 possible telephone sessions, spent 42.8 min/call, and rated the counseling 6.2 on a 1-7 scale. Medication adherence improved from 81 to 93 % (p = 0.04). CARE appears to be acceptable and engaging.

  11. Lost in translation? Moving contingency management and cognitive behavioral therapy into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kathleen M

    2014-10-01

    In the treatment of addictions, the gap between the availability of evidence-based therapies and their limited implementation in practice has not yet been bridged. Two empirically validated behavioral therapies, contingency management (CM) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), exemplify this challenge. Both have a relatively strong level of empirical support but each has weak and uneven adoption in clinical practice. This review highlights examples of how barriers to their implementation in practice have been addressed systematically, using the Stage Model of Behavioral Therapies Development as an organizing framework. For CM, barriers such as cost and ideology have been addressed through the development of lower-cost and other adaptations to make it more community friendly. For CBT, barriers such as relative complexity, lack of trained providers, and need for supervision have been addressed via conversion to standardized computer-assisted versions that can serve as clinician extenders. Although these and other modifications have rendered both interventions more disseminable, diffusion of innovation remains a complex, often unpredictable process. The existing specialty addiction-treatment system may require significant reforms to fully implement CBT and CM, particularly greater focus on definable treatment goals and performance-based outcomes.

  12. Is exposure to an effective contingency management intervention associated with more positive provider beliefs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Kimberly C; Carpenedo, Carolyn M; Stitzer, Maxine L; Dugosh, Karen L; Petry, Nancy M; Roll, John M; Saladin, Michael E; Cohen, Allan J; Hamilton, John; Reese, Karen; Sillo, Gina R; Stabile, Patricia Quinn; Sterling, Robert C

    2012-06-01

    This study empirically examined opinions of treatment providers regarding contingency management (CM) programs while controlling for experience with a specific efficacious CM program. In addition to empirically describing provider opinions, we examined whether the opinions of providers at the sites that implemented the CM program were more positive than those of matched providers at sites that did not implement it. Participants from 7 CM treatment sites (n = 76) and 7 matched nonparticipating sites (n = 69) within the same nodes of the National Institute of Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network completed the Provider Survey of Incentives (PSI), which assesses positive and negative beliefs about incentive programs. An intent-to-treat analysis found no differences in the PSI summary scores of providers in CM program versus matched sites, but correcting for experience with tangible incentives showed significant differences, with providers from CM sites reporting more positive opinions than those from matched sites. Some differences were found in opinions regarding costs of incentives, and these generally indicated that participants from CM sites were more likely to see the costs as worthwhile. The results from the study suggest that exposing community treatment providers to incentive programs may itself be an effective strategy in prompting the dissemination of CM interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Amount of earnings during prize contingency management treatment is associated with posttreatment abstinence outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Roll, John M

    2011-12-01

    Contingency management (CM) treatments that provide patients with the opportunity to earn chances of winning prizes of varying magnitudes are becoming increasingly popular. In the CM literature, magnitude of reinforcement is linked with effect sizes, such that CM treatments that provide larger magnitude reinforcement are more efficacious than those that provide lower magnitude reinforcement. With prize CM, even when magnitudes of overall expected prize earnings are constant, some patients win more prizes than others. Thus, patients who win larger overall amounts of prizes during treatment may have better outcomes than those who win fewer prizes. This study evaluated the impact of overall amounts of prizes won on long-term abstinence outcomes. The dollar amount of prizes won during prize CM treatments was determined from 78 cocaine-abusing methadone-maintenance patients who were randomized to prize CM treatments in three clinical trials. Abstinence three months following the end of the CM intervention was the primary dependent variable. The dollar amount of prizes won during CM treatment was a significant predictor of submission of cocaine-negative urine samples and self-reports of cocaine abstinence at the follow-up evaluation, even after controlling for other variables associated with long-term abstinence, such as pretreatment urinalysis results and longest duration of abstinence achieved during treatment. These results suggest that magnitudes of earnings during prize CM may impact outcomes and call for further experimentation of parameters related to the efficacy of prize CM.

  14. Contingency management improves outcomes in cocaine-dependent outpatients with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Gloria; Secades-Villa, Roberto; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Peña-Suárez, Elsa; Sánchez-Hervás, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    Despite depressive symptoms being very common among patients seeking treatment for cocaine dependence, few studies have examined the effects of depressive symptoms on cocaine outpatient treatment outcomes, and there is even less research in the context of Contingency Management (CM). The purpose of this study was to assess the main and interactive effects of co-occurring depressive symptoms on CM outcomes. Cocaine-dependent individuals (N = 108) were randomized to Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) or CRA plus CM in two outpatient community clinical settings. Participants were categorized according to depression symptoms, self-reported by means of the BDI at treatment entry. Outcome measures included treatment retention and documented cocaine abstinence over a 6-month treatment period. Depressive symptoms were more commonly found in females and in unemployed participants, and were associated with more drug-related, social, and psychiatric problems at treatment entry. Individuals with baseline depressive symptoms had poorer treatment outcomes than patients without depressive symptoms. The addition of CM to CRA made the program more effective than with CRA alone, regardless of depressive symptoms. CM was associated with better abstinence treatment outcomes, while the interaction between unemployment and depressive symptoms was associated with negative retention treatment outcomes. This study supports the efficacy of CM for cocaine-dependent outpatients with and without depressive symptoms, and highlights its importance for improving treatment for unemployed and depressed cocaine-dependent individuals.

  15. Acceptability of an Internet-based contingency management intervention for smoking cessation: views of smokers, nonsmokers, and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiff, Bethany R; Jarvis, Brantley P; Turturici, Marissa; Dallery, Jesse

    2013-06-01

    The acceptability of an Internet-based contingency management (CM) intervention for cigarette smoking was evaluated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, 67 participants (46% female) completed an Internet-based CM intervention and then answered questions about the intervention. Experiment 2 assessed the acceptability of the intervention among potential treatment users who had never used the intervention, (smokers, n = 164, 52% female), nonsmokers (n = 166, 73% female), and health-care providers (n = 139, 63% female). Participants in Experiment 2 were randomly assigned to either watch a video describing the standard CM intervention (no-deposit group) or to watch a video about the standard intervention plus a deposit incentive (deposit group). Overall, results of both experiments indicated high acceptability across all dimensions of the intervention. In Experiment 1, 74% (n = 26 of participants in the treatment group) of participants said they would use it if they needed to quit, as well as 92% (n = 150 among smokers) of those in Experiment 2. Of the health-care providers, 81% (n = 113) reported that they would be very likely to recommend the intervention to patients. Participants in both experiments reported that monitoring their progress and earning vouchers were strengths of the intervention. The no-deposit group rated voucher earnings, cash earnings, and cost-effectiveness of the intervention higher than the deposit group. Health-care professionals did not differ in their ratings across video conditions. Overall, the results suggest that Internet-based CM is acceptable as a method to help people quit smoking.

  16. Contingency management in cocaine abusers: a dose-effect comparison of goods-based versus cash-based incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrey, Ryan; Bigelow, George E; Stitzer, Maxine L

    2007-08-01

    Goods-based contingency management interventions (e.g., those using vouchers or prizes as incentives) have demonstrated efficacy in reducing cocaine use, but cost has limited dissemination to community clinics. Recent research suggests that development of a cash-based contingency management approach may improve treatment outcomes while reducing operational costs of the intervention. However, the clinical safety of providing cash-based incentives to substance abusers has been a concern. The present 16-week study compared the effects of goods-based versus cash-based incentives worth $0, $25, $50, and $100 on short-term cocaine abstinence in a small sample of cocaine-dependent methadone patients (N = 12). A within-subject design was used; a 9-day washout period separated each of 8 incentive conditions. Higher magnitude ($50 and $100) cash-based incentives (checks) produced greater cocaine abstinence compared with the control ($0) condition, but a magnitude effect was not seen for goods-based incentives (vouchers). A trend was observed for greater rates of abstinence in the cash-based versus goods-based incentives at the $50 and $100 magnitudes. Receipt of $100 checks did not increase subsequent rates of cocaine use above those seen in control conditions. The efficacy and safety data provided in this and other recent studies suggest that use of cash-based incentives deserves consideration for clinical applications of contingency management, but additional confirmation in research using larger samples and more prolonged periods of incentive delivery is needed.

  17. Tactics at the category level of purchasing and supply management: sourcing levers, contingencies and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesping, Frank

    2015-01-01

    For the ‘front-line’ purchasing agent, it is obvious that not all categories of products and supplier relationships should be managed in the same way. Rather, in a modern category management approach, firms group similar products into ‘sourcing categories’ forming coherent supply markets (e.g.,

  18. Contingent workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrina, Ryan T; Burns, Candace M; Conlon, Helen

    2011-03-01

    Contingent workers compose a large portion of the U.S. work force. Contingent workers include temporary employees, contracted employees, day laborers, and freelancers. The skill level and educational requirements for their jobs vary from basic to highly advanced. Construction, housekeeping, engineering, and nursing have such positions. U.S. contingent workers are more likely to engage in occupations associated with increased risk of injury, and a variety of factors increase their risk of work injuries, particularly those leading to death. This article focuses on select occupational health and safety issues affecting contingent workers and their implications for occupational health nurses. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. The Role of Communication in Group Decision-Making Efficacy: A Task-Contingency Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Randy Y.

    1990-01-01

    Argues importance of communication for group decision-making performance and its impact on such performance are function of three task characteristics: structure, information requirement, and evaluation demand. Identifies task circumstances in which group communication can be expected to play role in determining decision-making performance, as…

  20. Interdependent Group Contingency and Mystery Motivators to Reduce Preschool Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelly A.; Theodore, Lea A.; Aloiso, Danielle; Alric-Edwards, Jolie M.; Hughes, Tammy L.

    2007-01-01

    Children exhibiting challenging and disruptive behaviors can require teachers to spend a substantial amount of time on classroom management. Disruptive behaviors in the classroom impact the learning process by taking time away from academic instruction. Further, preschoolers who are disruptive are more likely to continue displaying problematic…

  1. The Effects of a Discriminative Stimulus, Paired with Individual and Group Reward Contingencies, on the Decibel Levels in an Elementary School Lunch Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Bryan; Alexander, Melina; Edmonson, Claudia; Stenhoff, Donald; West, Richard P.

    A study examined the effects of using a musical clocklight as discriminative stimulus, paired with individual and group contingency rewards, on the decibel level in an elementary school lunchroom. Subjects were 256 students aged 5-12, who ate lunch in two sessions for younger and older students. The musical clocklight (MCL) apparatus consisted of…

  2. Total Quality Management (TQM): Group Dynamics Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-15

    TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT (TQM) Group Dynamics Workshop © Copyright 1990 Booz*Allen & Hamilton... QUALITY MANAGEMENT (TQM) GROUP DYNAMICS COURSE -’ Total Quality Management * This course has been designed under the direction and approval of OASD (P...participants’ use of group dynamics skills as leaders and members of OSD TQM groups. Total Quality Management " Examples of such groups include

  3. Accounting protesting and warm glow bidding in Contingent Valuation surveys considering the management of environmental goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grammatikopoulou, Ioanna; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2013-01-01

    Based on a Contingent Valuation survey aiming to reveal the willingness to pay (WTP) for conservation of a wetland area in Greece, we show how protest and warm glow motives can be taken into account when modeling WTP. In a sample of more than 300 respondents, we find that 54% of the positive bids...

  4. The Challenge of Modern Contingency Base Management During Sustained Land Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The DOD should recognize where the needs of the homeland and the needs of war intersect in contingency basing and seek to co-develop solutions to...Appleman, Patrick. 19 Ivanovich, David, " Electrocutions Kill at least 12 Soldiers, Marines in Iraq Ungrounded wires the focus of Inquiry at

  5. A public health response to the methamphetamine epidemic: the implementation of contingency management to treat methamphetamine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hare C Bradley

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In response to increases in methamphatemine-associated sexually transmitted diseases, the San Francisco Department of Public Health implemented a contingency management (CM field program called the Positive Reinforcement Opportunity Project (PROP. Methods Methamphetamine-using men who have sex with men (MSM in San Francisco qualified for PROP following expressed interest in the program, provision of an observed urine sample that tested positive for methamphetamine metabolites and self-report of recent methamphetamine use. For 12 weeks, PROP participants provided observed urine samples on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays and received vouchers of increasing value for each consecutive sample that tested negative to metabolites of methamphetamine. Vouchers were exchanged for goods and services that promoted a healthy lifestyle. No cash was provided. Primary outcomes included acceptability (number of enrollments/time, impact (clinical response to treatment and cost-effectiveness as cost per patient treated. Results Enrollment in PROP was brisk indicating its acceptability. During the first 10 months of operation, 143 men sought treatment and of these 77.6% were HIV-infected. Of those screened, 111 began CM treatment and averaged 15 (42% methamphetamine-free urine samples out of a possible 36 samples during the 12-week treatment period; 60% completed 4 weeks of treatment; 48% 8 weeks and 30% 12 weeks. Across all participants, an average of $159 (SD = $165 in vouchers or 35.1% of the maximum possible ($453 was provided for these participants. The average cost per participant of the 143 treated was $800. Conclusion Clinical responses to CM in PROP were similar to CM delivered in drug treatment programs, supporting the adaptability and effectiveness of CM to non-traditional drug treatment settings. Costs were reasonable and less than or comparable to other methamphetamine outpatient treatment programs. Further expansion of programs

  6. Effect of reinforcement probability and prize size on cocaine and heroin abstinence in prize-based contingency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghitza, Udi E; Epstein, David H; Schmittner, John; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L

    2008-01-01

    Although treatment outcome in prize-based contingency management has been shown to depend on reinforcement schedule, the optimal schedule is still unknown. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial (Ghitza et al., 2007) to determine the effects of the probability of winning a prize (low vs. high) and the size of the prize won (small, large, or jumbo) on likelihood of abstinence until the next urine-collection day for heroin and cocaine users (N=116) in methadone maintenance. Higher probability of winning, but not the size of individual prizes, was associated with a greater percentage of cocaine-negative, but not opiate-negative, urines.

  7. Resurgence of instrumental behavior after an abstinence contingency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Mark E; Schepers, Scott T

    2014-06-01

    In resurgence, an extinguished instrumental behavior (R1) recovers when a behavior that has replaced it (R2) is also extinguished. The phenomenon may be relevant to understanding relapse that can occur after the termination of "contingency management" treatments, in which an unwanted behavior (e.g., substance abuse) is reduced by reinforcing an alternative behavior. When reinforcement is discontinued, the unwanted behavior might resurge. However, unlike most resurgence experiments, contingency management treatments also introduce a negative contingency, in which reinforcers are not delivered unless the client has abstained from the unwanted behavior. In two experiments with rats, we therefore examined the effects of adding a negative "abstinence" contingency to the resurgence design. During response elimination, R2 was not reinforced unless R1 had not been emitted for a minimum period of time (45, 90, or 135 s). In both experiments, adding such a contingency to simple R1 extinction reduced, but did not eliminate, resurgence. In Experiment 2, we found the same effect in a yoked group that could earn reinforcers for R2 at the same points in time as the negative-contingency group, but without the requirement to abstain from R1. Thus, the negative contingency per se did not contribute to the reduction in resurgence. These results suggest that the contingency reduced resurgence by making reinforcers more difficult to earn and more widely spaced in time. This could have allowed the animal to learn that R1 was extinguished in the "context" of infrequent reinforcement-a context more like that of resurgence testing. The results are thus consistent with a contextual (renewal) account of resurgence. The method might provide a better model of relapse after termination of a contingency management treatment.

  8. Lifetime substance use and HIV sexual risk behaviors predict treatment response to contingency management among homeless, substance-dependent MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reback, Cathy J; Peck, James A; Fletcher, Jesse B; Nuno, Miriam; Dierst-Davies, Rhodri

    2012-01-01

    Homeless, substance-dependent men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to suffer health disparities, including high rates of HIV. One-hundred and thirty one homeless, substance-dependent MSM were randomized into a contingency management (CM) intervention to increase substance abstinence and health-promoting behaviors. Participants were recruited from a community-based, health education/risk reduction HIV prevention program and the research activities were also conducted at the community site. Secondary analyses were conducted to identify and characterize treatment responders (defined as participants in a contingency management intervention who scored at or above the median on three primary outcomes). Treatment responders were more likely to be Caucasian/White (p interventions continues to be a public health priority, especially in the effort to implement effective interventions for use in community settings. The identification of both treatment responders and nonresponders is important for intervention development tailored to specific populations, both in service programs and research studies, to optimize outcomes among highly impacted populations.

  9. Future Contingents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Hasle., Per F. V.

    2015-01-01

    will be a sea-battle tomorrow” could serve as standard examples. What could be called the problem of future contingents concerns how to ascribe truth-values to such statements. If there are several possible decisions out of which one is going to be made freely tomorrow, can there be a truth now about which one......, ‘future contingents’ could also refer to future contingent objects. A statement like “The first astronaut to go to Mars will have a unique experience” could be analyzed as referring to an object not yet existing, supposing that one day in the distant future some person will indeed travel to Mars......, but that person has not yet been born. The notion of ‘future contingent objects’ involves important philosophical questions, for instance the issue of ethical obligations towards future generations, quantification over ‘future contingent objects’ etc. However, this entry is confined to the study of future...

  10. Future Contingents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Hasle., Per F. V.

    2011-01-01

    will be a sea-battle tomorrow” could serve as standard examples. What could be called the problem of future contingents concerns how to ascribe truth-values to such statements. If there are several possible decisions out of which one is going to be made freely tomorrow, can there be a truth now about which one......, ‘future contingents’ could also refer to future contingent objects. A statement like “The first astronaut to go to Mars will have a unique experience” could be analyzed as referring to an object not yet existing, supposing that one day in the distant future some person will indeed travel to Mars......, but that person has not yet been born. The notion of ‘future contingent objects’ involves important philosophical questions, for instance the issue of ethical obligations towards future generations, quantification over ‘future contingent objects’ etc. However, this entry is confined to the study of future...

  11. Analysis of integrated healthcare networks' performance: a contingency-strategic management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B Y; Wan, T T

    1999-12-01

    Few empirical analyses have been done in the organizational researches of integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) or integrated healthcare delivery systems. Using a contingency derived contact-process-performance model, this study attempts to explore the relationships among an IHN's strategic direction, structural design, and performance. A cross-sectional analysis of 100 IHNs suggests that certain contextual factors such as market competition and network age and tax status have statistically significant effects on the implementation of an IHN's service differentiation strategy, which addresses coordination and control in the market. An IHN's service differentiation strategy is positively related to its integrated structural design, which is characterized as integration of administration, patient care, and information system across different settings. However, no evidence supports that the development of integrated structural design may benefit an IHN's performance in terms of clinical efficiency and financial viability.

  12. Valuation of Haze Management and Prevention Using the Contingent Valuation Method with the Sure Independence Screening Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guizhi Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Haze has caused the deterioration of air quality and has ultimately affected the ecological environment. The contingent valuation method (CVM is an important assessment method that is widely used in ecological economics. The public’s willingness to pay (WTP for haze management and prevention can be analyzed using dichotomous choices. Here, the method is applied to study the valuation of haze management and prevention. Taking Jiangsu Province as an example, the non-market value is calculated by constructing the binary logistic model from questionnaire data, combined with a data-processing method: the sure independence screening (SIS algorithm. The conclusions are as follows: (1 The public’s WTP for haze management and prevention is closely related to the monthly income of families and transport modality; (2 According to the CVM, the non-market value for haze management and prevention in Jiangsu is 7.645 billion yuan; (3 By the average estimate method (AEM, this value is 12.529 billion yuan, about 1.64 times the estimate from the CVM. This is because the AEM ignores the correlation among the influence factors and, therefore, overestimates the valuation of the services; (4 The CVM, combined with the SIS algorithm, does a better job in estimating the valuation of the services.

  13. Group Work Management in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund Frykedal, Karin; Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to provide a better understanding of teachers' managing roles when using group work in the classroom. Building on Granström's 2 concepts of leadership and teachership, a more specific aim is to investigate teachers' managing roles when using group work and how teachers' presumptions affect the way in which they manage the…

  14. Zidan Management Group, Inc. Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan Management Group, Inc. (the Company) is located in Indianapolis, Indiana. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

  15. Managing factoring in banking groups

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    On the market for factoring services independent suppliers coexhist with companies affiliated with banking groups. The last ones can be oriented in their decision processes by the policies of their parent company, usually a bank. They could also benefit from synergies among the different units of the group. The main benefits are linked to cost reduction, better skill-based resources allocation and a higher amount of financial coverage. If such interdependencies are found ...

  16. Management of a research group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, T

    1991-01-01

    It is generally believed that research and commerce are unique and different activities. However, the criteria of good business management can also be applied to research programmes, with much benefit to the latter. The objectives of both are fundamentally similar: in one case to produce goods and services, in the other to produce scientific papers. The most successful goods and services, and scientific projects, are those which are closely geared to the desires of consumers--whether the latter be the general public or large organisations. Science, like business, requires good leadership and good people-management. The characteristics of a successful science leader are often remarkably similar to those of a business leader. Individuals within any team must be carefully selected, adequately briefed, and then allowed to proceed with the job in hand. Obtaining resources for scientific research is also very similar to the funding of business activities--all come down to competition between different products and services. The end product of scientific research--the published paper--requires marketing in exactly the same way as a business product. Without such marketing the programme is almost always a failure. The effectiveness of a research programme must be monitored with the same care as would be devoted to a business. If research performance does not reach reasonably defined criteria, then resources are generally withdrawn--the equivalent of a bankruptcy in commerce.

  17. Group Work Management in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund Frykedal, Karin; Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to provide a better understanding of teachers' managing roles when using group work in the classroom. Building on Granström's 2 concepts of leadership and teachership, a more specific aim is to investigate teachers' managing roles when using group work and how teachers' presumptions affect the way in which they…

  18. Future Contingents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Hasle., Per F. V.

    2011-01-01

    will be a sea-battle tomorrow” could serve as standard examples. What could be called the problem of future contingents concerns how to ascribe truth-values to such statements. If there are several possible decisions out of which one is going to be made freely tomorrow, can there be a truth now about which one...... about the future. Finally, it should be mentioned that temporal logic has found a remarkable application in computer science and applied mathematics. In the late 1970s the first computer scientists realised the relevance of temporal logic for the purposes of computer science (see Hasle and Øhrstrøm 2004)....

  19. Contingency Management Interventions for HIV, Tuberculosis, and Hepatitis Control Among Individuals With Substance Use Disorders: A Systematized Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Evan S; Matusiewicz, Alexis K; Stitzer, Maxine L; Higgins, Stephen T; Sigmon, Stacey C; Heil, Sarah H

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis, HIV and tuberculosis are significant and costly public health problems that disproportionately affect individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs). Incentive-based treatment approaches (i.e., contingency management; CM) are highly effective at reducing drug use. The primary aim of this report is to review the extant literature that examines the efficacy of CM interventions for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis, HIV and tuberculosis among individuals with SUDs. A literature search identified 23 controlled studies on this topic. In approximately 85% of the studies, CM produced significantly better adherence to prevention, diagnosis and treatment-related medical services, with adherence rates averaging almost 35% higher among patients receiving incentives vs. control condition participants. Findings from these studies parallel the results of a meta-analysis of CM interventions for the treatment of SUDs. The results also suggest that the principles that underlie the efficacy of CM generalize across infectious disease and substance abuse treatment behaviors. The application of additional principles from the literature on CM for treatment of SUDs to interventions targeting infectious disease control would be beneficial. Further development and dissemination of these interventions has the potential to greatly impact public health.

  20. Patients Undergoing Substance Abuse Treatment and Receiving Financial Assistance for a Physical Disability Respond Well to Contingency Management Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Ashley E; Morasco, Benjamin J; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-11-01

    Physical illness and disability are common in individuals with substance use disorders, but little is known about the impact of physical disability status on substance use treatment outcomes. This study examined the main and interactive effects of physical disability payment status on substance use treatment. Participants (N = 1,013) were enrolled in one of six prior randomized clinical trials comparing contingency management (CM) to standard care; 79 (7.8%) participants reported receiving disability payments, CM improved all three primary substance use outcomes: treatment retention, percent negative samples and longest duration of abstinence. There was no significant main effect of physical disability payment status on treatment outcomes; however, a significant treatment condition by physical disability status interaction effect emerged in terms of retention in treatment and duration of abstinence achieved. Patients who were receiving physical disability payments responded particularly well to CM, and their time in treatment and durations of drug and alcohol abstinence increased even more markedly with CM than did that of their counterparts who were not receiving physical disability assistance. These findings suggest an objectively defined cohort of patients receiving substance use treatment who respond particularly well to CM.

  1. The role of avoidance and inflexibility in characterizing response to contingency management for cocaine use disorders: A secondary profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotts, Angela L; Vujanovic, Anka; Heads, Angela; Suchting, Robert; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy M

    2015-06-01

    Contingency management (CM) is a reinforcement-based approach that provides tangible rewards for objectively verified drug abstinence. CM is the most effective available behavioral intervention for cocaine use disorders; however, response to CM is variable, with significant rates of nonresponse. In the present investigation, we conducted a secondary profile analysis to identify potentially modifiable cognitive-affective characteristics associated with CM response (abstinence vs. continued use) preceding a pharmacotherapy trial for cocaine dependence. Ninety-nine cocaine-dependent, treatment-seeking adults participated in a 4-week baseline CM procedure using high-value vouchers for submission of cocaine-negative urines. Separate profiles for responders and the nonresponders were established using standardized mean scores on relevant pretreatment measures of negative affect, experiential avoidance, cocaine withdrawal/craving, and impulsivity. Results indicated no differences between responder subgroups on baseline levels of negative affect, withdrawal/craving, or impulsivity; however, CM nonresponders, relative to responders, reported significantly higher levels of avoidance and behavioral inflexibility (p < .01) in the context of distressing cocaine-related thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. These data suggest that emotion regulation skills may serve as a therapeutic strategy for enhancing response to CM for cocaine use disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Examining Longitudinal Stimulant Use and Treatment Attendance as Parallel Outcomes in Two Contingency Management Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Sterling; Brooks, Olivia; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Lederhos, Crystal; Lamp, Amanda; Murphy, Sean; Layton, Matthew; Roll, John

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine stimulant use and longitudinal treatment attendance in one 'parallel outcomes' model in order to determine how these two outcomes are related to one another during treatment, and to quantify how the intervention impacts these two on- and off-target outcomes differently. Data came from two multi-site randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of contingency management (CM) that targeted stimulant use. We used parallel multilevel modeling to examine the impact of multiple pre-specified covariates, including selected Addiction Severity Index (ASI) scores, age and sex, in addition to CM on concurrent attendance and stimulant use in two separate analyses, i.e., one per trial. In one trial, CM was positively associated with attending treatment throughout the trial (β=0.060, preinforcement' between two clinically meaningful on-target (directly reinforced behavior) and off-target (indirectly reinforced behavior) outcomes is in need of further examination in order to fully exploit the potential clinical benefits that could be realized in substance use disorder treatment trials.

  3. Lighting the darkness of addiction: can phototherapy enhance contingency-management-based treatment of substance-related and addictive disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siporin, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    Maladaptive patterns of substance use are serious social problems. Both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments are available, but nondrug options may be preferable because they avoid the expense and adverse side effects of psychotropic medication. Contingency management (CM) and nondrug social and recreational activities (NDSRAs) are based on operant conditioning principles and seek to decrease substance use by means of nondrug rewards. However, their efficacy may be hindered where brain reward circuitry is dysfunctional. Research shows that substance abuse biases neural reward systems in favor of drug-induced highs, while disrupting circadian-based rhythms. Circadian systems also have been found to influence human reward pathways. Possibly, a bidirectional relationship exists between circadian disturbance and substance abuse effects. If so, repair of abnormal circadian rhythms might help normalize reward response in substance abusers, with positive effects on CM or NDSRA treatment outcomes. Phototherapy has been effective in repairing circadian rhythms in persons with seasonal affective disorder and other chronobiological conditions. This article proposes that it similarly may repair circadian response in substance abusers, thereby normalizing brain reward systems. By doing so, it would enhance the efficacy of CM and NDSRA therapies and may also help prevent relapse. Given its low cost and ease of administration, phototherapy seems a promising avenue to pursue.

  4. Applying Contingent Valuation Method for Economic Valuation of Awqaf Wealth Management in Welfare Changes of Muslim Households in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabdeen Masahina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective- The main objective of this study is to estimate the Willingness to Pay of the Muslim households to contribute cash waqf as a strategy towards wealth management in Sri Lanka. Waqf is holding or confinement which is emphasised in Islam as ibadah as it can distribute the wealth among the Muslim society and would help to develop the Islamic vision of brotherhood.Method- Contingent valuation method is used to estimate the Willingness to Pay of Muslim households to improve socio-economic status of the low income people through waqf wealth management in Sri Lanka. This study is developed based on Random Utility Theory.Result- This paper identifies the appropriate methods to estimate the willingness to pay of Muslim households in Sri Lanka for waqf (awqaf is plural institutions. Such evaluations are crucial for the Islamic financial system to function effectively in order to achieve the dignified objectives of socio-economic justice through proper distribution of wealth.Conclusion-This paper presents a conceptual model of waqf institutions which would be useful for further empirical research in this area. The findings are not only appropriate and applicable to Sri Lanka but also to other Muslim and non-Muslim countries. This is a unique contribution to the Islamic economic literature. The knowledge obtained from this study hopes to propose cash waqf to manage the wealth in order to improve the socio-economic status of low income people in Sri Lanka.Tujuan - Tujuan utama dari penelitian ini adalah untuk memperkirakan Kemauan Membayar rumah tangga Muslim untuk berkontribusi wakaf tunai sebagai strategi menuju pengelolaan kekayaan di Sri Lanka. Wakaf secara bahasa menahan (harta yang ditekankan dalam Islam sebagai ibadah karena dapat mendistribusikan kekayaan di antara masyarakat Muslim dan akan membantu untuk mengembangkan visi Islam yaitu persaudaraan.Metode - Metode penilaian Kontingensi digunakan untuk memperkirakan Kesediaan membayar rumah

  5. Primary and Secondary Congestion Management in Restructured Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hajian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new strategy for congestion management is presented. Generally, in congestion management programs all considered contingencies are deterministic or stochastic. Therefore, congestion management cost is increased. In the proposed algorithm, congestion management program is divided to two parts, Primary and Secondary Congestion Management. Also, contingencies are divided in two groups. In the first group, the contingencies that should be managed by preventive actions are considered and the others are taken into account in the second group. The first group of contingencies is in primary congestion management. The secondary congestion management program starts from the nearest time to market run time. So, the secondary congestion management uses corrective actions for managing secondary group contingencies. Also, the secondary congestion management is capable of covering most uncertainties, especially load variations. The proposed method reduces congestion management cost.

  6. Examining longitudinal stimulant use and treatment attendance as parallel outcomes in two contingency management randomized clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Sterling; Brooks, Olivia; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Lederhos, Crystal; Lamp, Amanda; Murphy, Sean; Layton, Matthew; Roll, John

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine stimulant use and longitudinal treatment attendance in one ‘parallel outcomes’ model in order to determine how these two outcomes are related to one another during treatment, and to quantify how the intervention impacts these two on- and off-target outcomes differently. Data came from two multi-site randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of contingency management (CM) that targeted stimulant use. We used parallel multilevel modeling to examine the impact of multiple pre-specified covariates, including selected Addiction Severity Index (ASI) scores, age and sex, in addition to CM on concurrent attendance and stimulant use in two separate analyses, i.e., one per trial. In one trial, CM was positively associated with attending treatment throughout the trial (β = 0.060, p < 0.05). In the second trial, CM predicted negative urinalysis (−UA) over the 12-week treatment period (β = 0.069, p < 0.05). In both trials, there was a significant, positive relationship between attendance and −UA submission, but in the first trial a −UA at both baseline and over time was related to attendance over time (r = 0.117; r = 0.013, respectively) and in the second trial, a −UA submission at baseline was associated with increased attendance over time (r = 0.055). These findings indicate that stimulant use and treatment attendance over time are related but distinct outcomes that, when analyzed simultaneously, portray a more informative picture of their predictors and the separate trajectories of each. This ‘indirect reinforcement’ between two clinically meaningful on-target (directly reinforced behavior) and off-target (indirectly reinforced behavior) outcomes is in need of further examination in order to fully exploit the potential clinical benefits that could be realized in substance use disorder treatment trials. PMID:26456717

  7. Follow-up treatment effects of contingency management and motivational interviewing on substance use: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Caitlin S; Huey, Stanley J; Zara, Erica J; Jhaveri, Kinnari

    2017-06-01

    Motivation is an integral factor in substance use treatment and long-term recovery. However, it is unclear what role intrinsic and extrinsic motivation play across different treatment modalities. A meta-analysis (N = 84) was performed to estimate the pooled effect size of Motivational Interviewing (MI; primarily targeting intrinsic motivation) and contingency management (CM; primarily targeting extrinsic motivation) at different follow-up periods. Collapsed across all substance types, CM had a significant effect at 3-month follow-up, only. In contrast, MI had a significant effect at 6-month follow-up, only. CM had small and medium effects on multiple substances at 3-month follow-up (i.e., tobacco, marijuana, stimulants, polysubstances), but not at 6-month follow-up. MI had 1 significant medium effect at 3-month follow-up (i.e., marijuana), but several significant small effects at 6-month follow-up (i.e., alcohol, tobacco, polysubstances). This meta-analysis suggests that both CM and MI promote reductions in a range of substances, even several months after the intervention concludes. Further, these results provide some evidence that extrinsically focused CM may produce medium follow-up effects in the short run, but intrinsically focused MI may produce small but durable follow-up effects. However, this interpretation is complicated by the differences between the MI and CM studies that preclude statistical tests comparing effect sizes, and few studies assessed motivation itself. Future researchers should investigate how motivational dynamics impact lasting outcomes in substance use treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Blunted striatal response to monetary reward anticipation during smoking abstinence predicts lapse during a contingency-managed quit attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweitzer, Maggie M.; Geier, Charles F.; Denlinger, Rachel; Forbes, Erika E.; Raiff, Bethany R.; Dallery, Jesse; McClernon, F.J.; Donny, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Tobacco smoking is associated with dysregulated reward processing within the striatum, characterized by hypersensitivity to smoking rewards and hyposensitivity to non-smoking rewards. This bias toward smoking reward at the expense of alternative rewards is further exacerbated by deprivation from smoking, which may contribute to difficulty maintaining abstinence during a quit attempt. Objective We examined whether abstinence-induced changes in striatal processing of rewards predicted lapse likelihood during a quit attempt supported by contingency management (CM), in which abstinence from smoking was reinforced with money. Methods Thirty-six non-treatment seeking smokers participated in two fMRI sessions, one following 24-hr abstinence and one following smoking as usual. During each scan, participants completed a rewarded guessing task designed to elicit striatal activation in which they could earn smoking and monetary rewards delivered after the scan. Participants then engaged in a 3-week CM-supported quit attempt. Results As previously reported, 24-hr abstinence was associated with increased striatal activation in anticipation of smoking reward and decreased activation in anticipation of monetary reward. Individuals exhibiting greater decrements in right striatal activation to monetary reward during abstinence (controlling for activation during non-abstinence) were more likely to lapse during CM (p<.05), even when controlling for other predictors of lapse outcome (e.g., craving); no association was seen for smoking reward. Conclusions These results are consistent with a growing number of studies indicating the specific importance of disrupted striatal processing of non-drug reward in nicotine dependence, and highlight the importance of individual differences in abstinence-induced deficits in striatal function for smoking cessation. PMID:26660448

  9. Contingency management to reduce methamphetamine use and sexual risk among men who have sex with men: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson Damon R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine use is associated with HIV acquisition and transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM. Contingency management (CM, providing positive reinforcement for drug abstinence and withholding reinforcement when abstinence is not demonstrated, may facilitate reduced methamphetamine use and sexual risk. We compared CM as a stand-alone intervention to a minimal intervention control to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger, more definitive trial of CM; to define the frequency of behavioral outcomes to power such a trial; and, to compute preliminary estimates of CM's effectiveness. Methods We randomly assigned 127 MSM from Seattle, WA who use methamphetamine to receive a 12-week CM intervention (n = 70 or referral to community resources (n = 57. Results Retention at 24 weeks was 84%. Comparing consecutive study visits, non-concordant UAI declined significantly in both study arms. During the intervention, CM and control participants were comparably likely to provide urine samples containing methamphetamine (adjusted relative risk [aRR] = 1.09; 95%CI: 0.71, 1.56 and to report non-concordant UAI (aRR = 0.80; 95%CI: 0.47, 1.35. However, during post-intervention follow-up, CM participants were somewhat more likely to provide urine samples containing methamphetamine than control participants (aRR = 1.21; 95%CI: 0.95, 1.54, P = 0.11. Compared to control participants, CM participants were significantly more likely to report weekly or more frequent methamphetamine use and use of more than eight quarters of methamphetamine during the intervention and post-intervention periods. Conclusions While it is possible to enroll and retain MSM who use methamphetamine in a trial of CM conducted outside drug treatment, our data suggest that CM is not likely to have a large, sustained effect on methamphetamine use. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01174654

  10. An Evidence-based Approach to Developing a Management Strategy for Medical Contingencies on the Lunar Surface: The NASA/Haughton-Mars Project (HMP) 2006 Lunar Medical Contingency Simulation at Devon Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, R. A.; Jones, J. A.; Lee, P.; Comtois, J. M.; Chappell, S.; Rafiq, A.; Braham, S.; Hodgson, E.; Sullivan, P.; Wilkinson, N.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The lunar architecture for future sortie and outpost missions will require humans to serve on the lunar surface considerably longer than the Apollo moon missions. Although the Apollo crewmembers sustained few injuries during their brief lunar surface activity, injuries did occur and are a concern for the longer lunar stays. Interestingly, lunar medical contingency plans were not developed during Apollo. In order to develop an evidence-base for handling a medical contingency on the lunar surface, a simulation using the moon-Mars analog environment at Devon Island, Nunavut, high Canadian Arctic was conducted. Objectives of this study included developing an effective management strategy for dealing with an incapacitated crewmember on the lunar surface, establishing audio/visual and biomedical data connectivity to multiple centers, testing rescue/extraction hardware and procedures, and evaluating in suit increased oxygen consumption. Methods: A review of the Apollo lunar surface activities and personal communications with Apollo lunar crewmembers provided the knowledge base of plausible scenarios that could potentially injure an astronaut during a lunar extravehicular activity (EVA). Objectives were established to demonstrate stabilization and transfer of an injured crewmember and communication with ground controllers at multiple mission control centers. Results: The project objectives were successfully achieved during the simulation. Among these objectives were extraction from a sloped terrain by a two-member crew in a 1 g analog environment, establishing real-time communication to multiple centers, providing biomedical data to flight controllers and crewmembers, and establishing a medical diagnosis and treatment plan from a remote site. Discussion: The simulation provided evidence for the types of equipment and methods for performing extraction of an injured crewmember from a sloped terrain. Additionally, the necessary communications infrastructure to connect

  11. Group profile management in ubiquitous healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengou, Maria-Anna; Mantas, Georgios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, ubiquitous healthcare is of utmost importance in the patient-centric model. Furthermore, the personalization of ubiquitous healthcare services plays a very important role to make the patient-centric model a reality. The personalization of the ubiquitous healthcare services is based on the profiles of the entities participating in these services. In this paper, we propose a group profile management system in a ubiquitous healthcare environment. The proposed system is responsible for the dynamic creation of a group profile and its management.

  12. The Use of Contingency Management and Motivational/Skills-Building Therapy to Treat Young Adults with Marijuana Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Easton, Caroline J.; Nich, Charla; Hunkele, Karen A.; Neavins, Tara M.; Sinha, Rajita; Ford, Haley L.; Vitolo, Sally A.; Doebrick, Cheryl A.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2006-01-01

    Marijuana-dependent young adults (N = 136), all referred by the criminal justice system, were randomized to 1 of 4 treatment conditions: a motivational/skills-building intervention (motivational enhancement therapy/cognitive-behavioral therapy; MET/CBT) plus incentives contingent on session attendance or submission of marijuana-free urine…

  13. Working group 7: pipeline risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariyawasam, Shahani; Weir, David

    2011-07-01

    This seventh working group of the Banff 2011 conference provided an understanding of risk management process in the pipeline industry, including system-wide risk assessment, risk based integrity systems and risk control techniques. The presentations furnished a basis on which to discuss programs, processes and procedures including reliability based decision support and performance measures that support a company's risk management policy. This workshop was divided into three sessions. The first session focused on the comparison between reliability methods and conventional deterministic methods in terms of accuracy, simplicity and sensitivity. Next, the importance of low probability high consequence events and the processes to prevent them were discussed. The last session discussed the consequences of management processes on failures and risks. The debates following these presentations tried to identify the best management practices to reduce risks, and the regulations and requirements to develop.

  14. The Effects of an Interdependent Group Oriented Contingency and Performance Feedback on the Praise Statements of Pre-Service Teachers during a Summer Day-Camp for Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clinton; Bicard, David F.; Casey, Laura B.; Bicard, Sara C.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher praise is one of the most important elements of teaching and learning. Behavioral consultation with and without performance has been shown to be an effective method for increasing instructional praise. The authors used an ABCBC design to investigate the effects of an interdependent group oriented contingency (GC) and the GC plus…

  15. Evaluation of a Lag Schedule of Reinforcement in a Group Contingency to Promote Varied Naming of Categories Items with Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskow, Katie M.; Donaldson, Jeanne M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the effects of Lag 0 and Lag 1 schedules of reinforcement on children's responses naming category items in a group context and subsequent responses emitted during individual testing in which the schedule of reinforcement remained Lag 0. Specifically, we measured response variability and novel responses to categories for 3 children who…

  16. Contingency Factors Influence on the Attributes of Management Accounting System: a study of textile companies in the State of Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Maria Beuren

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine whether contingency factors (environment, technology, strategy, organizational structure and size influence on the attributes of management accounting system of textile companies of Rio Grande do Sul. A questionnaire was sent to the owners of 38 companies registered in the Trade Union of the cities Farroupilha e Sarandi, and were obtained 14 replies. To the data was applied the entropy technique to verify the amount of information of the responses. The results indicated that the environment variable was verifies as the one which influences the most, with an emphasis on the customer tastes and preferences and technology applied to the production process. On the other hand, competition for the purchase of inputs/components and competition attitudes was considered as the variable which influences less the companies. It was concluded that the contingency factors of environment, technology, strategy, organizational structure and size, whether with more or less information weight, influence the attributes of the Management Accounting System.

  17. Habitat planning, maintenance and management working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM), called {open_quotes}America`s Sea,{close_quotes} is actually a small ocean basin covering over 1.5 million square kilometers. Because of the multiple uses, diversity, and size of the Gulf`s resources, management is shared by a number of governmental agencies including the Minerals Management Service, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, National Marine Fisheries Service, the US Coast Guard, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the five Gulf states fisheries agencies. All of these entities share a common goal of achieving optimum sustainable yield to maximize geological, biological, social, and economic benefits from these resources. These entities also share a common theme that the successful management of the northern GOM requires maintenance and enhancement of both the quantity and quality of habitats. A closer look at the GOM shows the sediment to be clearly dominated by vast sand and mud plains. These soft bottom habitats are preferred by many groundfish and shrimp species and, thus, have given rise to large commercial fisheries on these stocks. Hard bottom and reef habitats, on the other hand, are limited to approximately 1.6% of the total area of the Gulf, so that, while there are high demands by commercial and recreational fishermen for reef associated species, the availability of habitat for these stocks is limited. The thousands of oil and gas structures placed in the Gulf have added significant amounts of new hard substrate. The rigs-to-reefs concept was a common sense idea with support from environmental user groups and the petroleum industry for preserving a limited but valuable habitat type. As long as maximizing long-term benefits from the Gulf s resources for the greatest number of users remains the goal, then programs such as Rigs-to-Reefs will remain an important tool for fisheries and habitat managers in the Gulf.

  18. Management by objectives in medical group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozis, D E

    1986-01-01

    When the concept of management by objectives first emerged, it was heralded by many as the long-sought secret to employee motivation. The MBO technique, involving the three primary functions of objective setting, objective using, and employee involvement, is described here in terms of both theory and practice. Although it does have its pitfalls and is certainly not the "ultimate answer," MBO in medical group practice does have its merits when properly introduced. It is much more than a purely academic concept, and its major strength lies in its recognition of the importance of human resources in getting the job done.

  19. The Peoples Liberation Army and Contingency Planning in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    in 2012 with the Philippines over Scarborough Shoal and with Japan over the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands high- lighted how disputes over maritime and...the office will mobilize the District Working Groups to assist in management. Notably, the Xi’an plan is silent on what happens if the municipal and...planes, 35 assault boats, and 140 sets of large machinery. They successfully treated more than 12,000 civilians.17 Disaster Contingency Mobilization

  20. Succession managériale et richesse des actionnaires: le rôle de l’origine du successeur et des facteurs de contingence structurelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léopold DJOUTSA Wamba

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available L’objectif de cet article est tout d’abord, de déterminer l’impact de la succession managériale sur la richesse des actionnaires, ensuite de vérifier si la prise en compte des facteurs de contingence structurelle en fonction de l’origine du successeur peut modifier cet impact. A travers une méthodologie d’études d’événement, d’association et de comparaison sur des données collectées entre mars et octobre sur un échantillon de 50 cas de succession managériale sur la période 1990 à 2004 dans les sociétés anonymes au Cameroun, les résultats ont montré d’une part que l’impact global de la succession managériale sur la richesse des actionnaires est négatif et significatif; et d’autre part que cet impact varie significativement avec la prise en compte des facteurs de contingence structurelle (la taille de l’entreprise, la performance de l’entreprise avant la succession et l’environnement de l’entreprise en fonction de l’origine du successeur. Ces résultats suggèrent d’une part que cet impact négatif est amplifié par la taille de l’entreprise, la performance de l’entreprise, la variabilité de l’entreprise et atténué par la complexité de l’environnement.

  1. Crafting the group: Care in research management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah R; Horst, Maja

    2015-06-01

    This article reports findings from an interview study with group leaders and principal investigators in Denmark, the United Kingdom and the United States. Taking as our starting point current interest in the need to enhance 'responsible research and innovation', we suggest that these debates can be developed through attention to the talk and practices of scientists. Specifically, we chart the ways in which interview talk represented research management and leadership as processes of caring craftwork. Interviewees framed the group as the primary focus of their attention (and responsibilities), and as something to be tended and crafted; further, this process required a set of affective skills deployed flexibly in response to the needs of individuals. Through exploring the presence of notions of care in the talk of principal investigators and group leaders, we discuss the relation between care and craft, reflect on the potential implications of the promotion of a culture of care and suggest how mundane scientific understandings of responsibility might relate to a wider discussion of responsible research and innovation.

  2. Oil spill contingency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kip, S.H. (Sarawak Shell Bhd/Saban Shell Petroleum Co. Ltd. (MY))

    1988-01-01

    Oil spill contingency planning is an essential feature required in present day activities involving oil and gas exploration, production and transportation. A well through out continency plan will not only eliminate or minimize the sense of panic, normally associated with oil spill emergency, but also can minimize damage and cost involved. Oil spill contingency planning is a process of predetermining a response to an oil spill emergency. The process of preparing a contingency plan is discussed in this paper.

  3. Contingency contrast effects in discrimination conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grings, W W; Givens, M C; Carey, C A

    1979-09-01

    Three experiments observed differential electrodermal responding to signal stimuli (CSs) by contrasting positive, random, and negative contingencies between the signals and strong stimuli (UCSs). Experimentation began as a test of the proposition that electrodermal response to a random signal (or CSR) would lie between the response to a reinforced or excitatory stimulus (CS+) and that to a nonreinforced or inhibitory stimulus (CS- or CSI). A clear intermediate position for CSR did not result. Instead it appeared that CSR was operating as a mildly excitatory signal. This led to a second experiment where response to pairs of stimuli with different contingent relations could be compared in independent samples. The pairs were CS+ and CS-, CS+ and CSR, and CSR and CS-. Differential responding was observed in all pairs and response to CSR was significantly larger in the group receiving CSR with CS- than it was in the group receiving CSR with CS+. A contingency contrast effect was suggested. A third experiment explored the implications of a contingency contrast effect by varying overall UCS density, the duration of "safety intervals," and the presence or absence of instructions about contingencies. The UCS density and instruction variables influenced the differential performance to CSR and CS-, a result that was interpreted as further evidence for a perceptual contingency-contrast effect. Some theoretical implications of such a contrast phenomenon are examined, as they apply to autonomic learning. The CS is interpreted as a signal supplying contingency information that is dependent upon a complex of factors in the stimulation environment.

  4. Contingency nursing care management for ICU wards in case of power failure%我院ICU病房停电应急护理管理的实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈巧玲; 柳芳登; 王建红; 杜肖红; 林秀霞

    2012-01-01

    介绍了我院应对重症加强护理病房(ICU)停电应急护理管理的实践.我院的SICU病房制定了《SICU标准化停电应急预案》,预案中将停电事件突发时当班护理人员,根据其当前的岗位及资质分为A、B、C3种角色,分别赋予负责患者安全、负责协调指挥、负责医疗辅助的应急职责,并建立相应职能的应急行为流程.通过培训和考核,使医护人员熟练掌握应急预案的流程,明确自己的职责.经过4次实践,应急预案的实施降低了风险事件的发生率,提高了满意度.预案管理使ICU护理人员在停电事件中能快速有效地应对危机事件,规避ICU护理风险.%The paper described the practice of contingency nursing management for ICU wards in case of power breakdown in the hospital The SICU wards have developed their power failure contingency plan in which the nurses on duty are divided into Group A,B and C according to their positions and qualifications.Respectively,they take charge of patient safety,coordination and command,and medical aid.We also established the procedure of emergency response for these duties.Training and examination familiarize the medical personnel with the procedure and their duties.Four practices proved that the implementation of the plan reduces risks exposure and improves the satisfaction.With the contingency plan,the nurses in ICU can now take care of critical incidents and avoid nursing risks in ICU efficiently.

  5. Mountain substitutability and peak load pricing of high alpine peaks as a management tool to reduce environmental damage: a contingent valuation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, John B; Keske, Catherine M

    2009-04-01

    High alpine peaks throughout the world are under increasing environmental pressure from hikers, trekkers, and climbers. Colorado's "Fourteeners", peaks with summits above 14,000 feet are no exception. Most of these peaks have no entrance fees, and reach ecological and social carrying capacity on weekends. This paper illustrates how a series of dichotomous choice contingent valuation questions can be used to evaluate substitutability between different alpine peaks and quantify the price responsiveness to an entrance fee. Using this approach, we find that peak load pricing would decrease use of popular Fourteeners in Colorado by 22%. This reduction is due almost entirely to substitution, rather than income effects. There is also price inelastic demand, as 60% of the hikers find no substitution for their specific Fourteener at the varying cost increases posed in the survey. The no substitute group has a mean net benefit of $294 per hiker, per trip, considerably higher than visitor net benefits in most recreational use studies.

  6. 75 FR 34476 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation... Interior (Secretary) is renewing the charter for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group is to advise and to provide recommendations to the...

  7. The economic value of conjoint local management in water resources: Results from a contingent valuation in the Boquerón aquifer (Albacete, SE Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez-Moreno, Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Julio; Senent-Aparicio, Javier; del Pilar Flores-Asenjo, Maria

    2015-11-01

    In the field of water resources management, the Water Framework Directive is the first directive to adopt an ecosystem approach, establishing principles and economic tools for an integrated management of water resources to protect, conserve and restore all water bodies. The incorporation of local authorities in this management involves quality benefits that are perceived by users in an effective and lasting way. The purpose of this paper is to present the economic value of the environmental recovery of the overexploited Boquerón aquifer in Hellín (Albacete, SE Spain) and all of its associated ecosystems. This aquifer operates as a regulating reservoir for the surface waters of the Hellín Canal. The contingent valuation method (CVM) applied in this environmental assessment of the aquifer showed that its non-use value was €147,470 per year, due to the high environmental awareness of the Hellín people, which is enough to ensure the survival of the ecosystems linked to the aquifer.

  8. Pain management in pediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Namrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of pain in palliative care of children is somewhat different from that in adults.The use of opioids in pediatric palliative care presents some unique challenges. Confident and rational use of opioids, illustrated by WHO Guidelines is essential for adequate management of pain in children with life limiting conditions.

  9. Contingency planning: preparation of contingency plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, J M

    2008-01-01

    . The risk of introducing disease pathogens into a country and the spread of the agent within a country depends on a number of factors including import controls, movement of animals and animal products and the biosecurity applied by livestock producers. An adequate contingency plan is an important instrument...

  10. Group Work and Multicultural Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Globalization changes the composition of the adult classroom, increasing diversity and bringing new associated teaching and learning problems; problems with group work. Educators may have goals to teach transferable multicultural group working skills yet learners find such work more challenging, showing a propensity to form groups containing…

  11. Contingent methadone delivery: effects on illicit-opiate use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, S T; Stitzer, M L; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1986-07-01

    This study examined the effects of contingent vs. non-contingent delivery of a methadone dose supplement on relapse to illicit opiate use in the context of a methadone outpatient detoxification program. Following a 3-week methadone stabilization period on 30 mg, patients (N = 39) were randomly assigned to a contingent, a non-contingent, or a control treatment group. All patients received identical gradual reductions in their assigned methadone dose. During the dose reduction period (weeks 4-11), members of the contingent (N = 13) and non-contingent groups (N = 13) could obtain daily methadone-dose supplements up to 20 mg, but contingent group members could obtain supplements only if their most recent urinalysis results were opiate negative. Control subjects (N = 13) did not have dose increases available. The contingent group presented significantly lower opiate-positive urines during weeks 8-11 (14% positive) of the detox than the non-contingent (38% positive) or control (50% positive) groups. Additionally, the availability of extra methadone improved treatment retention and increased clinic attendance above levels observed in the control group. The potential for further use of methadone's reinforcing properties in the treatment of opiate dependence is discussed.

  12. Collective proposal of Contingency Plan as an alternative for management risks to socioenvironmental disasters within Network Management Risk of Córrego Dantas (REGER-CD), Nova Friburgo, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Leonardo; Luiza Coelho Netto, Ana

    2017-04-01

    An extreme rainfall event took place in the Mountainous Region of the state of Rio de Janeiro in January 2011, causing a catastrophic landslide that resulted in more than 900 deaths and 350 people disappearances. Precipitation events associated with landslides are common in this region and climate change tends to increase the frequency of intense rains and, consequently, landslides. At the same time, the vulnerability of communities has increased as a result of disorderly urban growth. Despite that, before 2011 communities and public power were not prepared to disaster management..After the 2011 event, public authorities try to established policies to reduce these vulnerabilities. One of the communities where the government acted was Córrego Dantas. However, the actions in this place were carried out in a top-down model, without discussion with population. As a consequence, the performance of public power has amplified social vulnerabilities. Highlight for the truculent removal of residents; resettlement in geographically isolated housing complexes; and the establishment of urbanization policies that go against the interests of the residents. The construction of the Córrego d'Aantas Disaster Risk Management Network (REGER-CD), including residents of affected communities, researchers, NGO members and representatives of the public power, is one way to respond these questions. Within this network, the construction of a proposal for a collective contingency plan, articulated with the municipal contingency plan, is generating residents' empowerment, greater adaptation to risks and reducing the vulnerability of Disasters and mass movements

  13. Mobile contingency unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sergio O. da; Magalhaes, Milton P. de [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Junqueira, Rodrigo A.; Torres, Carlos A.R. [PETROBRAS Transporte S/A (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting what is already a reality in TRANSPETRO in the area covered by OSBRA, a pipeline that carries by-products to the Mid-West region of Brazil. In order to meet the needs of covering occasional accidents, TRANSPETRO counts on a standardized system of emergency management. It is a great challenge to secure an efficient communication along the 964 km of extension, considering that there are shadow zones where it is not possible to use conventional means of communication such as mobile telephony and internet. It was in this context that the Mobile Contingency Unit Via Satellite - MCU was developed, to extend the communication facilities existing in fixed installations to remote places, mainly the pipeline right of ways. In case of emergency, simulation and work in the pipeline right of way, MCU is fully able to provide the same data, voice, closed-circuit TV and satellite video conference facilities that are available in any internal area of the PETROBRAS system. (author)

  14. Management behavior, group climate and performance appraisal at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderlink, G.; Clark, L. P.; Bernstein, W. M.; Burke, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    The relationships among manager behavior, group climate and managerial effectiveness are examined. Survey data were collected from 435 GM14-15 managers and their subordinates at NASA concerning management practices and perceptions of the group environment. Performance ratings of managers were obtained from their superiors. The results strongly supported a causal model in which subordinates' climate perceptions mediate the effects of manager behavior on performance. That is, the development of group climate provides the process through which the effects of manager practices may be understood. Analyses also revealed that the function performed by a manager and his group (e.g., research) influenced the specific nature of the causal dynamics. Some implications of the results for management training and development are discussed.

  15. 78 FR 21415 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group..., the AMWG, a technical work group, a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, and...

  16. 77 FR 43117 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and...

  17. 77 FR 22801 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation... Management Work Group (AMWG) makes recommendations to the Secretary of the Interior concerning Glen Canyon... AMP includes a Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work group, a Grand Canyon...

  18. 77 FR 9265 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and...

  19. Waterfowl disease contingency plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this contingency plan is reduce waterfowl losses from disease, primarily avian botulism, along the eastern shore of the Great Salt Lake in Utah. This...

  20. Contingent Information Systems Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, C.; Schoonhoven, Bram

    1996-01-01

    Situated approaches based on project contingencies are becoming more and more an important research topic for information systems development organizations. The Information Services Organization, which was investigated, has recognized that it should tune its systems development approaches to the

  1. Business Groups, Taxes and Accruals Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuselinck, C.A.C.; Deloof, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that Belgian firms belonging to a business group have a lower effective tax rate (ETR) and face a less positive association between pre-tax income and ETRs than independent firms.These findings suggest that individual group members apply efficient tax planning techniques

  2. Business Groups, Taxes and Accruals Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuselinck, C.A.C.; Deloof, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that Belgian firms belonging to a business group have a lower effective tax rate (ETR) and face a less positive association between pre-tax income and ETRs than independent firms.These findings suggest that individual group members apply efficient tax planning techniques

  3. The acceptability and feasibility of the Positive Reinforcement Opportunity Project, a community-based contingency management methamphetamine treatment program for gay and bisexual men in San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strona, Frank V; McCright, Jacque; Hjord, Hanna; Ahrens, Katherine; Tierney, Steven; Shoptaw, Steven; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2006-11-01

    The Positive Reinforcement Opportunity Project (PROP) was a pilot program developed to build on the efficacy of contingency management (CM) using positive reinforcement to address the treatment needs of gay and bisexual men currently using crystal methamphetamines (meth). It was hypothesized that a version of CM could be implemented in San Francisco that was less costly than traditional treatment methods and reached gay and other MSM using meth who also engaged in high-risk sexual activity. Of the 178 men who participated in PROPfrom December 2003 to December 2005, many self-reported behaviors for acquiring and spreading sexually transmitted diseases including HIV infection. During the initial intake, 73% reported high-risk sexual behavior in the prior three months, with 60% reporting anal receptive and/or insertive sex without condoms. This report describes the implementation of PROP and suggest both its limitations and potential strengths. Initial findings suggest that PROP was a useful and low cost substance use treatment option that resulted in a 35% 90-day completion rate, which is similar to graduation rates from traditional, more costly treatment options. Further evaluation of the limited data from three- and six-month follow-up of those who completed PROP is currently ongoing.

  4. Global Health, Geographical Contingency, and Contingent Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Health geography has emerged from under the “shadow of the medical” to become one of the most vibrant of all the subdisciplines. Yet, this success has also meant that health research has become increasingly siloed within this subdisciplinary domain. As this article explores, this represents a potential lost opportunity with regard to the study of global health, which has instead come to be dominated by anthropology and political science. Chief among the former's concerns are exploring the gap between the programmatic intentions of global health and the unintended or unanticipated consequences of their deployment. This article asserts that recent work on contingency within geography offers significant conceptual potential for examining this gap. It therefore uses the example of alcohol taxation in Botswana, an emergent global health target and tool, to explore how geographical contingency and the emergent, contingent geographies that result might help counter the prevailing tendency for geography to be side-stepped within critical studies of global health. At the very least, then, this intervention aims to encourage reflection by geographers on how to make explicit the all-too-often implicit links between their research and global health debates located outside the discipline. PMID:27611662

  5. The Relevance of IT Service Management Maturity for IT Alignment and Its Strategy and Organization Size Contingencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Till J.; Wulf, Jochen; Brenner, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The paradigm to manage information technology (IT) services in accordance with widely accepted ‘good practices’ has led to the widespread adoption of IT Service Management (ITSM) frameworks such as the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL). Little academic research, however, has been conducted....... Our findings strengthen the view that ITSM frameworks like ITIL incorporate governance mechanisms that can enhance the effect of the established relational antecedents of IT alignment. In addition, our data particularly provide evidence for the relevance of execution-level ITSM processes and suggest...

  6. Contingencies of self-worth and social-networking-site behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanone, Michael A; Lackaff, Derek; Rosen, Devan

    2011-01-01

    Social-networking sites like Facebook enable people to share a range of personal information with expansive groups of "friends." With the growing popularity of media sharing online, many questions remain regarding antecedent conditions for this behavior. Contingencies of self-worth afford a more nuanced approach to variable traits that affect self-esteem, and may help explain online behavior. A total of 311 participants completed an online survey measuring such contingencies and typical behaviors on Facebook. First, exploratory factor analyses revealed an underlying structure to the seven dimensions of self-worth. Public-based contingencies explained online photo sharing (β = 0.158, p self-worth had the strongest relationship with the intensity of online photo sharing (β = 0.242), although no relationship was evident for time spent managing profiles.

  7. Effects of Contingency Contracting on Decreasing Student Tardiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Feng S.; Isack, Lori R.; Rietveld, Jill

    A contingency contract program was implemented in this study to determine the effects of contingency contracting on decreasing student tardiness in high school classrooms. The participants were 32 high school students. Of the 32 participants, 16 were randomly assigned to the experimental group and the other 16 to the control group. The…

  8. Medical group management: a marketing orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, K D; Allcorn, S

    1986-09-01

    This article considers the pragmatic aspects of conducting a situation/marketing audit for group medical practices. This audit is a key component in the formulation of a competitive strategy and the development of a marketing program. Given are a series of questions that may be used by medical groups to guide assessment of the opportunities and threats present in the environment as well as the strengths and weaknesses of the organization in meeting the environmental challenges. Furthermore, the article provides a framework for thinking about strategy and the variables that should be considered and aligned to achieve effective implementation of strategy. Finally, the parameters are outlined for deciding on a marketing program: the mix of marketing tools (service design, distribution channels, pricing and promotion) that should be employed to offensively and/or defensively position the medical group in the competitive marketplace.

  9. Management Innovations in Power Generation Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Since the institutional reform of power industry in 2002,power sectors,in particularelectrity generation enterprises in China have been grently changed, not only in institutionand industrial pattern but also in operational environment.The year2006is a turning point of tense power supply lasting for three years and a half .The change of power supply situationin the 11th Five-Year Plan period and in-depth reform of power institutional systm haveplaced serious challenges in front of power genration groups.In this new historical era,powergeneration groups can keep undefeated only by carrying out actively mangement innovations.

  10. Contingent reinforcement of abstinence with individuals abusing cocaine and marijuana.

    OpenAIRE

    Budney, A J; Higgins, S T; Delaney, D D; Kent, L; Bickel, W K

    1991-01-01

    Two males diagnosed with cocaine dependence received a behavioral intervention comprised of contingency management and the community reinforcement approach. During the initial phase of treatment, reinforcement was delivered contingent on submitting cocaine-free urine specimens. The community reinforcement approach involved two behavior therapy sessions each week. Almost complete cocaine abstinence was achieved, but regular marijuana use continued. During a second phase, reinforcement magnitud...

  11. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with bette

  12. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  13. 77 FR 50155 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  14. 76 FR 70751 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  15. 75 FR 10501 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  16. 76 FR 14044 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  17. 76 FR 52345 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  18. 77 FR 30314 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  19. 77 FR 10766 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  20. 76 FR 34248 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  1. 77 FR 74203 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  2. 75 FR 17158 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  3. 75 FR 70947 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  4. 77 FR 45370 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords... will take place at the North Fork Grange Hall, Dutch Creek Road, Junction City, CA 96048. The...

  5. 76 FR 23621 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  6. 75 FR 51284 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG)...

  7. 78 FR 7810 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group.... L. 102-575) of 1992. The AMP includes a Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work...

  8. Introduction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Henry

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we presented the planned direction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group. This group consists of concerned system developers and users who have organized to synthesize recommendations for standard UNIX performance management subsystem interfaces and architectures. The purpose of these recommendations is to provide a core set of performance management functions and these functions can be used to build tools by hardware system developers, vertical application software developers, and performance application software developers.

  9. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 73 - Nuclear Power Plant Safeguards Contingency Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... recommendations of the safeguards contingency plan review, management findings on whether the safeguards.... Licensee's Organizational Structure for Contingency Responses—A delineation of the organization's chain of... safeguards contingency will be easily accessible, in good working order, and in sufficient supply to...

  10. Group Search Optimizer for the Mobile Location Management Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a diversity-guided group search optimizer-based approach for solving the location management problem in mobile computing. The location management problem, which is to find the optimal network configurations of management under the mobile computing environment, is considered here as an optimization problem. The proposed diversity-guided group search optimizer algorithm is realized with the aid of diversity operator, which helps alleviate the premature convergence problem of group search optimizer algorithm, a successful optimization algorithm inspired by the animal behavior. To address the location management problem, diversity-guided group search optimizer algorithm is exploited to optimize network configurations of management by minimizing the sum of location update cost and location paging cost. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Group Search Optimizer for the Mobile Location Management Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Xiong, Congcong; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We propose a diversity-guided group search optimizer-based approach for solving the location management problem in mobile computing. The location management problem, which is to find the optimal network configurations of management under the mobile computing environment, is considered here as an optimization problem. The proposed diversity-guided group search optimizer algorithm is realized with the aid of diversity operator, which helps alleviate the premature convergence problem of group search optimizer algorithm, a successful optimization algorithm inspired by the animal behavior. To address the location management problem, diversity-guided group search optimizer algorithm is exploited to optimize network configurations of management by minimizing the sum of location update cost and location paging cost. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25180199

  12. Contingency contractor optimization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Jones, Katherine A.; Bandlow, Alisa; Durfee, Justin David.; Jones, Dean A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Detry, Richard Joseph; Nanco, Alan Stewart; Nozick, Linda Karen

    2013-10-01

    The goal of Phase 3 the OSD ATL Contingency Contractor Optimization (CCO) project is to create an engineering prototype of a tool for the contingency contractor element of total force planning during the Support for Strategic Analysis (SSA). An optimization model was developed to determine the optimal mix of military, Department of Defense (DoD) civilians, and contractors that accomplishes a set of user defined mission requirements at the lowest possible cost while honoring resource limitations and manpower use rules. An additional feature allows the model to understand the variability of the Total Force Mix when there is uncertainty in mission requirements.

  13. Contingency contractor optimization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Jones, Katherine A.; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Durfee, Justin David.; Jones, Dean A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Nanco, Alan Stewart; Nozick, Linda Karen

    2013-06-01

    The goal of Phase 3 the OSD ATL Contingency Contractor Optimization (CCO) project is to create an engineering prototype of a tool for the contingency contractor element of total force planning during the Support for Strategic Analysis (SSA). An optimization model was developed to determine the optimal mix of military, Department of Defense (DoD) civilians, and contractors that accomplishes a set of user defined mission requirements at the lowest possible cost while honoring resource limitations and manpower use rules. An additional feature allows the model to understand the variability of the Total Force Mix when there is uncertainty in mission requirements.

  14. Contingent Faculty as Nonideal Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Bernstein-Sierra, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores how contingent faculty address the issue of work and family and demonstrates the importance of understanding the diversity of contingent faculty experiences and of underemployment rather than notions of the ideal worker to explain their work lives.

  15. Baseline Response Levels Are a Nuisance in Infant Contingency Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, W. S.; Weir, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The impact of differences in level of baseline responding on contingency learning in the first year was examined by considering the response acquisition of infants classified into baseline response quartiles. Whereas the three lower baseline groups showed the predicted increment in responding to a contingency, the highest baseline responders did…

  16. Motor contingency learning and infants with Spina Bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Heather B; Barnes, Marcia A; Landry, Susan H; Swank, Paul; Fletcher, Jack M; Huang, Furong

    2013-02-01

    Infants with Spina Bifida (SB) were compared to typically developing infants (TD) using a conjugate reinforcement paradigm at 6 months-of-age (n = 98) to evaluate learning, and retention of a sensory-motor contingency. Analyses evaluated infant arm-waving rates at baseline (wrist not tethered to mobile), during acquisition of the sensory-motor contingency (wrist tethered), and immediately after the acquisition phase and then after a delay (wrist not tethered), controlling for arm reaching ability, gestational age, and socioeconomic status. Although both groups responded to the contingency with increased arm-waving from baseline to acquisition, 15% to 29% fewer infants with SB than TD were found to learn the contingency depending on the criterion used to determine contingency learning. In addition, infants with SB who had learned the contingency had more difficulty retaining the contingency over time when sensory feedback was absent. The findings suggest that infants with SB do not learn motor contingencies as easily or at the same rate as TD infants, and are more likely to decrease motor responses when sensory feedback is absent. Results are discussed with reference to research on contingency learning in infants with and without neurodevelopmental disorders, and with reference to motor learning in school-age children with SB.

  17. Incremental Contingency Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearden, Richard; Meuleau, Nicolas; Ramakrishnan, Sailesh; Smith, David E.; Washington, Rich

    2003-01-01

    There has been considerable work in AI on planning under uncertainty. However, this work generally assumes an extremely simple model of action that does not consider continuous time and resources. These assumptions are not reasonable for a Mars rover, which must cope with uncertainty about the duration of tasks, the energy required, the data storage necessary, and its current position and orientation. In this paper, we outline an approach to generating contingency plans when the sources of uncertainty involve continuous quantities such as time and resources. The approach involves first constructing a "seed" plan, and then incrementally adding contingent branches to this plan in order to improve utility. The challenge is to figure out the best places to insert contingency branches. This requires an estimate of how much utility could be gained by building a contingent branch at any given place in the seed plan. Computing this utility exactly is intractable, but we outline an approximation method that back propagates utility distributions through a graph structure similar to that of a plan graph.

  18. Small Groups' Ecological Reasoning While Making an Environmental Management Decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Explores the ideas and reasoning students use to make a collaborative environmental management decision. Compares students' discussions with scientists' guidelines for making environmental management decisions. Finds that whereas across groups students touched on all of the themes that scientists consider to be important for making environmental…

  19. Valuing Urban Forests: The Application of Contingent Valuation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choice-Academy

    1988-01-01

    Jan 1, 1988 ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management Vol.1 No.2 June. ... Key words: contingent valuation, forest service functions, trees,. ... and water values, and recreational resources. ... human health conditions.

  20. Managing parental groups: personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the experience and personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses. During their child's first year, all parents in Sweden are invited to participate in parental groups within the child health service; however, only 49% choose to participate. Despite extensive experience, child healthcare nurses find managing parental groups challenging and express a need for training in group dynamics and group leadership. The study was designed as a controlled study with a pretest/post-test design where the participants form their own control group. A group leadership course was given to 56 child healthcare nurses and evaluated in a pre- and postintervention questionnaire, a course evaluation and an interview with the course leaders. The child healthcare nurses felt their group leadership skills were strengthened and the majority (96%) felt that the course had changed their way of leading parental groups. They felt that the group leader role had been clarified and that they had obtained several new tools to use in their groups. Clarifying the role of group leader and adding knowledge about group leadership and dynamics seems to have increased the self-confidence for child healthcare nurses in group leadership. Improved confidence in group management might motivate the child healthcare nurses to further develop parental groups to attract the parents who currently choose not to participate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A Comparative Study of Group Key Management in MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Bashary,

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A Mobile Ad-Hoc Network (MANET is a self organized network, with no fixed infrastructure, limited resources and limited physical security. Security in such an environment is an essential requirement. Key management is a salient element in MANET security. It is responsible for key generation, storage, distribution, updating, revocation, deleting, and archiving. Key management protocols are classified into symmetric, asymmetric, group, and hybrid. Group key management is a point of interest for researchers with the growing usage of mobile devices and the rising of multicast communication. This paper surveys different approaches in group key management schemes. A comparative study is demonstrated in terms of reliability, computational complexity, storage cost, communication overheads, pre-requirements, security levels, robustness, vulnerabilities, scalability, energy and mobility. Finally, the study concludes the pros and cons of each protocol.

  2. Visual Analytics for Power Grid Contingency Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Pak C.; Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Mackey, Patrick S.; Jin, Shuangshuang

    2014-01-20

    Contingency analysis is the process of employing different measures to model scenarios, analyze them, and then derive the best response to remove the threats. This application paper focuses on a class of contingency analysis problems found in the power grid management system. A power grid is a geographically distributed interconnected transmission network that transmits and delivers electricity from generators to end users. The power grid contingency analysis problem is increasingly important because of both the growing size of the underlying raw data that need to be analyzed and the urgency to deliver working solutions in an aggressive timeframe. Failure to do so may bring significant financial, economic, and security impacts to all parties involved and the society at large. The paper presents a scalable visual analytics pipeline that transforms about 100 million contingency scenarios to a manageable size and form for grid operators to examine different scenarios and come up with preventive or mitigation strategies to address the problems in a predictive and timely manner. Great attention is given to the computational scalability, information scalability, visual scalability, and display scalability issues surrounding the data analytics pipeline. Most of the large-scale computation requirements of our work are conducted on a Cray XMT multi-threaded parallel computer. The paper demonstrates a number of examples using western North American power grid models and data.

  3. Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Rae

    2011-01-01

    In organizational behavior and management survey courses, students are likely to maximize certain career-appropriate knowledge when their classroom groups are leadered rather than leaderless. Using leadered groups facilitates the learning of the professional and managerial skills associated with formal leadership while reducing some problematic…

  4. Managing Student Behavior during Large Group Guidance: What Works Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Participants provided information pertaining to managing non-task-related behavior of students during large group guidance lessons. In particular, school counselors were asked often how often they provide large group guidance, the frequency of which students exhibit off-task and/or disruptive behavior during guidance lessons, and techniques they…

  5. THE MANAGEMENT SUBSIDIARIES: CORPORATE GOVERNANCE MECHANISMS IN GROUP OF COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Tatulyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many holdings in the process of converting its organizational structure to face several new problems, which reduce the overall efficiency of the management of its group of companies. Most often these problems are related to the control activities of subsidiaries. Due to the large number of organizations in the group of companies the Supervisory Board has no possibility to monitor all the activities of its sub-sidiaries, as a result of which most of these "daughters" more freedom and opportunity to conduct their activities without agreeing it with top management. Group of companies or integrated structures imply a close interaction between companies and coordination of their activities in the moment and end-to-end operational control. The main study is how the parent organization may be based on legitimate mechanisms to manage the activities of the subsidiary. The article is devoted to the interaction between subsidiaries and the parent organization in the group companies. It also discusses a variety of mecha-nisms through which the parent organization may influence the decisions made by subsidiaries. There is a very actual problem of management and control over the activities of subsidiaries and affiliates group companies that have a well developed organizational structure, a large number of subsidiaries and lead-ing the activities of several types. These mechanisms have already proven international practice and are promising in terms of adaptation to the management structure of the Russian groups of companies that will allow you to create the best conditions for conducting control activities of subsidiaries. The article describes some of the most common tools for the management of subsidiaries, for example is the direct involvement of senior management or even the owners of parent organization in the work of the Board of Directors of the subsidiary. The article discusses the contradictions that arise in the organization of the procedure of

  6. The role of enterprise asset management system in the PVO group`s business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervinen, J. [RAMSE Consulting Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    This presentation describes the role of the Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) and Enterprise Document Management (EDM) in the PVO Group`s business. The use of the functionality of the EAM (Immpower) and EDM (Documentum) is not limited only to the plant maintenance. All power plants and some other business functions and units will use the system in the future for financial management, activity based costing, purchasing, of materials, office supplies and fuel, invoice matching, project budgeting and costing, real estate management etc. The technical service concept of IT solution is also described in this presentation. The Information Management Strategy development as background to the project is also outlined together with the company information. The benefits of the common EAM system and related business process needs are also described. (orig.)

  7. The measurement of contingent valuation for health economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoumi, Ahmed M

    2004-01-01

    In health economics, contingent valuation is a method that elicits an individual's monetary valuations of health programmes or health states. This article reviews the theory and conduct of contingent valuation studies, with suggestions for improving the future measurement of contingent valuation for health economics applications. Contingent valuation questions can be targeted to any of the following groups: the general population, to value health insurance premiums for programmes; users of a health programme, to value the associated programme costs; or individuals with a disease, to evaluate health states. The questions can be framed to ask individuals how much they would pay to obtain positive changes in health status or avoid negative changes in health status ('willingness to pay'; WTP) or how much they would need to be paid to compensate for a decrease in health status or for foregoing an improvement in heath status ('willingness to accept'; WTA). In general WTP questions yield more accurate and precise valuations than WTA questions. Payment card techniques, with follow-up bidding using direct interviews with visual aids, are well suited for small contingent valuation studies. Several biases may be operative when assessing contingent valuation, including biases in the way participants are selected, the way in which the questions are posed, the way in which individuals interpret probabilities and value gains relative to losses, and the way in which missing or extreme responses are interpreted. An important aspect of all contingent valuation studies is an assessment of respondents' understanding of the evaluation method and the valuation task. Contingent valuation studies should measure the potential influence of biases, the validity of contingent valuation tests as measures of QOL, and the reliability and responsiveness of responses. Future research should address equity concerns associated with using contingent valuation and explore contingent valuation as a

  8. Exploring the Education Management System of Postgraduates in Colleges and Universities from the Perspective of Contingency Theory%权变理论视域下高校研究生教育管理体制探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余勇; 王孜; 李久东

    2014-01-01

    In the new era, Contingency Theory has been widely used in education management system of postgraduates in colleges and universities. From the perspective of Contingency Theory, the education management system of postgraduates should not only treat the internal education environment of postgraduates seriously, but also adapt to the changeable external environment positively. Hence, it requires the organization to be independent, flexible and diversified, the management system to be standard, scientific and completed, and the power of leadership system to be decentralized, and the work division of the party and government to be clear.%新时期,权变理论在高校研究生教育管理中得到广泛运用。权变理论视域下,高校研究生教育管理既要慎重对待研究生教育的内部环境,更需要积极适应其不断变化的外部环境。高校研究生教育管理体制适应内外部环境要求组织机构独立、灵活、多样;管理制度规范、科学、健全;领导体制权力下放、党政分工明确。

  9. Certificateless Efficient Group Key Management Scheme in Mobile Adhoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Rana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Securing mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs is a crucial task for their good deployments. One fundamental aspect of providing confidentiality and authentication is key management. While Public Key Infrastructure (PKI based solutions has provided these properties historically, MANETs are resource constrained and benefit from symmetric key encryption. In this paper, we proposed a certificateless efficient group key management scheme (CE-GKMS in MANETs for group confidentiality which uses identity based cryptography for secure multicast group communication. The scheme does not need PKI in which mobile nodes needs large storage to carry certificates and to perform public key cryptography based large computation. The scheme introduced a new idea of hiding the public keys and making them visible only to the trusted nodes which not only make it difficult for cryptanalyst to crack the private information but also permit to keep small value of encryption and decryption component causes asymmetric cryptography operation faster. For scalability and dynamic reconfigurability, we divide the network into groups. Leaders in these groups securely communicate with each other to agree on group key in response to membership change and member mobility-induced events. The performance results prove the effectiveness of our proposed key management scheme CE-GKMS.

  10. Improving nutritional management within high-risk groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Binsbergen, van J.J.; Berg, van den M.G.A.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Staveren, van W.A.; Rasmussen-Conrad, E.; Weel, van C.

    2009-01-01

    The current pitfalls and future possibilities of nutritional management are discussed by two patients with tongue cancer who have suffered from substantial weight loss. Their nutritional problems are illustrative of those among other (cancer) patient groups. The main concerns are the lack of early c

  11. Cassini launch contingency effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yale; O'Neil, John M.; McGrath, Brian E.; Heyler, Gene A.; Brenza, Pete T.

    2002-01-01

    On 15 October 1997 at 4:43 AM EDT, the Cassini spacecraft was successfully launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur on a mission to explore the Saturnian system. It carried three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and 117 Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs). As part of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) safety effort, a contingency plan was prepared to address the unlikely events of an accidental suborbital reentry or out-of-orbital reentry. The objective of the plan was to develop procedures to predict, within hours, the Earth impact footprints (EIFs) for the nuclear heat sources released during the atmospheric reentry. The footprint predictions would be used in subsequent notification and recovery efforts. As part of a multi-agency team, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) had the responsibility to predict the EIFs of the heat sources after a reentry, given the heat sources' release conditions from the main spacecraft. (No ablation burn-through of the heat sources' aeroshells was expected, as a result of earlier testing.) JHU/APL's other role was to predict the time of reentry from a potential orbital decay. The tools used were a three degree-of-freedom trajectory code, a database of aerodynamic coefficients for the heat sources, secure links to obtain tracking data, and a high fidelity special perturbation orbit integrator code to predict time of spacecraft reentry from orbital decay. In the weeks and days prior to launch, all the codes and procedures were exercised. Notional EIFs were derived from hypothetical reentry conditions. EIFs predicted by JHU/APL were compared to those by JPL and US SPACECOM, and were found to be in good agreement. The reentry time from orbital decay for a booster rocket for the Russian Progress M-36 freighter, a cargo ship for the Mir space station, was predicted to within 5 minutes more than two hours before reentry. For the

  12. Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG and Hospital Business Performance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szynkiewicz Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present the possibility of using Diagnosis- Related Groups (DRG in the hospital management process and to analyse the need for business performance management on the part of hospital management staff. The following research methods were used: literature analysis, case studies, and poll analysis. It is not possible to increase the effectiveness of operation of healthcare entities without increasing the importance of IT systems and using DRG more effectively in the management process. Training users in IT and the use of DRGs is important to achieving hospital effectiveness. The increased importance of analyses and planning in a hospital should be reflected in the organisational structure of service providers. Hospital controllers should have a similar role to those present in most companies in other industries.

  13. Incorporating green-area user groups in urban ecosystem management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colding, Johan; Lundberg, Jakob; Folke, Carl

    2006-08-01

    We analyze the role of urban green areas managed by local user groups in their potential for supporting biodiversity and ecosystem services in growing city-regions, with focus on allotment areas, domestic gardens, and golf courses. Using Stockholm, Sweden, as an example cityregion, we compile GIS data of its spatial characteristics and relate these data to GIS data for protected areas and "green wedges" prioritized in biodiversity conservation. Results reveal that the three land uses cover 18% of the studied land area of metropolitan Stockholm, which corresponds to more than twice the land set aside as protected areas. We review the literature to identify ecosystem functions and services provided by the three green areas and discuss their potential in urban ecosystem management. We conclude that the incorporation of locally managed lands, and their stewards and institutions, into comanagement designs holds potential for improving conditions for urban biodiversity, reducing transaction costs in ecosystem management, and realizing local Agenda 21.

  14. Heart Rate Reactivity during Contingency Learning in 5- to 10-Month-Old at-Risk and Non-Risk Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, W. S.; Weir, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated the dynamic relation between contingency learning and heart rate with risk and non-risk babies 5- to 10-months-old. Four groups were compared in a two contingency treatments (contingent, yoked) x two risk status design. Concurrent heart rate was monitored during three phases of a contingency learning task (baseline,…

  15. The management of social problems talk in a support group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Gomes Peretti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the health-disease process from a multifactorial perspective has allowed important transformations in the healthcare practices. In this article, we discuss the use of the support group as a resource for mental health care, analyzing how conversations about social issues are managed in this context. Based on contributions from the social constructionist movement, we analyzed the transcripts of the conversations developed in meetings of a support group offered to patients of a mental health outpatient clinic. The analysis of the process of meaning making indicates that the discourse of the social influence on mental health is not legitimized, due to a predominant individualistic discourse, which psychologizes care and is centered on the emotional analysis of the problems of the quotidian. We argue that this mode of management brings limits to the construction of the group as a device for promoting autonomy and encouraging the social transformation processes.

  16. Group handoff management in low power microcell-femtocell network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis De

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical model of group based hand-off management based on bird flocking behavior. In the proposed scheme, a number of mobile devices form a group if these devices move together for a long time duration. Although call delivery or call generation are performed individually, hand-off is performed in a group. Dynamic group formation, group division and group merging methods are proposed in this paper. From the simulation results it is demonstrated that approximately 75%, 65% and 90% reduction in power, cost and latency consumption can be obtained respectively using group hand-off management. Thus the proposed scheme is referred as green, economic and fast hand-off strategy. In this paper instead of a macrocell network, a microcell-femtocell network is considered as the transmission power of a microcell or a femtocell base station is much less than a macrocell base station. Simulation results present that the microcell-femtocell network achieves approximately 25–55% and 35–55% reduction in power transmission, and 50–65% and 15–45% reduction in path loss than only a macrocell network and macrocell-femtocell network respectively. Thus microcell-femtocell network is a power-efficient network.

  17. Alternative Forms of Fit in Contingency Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Robert; Van de Ven, Andrew H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the selection, interaction, and systems approaches to fit in structural contingency theory. The concepts of fit evaluated may be applied not only to structural contingency theory but to contingency theories in general. (MD)

  18. Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-01-14

    The Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool (DCAT) is an open-platform and publicly available methodology to help develop applications that aim to improve the capabilities of power system planning engineers to assess the impact and likelihood of extreme contingencies and potential cascading events across their systems and interconnections. Outputs from the DCAT will help find mitigation solutions to reduce the risk of cascading outages in technically sound and effective ways. The current prototype DCAT implementation has been developed as a Python code that accesses the simulation functions of the Siemens PSS�E planning tool (PSS/E). It has the following features: It uses a hybrid dynamic and steady-state approach to simulating the cascading outage sequences that includes fast dynamic and slower steady-state events. It integrates dynamic models with protection scheme models for generation, transmission, and load. It models special protection systems (SPSs)/remedial action schemes (RASs) and automatic and manual corrective actions. Overall, the DCAT attempts to bridge multiple gaps in cascading-outage analysis in a single, unique prototype tool capable of automatically simulating and analyzing cascading sequences in real systems using multiprocessor computers.While the DCAT has been implemented using PSS/E in Phase I of the study, other commercial software packages with similar capabilities can be used within the DCAT framework.

  19. Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-01-14

    The Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool (DCAT) is an open-platform and publicly available methodology to help develop applications that aim to improve the capabilities of power system planning engineers to assess the impact and likelihood of extreme contingencies and potential cascading events across their systems and interconnections. Outputs from the DCAT will help find mitigation solutions to reduce the risk of cascading outages in technically sound and effective ways. The current prototype DCAT implementation has been developed as a Python code that accesses the simulation functions of the Siemens PSS/E planning tool (PSS/E). It has the following features: It uses a hybrid dynamic and steady-state approach to simulating the cascading outage sequences that includes fast dynamic and slower steady-state events. It integrates dynamic models with protection scheme models for generation, transmission, and load. It models special protection systems (SPSs)/remedial action schemes (RASs) and automatic and manual corrective actions. Overall, the DCAT attempts to bridge multiple gaps in cascading-outage analysis in a single, unique prototype tool capable of automatically simulating and analyzing cascading sequences in real systems using multiprocessor computers.While the DCAT has been implemented using PSS/E in Phase I of the study, other commercial software packages with similar capabilities can be used within the DCAT framework.

  20. Contingent kernel density estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Fortmann-Roe

    Full Text Available Kernel density estimation is a widely used method for estimating a distribution based on a sample of points drawn from that distribution. Generally, in practice some form of error contaminates the sample of observed points. Such error can be the result of imprecise measurements or observation bias. Often this error is negligible and may be disregarded in analysis. In cases where the error is non-negligible, estimation methods should be adjusted to reduce resulting bias. Several modifications of kernel density estimation have been developed to address specific forms of errors. One form of error that has not yet been addressed is the case where observations are nominally placed at the centers of areas from which the points are assumed to have been drawn, where these areas are of varying sizes. In this scenario, the bias arises because the size of the error can vary among points and some subset of points can be known to have smaller error than another subset or the form of the error may change among points. This paper proposes a "contingent kernel density estimation" technique to address this form of error. This new technique adjusts the standard kernel on a point-by-point basis in an adaptive response to changing structure and magnitude of error. In this paper, equations for our contingent kernel technique are derived, the technique is validated using numerical simulations, and an example using the geographic locations of social networking users is worked to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  1. THE FORMATION OF CONSCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT GROUPS IN ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neisa Maria, Martins da Cunha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents theoretical proposals, as the Theory of Human Relations, especially the Theory of Group Dynamics and the Conscience Formation, which promote understanding and support for the conduct of the leaders in team management, aiming at a route suitable for questions, reflections, enabling new perceptions of self-consciousness, as Hegel says. It is worth highlighting that through these considerations, it becomes possible to conduct more realistic impacts triggered in the organizational culture, as from a better management of interpersonal relationships within teams, these teams have a training goal or not.

  2. 78 FR 49281 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and... Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and web-based... Management Working Group (TAMWG) will hold a meeting. Background The TAMWG affords stakeholders...

  3. 78 FR 35312 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and... Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and web-based... Management Working Group (TAMWG) will hold a meeting. Background The TAMWG affords stakeholders...

  4. 78 FR 61387 - Supermedia LLC, Publishing Operations Divison, Account Management Group, a Subsidiary of Dex...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Supermedia LLC, Publishing Operations Divison, Account Management..., Florida; Supermedia LLC, Publishing Operations Divison, Listing Management Group, a Subsidiary of Dex... Operation Division, Account Management Group, Internet Publishing Operations Group, and Listing...

  5. Integrating education, group support, and case management for diabetic Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sharon A; García, Alexandra A; Winter, Mary; Silva, Lita; Brown, Adama; Hanis, Craig L

    2011-01-01

    Culturally tailored diabetes self-management education (DSME) improves glycemic control and other health outcomes in Mexican Americans but sociocultural barriers to health improvements remain. This study explored the feasibility of adding a nurse case manager (NCM) to DSME to foster DSME attendance and increase utilization of other available health care services. The setting was a rural community on the Texas-Mexico border in one of the poorest counties in the United States. Using a repeated measures pretest, post-test control group design, we enrolled 165 Mexican American adults into: 1) an experimental group that received a DSME intervention plus access to a NCM; or 2) a control group that received DSME only. Both experimental and control groups received the DSME intervention, reported positive changes in diet and physical activity, and showed improved clinical outcomes; there were no significant group differences. A statistically significant reduction in body mass index was seen in women compared to men, regardless of group or number of NCM contacts. For individuals having the most NCM contacts, DSME attendance rates were greater. Participants expressed acceptance of the NCM; they preferred face-to-face contact rather than by telephone. Our previously tested, culturally tailored DSME continues to be an effective strategy for improving glycemic control in Mexican Americans. This feasibility study provided partial support for the NCM model for underserved border communities, but additional research is needed on resource utilization and the nature of NCM contacts.

  6. GROUP GUIDANCE SERVICES MANAGEMENT OF BEHAVIORAL TECHNIC HOMEWORK MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhri A M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This simple paper describes the implementation of management guidance service groups using the model home visits behavioral techniques (behavior technic homework. The ideas outlined in this paper are intended to add insight for counselors in the management of the implementation of counseling services group that carried out effectively. This simple paper is expected to be used as reference studies in theoretical matters relating to the management guidance services group, for counselors to students both need guidance services and those who passively as they face various problems difficulties martial jar and obstacles in the achievement of learning , In general, this study aims to provide insight in particular in the development of social skills for students, especially the ability to communicate with the participants of the service (students more While specifically to encourage the development of feelings, thoughts, perceptions, insights and attitudes that support embodiments behavior Iebih creative and effective in improving communication skills both verbal and non-verbal for students. Keyword: counselor, counseling, group, student

  7. Working group 3: upstream pipelines: inspection, corrosion and integrity management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paez, Jorge; Stephenson, Mark [Talisman Energy, (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The third topic investigated the latest challenges to upstream pipeline operation and the areas for improvement in upstream integrity in the pipeline industry. The first session of talks reported on the pipeline incident analysis conducted by the CAPP on several companies from 2006 to 2010 in order to identify best management practises and to drive improvement in pipeline integrity management. Reviews of primary failure statistics and failure frequency were conducted with respect to the various materials of pipes. A summary of changes to the CSA standard related to non-metallic pipes was also presented to complete this background overview of the upstream industry. The second session provided more information about these non-metallic pipes, focusing on construction and quality issues with large diameter HDPE pipelines. The third session discussed the ERW pipeline in relation to upstream industry. An integrity management panel discussion was carried out to close this third working group.

  8. Managing Climate Risk. Integrating Adaptation into World Bank Group Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aalst, M. [Global Environment Facility Program, The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, World Bank Group, Washington, DC (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Climate change is already taking place, and further changes are inevitable. Developing countries, and particularly the poorest people in these countries, are most at risk. The impacts result not only from gradual changes in temperature and sea level but also, in particular, from increased climate variability and extremes, including more intense floods, droughts, and storms. These changes are already having major impacts on the economic performance of developing countries and on the lives and livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world. Climate change thus directly affects the World Bank Group's mission of eradicating poverty. It also puts at risk many projects in a wide range of sectors, including infrastructure, agriculture, human health, water resources, and environment. The risks include physical threats to the investments, potential underperformance, and the possibility that projects will indirectly contribute to rising vulnerability by, for example, triggering investment and settlement in high-risk areas. The way to address these concerns is not to separate climate change adaptation from other priorities but to integrate comprehensive climate risk management into development planning, programs, and projects. While there is a great need to heighten awareness of climate risk in Bank work, a large body of experience on climate risk management is already available, in analytical work, in country dialogues, and in a growing number of investment projects. This operational experience highlights the general ingredients for successful integration of climate risk management into the mainstream development agenda: getting the right sectoral departments and senior policy makers involved; incorporating risk management into economic planning; engaging a wide range of nongovernmental actors (businesses, nongovernmental organizations, communities, and so on); giving attention to regulatory issues; and choosing strategies that will pay off immediately under

  9. Dengue Contingency Planning: From Research to Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge-Ranzinger, Silvia; Kroeger, Axel; Olliaro, Piero; McCall, Philip J.; Sánchez Tejeda, Gustavo; Lloyd, Linda S.; Hakim, Lokman; Bowman, Leigh R.; Horstick, Olaf; Coelho, Giovanini

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is an increasingly incident disease across many parts of the world. In response, an evidence-based handbook to translate research into policy and practice was developed. This handbook facilitates contingency planning as well as the development and use of early warning and response systems for dengue fever epidemics, by identifying decision-making processes that contribute to the success or failure of dengue surveillance, as well as triggers that initiate effective responses to incipient outbreaks. Methodology/Principal findings Available evidence was evaluated using a step-wise process that included systematic literature reviews, policymaker and stakeholder interviews, a study to assess dengue contingency planning and outbreak management in 10 countries, and a retrospective logistic regression analysis to identify alarm signals for an outbreak warning system using datasets from five dengue endemic countries. Best practices for managing a dengue outbreak are provided for key elements of a dengue contingency plan including timely contingency planning, the importance of a detailed, context-specific dengue contingency plan that clearly distinguishes between routine and outbreak interventions, surveillance systems for outbreak preparedness, outbreak definitions, alert algorithms, managerial capacity, vector control capacity, and clinical management of large caseloads. Additionally, a computer-assisted early warning system, which enables countries to identify and respond to context-specific variables that predict forthcoming dengue outbreaks, has been developed. Conclusions/Significance Most countries do not have comprehensive, detailed contingency plans for dengue outbreaks. Countries tend to rely on intensified vector control as their outbreak response, with minimal focus on integrated management of clinical care, epidemiological, laboratory and vector surveillance, and risk communication. The Technical Handbook for Surveillance, Dengue Outbreak

  10. Application Research on the Enterprise Management in Various Models Based on the Contingency and Effect%基于权变和效益的多种管理方法在企业中的运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘可夫

    2009-01-01

    企业管理实践的复杂性要求管理者学习和掌握多种管理思想,具备多样性的管理技能.本文依据基本的管理学原理以及通过对经典管理观点的分析,注重权变和效益,对一些看似存在冲突,但在处理不同的事务时却具有独特效应的管理方法进行探讨,分析这些管理方法在企业管理中的应用和效果.%Manager to want.learn and master some management thoughts and skill because of the complex work practice.The paper analyses basic theory and concept of the management,to include the contingency and effect,research some management way that to seem conflict and unique effect to process different works,analyses their application and result in the enterprise management.

  11. Group dynamics for the acquisition of competences in Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguas, E. V.; Aguilar, M. C.; Castillo, C.; Polo, M. J.; Pérez, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Bologna Process promotes European citizens' employability from teaching fields in the University which implies the design of activities addressed to the development of skills for the labor market and engagement of employers. This work has been conceived for improving the formation of Engineering Project Management through group dynamics focused on: 1) the use of the creativity for solving problems; 2) promoting leadership capacities and social skills in multidisciplinary/multicultural work groups; 3) the ethical, social and environmental compromise; 4) the continuous learning. Different types of activities were designed: short activities of 15-30 minutes where fragments of books or songs are presented and discussed and long activities (2 h) where groups of students take different roles for solving common problems and situations within the Engineering Projects context. An electronic book with the content of the dynamics and the material for the students has been carried out. A sample of 20 students of Electronic Engineering degree which had participated at least in two dynamics, evaluated the utility for improving their formation in Engineering Project Management with a mark of 8.2 (scale 0-10, standard deviation equal to 0.9). On the other hand, the teachers observed how this type of work, promotes the interdisciplinary training and the acquisition of social skills, usually not-included in the objectives of the subjects.

  12. 76 FR 54487 - Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of... the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group... of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group is in the public interest in connection...

  13. 78 FR 54482 - Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of... the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group... Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group is in the public interest in connection with the performance...

  14. 49 CFR 1542.301 - Contingency plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contingency plan. 1542.301 Section 1542.301... Contingency plan. (a) Each airport operator required to have a security program under § 1542.103(a) and (b) must adopt a contingency plan and must: (1) Implement its contingency plan when directed by TSA....

  15. 49 CFR 1544.301 - Contingency plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contingency plan. 1544.301 Section 1544.301... COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Threat and Threat Response § 1544.301 Contingency plan. Each aircraft operator must adopt a contingency plan and must: (a) Implement its contingency plan when directed by TSA. (b)...

  16. 30 CFR 282.26 - Contingency Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contingency Plan. 282.26 Section 282.26 Mineral... § 282.26 Contingency Plan. (a) When required by the Director, a lessee shall include a Contingency Plan as part of its request for approval of a Delineation, Testing, or Mining Plan. The Contingency...

  17. 76 FR 13666 - Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Employment and Training Administration Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering... firm worker group should read: Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering... workers of Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, including...

  18. 78 FR 46361 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and.... Fish and Wildlife Service, announce a joint meeting between the Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) and Trinity Management Council (TMC). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and...

  19. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Sara; Rowe, Heather; Kirkman, Maggie; Jordan, Lynne; McNamee, Kathleen; Bayly, Christine; McBain, John; Sinnott, Vikki; Fisher, Jane

    2016-02-15

    As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health.

  20. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. Objective To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. Methods To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. Results There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Conclusions Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health. PMID:26878865

  1. Energy Emergency and Contingency Planning

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Region 3 document outlines the purpose of Energy Emergency and Contingency Plans. These plans are intended to help refuges continue to function during energy...

  2. An efficient scalable key management scheme for secure group communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; GU Da-wu; MA Fan-yuan; BAI Ying-cai

    2006-01-01

    Several multicast key management schemes such as those proposed by Wallner et al and Wong et al are based on a multilevel, logical hierarchy (or tree) of key-encrypting keys. When used in conjunction with a reliable multicast infrastructure, this approach results in a highly efficient key update mechanism in which the number of multicast messages transmitted upon a membership update is proportional to the depth of the tree,which is logarithmic to the size of the secure multicast group. But this is based on the hypothesis that the tree is maintained in a balanced manner. This paper proposes a scalable rekeying scheme-link-tree structure for implementing secure group communication. Theoretical calculation and experimentation show that this scheme has better performance than the tree structure and the star structure, and at the same time still keep the link-tree structure balanced.

  3. Linguistic Extension for Group Multicriteria Project Manager Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Dodangeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Qualified human resource selection is one of the organizational key success factors. Since choosing the best candidate to fill the defined vacancy in a company is a complex task, intelligence analytical methods would be required to deal with this important issue. Regarding the vagueness and uncertainty of human resource selection process, it requires the linguistic extension of multicriteria decision making (MCDM models for robust recruitment. This research is aimed to develop a fuzzy MCDM model for linguistic reasoning under new fuzzy group decision making. The new linguistic reasoning for group decision making is able to aggregate subjective evaluation of the decision makers and hence create an opportunity to perform more robust human resource selection procedures. A numerical example demonstrates possibilities for the improvement of human resource management and any other business decision areas through applying the proposed model.

  4. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  5. Management of group B streptococcal bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Victoria M; Yudin, Mark H

    2012-05-01

    To provide information regarding the management of group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteriuria to midwives, nurses, and physicians who are providing obstetrical care. The outcomes considered were neonatal GBS disease, preterm birth, pyelonephritis, chorioamnionitis, and recurrence of GBS colonization. Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane database were searched for articles published in English to December 2010 on the topic of GBS bacteriuria in pregnancy. Bacteriuria is defined in this clinical practice guideline as the presence of bacteria in urine, regardless of the number of colony-forming units per mL (CFU/mL). Low colony counts refer to bacteriuria to optimize maternal and perinatal outcomes, to reduce the occurrences of antibiotic anaphylaxis, and to prevent increases in antibiotic resistance to GBS and non-GBS pathogens. No cost-benefit analysis is provided. 1. Treatment of any bacteriuria with colony counts ≥ 100 000 CFU/mL in pregnancy is an accepted and recommended strategy and includes treatment with appropriate antibiotics. (II-2A) 2. Women with documented group B streptococcal bacteriuria (regardless of level of colony-forming units per mL) in the current pregnancy should be treated at the time of labour or rupture of membranes with appropriate intravenous antibiotics for the prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease. (II-2A) 3. Asymptomatic women with urinary group B streptococcal colony counts bacteriuria should not be re-screened by genital tract culture or urinary culture in the third trimester, as they are presumed to be group B streptococcal colonized. (II-2D).

  6. Why projects often fail even with high cost contingencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kujawski, Edouard

    2002-02-28

    In this note we assume that the individual risks have been adequately quantified and the total project cost contingency adequately computed to ensure an agreed-to probability or confidence level that the total project cost estimate will not be exceeded. But even projects that implement such a process are likely to result in significant cost overruns and/or project failure if the project manager allocates the contingencies to the individual subsystems. The intuitive and mathematically valid solution is to maintain a project-wide contingency and to distribute it to the individual risks on an as-needed basis. Such an approach ensures cost-efficient risk management, and projects that implement it are more likely to succeed and to cost less. We illustrate these ideas using a simplified project with two independent risks. The formulation can readily be extended to multiple risks.

  7. Task-Contingent Conscientiousness as a Unit of Personality at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minbashian, Amirali; Wood, Robert E.; Beckmann, Nadin

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the viability of incorporating task-contingent units into the study of personality at work, using conscientiousness as an illustrative example. We used experience-sampling data from 123 managers to show that (a) momentary conscientiousness at work is contingent on the difficulty and urgency demands of the tasks people…

  8. Randomized Trial of Contingent Prizes versus Vouchers in Cocaine-Using Methadone Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Hanson, Tressa; Sierra, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions frequently utilize vouchers as reinforcers, but a prize-based system is also efficacious. This study compared these approaches. Seventy-four cocaine-dependent methadone outpatients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (ST), ST plus a maximum of $585 in contingent vouchers, or ST plus an expected…

  9. Task-Contingent Conscientiousness as a Unit of Personality at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minbashian, Amirali; Wood, Robert E.; Beckmann, Nadin

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the viability of incorporating task-contingent units into the study of personality at work, using conscientiousness as an illustrative example. We used experience-sampling data from 123 managers to show that (a) momentary conscientiousness at work is contingent on the difficulty and urgency demands of the tasks people…

  10. Voucher-Based Contingent Reinforcement of Smoking Abstinence among Methadone-Maintained Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heil, Sarah H.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a contingency management (CM) intervention to promote smoking cessation in methadone-maintained patients. Twenty participants, randomized into contingent (n = 10) or noncontingent (n = 10) experimental conditions, completed the 14-day study. Abstinence was determined using breath carbon monoxide and urine…

  11. Sustainability between Necessity, Contingency and Impossibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Bruckmeier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable use of natural resources seems necessary to maintain functions and services of eco- and social systems in the long run. Efforts in policy and science for sustainable development have shown the splintering of local, national and global strategies. Sustainability becomes contingent and insecure with the actors´ conflicting knowledge, interests and aims, and seems even impossible through the “rebound”-effect. To make short and long term requirements of sustainability coherent requires critical, comparative and theoretical analysis of the problems met. For this purpose important concepts and theories are discussed in this review of recent interdisciplinary literature about resource management.

  12. Future Objectives of Maintenance Management in the CV Group

    CERN Document Server

    Annila, L

    1999-01-01

    The ST/CV group has an extensive maintenance contract with a multinational consortium (Gematec-F/I/DE). Annually, the contract costs the group about 6 MCHF. Today the technical monitoring of the performance within the contract has become too irregular and different people's roles have not been sufficiently well defined. It has therefore been decided that all the technical, financial and performance-indicating data should be centrally co-ordinated within the group. The objective is to enable an efficient follow-up of the contract with a view to optimization. Another objective is to migrate to the new, more proficient version of the Computer Aided Maintenance Management (CAMM) software and learn to use it to its full potential. This means using its statistics and analysis features in addition to controlling the maintenance activities, spare-parts store, costs, etc. A further aim is to develop standards for the maintenance and the CAMM. This paper will discuss these objectives and the schedule for their implemen...

  13. Polio Endgame: Lessons Learned From the Immunization Systems Management Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipursky, Simona; Vandelaer, Jos; Brooks, Alan; Dietz, Vance; Kachra, Tasleem; Farrell, Margaret; Ottosen, Ann; Sever, John L; Zaffran, Michel J

    2017-07-01

    The Immunization Systems Management Group (IMG) was established to coordinate and oversee objective 2 of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018, namely, (1) introduction of ≥1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in all 126 countries using oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) only as of 2012, (2) full withdrawal of OPV, starting with the withdrawal of its type 2 component, and (3) using polio assets to strengthen immunization systems in 10 priority countries. The IMG's inclusive, transparent, and partnership-focused approach proved an effective means of leveraging the comparative and complementary strengths of each IMG member agency. This article outlines 10 key factors behind the IMG's success, providing a potential set of guiding principles for the establishment and implementation of other interagency collaborations and initiatives beyond the polio sphere. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  14. Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald R. Barden

    2012-07-01

    Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

  15. Voucher-based contingent reinforcement of marijuana abstinence among individuals with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Stacey C; Higgins, Stephen T

    2006-06-01

    Previous studies by our group have used money given contingent on abstinence to reduce drug use by individuals with schizophrenia. In this study, we examined the sensitivity of marijuana use by individuals with serious mental illness to voucher-based contingent reinforcement, which represents the first study to date investigating the efficacy of voucher incentives with this population. This within-subject reversal design consisted of three conditions: 4-week baseline, 12-week voucher intervention, and 4-week baseline. During baseline periods, subjects received 10 US dollars vouchers per urine specimen, independent of urinalysis results. During voucher intervention, only specimens testing negative for marijuana earned vouchers, with total possible earnings of 930 US dollars. Seven adults with schizophrenia or other serious mental illnesses participated in the study. The percentage of marijuana-negative specimens was significantly greater during voucher intervention than during baseline periods. These results provide evidence that marijuana use among individuals with serious mental illness is sensitive to voucher-based incentives and further support the potential feasibility of using voucher-based contingency management to reduce substance abuse in this challenging population.

  16. Marine oil spill contingency planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    According to the practice researching and formulating "The Oil Spill Contingency Plan of South Chinese Sea", this paper analyses and discusses the structure, functions and main contents of marine oil spill contingency planning, programs the organizing and commanding system and emergency response system, and advances the planning and researching method to coordinate comprehensively and to design practically the detailed emergency response steps until to formulate the ease operating programs for the plan implementation (PPI) and the PPI to apply high-techniques supporting emergency administrations and response.

  17. Wind Turbine Contingency Control Through Generator De-Rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan; Goebel, Kai; Balas, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbines with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. The contingency control involves de-rating the generator operating point to achieve reduced loads on the wind turbine. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  18. Contingency Theories of Leadership: A Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sunhir K.

    1979-01-01

    Some of the major contingency theories of leadership are reviewed; some results from the author's study of Fiedler's contingency model are reported; and some thoughts for the future of leadership research are provided. (Author/MLF)

  19. [Management of severe invasive group A streptococcal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, A; Lorrot, M; Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S; Cohen, R

    2014-11-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) is the 5(th) responsible pathogen of invasive infections in children in France. These particularly severe diseases are dominated in children by soft tissue infection, isolated bacteremia but also osteoarthritis. Other complications are rare in France such as lung infections, necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). More unusual localizations such as meningitis, neonatal infections, severe ear and throat and gastrointestinal infections and vascular disorders are also described. Based on published series, mortality ranging from 0-8 % of cases, is high but still lower than that observed in adults. Probabilistic antibiotherapy includes a β-lactam with anti-SGA but also anti-staphylococcal (predominantly methi-S in France) activity such as clavulanic acid- amoxicillin followed by amoxicillin as soon as identification of SGA is performed. The addition of an anti-toxin antibiotic such as clindamycin is recommended particularly in NF or STSS or clinical signs suggestive of toxin production by the SGA (rash, gastrointestinal signs, hemodynamic disorders). The use of intravenous polyvalent immunoglobulins must also be discussed in NF and STSS. In all cases surgery should be discussed. The prognosis of these potentially very severe infections is related to their early diagnosis and treatment. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of these infections may optimize their management but also their prevention.

  20. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  1. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  2. Permanent education and co-management: experience of a health managing group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Faria Corrêa da Costa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experience lived by a group of workers of the Regional Center for Action on Health of the 4th. Regional Health State Department of Health of Rio Grande do Sul in Santa Maria. The paper presents an experience of reorganization of the work process in order to tackle the historical fragmentation of activities in the field of health management, and trigger a learning process for institutional support to carry thirty-two municipalities in the area of administrative scope of this coordinating body . To do so, it relies upon the co-management strategies and continuing health education as tools to trigger processes of change and inventing other ways of designing and conducting health work. With this experience, we can dislodge established places, inventing new forms of teamwork and interdisciplinary manner in order to strengthen this group of workers and their practices.

  3. The Effects of Leadership Training and Experience: A Contingency Model Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Fred E.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes recent studies based on the contingency model of leadership effectiveness, which suggest why research has failed to show that leadership training and experience increase organizational performance. The contingency model postulated that group performance depends on the match between situational favorableness, i.e., the leader's control…

  4. 78 FR 17226 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting, Teleconference and... Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Public meeting, Teleconference, and web-based... Management Working Group (TAMWG) will hold a teleconference/web-based meeting. Background The TAMWG...

  5. 40 CFR 51.152 - Contingency plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contingency plans. 51.152 Section 51... FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Prevention of Air Pollution Emergency Episodes § 51.152 Contingency plans. (a) Each contingency plan must— (1) Specify two or more stages of...

  6. The Psychophysics of Contingency Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Lorraine G.; Hannah, Samuel D.; Crump, Matthew J. C.; Siegel, Shepard

    2008-01-01

    The authors previously described a procedure that permits rapid, multiple within-participant evaluations of contingency assessment (the "streamed-trial" procedure, M. J. C. Crump, S. D. Hannah, L. G. Allan, & L. K. Hord, 2007). In the present experiments, they used the streamed-trial procedure, combined with the method of constant stimuli and a…

  7. Job satisfaction and contingent employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf-Zijl, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses job satisfaction as an aggregate of satisfaction with several job aspects, with special focus on the influence of contingent-employment contracts. Fixed-effect analysis is applied on a longitudinal sample of Dutch employees in four work arrangements: regular, fixed-term, on-call

  8. Job satisfaction and contingent employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf-Zijl, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses job satisfaction as an aggregate of satisfaction with several job aspects, with special focus on the influence of contingent-employment contracts. Fixed-effect analysis is applied on a longitudinal sample of Dutch employees in four work arrangements: regular, fixed-term, on-call

  9. 76 FR 584 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Work Group (AMWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of... Management Work Group (AMWG), a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center... addition, there will be updates from the Charter Ad Hoc Group and a follow up report on the work done...

  10. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  11. [From quality management to dynamic management through quality: Deployment within a radiotherapy group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrier, B; Halm, É; Craman, M; Dujols, J-P; Norkowski, J-L; Meynard, K

    2017-10-01

    In 2015, the quality group of the radiotherapy clinic Groupement de Radiothérapie et d'Oncologie des Pyrénées (GROP, Pau, France) decided to review the deployment of its quality approach in order to optimize it continuously. For this, two improvements were proposed: an involvement of process drivers and a material and financial investment in document management software. The implementation of these organizational and managerial provisions enabled us to better cover the requirements of the ISO 9001 standard, the international reference in quality management. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. APPROPRIATE ALLOCATION OF CONTINGENCY USING RISK ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Andi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cost overruns in the world of construction are attributable to either unforeseen events or foreseen events for which uncertainty was not appropriately accommodated. It is argued that a significant improvement to project management performance may result from greater attention to the process of analyzing project risks. The objective of this paper is to propose a risk analysis methodology for appropriate allocation of contingency in project cost estimation. In the first step, project risks will be identified. Influence diagramming technique is employed to identify and to show how the risks affect the project cost elements and also the relationships among the risks themselves. The second step is to assess the project costs with regards to the risks under consideration. Using a linguistic approach, the degree of uncertainty of identified project risks is assessed and quantified. The problem of dependency between risks is taken into consideration during this analysis. For the final step, as the main purpose of this paper, a method for allocating appropriate contingency is presented. Two types of contingencies, i.e. project contingency and management reserve are proposed to accommodate the risks. An illustrative example is presented at the end to show the application of the methodology.

  13. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul P. Guss

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  14. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

    2008-04-16

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  15. Summary of predator management on WPA uplands and group recommendations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The topic "Predator Management on Waterfowl Production Area Uplands" was debated during the ND Project Leaders Meeting on August 26, 1987. The pro and c on side of...

  16. The Old Days, Hot Groups, and Managers' Lib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Harold J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes Douglas McGregor's group at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 1940s and the group at Carnegie's Graduate School of Industrial Administration in the 1960s. Both showed the lively, task-obsessed characteristics of "hot groups." Both occupied participants' hearts and minds, held to high standards, and were extremely…

  17. 78 FR 69124 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting and Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Meeting and Teleconference... announce that the Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) will hold a meeting. Background The... Service, announce a public meeting and teleconference meeting of the Trinity Adaptive Management...

  18. Nursing leadership in a chronic pain management group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysvik, Elin; Furnes, Bodil

    2012-03-01

    To explore and debate nursing leadership and challenges on organizational and group levels when conducting rehabilitation groups for people suffering from chronic pain. Group approaches based on cognitive behavioural therapy are generally described as effective. Leadership in group approaches offered to people suffering from chronic pain is a great challenge for nurses on an organizational as well as a group level. One overall leader and nine group leaders conducting 13 groups constituted the sample. Qualitative content analysis was used by identifying categories, subthemes and themes. The results from the content analysis revealed one main theme ('Complexity in nursing leadership') and three subthemes ('Challenges in leadership on organizational level', 'Challenges in leadership on teamwork level' and 'Challenges in leadership on group level'. The results show how important it is to have firm overall leadership and trained group leaders with a common purpose, interdependent roles and complementary skills, who are thus well prepared to prevent or deal with challenging group processes. The leaders of both levels, which are highly interrelated, should have a current theoretical understanding of pain theory, group leadership skills and a cognitive behavioural approach. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. [Job performance in work organizations: the effects of management by group goals and job interdependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Hisataka

    2015-04-01

    cThis study examined the interactive effect of management by group goals and job interdependence on employee's activities in terms of task and contextual performance. A survey was conducted among 140 Japanese employees. Results indicated that management by group goals was related only to contextual performance. Job interdependence, however, had a direct effect on both task and contextual performance. Moreover, moderated regression analyses revealed that for work groups requiring higher interdependence among employees, management by group goals had a positive relation to contextual performance but not to task performance. When interdependence was not necessarily required, however, management by group goals had no relation to contextual performance and even negatively impacted task performance, respectively. These results show that management by group goals affects task and contextual performance, and that this effect is moderated by job interdependence. This provides a theoretical extension as well as a practical application to the setting and management of group goals.

  20. Parallel contingency statistics with Titan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK/Titan and presents the recently parallelized contingency statistics engine. It is a sequel to [PT08] and [BPRT09] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, and principal component analysis engines. The ease of use of this new parallel engines is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets. Furthermore, this report justifies the design of these engines with parallel scalability in mind; however, the very nature of contingency tables prevent this new engine from exhibiting optimal parallel speed-up as the aforementioned engines do. This report therefore discusses the design trade-offs we made and study performance with up to 200 processors.

  1. How Precarious Is Contingent Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2015-01-01

    rights and opportunities in the job. The analyses (based on logit modelling, multivariate logistic regression) clearly show that contingent employment (e.g. as a temp) is a risk condition, not only because of the stipulated end of the employment period, but also because it implies a clearly lower chance...... of obtaining a number of the rights and opportunities that are normally connected to an employment relationship....

  2. Construction of Student Groups Using Belbin: Supporting Group Work in Environmental Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark; Polglase, Giles; Parry, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Belbin team role self and observer perceptions were applied to a large cohort (145) of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences undergraduates in a module assessed through two separate group projects. Students self-selected groups for the first project; for the second, groups were more "balanced." Results show slight improvement in…

  3. Contingencies of self-worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, J; Wolfe, C T

    2001-07-01

    Research on self-esteem has focused almost exclusively on level of trait self-esteem to the neglect of other potentially more important aspects such as the contingencies on which self-esteem is based. Over a century ago, W. James (1890) argued that self-esteem rises and falls around its typical level in response to successes and failures in domains on which one has staked self-worth. We present a model of global self-esteem that builds on James' insights and emphasizes contingencies of self-worth. This model can help to (a) point the way to understanding how self-esteem is implicated in affect, cognition, and self-regulation of behavior; (b) suggest how and when self-esteem is implicated in social problems; (c) resolve debates about the nature and functioning of self-esteem; (d) resolve paradoxes in related literatures, such as why people who are stigmatized do not necessarily have low self-esteem and why self-esteem does not decline with age; and (e) suggest how self-esteem is causally related to depression. In addition, this perspective raises questions about how contingencies of self-worth are acquired and how they change, whether they are primarily a resource or a vulnerability, and whether some people have noncontingent self-esteem.

  4. Contingent negative variation of mood disorder patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingzhi Lu; Wenbin Zong; Qingtao Ren; Jinyu Pu; Jun Chen; Juan Li; Xingshi Chen; Yong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Studies on brain-evoked potential and contingent negative variation (CNV) in mood disorder remain controversial. To date, no CNV difference between unipolar and bipolar depression has been reported. Brain-evoked potentials were measured in the present study to analyze CNV in three subtypes of mood disorder (mania, unipolar depression, and bipolar depression), and these results were compared with normal controls. In the mania group, CNV amplitude B was greater than in controls, and the depression group exhibited lower CNV amplitude B and smaller A-S'2 area, and prolonged post-imperative negative variation latency. The CNV comparison between unipolar and bipolar depression found that the prolonged post-imperative negative variation latency was only in unipolar depression. These results suggest that prolonged post-imperative negative variation latency is a characteristic of unipolar depression, and CNV amplitude change is a state characteristic of mood disorder patients.

  5. 77 FR 60138 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Teleconference/Web-Based Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group; Public Teleconference/ Web-Based... Working Group (TAMWG). DATES: Teleconference/web-based meeting: Wednesday October 17, 2012, from 9 a.m. to... announce that the Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) will hold a...

  6. 78 FR 42799 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group Meetings AGENCY: Bureau of... AMWG, a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, and independent.... Dated: July 11, 2013. Glen Knowles, Chief, Adaptive Management Work Group, Upper Colorado...

  7. Building Social Capital in Groups: Facilitating Skill Development for Natural Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of the experiences of four farmer groups set up to learn how to jointly manage local natural resource issues shows that the groups are going though two simultaneous processes. One builds technical competency in natural resource management and the other is the underpinning social process that allows the groups to make decisions and work…

  8. Product Drawing Management System Based on Group Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    With the development and widely used of the compute r technology, the CAD has been more and more used in the process of designing prod uct. The number of the engineering drawings will greatly increase because of the continually appearance of the new products. As a result, it has become a badly needed to be solved problem for us that how to rapidly and efficiently search an d appropriately preserve and manage the drawings. In this paper, a method of bui lding the product drawing management system for extr...

  9. The Influence of Group Training in the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program on Preschool Teachers' Classroom Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John S.; Tiret, Holly B.; Bender, Stacy L.; Benson, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined changes in preschool teachers' perceptions of classroom management strategies following group training in the recently revised Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program (C. Webster-Stratton, 2006). The authors used a pre/post follow-up design across 2 groups that each met for 8 sessions over an 8-10-week period for…

  10. The Influence of Group Training in the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program on Preschool Teachers' Classroom Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John S.; Tiret, Holly B.; Bender, Stacy L.; Benson, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined changes in preschool teachers' perceptions of classroom management strategies following group training in the recently revised Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program (C. Webster-Stratton, 2006). The authors used a pre/post follow-up design across 2 groups that each met for 8 sessions over an 8-10-week period for…

  11. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC`s Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON.

  12. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC's Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON.

  13. An integrative framework for managing project issues across stakeholder groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Offenbeek, Marjolein A.G.; Vos, Janita F.J.

    2016-01-01

    The stakeholders and the issues associated with a project are different concepts but closely interconnected. Despite this, the project stakeholder management literature falls short in analyzing the linkages between the stakeholders and the issues they bring. This paper develops a multilayered

  14. An integrative framework for managing project issues across stakeholder groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Offenbeek, Marjolein A.G.; Vos, Janita F.J.

    2016-01-01

    The stakeholders and the issues associated with a project are different concepts but closely interconnected. Despite this, the project stakeholder management literature falls short in analyzing the linkages between the stakeholders and the issues they bring. This paper develops a multilayered stakeh

  15. Ethics of managed care. Implications for group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, D J

    1997-01-01

    The advent of managed care and the impact of an increasingly pluralistic, postmodern society need not mean abandoning standards of medical ethics embraced since Hippocrates. The time-honored relationship between patients and physicians remains of paramount importance. Ethical issues surrounding "universal" access and financial models that directly incentivize practices to withhold care are both addressed from a historical perspective.

  16. 78 FR 5830 - Renewal of the Trinity River Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Office of the Secretary Renewal of the Trinity River Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Office of... Working Group (Working Group) for 2 years. The Working Group provides recommendations on all aspects of...; 707-822-7201. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Working Group conducts its operations in accordance...

  17. 76 FR 4365 - Renewal of the Trinity River Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Office of the Secretary Renewal of the Trinity River Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Office of... Working Group (Working Group) for 2 years. The Working Group provides recommendations on all aspects of...; 707-822-7201. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Working Group conducts its operations in accordance...

  18. Financing and cash flow management for the medical group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    The expansion of a medical group practice and the addition of ancillary services require a substantial cash outlay. Obtaining proper financing to complete a successful expansion is a process that takes time, and there are critical steps that must be followed. The group's business objectives must be presented properly by developing a business plan detailing the practice and goals associated with the desired expansion. This article discusses some of the key elements that are essential in creating an overall effective business plan for the group medical practice.

  19. Municipal solid waste management in rural areas and small counties: an economic analysis using contingent valuation to estimate willingness to pay for Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; He, Jie; Kim, Yoonhee; Kamata, Takuya

    2014-08-01

    Municipal solid waste management (SWM) is a major challenge for local governments in rural China. One key issue is the low priority assigned by the local government which is faced with limited financing capacity. We conducted an economic analysis in Eryuan, a poor county in Yunnan, China, where the willingness- to- pay (WTP) for an improved solid waste collection and disposal service was valuated and compared with project cost. Similar to most previous studies in developing countries, this study found that the mean WTP is approximately 1% of the household income. The economic internal rate of return of the project is about 5%, which signifies the estimated social benefit to be already higher than the project cost. Moreover, we believe our estimation of social benefit to be a conservative one since our study only focuses on the local people who will be directly served by the project; wider positive externality of the project, such as CO2 emission reduction and groundwater pollution alleviation, etc., whose impact most probably surpass the frontier of Eryuan county, are not considered explicitly in our survey. The analysis also reveals that the poorest households are not only willing to pay more than the rich households in terms of percentage income but are also willing to pay no less than the rich in terms of absolute value in locations where solid waste services are unavailable. This result reveals the fact that the poorest households have stronger demands for public SWM services, whereas the rich may have the ability to employ private solutions.

  20. Nurses' Educational Needs Assessment for Financial Management Education Using the Nominal Group Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Wonjung; Lim, Ji Young

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the financial management educational needs of nurses in order to development an educational program to strengthen their financial management competencies. Data were collected from two focus groups using the nominal group technique. The study consisted of three steps: a literature review, focus group discussion using the nominal group technique, and data synthesis. After analyzing the results, nine key components were selected: corporate management and accounting, introduction to financial management in hospitals, basic structure of accounting, basics of hospital accounting, basics of financial statements, understanding the accounts of financial statements, advanced analysis of financial statements, application of financial management, and capital financing of hospitals. The present findings can be used to develop a financial management education program to strengthen the financial management competencies of nurses. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Does contingent reinforcement strengthen operant behavior?

    OpenAIRE

    Nevin, John A.; Smith, Laurence D.; Roberts, Jean

    1987-01-01

    In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained to peck keys with equal food-reinforcement schedules in components that ended with either noncontingent or contingent transitions to a third component with a five-fold richer schedule. Response rates were higher in the initial component with contingent transitions, but resistance to prefeeding or extinction was not consistently greater. Experiment 2 also included noncontingent or contingent transitions to a signaled period of nonreinforcement. There was n...

  2. The Design of Self-Managing Work Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    0 .0 :j~ H H 6 work activities that ha’ e been carried oul, Under such circumsta~zces, a person feels an internal motivacional "kick" when he or she...other groups (Alderfer, 1977); and sometimes they exploit and stress group members rather than aid in their growth and personal well-being (Hackman...the theory fails to deal with other human needs that may be salient for individuals in organizations, some of which (e.g., needs for personal growth

  3. Tightening up the performance-pay linkage: roles of contingent reward leadership and profit-sharing in the cross-level influence of individual pay-for-performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Joo Hun; Bartol, Kathryn M; Kim, Seongsu

    2015-03-01

    Drawing upon line-of-sight (Lawler, 1990, 2000; Murphy, 1999) as a unifying concept, we examine the cross-level influence of organizational use of individual pay-for-performance (PFP), theorizing that its impact on individual employees' performance-reward expectancy is boosted by the moderating effects of immediate group managers' contingent reward leadership and organizational use of profit-sharing. Performance-reward expectancy is then expected to mediate the interactive effects of individual PFP with contingent reward leadership and profit-sharing on employee job performance. Analyses of cross-organizational and cross-level data from 912 employees in 194 workgroups from 45 companies reveal that organizations' individual PFP was positively related to employees' performance-reward expectancy, which was strengthened when it was accompanied by higher levels of contingent reward leadership and profit-sharing. Also, performance-reward expectancy significantly transmitted the effects of individual PFP onto job performance under higher levels of contingent reward leadership and profit-sharing, thus delineating cross-level mediating and moderating processes by which organizations' individual PFP is linked to important individual-level employee outcomes. Several theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  4. A health management system for marine cell group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingfu; Ruan, Mingzhi; Zi, Yiluo

    2017-06-01

    Storage battery plays an important role in the submarine. However, mechanism of its performance deterioration is so complex for the crew to master. A health management system for marine storage batteries is presented in the paper, so that scientific maintenance can be adopted to assure the working reliability of the battery. The system consists of an on-line monitoring subsystem and a performance prediction subsystem. In order to complete the key task of performance prediction, an intelligent forecasting model based on support vector machine is built, which can automatically find out the rule of performance deterioration from historical monitoring data. Validity of the performance prediction has been proved by testing results.

  5. ACCOUNTING OF PROVISIONS, CONTINGENT LIABILITIES, CONTINGENT ASSETS IN SCOPE OF IAS 37

    OpenAIRE

    Usul, Hayrettin; ÖZER KEÇE, Figen

    2016-01-01

    This study tries to gain an insight into thenumber 37 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets, one of theInternational Financial Reporting Standards. At first a general overview hasbeen provided about these concepts, and then under what circumstancesbusinesses accrue provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets andwhat kind of information related to the concepts about financial statementsshould be explained have been examined in detail. After these explanations, i...

  6. Pedigree analysis for the genetic management of group-living species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Mena, Belén; Schad, Kristine; Hanna, Nick; Lacy, Robert C

    2016-05-01

    Captive breeding programs are an important tool for the conservation of endangered species. These programs are commonly managed using pedigrees containing information about the history of each individual's family, such as breeding pairs and parentage. However, there are some species that are kept in groups where it is hard to distinguish between particular individuals within the group, making it very difficult to record any information at an individual level. Currently, software and methods commonly used for registering and analyzing pedigrees to help manage populations at an individual level are not adequate for managing these group-living species. Therefore, there is a need to further develop these tools and methodologies for pedigree analysis to better manage group-living species. PMx is a program used for the management of ex situ populations in zoos and aquariums. We adapted the pedigree analysis method implemented in PMx to analyze pedigrees (records of descendant lineages) of group-living species. In addition, we developed a group pedigree data entry sheet and group2PMx, a converter program that enables group datasets to be imported into PMx. We show how pedigree analysis of a group-living species can be used for population management using the studbook of the endangered Texas blind cave salamander Eurycea rathbuni. Such analyses of the pedigree of groups can improve the management of group-living species in ex situ breeding programs. Firstly, it enables better management decisions based on more accurate genetic measures between groups, allowing for greater control of inbreeding. Secondly, it can improve the conditions in which group-living species are held by adapting husbandry practices to better reflect conditions of these species living in the wild. The use of the spreadsheet and group2PMx extends the application of PMx, allowing conservation managers and other institutions outside the zoo and aquarium community to easily import and analyze their

  7. Three essays on contingent valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Timothy Kenneth Munro

    2001-07-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays on the contingent valuation methodology. The first essay develops a theoretical model of how agents respond to willingness to pay questions in a survey context. In particular, this essay focuses on the difference between a voluntary contribution mechanism and a mandatory contribution mechanism. The second essay applies this theory to a survey of willingness to pay for renewable energy by varying the mechanism by which the public good is supplied. The third essay proposes a methodology for choosing the number, location and range of contributions or bid levels in dichotomous choice contingent valuation surveys. The first essay, "Mandatory vs. Voluntary Payment to a Public Good" models the differing incentive effects of two different payment mechanisms in contingent valuations surveys. It is shown that under rationed voluntary payment (where each agent can contribute either a fixed amount or nothing) there exists a Nash equilibrium in which the level of public good provided is strictly below the level provided under a mandatory provision rule. This result is generalized to hypothetical valuation surveys and a set of condition ranking willingness to pay under each mechanism is described. The second essay "Valuing a Public Good" describes the result of a survey designed to test the above theory. This essay considers willingness to pay for renewable energy. In order to test the theory, a split sample survey of over fifteen hundred respondents was conducted. One half of the sample was asked whether they would volunteer to pay for green power and the other half was asked whether they would vote to support a program in which the entire population was required to contribute towards the provision of the public good. On average, respondents' willingness to pay was higher for the public good provided by the mandatory provision mechanism. The third essay describes the literature on how the contribution or bid levels can be chosen to

  8. The Anger Management Project: A Group Intervention for Anger in People with Physical and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiliassis, Nick; Gulbenkoglu, Hrepsime; Di Marco, Mark; Young, Suzanne; Hudson, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Background: This paper describes the evaluation of a group program designed specifically to meet the anger management needs of a group of individuals with various levels of intellectual disability and/or complex communication needs. Method: Twenty-nine individuals were randomly assigned to an intervention group or a waiting-list comparison group.…

  9. Managing parental groups during early childhood: New challenges faced by Swedish child health-care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Pia, Lundqvist; Eva, Drevenhorn; Inger, Hallström

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe child health centre (CHC) nurses' views of managing parental groups during early childhood. All 311 CHC nurses working within the Swedish CHC system in one county were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire. Findings showed that although the CHC nurses were experienced, several found group leadership challenging and difficult. The need for specialized groups for young parents, single parents and parents whose first language was not Swedish was identified by 57% of the nurses. The CHC nurses found the participation of fathers in their parental groups to be low (an estimate of 10-20%), and 30% of the nurses made special efforts to make the fathers participate. Education in group dynamics and group leadership can strengthen CHC nurses in managing parental groups. It is recommended that specialized parental groups are organized by a few family centres so CHC nurses can develop their skill in managing such groups.

  10. Evaluation of Learning Group Approaches for Fostering Integrated Cropping Systems Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blissett, Hana; Simmons, Steve; Jordan, Nicholas; Nelson, Kristen

    2004-01-01

    Cropping systems management requires integration of multiple forms of knowledge, practice, and learning by farmers, extension educators, and researchers. We evaluated the outcomes of participation in collaborative learning groups organized to address cropping systems and, specifically, challenges of integrated weed management. Groups were…

  11. Contingent approach to Internet-based supply network integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jessica; Boughton, Nick; Kehoe, Dennis; Michaelides, Zenon

    2001-10-01

    The Internet is playing an increasingly important role in enhancing the operations of supply networks as many organizations begin to recognize the benefits of Internet- enabled supply arrangements. However, the developments and applications to-date do not extend significantly beyond the dyadic model, whereas the real advantages are to be made with the external and network models to support a coordinated and collaborative based approach. The DOMAIN research group at the University of Liverpool is currently defining new Internet- enabled approaches to enable greater collaboration across supply chains. Different e-business models and tools are focusing on different applications. Using inappropriate e- business models, tools or techniques will bring negative results instead of benefits to all the tiers in the supply network. Thus there are a number of issues to be considered before addressing Internet based supply network integration, in particular an understanding of supply chain management, the emergent business models and evaluating the effects of deploying e-business to the supply network or a particular tier. It is important to utilize a contingent approach to selecting the right e-business model to meet the specific supply chain requirements. This paper addresses the issues and provides a case study on the indirect materials supply networks.

  12. Profitability recent open stock funds in Brazil: analysis of the performance of a management Funds Group active in relation to management fees charged for resource managers

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Ricardo Mendes Vasconcelos; Silvana Festa Sabes; Alexandre Gonzales

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed to evaluate the performance of a specific group of active management equity investments funds relating it to the management fees charged by managers in order to answer the following research problem: open equity funds with active management, that charge higher management fees, are those that provide the best returns for the investor? The objective was to test the hypothesis under which it is evident that the funds that charged the highest rates are those with the best perform...

  13. IP MULTICAST GROUP MANAGEMENT FOR BROADCAST LANS DISTRIBUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阿姆贾德

    2001-01-01

    Problems of the current IGMP mechanism were identified, such as unnecessary periodic probing of hosts and leave latency, which wastes bandwidth and cause more traffic and overhead. Alternative mechanism that preserve the IP multicast model but employ join/leave messages to track local group membership for broadcast LANs (shared medium LANs) was proposed in this paper. We describe the implementation requirements of the new mechanism and compare it to existing one, demonstrating that join/leave approach is uniformly superior for the environment of broadcast LANs.

  14. Contingent Diversity on Anthropic Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Balée

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Behaviorally modern human beings have lived in Amazonia for thousands of years. Significant dynamics in species turnovers due to human-mediated disturbance were associated with the ultimate emergence and expansion of agrarian technologies in prehistory. Such disturbances initiated primary and secondary landscape transformations in various locales of the Amazon region. Diversity in these locales can be understood by accepting the initial premise of contingency, expressed as unprecedented human agency and human history. These effects can be accessed through the archaeological record and in the study of living languages. In addition, landscape transformation can be demonstrated in the study of traditional knowledge (TK. One way of elucidating TK distinctions between anthropic and nonanthropic landscapes concerns elicitation of differential labeling of these landscapes and more significantly, elicitation of the specific contents, such as trees, occurring in these landscapes. Freelisting is a method which can be used to distinguish the differential species compositions of landscapes resulting from human-mediated disturbance vs. those which do not evince records of human agency and history. The TK of the Ka’apor Indians of Amazonian Brazil as revealed in freelisting exercises shows differentiation of anthropogenic from high forests as well as a recognition of diversity in the anthropogenic forests. This suggests that the agents of human-mediated disturbance and landscape transformation in traditional Amazonia encode diversity and contingency into their TK, which encoding reflects past cultural influence on landscape and society over time.

  15. Determinants of higher education students’ willingness to pay for violent crime reduction: a contingent valuation study

    OpenAIRE

    Mafalda Soeiro; Aurora A.C. Teixeira

    2010-01-01

    By eliciting an individual’s Willingness to Pay (WTP) for a reduction in crime risks, the contingent valuation method is one of the most solid methodologies in use to estimate the intangible costs of crime. However, very few studies have applied contingent valuation methods to random samples of the population located in high crime rate areas. This study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first attempt to apply the contingent valuation method to estimate how much a specific group of society...

  16. PERANCANGAN PROTOTYPE APLIKASI KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PADA DIVISI MANAGEMENT AUTOMATION INFORMATION UNTUK MENDUKUNG ORACLE FINANCIAL PADA ORANG TUA GROUP

    OpenAIRE

    Gema Gema; Celline Liawan; Gerardus Polla

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to design a knowledge management application as a media to document knowledge and facility that supported a knowledge sharing culture in Oracle Financial subdivision in Orang Tua Group. The researcher uses 7 first steps method which defined by Tiwana in doing knowledge management application prototype. The knowledge management prototype application modules consist of Wiki page, document library, discussion board, blog, picture library, knowledge base, help desk,...

  17. Managing medical groups: 21st century challenges and the impact of physician leadership styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William E; Keogh, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Physician group managers and administrators charged with leading medical groups in the 21st century face a set of old and new challenges and opportunities. Leadership is assumed to make the difference between a successful and not-so-successful medical group. Yet, there is little research about how physician manager leadership styles contribute to the success of medical group practices. This article is a study of physician leadership styles using the DiSC, based upon a sample of 232 physician managers. Dominance (D) and conscientiousness (C) were the two dominant styles found in this study. Moreover, the two dominant combination leadership styles fall under the categories of the "creative" and the 'perfectionist." The article formulates practical recommendations for both physician managers and administrators for leading medical groups to respond more effectively to the challenges and opportunities facing medical groups in the 21st century.

  18. Managing a Bone Healthy Lifestyle After Attending Multifaceted Group Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annesofie Lunde; Lomborg, Kirsten; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt

    2016-01-01

    We examined patients with osteoporosis implementation of recommendations regarding a bone healthy lifestyle after the patients attended multifaceted osteoporosis group education (GE). Our findings suggest that GE can support and influence patients’ transfer of preventive actions. Still patients...... diagnosed with osteoporosis who attended multifaceted GE at a Danish hospital participated. Data consisted of field work and individual interviews in the participants’ everyday environment after completion of GE. After attending multifaceted GE, participants experienced increased attention to and reflected....... On the contrary, attending GE was in some cases not sufficient to overcome social and physical concerns, or to eliminate uncertainty about recommendations or to make participants identify with the osteoporosis diagnosis, which thus impeded implementation of a bone healthy lifestyle. Attending multifaceted GE can...

  19. Contingency Planning. Technical Assistance Bulletin 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, C. P.

    This bulletin describes a set of general guidelines for developing contingency plans that prepare school systems to cope with expected and unexpected disruptions in the educational process. Typically, contingency plans are prepared to anticipate consequences of school desegregation, natural disasters, bomb threats, or mass demonstrations. The…

  20. The Role of Contingency in Classical Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Mauricio R.; Bitterman, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    Early experiments suggesting that classical conditioning depends on the contingency between conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US) are reconsidered along with later evidence that shows conditioning of the CS and its context in random training. CS-US contingency is neither necessary nor sufficient for conditioning. (SLD)

  1. Overseas Contingency Operations Funding: Background and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Operations Funding: Background and Status Congressional Research Service Summary The Department of Defense (DOD) estimates that through FY2016...Contingency Operations Funding: Background and Status Congressional Research Service Contents Introduction...Contingency Operations Funding: Background and Status Congressional Research Service 2 budget to which government financiers increasingly turn to

  2. Contingency Pest Management Guide. 2010 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    to 22 days. Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bactimos Briquets ] 10% 6840-01-377-7049 BX Box/100 briquets Apply per label directions (10...mosquito season (or 150 days). For Aedes and Psorophora, use 1 briquet /200 sq ft for shallow depressions. For Culex, Culiseta and Anopheles, place...1 briquet /100 sq ft. For Coquillettidia and Mansonia in cattail marshes and water hyacinth beds, place 1 briquet /100 sq ft. Briquettes control

  3. Social identity contingencies: how diversity cues signal threat or safety for African Americans in mainstream institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Steele, Claude M; Davies, Paul G; Ditlmann, Ruth; Crosby, Jennifer Randall

    2008-04-01

    This research demonstrates that people at risk of devaluation based on group membership are attuned to cues that signal social identity contingencies--judgments, stereotypes, opportunities, restrictions, and treatments that are tied to one's social identity in a given setting. In 3 experiments, African American professionals were attuned to minority representation and diversity philosophy cues when they were presented as a part of workplace settings. Low minority representation cues coupled with colorblindness (as opposed to valuing diversity) led African American professionals to perceive threatening identity contingencies and to distrust the setting (Experiment 1). The authors then verified that the mechanism mediating the effect of setting cues on trust was identity contingent evaluations (Experiments 2 & 3). The power of social identity contingencies as they relate to underrepresented groups in mainstream institutions is discussed. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Time Contingency Assessment in Construction Projects in Egypt using Artificial Neural Networks Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Yahia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Time schedule is an essential tool for construction project management. For instance, it can materially help to identify the expected financial requirements. It is also an important tool for the time control process. Construction project time schedule is greatly affected by many uncertain but predictable factors. Hence, a certain percentage of time contingency should be added to the scheduled time to arrive at more reliable time schedule. In this research, the most important factors affecting time contingency in construction projects were identified based on a comprehensive survey among a collected sample of the Egyptian construction experts. In addition, a neural networks model was developed in order to help project planner to have a more reliable prediction for the amount of time contingency that should be added to the scheduled completion time. This paper explains the data collection process, lists the main factors affecting time contingency and discusses the model development methodology.

  5. Making time for learning-oriented leadership in multidisciplinary hospital management groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Hayes, Jennifer E; Gray, Garry C; Kiang, Mathew V

    2015-01-01

    Although the clinical requirements of health care delivery imply the need for interdisciplinary management teams to work together to promote frontline learning, such interdisciplinary, learning-oriented leadership is atypical. We designed this study to identify behaviors enabling groups of diverse managers to perform as learning-oriented leadership teams on behalf of quality and safety. We randomly selected 12 of 24 intact groups of hospital managers from one hospital to participate in a Safety Leadership Team Training program. We collected primary data from March 2008 to February 2010 including pre- and post-staff surveys, multiple interviews, observations, and archival data from management groups. We examined the level and trend in frontline perceptions of managers' learning-oriented leadership following the intervention and ability of management groups to achieve objectives on targeted improvement projects. Among the 12 intervention groups, we identified higher- and lower-performing intervention groups and behaviors that enabled higher performers to work together more successfully. Management groups that achieved more of their performance goals and whose staff perceived more and greater improvement in their learning-oriented leadership after participation in Safety Leadership Team Training invested in structures that created learning capacity and conscientiously practiced prescribed learning-oriented management and problem-solving behaviors. They made the time to do these things because they envisioned the benefits of learning, valued the opportunity to learn, and maintained an environment of mutual respect and psychological safety within their group. Learning in management groups requires vision of what learning can accomplish; will to explore, practice, and build learning capacity; and mutual respect that sustains a learning environment.

  6. 75 FR 66125 - Federal Land Managers' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... National Park Service Federal Land Managers' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG) AGENCY: National...' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG) was formed (1) to develop a more consistent and objective... constituencies (e.g., State air regulatory agencies, concerned citizens, environmental groups,...

  7. On the contingent nature of language‐learning tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Hellermann, John; Pekarek Doehler, Simona

    2013-01-01

    Using methods from conversation analysis, this paper explores ways that teacher‐designed language‐learning task interactions can vary in their performance due to the nature of face‐to‐face interaction. The analysis describes three task interactions from language‐learning classrooms, showing how the contingencies that are necessitated by learners working in small groups provide for different task performance as well as different potentials for language learning. The video‐recorded interactions...

  8. The Contingent Character of Necessity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guzmán

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most frequent criticisms raised against Hegel has to do with the totalizing aspect of his system, which determines what is as absolutely necessary. The Science of Logic, being the conceptual edifice upon which his whole system is built, is the appropriate place to determine the specific meaning of the Hegelian concepts. The following paper offers a detailed analysis on the chapter on Actuality (Wirklichkeit in the Science of Logic, in order to show how the concept of absolute necessity not only includes within it, but also contains as a structural element, the concept of contingency. In this manner a deflationary interpretation is generated in which the absolutely necessary character of actuality should not be understood as grounded on a pre-established end that inexorably determines actuality, but rather as an interpretive movement, in recollection, of its process.

  9. Contingent Conspiracies: Art, Philosophy, Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    , it is difficult not to detect in this principle a hint of the kantian sublime. This paper will offer a survey of these and other findings drawn from my doctoral research. Following a speculative pragmatic approach, several implicit conceptual links between art practice (understood as an aesthetic concern......The question of whether creativity comes from being “open” or “closed” to contingent processes, deeply intersects art-historical discourse on authorship, style, technique and practice: from the Greek notion of the Daimon, through commedia dell'arte’s improvised styles and romanticism’s investment...... distributions (chaos). Perhaps most intriguingly of all, on the “edge of chaos”, between order and randomness, universal computing (Turing) has been shown to emerge in simple rule-based systems such as Conway’s “Game of Life” and Wolfram’s “rule 110”, implying that any computational universe can be emulated...

  10. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E

    2015-02-01

    To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed quality managers on six domains of quality management. Questionnaires measured organization of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, quality improvement policy, and management strategies (score range 0-100%). Based on the scores, responders received feedback and a benchmark and were granted access to a toolbox of quality improvement instruments. If requested, additional support in improving quality management was available, consisting of an elucidating phone call or a visit from an experienced consultant. After 1 year, the level of quality management was measured again. Of the initially 60 participating care groups, 51 completed the study. The total quality management score improved from 59.8% (95% CI 57.0-62.6%) to 65.1% (62.8-67.5%; P teamwork improved (P = 0.001). Measuring quality management and providing feedback and a benchmark improves the level of quality management in care groups but not in outpatient clinics. The questionnaires might also be a useful asset for other diabetes care groups, such as Accountable Care Organizations. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Change management in a group dental practice. A consideration of management issues that may arise in a larger dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Vernon P

    2007-10-01

    The drive for quality assurance in general dental practice has arisen as a response to changing standards and demands. Dentists need to develop skills in change management in this new culture of change. Groups of practitioners often encounter difficulties when managing change, yet it is essential that they lead the process. Such problems are common among groups of professionals. A wide range of topics is presented that may, from one point of view, represent challenging or problem areas (obstacles) for a group practice but may also, from a different point of view, provide a framework of opportunities for improvement, and facilitate the management processes within the practice and the management of change in particular (tools). The range of skills required to assist a professional group is such that individual dentists or advisers may not be able to achieve much on their own. The best way forward may be to interpret the problems as a professional training need and to organise training as a group. These issues will be considered under the following headings: partners and teams; introduction: the need for change management; the challenge for group practices; obstacles and tools; conclusion: the way forward--a case for training.

  12. Group Training of Stress Management vs. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Reducing Depression, Anxiety and Perceived Stress Among HIV-Positive Men

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmati Sabet, Akbar; Khalatbari, Javad; Abbas Ghorbani, Maryam; Haghighi, Mohammad; Ahmadpanah, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of group training of stress management with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing depression, anxiety and stress perceived among HIV-positive men. Methods:Inthis semi-experimental study, three groups of HIV-positive men (CBT group, stress management group, and control group) including 15 patients in each group were compared regarding depression, anxiety, and stress using pre-test and post-test tools. Results: Both interventions (CBT and stress ...

  13. The Good Behavior Game for Latino English Language Learners in a Small-Group Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jennifer; Bray, Melissa A.; Bilias-Lolis, Evelyn; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a group contingency intervention that has effectively reduced disruptive behavior and improved classroom management in many replications, for various settings and populations. The student composition of American public schools is changing, leading to culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms with unique…

  14. The Good Behavior Game for Latino English Language Learners in a Small-Group Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jennifer; Bray, Melissa A.; Bilias-Lolis, Evelyn; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a group contingency intervention that has effectively reduced disruptive behavior and improved classroom management in many replications, for various settings and populations. The student composition of American public schools is changing, leading to culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms with unique…

  15. Managing wildfire events: risk-based decision making among a group of federal fire managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyn S. Wilson; Patricia L. Winter; Lynn A. Maguire; Timothy. Ascher

    2011-01-01

    Managing wildfire events to achieve multiple management objectives involves a high degree of decision complexity and uncertainty, increasing the likelihood that decisions will be informed by experience-based heuristics triggered by available cues at the time of the decision. The research reported here tests the prevalence of three risk-based biases among 206...

  16. Managing diversity : How leaders' multiculturalism and colorblindness affect work group functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, Loes; Otten, Sabine; Phalet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Workforces are becoming increasingly diverse and leaders face the challenge of managing their groups to minimize costs and maximize benefits of diversity. This paper investigates how leaders' multiculturalism and colorblindness affect cultural minority and majority members' experiences of connectedn

  17. Managing diversity : How leaders' multiculturalism and colorblindness affect work group functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, Loes; Otten, Sabine; Phalet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Workforces are becoming increasingly diverse and leaders face the challenge of managing their groups to minimize costs and maximize benefits of diversity. This paper investigates how leaders' multiculturalism and colorblindness affect cultural minority and majority members' experiences of connectedn

  18. 76 FR 66327 - Iron Mountain Information Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information Technology (IT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ..., Information Technology (IT) Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From TEK Systems, Professional... Technology (IT) Division, including on-site leased workers from TEK Systems, Professional Alternative... Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information Technology (IT) Division. The Department...

  19. Perspectives on Self-Management in Multiple Sclerosis: A Focus Group Study

    OpenAIRE

    Knaster, Elizabeth S.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Johnson, Kurt; McMullen, Kara A.; Ehde, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the experience of self-management among people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and gather their input to inform a self-management intervention. Twelve people with MS participated in focus groups in which they were asked open-ended questions about MS symptoms, challenges, overcoming challenges, symptom management, and treatment preferences. The results suggest four major themes: 1) “The Everyday Experience of MS,” including comments about symptoms and their ...

  20. A summary of the Nordic-group conference on safety management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, I. [Lund University (Sweden); Svenson, O. [Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    The report summarizes the Nordic-group conference on safety management, which took place in Lund, Sweden on October 28-29, 2004. The theme-group was originally created by researchers who had a common interest in cooperation, sharing their results, and discuss topics focusing on safety management and safety culture in nuclear power production, but also in other technologies involving risks. The research has, so far, basically been related to the areas of MTO, partly from a psychological perspective, but also from other perspectives. Today, the group consists primarily of members from Sweden, Finland and Norway. During the last three years the group has gathered twice a year. (au)

  1. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J.; Baan, Caroline A.; Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Rutten, Guy E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed qualitymanagers on six domains of quality management. Q

  2. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J.; Baan, Caroline A.; Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Rutten, Guy E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed qualitymanagers on six domains of quality management.

  3. Saving Face: Managing Rapport in a Problem-Based Learning Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leslie; Harris, Ann; Burton, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the complex social aspects of communication required for students to participate effectively in Problem-Based Learning and explored how these dynamics are managed. The longitudinal study of a group of first-year undergraduates examined interactions using Rapport Management as a framework to analyse communication…

  4. Using a Virtual Learning Environment to Manage Group Projects: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Yvonne; Marcus-Quinn, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are increasingly used by Higher Education Institutions to manage and enhance teaching and learning, and research. Discussion, chat, scheduling, and other collaboration tools make VLEs especially useful systems for designing and managing complex group projects. In the spring semester of 2006, students at the…

  5. Assessment of Groups Influence on Management Style as Related to University Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irtwange, S. V.; Orsaah, S.

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken with the objective of assessing groups influence on management style as related to University governance with University of Agriculture, Makurdi as a case study from academic staff perspective. The management style of the Vice Chancellor of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi between the period September 3, 1996 to…

  6. Assessment of Groups Influence on Management Style as Related to University Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irtwange, S. V.; Orsaah, S.

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken with the objective of assessing groups influence on management style as related to University governance with University of Agriculture, Makurdi as a case study from academic staff perspective. The management style of the Vice Chancellor of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi between the period September 3, 1996 to…

  7. STUDI KOMITMEN ORGANISASIONAL: PEKERJA CONTINGENT DAN SURVIVOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenika Walani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, contingent and survivor workers have emerged as a common reality in business activities. Unfortunately, contingent worker has high job insecurity on his employment status. On the other side, downsizing activities can result in decreasing job security of survivor worker. As a consequence, both contingent and survivor workers very potential have low organizational commitment. However, organizations still have an opportunity to give their workers an exclusive treatment for building organizational commitment without ignoring the fact that workers have other commitment foci.

  8. Innovation management based on proactive engagement of customers: A case study on LEGO Group. Part I: Innovation Management at Lego Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, G.; Avasilcăi, S.

    2015-11-01

    Customers' proactive engagement in the innovation process represents a business priority for companies which adopt the open innovation business model. In such a context, it is of outmost importance for companies to use the online environment and social media, in order to create an interactive and open dialogue with customers and other important external stakeholders, achieving to gather creative solutions and innovative ideas by involving them in the process of co-creating value. Thus, the current paper is based on a case study approach, which aims to highlight the open innovation business model of the LEGO Group, one of the most successful and active company in engaging customers in submitting ideas and creative solutions for developing new products and new technologies, through online platforms. The study then proceeds to analyze the innovation management at LEGO Group, emphasizing the most important elements regarding the management team, the success and failures, the evolution of the LEGO products focusing on the innovation efforts of the company, its mission, vision, and values, emphasizing the innovation terms which guide the actions and objectives of the LEGO Group. Also, the research based on the case study approach, outlines the most important policies and strategies of the company, the organizational structure consisting of flat structures which facilitate the orientation of the team management on the innovation process and the proactive involvement of consumers and other external stakeholders in product development, highlighting also the most important activities developed by the management team in exploring the new opportunities which may occur on the market, involving customers in sharing their ideas at festivals, participating to discussions of adult fans on web-based platforms and establishing partnerships with the external stakeholders in order to create value. Moreover, the paper is focused on identifying the company's concerns regarding the

  9. 77 FR 63872 - Alternative Management Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    .... Time Staffing, Inc., Personnel Management Group, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance... workers of Alternative Management Resources, Inc., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc...., Doepker Group, Inc., D.B.A. Time Staffing, Inc., Personnel Management Group, Inc., including workers...

  10. Effects of Structured Group Counseling on Anger Management Skills of Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üzar-Özçetin, Yeter Sinem; Hiçdurmaz, Duygu

    2017-03-01

    Anger management is an important skill for nurses to prevent conflicts in the health care environment. Efforts, beginning with nursing education, are required to improve this skill and evaluate the effects. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a structured counseling program on improving the anger management skills of nursing students. The study had an experimental design with pre- and posttests. Twenty-six undergraduate nursing students who were randomly assigned to the groups participated. The authors conducted eight counseling sessions with the experiment group and no intervention with the control group. Data were collected using the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. The counseling group had higher anger control and repression scores and lower trait anger scores after the counseling, compared with the control group. This counseling improved the students' anger management skills. Therefore, such programs should be integrated into the services provided for nursing students. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(3):174-181.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. The rejection-rage contingency in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Kathy R; Downey, Geraldine; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Coifman, Karin G; Paquin, Nina Leventhal

    2011-08-01

    Though long-standing clinical observation reflected in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) suggests that the rage characteristic of borderline personality disorder (BPD) often appears in response to perceived rejection, the role of perceived rejection in triggering rage in BPD has never been empirically tested. Extending basic personality research on rejection sensitivity to a clinical sample, a priming-pronunciation experiment and a 21-day experience-sampling diary examined the contingent relationship between perceived rejection and rage in participants diagnosed with BPD compared with healthy controls. Despite the differences in these 2 assessment methods, the indices of rejection-contingent rage that they both produced were elevated in the BPD group and were strongly interrelated. They provide corroborating evidence that reactions to perceived rejection significantly explain the rage seen in BPD. © 2011 American Psychological Association

  12. A taxonomy for disease management: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Disease Management Taxonomy Writing Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Harlan M; Currie, Peter M; Riegel, Barbara; Phillips, Christopher O; Peterson, Eric D; Smith, Renee; Yancy, Clyde W; Faxon, David P

    2006-09-26

    Disease management has shown great promise as a means of reorganizing chronic care and optimizing patient outcomes. Nevertheless, disease management programs are widely heterogeneous and lack a shared definition of disease management, which limits our ability to compare and evaluate different programs. To address this problem, the American Heart Association's Disease Management Taxonomy Writing Group developed a system of classification that can be used both to categorize and compare disease management programs and to inform efforts to identify specific factors associated with effectiveness. The AHA Writing Group began with a conceptual model of disease management and its components and subsequently validated this model over a wide range of disease management programs. A systematic MEDLINE search was performed on the terms heart failure, diabetes, and depression, together with disease management, case management, and care management. The search encompassed articles published in English between 1987 and 2005. We then selected studies that incorporated (1) interventions designed to improve outcomes and/or reduce medical resource utilization in patients with heart failure, diabetes, or depression and (2) clearly defined protocols with at least 2 prespecified components traditionally associated with disease management. We analyzed the study protocols and used qualitative research methods to develop a disease management taxonomy with our conceptual model as the organizing framework. The final taxonomy includes the following 8 domains: (1) Patient population is characterized by risk status, demographic profile, and level of comorbidity. (2) Intervention recipient describes the primary targets of disease management intervention and includes patients and caregivers, physicians and allied healthcare providers, and healthcare delivery systems. (3) Intervention content delineates individual components, such as patient education, medication management, peer support, or some

  13. PERANCANGAN PROTOTYPE APLIKASI KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PADA DIVISI MANAGEMENT AUTOMATION INFORMATION UNTUK MENDUKUNG ORACLE FINANCIAL PADA ORANG TUA GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Gema

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this project is to design a knowledge management application as a media to document knowledge and facility that supported a knowledge sharing culture in Oracle Financial subdivision in Orang Tua Group. The researcher uses 7 first steps method which defined by Tiwana in doing knowledge management application prototype. The knowledge management prototype application modules consist of Wiki page, document library, discussion board, blog, picture library, knowledge base, help desk, frequently asked questions, and surveys. In using knowledge in knowledge base, user will get knowledge through business process, how to use the application, or how to finish some cases. Knowledge management prototype application design as a whole could fulfill user’s needs in sharing knowledge, but still needs continuous improvement for maximal usage.Keywords: prototype design, knowledge management application, knowledge

  14. A Framework for Group Key Management Protocol Assessment Independent of View Synchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Manz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: As group key management extended into the area of large dynamic networks, complex issues emerged involving the many operations that run over several network topologies. The issues that occurred due to multiple topologies were also compounded by differing views of the network, taken at different time slices or positions within the network. This was especially complex when figuring in mobile, ad-hoc networks. View synchrony is the current operational technique, or assumption, applied to group key exchange protocols. However, before this analysis view synchrony was just that, an assumption and the literature for group key exchange lacked an inquiry into what could happen when view synchrony was removed. Current group key management protocols rely on view synchrony and yet all protocols vary in requisite operational descriptions and performance measures. In this study, a framework for group key management protocol operations and performance measures was defined and examined how that framework could be used to compare and contrast existing protocols with and, more importantly, without view synchrony. Approach: Current literature lacked categories by which to quantify the performance metric of the protocols. This study first defined the dynamic key operations that all protocols share. By these definitions, group key management protocols were directly compared. Once definitions existed, this study assembled a list of costs that every protocol requires to establish and share keys across the dynamic group. These results provided an understanding of view synchrony's role and whether or not it should be solely relied on in these current protocols. Results: The prior conclusion that view synchrony was an integral part of all group key management protocols was shattered, when seen through the lens of communication costs and assumptions in wireless ad-hoc networks. View synchrony, as an assumed part of all group key management was

  15. [Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Disease Contingency Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Disease Contingency Plan for Ottawa NWR provides background information on disease surveillance; an inventory of Refuge personnel, equipment, and resources; and...

  16. Energy Emergency Contingency Plan: Clarence Cannon NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Energy Emergency Contingency Plan for Clarence Cannon NWR outlines energy requirements for the Refuge and tables of projected energy reduction, energy...

  17. Contingency Contractor Optimization Phase 3 Sustainment Platform Requirements - Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, Justin David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Frazier, Christopher Rawls [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bandlow, Alisa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gearhart, Jared Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Katherine A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is in Phase 3 Sustainment of development of a prototype tool, currently referred to as the Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype (CCOTP), under the direction of OSD Program Support. CCOT-P is intended to help provide senior Department of Defense (DoD) leaders with comprehensive insight into the global availability, readiness and capabilities of the Total Force Mix. The CCOT-P will allow senior decision makers to quickly and accurately assess the impacts, risks and mitigating strategies for proposed changes to force/capabilities assignments, apportionments and allocations options, focusing specifically on contingency contractor planning. During Phase 2 of the program, conducted during fiscal year 2012, Sandia developed an electronic storyboard prototype of the Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool that can be used for communication with senior decision makers and other Operational Contract Support (OCS) stakeholders. Phase 3 used feedback from demonstrations of the electronic storyboard prototype to develop an engineering prototype for planners to evaluate. Sandia worked with the DoD and Joint Chiefs of Staff strategic planning community to get feedback and input to ensure that the engineering prototype was developed to closely align with future planning needs. The intended deployment environment was also a key consideration as this prototype was developed. Initial release of the engineering prototype was done on servers at Sandia in the middle of Phase 3. In 2013, the tool was installed on a production pilot server managed by the OUSD(AT&L) eBusiness Center. The purpose of this document is to specify the CCOT-P engineering prototype platform requirements as of May 2016. Sandia developed the CCOT-P engineering prototype using common technologies to minimize the likelihood of deployment issues. CCOT-P engineering prototype was architected and designed to be as independent as possible of the major deployment

  18. Group excellence: a model for the application of Japanese management to mental health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, S

    1986-01-01

    Mental health centers and other government sponsored service organizations need highly effective management techniques. In this era of tightening budgets, the Japanese Management System may be a way of increasing both excellence and employee satisfaction. Managers who choose to explore this system may need a concise, written model as a guide to the ingenious, extensive, and paradoxical Japanese Management System. The System centers around quality control circles--autonomous problem-solving groups that strive for excellence. Composed of hierarchically interlocking groups, it uses a wide selection of group cohesion techniques to inspire esprit de corps, and an interlocking set of rewards governs behavior at every level. Decision making is collective (although supervisors retain veto power), and execution of ideas, once agreed upon, is quick and consistent. The System operates holistically, enthusiastically, with a high degree of excellence and mutual concern.

  19. We Scrum Every Day: Using Scrum Project Management Framework for Group Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope-Ruark, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative group projects have documented learning benefits, yet collaboration is challenging for students because the educational system values individual achievement. This article explores Scrum, an approach to framing, planning, and managing group projects used in Web-software development. Designed for multi-faceted projects, this approach…

  20. Primary Children's Management of Themselves and Others in Collaborative Group Work: "Sometimes It Takes Patience…"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershner, Ruth; Warwick, Paul; Mercer, Neil; Kleine Staarman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    We focus on children's approaches to managing group work in classrooms where collaborative learning principles are explicit. Small groups of 8-10 year olds worked on collaborative science activities using an interactive whiteboard. Insubsequent interviews, they spoke of learning to "be patient" and "wait", for multiple social…

  1. The Effects of Virtual Communities on Group Identity in Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tu-Kuang; Lin, Yu-Tzeng

    2016-01-01

    Group identity is a critical component in developing effective classroom management. While there have been numerous studies on group identity, they have primarily focused on its effects on the physical classroom entity. Advances in information technology, however, have enabled the creation of virtual communities, which have become a vital channel…

  2. Characteristics of Interactional Management Functions in Group Oral by Japanese Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Junko

    2010-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate the characteristics of interaction dynamics in a group oral interaction carried out by Japanese learners of English. The relationship between the participants' language development and interactional management functions (IMFs) was also explored. Oral performance tests in a paired or a small group have recently…

  3. We Scrum Every Day: Using Scrum Project Management Framework for Group Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope-Ruark, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative group projects have documented learning benefits, yet collaboration is challenging for students because the educational system values individual achievement. This article explores Scrum, an approach to framing, planning, and managing group projects used in Web-software development. Designed for multi-faceted projects, this approach…

  4. 75 FR 20381 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation... technical work group (TWG), a monitoring and research center, and independent review panels. The AMWG makes.... (PDT) to ensure that the connections work properly. The one hour test Web site is:...

  5. The Effects of Virtual Communities on Group Identity in Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tu-Kuang; Lin, Yu-Tzeng

    2016-01-01

    Group identity is a critical component in developing effective classroom management. While there have been numerous studies on group identity, they have primarily focused on its effects on the physical classroom entity. Advances in information technology, however, have enabled the creation of virtual communities, which have become a vital channel…

  6. Developing a took for project contingency estimation in a large portfolio of construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Niekerk, Mariette

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To enable the management of project-related risk on a portfolio level in an owner organisation, project contingency estimation should be performed consistently and objectively. This article discusses the development of a contingency estimation tool for a large portfolio that contains similar construction projects. The purpose of developing this tool is to decrease the influence of subjectivity on contingency estimation methods throughout the project life cycle, thereby enabling consistent reflection on project risk at the portfolio level. Our research contribution is the delivery of a hybrid tool that incorporates both neural network modelling of systemic risks and expected value analysis of project-specific risks. The neural network is trained using historical project data, supported by data obtained from interviews with project managers. Expected value analysis is achieved in a risk register format employing a binomial distribution to estimate the number of risks expected. By following this approach, the contingency estimation tool can be used without expert knowledge of project risk management. In addition, this approach can provide contingency cost and duration output on a project level, and it contains both systemic and project-specific risks in a single tool.

  7. Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency.

    OpenAIRE

    Sidman, M

    2000-01-01

    Where do equivalence relations come from? One possible answer is that they arise directly from the reinforcement contingency. That is to say, a reinforcement contingency produces two types of outcome: (a) 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, or n-term units of analysis that are known, respectively, as operant reinforcement, simple discrimination, conditional discrimination, second-order conditional discrimination, and so on; and (b) equivalence relations that consist of ordered pairs of all positive elements that...

  8. The Contingent Value of Organizational Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virpi Turkulainen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We elaborate the link between organizational design and effectiveness by examining organizational integration and performance in the context of modern manufacturing. Through careful contextualization and empirical analysis of 266 manufacturing organizations in three industries and nine countries, we uncover a joint effect of integration and complexity on organizational effectiveness. The results extend structural contingency theory, in particular the mechanisms that link organizational integration to organizational effectiveness. We conclude by discussing the continuing relevance of structural contingency theory.

  9. Variation in managing asthma: experience at the medical group level in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta, A P; Liu, X; Zaher, C A; Jatulis, D E

    2000-04-01

    To explore the degree of variation in the quality of asthma management among physician groups participating in a managed care network. Cross-sectional observation. The study population consisted of patients with moderate or severe asthma identified through a pharmacy database from a managed care plan in 1996. The patients were surveyed to obtain their assessments of asthma care, including components on quality of care, quality of service, and outcomes of care. We selected 47 physician groups that provided services for at least 35 asthma patients who responded to the survey. Variations in the outcome variables across physician groups were described by quartile, range, and histogram. Compliance with national guidelines varied among physician groups but was generally low. Physician group rates for patient use of steroid inhalers ranged from 10.7% to 45.5% and daily peak flow meter use ranged from 0% to 13.1%. Satisfaction ratings were higher, with overall satisfaction with the quality of asthma care ranging from 74.6% to 94.3%. Outcomes also showed considerable variation among groups. One-month absenteeism rates ranged from 32% to 61%, and 65.7% to 94.3% of respondents did not have an emergency room visit in the past year. The quality of asthma care and service varied significantly across physician groups. Such reports for different physician groups make evidence-based outcomes information directly available to patients and physician groups, help patients make informed healthcare decisions, and stimulate quality improvement efforts by physician groups.

  10. Strategy as Mutually Contingent Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Martin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Schelling’s The Strategy of Conflict carries significant behavioral implications which have been overlooked by economic readers. I argue that these implications are central to Schelling’s vision of game theory, that they fit well with recent advances in experimental psychology and behavioral economics, and provide a comprehensive framework that can inform research on strategy. In my view, Schelling develops a non-mathematical approach to strategy which anticipates on Gigerenzer and Selten’s “ecological rationality” program. This approach maps the processes involved in strategic reasoning and highlights their reliance on the particular information structure of interactive social environments. Building on this approach, I model strategy as a heuristic form of reasoning that governs the way in which individuals search for and provide cues in situations of mutually contingent choice. I conclude by examining how the reference to ecological rationality can help clarify Schelling’s contribution to game theory and outline potential avenues of research into strategic reasoning and interaction.

  11. User and group storage management the CMS CERN T2 centre

    CERN Document Server

    Cerminara, G; Pfeiffer, A

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of detector commissioning, calibration and data analysis tasks is carried out by CMS using dedicated storage resources available at the CMS CERN Tier-2 centre. Relying on the functionalities of the EOS disk-only storage technology, the optimal exploitation of the CMS user/group resources has required the introduction of policies for data access management, data protection, cleanup campaigns based on access pattern, and long term tape archival. The resource management has been organised around the definition of working groups and the delegation to an identified responsible of each group composition. In this paper we illustrate the user/group storage management, and the development and operational experience at the CMS CERN Tier-2 centre in the 2012-2015 period.

  12. Web-based management of research groups - using the right tools and an adequate integration strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira; Menezes, Mario Olimpio de, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b, E-mail: mario@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Grupo de Pesquisa em Gestao do Conhecimento Aplicada a Area Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays broad interest in a couple of inter linked subject areas can make the configuration of a research group to be much diversified both in terms of its components and of the binding relationships that glues the group together. That is the case of the research group for knowledge management and its applications to nuclear technology - KMANT at IPEN, a living entity born 7 years ago and that has sustainably attracted new collaborators. This paper describes the strategic planning of the group, its charter and credo, the present components of the group and the diversified nature of their relations with the group and with IPEN. Then the technical competencies and currently research lines (or programs) are described as well as the research projects, and the management scheme of the group. In the sequence the web-based management and collaboration tools are described as well our experience with their use. KMANT have experiment with over 20 systems and software in this area, but we will focus on those aimed at: (a) web-based project management (RedMine, ClockinIT, Who does, PhProjekt and Dotproject); (b) teaching platform (Moodle); (c) mapping and knowledge representation tools (Cmap, Freemind and VUE); (d) Simulation tools (Matlab, Vensim and NetLogo); (e) social network analysis tools (ORA, MultiNet and UciNet); (f) statistical analysis and modeling tools (R and SmartPLS). Special emphasis is given to the coupling of the group permanent activities like graduate courses and regular seminars and how newcomers are selected and trained to be able to enroll the group. A global assessment of the role the management strategy and available tool set for the group performance is presented. (author)

  13. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a contingency management intervention compared to treatment as usual for reduction of cannabis use and of relapse in early psychosis (CIRCLE): a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonia; Sheridan Rains, Luke; Marwaha, Steven; Strang, John; Craig, Thomas; Weaver, Tim; McCrone, Paul; King, Michael; Fowler, David; Pilling, Stephen; Marston, Louise; Omar, Rumana Z; Craig, Meghan; Hinton, Mark

    2016-10-22

    Around 35-45 % of people in contact with services for a first episode of psychosis are using cannabis. Cannabis use is associated with delays in remission, poorer clinical outcomes, significant increases in the risk of relapse, and lower engagement in work or education. While there is a clear need for effective interventions, so far only very limited benefits have been achieved from psychological interventions. Contingency management (CM) is a behavioural intervention in which specified desired behavioural change is reinforced through financial rewards. CM is now recognised to have a substantial evidence base in some contexts and its adoption in the UK is advocated by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance as a treatment for substance or alcohol misuse. However, there is currently little published data testing its effectiveness for reducing cannabis use in early psychosis. CIRCLE is a two-arm, rater-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT) investigating the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a CM intervention for reducing cannabis use among young people receiving treatment from UK Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) services. EIP service users (n = 544) with a recent history of cannabis use will be recruited. The experimental group will receive 12 once-weekly CM sessions, and a voucher reward if urinalysis shows that they have not used cannabis in the previous week. Both the experimental and the control groups will be offered an Optimised Treatment as Usual (OTAU) psychoeducational package targeting cannabis use. Assessment interviews will be performed at consent, at 3 months, and at 18 months. The primary outcome is time to relapse, defined as admission to an acute mental health service. Secondary outcomes include proportion of cannabis-free urine samples during the intervention period, severity of positive psychotic symptoms, quality-adjusted life years, and engagement in work or education. CIRCLE is a RCT of CM for

  14. Relationships between Budgetary Participation and Organizational Commitment: Mediated by Reinforcement Contingency Evidence from the Service Sector Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Selvina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship, mediated through reinforcement contingency, between (a participation in budgeting, and (b organizational commitment, of those organizations in  the service industry, listed in the Indonesian Stock Exchange and also having their branch offices in Bandar Lampung.  We develop a new construct of  reinforcement contingency, through focus group discussion and several pilot studies, and use it in the main survey. We analyse data from 42 respondents, using SmartPLS. We find that reinforcement contingency as the mediation variable affects the relation between participation in budgeting andn organizational commitment. This study suggests the “no reward and no punishment” system as the appropriate  reinforcement contingency for employees, in order  to enhance their commitment to their organization.Keywords: Participation in Budgeting, Reinforcement Contingency, Organizational Commitment, Service Sector

  15. School Empowerment through Self-Managing Teams: Leader Behavior in Developing Self-Managing Work Groups in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Paula M.

    In searching for avenues to create a collaborative school environment in which autonomous teachers impact the outcomes of schooling and students become independent learners, there is increasing interest in "self-managing work groups." This paper presents findings of a study that examined the role of the principal in the development of…

  16. Performance management when innovation and learning become critical performance indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, E.; Timmerman, H.

    2003-01-01

    If the organization's leading performance indicators shift towards innovation and the creation of knowledge, this will result in more non-routine work and a higher level of interdependency among workers. We argue that a contingent performance management (PM) system has to focus on Learning and group

  17. Performance management when innovation and learning become critical performance indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, E.; Timmerman, H.

    2003-01-01

    If the organization's leading performance indicators shift towards innovation and the creation of knowledge, this will result in more non-routine work and a higher level of interdependency among workers. We argue that a contingent performance management (PM) system has to focus on Learning and group

  18. The Effect of Management Style on Encouraging Creativity in a Work Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Bižal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: Whether and how the manager with his management style affects the creativity of employees in departmentproduction preparation?Purpose: The purpose is to examine the management style through the eyes of managers and employees. In addition, the purpose was todiscover the optimal management style to be used by the manager tomaintain maximum creative employees in a work group.Method: The method used was to review existing literature and quantitative analysis of a closed - type questionnaire. Data analysiswas performed by using the average value, dependent ANOVA test andPearson correlation coefficient.Results: The results of the study provided a deeper insight into themanagement of the studied work group. Managers and most of the workers assessed management style as a dense (unified, but other tendencies were also visible. Employees estimated that in the workplace creativity is promoted with dense (unified management style, and partly contributes to the goal achievement with an ambitious management style.Organization: The organization will analyse the results and, if necessary, introduce improvements to procedures to improve overallbusiness excellence.Society: Study was conducted in one of the fastest growing companiesin the Dolenjska - Posavje region in which they are aware of theresponsibilities and role model to other businesses in the region,which is reflected in the constant care for employees withappropriate conditions for work and education, decent wages andbonuses. This is all cared for by responsible and capable management.Originality: This is the first research study of this type in the company studied.Limitations/Future Research: This study was conducted only in the production preparation department, but such an analysis should be implemented within other departments.

  19. [The activities of hospitals of Narkomat of public health system for special contingent during the Great Patriotic War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svintsova, M N

    2015-01-01

    The period of the Great Patriotic War from autumn 1942 to summer 1945 is marked by process of becoming ofsystem of hospitals for special contingent. The special hospitals were marked out in common system of medical care in war time by specificity of its treatment activities, every day and technical commodities and schemes of management and provision. The organization of treatment of prisoners of war encountered difficulties in transportation and diagnostic of diseases, health conditions of arrived contingent, provision with medical documentation and specificity of psychological aspects of work of military medical personnel in hospitals for special contingent.

  20. Nominal Group Technique and its Applications in Managing Quality in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafikul Islam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality management is an important aspect in all kinds of businesses – manufacturing or service. Idea generation plays a pivotal role in managing quality in organizations. It is thenew and innovative ideas which can help corporations to survive in the turbulent business environment. Research in group dynamics has shown that more ideas are generated by individuals working alone but in a group environment than the individuals engaged in a formal group discussion. In Nominal Group Technique (NGT, individuals work alone but in a group setting. This paper shows how NGT can be applied to generate large number of ideas to solve quality related problems specifically in Malaysian higher education setting. The paper also discusses the details of NGT working procedure andexplores the areas of its further applications.

  1. Optimal self-esteem is contingent: Intrinsic versus extrinsic and upward versus downward contingencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, R.; Smit, H.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    We argue that noncontingent, unconditional self-esteem is not optimal but defensive. We introduce the concept of intrinsic contingency, where self-esteem is affected by whether one's actions are self-congruent and conducive to personal growth. Whereas external contingencies, especially social and ap

  2. Classical conditioning of autonomic fear responses is independent of contingency awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Douglas H; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2010-10-01

    The role of contingency awareness in classical conditioning experiments using human subjects is currently under debate. This study took a novel approach to manipulating contingency awareness in a differential Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. Complex sine wave gratings were used as visual conditional stimuli (CS). By manipulating the fundamental spatial frequency of the displays, we were able to construct pairs of stimuli that varied in discriminability. One group of subjects was given an "easy" discrimination, and another was exposed to a "difficult" CS+ and CS-. A 3rd group was exposed to a stimulus that was paired with the unconditional stimulus (UCS) 50% of the time and served as a control. Skin conductance response (SCR) and continuous UCS expectancy data were measured concurrently throughout the experiment. Differential UCS expectancy was found only in the easy discrimination group. Differential SCRs were found in the easy discrimination group as well as in the difficult discrimination group, but not in the 50% contingency control. The difficult discrimination group did not exhibit differential UCS expectancy but did show clear differential SCR. These observations support a dual process interpretation of classical conditioning whereby conditioning on an implicit level can occur without explicit knowledge about the contingencies. The role of contingency awareness in classical conditioning experiments using human subjects is currently under debate. This study took a novel approach to manipulating contingency awareness in a differential Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. Complex sine wave gratings were used as visual conditional stimuli (CS). By manipulating the fundamental spatial frequency of the displays, we were able to construct pairs of stimuli that varied in discriminability. One group of subjects was given an "easy" discrimination, and another was exposed to a "difficult" CS+ and CS-. A 3rd group was exposed to a stimulus that was paired with the

  3. Management of IT Costs and Performance in Business Groups: Analysis of Unaddressed Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Hamel, Florian; Herz, Thomas Philipp; Uebernickel, Falk; Brenner, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Information technology (IT) management is a multifaceted and sophisticated mission, particularly inthe context of multinational corporations. Loosely coupled heterogeneous IT systems and almostindependent IT departments within business groups around the globe do not facilitate transparency ofIT costs and performance. The management of costs and performance of IT, also known as ITcontrolling, describes the discipline of ensuring the effective and efficient usage of IT resources. Thebasis of th...

  4. Distinct changes in CREB phosphorylation in frontal cortex and striatum during contingent and non-contingent performance of a visual attention task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana eCarli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB family of transcription factors has been implicated in numerous forms of behavioural plasticity. We investigated CREB phosphorylation along some nodes of corticostriatal circuitry such as frontal cortex (FC and dorsal (caudate putamen, CPu and ventral (nucleus accumbens, NAC striatum in response to the contingent or non-contingent performance of the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT used to assess visuospatial attention. Three experimental manipulations were used; an attentional performance group (contingent, master, a group trained previously on the task but for whom the instrumental contingency coupling responding with stimulus detection and reward was abolished (non-contingent, yoked and a control group matched for food deprivation and exposure to the test apparatus (untrained. Rats trained on the 5-CSRTT (both master and yoked had higher levels of CREB protein in the FC, CPu and NAC compared to untrained controls. Despite the divergent behaviour of master and yoked rats CREB activity in the FC was not substantially different. In rats performing the 5-CSRTT (master, CREB activity was completely abolished in the CPu whereas in the NAC it remained unchanged. In contrast, CREB phosphorylation in CPu and NAC increased only when the contingency changed from goal-dependent to goal-independent reinforcement (yoked. The present results indicate that up-regulation of CREB protein expression across cortical and striatal regions possibly reflects the extensive instrumental learning and performance whereas increased CREB activity in striatal regions may signal the unexpected change in the relationship between instrumental action and reinforcement.

  5. Evaluation of anger management groups in a high-security hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Claire; Gandolfi, Stacy; Dudley, Alison; Thomas, Brian; Tapp, James; Moore, Estelle

    2013-12-01

    Anger management programmes for offenders typically aim to improve the management of emotion associated with aggressive and antisocial behaviour. Such programmes have been quite extensively evaluated in prison and probation settings, but there is less published research in forensic mental health settings. This study aimed to evaluate anger management groups in a high-security hospital. Eighty-six patients were referred for a 20-session anger management intervention. Outcomes were self-reported experiences of anger and changes in institutionally documented incidents of aggression. Incident rates were retrospectively reviewed for all group graduates, where data were available, including a comparison group of graduates who acted as their own controls. Group graduates reported sustained reductions in feelings of anger and positive changes in their use of aggression in reaction to provocation. Some reduction in incidents of physical aggression was noted when group completers were compared with non-completers. Incidents of verbal aggression were observed to increase for graduates. There was also a trend towards improvement when treated men were compared with men on the waiting list. Our findings contribute to the growing evidence for anger management groups for aggressive men, although the low-base rate of incidents, typical of such a containing and therapeutic hospital setting, rendered the analysis of behavioural outcomes difficult. Anger management sessions for male forensic psychiatric patients can be effective in reducing incidents of physical aggression in response to provocation. Evaluation of treatments for anger is particularly difficult in secure and protective settings, where the aim is to keep incidents of actual physical aggression to a minimum. Further research of this kind is needed to test the value of self-reported reduction in angry feelings as an indicator of clinically useful progress. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Contingency Contractor Optimization Phase 3 Sustainment Software Design Document - Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, Justin David; Frazier, Christopher Rawls; Bandlow, Alisa; Jones, Katherine A

    2016-05-01

    This document describes the final software design of the Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype. Its purpose is to provide the overall architecture of the software and the logic behind this architecture. Documentation for the individual classes is provided in the application Javadoc. The Contingency Contractor Optimization project is intended to address Department of Defense mandates by delivering a centralized strategic planning tool that allows senior decision makers to quickly and accurately assess the impacts, risks, and mitigation strategies associated with utilizing contract support. The Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype was developed in Phase 3 of the OSD ATL Contingency Contractor Optimization project to support strategic planning for contingency contractors. The planning tool uses a model to optimize the Total Force mix by minimizing the combined total costs for selected mission scenarios. The model optimizes the match of personnel types (military, DoD civilian, and contractors) and capabilities to meet mission requirements as effectively as possible, based on risk, cost, and other requirements.

  7. Effects of group psychotherapy on anger management following acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulafia-Brakha, Tatiana; Ptak, Radek

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effects of an anger management group programme for patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) on self-reported anger and to identify specific effects of intervention components at different time-points. Twenty-six participants with ABI were randomized, 24 started the programme and 19 completed it. A paired-randomization was held following the first baseline (T0) and a second baseline (T1) was held several weeks later. One group (n = 8) started with an 8-week anger management programme followed by a 4-week intervention focusing on the psychosocial impact of brain injury. This order was reversed in the other group (n = 11). Assessment was carried-out every 4 weeks (T1-T4) during the 12-week intervention period. The Aggression Questionnaire-12, The State-Trait Anger and Expression Inventory-2 and The Multidimensional Anger Reaction Scale. Anger levels did not significantly change between T0 and T1, but decreased significantly at T4. Adaptive anger coping strategies also increased following intervention. Inwardly expressed anger decreased following the anger management programme compared to the psychosocial adjustment programme. Group psychotherapy may improve parameters of anger management in patients with ABI. However, specific effects of different components of the anger management programme merit further investigation.

  8. Turnover and heterogeneity in top management networks - A demographic analysis of two Swedish business groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin, S. & Umans, T.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A theory based on the demography of top management teams is used to explain membership turnover in two Swedish business groups, network analysis being used to define group membership. The results suggest these business groups possess a combination of financial and industrial experience as a group resource and the socialising strategy of control as a force counteracting the conflict-producing force of heterogeneity. An organisational demographic perspective focusing on opposing forces of heterogeneity and homogeneity is developed. It is shown that the perspective can be applied both to formal organisations and to informal ones such as networks.

  9. The role of bridging organizations in environmental management: examining social networks in working groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Kowalski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The linkage of diverse sets of actors and knowledge systems across management levels and institutional boundaries often poses one of the greatest challenges in adaptive management of natural resources. Bridging organizations can facilitate interactions among actors in management settings by lowering the transaction costs of collaboration. The Center for Ocean Solutions (COS is an example of a bridging organization that is focused on linking actors within the ocean sciences and governance arena through the use of working groups. This research examines how network connections between group members affect working group functionality and, more specifically, whether cohesive network structures allow groups to more effectively achieve their goals and objectives. A mixed-methods approach, incorporating both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis methods, is employed to understand the structural characteristics of COS working groups. The study finds that cohesive network structures are not associated with increased working group functionality. Strong, centralized leadership is a better predictor of working group success in achieving goals and objectives.

  10. The best laid plans: community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) group capacity and planning success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountjoy, Natalie J; Seekamp, Erin; Davenport, Mae A; Whiles, Matt R

    2013-12-01

    As community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) increases in popularity, the question of the capacity of such groups to successfully manage natural resources becomes increasingly relevant. However, few studies have quantifiably analyzed how the amount or type of capacity in a CBNRM organization directly affects the outputs or the environmental outcomes produced. This paucity of research exists in part due to the diversity of indicators for CBNRM group capacity, as well as the ensuing debate over how to best define and measure success in CBNRM initiatives. Although concrete outputs vary widely, many efforts center on creating natural resource management plans (RMPs). The primary objective of our research was to explore the link between capacity and RMP implementation success, as perceived by practitioners among CBNRM groups across Illinois. A short online survey was constructed, utilizing findings from focus groups in combination with an extensive literature review, to measure CBNRM participants' (n = 190) perceptions of 10 key capacity indicators and RMP implementation success. Results show that capacity perceptions varied significantly among respondents in low, moderate, and high RMP implementation success groups, and that group capacity was predictive of the degree of perceived RMP implementation success. Further, our findings suggest that bonding social capital and outreach are crucial in predicting low versus moderate RMP success, while leadership, motivation, and vision best distinguish the moderately successful and highly successful groups.

  11. A new Hierarchical Group Key Management based on Clustering Scheme for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman EL-SAYED

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The migration from wired network to wireless network has been a global trend in the past few decades because they provide anytime-anywhere networking services. The wireless networks are rapidly deployed in the future, secure wireless environment will be mandatory. As well, The mobility and scalability brought by wireless network made it possible in many applications. Among all the contemporary wireless networks,Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANET is one of the most important and unique applications. MANET is a collection of autonomous nodes or terminals which communicate with each other by forming a multihop radio network and maintaining connectivity in a decentralized manner. Due to the nature of unreliable wireless medium data transfer is a major problem in MANET and it lacks security and reliability of data. The most suitable solution to provide the expected level of security to these services is the provision of a key management protocol. A Key management is vital part of security. This issue is even bigger in wireless network compared to wired network. The distribution of keys in an authenticated manner is a difficult task in MANET. When a member leaves or joins the group, it needs to generate a new key to maintain forward and backward secrecy. In this paper, we propose a new group key management schemes namely a Hierarchical, Simple, Efficient and Scalable Group Key (HSESGK based on clustering management scheme for MANETs and different other schemes are classified. Group members deduce the group key in a distributed manner.

  12. Anger Management groups for adolescents: a mixed-methods study of efficacy and treatment preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, Richard; Willner, Paul; Watts, Louise; Griffiths, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of, and adolescents' preferences for, a Cognitive Behavioural (CBT) and Personal Development (PD) Anger Management (AM) group. The CBT group aimed to help adolescents develop skills to manage predominantly reactive aggression. The PD group aimed to enhance motivation to develop less aggressive identities with less use of proactive aggression. Eighteen adolescents were randomly allocated to a 10-session CBT or PD AM Group; seven additional adolescents formed a control group. They completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires to assess anger expression and control, use of AM coping skills (also completed by carers) and self-image. Participants were also interviewed pre- and post-intervention; transcripts were subjected to Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Both treatment groups demonstrated significant improvements in anger coping and self-esteem, relative to the control group. Participants' age was significantly correlated with self-image and anger control outcomes in the CBT group. Qualitative analysis identified factors associated with improved outcomes, particularly regarding participants' age, motivation and readiness to change, engagement in the therapeutic process, group dynamics and emotional expressiveness. Our ability to interpret data clinically was enhanced by the use of a mixed quantitative-qualitative methodology. The results help us to better match interventions to clients.

  13. Managing the market. Focusing on a select group of customers can keep an organization competitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacStravic, R S

    1989-05-01

    The real challenge in healthcare marketing today is managing markets, focusing on selected groups of customers rather than on the organization or its services. Market management includes three distinct but related levels: Strategic market management assesses current and potential markets and chooses those the organization can serve best; segment management focuses on the needs and wants of subsets of chosen customers; and customer management reinforces long-term commitments to the organization. The patient care experience can be broken down into specific contacts with each staff member. The key to managing the experience is to identify and achieve standards of performance for each contact by examining what each event means to the patients and how patients judge each staff member, as well as the overall care experience. Regular feedback helps. An unavoidable risk in market management is that a given segment may decline in size, in need for services, or in cohesiveness as a segment. Yet those organizations which can identify the right segments and "manage" them effectively will have an advantage in a competitive market.

  14. Guidelines for the management of neuroendocrine tumours by the Brazilian gastrointestinal tumour group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechelmann, Rachel P; Weschenfelder, Rui F; Costa, Frederico P; Andrade, Aline Chaves; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch; Quidute, Ana Rosa P; dos Santos, Allan; Hoff, Ana Amélia O; Gumz, Brenda; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Vilhena Pereira, Bruno S; Lourenço Junior, Delmar Muniz; da Rocha Filho, Duilio Reis; Fonseca, Eduardo Antunes; Riello Mello, Eduardo Linhares; Makdissi, Fabio Ferrari; Waechter, Fabio Luiz; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Coura-Filho, George B; de Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Girotto, Gustavo Colagiovanni; Neto, João Evangelista Bezerra; Glasberg, João; Casali-da-Rocha, Jose Claudio; Rego, Juliana Florinda M; de Meirelles, Luciana Rodrigues; Hajjar, Ludhmila; Menezes, Marcos; Bronstein, Marcello D; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Barros, Milton; Forones, Nora Manoukian; do Amaral, Paulo Cezar Galvão; de Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Araujo, Raphael L C; Bezerra, Regis Otaviano França; Peixoto, Renata D’Alpino; Aguiar, Samuel; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Pfiffer, Tulio; Hoff, Paulo M; Coutinho, Anelisa K

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours are a heterogeneous group of diseases with a significant variety of diagnostic tests and treatment modalities. Guidelines were developed by North American and European groups to recommend their best management. However, local particularities and relativisms found worldwide led us to create Brazilian guidelines. Our consensus considered the best feasible strategies in an environment involving more limited resources. We believe that our recommendations may be extended to other countries with similar economic standards. PMID:28194228

  15. Benefits of groups in managing systemic arterial hypertension: perceptions of patients and physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Pereira do Amaral; Charles Dalcanale Tesser; Pedro Müller

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the nature of the benefits of using groups within primary care services to manage hypertension, from the point of view of both patients and physicians. Methods: A qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews with patients and doctors attending distinct consolidated groups, which have been purposely selected and carried out in physician-patient pairs until reaching data saturation. The interviews were subjected to thematic analysis. Results and discu...

  16. An Efficient Group Key Management Using Code for Key Calculation for Simultaneous Join/Leave: CKCS

    OpenAIRE

    Melisa Hajyvahabzadeh; Elina Eidkhani; S. Anahita Mortazavi; Alireza Nemaney Pour

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient group key management protocol, CKCS (Code for Key Calculation in Simultaneous join/leave) for simultaneous join/leave in secure multicast. This protocol is based on logical key hierarchy. In this protocol, when new members join the group simultaneously, server sends only thegroup key for those new members. Then, current members and new members calculate the necessary keys by node codes and one-way hash function. A node code is a random number which is assigned...

  17. A Nordic survey of management practices and owners' attitudes towards keeping horses in groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, E; Bøe, K E; Christensen, J W; Hyyppä, S; Jansson, H; Jørgensen, G H M; Ladewig, J; Mejdell, C M; Norling, Y; Rundgren, M; Särkijärvi, S; Søndergaard, E; Keeling, L J

    2015-09-01

    Keeping horses in groups is widely recommended but limited information is available about how this is implemented in practice. The aim of this survey was to describe how horses are kept in the Nordic countries in relation to sex, age, breed, and equestrian discipline and to assess owners' attitudes toward keeping horses in groups. Horse owners in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden were approached using a web-based questionnaire, which was translated into 4 languages and distributed online via equestrian forums, organizations, and social media. The number of respondents was 3,229, taking care of 17,248 horses. Only 8% of horses were never kept in groups, 47% were permanently grouped for 24 h/d, and 45% were stabled singly but grouped during turnout. Yearlings were most often permanently kept in groups (75%), mares and geldings more commonly during parts of the day (50 and 51%, respectively), and stallions were often kept alone (38%). Icelandic horses were more likely to be permanently kept in groups (36%) than warmbloods (16%) and ponies (15%). Twice as many competition horses (51%) were never grouped compared with horses used for breeding (20%) or leisure purposes (15%). The majority of respondents (86%) strongly agreed that group housing benefits horse welfare and that it is important for horses to have the company of conspecifics (92%). Nevertheless, not all horses were kept in groups, showing that attitudes toward group housing may not necessarily reflect current management. The risk of injury was a concern of many respondents (45%), as was introducing unfamiliar horses into already established groups (40%) and challenges in relation to feeding in groups (44%). Safety of people (23%) and difficulties handling group-kept horses (19%) were regarded as less problematic. Results suggest that the majority of horses have the possibility to freely interact with other horses, either as fulltime members of a group during 24 h/d or during turnout. Future research should

  18. Category Contingent Aftereffects for Faces of Different Races, Ages and Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Anthony C.; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Jones, Benedict C.; Waitt, Corri

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to faces biases perceptions of subsequently viewed faces such that normality judgments of similar faces are increased. Simultaneously inducing such an aftereffect in opposite directions for two groups of faces might indicate discrete responding of the neural populations coding for those groups. Here we show such "category contingent"…

  19. Contingency Contractor Optimization Phase 3 Sustainment Cost by JCA Implementation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, Justin David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Frazier, Christopher Rawls [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arguello, Bryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bandlow, Alisa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gearhart, Jared Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Katherine A [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This document provides implementation guidance for implementing personnel group FTE costs by JCA Tier 1 or 2 categories in the Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool – Engineering Prototype (CCOT-P). CCOT-P currently only allows FTE costs by personnel group to differ by mission. Changes will need to be made to the user interface inputs pages and the database

  20. A Knowledge Management Case Study: The First U.S. Navy Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG-3) to Implement Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Air meeting, the staff worked on flight operations for a certain day and, in the combat meeting, the staff scheduled a guri shoot for the same day...planning a gun shoot the same day flight operations were scheduled, which resulted in the lead for each group having to work out the conflicting schedules...Traditions, (Sage Publications, 1998,61. 6 Meridith Levinson, "ABC: An Introduction to Knowledge Management (KM), cra , no date. 7 Jay Liebowitz

  1. A Retention Assessment Process: Utilizing Total Quality Management Principles and Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codjoe, Henry M.; Helms, Marilyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Retaining students is a critical topic in higher education. Methodologies abound to gather attrition data as well as key variables important to retention. Using the theories of total quality management and focus groups, this case study gathers and reports data from current college students. Key results, suggestions for replication, and areas for…

  2. Local land management in Benin with special reference to pastoral groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. de Haan (Leo); T. Djedjebi

    2000-01-01

    textabstractA review of local land management experiences in West Africa reveals that the resolution of conflicts over the uses of resources between herders and farmers depends on factors like land and water rights, promotion of the interests of pastoral groups and the Intervention of traditional an

  3. An Empirical Study of Hospitality Management Student Attitudes toward Group Projects: Instructional Factors and Team Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngsoo; Ro, Heejung

    2012-01-01

    The development of positive attitudes in team-based work is important in management education. This study investigates hospitality students' attitudes toward group projects by examining instructional factors and team problems. Specifically, we examine how the students' perceptions of project appropriateness, instructors' support, and evaluation…

  4. Do stakeholder groups influence environmental management system development in the Dutch agri-food sector?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmers, H.J.; Omta, S.W.F.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Haverkamp, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey that included 492 companies in the Dutch agri-food sector with respect to the influence of stakeholder groups on the companies' level of environmental management system (EMS) implementation. It is concluded that primary stakeholders (government, clients) a

  5. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  6. Use of a Wiki-Based Software to Manage Research Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Vezenov, Dmitri V.; Simboli, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses use of the wiki software Confluence to organize research group activities and lab resources. Confluence can serve as an electronic lab notebook (ELN), as well as an information management and collaboration tool. The article provides a case study in how researchers can use wiki software in "home-grown" fashion to…

  7. Coping with Workplace Stress: A Multiple-Group Comparison of Female Managers and Clerical Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bonita C.

    1998-01-01

    A causal model of workplace stress was refined and cross-validated. Multivariate analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were used to investigate the effects of social roles on patterns of coping with workplace stress and job satisfaction. Differences found between managers (n=249) and clerical workers (n=214) suggest power and…

  8. An Empirical Study of Hospitality Management Student Attitudes toward Group Projects: Instructional Factors and Team Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngsoo; Ro, Heejung

    2012-01-01

    The development of positive attitudes in team-based work is important in management education. This study investigates hospitality students' attitudes toward group projects by examining instructional factors and team problems. Specifically, we examine how the students' perceptions of project appropriateness, instructors' support, and evaluation…

  9. A Retention Assessment Process: Utilizing Total Quality Management Principles and Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codjoe, Henry M.; Helms, Marilyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Retaining students is a critical topic in higher education. Methodologies abound to gather attrition data as well as key variables important to retention. Using the theories of total quality management and focus groups, this case study gathers and reports data from current college students. Key results, suggestions for replication, and areas for…

  10. Integration of Information Management and Organizational Behavior: Lessons from Group-Based Teaching Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollalis, Yannis A.

    This paper reports on observations from teaching an undergraduate information-based organization (IBO) course and builds on past research to explain the findings in student issues, achievement motivation, and small-group effectiveness in information management teaching. The paper has three purposes: (1) to describe the development of a new course…

  11. Color and Contingency in Robert Boyle's Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tawrin

    2015-01-01

    This essay investigates the relationship between color and contingency in Robert Boyle's Experiments and Considerations Touching Colours (1664) and his essays on the unsuccessfulness of experiments in Certain Physiological Essays (1661). In these two works Boyle wrestles with a difficult practical and philosophical problem with experiments, which he calls the problem of contingency. In Touching Colours, the problem of contingency is magnified by the much-debated issue of whether color had any deep epistemic importance. His limited theoretical principle guiding him in Touching Colours, that color is but modified light, further exacerbated the problem. Rather than theory, Boyle often relied on craftsmen, whose mastery of color phenomena was, Boyle mentions, brought about by economic forces, to determine when colors were indicators of important 'inward' properties of substances, and thus to secure a solid foundation for his experimental history of color.

  12. Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, M

    2000-07-01

    Where do equivalence relations come from? One possible answer is that they arise directly from the reinforcement contingency. That is to say, a reinforcement contingency produces two types of outcome: (a) 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, or n-term units of analysis that are known, respectively, as operant reinforcement, simple discrimination, conditional discrimination, second-order conditional discrimination, and so on; and (b) equivalence relations that consist of ordered pairs of all positive elements that participate in the contingency. This conception of the origin of equivalence relations leads to a number of new and verifiable ways of conceptualizing equivalence relations and, more generally, the stimulus control of operant behavior. The theory is also capable of experimental disproof.

  13. Defense Infrastructure: Actions Needed to Enhance Oversight of Construction Projects Supporting Military Contingency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Government,9 which states among other things that management should establish an organizational structure, assign responsibility, and delegate...O&M funds under the Contingency Construction Authority. The information may also enable DOD to determine whether existing departmental processes...construction needs; and revise existing departmental processes or seek additional authorities, as appropriate. • To help ensure that DOD limits demands

  14. Productive work groups in complex hospital units. Proposed contributions of the nurse executive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheafor, M

    1991-05-01

    The Fiedler and Garcia cognitive resources contingency model of leadership offers a new approach for nurse executives to influence the productivity of work groups led by nurse managers. The author offers recommendations toward achieving the relatively stress-free environment for nurse managers specified by the model using Schmeiding's application of Orlando's communication theory to nursing administration. Suggestions for incorporating these insights into graduate education for nursing administration follow.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Enterprise Knowledge Management based on Multiple Attribute Group Decision Making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-chi; GUO Hong-wei

    2009-01-01

    Given that the classical performance evaluation models can not deal with the group decision making problems since they simply average the index, we propose an enterprise knowledge management evaluation model based on multiple attribute group decision making (MAGDM). Find the differences between Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA) and meth- ods for uncertain decision making. Also, analyze the multiple attribute group decision making process and implement the al. gorithm. Finally, apply the method on performance evaluation of four enterprises and make sensitivity analysis towards the evaluation results.

  16. Estimating state-contingent production functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Svend; Karantininis, Kostas

    The paper reviews the empirical problem of estimating state-contingent production functions. The major problem is that states of nature may not be registered and/or that the number of observation per state is low. Monte Carlo simulation is used to generate an artificial, uncertain production...... environment based on Cobb Douglas production functions with state-contingent parameters. The pa-rameters are subsequently estimated based on different sizes of samples using Generalized Least Squares and Generalized Maximum Entropy and the results are compared. It is concluded that Maximum Entropy may...

  17. A contingency table approach to nonparametric testing

    CERN Document Server

    Rayner, JCW

    2000-01-01

    Most texts on nonparametric techniques concentrate on location and linear-linear (correlation) tests, with less emphasis on dispersion effects and linear-quadratic tests. Tests for higher moment effects are virtually ignored. Using a fresh approach, A Contingency Table Approach to Nonparametric Testing unifies and extends the popular, standard tests by linking them to tests based on models for data that can be presented in contingency tables.This approach unifies popular nonparametric statistical inference and makes the traditional, most commonly performed nonparametric analyses much more comp

  18. Contingency Base Camp Solid Waste Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    wastes gener- ated at Army base camps. The data in this report were obtained from solid waste characterization surveys of base camps in Bosnia, Kosovo ...ER D C/ CE RL T R- 13 -1 7 Contingency Base Camp Solid Waste Generation Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es ea rc h La bo ra to...Contingency Base Camp Solid Waste Generation Stephen D. Cosper, H. Garth Anderson, Kurt Kinnevan, and Byung J. Kim Construction Engineering Research

  19. Conflict Management in Student Groups - a Teacher’s Perspective in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Borg

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Students working in groups is a commonly used method of instruction in higher education, popularized by the introduction of problem based learning. As a result, management of small groups of people has become an important skill for teachers. The objective of our study is to investigate why conflicts arise in student groups at the Faculty of Engineering at Lund University and how teachers manage them. We have conducted an exploratory interdepartmental interview study on teachers' views on this matter, interviewing ten university teachers with different levels of seniority. Our results show that conflicts frequently arise in group work, most commonly caused by different levels of ambition among students. We also found that teachers prefer to work proactively against conflicts and stress the student’s responsibility. Finally, we show that teachers at our faculty tend to avoid the more drastic conflict resolution strategies suggested by previous research. The outcome of our study could be used as input to future guidelines on conflict management in student groups.

  20. Hypertension management initiative prospective cohort study: comparison between immediate and delayed intervention groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobe, S W; Moy Lum-Kwong, M; Von Sychowski, S; Kandukur, K; Kiss, A; Flintoft, V

    2014-01-01

    The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario's Hypertension Management Initiative (HMI) was a pragmatic implementation of clinical practice guidelines for hypertension management in primary care clinics. The HMI was a prospective delayed phase cohort study of 11 sites enrolling patients in two blocks starting 9 months apart in 2007. The intervention was an evidence-informed chronic disease management program consisting of an interprofessional educational intervention with practice tools to implement the Canadian Hypertension Education Program's clinical practice guidelines. This study compares the change in blood pressure (BP) from baseline to 9 months after the intervention between groups. In the immediate intervention group, the mean BP at baseline was 134.6/79.1 mm Hg (18.2/11.5) and in the delayed intervention group 134.2/77.1 mm Hg (18.9/11.8). The fall in BP in the immediate intervention group from baseline to 9 months after the intervention was 7.3/3.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.9-8.7/2.6-4.5) and in the delayed group 8.1/3.3 mm Hg (95% CI: 7.0-9.3/2.5-4.1) (all Phypertension can rapidly lead to lower BP levels.

  1. Experience-dependent changes in human brain activation during contingency learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlund, M W; Ortu, D

    2010-01-13

    Successful adaption requires learning to respond appropriately to cues associated with response-reinforcer contingencies. In this investigation, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize changes in frontal and limbic activation associated with learning under a positive reinforcement contingency. Imaging analyses identified linear and nonlinear changes in brain activation across nine reinforcement trials when response accuracy and reaction times were stable. The development of contingency control was generally associated with linear increases or inverted-U shaped changes in activation in superior, medial and orbitofrontal (OFC) regions, amygdala, insula and the medial temporal lobe. Linear decreases and U-shaped changes in activation were generally observed in parietal, occipital and cerebellar regions. Results highlighting linear increases in activation in superior, medial and OFC regions suggest involvement in the development of contingency control, even when behavior is stable. Results also highlighted a positive correlation between changes in OFC activation and amygdala activation. However, inspection of the correspondence between group changes and individual subject changes in OFC, amygdala and insula activation revealed that approximately half of subjects exhibited changes resembling group changes and the strength of the OFC-amygdala relationship varied markedly between subjects. Such disparities highlight a unique opportunity for exploring individual differences in regional sensitivity to contingency as well as improving experimental preparations to better highlight and control the effects of extraneous variables.

  2. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Energy Emergency Contingency Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Energy Emergency Contingency Plan for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge. The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Energy Emergency Contingency Plan outlines...

  3. Managing a work-life balance: the experiences of midwives working in a group practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereday, Jennifer; Oster, Candice

    2010-06-01

    To explore how a group of midwives achieved a work-life balance working within a caseload model of care with flexible work hours and on-call work. in-depth interviews were conducted and the data were analysed using a data-driven thematic analysis technique. Children, Youth and Women's Health Service (CYWHS) (previously Women's and Children's Hospital), Adelaide, where a midwifery service known as Midwifery Group Practice (MGP) offers a caseload model of care to women within a midwife-managed unit. 17 midwives who were currently working, or had previously worked, in MGP. analysis of the midwives' individual experiences provided insight into how midwives managed the flexible hours and on-call work to achieve a sustainable work-life balance within a caseload model of care. it is important for midwives working in MGP to actively manage the flexibility of their role with time on call. Organisational, team and individual structure influenced how flexibility of hours was managed; however, a period of adjustment was required to achieve this balance. the study findings offer a description of effective, sustainable strategies to manage flexible hours and on-call work that may assist other midwives working in a similar role or considering this type of work setting. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cognitive Behavioral Anger Management for Man Transexuals in Prison a Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Görgülü

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Transsexuals who have been rejected because of their sexual orientations or exposed to sarcastic jokes or comments live a great deal of psychological and social problems such as anger and aggression. The feeling of stress comes from their being in a prison make these problems forcer they are living through. These stress elements cause transsexual individuals to have negative psychological consequences like crime behaviours. In the light of mentioned information, the aim of this group work is to provide anger management to those transsexuals who are in prison, help them to gain positive feelings and behaviours and minimise their maladaptive behaviours. In line with this purpose, an Anger Management Program focused on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT which was developed by General Directorate of Prisons in Ministry of Justice within the scope of modernization of justice and the project of prison reform have been applied on this study. The group work was carried out with three male transsexual prisoners who were in Ankara Penal Institution Campus between the dates 31.10.2011 and 31.12.2011. In this article it is submits about administer of Anger Management Programme, group process and assessments.  As a result of the group work, it was observed that Anger Management Programme was an useful one, the anger of transsexual individuals and the core beliefs which used to be reasons of their anger changed in a positive way and they have started to show positive behaviour changes. Key Words: transsexual; anger management; cognitive behavioural therapy; closed prison

  5. Decentralized architecture for resource management of group-based distributed systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong ZHANG; Koji ZETTSU; Yutaka KIDAWARA; Yasushi KIYOKI

    2008-01-01

    As the development of hardware and software,large scale,flexible,distributed,secure and coordinated resource sharing has attracted much attention.One of the major challenges is to support distributed group-based resource management,e.g.interest-based organization,with resources/services classifiable.Although there have been some proposals to-address this challenge,they share the same weakness of using either severs or super peers to keep global knowledge,and win good search efficiency at the expenses of the system scalability.As a result,such designs can not keep both the search efficiency and system scalability.To that end,this paper proposes a group-based distributed architecture.It organizes the nodes inside the groups by Chord protocol,a classical Peer-to-Peer (P2P) technology and it defines new communication protocol for nodes among different groups but removes servers/super peers for group management.Such a design keeps the resource classifiable property together with good system performance.The main characteristics of this architecture are highlighted by its convenience for group activity analysis,promising scalability,high search efficiency,as well as robustness.The experimental performance results presented in the paper demonstrate the efficiency of the design.

  6. A least square support vector machine-based approach for contingency classification and ranking in a large power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Pratap Soni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an effective supervised learning approach for static security assessment of a large power system. Supervised learning approach employs least square support vector machine (LS-SVM to rank the contingencies and predict the system severity level. The severity of the contingency is measured by two scalar performance indices (PIs: line MVA performance index (PIMVA and Voltage-reactive power performance index (PIVQ. SVM works in two steps. Step I is the estimation of both standard indices (PIMVA and PIVQ that is carried out under different operating scenarios and Step II contingency ranking is carried out based on the values of PIs. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is demonstrated on IEEE 39-bus (New England system. The approach can be beneficial tool which is less time consuming and accurate security assessment and contingency analysis at energy management center.

  7. Managing the unmanageable: the nature and impact of drug risk in physician groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Helene Levens; Agnew, Jonathan D; Stebbins, Marilyn R; Kuo, Angela; Dudley, R Adams

    2005-08-01

    As drug costs rose in the 1990s, health maintenance organizations (HMOs) began transferring risk for prescription drug expenditures to physician groups. With principal-agent theory as a framework for understanding drug-risk transfer, we used a multiple case-study design to examine the relationship between the level of drug risk that a physician group accepts and the physician group's adoption of drug-use management strategies. The data demonstrated that adoption of drug-use management innovations was not related to level of risk for pharmacy costs and that factors other than drug-risk level (e.g., contracting and data issues, financial and market factors, and physician group assessments of the fairness and incentives of risk contracts) can influence the principal-agent relationship. The data also revealed a novel form of information asymmetry between physicians and HMOs and unexpected failures of HMOs to fully enable their physician-agents. We believe these observations reflect the complexity of relationships in the health care system and have implications for the use of incentives. Based on principal-agent theory and our findings, we offer an alternative approach to drug-risk contracting that reduces physicians responsibility for aspects of drug use that are beyond their control while maintaining the incentives to manage drug costs and use that were the original intent of drug-risk contracting.

  8. Management of Overweight during Childhood: A Focus Group Study on Health Professionals’ Experiences in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lone Marie Larsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Because of the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in childhood in the Western world, focus on the management in general practice has also increased. Objective. To explore the experiences of general practitioners (GPs and practice nurses participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT comparing two management programmes in general practice for children who are overweight or obese. Methods. Three focus groups with GPs and nurses participating in the RCT. Transcribed data were analysed using systematic text condensation followed by thematic analysis. Results. Health professionals considered it their responsibility to offer a management programme to overweight children. They recognised that management of overweight during childhood was a complex task that required an evidence-based strategy with the possibility of supervision. Health professionals experienced a barrier to addressing overweight in children. However, increasing awareness of obesity in childhood and its consequences in society was considered helpful to reach an understanding of the articulations concerning how best to address the issue. Conclusions. Health professionals in general practice recognised that they have a special obligation, capacity, and role in the management of obesity in childhood. Implementation of future management programmes must address existing barriers beyond an evidence-based standardised strategy.

  9. Contingency Contractor Optimization Phase 3 Sustainment Third-Party Software List - Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, Justin David; Frazier, Christopher Rawls; Bandlow, Alisa

    2016-05-01

    The Contingency Contractor Optimization Tool - Prototype (CCOT-P) requires several third-party software packages. These are documented below for each of the CCOT-P elements: client, web server, database server, solver, web application and polling application.

  10. The Contingent Valuation Method in Public Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hye-Kyung

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to present a new model measuring the economic value of public libraries, combining the dissonance minimizing (DM) and information bias minimizing (IBM) format in the contingent valuation (CV) surveys. The possible biases which are tied to the conventional CV surveys are reviewed. An empirical study is presented to compare the model…

  11. Modeling and simulation of cascading contingencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    This dissertation proposes a new approach to model and study cascading contingencies in large power systems. The most important contribution of the work involves the development and validation of a heuristic analytic model to assess the likelihood of cascading contingencies, and the development and validation of a uniform search strategy. We model the probability of cascading contingencies as a function of power flow and power flow changes. Utilizing logistic regression, the proposed model is calibrated using real industry data. This dissertation analyzes random search strategies for Monte Carlo simulations and proposes a new uniform search strategy based on the Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm. The proposed search strategy is capable of selecting the most significant cascading contingencies, and it is capable of constructing an unbiased estimator to provide a measure of system security. This dissertation makes it possible to reasonably quantify system security and justify security operations when economic concerns conflict with reliability concerns in the new competitive power market environment. It can also provide guidance to system operators about actions that may be taken to reduce the risk of major system blackouts. Various applications can be developed to take advantage of the quantitative security measures provided in this dissertation.

  12. The dependency and contingency of politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafillou, Peter

    2016-01-01

    differences which make any analytical synthesis both a difficult and a questionable endeavour. In particular, whereas historical institutionalism seeks to explain the present in terms of its dependence on past events, genealogy seeks to provoke the present by demonstrating its historical contingency. In spite...

  13. If -Then Contingencies in Children's Sibling Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Michal; Ross, Hildy S.

    2005-01-01

    Two-step (if -then) behavioral contingencies in the naturally occurring conflicts of 2- and 4-year-old siblings were identified and described. Children's crying, compliance, ignoring, opposition, power, and reasoning strategies were examined to determine how they were used immediately following opposition, power, and reasoning from siblings and…

  14. Neural Events in the Reinforcement Contingency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria Teresa Araujo; Goncalves, Fabio Leyser; Garcia-Mijares, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    When neural events are analyzed as stimuli and responses, functional relations among them and among overt stimuli and responses can be unveiled. The integration of neuroscience and the experimental analysis of behavior is beginning to provide empirical evidence of involvement of neural events in the three-term contingency relating discriminative…

  15. The Contingent Valuation Method in Public Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hye-Kyung

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to present a new model measuring the economic value of public libraries, combining the dissonance minimizing (DM) and information bias minimizing (IBM) format in the contingent valuation (CV) surveys. The possible biases which are tied to the conventional CV surveys are reviewed. An empirical study is presented to compare the model…

  16. Congestion Relief of Contingent Power Network with Evolutionary Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinandan De

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a differential evolution optimization technique based methodology for congestion management cost optimization of contingent power networks. In Deregulated systems, line congestion apart from causing stability problems can increase the cost of electricity. Restraining line flow to a particular level of congestion is quite imperative from stability as well as economy point of view. Employing ‘Congestion Sensitivity Index’ proposed in this paper, the algorithm proposed can be adopted for selecting the congested lines in a power networks and then to search for a congestion constrained optimal generation schedule at the cost of a minimum ‘congestion management charge’ without any load curtailment and installation of FACTS devices. It has been depicted that the methodology on application can provide better operating conditions in terms of improvement of bus voltage and loss profile of the system. The efficiency of the proposed methodology has been tested on an IEEE 30 bus benchmark system and the results look promising.

  17. Relationships between Budgetary Participation and Organizational Commitment: Mediated by Reinforcement Contingency Evidence from the Service Sector Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Selvina; Yuliansyah Yuliansyah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship, mediated through reinforcement contingency, between (a) participation in budgeting, and (b) organizational commitment, of those organizations in the service industry, listed in the Indonesian Stock Exchange and also having their branch offices in Bandar Lampung. We develop a new construct of reinforcement contingency, through focus group discussion and several pilot studies, and use it in the main survey. We analyse data from 4...

  18. Development of a national sport event risk management training program for college command groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Homeland Security identified college sport venues as terrorist targets due to the potential for mass casualties and catastrophic social and economic impact. Therefore, it is critical for college sport safety and security personnel to implement effective risk management practices. However, deficiencies have been identified in the level of preparedness of college sport event security personnel related to risk management training and effective emergency response capabilities. To address the industry need, the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security designed, developed, and evaluated a national sport event risk management training program for National Collegiate Athletic Association command groups. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the design, development, and evaluation process.

  19. Revisiting the modifiers: how should the evaluation and management of acute concussions differ in specific groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdissi, Michael; Davis, Gavin; Jordan, Barry; Patricios, Jon; Purcell, Laura; Putukian, Margot

    2013-04-01

    One of the key difficulties while managing concussion in sport is that there are few prognostic factors to reliably predict clinical outcome. The aims of the current paper are to review the evidence for concussion modifiers and to consider how the evaluation and management of concussion may differ in specific groups. A qualitative review of the literature on concussion was conducted with a focus on prognostic factors and specific groups including children, female athletes and elite versus non-elite players. PubMed, MEDLINE and SportsDiscus databases were reviewed. The literature demonstrates that number and severity of symptoms and previous concussions are associated with prolonged recovery and/or increased risk of complications. Brief loss of consciousness (LOC) and/or impact seizures do not reliably predict outcomes following a concussion, although a cautious approach should be adopted in an athlete with prolonged LOC or impact seizures (ie, >1 min). Children generally take longer to recover from concussions and assessment batteries have yet to be validated in the younger age group. Currently, there are insufficient data on the influence of genetics and gender on outcomes following a concussion. Several modifiers are associated with prolonged recovery or increased risk of complications following a concussion and have important implications for management. Children with concussion should be managed conservatively, with an emphasis on return to learn as well as return to sport. In cases of concussions managed with limited resources (eg, non-elite players), a conservative approach should also be taken. There should be an emphasis on concussion education in all sports and at all levels, particularly in junior and community-based competitions.

  20. Group assessment of key indicators of sustainable waste management in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tot, Bojana; Vujić, Goran; Srđević, Zorica; Ubavin, Dejan; Russo, Mário Augusto Tavares

    2017-09-01

    Decision makers in developing countries are struggling to solve the present problems of solid waste management. Prioritisation and ranking of the most important indicators that influence the waste management system is very useful for any decision maker for the future planning and implementation of a sustainable waste management system. The aim of this study is to evaluate key indicators and their related sub-indicators in a group decision-making environment. In order to gain insight into the subject it was necessary to obtain the qualified opinions of decision makers from different countries who understand the situation in the sector of waste management in developing countries. An assessment is performed by 43 decision makers from both developed and developing countries, and the applied methodology is based on a combined use of the analytic hierarchy process, from the multi-criteria decision-making set of tools, and the preferential voting method known as Borda Count, which belongs to social choice theory. Pairwise comparison of indicators is performed with the analytic hierarchy process, and the ranking of indicators once obtained is assessed with Borda Count. Detailed analysis of the final results showed that the Institutional-Administrative indicator was the most important one, with the maximum weight as derived by both groups of decision makers. The results also showed that the combined use of the analytic hierarchy process and Borda Count contributes to the credibility and objectivity of the decision-making process, allowing its use in more complex waste management group decision-making problems to be recommended.

  1. The American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) Working Group: 15 years of collaborative focal species research and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Theodore R.

    2017-01-01

    The American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) Working Group formed spontaneously in 2001 as coastal waterbird biologists recognized the potential for American Oystercatchers to serve as focal species for collaborative research and management. Accomplishments over the past 15 years include the establishment of rangewide surveys, color-banding protocols, mark-resight studies, a revision of the Birds of North America species account, and new mechanisms for sharing ideas and data. Collaborations among State, Federal, and private sector scientists, natural resource managers, and dedicated volunteers have provided insights into the biology and conservation of American Oystercatchers in the United States and abroad that would not have been possible without the relationships formed through the Working Group. These accomplishments illustrate how broad collaborative approaches and the engagement of the public are key elements of effective shorebird conservation programs.

  2. Analysis of a support group for children of parents with mental illnesses: managing stressful situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Brenda M; McKeever, Patricia; Seeman, Mary; Boydell, Katherine M

    2014-09-01

    We report an ethnographic analysis of a psycho-education and peer-support program for school-aged children of parents with mental illnesses. We conducted a critical discourse analysis of the program manual and observed group interactions to understand whether children shared program goals predetermined by adults, and how, or if, the intervention was responsive to their needs. Children were expected to learn mental illness information because "knowledge is power," and to express difficult feelings about being a child of a mentally ill parent that was risky. Participants used humor to manage group expectations, revealing how they made sense of their parents' problems, as well as their own. Suggestions are made for determining good mental health literacy based on children's preferences for explaining circumstances in ways they find relevant, and for supporting children's competencies to manage relationships that are important to them. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Diagnosis, Prevention, and Management of Statin Adverse Effects and Intolerance: Canadian Consensus Working Group Update (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G B John; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet; Tashakkor, A Yashar

    2016-07-01

    The Canadian Consensus Working Group has updated its evaluation of the literature pertaining to statin intolerance and adverse effects. This overview introduces a pragmatic definition of statin intolerance (goal-inhibiting statin intolerance) that emphasizes the effects of symptoms on achieving nationally vetted goals in patients fulfilling indications for lipid-lowering therapy and cardiovascular risk reduction. The Canadian Consensus Working Group provides a structured framework for avoiding, evaluating and managing goal-inhibiting statin intolerance. Particularly difficult practice situations are reviewed, including management in young and elderly individuals, and in athletes and labourers. Finally, targeted at specialty practitioners, more detailed analyses of specific but more unusual adverse effects ascribed to statins are updated including evidence regarding new-onset diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, cataracts, and the rare but important immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Management factors affecting aggression in dynamic group housing systems with electronic sow feeding - a field trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, L S; Bertelsen, D; Jensen, K H

    1999-01-01

    material and starting the feeding cycle in the evening for overnight feeding may improve behaviour in dynamic group housing systems with ESF. However, the benefits of starting the feeding cycle in the evening may depend on low disturbance in daytime from other management procedures......A series of 24-h video studies on four commercial Danish pig herds investigated the behaviour of pregnant sows kept in dynamic groups (72 to 200 sows) with electronic sow feeding (ESF). The herds mainly differed with respect to provision of a layer of unchopped straw as bedding material...

  5. A Loss-Tolerant Group Key Management Scheme with Revocation Capability for Wireless Sensor Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin-chun; LI Jian-hua; YI Ping; PAN Jun

    2009-01-01

    A new group key management scheme against the unreliable wireless communication channel and unsafe environment was proposed for wireless sensor network (WSN). In the proposed scheme, broadcast polynomial, generated over finite field Fq based on the secret sharing, was employed to revoke compromised sensor nodes. In order to tolerate key-update message loss, group session keys were generated as one-way hash chain sequence and distributed in advance. The analysis showes that the scheme has better performance in terms of the computation and communication overhead.

  6. Group Dynamics in Top Management Teams: Groupthink, Vigilance, and Alternative Models of Organizational Failure and Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson; Owens; Tetlock; Fan; Martorana

    1998-02-01

    This study explored the heuristic value of Janis' (1982) groupthink and vigilant decision making models as explanations of failure and success in top management team decision making using the Organizational Group Dynamics Q-sort (GDQ). Top management teams of seven Fortune 500 companies were examined at two historical junctures-one when the team was successful (defined as satisfying strategic constituencies) and one when the team was unsuccessful. Results strongly supported the notion that a group' decision making process is systematically related to the outcomes experienced by the team. Ideal-type Q-sorts organized around Janis' analysis of groupthink and vigilance were substantially correlated with Q-sorts of failing and successful groups, respectively. The fit was, however, far from perfect. Ideal-type Q-sorts derived from other frameworks correlated better with the failure-success classification than did the Janis-derived ideal types. Successful groups showed some indicators of groupthink (e.g., risk-taking, cohesion, and strong, opinionated leaders), whereas unsuccessful groups showed signs of vigilance (e.g., internal debate to the point of factionalism). The results illustrate the usefulness of the GDQ for developing and empirically testing theory in organizational behavior from historical cases. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  7. Repeated anticonvulsant testing: contingent tolerance to diazepam and clobazam in kindled rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, E I

    1992-04-01

    The acute anticonvulsant efficacy of diazepam (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated by repeated test injection in kindled rats subcutaneously implanted with diazepam-filled or empty silastic tubes for 3 weeks. Tolerance developed to acute test injections in both diazepam- and sham-implanted rats. Tolerance developed to a lesser extent in another group of diazepam-implanted rats which did not receive acute intermittent anticonvulsant tests. The hypothesis that contingent tolerance had developed to the anticonvulsant actions of benzodiazepines (diazepam, 1.5 mg/kg, i.p. and clobazam, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) in kindled rats given acute intermittent injections was investigated using a 'before-after' design. Significant contingent tolerance developed in rats which received intermittent benzodiazepine treatment before, but not after, amygdala stimulation. Tolerance developed to different extents depending on the seizure measure evaluated (forelimb clonus duration, amygdala afterdischarge duration, motor seizure latency and duration, and seizure stage). Contingent tolerance to both benzodiazepines developed at a similar rate. The findings suggest that contingent tolerance may contribute a sizeable component to the overall functional benzodiazepine tolerance measured in long-term anticonvulsant drug studies in kindled rats. Several questions regarding contingent tolerance phenomena are posed and the implications of these findings for studies using repeated anticonvulsant testing are discussed.

  8. An ID/Locator Separation Based Group Mobility Management in Wireless Body Area Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb Gohar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobility management in wireless sensor network is the most important factor to be considered for applications such as healthcare system. Recently, Identifier (ID/Locator (LOC separation based mobility management scheme has been proposed for wireless sensor network. However, it does not perform well in group-based mobility management in wireless body area network, and thus it tends to induce large registration, packet delivery, and handover delays. To overcome these limitations, we propose a group-based mobility management scheme based on ID/LOC separation concept for ID-based communications with location-based routing to reduce the number of control messages. In the proposed scheme, each sensor device has a globally unique device identifier (GDID which contains the information of its home network domain. For handover support, each access gateway maintains its home GDID register (HGR and visiting GDID register (VGR which are used to keep the GDID-locator (LOC mappings for primary mobile devices in the distributed manner. Besides, in the proposed scheme, only the coordinator will send Router Solicitation and Router Advertisement messages to reduce the control messages further. By numerical analysis, we show that the proposed scheme can significantly reduce the registration, packet delivery, and handover delays, compared to the existing schemes.

  9. 集团化医院的票据管理%Group Hospital Bills Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘争光; 郑彩霞

    2012-01-01

    现代化医院在发展的过程当中,逐渐摆脱了单体医院的发展思路,走向了集团化的道路,集团化、中心化的医院越来越多,这种组织结构的集团化加速了医院整合管理的集中化,票据管理集团化就是这个背影下的产物,文章重点讨论了集团化医院票据管理当中,集团与各院区关于票据的购置、领用、退费、作废、核销等管理办法及常见的相应问题.%Modern hospital in the process of development, gradually gets out of the hospital the ideas of monomer, and gets to the way of collectivization, collectivization, more and more of the suppressive hospital. The organization structure of the collectivization accelerated the hospital the centralization of integration management. Management group is the instrument product of the figure. The collectivization management of hospital bills, management measures of each group underwent the purchase, and questions about bill recipients, refund, invalid, cancel after verification and the common are discussed.

  10. Detection of rare blood group, Bombay (Oh) phenotype patients and management by acute normovolemic hemodilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Manisha; Navaid, Seema; Peethambarakshan, A; Agrawal, Kalpana; Khan, Athar

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of correct blood grouping practices, the rare Bombay Oh phenotype may be missed, subjecting patients to the risk of severe hemolytic transfusion reaction. In the absence of blood donor registry, transfusion management of patients needing immediate surgery is a challenge. This study presents detection of rare Bombay Oh phenotype patients and their management by acute peri-operative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) in a hospital from central India. Blood grouping of patients and blood donors with a standard tube method was carried out and samples identified as rare Bombay phenotype were confirmed by saliva inhibition test. Surgical management of cases needing transfusion was done by ANH, as per the British Committee for Standards in Hematology guidelines. The incidence of Bombay phenotype was 0.002% or 1 in 51,924 in the study. Amongst three cases (patients) identified as Bombay phenotype, one was Bombay Oh, Rh negative. Two cases were missed in the first instance and one case actually did not require transfusion. In the absence of a blood donor registry for Bombay phenotype, the cases needing transfusion were successfully managed with ANH in the operation theatre. A simple test like blood grouping should be done with serious intention with incorporation of both forward and reverse grouping, so that no patient receives wrong blood leading to fatal hemolysis due to transfusion. ANH is a cost-effective transfusion option for suitable patients. Appropriate clinical decision making, use of strategies to decrease peri-operative blood losses and cost-effective country based planning could be more widely applied to improve clinical transfusion practice.

  11. Detection of rare blood group, Bombay (Oh phenotype patients and management by acute normovolemic hemodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Shrivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to lack of correct blood grouping practices, the rare Bombay Oh phenotype may be missed, subjecting patients to the risk of severe hemolytic transfusion reaction. In the absence of blood donor registry, transfusion management of patients needing immediate surgery is a challenge. This study presents detection of rare Bombay Oh phenotype patients and their management by acute peri-operative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH in a hospital from central India. Materials and Methods: Blood grouping of patients and blood donors with a standard tube method was carried out and samples identified as rare Bombay phenotype were confirmed by saliva inhibition test. Surgical management of cases needing transfusion was done by ANH, as per the British Committee for Standards in Hematology guidelines. Results: The incidence of Bombay phenotype was 0.002% or 1 in 51,924 in the study. Amongst three cases (patients identified as Bombay phenotype, one was Bombay Oh, Rh negative. Two cases were missed in the first instance and one case actually did not require transfusion. In the absence of a blood donor registry for Bombay phenotype, the cases needing transfusion were successfully managed with ANH in the operation theatre. Conclusion: A simple test like blood grouping should be done with serious intention with incorporation of both forward and reverse grouping, so that no patient receives wrong blood leading to fatal hemolysis due to transfusion. ANH is a cost-effective transfusion option for suitable patients. Appropriate clinical decision making, use of strategies to decrease peri-operative blood losses and cost-effective country based planning could be more widely applied to improve clinical transfusion practice.

  12. Physiotherapy management of joint hypermobility syndrome - a focus group study of patient and health professional perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, S.; Terry, R.; Rimes, K. A.; Clark, Carol J.; Simmonds, J; Horwood, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop an understanding of patient and health professional views and experiences of physiotherapy to manage joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS).Design: An explorative qualitative design. Seven focus groups were convened, audio recorded, fully transcribed and analysed using a constant comparative method to inductively derive a thematic account of the data.Setting: Four geographical areas of the UK.Participants: 25 people with JHS and 16 health professionals (14 physiotherapists a...

  13. Group management influences reproductive function of the male cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Diana C; Freeman, Elizabeth W; Wildt, David E; Terrell, Kimberly A; Franklin, Ashley D; Meeks, Karen; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2015-09-21

    Although the free-ranging cheetah is generally socially solitary, as many as 60% of males live in same-sex (usually sibling) coalitions. Under ex situ conditions, the cheetah experiences low reproductive success with only ~18% of males having ever produced young. Most male cheetahs (85%) are managed in captivity in coalitions, but with no data on the influence of social grouping on reproductive parameters. We examined the influence of singleton versus coalition management on various male cheetah physiological traits, including ejaculate quality and gonadal and adrenal hormone metabolite concentrations. We also assessed behaviour within coalitions for evidence of social hierarchy through initiation of interactions with group mates and relatedness to physiological traits. Ejaculate quality (including total motile and structurally normal spermatozoa per ejaculate) and androgen concentration profiles were higher (P cheetah, specifically related to the development of normal, motile spermatozoa and androgen production, is influenced by management with same-sex conspecifics. The findings have implications for ex situ conservation breeding programs by suggesting that reproductive quality can be enhanced through group maintenance of cheetah males.

  14. [Pediatric pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Párniczky, Andrea; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szabó, Flóra; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Veres, Gábor; Szücs, Ákos; Lásztity, Natália

    2015-02-22

    Pediatric pancreatitis is a rare disease with variable etiology. In the past 10-15 years the incidence of pediatric pancreatitis has been increased. The management of pediatric pancreatitis requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. In 8 clinical topics (diagnosis; etiology; prognosis; imaging; therapy; biliary tract management; complications; chronic pancreatitis) 50 relevant questions were defined. Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinical statements were accepted with total (more than 95%) agreement. The present Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group guideline is the first evidence based pediatric pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The present guideline is the first evidence-based pancreatic cancer guideline in Hungary that provides a solid ground for teaching purposes, offers quick reference for daily patient care in pediatric pancreatitis and guides financing options. The authors strongly believe that these guidelines will become a standard reference for pancreatic cancer treatment in Hungary.

  15. A reinforcement learning approach to instrumental contingency degradation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutech, Alain; Coutureau, Etienne; Marchand, Alain R

    2011-01-01

    Goal-directed action involves a representation of action consequences. Adapting to changes in action-outcome contingency requires the prefrontal region. Indeed, rats with lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex do not adapt their free operant response when food delivery becomes unrelated to lever-pressing. The present study explores the bases of this deficit through a combined behavioural and computational approach. We show that lesioned rats retain some behavioural flexibility and stop pressing if this action prevents food delivery. We attempt to model this phenomenon in a reinforcement learning framework. The model assumes that distinct action values are learned in an incremental manner in distinct states. The model represents states as n-uplets of events, emphasizing sequences rather than the continuous passage of time. Probabilities of lever-pressing and visits to the food magazine observed in the behavioural experiments are first analyzed as a function of these states, to identify sequences of events that influence action choice. Observed action probabilities appear to be essentially function of the last event that occurred, with reward delivery and waiting significantly facilitating magazine visits and lever-pressing respectively. Behavioural sequences of normal and lesioned rats are then fed into the model, action values are updated at each event transition according to the SARSA algorithm, and predicted action probabilities are derived through a softmax policy. The model captures the time course of learning, as well as the differential adaptation of normal and prefrontal lesioned rats to contingency degradation with the same parameters for both groups. The results suggest that simple temporal difference algorithms with low learning rates can largely account for instrumental learning and performance. Prefrontal lesioned rats appear to mainly differ from control rats in their low rates of visits to the magazine after a lever press, and their inability to

  16. Accounting protesting and warm glow bidding in Contingent Valuation surveys considering the management of environmental goods--an empirical case study assessing the value of protecting a Natura 2000 wetland area in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikopoulou, Ioanna; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2013-11-30

    Based on a Contingent Valuation survey aiming to reveal the willingness to pay (WTP) for conservation of a wetland area in Greece, we show how protest and warm glow motives can be taken into account when modeling WTP. In a sample of more than 300 respondents, we find that 54% of the positive bids are rooted to some extent in warm glow reasoning while 29% of the zero bids can be classified as expressions of protest rather than preferences. In previous studies, warm glow bidders are only rarely identified while protesters are typically identified and excluded from further analysis. We test for selection bias associated with simple removal of both protesters and warm glow bidders in our data. Our findings show that removal of warm glow bidders does not significantly distort WTP whereas we find strong evidence of selection bias associated with removal of protesters. We show how to correct for such selection bias by using a sample selection model. In our empirical sample, using the typical approach of removing protesters from the analysis, the value of protecting the wetland is significantly underestimated by as much as 46% unless correcting for selection bias.

  17. 企业“234”班组安全管理的创新实践%Innovative Practice of“234”Team and Group Safety Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁忠军

    2012-01-01

      The paper analyzes how Datang Yantan Hydropower Co., Ltd. to draw lessons from the theory about risk man-agement. Based on four key parts, the management of risky source, process control, contingency plan and continuous im-provement, it also holds that controllable and controlling ways about team and group safe production can be realized, by pro-moting“Two Table, Three Cards and Four Graphs”team management mode.%  文章分析了大唐岩滩水力发电有限责任公司借鉴风险管理理论,围绕风险源头管理、过程控制、应急处置、持续改进4个关键环节,通过推行“两表三卡四图”班组管理模式,实现班组安全生产风险可控、在控、能控的主要路径和方法。

  18. Anaerobic Digestion Assessment for Contingency Base Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    plastics and biobased products. Journal of Environmental Science and Engineering 1:108-114. Energy Working Group (EWG). 2012. Energy working group...large plastic bag (Lansing and Moss 2010). ............. 58 Tables Table 1. Fuel and energy requirements for three sizes of DOBs...management model developed for FOBs (Medina et al. 2013). Energy from dry organic materials (paper, plastics , etc.) can be recovered using

  19. Group participants' experiences of a patient-directed group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers-Jewell, Kate; Isenring, Elisabeth A; Thomas, Rae; Reidlinger, Dianne P

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals who participated in a group-based education program, including their motivators in relation to their diabetes management, and the perceived impact of group interactions on participants' experiences and motivation for self-management. Understanding individuals diagnosed with diabetes experiences of group-based education for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus may guide the development and facilitation of these programs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all individuals who participated in the intervention. Using thematic analysis underpinned by self-determination theory, we developed themes that explored participants' motivators in relation to diabetes management and the impact of group interactions on their experiences and motivation. The key themes included knowledge, experience, group interactions and motivation. Participants perceived that the group interactions facilitated further learning and increased motivation, achieved through normalization, peer identification or by talking with, and learning from the experience of others. The results support the use of patient-centred programs that prioritize group interactions over the didactic presentation of content, which may address relevant psychological needs of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and improve their motivation and health behaviours. Future group-based education programs may benefit from the use of self-determination theory as a framework for intervention design to enhance participant motivation.

  20. Reduction of Classroom Noise Levels Using Group Contingencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Brandon M.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Eubanks, Sean L.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic workplace is an employment-based abstinence reinforcement intervention for unemployed drug users where trainees receive on-the-job employment skills training in a classroom setting. The study is an extension of prior therapeutic workplace research, which suggested that trainees frequently violated noise standards. Participants…

  1. Interdependent Group Contingency to Promote Physical Activity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Catherine; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; VanHeest, Jaci L.; Gelbar, Nicholas W.; Byer-Alcorace, Gabriel; Maykel, Cheryl; DeBiase, Emily

    2017-01-01

    As the number of children affected by obesity increases in the United States, it is necessary to intervene with preventive and intervention techniques that will enact change. Because children spend a significant amount of their time in school, it is of particular interest to target strategies during the school day. Given the recommendations for…

  2. The Effects of Verbal and Nonverbal Contingent Reinforcement Upon the Intelligence Test Performance of Black Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheckart, George R.; Bass, Barry A.

    1976-01-01

    It appears that contingent reinforcement may have an effect upon the intelligence test performance of black adults as evidenced by the consistent trend of the IQ scores in the direction of the proposed hypothesis. However, the primary analysis of the data revealed no statistically significant differences among treatment groups. (Author)

  3. The Effect of Contingent Reinforcement on the Acquisition of Sight Vocabulary. Technical Report No. 49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Mary E.; And Others

    The present study is a replication of a Lahey and Drabman study (1974) which investigated the effects of contingent versus noncontingent reinforcement on the learning of sight words. The subjects in this study were 14 Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) students who composed the lowest reading group in a combined first-second grade…

  4. The Financial Impact of Risk Factors Affecting Project Cost Contingency: Evidential Reasoning Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Abeere-Inga

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of cost modeling using risk analysis for construction projects is very crucial for the achievement of project success. The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of the financial impact of risk factors affecting key construction work sections; using a systematic risk methodology based on empirical judgment. The failure mode effect analysis (FMEA and the evidential reasoning methods are presented as qualitative and quantitative risk tools respectively. Data analysis from structured questionnaires revealed that four work sections are prone to high scope changes contemporaneous with seven risk factors. Contrary to the usual 10% contingency estimate allowed for construction projects in Ghana, an approximate overall physical contingency range of between 13.36% and 17.88% was determined using evidential reasoning methods. The likely impact of the integrated work sections and risk factors provide a clue to estimators on how to estimate and account for project cost contingency. The research concludes by recommending a framework for improving the estimation process of cost contingency through the integration of efficient risk management strategies, cost estimation and design management process.

  5. Relationships between Budgetary Participation and Organizational Commitment: Mediated by Reinforcement Contingency Evidence from the Service Sector Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Selvina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship, mediated through reinforcement contingency, between (a participation in budgeting, and (b organizational commitment, of those organizations in the service industry, listed in the Indonesian Stock Exchange and also having their branch offices in Bandar Lampung. We develop a new construct of reinforcement contingency, through focus group discussion and several pilot studies, and use it in the main survey. We analyse data from 42 respondents, using SmartPLS. We find that reinforcement contingency as the mediation variable affects the relation between participation in budgeting and organizational commitment. This study suggests the “no reward and no punishment” system as the appropriate reinforcement contingency for employees, in order to enhance their commitment to their organization.

  6. Profitability recent open stock funds in Brazil: analysis of the performance of a management Funds Group active in relation to management fees charged for resource managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ricardo Mendes Vasconcelos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to evaluate the performance of a specific group of active management equity investments funds relating it to the management fees charged by managers in order to answer the following research problem: open equity funds with active management, that charge higher management fees, are those that provide the best returns for the investor? The objective was to test the hypothesis under which it is evident that the funds that charged the highest rates are those with the best performances evaluated according to the average yield of the last five years. To achieve this objective, a study of descriptive nature was carried out with a quantitative approach having as object of study the profitability of Brazilian Equity Fund ranked by the Brazilian Association of Financial and Capital Markets (Anbima as IBX Active Equity Funds in the period 2010 to 2014. The analyzed returns were calculated from the Information ratio index, which measures the risk-adjusted return of the asset class. The study found no correlation between the performance of the funds and charged management fees.

  7. Summary Report of the NASA Management Study Group: Recommendations to the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Samuel C.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Management Study Group (NMSG) was established under the auspices of the National Acedamy of Public Administration at the request of the Administrator of NASA to assess NASA's management practices and to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA organization. This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the NMSG on the overall management and organization of NASA.

  8. The Fritz Roethlisberger Memorial Award Goes to "Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Lisa M.; Loyd, Denise Lewin; Hoobler, Jenny M.

    2012-01-01

    The Fritz J. Roethlisberger Memorial Award for the best article in the 2011 "Journal of Management Education" goes to Rae Andre for her article, Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses ("Journal of Management Education," Volume 35, Number 5, pp. 596-619). In keeping with Roethlisberger's legacy, this year's…

  9. How Local Landholder Groups Collectively Manage Weeds in South-Eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Sonia; Rogers, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    For two decades researchers and policy makers have been arguing that community-based collective action is needed to effectively control weeds. Yet there has been little social research into the ways that collective weed control emerges at local scales. The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms through which three local landholder groups in south-eastern Australia collectively manage weeds and the measures they use to evaluate success. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of three Landcare groups—Jerrawa Creek/Upper Lachlan, MacLaughlin River and Towamba Valley—as well as government staff external to the groups. The results reveal that for all three groups collective weed control is about supporting individual weed control efforts as well as proactively engaging landholders with the worst infestations. The groups were seen to be successful because they focused on the common challenge that weeds pose to all landholders, thereby removing the shame associated with having weeds, and because they organised community events that were as much about building and maintaining social relationships as improving weed control. Groups were positive about what they had achieved as collectives of landholders, but also saw an important role for government in providing funding, engaging with landholders who were unwilling to engage directly with the group, and controlling weeds on public lands.

  10. Review of recent reports of INLA study group V: radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    As an introduction to this 1993 report, Working Group V offers this brief review of its three previous reports made in 1987, 1989 and 1991. the principal topics addressed in these reports were: clear definitions of terms such as radioactive waste, storage and final disposal; respective technical and financial responsibilities of waste producers management agencies, public authorities; the various phases of waste management such as production, package, transport, storage, preclosure and post closure of disposal installations; financing of these phases; information and participation of the public in choice and licensing of storage and final disposal installations; The aim of these studies is ti explore the nature of appropriate actions in radioactive waste management necessary to ensure adequate protection of man and environment. Moreover, it is important to assure adequate protection for the full life of the waste, even though that time may reach hundreds or thousands of years or more. Although this raises both technical and juridical problems, the study group focused mainly the juridical ones. (author).

  11. Managing Indigenous Minority Groups in the Tourism Industry: An Exploratory Case Study in Southern Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuwahara Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism-based employment has been promoted for reducing poverty in the least developed countries (LDCs. However, for employing the poor sustainably, particularly, indigenous minority groups, management has to cope with the socioeconomic disadvantages in these environments. This study aims to explore the challenges and practical strategies for human resource management (HRM of indigenous minority groups in the tourism sectors of LDCs; specifically, those identified as “best practice” in southern Laos. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the managing director of the project regarding training, compatibility with family life, benefits and incentives, and leadership and teamwork. A qualitative analysis was applied to the interview data and hypothetical HRM strategies were derived. Then, to examine the validity of these strategies within the project, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a half of the employees. The results suggest significance for the following HRM strategies: a social orientation toward tourism industry hygiene standards; a flexible leave system that allows employees to participate in family events and family-operated farming; and nonfinancial benefits such as food, clothing, and housing.

  12. Lesson Learned from Leading an Anger Management Group Using the "Seeing Red" Curriculum within an Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Emily L.; Carlson, John S.; Guthrie, Kelly M.

    2010-01-01

    Four fourth-grade boys participated in an anger management group using "Seeing Red: An Anger Management and Peacemaking Curriculum for Kids" facilitated by a school psychology intern and her supervisor (J. Simmonds, 2003). The group met for 30 min weekly for a total of 14 sessions. Lessons consisted of practicing skills and strategies related to…

  13. Definition of a COPD self-management intervention: International Expert Group consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effing, Tanja W; Vercoulen, Jan H; Bourbeau, Jean; Trappenburg, Jaap; Lenferink, Anke; Cafarella, Paul; Coultas, David; Meek, Paula; van der Valk, Paul; Bischoff, Erik W M A; Bucknall, Christine; Dewan, Naresh A; Early, Frances; Fan, Vincent; Frith, Peter; Janssen, Daisy J A; Mitchell, Katy; Morgan, Mike; Nici, Linda; Patel, Irem; Walters, Haydn; Rice, Kathryn L; Singh, Sally; Zuwallack, Richard; Benzo, Roberto; Goldstein, Roger; Partridge, Martyn R; van der Palen, Job

    2016-07-01

    There is an urgent need for consensus on what defines a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) self-management intervention. We aimed to obtain consensus regarding the conceptual definition of a COPD self-management intervention by engaging an international panel of COPD self-management experts using Delphi technique features and an additional group meeting.In each consensus round the experts were asked to provide feedback on the proposed definition and to score their level of agreement (1=totally disagree; 5=totally agree). The information provided was used to modify the definition for the next consensus round. Thematic analysis was used for free text responses and descriptive statistics were used for agreement scores.In total, 28 experts participated. The consensus round response rate varied randomly over the five rounds (ranging from 48% (n=13) to 85% (n=23)), and mean definition agreement scores increased from 3.8 (round 1) to 4.8 (round 5) with an increasing percentage of experts allocating the highest score of 5 (round 1: 14% (n=3); round 5: 83% (n=19)).In this study we reached consensus regarding a conceptual definition of what should be a COPD self-management intervention, clarifying the requisites for such an intervention. Operationalisation of this conceptual definition in the near future will be an essential next step.

  14. An Auto-configuration 4M Group Management using Wireless Sensor Networks for Reconfigurable Manufacturing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suk-Keun; Cha; Jeong-Hoon; Lee; Joon; Jae; Yoo; Jung; Hoon; Kang; Han; Gyu; Kim; Dong; Hoon; Kim; Jun; Yeob; Song

    2010-01-01

    <正>The first tier of automotive manufacturers has faced to pressures about move,modify,updating tasks for manufacturing resources in production processes from demand response of production order sequence for motor company and process innovation purpose for productivity. For meets this requirements,it has to require absolutely lead time to re-wiring of physical interface for production equipment,needs for change existing program and test over again.For prepare this constraints,it needs studying an auto-configuration functions that build for both visibility and flexibility based on the 4M(Man,Machine,Material, Method)group management which is supports from WSN (Wireless Sensor Network)of the open embedded device called M2M(Machine to Machine)and major functions of middleware including point manager for real-time device communication,real-time data management,Standard API (Application Program Interface)and application template management.To be application system to RMS (Reconfigurable Manufacturing System)for rapidly response from various orders and model from motor company that is beginning to establishing the mapping of manufacturing resources of 4M using WSN.

  15. Waste Area Grouping 4 Site Investigation Data Management Plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this Data and Records Management Plan (DRMP) is to ensure that the ER environmental measurements data management process, from planning through measurement, recording, evaluation, analysis, use, reporting, and archival of data, is controlled in an efficient, comprehensive, and standardized manner. Proper organization will ensure that data and documentation are adequate to describe the procedures, events,and results of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 project. The data management process manages the life cycle of environmental measurements data from the planning of data for characterization and remediation decisions through the collection, review, and actual usage of the data for decision-making purposes to the long-term storage of the data. The nature of the decision-making process for an Environmental Restoration (ER) project is inherently repetitive. Existing data are gathered and evaluated to establish what is known about a site. Decisions regarding the nature of the contamination and potential remedial actions are formulated. Based upon the potential risk to human health and the environment, an acceptable level of uncertainty is defined for each remediation decision. WAG 4 is a shallow-waste burial site consisting of three separate areas: (1) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; (2) an experimental Pilot Pit Area, including a pilot-scale testing pit; and (3) sections of two abandoned underground pipelines formerly used for transporting liquid, low-level radioactive waste.

  16. Insensitivity to Scope in Contingent Valuation Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    insensitivity and to assess the relevance of potential explanations that may help to shed light on how to appropriately handle this problem in contingent valuation studies. Methods: We surveyed a sample of 2004 men invited for cardiovascular disease screening. Each respondent had three contingent valuation...... tasks from which their sensitivity to larger risk reductions (test 1) and to change in travel costs associated with participation (test 2) could be assessed. Participants were surveyed while waiting for their screening session. Non-participants were surveyed by postal questionnaire. Results: The sample...... was overall found to be sensitive to scope, testing at the conventional sample-mean level. At the individual respondent level, however, more than half of the respondents failed the tests. Potential determinants for failing the tests were examined in alternative regression models but few consistent...

  17. Diagnosis and management of chronic ITP: comments from an ICIS expert group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, John David; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Godeau, Bertrand; Bussel, Jim; Donato, Hugo; Elalfy, Mohsen; Hainmann, Ina; Matzdorff, Axel; Müller-Beissenhirtz, Hannes; Rovó, Alicia; Tichelli, Andre

    2010-07-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common disorder in children and adults. In a patient with newly diagnosed ITP, the treatment strategy is relatively well defined. Second-line treatments are more controversial, and the management of chronic ITP is even more so. During the 3rd ICIS Expert Meeting on Consensus and Development of Strategies in ITP, held in Basel on September 3-5, 2009, a group of experts were tasked with reaching a consensus on some frequently asked questions relating to diagnosis and management of children and adults with chronic ITP. The content of this article is designed to provide a practical support to trained haematologists in their care of patients with chronic ITP.

  18. Fundamentals and Catalytic Innovation: The Statistical and Data Management Center of the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huvane, Jacqueline; Komarow, Lauren; Hill, Carol; Tran, Thuy Tien T; Pereira, Carol; Rosenkranz, Susan L; Finnemeyer, Matt; Earley, Michelle; Jiang, Hongyu Jeanne; Wang, Rui; Lok, Judith; Evans, Scott R

    2017-03-15

    The Statistical and Data Management Center (SDMC) provides the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) with statistical and data management expertise to advance the ARLG research agenda. The SDMC is active at all stages of a study, including design; data collection and monitoring; data analyses and archival; and publication of study results. The SDMC enhances the scientific integrity of ARLG studies through the development and implementation of innovative and practical statistical methodologies and by educating research colleagues regarding the application of clinical trial fundamentals. This article summarizes the challenges and roles, as well as the innovative contributions in the design, monitoring, and analyses of clinical trials and diagnostic studies, of the ARLG SDMC. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Patients' views on improving sickle cell disease management in primary care: focus group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuburi, Ghida; Phekoo, Karen J; Okoye, Nv Ogo; Anie, Kofie; Green, Stuart A; Nkohkwo, Asaah; Ojeer, Patrick; Ndive, Comfort; Banarsee, Ricky; Oni, Lola; Majeed, Azeem

    2012-12-01

    To assess sickle cell disease (SCD) patient and carer perspectives on the primary care services related to SCD that they receive from their general practitioner (GP). A focus group discussion was used to elicit the views of patients about the quality of care they receive from their primary health-care providers and what they thought was the role of primary care in SCD management. The focus group discussion was video recorded. The recording was then examined by the project team and recurring themes were identified. A comparison was made with notes made by two scribes also present at the discussion. Sickle Cell Society in Brent, UK. Ten participants with SCD or caring for someone with SCD from Northwest London, UK. Patients' perceptions about the primary care services they received, and a list of key themes and suggestions. Patients and carers often bypassed GPs for acute problems but felt that GPs had an important role to play around repeat prescriptions and general health care. These service users believed SCD is often ignored and deemed unimportant by GPs. Participants wanted the health service to support primary health-care providers to improve their knowledge and understanding of SCD. Key themes and suggestions from this focus group have been used to help develop an educational intervention for general practice services that will be used to improve SCD management in primary care.

  20. Diagnosing and managing anorexia nervosa in UK primary care: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, D; Churchill, R

    2013-08-01

    Anorexia is a leading cause of adolescent hospital admission and death from psychiatric disorder. Despite the potential role of general practitioners in diagnosis, appropriate referral and coordinating treatment, few existing studies provide fine-grained accounts of GPs' beliefs about anorexia. To identify GPs' understandings and experiences of diagnosing and managing patients with anorexia in primary care. Case-based focus groups with co-working general practitioners in the East Midlands region of England were used to explore attitudes towards issues common to patients with eating disorders. Group discussions were transcribed and analysed using corpus linguistic and discourse analytic approaches. Participants' discussion focused on related issues of making hesitant diagnoses, the utility of the body mass index, making referrals and overcoming patient resistance. Therapeutic relationships with patients with anorexia are considered highly complex, with participants using diagnostic tests as rhetorical strategies to help manage communicative obstacles. Overcoming patient repudiation and securing referrals are particular challenges with this patient group. Successfully negotiating these problems appears to require advanced communication skills.

  1. Contingent Weighting in Judgment and Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-08

    Review, 94, 236-254. Grether, D. M., & Plott, C. R. (1979). Economic theory of choice and the preference rever- sal phenomenon. American Economic Review , 69...805-824. Loomes, G., & Sugden, R. (1983). A rationale for preference reversal. American Economic Review , 73, 428-432. Payne, J. W. (1982). Contingent...Lichtenstein, S. (1983). Preference reversals: A broader perspective. American Economic Review , 73, 596-605. Slovic, P., Lichtenstein, S

  2. Fuzzy Logic Based Power System Contingency Ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Abdelaziz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage stability is a major concern in planning and operations of power systems. It is well known that voltage instability and collapse have led to major system failures. Modern transmission networks are more heavily loaded than ever before to meet the growing demand. One of the major consequences resulted from such a stressed system is voltage collapse or instability. This paper presents maximum loadability identification of a load bus in a power transmission network. In this study, Fast Voltage Stability Index (FVSI is utilized as the indicator of the maximum loadability termed as Qmax. In this technique, reactive power loading will be increased gradually at particular load bus until the FVSI reaches close to unity. Therefore, a critical value of FVSI was set as the maximum loadability point. This value ensures the system from entering voltage-collapse region. The main purpose in the maximum loadability assessment is to plan for the maximum allowable load value to avoid voltage collapse; which is important in power system planning risk assessment.The most important task in security analysis is the problem of identifying the critical contingencies from a large list of credible contingencies and ranks them according to their severity. The condition of voltage stability in a power system can be characterized by the use of voltage stability indices. This paper presents fuzzy approach for ranking the contingencies using composite-index based on parallel operated fuzzy inference engine. The Line Flow index (L.F and bus Voltage Magnitude (VM of the load buses are expressed in fuzzy set notation. Further, they are evaluated using Fuzzy rules to obtain overall Criticality Index. Contingencies are ranked based on decreasing order of Criticality Index and then provides the comparison of ranking obtained with FVSI method.

  3. Income contingent loans in higher education financing

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Around nine countries currently use a national income contingent loan (ICL) scheme for higher education tuition using the income tax system. Increased international interest in ICL validates an examination of its costs and benefits relative to the traditional financing system, government-guaranteed bank loans (GGBLs). Bank-type loans exhibit poor economic characteristics: namely, repayment hardships for the disadvantaged, and default. This damages credit reputations and can be associated with...

  4. Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Maori

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a prolonged exposure to a paired presentation of different types of signals (e.g., color and motion, one of the signals (color becomes a driver for the other signal (motion. This phenomenon, which is known as contingent motion aftereffect, indicates that the brain can establish new neural representations even in the adult's brain. However, contingent motion aftereffect has been reported only in visual or auditory domain. Here, we demonstrate that a visual motion aftereffect can be contingent on a specific sound. Results Dynamic random dots moving in an alternating right or left direction were presented to the participants. Each direction of motion was accompanied by an auditory tone of a unique and specific frequency. After a 3-minutes exposure, the tones began to exert marked influence on the visual motion perception, and the percentage of dots required to trigger motion perception systematically changed depending on the tones. Furthermore, this effect lasted for at least 2 days. Conclusions These results indicate that a new neural representation can be rapidly established between auditory and visual modalities.

  5. Effectiveness of a group anger management programme after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexandra J; Nott, Melissa T; Doyle, Margaret; Onus, Margaret; McCarthy, Kathleen; Baguley, Ian J

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a group approach to the treatment of anger management difficulties for people with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Repeated-measures design with convenience sampling. Participants were community living clients of a tertiary brain injury service. The group programme consisted of 12 weekly sessions based on a cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) model, with modifications to incorporate compensations for TBI-related cognitive impairment. Treatment effectiveness was measured using the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), at pre-treatment, post-treatment and follow-up. The programme was completed by 52 people across nine groups over the years 1998-2006 and 31 of these attended a follow-up session. Completion of the programme was associated with significant decreases in self-reported frequency with which anger was experienced (STAXI Trait Anger) and frequency of expression of anger (Anger Expression-Out), as well as a significant increase in reported attempts to control feelings of anger (Anger Control); changes were maintained at follow-up assessment. A group CBT approach shows promise as an effective community-based treatment for anger control issues after severe TBI. Future research directions should include a wait-list control group and objective rating of anger expression.

  6. 电力企业班组管理%Group Management of Electric Power Enterprise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张拥刚; 张娜; 程魁杰; 冯越; 宋倩倩

    2012-01-01

    Group is the most basic unit which employees engaged in the production of enterprises,like the cell of the enterprise,every tasks of enterprise are fulfilled through the group.Most of enterprise employees work in the team,vast majority of machinery and equipments are used by the group,group is the forward position of effectively controlling the accident.Therefore,grasping the safety management must from group.%班组是企业的细胞,是企业组织职工从事生产劳动的最基本的单位,企业的各项工作任务都要通过班组来落实。企业绝大多数职工在班组,绝大多数机械、设备归班组使用和维护,班组是有效控制事故的前沿阵地。因此,抓安全管理,必须从班组抓起。

  7. Management in non-traumatic arm, neck and shoulder complaints: differences between diagnostic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feleus, Anita; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Miedema, Harald S; Verhaar, Jan A N; Koes, Bart W

    2008-09-01

    Arm, neck and/or shoulder complaints are common in western societies. In the Netherlands, general practice guidelines are issued on shoulder pain and epicondylitis only. Little is known about actual management of the total range of diagnoses. The objectives of the study are: to determine management in patients consulting the GP with a new episode of non-traumatic arm neck and shoulder complaints up to 6 months after the first consultation. To evaluate differences in management between patients with specific diagnoses versus non-specific diagnoses and between specific diagnostic groups. In a prospective cohort study in general practice. We recruited 682 eligible patients. Data on diagnosis, management, patient- and complaint-characteristics were collected. Co-occurrence of treatment options was presented in scaled rectangles. After 6 months, additional diagnostic tests had been performed in 18% of the patients, mainly radiographic examination (14%). Further, 49% had been referred for physiotherapy and 12% to the medical specialist. Patients with specific diagnoses were more frequently referred for specialist treatment, and patients with non-specific diagnoses for physiotherapy. Corticosteroid injections (17%) were mainly applied specific diagnoses (e.g. impingement syndrome, frozen shoulder, carpal tunnel and M. Quervain). Frequencies of prescribed medication (51%) did not differ between specific and non-specific diagnoses. In 19% of the patients no referral, prescribed analgesics or injection was applied. Braces (4%) were mainly prescribed in epicondylitis. Overall, management most frequently consisted of prescribed analgesics and referral for physiotherapy. Specific and non-specific diagnostic subgroups differed in the frequency corticosteroid injections were applied, and referrals to physiotherapy and to a medical specialist.

  8. Group-Oriented Services: A Shift towards Consumer-Managed Relationships in the Telecom Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrdoljak, Luka; Bojic, Iva; Podobnik, Vedran; Jezic, Gordan; Kusek, Mario

    Today, telecom operators face a threefold challenge: a social challenge dealing with the evolution of the consumer lifestyle, a technological challenge dealing with ever changing ICT trends and a business challenge dealing with the need for innovative business models. This paper introduces an idea of group-oriented services, a special type of personalized telecom services, as a possible solution for all three of these challenges. A proof-of-concept service, called Agent-Based Mobile Content Brokerage, is presented and elaborated with the aim to demonstrate a shift towards consumer-managed relationships, a novel provisioning paradigm within the telecom industry.

  9. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Guss

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident; protect public health and safety; restore essential government services; and provide emergency assistance to those affected. Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2009, Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." The Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium's radioactive decay. This power source gives the mission an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Martian year (687 Earth days) or more, while also providing significantly greater mobility and operational flexibility, enhanced science payload capability, and exploration of a much larger range of latitudes and altitudes than was possible on previous missions to Mars. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the DOE in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. NSTec is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring

  10. Volcanic Eruption: Students Develop a Contingency Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2013-04-01

    , causing a blockage and afflux of the Rhine, which, due to the given conditions of a very narrow valley, would lead to excessive flooding affecting even the greater Rhine-Main-region. Not to mention the consequences of a pyroclastic flow, dropping volcanic bombs and further hazardous/disastrous consequences. In comparison to other "potentially active" or "active volcanoes", e.g. the Vesuvius, the Laacher See is scarcely monitored and according to recent publications poorly analyzed in terms of contingency and evacuation plans. This offers space for critical analysis and creative solutions to an existing problem. Short: We need geographers and their knowledge to provide help. Given these facts, the Laacher See could be the layout for a very interesting geography project bringing together previously gained knowledge and understanding of volcanic activities, their destructive powers, consequences and risks in case of an eruption in combination with their topographical characteristics. Your students thereby act the role of a geoscientist developing contingency plans and evacuation zones for the greater Laacher See area. This involves a detailed analysis of the topographical characteristics based on (classic) topographic maps or online via the use of a GIS (e.g. Google maps). In a second step students enlist the possible consequences they already know according to their range and copy them onto a transparency layer on the topographic map. Using such a layer technique students add population density, important topographic features and maybe even anticipated wind directions to their map. The information density and the specific layout of this map are thereby only determined by the student's previous knowledge, their personal abilities and skills and the amount of time provided. This offers the opportunities to even differentiate the task within your group and provide support adjusted to the individual students level. On the basis of their own thematic map your students should be

  11. Effects and timing of developmental peer appraisals in self-managing work groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druskat, V U; Wolff, S B

    1999-02-01

    This study used a repeated measures time-series design to examine the immediate and longer term impact of a structured, face-to-face developmental peer appraisal on 294 undergraduates in 44 self-managing work groups (SMWGs) and 217 MBA students in 36 SMWGs. Results revealed an immediate positive impact on perceptions of open communication, task motivation, social loafing, group viability, cohesion, and satisfaction. Also, the effects of the peer appraisal were not dependent on the perceived ratio of positive to negative feedback, and the enduring impact of the appraisal was influenced by its timing relative to task deadline. Overall, results emphasized that peer appraisals can have a positive effect on relationships and task focus, are influenced by temporal context, and have great potential for work teams.

  12. Group visits in the management of diabetes and hypertension: effect on glycemic and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loney-Hutchinson, Lisel M; Provilus, Alfrede D; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Zizi, Ferdinand; Ogedegbe, Olugbenga; McFarlane, Samy I

    2009-06-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem that is reaching epidemic proportions in the United States and worldwide. Over 22 million Americans currently have diabetes and it is forecast that over 350 million people worldwide will be affected by 2030. Furthermore, the economic cost of diabetes care is enormous. Despite current efforts on the part of health care providers and their patients, outcomes of care remain largely suboptimal, with only 3% to 7% of the entire diabetes population meeting recommended treatment goals for glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid control. Therefore, alternative approaches to diabetes care are desperately needed. Group visits may provide a viable option for patients and health care providers, with the potential to improve outcomes and cost effectiveness. In this review, we highlight the magnitude of the diabetes epidemic, the barriers to optimal diabetes care, and the utility of the concept of group visits as a chronic disease management strategy for diabetes care.

  13. Status report on the land processes aircraft science management operations working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, James G.; Mann, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    Since its inception three years ago, the Land Processes Aircraft Science Management Operations Working Group (MOWG) provided recommendations on the optimal use of the Agency's aircraft in support of the Land Processes Science Program. Recommendations covered topics such as aircraft and sensor usage, development of long-range plans, Multisensor Airborne Campaigns (MAC), program balance, aircraft sensor databases, new technology and sensor development, and increased University scientist participation in the program. Impacts of these recommendations improved the efficiency of various procedures including the flight request process, tracking of flight hours, and aircraft usage. The group also created a bibliography focused on publications produced by Land Processes scientists from the use of the aircraft program, surveyed NASA funded PI's on their participation in the aircraft program, and developed a planning template for multi-sensor airborne campaigns. Benefits from these activities are summarized.

  14. Data Management Plan and Functional System Design for the Information Management System of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation and Waste Area Grouping 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, T.; Brandt, C.; Calfee, J.; Garland, M.; Holladay, S.; Nickle, B.; Schmoyer, D.; Serbin, C.; Ward, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The Data Management Plan and Functional System Design supports the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) and Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 Environmental Monitoring Program. The objective of the Data Management Plan and Functional System Design is to provide organization, integrity, security, traceability, and consistency of the data generated during the CRRI and WAG 6 projects. Proper organization will ensure that the data are consistent with the procedures and requirements of the projects. The Information Management Groups (IMGs) for these two programs face similar challenges and share many common objectives. By teaming together, the IMGs have expedited the development and implementation of a common information management strategy that benefits each program.

  15. The environmental management problem of Pohorje, Slovenia: A new group approach within ANP - SWOT framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grošelj, Petra; Zadnik Stirn, Lidija

    2015-09-15

    Environmental management problems can be dealt with by combining participatory methods, which make it possible to include various stakeholders in a decision-making process, and multi-criteria methods, which offer a formal model for structuring and solving a problem. This paper proposes a three-phase decision making approach based on the analytic network process and SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis. The approach enables inclusion of various stakeholders or groups of stakeholders in particular stages of decision making. The structure of the proposed approach is composed of a network consisting of an objective cluster, a cluster of strategic goals, a cluster of SWOT factors and a cluster of alternatives. The application of the suggested approach is applied to a management problem of Pohorje, a mountainous area in Slovenia. Stakeholders from sectors that are important for Pohorje (forestry, agriculture, tourism and nature protection agencies) who can offer a wide range of expert knowledge were included in the decision-making process. The results identify the alternative of "sustainable development" as the most appropriate for development of Pohorje. The application in the paper offers an example of employing the new approach to an environmental management problem. This can also be applied to decision-making problems in various other fields.

  16. Images of Environmental Management: Competing Metaphors in Focus Group Discussions of Swedish Environmental Quality Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibeck, Victoria

    2012-04-01

    In managing environmental problems, several countries have chosen the management by objectives (MBO) approach. This paper investigates how focus group participants from the Swedish environmental administration used metaphors to describe the mode of organization needed to attain environmental objectives. Such analysis can shed light on how an MBO system is perceived by actors and how it works in practice. Although the Swedish government intended to stimulate broad-based cooperation among many actors, participants often saw themselves as located at a certain "level," i.e., "higher" or "lower," in the MBO system—that is, their conceptions corresponded to a traditional, hierarchical interpretation of MBO. Prepositions such as "in" and "out" contributed to feelings of inclusion and exclusion on the part of MBO actors. However, horizontal metaphors merged with vertical ones, indicating ongoing competition for the right to interpret how the system of environmental objectives should best be managed. The paper concludes that any organization applying MBO could benefit from discussing alternate ways of talking and thinking about its constituent "levels."

  17. An effective workplace stress management intervention: Chicken Soup for the Soul at Work Employee Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Anne Puidk

    2002-01-01

    Stress is a costly and significant source of health problems and mental distress--with work cited as a primary stressor. This pilot study supports the effectiveness of a new workplace stress intervention: Chicken Soup for the Soul at Work Employee Groups. In this program, employee-participants met during nine weekly meetings to read inspirational workplace stories, comment, and share their own stories. A leader, chosen from and by the group, guided meetings. Utilizing a wait-list control group design, participants were randomly assigned to an experimental or wait-list group. Participants completed pretests and posttests (Coping Resources Inventory, Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised, Job Descriptive Index, Pressure Management Indicator, survey). Statistical interaction effect for subtests was evaluated using a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Participants exhibited improved total coping resources, cognitive/rational coping, state of mind, confidence and home/work balance. Participant comments and their continued participation in a similar company-sponsored program bolster these empirical results.

  18. [Autoimmune pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Szücs, Ákos; Czakó, László

    2015-02-22

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare disease which can even mimic pancreatic tumor, however, unlike the latter, it requires not surgical but conservative management. Correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and treatment of these patients requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. 29 relevant clinical questions in 4 topics were defined (Basics; Diagnosis; Differential diagnostics; Therapy). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinial questions were accepted with almost total (more than 95%) agreement. The present guideline is the first evidence based autoimmune pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide very important and helpful data for tuition of autoimmune pancreatitis, for everyday practice and for establishing proper finance. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become a basic reference in Hungary.

  19. Classroom management of situated group learning: A research study of two teaching strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeh, Kathy; Fawns, Rod

    2000-06-01

    Although peer-based work is encouraged by theories in developmental psychology and although classroom interventions suggest it is effective, there are grounds for recognising that young pupils find collaborative learning hard to sustain. Discontinuities in collaborative skill during development have been suggested as one interpretation. Theory and research have neglected situational continuities that the teacher may provide in management of formal and informal collaborations. This experimental study, with the collaboration of the science faculty in one urban secondary college, investigated the effect of two role attribution strategies on communication in peer groups of different gender composition in three parallel Year 8 science classes. The group were set a problem that required them to design an experiment to compare the thermal insulating properties of two different materials. This presents the data collected and key findings, and reviews the findings from previous parallel studies that have employed the same research design in different school settings. The results confirm the effectiveness of social role attribution strategies in teacher management of communication in peer-based work.

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program Schedule Contingency Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report represents the schedule contingency evaluation done on the FY-93 Major System Acquisition (MSA) Baseline for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL) Environmental Restoration Program (EPP). A Schedule Contingency Evaluation Team (SCET) was established to evaluate schedule contingency on the MSA Baseline for the INEL ERP associated with completing work within milestones established in the baseline. Baseline schedules had been established considering enforceable deadlines contained in the Federal Facilities Agreement/Consent Order (FFA/CO), the agreement signed in 1992, by the State of Idaho, Department of Health & Welfare, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The evaluation was based upon the application of standard schedule risk management techniques to the specific problems of the INEL ERP. The schedule contingency evaluation was designed to provided early visibility for potential schedule delays impacting enforceable deadlines. The focus of the analysis was on the duration of time needed to accomplish all required activities to achieve completion of the milestones in the baseline corresponding to the enforceable deadlines. Additionally, the analysis was designed to identify control of high-probability, high-impact schedule risk factors.