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Sample records for group clinical trial

  1. Group-sequential clinical trials with multiple co-objectives

    CERN Document Server

    Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R; Ochiai, Toshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on group sequential methods for clinical trials with co-primary endpoints based on the decision-making frameworks for: (1) rejecting the null hypothesis (stopping for efficacy), (2) rejecting the alternative hypothesis (stopping for futility), and (3) rejecting the null or alternative hypothesis (stopping for either futility or efficacy), where the trial is designed to evaluate whether the intervention is superior to the control on all endpoints. For assessing futility, there are two fundamental approaches, i.e., the decision to stop for futility based on the conditional probability of rejecting the null hypothesis, and the other based on stopping boundaries using group sequential methods. In this book, the latter approach is discussed. The book also briefly deals with the group sequential methods for clinical trials designed to evaluate whether the intervention is superior to the control on at least one endpoint. In addition, the book describes sample size recalculation and the resulting ef...

  2. Metabolic deterioration of the sedentary control group in clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahesh J. Patel; Cris A. Slentz; William E. Kraus

    2011-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials of exercise training regimens in sedentary individuals have provided a mechanistic understanding of the long-term health benefits and consequences of physical activity and inactivity...

  3. Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Group: The University of Michigan Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    cerebrovascular accident , myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or coronary artery stenting within 6 months of enrollment, or a history of venous thrombosis...concept and accruing to six DOD-PCCTC trials including two that stem from major contributions by our group. c11-089 is a randomized, gene fusion...status in the CTCs is associated with response to therapy.  To evaluate changes in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) at baseline and during therapy in all

  4. Population Analysis of Adverse Events in Different Age Groups Using Big Clinical Trials Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jake; Eldredge, Christina; Cho, Chi C; Cisler, Ron A

    2016-10-17

    Understanding adverse event patterns in clinical studies across populations is important for patient safety and protection in clinical trials as well as for developing appropriate drug therapies, procedures, and treatment plans. The objective of our study was to conduct a data-driven population-based analysis to estimate the incidence, diversity, and association patterns of adverse events by age of the clinical trials patients and participants. Two aspects of adverse event patterns were measured: (1) the adverse event incidence rate in each of the patient age groups and (2) the diversity of adverse events defined as distinct types of adverse events categorized by organ system. Statistical analysis was done on the summarized clinical trial data. The incident rate and diversity level in each of the age groups were compared with the lowest group (reference group) using t tests. Cohort data was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov, and 186,339 clinical studies were analyzed; data were extracted from the 17,853 clinical trials that reported clinical outcomes. The total number of clinical trial participants was 6,808,619, and total number of participants affected by adverse events in these trials was 1,840,432. The trial participants were divided into eight different age groups to support cross-age group comparison. In general, children and older patients are more susceptible to adverse events in clinical trial studies. Using the lowest incidence age group as the reference group (20-29 years), the incidence rate of the 0-9 years-old group was 31.41%, approximately 1.51 times higher (P=.04) than the young adult group (20-29 years) at 20.76%. The second-highest group is the 50-59 years-old group with an incidence rate of 30.09%, significantly higher (Pdata suggest that age-associated adverse events should be considered in planning, monitoring, and regulating clinical trials.

  5. Group sequential and confirmatory adaptive designs in clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Wassmer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of the general principles of and techniques for confirmatory adaptive designs. Confirmatory adaptive designs are a generalization of group sequential designs. With these designs, interim analyses are performed in order to stop the trial prematurely under control of the Type I error rate. In adaptive designs, it is also permissible to perform a data-driven change of relevant aspects of the study design at interim stages. This includes, for example, a sample-size reassessment, a treatment-arm selection or a selection of a pre-specified sub-population. Essentially, this adaptive methodology was introduced in the 1990s. Since then, it has become popular and the object of intense discussion and still represents a rapidly growing field of statistical research. This book describes adaptive design methodology at an elementary level, while also considering designing and planning issues as well as methods for analyzing an adaptively planned trial. This includes estimation methods...

  6. Interpreting the clinical importance of group differences in chronic pain clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C; McDermott, Michael P; Peirce-Sandner, Sarah; Burke, Laurie B; Cowan, Penney; Farrar, John T; Hertz, Sharon; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Sampaio, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    An essential component of the interpretation of results of randomized clinical trials of treatments for chronic pain involves the determination of their clinical importance or meaningfulness. This involves two distinct processes--interpreting the clinical importance of individual patient improvements and the clinical importance of group differences--which are frequently misunderstood. In this article, we first describe the essential differences between the interpretation of the clinical importance of patient improvements and of group differences. We then discuss the factors to consider when evaluating the clinical importance of group differences, which include the results of responder analyses of the primary outcome measure, the treatment effect size compared to available therapies, analyses of secondary efficacy endpoints, the safety and tolerability of treatment, the rapidity of onset and durability of the treatment benefit, convenience, cost, limitations of existing treatments, and other factors. The clinical importance of individual patient improvements can be determined by assessing what patients themselves consider meaningful improvement using well-described methods. In contrast, the clinical meaningfulness of group differences must be determined by a multi-factorial evaluation of the benefits and risks of the treatment and of other available treatments for the condition in light of the primary goals of therapy. Such determinations must be conducted on a case-by-case basis, and are ideally informed by patients and their significant others, clinicians, researchers, statisticians, and representatives of society at large.

  7. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  8. International Conference on Harmonisation; choice of control group and related issues in clinical trials; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "E10 Choice of Control Group and Related Issues in Clinical Trials." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance sets forth general principles that are relevant to all controlled trials and are especially pertinent to the major clinical trials intended to demonstrate drug (including biological drug) efficacy. The guidance describes the principal types of control groups and discusses their appropriateness in particular situations. The guidance is intended to assist sponsors and investigators in the choice of control groups for clinical trials.

  9. Recommendations for collection and handling of specimens from group breast cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyland-Jones, Brian R; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bartlett, John; Ellis, Matthew J C; Enos, Rebecca A; Raji, Adekunle; Pins, Michael R; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Hewitt, Stephen M; Forbes, John F; Abramovitz, Mark; Braga, Sofia; Cardoso, Fatima; Harbeck, Nadia; Denkert, Carsten; Jewell, Scott D

    2008-12-01

    Recommendations for specimen collection and handling have been developed for adoption across breast cancer clinical trials conducted by the Breast International Group (BIG)-sponsored Groups and the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored North American Cooperative Groups. These recommendations are meant to promote identifiable standards for specimen collection and handling within and across breast cancer trials, such that the variability in collection/handling practices that currently exists is minimized and specimen condition and quality are enhanced, thereby maximizing results from specimen-based diagnostic testing and research. Three working groups were formed from the Cooperative Group Banking Committee, BIG groups, and North American breast cancer cooperative groups to identify standards for collection and handling of (1) formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue; (2) blood and its components; and (3) fresh/frozen tissue from breast cancer trials. The working groups collected standard operating procedures from multiple group specimen banks, administered a survey on banking practices to those banks, and engaged in a series of discussions from 2005 to 2007. Their contributions were synthesized into this document, which focuses primarily on collection and handling of specimens to the point of shipment to the central bank, although also offers some guidance to central banks. Major recommendations include submission of an FFPE block, whole blood, and serial serum or plasma from breast cancer clinical trials, and use of one fixative and buffer type (10% neutral phosphate-buffered formalin, pH 7) for FFPE tissue across trials. Recommendations for proper handling and shipping were developed for blood, serum, plasma, FFPE, and fresh/frozen tissue.

  10. Hepato-biliary clinical trials and their inclusion in the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group register and reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Alexakis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group (CHBG) is one of the 52 collaborative review groups within The Cochrane Collaboration. The activities of the CHBG focus on collecting hepato-biliary randomized clinical trials (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT), and including them in systematic reviews...... with meta-analyses of the trials. In this overview, we present the growth of The CHBG Controlled Trials Register, as well as the systematic reviews that have been produced since March 1996....

  11. Brain Malignancy Steering Committee clinical trials planning workshop: report from the Targeted Therapies Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Brian M; Galanis, Evanthia; Yung, W K Alfred; Ballman, Karla V; Boyett, James M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Degroot, John F; Huse, Jason T; Mann, Bhupinder; Mason, Warren; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mikkelsen, Tom; Mischel, Paul S; O'Neill, Brian P; Prados, Michael D; Sarkaria, Jann N; Tawab-Amiri, Abdul; Trippa, Lorenzo; Ye, Xiaobu; Ligon, Keith L; Berry, Donald A; Wen, Patrick Y

    2015-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain malignancy and is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, which is related to a paucity of viable treatment options in both the newly diagnosed and recurrent settings. Even so, the rapidly increasing number of targeted therapies being evaluated in oncology clinical trials offers hope for the future. Given the broad range of possibilities for future trials, the Brain Malignancy Steering Committee convened a clinical trials planning meeting that was held at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, on September 19 and 20, 2013. This manuscript reports the deliberations leading up to the event from the Targeted Therapies Working Group and the results of the meeting.

  12. Return of individual research results and incidental findings in the clinical trials cooperative group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Michael; Van Ness, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative group cancer clinical trial system develops experimental therapies and often collects samples from patients for correlative research. The cooperative group bank (CGB) system maintains biobanks with a current policy not to return research results to individuals. An online survey was created, and 10 directors of CGBs completed the surveys asking about understanding and attitudes in changing policies to consider return of incidental findings (IFs) and individual research results (IRRs) of health significance. The potential impact of the 10 consensus recommendations of Wolf et al. presented in this issue are examined. Reidentification of samples is often not problematic; however, changes to the current banking and clinical trial systems would require significant effort to fulfill an obligation of recontact of subjects. Additional resources, as well as a national advisory board would be required to standardize implementation.

  13. Hepato-biliary clinical trials and their inclusion in the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group register and reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Alexakis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group (CHBG) is one of the 52 collaborative review groups within The Cochrane Collaboration. The activities of the CHBG focus on collecting hepato-biliary randomized clinical trials (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT), and including them in systematic reviews wi...

  14. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study ...

  15. Venous thromboembolism and nonsmall cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lisa K; Cheung, Matthew C; Ding, Keyue; Hasan, Baktiar; Seymour, Lesley; Le Maître, Aurélie; Leighl, Natasha B; Shepherd, Frances A

    2009-12-01

    Advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, to the authors' knowledge, the incidence of VTE in early NSCLC, predictors of VTE, and the prognostic significance of VTE in NSCLC have not been explored. Individual patient data from 3 National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group trials were analyzed (n = 1987 patients). Clinical Trial BR.10 was a randomized study of postoperative vinorelbine and cisplatin versus observation in patients with stage IB/II NSCLC (grading determined according to the TNM staging system). Clinical Trial BR.18 was a randomized study of paclitaxel and carboplatin with or without the metalloproteinase inhibitor BMS-275291 in patients with advanced NSCLC. BR.21 was a randomized study of erlotinib versus placebo in patients with previously treated NSCLC. The relations between VTE, treatment, concomitant medications, and patient characteristics were explored in univariate and multivariate analyses. Survival analysis was completed using Cox regression. The incidence of VTE ranged from 0% in patients with early stage NSCLC on the observation arm of BR.10 to 7.9% in patients with advanced NSCLC who received chemotherapy (BR.18). Patients with early stage NSCLC who received chemotherapy (BR.10) and patients with previously treated NSCLC who received erlotinib or placebo (BR.21) had a VTE incidence of approximately 3%. Factors that were found to be predictive of VTE included previous VTE (BR.18; P = .001) and obesity (BR.10; P = .03). In patients with advanced NSCLC, VTE was associated with shorter survival (BR.18: hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.26-2.07 [P = .0002]; BR.21: HR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.57-3.04 [P obesity and a history of VTE. VTE was found to be prognostic in patients with advanced stage NSCLC. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  16. What Are Clinical Trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Clinical ... conducted all the time. The Different Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials related to drugs are classified into ...

  17. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  18. Group sequential control of overall toxicity incidents in clinical trials - non-Bayesian and Bayesian approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jihnhee; Hutson, Alan D; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Kedron, Mary A

    2016-02-01

    In some small clinical trials, toxicity is not a primary endpoint; however, it often has dire effects on patients' quality of life and is even life-threatening. For such clinical trials, rigorous control of the overall incidence of adverse events is desirable, while simultaneously collecting safety information. In this article, we propose group sequential toxicity monitoring strategies to control overall toxicity incidents below a certain level as opposed to performing hypothesis testing, which can be incorporated into an existing study design based on the primary endpoint. We consider two sequential methods: a non-Bayesian approach in which stopping rules are obtained based on the 'future' probability of an excessive toxicity rate; and a Bayesian adaptation modifying the proposed non-Bayesian approach, which can use the information obtained at interim analyses. Through an extensive Monte Carlo study, we show that the Bayesian approach often provides better control of the overall toxicity rate than the non-Bayesian approach. We also investigate adequate toxicity estimation after the studies. We demonstrate the applicability of our proposed methods in controlling the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rate for treating acute ischemic stroke patients.

  19. The effectiveness of a health promotion with group intervention by clinical trial. Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo Osaba Maria-Antonia

    2012-03-01

    responsibility for his/her own health. The rhythm of a weekly session during 8 weeks with recommended activities to put into practice, as well as the support of the group is an opportunity to incorporate healthy habits and make a commitment to self-care. The sheets handed out are a Health Manual that can always be consulted after the workshop ends. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01440738

  20. Cognitive-behavioral group therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordioli Aristides V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a cognitive-behavioral group therapy protocol and to verify its efficacy to reduce obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Methods: An open clinical trial with 32 obsessive-compulsive patients was performed, in which a cognitive-behavioral group therapy protocol of 12 weekly sessions of two hours, in 5 consecutive groups, was applied. The severity of symptoms was rated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive (Y-BOCS, Hamilton Anxiety (HAM A and Hamilton Depression (HAM D scales. The patients were followed up for 3 months after the end of the treatment. Results: There was a significant reduction in the scores of Y-BOCS, HAM A and HAM D scales with the treatment regardless the use of anti-obsessive medications. The rate of improved patients (decrease of > or = 35% in Y-BOCS was 78.1%. Two patients (6.25% dropped out from the study. The effect size calculated for the Y-BOCS scale was 1.75. Conclusions: This study suggests that cognitive-behavioral group therapy reduces obsessive-compulsive symptoms. In addition, patients presented good compliance.

  1. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Andrew; Sikov, William M.; Quesenberry, Matthew I.; Safran, Howard; Khurshid, Humera; Mitchell, Kristen M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Informed consent forms (ICFs) for oncology clinical trials have grown increasingly longer and more complex. We evaluated objective understanding of critical components of informed consent among patients enrolling in contemporary trials of conventional or novel biologic/targeted therapies. Methods We evaluated ICFs for cancer clinical trials for length and readability, and patients registered on those studies were asked to complete a validated 14-question survey assessing their understanding of key characteristics of the trial. Mean scores were compared in groups defined by trial and patient characteristics. Results Fifty patients, of whom half participated in trials of immunotherapy or biologic/targeted agents and half in trials of conventional therapy, completed the survey. On average, ICFs for industry-originated trials (N = 9 trials) were significantly longer (P < .0001) and had lower Flesch ease-of-reading scores (P = .003) than investigator-initiated trials (N = 11). At least 80% of patients incorrectly responded to three key questions which addressed the experimental nature of their trial therapy, its purported efficacy and potential risks relative to alternative treatments. The mean objective understanding score was 76.9±8.8, but it was statistically significantly lower for patients who had not completed high school (P = .011). The scores did not differ significantly by type of cancer therapy (P = .12) or trial sponsor (P = .38). Conclusions Many participants enrolled on cancer trials had poor understanding of essential elements of their trial. In order to ensure true informed consent, innovative approaches, such as expanded in-person counseling adapted to the patient’s education level or cultural characteristics should be evaluated across socio-demographic groups. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01772511 PMID:28235011

  2. [Development of clinical trial education program for pharmaceutical science students through small group discussion and role-playing using protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imakyure, Osamu; Shuto, Hideki; Nishikawa, Fumi; Hagiwara, Yoshifuka; Inoue, Sachiko; Koyanagi, Taeko; Hirakawa, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2010-08-01

    The acquirement of basic knowledge of clinical trials and professional attitude in their practices is a general instructional objective in the Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education. Unfortunately, the previous program of clinical trial education was not effective in the acquirement of a professional attitude in their practices. Then, we developed the new clinical trial education program using protocol through small group discussion (SGD) and roll-playing. Our program consists of 7 steps of practical training. In step 1, the students find some problems after presentation of the protocol including case and prescription. In step 2, they analyse the extracted problems and share the information obtained in SGD. In steps 3 and 5, five clinical case scenarios are presented to the students and they discuss which case is suitable for entry to the clinical trial or which case corresponds to the discontinuance criteria in the present designed protocol. In steps 4 and 6, the roll-playing is performed by teachers and students as doctors and clinical research coordinators (CRC) respectively. Further, we conducted a trial practice based on this program for the students. In the student's self-evaluation into five grades, the average score of the skill acquisition level in each step was 3.8-4.7 grade. Our clinical trial education program could be effective in educating the candidates for CRC or clinical pharmacists.

  3. Types of Treatment: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Information Treatment Types of Treatment Clinical Trials Clinical Trials Clinical Trials SHARE: Print Glossary Taking part in a clinical ... for cancer are based on previous clinical trials. Clinical Trial Service: LLS provides personalized clinical trial navigation when ...

  4. Metoprolol in acute myocardial infarction. Other clinical findings and tolerability. The MIAMI Trial Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-22

    Fifteen minutes after injection there was a fall in mean heart rate (18%, p less than 0.001), systolic blood pressure (10%, p less than 0.001) and rate-pressure product (27%, p less than 0.0001) in the metoprolol group of patients in the MIAMI trial. Hypotension and bradycardia not necessarily associated with withdrawal of drug were more common in the metoprolol group (p less than 0.001). Atrioventricular block I was more common in the metoprolol group (p less than 0.03), whereas no such difference was observed for atrioventricular block II and III, asystole or pacemaker implantations. Left ventricular failure was observed no more often in the metoprolol group. The occurrence of cardiogenic shock also did not differ between the groups. Cardiac glycosides were used more in the placebo group, but diuretic and furosemide usage did not differ. For all patients mean furosemide doses and number of diuretic injections were similar in both treatment groups. Atropine (4.1 vs 6.4%) and sympathomimetic (3.2 vs 4.6%) agents were used more often in the metoprolol group during days 0 to 5 (p less than 0.05). The trial medication was withdrawn temporarily more often in the metoprolol than in the placebo group (p less than 0.001). However, permanent withdrawal of trial medication occurred with a similar frequency overall in both groups. More patients were withdrawn from the study because of cardiovascular reasons in the metoprolol group (9%) than in the placebo group (5%, p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Group psychotherapy for eating disorders: A randomized clinical trial and a pre-treatment moderator and mediator analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir

    disorders in group therapy. We conducted a randomized clinical trial and included 159 adult participants, 156 females and 3 males, diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or eating disorder not otherwise specified according to DSM-IV. Eighty participants were allocated to the experimental...

  6. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Publications Data Sharing and Other Resources Research Clinical Trials & Clinical Research Skip sharing on social media links ... health care providers, and researchers. Find NICHD-Supported Clinical Trials Use this link to find a list of ...

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial is to find out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will ... disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The ...

  8. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health Information > Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical studies depend on people ... vision research in the United States. Basics of Clinical Trials What is a clinical trial? Clinical trials are ...

  9. Modernizing Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology-Friends of Cancer Research Organ Dysfunction, Prior or Concurrent Malignancy, and Comorbidities Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Stuart M; Harvey, R Donald; Damiette Smit, Marie-Anne; Rahman, Atiqur; Thompson, Michael A; Roach, Nancy; Schenkel, Caroline; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Cortazar, Patricia; Walker, Dana; Fehrenbacher, Louis

    2017-10-02

    Purpose Patients with organ dysfunction, prior or concurrent malignancies, and comorbidities are often excluded from clinical trials. Excluding patients on the basis of these factors results in clinical trial participants who are healthier and younger than the overall population of patients with cancer. Methods ASCO and Friends of Cancer Research established a multidisciplinary working group that included experts in trial design and conduct to examine how eligibility criteria could be more inclusive. The group analyzed current eligibility criteria; conducted original data analysis; considered safety concerns, potential benefits, research, and potential hurdles of this approach through discussion; and reached consensus on recommendations regarding updated eligibility criteria that prioritize inclusiveness without compromising patient safety. Results If renal toxicity and clearance are not of direct treatment-related concern, then patients with lower creatinine clearance values of > 30 mL/min should be included in trials. Inclusion of patients with mild to moderate hepatic dysfunction may be possible when the totality of the available nonclinical and clinical data indicates that inclusion is safe. Ejection fraction values should be used with investigator assessment of a patient's risk for heart failure to determine eligibility. Patients with laboratory parameters out of normal range as a result of hematologic disease should be included in trials. Measures of patient functional status should be included in trials to better assess fit versus frail patients. Conclusion Expanding inclusion of these patients will increase the number and diversity of patients in clinical trials and result in a more appropriate population of patients.

  10. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...... of reasons but in particular, to determine whether biomarkers are useful in identifying those individuals most likely to receive clinically important benefits from an intervention; and to determine whether biomarkers are useful for identifying individuals at earlier stages of OA in order to institute...... both academia and industry, convened to discuss issues related to soluble biomarkers and to make recommendations for their use in OA clinical trials based on current knowledge and anticipated benefits. This document summarizes current guidance on use of biomarkers in OA clinical trials...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and her initial results. Nueva Esperanza Para Las Enfermedades Del Corazón 09/23/2014 Milena tuvo un ... Story 09/23/2014 Nueva Esperanza Para Las Enfermedades Del Corazón 09/23/2014 Children and Clinical ...

  12. Moving the Self-Esteem of People with Epilepsy by Supportive Group: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritaya Sawangchareon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with epilepsy (PWE face physical and mental illness, and social stigma, which affect their self-esteem and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a support group on the self-esteem of PWE. Methods: A Quasi-experimental study was performed on 120 PWE in the Epilepsy Clinic at Srinagarind Hospital. The experimental group (N=60 attended the support group before receiving regular health care services. The control group (N=60 received only regular healthcare services. Data was collected by using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale scoring before and after the experiment. The score was analyzed by using a paired t-test and an independent t-test. Results: The study showed that before the experiment, the self–esteem score of the control group was significantly higher than the experimental group. After the experiment, the scores of the control group and the experimental group showed a significant statistical difference. The score in the control group was significantly lower than the experimental group, while the score in the experimental group was significantly higher than before the experiment. Conclusion: The support group improves the self-esteem of PWE. Medical personnel should set up a support group for PWE to enhance their self-esteem.

  13. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...... and index knee, describing interventions, patient-reported and physical performance measures, structural outcome measures, biochemical biomarkers, and reporting recommendations. In summary, the working group identified 25 recommendations that represent the current best practices regarding clinical trials...... that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee OA. These updated recommendations incorporate novel technologies (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and strategies to address the heterogeneity of knee OA....

  14. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical ... protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan ...

  15. Group Versus Individual Physical Therapy for Veterans With Knee Osteoarthritis: Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Bongiorni, Dennis; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Datta, Santanu K; Edelman, David; Hall, Katherine S; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Oddone, Eugene Z; Hoenig, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Efficient approaches are needed for delivering nonpharmacological interventions for management of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This trial compared group-based versus individual physical therapy interventions for management of knee OA. Three hundred twenty patients with knee OA at the VA Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, (mean age=60 years, 88% male, 58% nonwhite) were randomly assigned to receive either the group intervention (group physical therapy; six 1-hour sessions, typically 8 participants per group) or the individual intervention (individual physical therapy; two 1-hour sessions). Both programs included instruction in home exercise, joint protection techniques, and individual physical therapist evaluation. The primary outcome measure was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; range=0-96, higher scores indicate worse symptoms), measured at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. The secondary outcome measure was the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range=0-12, higher scores indicate better performance), measured at baseline and 12 weeks. Linear mixed models assessed the difference in WOMAC scores between arms. At 12 weeks, WOMAC scores were 2.7 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% confidence interval [CI]=-5.9, 0.5; P=.10), indicating no between-group difference. At 24 weeks, WOMAC scores were 1.3 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% CI=-4.6, 2.0; P=.44), indicating no significant between-group difference. At 12 weeks, SPPB scores were 0.1 points lower in the group physical therapy arm compared with the individual physical therapy arm (95% CI=-0.5, 0.2; P=.53), indicating no difference between groups. This study was conducted in one VA medical center. Outcome assessors were blinded, but participants and physical therapists were not blinded. Group physical therapy was not more effective

  16. Cancer and Leukemia Group B Pathology Committee guidelines for tissue microarray construction representing multicenter prospective clinical trial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm, David L; Nielsen, Torsten O; Jewell, Scott D; Rohrer, Daniel C; Broadwater, Gloria; Waldman, Frederic; Mitchell, Kisha A; Singh, Baljit; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Frankel, Wendy L; Magliocco, Anthony M; Lara, Jonathan F; Hsi, Eric D; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Badve, Sunil S; Chen, Beiyun; Ravdin, Peter M; Schilsky, Richard L; Thor, Ann; Berry, Donald A

    2011-06-01

    Practice-changing evidence requires confirmation, preferably in multi-institutional clinical trials. The collection of tissue within such trials has enabled biomarker studies and evaluation of companion diagnostic tests. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) have become a standard approach in many cooperative oncology groups. A principal goal is to maximize the number of assays with this precious tissue. However, production strategies for these arrays have not been standardized, possibly decreasing the value of the study. In this article, members of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B Pathology Committee relay our experiences as array facility directors and propose guidelines regarding the production of high-quality TMAs for cooperative group studies. We also discuss statistical issues arising from having a proportion of patients available for TMAs and the possibility that patients with TMAs fail to represent the greater study population.

  17. Changes in health-related quality of life across three post-heart transplantation stages: preoperative extracorporeal membrane versus non-extracorporeal membrane group/clinical trial plan group versus non-clinical trial plan group in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, P-H; Wang, S-S; Shih, F-J

    2012-05-01

    The aims of this research were to compare changes in overall health-related quality of life (HRQoL), working competence (WC), physical functions (PF), and quality of sleep across 3 crucial post-heart transplantation (HT) stages (1 month, 6 months, and 1 year post-HT) between the following: (1) preoperative extracorporeal membrane (preop-ECMO) versus non-ECMO group and (2) postoperative Clinical Trial Plan (CTP) group versus non-CTP group in Taiwan. A between-method triangulation design was used. Subjects who had undergone HT in the last 1-4 years were recruited from a leading medical center in Taipei. Quantitative data were collected using Visual Analog scale (VAS) and Taiwan's version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL) questionnaire. Semistructured qualitative questions were added to explore the factors influencing the changes in social domains of HRQoL. A total of 62 heart transplant recipients (HTRs) participated in this study. Their ages ranged from 20 to 70 (mean, 47.16 ± 12.09) years; 80.6% were male. Compared with the subjects with preop-ECMO, HRQoL, WC, and PF of the subjects without preop-ECMO were less at 1 month post-HT; the difference reached statistical significance for HRQoL and PF for 1 month post-HT, but they recovered at the 6 months post-HT stage. HTRs who had participated in the CTP had higher HRQoL and perceived WC in the period of 1 month post-HT, 6 months post-HT, and 1 year post-HT as compared with the group not in CTP; meanwhile, the difference was statistically significant for HRQoL at 1 month post-HT and 6 months post-HT and for PF at 1 month post-HT. The efficacy of postop-CTP including HRQoL, WC, and PF was promising across the 3 post-HT stages. Postop-CTP was suggested both clinically and was shown to be statistically significant to HTR's recovery of their health status. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A generalised model for individualising a treatment recommendation based on group-level evidence from randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Maura; Sinclair, John C

    2013-08-13

    Randomised controlled trials report group-level treatment effects. However, an individual patient confronting a treatment decision needs to know whether that person's expected treatment benefit will exceed the expected treatment harm. We describe a flexible model for individualising a treatment decision. It individualises group-level results from randomised trials using clinical prediction guides. We constructed models that estimate the size of individualised absolute risk reduction (ARR) for the target outcome that is required to offset individualised absolute risk increase (ARI) for the treatment harm. Inputs to the model include estimates for the individualised predicted absolute treatment benefit and harm, and the relative value assigned by the patient to harm/benefit. A decision rule recommends treatment when the predicted benefit exceeds the predicted harm, value-adjusted. We also derived expressions for the maximum treatment harm, or the maximum relative value for harm/benefit, above which treatment would not be recommended. For the simpler model, including one kind of benefit and one kind of harm, the individualised ARR required to justify treatment was expressed as required ARRtarget(i)=ARIharm(i) × RVharm/target(i). A complex model was also developed, applicable to treatments causing multiple kinds of benefits and/or harms. We demonstrated the applicability of the models to treatments tested in superiority trials (either placebo or active control, either fixed harm or variable harm) and non-inferiority trials. Individualised treatment recommendations can be derived using a model that applies clinical prediction guides to the results of randomised trials in order to identify which individual patients are likely to derive a clinically important benefit from the treatment. The resulting individualised prediction-based recommendations require validation by comparison with strategies of treat all or treat none.

  19. Outcome assessment for clinical trials: how many adjudicators do we need? Canadian Lung Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, S D; Cook, D J; Guyatt, G H; King, D; Troyan, S

    1997-02-01

    Considerable effort is often expended to adjudicate outcomes in clinical trials, but little has been written on the administration of the adjudication process and its possible impact on study results. As a case study, we describe the function and performance of an adjudication committee in a large randomized trial of two diagnostic approaches to potentially operable lung cancer. Up to five independent adjudicators independently determined two primary outcomes: tumor status at death or at final follow-up and the cause of death. Patients for whom there was any disagreement were discussed in committee until a consensus was achieved. We describe the pattern of agreement among the adjudicators and with the final consensus result. Additionally, we model the adjudication process and predict the results if a smaller committee had been used. We found that reducing the number of adjudicators from five to two or three would probably have changed the consensus outcome in less than 10% of cases. Correspondingly, the effect on the final study results (comparing primary outcomes in both randomized arms) would have been altered very little. Even using a single adjudicator would not have affected the results substantially. About 90 minutes of person-time per patient was required for activities directly related to the adjudication process, or approximately 6 months of full time work for the entire study. This level of effort could be substantially reduced by using fewer adjudicators with little impact on the results. Thus, we suggest that when high observer agreement is demonstrated or anticipated, adjudication committees should consist of no more than three members. Further work is needed to evaluate if smaller committees are adequate to detect small but important treatment effects or if they compromise validity when the level of adjudicator agreement is lower.

  20. Informed Consent (Clinical Trials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Cancer Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs ... Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer ...

  1. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  2. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to This Site Terms and Conditions Disclaimer ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly ... of human participants conducted around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly ...

  3. Modernizing Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology-Friends of Cancer Research Brain Metastases Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nancy U; Prowell, Tatiana; Tan, Antoinette R; Kozak, Marina; Rosen, Oliver; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; White, Julia; Sul, Joohee; Perkins, Louise; Beal, Katherine; Gaynor, Richard; Kim, Edward S

    2017-10-02

    Purpose Broadening trial eligibility to improve accrual and access and to better reflect intended-to-treat populations has been recognized as a priority. Historically, patients with brain metastases have been understudied, because of restrictive eligibility across all phases of clinical trials. Methods In 2016, after a literature search and series of teleconferences, a multistakeholder workshop was convened. Our working group focused on developing consensus recommendations regarding the inclusion of patients with brain metastases in clinical trials, as part of a broader effort that encompassed minimum age, HIV status, and organ dysfunction. The working group attempted to balance the needs of protecting patient safety, facilitating access to investigational therapies, and ensuring trial integrity. On the basis of input at the workshop, guidelines were further refined and finalized. Results The working group identified three key populations: those with treated/stable brain metastases, defined as patients who have received prior therapy for their brain metastases and whose CNS disease is radiographically stable at study entry; those with active brain metastases, defined as new and/or progressive brain metastases at the time of study entry; and those with leptomeningeal disease. In most circumstances, the working group encourages the inclusion of patients with treated/stable brain metastases in clinical trials. A framework of key considerations for patients with active brain metastases was developed. For patients with leptomeningeal disease, inclusion of a separate cohort in both early-phase and later-phase trials is recommended, if CNS activity is anticipated and when relevant to the specific disease type. Conclusion Expanding eligibility to be more inclusive of patients with brain metastasis is justified in many cases and may speed the development of effective therapies in this area of high clinical need.

  4. Randomized clinical trial comparing affect regulation and supportive group therapies for victimization-related PTSD with incarcerated women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julian D; Chang, Rocío; Levine, Joan; Zhang, Wanli

    2013-06-01

    Traumatic victimization and associated problems with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and affect dysregulation are prevalent among incarcerated women, but there is limited evidence to support psychotherapeutic interventions for these problems in this underserved population. A group psychotherapy designed to enhance affect regulation without trauma memory processing-Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET)-was compared to a supportive group therapy (SGT) in a randomized clinical trial with 72 incarcerated women with full or partial PTSD. Both interventions achieved statistically significant reductions in PTSD and associated symptom severity and increased self-efficacy. Dropout rates for both interventions were low (PTSD and associated symptoms. Experiential-focused supportive group therapy also may reduce victimization-related PTSD and associated symptoms. Both group therapy approaches warrant further study with this vulnerable population.

  5. Effectiveness of group cognitive–behavioral treatment for childhood anxiety disorders in community clinics: benchmarking against an efficacy trial at a university clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Hjalti; Arendt, Kristian Bech; Jørgensen, Lisbeth

    Background: The efficacy of a group cognitive behavioural therapy program (Cool Kids) of childhood anxiety has been demonstrated in a university-clinic setting in Australia (Hudson et al., 2009) and findings from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) at a University-clinic supports its efficacy...... Service in Denmark. Method: Psychologists and psychiatrists from three Child and Adolescent Psychiatry clinics and four community bases School Counselling Services are trained and supervised in a manualized group CBT treatment program (Cool Kids) for Childhood anxiety. Ninety-six children with anxiety...... disorders aged between 7 - 14 are expected to be included, equally divided between Psychiatric clinics (n = 48) and School Counselling services (n =48). The treatment consists of 10 2-hour group sessions with 5-6 children and their parents. Results are measured by independent diagnostic interviews...

  6. A randomized clinical trial comparing general exercise, McKenzie treatment and a control group in patients with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellman, Görel; Oberg, Birgitta

    2002-07-01

    Seventy-seven patients with neck pain in the primary health care were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial and randomly assigned to general exercise, McKenzie treatment, or a control group. Seventy patients completed the treatment; response rate 93% at 12-month follow-up. All three groups showed significant improvement regarding the main outcomes, pain intensity and Neck Disability Index, even at 12-month follow-up, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In all, 79% reported that they were better or completely restored after treatment, although 51% reported constant/daily pain. In the McKenzie group compared with the control group, a tendency toward greater improvement was noted for pain intensity at 3 weeks and at 6-month follow-up, and for post-treatment Neck Disability Index. Significant improvement in Distress and Risk Assessment Method scores was shown in the McKenzie group only. The three groups had similar recurrence rates, although after 12 months the McKenzie group showed a tendency toward fewer visits for additional health care. The study did not provide a definite evidence of treatment efficacy in patients with neck pain, however, there was a tendency toward a better outcome with the two active alternatives compared with the control group.

  7. Headache : The placebo effects in the control groups in randomized clinical trials; An analysis of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Femke M.; Voogt-Bode, Annieke; Passchier, Jan; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Koes, Bart W.; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the effects in the placebo and "no treatment" arms in trials with headache patients. Method: This is a secondary analysis of randomized controlled trials from 8 systematic reviews and selected trials with a "no treatment" or placebo control group.

  8. Bayesian decision-theoretic group sequential clinical trial design based on a quadratic loss function: a frequentist evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Roger J; Lipsky, Ari M; Berry, Donald A

    2007-01-01

    The decision to terminate a controlled clinical trial at the time of an interim analysis is perhaps best made by weighing the value of the likely additional information to be gained if further subjects are enrolled against the various costs of that further enrollment. The most commonly used statistical plans for interim analysis (eg, O'Brien-Fleming), however, are based on a frequentist approach that makes no such comparison. A two-armed Bayesian decision-theoretic clinical trial design is developed for a disease with two possible outcomes, incorporating a quadratic decision loss function and using backward induction to quantify the cost of future enrollment. Monte Carlo simulation is used to compare frequentist error rates and mean required sample sizes for these Bayesian designs with the two-tailed frequentist group-sequential designs of, O'Brien-Fleming and Pocock. When the terminal decision loss function is chosen to yield typical frequentist error rates, the mean sample sizes required by the Bayesian designs are smaller than those of the corresponding O'Brien-Fleming frequentist designs, largely due to the more frequent interim analyses typically used with the Bayesian designs and the ability of the Bayesian designs to terminate early and conclude equivalence. Adding stochastic curtailment to the frequentist designs and using the same number of interim analyses results in largely equivalent trials. An example of a Bayesian design for the data safety monitoring of a clinical trial is given. Our design assumes independence of the probabilities of success in the two trial arms. Additionally, we have chosen non-informative priors and selected loss functions to produce trials with appealing frequentist error rates, rather than choosing priors that reflect realistic prior information and loss functions that reflect true costs. Our Bayesian designs allow interpretation of the final results along either Bayesian or frequentist lines. For the Bayesian, they minimize

  9. The Effect of Spiritual and Religious Group Psychotherapy on Suicidal Ideation in Depressed Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Suicide is a great economical, social and public health problem. It is prevalent worldwide and has a lot of negative effects on individuals, families and society. Depression is often prelude to Suicide. An important part of the treatment of the mentally ill patients is spiritual-religious psychotherapy which should be done after physical treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of spiritual and religious group psychotherapy on suicidal ideation in depressed patients. Methods: 51 depressed patients with suicidal ideation from Razi hospital (Tabriz, Iran participated in this clinical trial. To collect Data questionnaire was used which included demographic and Beck Suicide Scale Ideation. Experimental group participated in 10 sessions of group psychotherapy. Each section lasted 1 hour. Two weeks after the last section post test was done. Statistical software SPSS ver 13 was used for data analysis. Results: Results of independent t-test revealed no difference between two groups in terms of suicidal ideation before intervention but after study there is a statistical difference. Also the results of ANCOVA test showed a significant relationship between spiritual group therapy and decrease in suicidal ideation, so that this intervention can make 57% of variance in suicidal ideation of experimental group.Conclusion: Regarding positive effect of spiritual and religious group psychotherapy on decreasing suicidal ideation of depressed patients, we suggest this intervention to be held in Psychiatric Wards and also more study on depression and other psychiatric patients with greater sample size would be helpful.

  10. The Effectiveness of Group Therapy on the Family Functioning of Individuals under Methadone Treatment: A Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaaddini, Hassan; Ebrahim-Nejad, Batoul; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of opioid-dependent patients in Iran are now being treated by methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). One of the social complications of substance dependency is family disorganization and a decrease in marital satisfaction. This study aimed to determine the effect of group therapy based on the transtheoretical model of change on family functioning of the patients under MMT. In this open clinical trial, 48 married people who were between the ages of 19 and 40, and under methadone maintenance therapy had been assigned to two random groups of test and control. In the intervention group, group therapy was held based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change, for 29 sessions (two times a week). To assess the overall health and pathology of the family, the two questionnaires Family Assessment Device (FAD) and Marital Conflict Questionnaire (MCQ), both with approved reliability and validity, were used. A total of 24 patients in the control group and 23 patients in the intervention group (one person withdrew from the study in the early meetings) were evaluated. The mean ± SD of age of the control and intervention groups, respectively, were 33.9 ± 4.8 and 32.8 ± 4.3 (P = 0.40). Before the intervention began the average score of FAD and MCQ questionnaires between the two groups was comparable. After the intervention was over the score of each of the two questionnaires, with the adjustment of the baseline score, was lower in the treatment group than the control group, the difference was marginally significant (P family functioning of the MMT treated patients showed improvement. Therefore, with the use of stage-of-change and group therapy, steps can be taken for improving family functioning of these patients. Due to the relatively long duration and frequency of treatment sessions the feasibility of this intervention needs further research.

  11. Challenges relating to solid tumour brain metastases in clinical trials, part 1: patient population, response, and progression. A report from the RANO group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nancy U; Lee, Eudocia Q; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Barani, Igor J; Baumert, Brigitta G; Brown, Paul D; Camidge, D Ross; Chang, Susan M; Dancey, Janet; Gaspar, Laurie E; Harris, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Kalkanis, Steven N; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Linskey, Mark E; Macdonald, David R; Margolin, Kim; Mehta, Minesh P; Schiff, David; Soffietti, Riccardo; Suh, John H; van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic outcomes for patients with brain metastases need to improve. A critical review of trials specifically addressing brain metastases shows key issues that could prevent acceptance of results by regulatory agencies, including enrolment of heterogeneous groups of patients and varying definitions of clinical endpoints. Considerations specific to disease, modality, and treatment are not consistently addressed. Additionally, the schedule of CNS imaging and consequences of detection of new or progressive brain metastases in trials mainly exploring the extra-CNS activity of systemic drugs are highly variable. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group is an independent, international, collaborative effort to improve the design of trials in patients with brain tumours. In this two-part series, we review the state of clinical trials of brain metastases and suggest a consensus recommendation for the development of criteria for future clinical trials.

  12. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  13. Implementation of remote 3-dimensional image guided radiation therapy quality assurance for radiation therapy oncology group clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yunfeng; Galvin, James M; Parker, William; Breen, Stephen; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Papiez, Lech S; Li, X Allen; Bednarz, Greg; Chen, Wenzhou; Xiao, Ying

    2013-01-01

    To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA for RTOG clinical trials is feasible and effective

  14. The DEMO trial: a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of strength versus aerobic versus relaxation training for patients with mild to moderate depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefit and harm of exercise training in adults with clinical depression. METHOD: The DEMO trial is a randomized pragmatic trial for patients with unipolar depression conducted from January 2005 through July 2007. Patients were referred from general practitioners or psych......OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefit and harm of exercise training in adults with clinical depression. METHOD: The DEMO trial is a randomized pragmatic trial for patients with unipolar depression conducted from January 2005 through July 2007. Patients were referred from general practitioners...

  15. Designing clinical trials for amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) study design leads to one of the highest levels of evidence, and is a preferred study design over cohort studies, because randomization reduces bias and maximizes the chance that even unknown confounding factors will be balanced between treatment groups. Recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies in amblyopia can be taken together to formulate an evidence-based approach to amblyopia treatment, which is presented in this review. When designing future clinical studies of amblyopia treatment, issues such as regression to the mean, sample size and trial duration must be considered, since each may impact study results and conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Racial Differences in Response to Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection: An AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) Study Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaudo, Heather J.; Smith, Kimberly Y.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Flexner, Charles; Haubrich, Richard; Chen, Yun; Fischl, Margaret A.; Schackman, Bruce R.; Riddler, Sharon A.; Gulick, Roy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the United States, black individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have higher rates of virologic failure on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and of death compared to white individuals. The cause for these disparities is uncertain. We sought to examine differences in virologic outcomes among antiretroviral-naive clinical trial participants starting randomized ART and to investigate factors to explain the differences. Methods. Individual-level data from participants initiating ART in 5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group studies were analyzed. Included studies were those conducted during 1998–2006 with a primary outcome of virologic failure. The primary outcome measure was time to virologic failure, regardless of ART changes. Results. A total of 2495 individuals (1151 black; 1344 white) were included with a median follow-up of 129 weeks. Compared to whites, blacks had an increased hazard of virologic failure (hazard ratio [HR]; 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4–1.9; P < .001), with no evidence of heterogeneity across regimens (P = .97); the association remained after adjustment for measured confounders (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2–1.6; P < .001). Increased hazard of virologic failure was associated with younger age, higher pretreatment HIV type 1 RNA level, lower pretreatment CD4 cell count, hepatitis C antibody, less education, and recent nonadherence to treatment. Sensitivity analyses with different endpoint definitions demonstrated similar results. Conclusions. In this analysis, blacks had a 40% higher virologic failure risk than whites that was not explained by measured confounders. The observation was consistent over a range of regimens, suggesting that the difference may be driven by social factors; however, biological factors cannot be ruled out. Further research should identify the sources of racial disparities and develop strategies to reduce them. PMID:24046302

  17. Social media in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape.

  18. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  19. Toward comprehensive management tailored to prognostic factors of patients with clinical stages I and II in Hodgkin's disease. The EORTC Lymphoma Group controlled clinical trials: 1964-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, M; Henry-Amar, M; Carde, P; Burgers, J M; Hayat, M; Van der Schueren, E; Noordijk, E M; Tanguy, A; Meerwaldt, J H; Thomas, J

    1989-01-01

    From 1964 to 1987, the EORTC Lymphoma Group conducted four consecutive controlled clinical trials on clinical stages I and II Hodgkin's disease in which 1,579 patients were entered. From the onset the main aim of these trials was to identify the subsets of patients who could be treated safely by regional radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, several prognostic indicators were prospectively registered and progressively used in the trial protocols for the delineation of the favorable and unfavorable subgroups as soon as they were recognized of high predictive value. In the H2 trial (1972 to 1976), the histologic subtype was the only variable taken into account for the therapeutic strategy and the staging laparotomy findings were found to be of prognostic value only in patients with favorable prognostic indicators. In the H5 trial (1977 to 1982), patients were subdivided into two subgroups according to six prognostic indicators. Patients with favorable features were submitted to a staging laparotomy (lap); lap negative patients were randomized between mantle field RT and mantle field plus paraaortic RT. Disease free survival (DFS) and total survival (S) were similar in the two arms. Among patients with unfavorable features, DFS and S were significantly higher in the arm treated by combination of mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone (MOPP) chemotherapy (CT) and RT than in the arm treated by total nodal irradiation. Nevertheless, in patients below the age of 40, the overall survival rates were equivalent in the two arms. In the H6 trial, the delineation of the favorable subgroup was based on (a) absence of systemic symptoms and elevated ESR, (b) no more than one or two lymph node areas involved. The aim of the study was to assess the impact on survival of a therapeutic strategy including staging laparotomy. At a 4-year follow-up, no difference in survival was evidenced. In patients with unfavorable prognostic indicators, 3 MOPP-RT-3 MOPP were compared with 3

  20. Looking for the new preparations for antibacterial therapy III. New antimicrobial agents from the quinolones group in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    There is an essential need for searching for the new compounds effective in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This paper is the third part of a series associated with the exploration of new antibacterial agents and it discusses the compounds belonging to the group of quinolones and substances possessing a hybrid structure composed of the quinolone molecule and other compounds. Eleven new substances at the stage of clinical trials are presented. Three of them belong to the group of non-fluorinated quinolone (nemonoxacin, ozenoxacin and KRP-AM 1977X), while six are the quinolones containing fluorine atom at 6 position of the carbon atom in the quinoline ring (zabofloxacin, finafloxacin, delafloxacin, JNJ-Q2, WCK771 and KPI-10). The remaining two compounds possess a hybrid construction composed of the quinolone structure and other molecules (cadazolid and CBR-2092). There is a chance in the near future, that the presented compounds can extend the range of existing antibacterial drugs and provide an alternative to currently available medicinal products.

  1. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may ... Institutes of Health | U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Customer Support | Accessibility | Copyright | Privacy | Viewers and Players

  2. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases...

  3. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or prevent a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may compare existing ...

  4. Falsificationism and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, S J

    1991-11-01

    The relevance of the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper to the planning, conduct and analysis of clinical trials is examined. It is shown that blinding and randomization can only be regarded as valuable for the purpose of refuting universal hypotheses. The purpose of inclusion criteria is also examined. It is concluded that a misplaced belief in induction is responsible for many false notions regarding clinical trials.

  5. The outcome of control groups in clinical trials of conservative treatments for chronic mechanical neck pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagino Carol

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is highly prevalent in Western societies, with about 15% of females and 10% of males suffering with it at any time. The course of untreated chronic neck pain patients in clinical trials has not been well-defined and the placebo effect has not been clarified. Methods A systematic review of RCT's of conservative treatments for chronic mechanical neck pain was conducted. Studies were excluded if they did not include a control group, if they involved subjects with whiplash injuries, a predominance of headache or arm pain associated with chronic neck pain and if only one treatment was reported. Only studies scoring 3–5 out of 5 on the Jadad Scale for quality were included in the final analysis. Data on change in pain scores of subjects in both placebo (PL as well as no-treatment (NT control groups were analyzed. Mean changes in pain scores as well as effect sizes were calculated, summarized and compared between these groups. Results Twenty (20 studies, 5 in the NT group and 15 in the PL group, with outcome intervals ranging from 1–52 weeks were included in the final analysis. The mean [95% CI] effect size of change in pain ratings in the no-treatment control studies at outcome points up to 10 weeks was 0.18 [-0.05, 0.41] and for outcomes from 12–52 weeks it was 0.4 [0.12, 0.68]. In the placebo control groups it was 0.50 [0.10, 0.90] at up to 10 weeks and 0.33. [-1.97, 2.66] at 12–24 weeks. None of the comparisons between the no-treatment and placebo groups were statistically significant. Conclusion It appears that the changes in pain scores in subjects with chronic neck pain not due to whiplash who are enrolled in no-treatment and placebo control groups were similarly small and not significantly different. As well, they do not appear to increase over longer-term follow-up.

  6. Acupuncture treatment for pain: systematic review of randomised clinical trials with acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, and no acupuncture groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the analgesic effect of acupuncture and placebo acupuncture and to explore whether the type of the placebo acupuncture is associated with the estimated effect of acupuncture. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of three armed randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES......: Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Biological Abstracts, and PsycLIT. Data extraction and analysis Standardised mean differences from each trial were used to estimate the effect of acupuncture and placebo acupuncture. The different types of placebo acupuncture were ranked from 1 to 5 according...... to assessment of the possibility of a physiological effect, and this ranking was meta-regressed with the effect of acupuncture. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirteen trials (3025 patients) involving a variety of pain conditions were eligible. The allocation of patients was adequately concealed in eight trials...

  7. Acupuncture treatment for pain: systematic review of randomised clinical trials with acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, and no acupuncture groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the analgesic effect of acupuncture and placebo acupuncture and to explore whether the type of the placebo acupuncture is associated with the estimated effect of acupuncture. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of three armed randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES......: Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Biological Abstracts, and PsycLIT. Data extraction and analysis Standardised mean differences from each trial were used to estimate the effect of acupuncture and placebo acupuncture. The different types of placebo acupuncture were ranked from 1 to 5 according...... to assessment of the possibility of a physiological effect, and this ranking was meta-regressed with the effect of acupuncture. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirteen trials (3025 patients) involving a variety of pain conditions were eligible. The allocation of patients was adequately concealed in eight trials...

  8. Confronting diversity in the production of clinical evidence goes beyond merely including under-represented groups in clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronks, Karien; Wieringa, Nicolien F.; Hardon, Anita

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that outcomes of health care differ by patient characteristics, such as gender and ethnicity. If evidence-based medicine is to improve quality of care for all patients, it is essential to take this diversity into account when designing clinical studies. So far, this noti

  9. The DEMO trial: a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of strength versus aerobic versus relaxation training for patients with mild to moderate depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Saltin, Bengt; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefit and harm of exercise training in adults with clinical depression. METHOD: The DEMO trial is a randomized pragmatic trial for patients with unipolar depression conducted from January 2005 through July 2007. Patients were referred from general practitioners......: Our findings do not support a biologically mediated effect of exercise on symptom severity in depressed patients, but they do support a beneficial effect of strength training on work capacity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: (ClinicalTrials.gov) Identifier: NCT00103415....... or psychiatrists and were eligible if they fulfilled the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, criteria for unipolar depression and were aged between 18 and 55 years. Patients (N = 165) were allocated to supervised strength, aerobic, or relaxation training during a 4-month period. The primary...

  10. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease or prevent a disease from returning. Supportive Care Trials In supportive care trials, researchers look for ways to make life ... groups, and various types of social interventions. Supportive care interventions are not intended to treat or cure ...

  11. Clinical Trial Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Am I Protected? Mark Bowden / iStock Ethical guidelines The goal of clinical research is to develop knowledge that improves human ... data and decide whether the results have medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in peer-reviewed scientific ...

  12. Clinical risk assessment of organ manifestations in systemic sclerosis: a report from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research group database

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, U.; A. Tyndall; Czirják, L; Denton, C.; Farge-Bancel, D.; Kowal-Bielecka, O.; Müller-Ladner, U; Bocelli-Tyndall, C.; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Ribi, Camillo; Chizzolini, Carlo; EUSTAR Group

    2007-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem autoimmune disease, which is classified into a diffuse cutaneous (dcSSc) and a limited cutaneous (lcSSc) subset according to the skin involvement. In order to better understand the vascular, immunological and fibrotic processes of SSc and to guide its treatment, the EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research (EUSTAR) group was formed in June 2004.

  13. Organisation and management of the first clinical trial of BNCT in Europe (EORTC protocol 11961).EORTC BNCT study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerwein, W; Moss, R; Rassow, J; Stecher-Rasmussen, F; Hideghéty, K; Wolbers, J G; Sack, H

    1999-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is based on the ability of the isotope 10B to capture thermal neutrons and to disintegrate instantaneously producing high LET particles. The only neutron beam available in Europe for such a treatment is based at the European High Flux Reactor HFR at Petten (The Netherlands). The European Commission, owners of the reactor, decided that the potential benefit of the facility should be opened to all European citizens and therefore insisted on a multinational approach to perform the first clinical trial in Europe on BNCT. This precondition had to be respected as well as the national laws and regulations. Together with the Dutch authorities actions were undertaken to overcome the obvious legal problems. Furthermore, the clinical trial at Petten takes place in a nuclear research reactor, which apart from being conducted in a non-hospital environment, is per se known to be dangerous. It was therefore of the utmost importance that special attention is given to safety, beyond normal rules, and to the training of staff. In itself, the trial is an unusual Phase I study, introducing a new drug with a new irradiation modality, with really an unknown dose-effect relationship. This trial must follow optimal procedures, which underscore the quality and qualified manner of performance.

  14. Defining responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical trials of invasive fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Brahm H; Herbrecht, Raoul; Stevens, David A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Sobel, Jack; Viscoli, Claudio; Walsh, Thomas J; Maertens, Johan; Patterson, Thomas F; Perfect, John R; Dupont, Bertrand; Wingard, John R; Calandra, Thierry; Kauffman, Carol A; Graybill, John R; Baden, Lindsey R; Pappas, Peter G; Bennett, John E; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Cordonnier, Catherine; Viviani, Maria Anna; Bille, Jacques; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Wheat, L Joseph; Graninger, Wolfgang; Bow, Eric J; Holland, Steven M; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Dismukes, William E; De Pauw, Ben E

    2008-09-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) have become major causes of morbidity and mortality among highly immunocompromised patients. Authoritative consensus criteria to diagnose IFD have been useful in establishing eligibility criteria for antifungal trials. There is an important need for generation of consensus definitions of outcomes of IFD that will form a standard for evaluating treatment success and failure in clinical trials. Therefore, an expert international panel consisting of the Mycoses Study Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer was convened to propose guidelines for assessing treatment responses in clinical trials of IFDs and for defining study outcomes. Major fungal diseases that are discussed include invasive disease due to Candida species, Aspergillus species and other molds, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Coccidioides immitis. We also discuss potential pitfalls in assessing outcome, such as conflicting clinical, radiological, and/or mycological data and gaps in knowledge.

  15. [Reading a clinical trial report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, J F; Chassany, O

    2000-04-15

    To improve medical knowledge by reading clinical trial reports it is necessary to check for the respect of the methodological rules, and to analyze and criticize the results. A control group and a randomisation are always necessary. Double blind assessment, sample size calculation, intention to treat analysis, a unique primary end point are also important. The conclusions of the trial are valid only for the population included and the clinical signification of the results, depending on the control treatment, has to be evaluated. Respect of the reading rules is necessary to assess the reliability of the conclusions, in order to promote evidence-based practice.

  16. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available skip navigation Help Search home health topics A-Z Videos A-Z about us Customer Support NIH SeniorHealth Built with You in Mind Resize Text: A A A Change Contrast print sign up Share Home > Health topics A-Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About ...

  17. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not know if you are taking the medicine or the placebo until the clinical trial is over. How do ... can already get by prescription ) or sugar pills ( placebos ) with the new medicine may last longer than Phases I and II ...

  18. Ethics and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O; Duracinský, M

    1999-01-01

    The current reference guideline about ethics in clinical trials is the Declaration of Helsinki of human rights in medical research. Three major principles are emphasised: respect of the patient to accept or not to participate in a trial, the constraints and the presumed risks must be acceptable for patients included in a study, and vulnerable subjects should not participate in studies. The investigator is responsible for obtaining a free and well-informed consent from patients before their inclusion in a study. Where possible, a new drug should always first be compared to placebo in order to prove its superiority. Else, a small-sized trial comparing a new drug versus a reference treatment can lead to an erroneous conclusion of absence of difference. Moreover, good results or improvement are obtained in at least 30% of cases with placebo, whatever the disease. The use of placebo is unethical in life-threatening diseases and when an effective proved drug exists. The use of placebo is ethical in severe diseases with no efficient drug, in some severe diseases even when an active reference treatment is available, and in all moderate and functional diseases. In order to detect flawed studies, most journals now ask for any manuscript submitted and reporting results of a randomised clinical trial to join a checklist in order to verify the quality of the trial. Finally, it remains the responsibility of the doctor to decide whether or not a protocol is ethical, to participate or not and to include patients or not.

  19. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials Insurance Coverage and Clinical Trials How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan Federal Government Programs Patient Safety Informed Consent Children's Assent Scientific Review Ending Trials Early Deciding to Take Part ...

  20. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  1. Standardization of pathologic evaluation and reporting of postneoadjuvant specimens in clinical trials of breast cancer: recommendations from an international working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Elena; Bossuyt, Veerle; Viale, Giuseppe; Cameron, David; Badve, Sunil; Denkert, Carsten; MacGrogan, Gaëtan; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Boughey, Judy; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Dixon, J Michael; Esserman, Laura; Fastner, Gerd; Kuehn, Thorsten; Peintinger, Florentia; von Minckwitz, Gunter; White, Julia; Yang, Wei; Symmans, W Fraser

    2015-09-01

    Neoadjuvant systemic therapy is being used increasingly in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Response, in the form of pathological complete response, is a validated and evaluable surrogate end point of survival after neoadjuvant therapy. Thus, pathological complete response has become a primary end point for clinical trials. However, there is a current lack of uniformity in the definition of pathological complete response. A review of standard operating procedures used by 28 major neoadjuvant breast cancer trials and/or 25 sites involved in such trials identified marked variability in specimen handling and histologic reporting. An international working group was convened to develop practical recommendations for the pathologic assessment of residual disease in neoadjuvant clinical trials of breast cancer and information expected from pathology reports. Systematic sampling of areas identified by informed mapping of the specimen and close correlation with radiological findings is preferable to overly exhaustive sampling, and permits taking tissue samples for translational research. Controversial areas are discussed, including measurement of lesion size, reporting of lymphovascular space invasion and the presence of isolated tumor cells in lymph nodes after neoadjuvant therapy, and retesting of markers after treatment. If there has been a pathological complete response, this must be clearly stated, and the presence/absence of residual ductal carcinoma in situ must be described. When there is residual invasive carcinoma, a comment must be made as to the presence/absence of chemotherapy effect in the breast and lymph nodes. The Residual Cancer Burden is the preferred method for quantifying residual disease in neoadjuvant clinical trials in breast cancer; other methods can be included per trial protocols and regional preference. Posttreatment tumor staging using the Tumor-Node-Metastasis system should be included. These recommendations for standardized

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: 4'-Thio-ara-C, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate; ABT-089, AD-237, AF-37702, alvocidib hydrochloride, apricitabine, armodafinil, atrasentan, AVE-5883, avian influenza vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Banoxantrone, BIBF-1120; CD34+ cells, certolizumab pegol, CHIR-258, cilansetron, CoFactor, CX-3543, cystemustine; D-003, dexloxiglumide, DMXB-anabaseine; Ecogramostim, elcometrine, elcometrine/ethinylestradiol, etravirine; Fenretinide, fingolimod hydrochloride, fospropofol disodium; Gaboxadol, gestodene, glutamine; Human insulin, hyaluronic acid; Incyclinide, indacaterol, ispronicline, istradefylline; Labradimil, lamifiban, lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal cisplatin, liposome encapsulated paclitaxel, LY-517717; Manidipine hydrochloride/delapril hydrochloride, maraviroc, MBP(82-98), MD-0727, MDX-214, melanotan I, MMR vaccine; Nacystelyn, nalfurafine hydrochloride, nibentan, nilotinib, NK-105; OBI-1, oblimersen sodium, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, oregovomab; Pexelizumab, PG-116800, PG-CPT, PHA-794428, prasugrel; RC-3095, rDNA insulin, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhEndostatin, rhenium Re-186 etidronate, rhGM-CSF, roflumilast, romidepsin; Sarcosine, SGLU1, SGN-40, succinobucol; TAU, teduglutide, telatinib, tesofensine, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TKA-731, tolvaptan, trabectedin; Vaccimel, vatalanib succinate, velafermin, vildagliptin, vinflunine; XP-19986; YM-155.

  3. Control groups in recent septic shock trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Jakob, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    , and mortality outcomes, and calculated a data completeness score to provide an overall view of quality of reporting. RESULTS: A total of 24 RCTs were included (mean n = 287 patients and 71 % of eligible patients were randomized). Of the 24 studies, 14 (58 %) presented baseline data on vasopressors and 58......PURPOSE: The interpretation of septic shock trial data is profoundly affected by patients, control intervention, co-interventions and selected outcome measures. We evaluated the reporting of control groups in recent septic shock trials. METHODS: We searched for original articles presenting...... randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in adult septic shock patients from 2006 to 2016. We included RCTs focusing on septic shock patients with at least two parallel groups and at least 50 patients in the control group. We selected and evaluated data items regarding patients, control group characteristics...

  4. Placebo response in binge eating disorder: a pooled analysis of 10 clinical trials from one research group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Thomas J; Mingione, Carolyn J; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Keck, Paul E; Welge, Jeffrey A; McElroy, Susan L

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to gain further understanding of placebo response in binge eating disorder. We pooled participant-level data from 10 double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials of medications for binge eating disorder. The primary outcomes were response (75% reduction in binge eating episodes), cessation of binge eating episodes, change in mean weekly binge eating episodes and binge eating episodes per week. Of 234 participants receiving placebo, 89 (38%) were responders and 59 (26%) attained cessation. Placebo-treated participants significantly reduced their binge eating. The mean (SD) binge eating episodes per week at baseline was 5.2 (3.2) and at endpoint was 2.2 (2.6). Lower baseline binge eating episode frequency and longer study participation were significantly associated with response and cessation. Less severe eating pathology at baseline was associated with higher placebo response and cessation rates. Future clinical trials may want to stipulate that participants exceed a threshold of illness severity, which may lead to better placebo and drug separation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment, screening, diagnostic, prevention, and supportive care trials. Treatment Trials In treatment trials, researchers may gather information about experimental treatments, ...

  6. The Effect of Participation in Support Groups on Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Family Caregivers of People with Alzheimers: Randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Taati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine the effect of participation in support groups on the depression, anxiety and stress level of caregivers of patients with Alzheimer. This study was a single blind randomized clinical controlled trial (RCT with 80 family caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s (per group=40. The intervention group participated in eight sessions 1.5- 2 hours in support groups. The tool used in this study was the DASS-21 questionnaire for measuring depression, anxiety and stress level of the caregivers, analysis of parametric data, using SPSS version 21. Findings showed, participation in support groups showed no significant difference on depression, anxiety and stress in family caregivers of Alzheimer patients in the control group and the intervention group. Given that caring for these patients by their family members are very sensitive and costly issues for policy makers and health service providers, community and families of these patients.

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Usually, trial participants must show signs of the disease or condition before they can join this type of trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, ...

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  9. Design paper: The CapOpus trial: A randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of specialized addiction treatment versus treatment as usual for young patients with cannabis abuse and psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gluud Christian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies indicate a link between cannabis-use and psychosis as well as more severe psychosis in those with existing psychotic disorders. There is currently insufficient evidence to decide the optimal way to treat cannabis abuse among patients with psychosis. Objectives The major objective for the CapOpus trial is to evaluate the additional effect on cannabis abuse of a specialized addiction treatment program adding group treatment and motivational interviewing to treatment as usual. Design The trial is designed as a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial. Patients are primarily recruited through early-psychosis detection teams, community mental health centers, and assertive community treatment teams. Patients are randomized to one of two treatment arms, both lasting six months: 1 specialized addiction treatment plus treatment as usual or 2 treatment as usual. The specialized addiction treatment is manualized and consists of both individual and group-based motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy, and incorporates both the family and the case manager of the patient. The primary outcome measure will be changes in amount of cannabis consumption over time. Other outcome measures will be psychosis symptoms, cognitive functioning, quality of life, social functioning, and cost-benefit analyses. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00484302.

  10. Pneumatic retinopexy. A multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial comparing pneumatic retinopexy with scleral buckling. The Retinal Detachment Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornambe, P E; Hilton, G F

    1989-06-01

    Pneumatic retinopexy was compared with scleral buckling in a multicenter (7 centers), randomized, controlled, clinical trial with 198 patients. Admission criteria included detachments with retinal break(s) no greater than 1 clock hour in size, within the superior two thirds of the fundus, without significant proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). All patients were followed for at least 6 months. Scleral buckling was compared with pneumatic retinopexy with regard to single-operation reattachment (82 versus 73%), reattachment with one operation and postoperative laser/cryotherapy (84 versus 81%), overall reattachment with reoperations (98 versus 99%), final visual acuity of 20/50 or better in eye with preoperative detachment of the macula for 2 weeks or less (56 versus 80%), PVR (5 versus 3%), and new retinal breaks (13 versus 23%). Complications, including reoperations, as measured by the "score" system, were similar. The anatomic results of the two operations were not significantly different (P greater than 0.05), but pneumatic retinopexy had less morbidity and better postoperative visual acuity (P = 0.01). Pneumatic retinopexy is recommended for cases meeting the admission criteria.

  11. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  12. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer ... Trials Insurance Coverage and Clinical Trials How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan Federal Government Programs ...

  13. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  14. Gatekeepers for pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicher, Danielle M; Miller, Jennifer E; Dunham, Kelly M; Joffe, Steven

    2015-10-01

    To successfully implement a pragmatic clinical trial, investigators need access to numerous resources, including financial support, institutional infrastructure (e.g. clinics, facilities, staff), eligible patients, and patient data. Gatekeepers are people or entities who have the ability to allow or deny access to the resources required to support the conduct of clinical research. Based on this definition, gatekeepers relevant to the US clinical research enterprise include research sponsors, regulatory agencies, payers, health system and other organizational leadership, research team leadership, human research protections programs, advocacy and community groups, and clinicians. This article provides a framework to help guide gatekeepers' decision-making related to the use of resources for pragmatic clinical trials. Relevant ethical considerations for gatekeepers include (1) concern for the interests of individuals, groups, and communities affected by the gatekeepers' decisions, including protection from harm and maximization of benefits; (2) advancement of organizational mission and values; and (3) stewardship of financial, human, and other organizational resources. Separate from these ethical considerations, gatekeepers' actions will be guided by relevant federal, state, and local regulations. This framework also suggests that to further enhance the legitimacy of their decision-making, gatekeepers should adopt transparent processes that engage relevant stakeholders when feasible and appropriate. We apply this framework to the set of gatekeepers responsible for making decisions about resources necessary for pragmatic clinical trials in the United States, describing the relevance of the criteria in different situations and pointing out where conflicts among the criteria and relevant regulations may affect decision-making. Recognition of the complex set of considerations that should inform decision-making will guide gatekeepers in making justifiable choices regarding

  15. Biomarkers of response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Working Group: standardization for use in the clinical trial setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, David A; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Johnson, Bruce E

    2008-02-20

    The body of literature on the correlations between molecular assessments and patient outcomes after treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors continues to grow. It will be important in the future to determine how to most effectively integrate molecular assays that assess the likelihood of therapeutic benefit into clinical practice. Although EGFR-targeted therapies such as erlotinib have been approved for use without molecular testing, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and mutational analyses of the EGFR gene have all been proposed as candidates to help predict response or survival benefit from EGFR-targeted therapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Further prospective validation from ongoing randomized studies will be needed to fully determine which assays are best to help predict patient outcome. In addition, it will be critical for these assays to undergo standardization before widespread clinical use. The Molecular Assays in NSCLC Working Group, under the sponsorship of Genentech Inc, Roche Pharmaceuticals, and OSI Pharmaceuticals, Inc, was convened to evaluate the available molecular assays for use in the clinical trial setting and provide recommendations for application and interpretation of these tests for future clinical trials. Recommendations of the Molecular Assays in NSCLC Working Group for the use of EGFR molecular assays are presented and include guidelines for tissue storage, handling, and processing. Recommendations for the standardization of molecular assays are also discussed.

  16. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery

  17. Clinical Trials and the Role of the Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Elizabeth A; Royce, Cheryl

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials are paramount to improving human health. New trial designs and informed consent issues are emerging as a result of genomic profiling and the development of molecularly targeted agents. Many groups and individuals are responsible for ensuring the protection of research participants and the quality of the data produced. The specialty role of the clinical trials nurse (CTN) is critical to clinical trials. Oncology CTNs have competencies that can help guide their practice; however, not all oncology clinical trials are supervised by a nurse. Using the process of engagement, one organization has restructured oncology CTNs under a nurse-supervised model.

  18. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, researchers study ways to reduce the risk of getting a disease or a specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  19. Looking for new preparations for antibacterial therapy. IV. New antimicrobial agents from the aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline groups in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series on the search for new antibacterial therapies, and covers new compounds belonging to the aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline groups of antibiotics. The article describes eight new substances at the clinical trial stage of development. One of them is an aminoglycoside (plazomicin), four are macrolides, collectively known as ketolides (cethromycin, solithromycin, EDP-420 and EDP-788), and the remaining three are members of the tetracycline group (omadacycline, eravacycline, sarecycline). Despite the long-term and very expensive process of collecting documentation proving the efficacy of antimicrobial drugs, there is a possibility, that particular compounds find use as active ingredients of medicinal products allowing for the triumph over the clinically relevant, dangerous bacteria.

  20. The role of ADME pharmacogenomics in early clinical trials: perspective of the Industry Pharmacogenomics Working Group (I-PWG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremaine, Larry; Brian, William; DelMonte, Terrye; Francke, Stephan; Groenen, Peter; Johnson, Keith; Li, Lei; Pearson, Kimberly; Marshall, Jean-Claude

    2015-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters have been shown to significantly impact the exposure of drugs having a high dependence on a single mechanism for their absorption, distribution or clearance, such that genotyping can lead to actionable steps in disease treatment. Recently, global regulatory agencies have provided guidance for assessment of pharmacogenomics during early stages of drug development, both in the form of formal guidance and perspectives published in scientific journals. The Industry Pharmacogenomics Working Group (I-PWG), conducted a survey among member companies to assess the practices relating to absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion pharmacogenomics) during early stages of clinical development, to assess the impact of the recent Regulatory Guidance issued by the US FDA and EMA on Industry practices.

  1. [Critical reading of clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptel, F; Cucherat, M; Blumen-Ohana, E; Denis, P

    2011-12-01

    Clinical trials are playing an increasingly crucial role in modern evidence based medicine, allowing for rigorous scientific evaluation of treatment strategies and validation of patient care. The results of clinical trials often form the rational basis from which physicians draw information used to adapt their therapeutic practices. Critical reading and analysis of trials involves the assessment of whether the available data provide enough credible evidence that the treatment will result in a clinically significant and relevant improvement. Evaluating the quality of a clinical trial is a process that draws upon sometimes complex methodological and statistical concepts, with which the reader should nonetheless be familiar in order to come to impartial conclusions regarding the raw data presented in the clinical trials. The goal of the current article is to review the methodological and statistical concepts required for the design and interpretation of clinical trials, so as to allow for a critical analysis of publications or presentations of clinical trials. The first section describes the major methodological principles of clinical trial design required for a rigorous evaluation of the treatment benefit, as well as the various pitfalls or biases that could lead to erroneous conclusions. The second section briefly describes the main statistical tests used in clinical trials, as well as certain situations that may increase the risk of false positive findings (type 1 error), such as multiple, subgroup, intermediate and non-inferiority analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Phases of Clinical Trials Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Surgery Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Targeted Therapy Hormone Therapy Stem Cell Transplant Precision ...

  3. [A multicenter clinical trial. Zinc acexamate versus famotidine in the treatment of acute duodenal ulcer. Study Group of Zinc acexamate (new UP doses)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Plaza, A; Arenas, J I; Belda, O; Diago, A; Domínguez, A; Fernández, C; Martín, L; Pallarés, A; Rodrigo, L; de la Santa, J w

    1996-11-01

    A multicentric double-blind trial comparing 600 mg/d of Zinc Acexamate (ACZ) and 40 mg/d of Famotidine (FMT) in the short term treatment of acute duodenal ulcer included 199 patients, diagnosed by endoscopy. One-hundred and five patients received ACZ and 94 FMT, during four weeks. A clinical control took place at two weeks and a second clinical and endoscopic control at the end of the treatment (4 weeks). Complete cicatrization of the ulcer was observed in 56.5% of patients on ACZ and in 69.5% of patients of FMT (N.S.). A reduction of more than 50% of the ulcer diameter was recorded in 78.8% of the ACZ group and in 79.9% of the FMT group. Alcohol and smoking did not influence the results. Both treatments were equally effective in the disappearance of symptoms. The incidence of adverse reactions was very low in both groups (< 5%) and no patient dropped from the trial for this reason. In conclusion, a dosage of 600 mg/d of ACZ has shown to be as effective as 40 mg/d of FMT in the healing of duodenal ulcer.

  4. A guide to clinical trials for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000823.htm A guide to clinical trials for cancer To use ... trial and where to find one. What is a Clinical Trial for Cancer? Clinical trials for cancer ...

  5. A risk-management approach for effective integration of biomarkers in clinical trials: perspectives of an NCI, NCRI, and EORTC working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, J.A.; Salgado, R.; Lively, T.; Sweep, F.C.; Schuh, A.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical cancer research today often includes testing the value of biomarkers to direct treatment and for drug development. However, the practical challenges of integration of molecular information into clinical trial protocols are increasingly appreciated. Inherent difficulties include evidence gap

  6. Body mass index and its association with clinical outcomes for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients enrolled on Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Suzanne E; Schiller, Joan H; Bonomi, Philip B; Sandler, Alan B; Brahmer, Julie R; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Johnson, David H

    2013-09-01

    Obesity increases the risk of death from many adverse health outcomes and has also been linked with cancer outcomes. The impact of obesity on outcomes of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients is unclear. The authors evaluated the association of body mass index (BMI) and outcomes in 2585 eligible patients enrolled in three consecutive first-line trials conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. BMI was categorized as underweight (BMI obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m). In addition to analyzing overall and progression-free survival, reasons for treatment discontinuation were also assessed by BMI group. Of the patients enrolled, 4.6% were underweight, 44.1% were normal weight, 34.3% of patients were classified as overweight, and 16.9% were obese. Nonproportional hazards existed for obese patients relative to the other three groups of patients, with a change in overall survival hazard occurring at approximately 16 months. In multivariable Cox models, obese patients had superior outcomes earlier on study compared with normal/overweight patients 0.86 (HR=0.86, p=0.04; 95% CI: 0.75-0.99), but later experienced increased hazard (HR=1.54, p< 0.001; 95% CI: 1.22-1.94), indicating a time effect while undergoing treatment. Data from these three trials suggest differential outcomes associated with BMI, and additional studies of the mechanisms underlying this observation, as well as dietary and lifestyle interventions, are warranted to help optimize therapy.

  7. Endpoint comparison for bone mineral density measurements in North Central Cancer Treatment Group cancer clinical trials N02C1 and N03CC (Alliance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J.; Atherton, P.; Liu, H.; Novotny, P.; Hines, S.; Loprinzi, C. L.; Perez, E. A.; Tan, A.; Burger, K.; Zhao, X.; Diekmann, B.; Sloan, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bone mineral density (BMD) measurement can vary depending upon anatomical site, machine, and normative values used. This analysis compared different BMD endpoints in two clinical trials. Trial results differed across endpoints. Future clinical trials should consider inclusion of multiple endpoints in sensitivity analysis to ensure sound overall study conclusions. Introduction Methodological issues hamper efficacy assessment of osteoporosis prevention agents in cancer survivors. Osteoporosis diagnosis can vary depending upon which bone mineral density (BMD) anatomical site and machine is used and which set of normative values are applied. This analysis compared different endpoints for osteoporosis treatment efficacy assessment in two clinical studies. Methods Data from North Central Cancer Treatment Group phase III clinical trials N02C1 and N03CC (Alliance) were employed involving 774 patients each comparing two treatments for osteoporosis prevention. Endpoints for three anatomical sites included raw BMD score (RawBMD); raw machine-based, sample-standardized, and reference population-standardized T scores (RawT, TSamp, TRef); and standard normal percentile corresponding to the reference population-standardized T score (TPerc). For each, treatment arm comparison was carried out using three statistical tests using change and percentage change from baseline (CB, %CB) at 1 year. Results Baseline correlations among endpoints ranged from 0.79 to 1.00. RawBMD and TPerc produced more statistically significant results (14 and 19 each out of 36 tests) compared to RawT (11/36), TSamp (8/36), and TRef (7/36). Spine produced the most statistically significant results (26/60) relative to femoral neck (20/60) and total hip (13/60). Lastly, CB resulted in 44 statistically significant results out of 90 tests, whereas %CB resulted in only 15 significant results. Conclusions Treatment comparisons and interpretations were different across endpoints and anatomical sites

  8. A randomized, controlled clinical trial of standard, group and brief cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia: a two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, André; Roberge, Pasquale; Primiano, Sandra; Germain, Vanessa

    2009-12-01

    A randomized controlled clinical trial with a wait-list control group was conducted to examine the effectiveness of three modalities (brief, group, and standard) of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants meeting DSM-IV criteria were randomly assigned to each treatment condition: a 14-session standard CBT (n=33), a 14-session group CBT (n=35) and a 7-session brief CBT (n=32). Participants received a self-study manual and were assigned weekly readings and exercises. The results indicate that regardless of the treatment condition, CBT for moderate to severe PDA is beneficial in medium and long term. To this effect, all three-treatment conditions significantly reduced the intensity of symptoms, increased participants' quality of life, offered high effect sizes, superior maintenance of gains over time, and lower rates of relapse, compared to the wait-list control.

  9. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health funds much of this basic research. Screening Trials In screening trials, researchers study ways of finding a disease before symptoms occur. These methods, often called screening tests, can include imaging tests ...

  10. [Sucrose gel for treatment of bacterial vaginosis: a randomized, double-blind, multi-center, parallel-group, phase III clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bing-bing; Zhang, Dai; Chen, Rui; Shi, Hui-rong; Xin, Xiao-ran; Wang, Hui-lan; Pang, Yi-cun; Zhu, Sai-nan; Yao, Chen; Liao, Qin-ping

    2015-12-18

    To evaluate the cure effectiveness and safety of sucrose gel in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis through a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, parallel controlled clinical study. A clinical research method of multi-center, randomly double-blind, and dose group parallel comparison was adopted. In the study, 533 patients with bacterial vaginosis were randomly divided into two groups, which included 214 cases in the control group (5.0 g metronidazole gel) and 319 cases in the trial group (5.0 g sucrose gel ). The patients were treated with different medication according to the group where they were. All the cases in these two groups were treated with drugs vaginally twice in a day, morning and evening separately, for 5 days. The curative effect and safety evaluation were assessed from 7 to 10 days and 21 to 30 days after treatment respectively. The efficacy of the comprehensive clinical treatment showed that the cure rate of metronidazole gel group and sucrose gel group were 70.53% and 80.83% respectively 7 to 10 days after treatment. The recovery rate of Nugent score for vaginal smear were 71.50% and 81.15% respectively. The differences in the efficacy between these two groups were significant statistically (P0.05) could be found in the cure rates of the two groups. The clinical comprehensive efficacy and recovery of vaginal bacteria of sucrose gel group in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis were obviously superior to those of metronidazole gel 7 to 10 days after treatment. The susucrose gel could improve the clinical efficacy index and laboratory index of bacterial vaginosis. Other effects included the release of clinical symptoms, and the recovery of the normal micro-environment in the vagina according to the Nugent score. The curative efficacy of sucrose gel was equal to that of metronidazole gel 21 to 30 days after treatment. In the future, sucrose gel treatment can be a new strategy for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Various advantages can be

  11. Terminating a long-term clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Long-term clinical trials often include more than one active treatment group. These may be discontinued independently if found to be ineffective or possibly harmful. Certain subgroups of patients may be discovered, in the course of a clinical trial, who do not respond satisfactorily and are, therefore, excluded during the course of a trial. Yet another kind of termination comes when we have a therapeutic breakthrough or when hope has to be abandoned for demonstrating beneficial effects for one, several, or all treatments included in a trial. Examples from the authors' experience are presented, as are successful and unsuccessful techniques in managing terminations of various types.

  12. Sample size determinations for group-based randomized clinical trials with different levels of data hierarchy between experimental and control arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Moonseong; Litwin, Alain H; Blackstock, Oni; Kim, Namhee; Arnsten, Julia H

    2017-02-01

    We derived sample size formulae for detecting main effects in group-based randomized clinical trials with different levels of data hierarchy between experimental and control arms. Such designs are necessary when experimental interventions need to be administered to groups of subjects whereas control conditions need to be administered to individual subjects. This type of trial, often referred to as a partially nested or partially clustered design, has been implemented for management of chronic diseases such as diabetes and is beginning to emerge more commonly in wider clinical settings. Depending on the research setting, the level of hierarchy of data structure for the experimental arm can be three or two, whereas that for the control arm is two or one. Such different levels of data hierarchy assume correlation structures of outcomes that are different between arms, regardless of whether research settings require two or three level data structure for the experimental arm. Therefore, the different correlations should be taken into account for statistical modeling and for sample size determinations. To this end, we considered mixed-effects linear models with different correlation structures between experimental and control arms to theoretically derive and empirically validate the sample size formulae with simulation studies.

  13. An analysis of registered clinical trials in otolaryngology from 2007 to 2010: ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsell, David L; Schulz, Kristine A; Lee, Walter T; Chiswell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    To describe the conditions studied, interventions used, study characteristics, and funding sources of otolaryngology clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database; compare this otolaryngology cohort of interventional studies to clinical visits in a health care system; and assess agreement between clinical trials and clinical activity. Database analysis. Trial registration data downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov and administrative data from the Duke University Medical Center from October 1, 2007 to September 27, 2010. Data extraction from ClinicalTrials.gov was done using MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms. Studies were subcategorized to create the following groupings for descriptive analysis: ear, nose, allergy, voice, sleep, head and neck cancer, thyroid, and throat. Duke Health System visits were queried by using selected ICD-9 codes for otolaryngology and non-otolaryngology providers. Visits were grouped similarly to ClinicalTrials.gov for further analysis. Chi-square tests were used to explore differences between groups. A total of 1115 of 40,970 registered interventional trials were assigned to otolaryngology. Head and neck cancer trials predominated. Study models most frequently incorporated parallel design (54.6%), 2 study groups (46.6%), and randomization (69.1%). Phase 2 or 3 studies constituted 46.4% of the cohort. Comparison of the ClinicalTrials.gov database with administrative health system visit data by disease condition showed discordance between national research activity and clinical visit volume for patients with otolaryngology complaints. Analysis of otolaryngology-related clinical research as listed in ClinicalTrials.gov can inform patients, physicians, and policy makers about research focus areas. The relative burden of otolaryngology-associated conditions in our tertiary health system exceeds research activity within the field.

  14. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  15. [PDCA Applied in Special Rectification of Medical Instrument Clinical Trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Qu, Xintao; Yu, Xiuchun

    2015-09-01

    PDCA cycle was applied in special rectification activities for medical instrument clinical trial, with quality criteria of implementation made. Completed medical instrument clinical trial from January 2011 to December 2012 was believed as control group, from January 2013 to December 2014 as PDCA group, the scores of clinical trial and the score rate of items were compared and analyzed. Results show quality scores of clinical trial in PDCA group are higher than that in control group (51 vs. 81, P rectification activities with PDCA applied in our department are feasible and effective. It significantly improves implement quality of medical instrument clinical trial.

  16. A phase II clinical trial of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer of undifferentiated type: Japan Clinical Oncology Group study JCOG1009/1010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kohei; Takashima, Atsuo; Kimura, Aya; Mizusawa, Junki; Hasuike, Noriaki; Ono, Hiroyuki; Terashima, Masanori; Muto, Manabu; Boku, Narikazu; Sasako, Mitsuru; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    A Phase II clinical trial has been initiated to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for intramucosal (cT1a) gastric cancer of undifferentiated type. Patients with cT1a gastric cancer with undifferentiated-type adenocarcinoma are eligible for the study. The tumor size should be 2 cm or less without ulceration. The study will enroll a total of 325 patients from 51 institutions over a 4-year period. The primary endpoint is proportion of 5-year overall survival (% 5-year overall survival) in patients with undifferentiated dominant type. The secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, % 5-year overall survival without either recurrence or gastrectomy, % en-bloc resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection, % pathological curative resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection, % 5-year overall survival in patients with differentiated dominant type, % 5-year overall survival in patients with pathologically curative resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection and adverse events.

  17. Varied acceptance of clinical trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1989-12-01

    The subject of varied acceptance of clinical trial results is discussed in the context of review of trials with which I have been involved and my subjective evaluation of their impact on the practice of clinical medicine. My experience goes back to 1949 and a World Health Organization trial of hyperimmune gamma globulin against rabies. This was followed by a large trial of secondary prevention of poliomyelitis. I participated in the planning and initiation of the first chronic disease trial, the University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP). The latter lasted for 15 years and its ramifications continue to this day. My next trial was the Coronary Drug Project (CDP), a complex trial with more than 8,000 patients. The trials of aspirin and aspirin combined with persantine (the CDPA, AMIS, PARIS I, and PARIS II) followed. My last three trials were a trial of photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy (DRS), a six-country trial of the antiarrhythmic drug mexiletine (IMPACT), and a study involving two diagnostic procedures for pulmonary embolism (PIOPED). When one considers, in retrospect, the plethora of trials one is struck by the uniform absence of a priori considerations of the impact on medical practice, or likely lack thereof, of possible outcomes.

  18. A Preliminary Core Domain Set for Clinical Trials of Shoulder Disorders: A Report from the OMERACT 2016 Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Beaton, Dorcas; Kopkow, Christian; Lenza, Mario; Jain, Nitin B; Richards, Bethan; Richards, Pamela; Voshaar, Marieke; van der Windt, Danielle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2017-01-15

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group (SIG) was established to develop a core outcome set (COS) for clinical trials of shoulder disorders. In preparation for OMERACT 2016, we systematically examined all outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in 409 randomized trials of interventions for shoulder disorders published between 1954 and 2015. Informed by these data, we conducted an international Delphi consensus study including shoulder trial experts, clinicians, and patients to identify key domains that should be included in a shoulder disorder COS. Findings were discussed at a stakeholder premeeting of OMERACT. At OMERACT 2016, we sought consensus on a preliminary core domain set and input into next steps. There were 13 and 15 participants at the premeeting and the OMERACT 2016 SIG meeting, respectively (9 attended both meetings). Consensus was reached on a preliminary core domain set consisting of an inner core of 4 domains: pain, physical function/activity, global perceived effect, and adverse events including death. A middle core consisted of 3 domains: emotional well-being, sleep, and participation (recreation and work). An outer core of research required to inform the final COS was also formulated. Our next steps are to (1) analyze whether participation (recreation and work) should be in the inner core, (2) conduct a third Delphi round to finalize definitions and wording of domains and reach final endorsement for the domains, and (3) determine which instruments fulfill the OMERACT criteria for measuring each domain.

  19. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Huber, Adam M; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and were derived from natural history data and a conjoint analysis survey. They were further validated using data from the PRINTO trial of prednisone alone compared to prednisone with methotrexate or cyclosporine and the Rituximab in Myositis (RIM) trial. At a consensus conference, experts considered 14 top candidate criteria based on their performance characteristics and clinical face validity, using nominal group technique. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model with a total improvement score of 0-100, using absolute percent change in core set measures of minimal (≥30), moderate (≥45), and major (≥70) improvement. The same criteria were chosen for adult DM/polymyositis, with differing thresholds for improvement. The sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 91-98% for minimal improvement, 92-94% and 94-99% for moderate improvement, and 91-98% and 85-86% for major improvement, respectively, in juvenile DM patient cohorts using the IMACS and PRINTO core set measures. These criteria were validated in the PRINTO trial for differentiating between treatment arms for minimal and moderate improvement (P = 0.009-0.057) and in the RIM trial for significantly differentiating the physician's rating for improvement (P Rheumatology.

  20. [Shared web-based data center for multi-institutional clinical trials: evaluation of UMIN-INDICE (university hospital medical information network-internet data and information center for medical research)in clinical trials of JIVROSG (Japan interventional radiology in oncology study group)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Miyuki; Arai, Yasuaki; Kiuchi, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Hirono; Aoki, Noriaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Aramaki, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Osuga, Keigo; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Okusaka, Takushi; Kanazawa, Susumu; Matsui, Osamu; Endo, Keigo

    2012-04-01

    A patient registration system is mandatory for establishing the scientific credibility of the multi-center clinical trials. The Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group (JIVROSG) was organized in 2002 to establish evidence supporting the procedures used in interventional radiology. The Internet Data and Information Center for Medical Research (INDICE), provided by the University Hospital Medical Information Network(UMIN), has been utilized for patient registration in the clinical trials of JIVROSG. In this study, the safety and efficacy of UMIN-INDICE were evaluated. From 2002 to 2010, 18 clinical trials, including one international trial, were conducted. A total of 736 patients were enrolled from 51 institutions. No significant trouble was encountered during this period. A questionnaire survey demonstrated that 90% of participating researchers could use this system without difficulties. UMIN-INDICE may contribute to promoting clinical trials as an infrastructure of multicenter studies.

  1. Sniffing around oxytocin: review and meta-analyses of trials in healthy and clinical groups with implications for pharmacotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, M J; van I Jzendoorn, M H

    2013-01-01

    ... (perceived threat of the 'out-group'), personality and childhood experiences. In individuals with untoward childhood experiences, positive behavioral or neurobiological effects seem lowered or absent...

  2. Continued benefit of coronary stenting versus balloon angioplasty: one-year clinical follow-up of Benestent trial. Benestent Study Group.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Miguel (Carlos); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.N. Ruygrok (Peter); H. Suryapranata (Harry); S. Klugmann (Silvio); P. Urban (Philip); P. den Heijer (Peter); K. Koch (Karel); R. Simon (Rudiger); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); P.A. Crean (Peter); J.J.R.M. Bonnier (Hans); W. Wijns (William); N. Danchin (Nicolas); C. Bourdonnec (Claude); M-A.M. Morel (Marie-Angèle); E.G. Mast (Gijs)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. This study sought to determine the 1-year clinical follow-up of patients included in the Benestent trial. Background. The Benestent trial is a randomized study comparing elective Palmaz-Schatz stent implantation with balloon angioplasty in patients with stable angina and a de

  3. Data fraud in clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephen L; Buyse, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Highly publicized cases of fabrication or falsification of data in clinical trials have occurred in recent years and it is likely that there are additional undetected or unreported cases. We review the available evidence on the incidence of data fraud in clinical trials, describe several prominent cases, present information on motivation and contributing factors and discuss cost-effective ways of early detection of data fraud as part of routine central statistical monitoring of data quality. Adoption of these clinical trial monitoring procedures can identify potential data fraud not detected by conventional on-site monitoring and can improve overall data quality. PMID:25729561

  4. A Novel Biomarker Panel Examining Response to Gemcitabine with or without Erlotinib for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy in NCIC Clinical Trials Group PA.3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Shultz

    Full Text Available NCIC Clinical Trials Group PA.3 was a randomized control trial that demonstrated improved overall survival (OS in patients receiving erlotinib in addition to gemcitabine for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Prior to therapy, patients had plasma samples drawn for future study. We sought to identify biomarkers within these samples.Using the proximity ligation assay (PLA, a probe panel was built from commercially available antibodies for 35 key proteins selected from a global genetic analysis of pancreatic cancers, and used to quantify protein levels in 20 uL of patient plasma. To determine if any of these proteins levels independently associated with OS, univariate and mulitbaraible Cox models were used. In addition, we examined the associations between biomarker expression and disease stage at diagnosis using Fisher's exact test. The correlation between Erlotinib sensitivity and each biomarkers was assessed using a test of interaction between treatment and biomarker.Of the 569 eligible patients, 480 had samples available for study. Samples were randomly allocated into training (251 and validation sets (229. Among all patients, elevated levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1 alpha, and interleukin-6 were independently associated with lower OS, while IL-8, CEA, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha and mucin-1 were associated with metastatic disease. Patients with elevated levels of receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2 expression had improved OS when treated with erlotinib compared to placebo. In conclusion, PLA is a powerful tool for identifying biomarkers from archived, small volume serum samples. These data may be useful to stratify patient outcomes regardless of therapeutic intervention.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00040183.

  5. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to obtain preliminary data on whether the drug works in people who have a certain disease or condition. These trials also continue to study safety, including short-term side effects. This phase ...

  6. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or ... specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  7. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, J N; Losina, E; Lohmander, L S

    2015-01-01

    To highlight methodological challenges in the design and conduct of randomized trials of surgical interventions and to propose strategies for addressing these challenges. This paper focuses on three broad areas: enrollment; intervention; and assessment including implications for analysis. For eac...

  8. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... new tests that could identify a disease in its early stages. Usually, trial participants must show signs ... often healthy people (20 to 80), to judge its safety and side effects, and to find the ...

  9. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Internet- vs. group-based cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: 4-year follow-up of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Erik; El Alaoui, Samir; Lindefors, Nils; Andersson, Erik; Rück, Christian; Ghaderi, Ata; Kaldo, Viktor; Lekander, Mats; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljótsson, Brjánn

    2014-08-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is common, debilitating and associated with high societal costs. The disorder can be effectively treated with Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT), but no previous study has investigated the long-term clinical or health economic effects of ICBT for SAD in comparison to an evidence-based control treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ICBT compared to cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) four years post-treatment. We conducted a 4-year follow-up study of participants who had received ICBT or CBGT for SAD within the context of a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial. The cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted taking a societal perspective. Participants in both treatment groups made large improvements from baseline to 4-year follow-up on the primary outcome measure (d = 1.34-1.48) and the 95% CI of the mean difference on the primary outcome was well within the non-inferiority margin. ICBT and CBGT were similarly cost-effective and both groups reduced their indirect costs. We conclude that ICBT for SAD yields large sustainable effects and is at least as long-term effective as CBGT. Intervention costs of both treatments are offset by net societal cost reductions in a short time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mycophenolate mofetil in idiopathic membranous nephropathy: a clinical trial with comparison to a historic control group treated with cyclophosphamide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branten, A.J.W.; Buf-Vereijken, P.W.G. du; Vervloet, M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cyclophosphamide can decrease proteinuria and improve renal function in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, but has a high risk of side effects. We studied whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) could be a reasonable alternative with fewer side effects. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical t

  11. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  12. Inept media trials of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Ramamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian media in general, with the exception of a few domain expert journalists, have failed to comprehend the complexities involved in the clinical trial process. In the run up to the deadline-based coverage of a story, a majority of them fall short in conveying the right perspective to readers, but nevertheless they have been successful in sensationalizing an event in this arena. Possibly by unintended misrepresentation, or mostly out of ignorance of the nuances involved in the clinical trials process, the media has done more harm than good, and got away with it. On the other side, the industry has been reluctant to engage with the media in a meaningful dialog for too long now. It bears not only the consequences of damage to its professional reputation following such reportage, but also the repercussions of unnecessary clampdowns by the regulators. Science journalism in India has yet to rise as a profession.

  13. International neurocognitive normative study: neurocognitive comparison data in diverse resource-limited settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, S R; Marra, C M; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, T B; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S; Kumarasamy, N; la Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-08-01

    Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource-limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impedes research and clinical care. Here, we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At ten sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n = 240), India (n = 480), Malawi (n = 481), Peru (n = 239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n = 240), and Zimbabwe (n = 240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline and 770 at 6 months. Participants were enrolled in eight strata, gender (female and male), education (normative data needed to build infrastructure for future neurological and neurocognitive studies in diverse RLS. These normative data are a much-needed resource for both clinicians and researchers.

  14. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  15. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Research and Discovery Stories of Discovery R&D Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data ... about some of NCI's major research initiatives R&D Resources Tools and data sets for researchers Research ...

  16. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer ... Therapy Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Targeted Therapy Hormone Therapy Stem Cell Transplant Precision Medicine Side Effects Clinical Trials Information ...

  17. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Report (RPPR) Grant Closeout Grant Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts ...

  18. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Report (RPPR) Grant Closeout Grant Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts ...

  19. Effectiveness of group cognitive–behavioral treatment for childhood anxiety disorders in community clinics: benchmarking against an efficacy trial at a university clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Hjalti; Arendt, Kristian Bech; Jørgensen, Lisbeth

    Service in Denmark. Method: Psychologists and psychiatrists from three Child and Adolescent Psychiatry clinics and four community bases School Counselling Services are trained and supervised in a manualized group CBT treatment program (Cool Kids) for Childhood anxiety. Ninety-six children with anxiety...... with the children and their parents at pre- and post-treatment and at 3-month follow-up (ADIS-C/P: Silverman & Nelles, 1988), as well as by self-report child and parent scales pre- and post-treatment, and at 3- and 12 month follow-ups. Parents’ symptoms of anxiety and depression are also measured. Results...... in Denmark (Arendt & Thastum, 2013). Objective: To evaluate the outcomes of evidence based, manualized group cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) for children and adolescent with anxiety disorders, when delivered in an outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatry or in a community based School Counselling...

  20. Function: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuri Seyed Kazem

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevention of pulmonary complications after coronary artery bypass graft is attended as a very important issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of pulmonary rehabilitation before surgery for reducing the risk of pulmonary complications after surgery. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients undergoing heart surgery were randomly divided into two groups A and B. Chest physiotherapy was performed before and after surgery on group A patients however it was done on group B’s, only after surgery. Effects of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation were compared between two groups, using spirometry and arterial blood gas (ABG. Results: Thirty nine males (65% and 21 females (35% with mean age of 8.10 ± 9.56 were analyzed.The mean differences were statistically significant for predicted forced vital capacity (FVC (CI95%:1.3 to 8.7 and Predicted Peak Flow indices (PEF (CI 95%: 1.9 to 9.4 of spirometry indicator,PCO2 index (of ABG parameter (CI 95%: 1.4 to 8.9 and mean oxygen saturation (mean Spo2 (CI 95%: 0.6 to 1.7 of ABG index in two groups. Conclusion: The performance of pulmonary rehabilitation program before surgery is recommended, as it may result in the reduction of complications of heart surgery.

  1. A risk-management approach for effective integration of biomarkers in clinical trials: perspectives of an NCI, NCRI, and EORTC working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jacqueline Anne; Salgado, Roberto; Lively, Tracy; Sweep, Fred; Schuh, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Clinical cancer research today often includes testing the value of biomarkers to direct treatment and for drug development. However, the practical challenges of integration of molecular information into clinical trial protocols are increasingly appreciated. Inherent difficulties include evidence gaps in available biomarker data, a paucity of robust assay methods, and the design of appropriate studies within the constraints of feasible trial operations, and finite resources. Scalable and proportionate approaches are needed to systematically cope with these challenges. Therefore, we assembled international experts from three clinical trials organisations to identify the common challenges and common solutions. We present a practical risk-assessment framework allowing targeting of scarce resources to crucial issues coupled with a library of useful resources and a simple actionable checklist of recommendations. We hope that these practical methods will be useful for running biomarker-driven trials and ultimately help to develop biomarkers that are ready for integration in routine practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. International Neurocognitive Normative Study: Neurocognitive Comparison Data in Diverse Resource Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, SR; Marra, CM; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, TB; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N; La Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L.; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-01-01

    Summary ACTG A5271 collected neurocognitive normative comparison test data in 2400 at-risk HIV seronegative participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and Zimbabwe. The participants were enrolled in strata by site (10 levels), age (2 levels), education (2 levels), and gender (2 levels). These data provide necessary normative data infrastructure for future clinical research and care in these diverse resource limited settings. Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment, and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impede research and clinical care. Here we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel, and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At 10 sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n=240), India (n=480), Malawi (n=481), Peru (n=239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n=240) and Zimbabwe (n=240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline, and 770 at six-months. Participants were enrolled in 8 strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 years and ≥ 10 years), and age (<35 years and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the six-month follow up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p<.0001). There was variation between the age, gender and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the

  3. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  4. Public information about clinical trials and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plétan, Yannick; Zannad, Faïez; Jaillon, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    Be it to restore the confused image of clinical research in relation to the lay public, or to develop new ways of accruing healthy volunteers or patients for clinical trials, there is a need to draft some guidance on how best to provide information on research. Although the French legal and regulatory armamentarium in this area is essentially liberal, there is currently little-justified reluctance among study sponsors to advertise publicly. A group of academic and pharmaceutical industry researchers, assembled for a workshop, together with regulators, journalists, representatives from ethics committees, social security, patient and health consumer groups and other French institutional bodies, has suggested the following series of recommendations: there is no need for additional legal or regulatory constraints; sponsors should be aware of and make use of direct public information on trials; a 'good practice charter' on public communication about clinical trials should be developed; all professionals should be involved in this communication platform; communication in the patient's immediate vicinity should be preferred (primary-care physician, local press); clinical databases and websites accessible to professionals, but also to patients and non-professionals, should be developed; genuine instruction on clinical trials for physicians and health professionals unfamiliar with such trials should be developed and disseminated; media groups should receive at least some training in the fundamentals of clinical research.

  5. High Accuracy of Common HIV-Related Oral Disease Diagnoses by Non-Oral Health Specialists in the AIDS Clinical Trial Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline H Shiboski

    Full Text Available Many studies include oral HIV-related endpoints that may be diagnosed by non-oral-health specialists (non-OHS like nurses or physicians. Our objective was to assess the accuracy of clinical diagnoses of HIV-related oral lesions made by non-OHS compared to diagnoses made by OHS.A5254, a cross-sectional study conducted by the Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance within the AIDS Clinical Trial Group, enrolled HIV-1-infected adults participants from six clinical trial units (CTU in the US (San Francisco, New York, Chapel Hill, Cleveland, Atlanta and Haiti. CTU examiners (non-OHS received standardized training on how to perform an oral examination and make clinical diagnoses of specific oral disease endpoints. Diagnoses by calibrated non-OHS were compared to those made by calibrated OHS, and sensitivity and specificity computed.Among 324 participants, the majority were black (73%, men (66%, and the median CD4+ cell count 138 cells/mm(3. The overall frequency of oral mucosal disease diagnosed by OHS was 43% in US sites, and 90% in Haiti. Oral candidiasis (OC was detected in 153 (47% by OHS, with erythematous candidiasis (EC the most common type (39% followed by pseudomembranous candidiasis (PC; 26%. The highest prevalence of OC (79% was among participants in Haiti, and among those with CD4+ cell count ≤ 200 cells/mm(3 and HIV-1 RNA > 1000 copies/mL (71%. The sensitivity and specificity of OC diagnoses by non-OHS were 90% and 92% (for EC: 81% and 94%; PC: 82% and 95%. Sensitivity and specificity were also high for KS (87% and 94%, respectively, but sensitivity was < 60% for HL and oral warts in all sites combined. The Candida culture confirmation of OC clinical diagnoses (as defined by ≥ 1 colony forming unit per mL of oral/throat rinse was ≥ 93% for both PC and EC.Trained non-OHS showed high accuracy of clinical diagnoses of OC in comparison with OHS, suggesting their usefulness in studies in resource-poor settings, but detection of less common

  6. Reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Japanese version of International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale for restless legs syndrome in a clinical trial setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuichi; Oka, Yasunori; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Kuroda, Kenji; Hirata, Koichi

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to verify the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Japanese version of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale for restless legs syndrome (J-IRLS) as a sub-study of a clinical trial of pramipexole against restless legs syndrome. After evaluating the test-retest reliability, concurrent validity and construct validity were analyzed. The responsiveness of J-IRLS was confirmed by evaluating the correlations between the changes in J-IRLS total score after treatment, Clinical Global Impression Improvement Scale (CGI-I), and Patient Global Impression. Test-retest reliability of J-IRLS was good (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0.877; 95% confidence interval, 0.802-0.925). The correlation coefficient of J-IRLS total score and CGI-S score for the first and second visit was 0.804 and 0.796, respectively (both P restless legs syndrome and for assessing drug efficacy. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  7. Intravenous Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation for Stroke: Phase1/2a Clinical Trial in a Homogeneous Group of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Akihiko; Sakai, Chiaki; Soma, Toshihiro; Kasahara, Yukiko; Stern, David M; Kajimoto, Katsufumi; Ihara, Masafumi; Daimon, Takashi; Yamahara, Kenichi; Doi, Kaori; Kohara, Nobuo; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this clinical trial was to assess the feasibility and safety of transplanting autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells into patients suffering severe embolic stroke. Major inclusion criteria included patients with cerebral embolism, age 20-75 years, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score displaying improvement of ≤ 5 points during the first 7 days after stroke, and NIHSS score of ≥ 10 on day 7 after stroke. Bone marrow aspiration (25 or 50 mL; N = 6 patients in each case) was performed 7-10 days poststroke, and bone marrow mononuclear cells were administrated intravenously. Mean total transplanted cell numbers were 2.5 × 10(8) and 3.4 × 10(8) cells in the lower and higher dose groups, respectively. No apparent adverse effects of administering bone marrow cells were observed. Compared with the lower dose, patients receiving the higher dose of bone marrow cells displayed a trend toward improved neurologic outcomes. Compared with 1 month after treatment, patients receiving cell therapy displayed a trend toward improved cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate of oxygen consumption 6 months after treatment. In comparison with historical controls, patients receiving cell therapy had significantly better neurologic outcomes. Our results indicated that intravenous transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells is safe and feasible. Positive results and trends favoring neurologic recovery and improvement in cerebral blood flow and metabolism by cell therapy underscore the relevance of larger scale randomized controlled trials using this approach.

  8. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, C. A.; Roos, Ewa M.; Verhagen, E.;

    2015-01-01

    The risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) substantially increases following joint injury. Research efforts should focus on investigating the efficacy of preventative strategies in high quality randomized controlled trials (RCT). The objective of these OARSI RCT recommendations is to inform...

  9. Current status and perspectives of interventional clinical trials for glioblastoma - analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Minniti, Giuseppe; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Mathier, Etienne; Soldatovic, Ivan; Jeremic, Branislav; Ghadjar, Pirus; Elicin, Olgun; Lössl, Kristina; Aebersold, Daniel M; Belka, Claus; Herrmann, Evelyn; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2017-01-03

    The records of 208.777 (100%) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on the 19th of February 2016. Phase II and III trials including patients with glioblastoma were selected for further classification and analysis. Based on the disease settings, trials were classified into three groups: newly diagnosed glioblastoma, recurrent disease and trials with no differentiation according to disease setting. Furthermore, we categorized trials according to the experimental interventions, the primary sponsor, the source of financial support and trial design elements. Trends were evaluated using the autoregressive integrated moving average model. Two hundred sixteen (0.1%) trials were selected for further analysis. Academic centers (investigator initiated trials) were recorded as primary sponsors in 56.9% of trials, followed by industry 25.9%. Industry was the leading source of monetary support for the selected trials in 44.4%, followed by 25% of trials with primarily academic financial support. The number of newly initiated trials between 2005 and 2015 shows a positive trend, mainly through an increase in phase II trials, whereas phase III trials show a negative trend. The vast majority of trials evaluate forms of different systemic treatments (91.2%). In total, one hundred different molecular entities or biologicals were identified. Of those, 60% were involving drugs specifically designed for central nervous system malignancies. Trials that specifically address radiotherapy, surgery, imaging and other therapeutic or diagnostic methods appear to be rare. Current research in glioblastoma is mainly driven or sponsored by industry, academic medical oncologists and neuro-oncologists, with the majority of trials evaluating forms of systemic therapies. Few trials reach phase III. Imaging, radiation therapy and surgical procedures are underrepresented in current trials portfolios. Optimization in research portfolio for glioblastoma is needed.

  10. Differential success rates in racial groups: Results of a clinical trial of smoking cessation among female prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Michael F.; Eldridge, Gloria D.; Villalobos, Gabriela C.; Best, Al M.; Stitzer, Maxine L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction This study replicated prior observations of racial differences in smoking cessation in which Black smokers have demonstrated lower smoking cessation rates than White smokers. Methods The study used data from a smoking cessation intervention and compared White and Black female prisoners (N = 233) on a 10-week intervention of group psychotherapy and nicotine replacement (patch). Generalized estimating equations were used to model smoking cessation across the 12-month follow-up. Results Compared with an untreated control group, both Black and White smokers benefited from the cessation treatment. However, after controlling for potential confounds, White smokers had significantly higher overall smoking cessation rates across time compared with Black smokers (e.g., 30% vs. 24% abstinent at 6 weeks; 13% vs. 10% abstinent at 12 months). Smoking mentholated cigarettes was not associated with these differences in quit rates. Discussion Understanding differential treatment responses can lead to the development of more tailored and efficacious smoking cessation interventions that may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with smoking in prison populations. PMID:19386816

  11. Definition of delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage as an outcome event in clinical trials and observational studies: proposal of a multidisciplinary research group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Vermeulen, Marinus; van Gijn, Jan; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Wijdicks, Eelco F; Muizelaar, J Paul; Mendelow, A David; Juvela, Seppo; Yonas, Howard; Terbrugge, Karel G; Macdonald, R Loch; Diringer, Michael N; Broderick, Joseph P; Dreier, Jens P; Roos, Yvo B W E M

    2010-10-01

    In clinical trials and observational studies there is considerable inconsistency in the use of definitions to describe delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A major cause for this inconsistency is the combining of radiographic evidence of vasospasm with clinical features of cerebral ischemia, although multiple factors may contribute to DCI. The second issue is the variability and overlap of terms used to describe each phenomenon. This makes comparisons among studies difficult. An international ad hoc panel of experts involved in subarachnoid hemorrhage research developed and proposed a definition of DCI to be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and observational studies. We used a consensus-building approach. It is proposed that in observational studies and clinical trials aiming to investigate strategies to prevent DCI, the 2 main outcome measures should be: (1) cerebral infarction identified on CT or MRI or proven at autopsy, after exclusion of procedure-related infarctions; and (2) functional outcome. Secondary outcome measure should be clinical deterioration caused by DCI, after exclusion of other potential causes of clinical deterioration. Vasospasm on angiography or transcranial Doppler can also be used as an outcome measure to investigate proof of concept but should be interpreted in conjunction with DCI or functional outcome. The proposed measures reflect the most relevant morphological and clinical features of DCI without regard to pathogenesis to be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and observational studies.

  12. An intervention for reducing secondary traumatization and improving professional self-efficacy in well baby clinic nurses following war and terror: a random control group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Rony; Gelkopf, Marc

    2011-05-01

    Due to the terror and war-related situation in Israel, well baby clinic nurses dealing with a large number of traumatized and highly distressed infants, toddlers and their parents have become overwhelmed. (1) Assess the level of secondary traumatization, including lack of compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue of well baby clinic nurses living under chronic threat of war and terror. (2) Assess the efficacy of an intervention aimed at providing well baby clinic nurses with psycho-educational knowledge pertaining to stress and trauma in infants, young children and parents. This intervention provides the nurses with screening tools for identifying children and parents at risk of developing stress-related problems and equips them with stress management techniques. Quasi-random control trial. The intervention took place in Israel, in war (North) and terror (South) affected areas. Ninety well baby clinic nurses from the most war and terror affected areas in Israel were approached, 42 were randomly assigned the experimental intervention and 38 served as a waiting list group. The intervention was comprised of 12 weekly 6-h sessions. Each session included theoretical knowledge, experiential exercises based on the nurses' work or personal life experience, and the learning of skills accompanied by homework assignments. Participants were assessed on self-report measures of secondary traumatization, professional self-efficacy, hope, sense of mastery and self-esteem before and after the intervention. (1) Well baby clinic nurses were found to have elevated secondary traumatization levels. (2) Compared to the waiting list group, the intervention group improved significantly on the professional self-efficacy measure as well as reducing the level of secondary traumatization. Furthermore, improvement on all secondary traumatization measures covaried with the improvement on the professional self-efficacy assessments. Based on additional informal reports, the

  13. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P  .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve neuropsychological functioning and reduce neurological dysfunction. Clinical trials registration.  NCT00096824. PMID:22661489

  14. Effects of Group Psychotherapy, Individual Counseling, Methylphenidate, and Placebo in the Treatment of Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Jans, Thomas; Graf, Erika; Matthies, Swantje; Borel, Patricia; Colla, Michael; Gentschow, Laura; Langner, Daina; Jacob, Christian; Groß-Lesch, Silke; Sobanski, Esther; Alm, Barbara; Schumacher-Stien, Martina; Roesler, Michael; Retz, Wolfgang; Retz-Junginger, Petra; Kis, Bernhard; Abdel-Hamid, Mona; Heinrich, Viola; Huss, Michael; Kornmann, Catherine; Bürger, Arne; Perlov, Evgeniy; Ihorst, Gabriele; Schlander, Michael; Berger, Mathias; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with high prevalence in adulthood. There is a recognized need to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy in adult ADHD. To evaluate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral group psychotherapy (GPT) compared with individual clinical management (CM) and that of methylphenidate hydrochloride compared with placebo. Prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial of 18- to 58-year-old outpatients with ADHD from 7 German study centers. Patients were recruited between January 2007 and August 2010, treatment was finalized in August 2011, and final follow-up assessments occurred in March 2013. Sessions of GPT and CM were held weekly for the first 12 weeks and monthly thereafter (9 months). Patients received either methylphenidate or placebo for 1 year. The primary outcome was the change in the ADHD Index of the Conners Adult ADHD Rating Scale from baseline to the end of the 3-month intensive treatment (blinded observer ratings). Secondary outcomes included ADHD ratings after 1 year, blinded observer ratings using the Clinical Global Impression Scale, and self-ratings of depression. Among 1480 prescreened patients, 518 were assessed for eligibility, 433 were centrally randomized, and 419 were analyzed as randomized. After 3 months, the ADHD Index all-group baseline mean of 20.6 improved to adjusted means of 17.6 for GPT and 16.5 for CM, with no significant difference between groups. Methylphenidate (adjusted mean, 16.2) was superior to placebo (adjusted mean, 17.9) (difference, -1.7; 97.5% CI, -3.0 to -0.4; P = .003). After 1 year, treatment effects remained essentially stable. Descriptive analyses showed that methylphenidate was superior to placebo in patients assigned to GPT (difference, -1.7; 95% CI, -3.2 to -0.1; P = .04) or CM (difference, -1.7; 95% CI, -3.3 to -0.2; P = .03). Regarding depression, no significant differences were found. In contrast, GPT was superior to CM for all

  15. SMi's Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    The Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe meeting, held in London, included topics covering new developments in the field of clinical trials and recommendations on how to best conduct a trial. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the state of affairs of trials in Europe, conducting trials in emerging markets, strategies for improving trials, trial design options, peri-approval and pediatric trials, and the role of key players, such as physicians. Company perspectives from Pfizer Inc and Nycomed are also included.

  16. Oral fibrinogen-depleting agent lumbrokinase for secondary ischemic stroke prevention: results from a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group and controlled clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong-jun; ZHANG Xia; WANG Wan-hua; ZHAI Wan-qing; QIAN Ju-fen; WANG Jian-sheng; CHEN Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated fibrinogen (Fg) level is a known risk factor for ischemic stroke.There are few clinical trials on oral fibrinogen-depleting therapies for secondary ischemic stroke prevention.We aimed to assess the effects of one-year therapy with oral lumbrokinase enteric-coated capsules on secondary ischemic stroke prevention.Methods This is a multicenter,randomized,parallel group and controlled study that began treatment in hospitalized patients with ischemic stroke and continued for 12 months.Patients were randomized to either the control group that received the standard stroke treatment or the fibrinogen-depleting group that received the standard stroke treatment plus enteric-coated lumbrokinase capsules.The NIH Stroke Scale scores (NIHSSs) and plasma Fg level were recorded.The carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and status of plaques were examined through carotid ultrasound examination.Primary outcomes included all-cause mortality,any event of recurrent ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA),hemorrhagic stroke,myocardial infarction and angina,and other noncerebral ischemia or hemorrhage.Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Long-rank test were used to compare total vascular end point incidence between the two groups.Comparison of median values between two groups was done by the Student t test,one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA),or non-parametric rank sum test.Results A total of 310 patients were enrolled,192 patients in the treatment group and 118 patients in the control group.Compared to the control group,the treatment group showed favorable outcomes in the Fg level,carotid IMT,the detection rate of vulnerable plaques,the volume of carotid plaques,NIHSS scores,and incidence of total vascular (6.78% and 2.08%,respectively) and cerebral vascular events (5.93% and 1.04%,respectively) (P <0.05).In the treatment group,the volume of carotid plaques was significantly related to the carotid IMT,the plaque diameter,width and number (P

  17. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management. |

  18. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  19. Clinical trials. A pending subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Extremera, B; Jiménez-López, P; Mediavilla-García, J D

    2017-07-31

    Clinical trials are essential tools for the progress of clinical medicine in its diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. Since the first trial in 1948, which related tobacco use with lung cancer, there have been more than 150,000 clinical trials to date in various areas (paediatrics, cardiology, oncology, endocrinology, etc.). This article highlights the importance for all physicians to participate, over the course of their professional career, in a clinical trial, due to the inherent benefits for patients, the progress of medicine and for curricular prestige. The authors have created a synthesis of their experience with clinical trials on hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease over the course of almost 3 decades. Furthermore, a brief reference has been made to the characteristics of a phase I unit, as well as to a number of research studies currently underway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. Feedback versus no feedback to improve patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Waaddegaard, Mette; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    of continuous feedback on adherence and outcome in group psychotherapy. Methods/design: The trial is set up in a randomized design for outpatients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or eating disorder not otherwise specified (DSM-IV). They are allocated 1:1 to the experimental group...

  1. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search About Our Mission History of the ACTG Network Leadership Committees Organizational Matrix (PDF - 68 KB) State ... Guidelines Annual Progress Reports Leadership and Operations Center Network Coordinating Center Statistical and Data Management Center Performance ...

  2. Randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, C; Lødrup, A B; Smith, G;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many reflux patients remain symptomatic on a standard dose of proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Alginates decrease the number of reflux events by forming a raft on top of the stomach content and thus offer a supplemental mechanism of action to acid suppression. AIM: To assess the efficacy...... of an alginate (Gaviscon Advance, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) on reflux symptoms in patients with persistent symptoms despite once daily PPI. METHODS: This was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-day double-blind trial preceded by a 7-day run-in period. Reflux symptoms were assessed using......: In patients with residual reflux symptoms despite PPI treatment, adding an alginate offers additional decrease in the burden of reflux symptoms (EudraCT/IND Number: 2011-005486-21)....

  3. Medical coding in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deven Babre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data generated in all clinical trial are recorded on the data collection instrument Case report Form / Electronic Case Report Form by investigators located at various sites in various countries. In multicentric clinical trials since different investigator or medically qualified experts are from different sites / centers recording the medical term(s uniformly is a big challenge. Medical coders from clinical data management team process these terms and perform medical coding. Medical coding is performed to categorize the medical terms reported appropriately so that they can be analyzed/reviewed. This article describes process which is used for medical coding in clinical data management and two most commonly used medical dictionaries MedDRA and WHO-DDE in brief. It is expected to help medical coders to understand the process of medical coding in clinical data management. Few common issues which the medical coder faces while performing medical coding, are also highlighted.

  4. Design paper: The CapOpus trial: a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of specialized addiction treatment versus treatment as usual for young patients with cannabis abuse and psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Fohlmann, Allan; Larsen, Anne-Mette

    2008-01-01

    trial. Patients are primarily recruited through early-psychosis detection teams, community mental health centers, and assertive community treatment teams. Patients are randomized to one of two treatment arms, both lasting six months: 1) specialized addiction treatment plus treatment as usual or 2...... of cannabis consumption over time. Other outcome measures will be psychosis symptoms, cognitive functioning, quality of life, social functioning, and cost-benefit analyses. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00484302....

  5. Innovations in clinical trials informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Ron; Vyas, Hiten; Dudhal, Nilesh; Doherty, Neil F; Coombs, Crispin R; Hepworth, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper will investigate innovations in information management for use in clinical trials. The application typifies a complex, adaptive, distributed and information-rich environment for which continuous innovation is necessary. Organisational innovation is highlighted as well as the technical innovations in workflow processes and their representation as an integrated set of web services. Benefits realization uncovers further innovations in the business strand of the work undertaken. Following the description of the development of this information management system, the semantic web is postulated as a possible solution to tame the complexity related to information management issues found within clinical trials support systems.

  6. Efficacy and safety of oral rehydration solution with reduced osmolarity in adults with cholera: a randomised double-blind clinical trial. CHOICE study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, N H; Majumder, R N; Fuchs, G J

    1999-07-24

    The effects of oral rehydration solution (ORS) with reduced osmolarity on children with acute watery diarrhoea are known, but little is known about the effects of such ORS on adults with cholera. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of an ORS with reduced osmolarity with that of standard WHO ORS in adults with cholera. We undertook a double-blind, controlled clinical trial in adults with severe cholera at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. Our primary outcomes were mean stool output in the 24 h after randomisation, proportion of patients who needed unscheduled intravenous therapy, and proportion of patients with biochemical hyponatraemia 24 h after randomisation. 147 patients received ORS with reduced osmolarity and 153 received standard WHO ORS. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of main outcome variables: mean initial 24 h and total stool output (reduced osmolarity vs standard WHO ORS 212 [SE 8] vs 207 [8] and 284 [13] vs 273 [13] g/kg respectively), duration of diarrhoea (46 [1.5] vs 43 [1.5]). The proportion of patients vomiting during the first 24 h and the proportion who received unscheduled intravenous infusion during the first 24 h was similar between groups. More patients on reduced osmolarity ORS than on standard WHO ORS developed hyponatraemia during the first 24 h, defined as serum sodium concentration below 130 mmol/L (29 of 142 vs 16 of 150; odds ratio 2.1 [95% CI 1.1-4.1]). However, all hyponatraemic patients in both groups were symptom-free and the proportion of patients with serum sodium concentration below 125 mmol/L was similar between groups. There was no difference in clinical outcome between cholera patients treated with reduced osmolarity ORS solution and those treated with standard WHO ORS. The risk of increased incidence of symptom-free hyponatraemia in patients with cholera treated with an ORS with reduced osmolarity should be further assessed by meta-analysis. The

  7. The Racial, Cultural and Social Makeup of Hispanics as a potential Profile Risk for Intensifying the Need for Including this Ethnic Group in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Candales, Angel; Aponte Rodríguez, Jaime; Harris, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension not only is the most frequently listed cause of death worldwide; but also a well-recognized major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke. Based on the latest published statistics published by the American Heart Association, hypertension is very prevalent and found in one of every 3 US adults. Furthermore, data from NHANES 2007 to 2010 claims that almost 6% of US adults have undiagnosed hypertension. Despite this staggering statistic, previous US guidelines for the prevention, detection, and treatment of hypertension (The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure 7 [JNC 7]), released in 2003, stated that; "unfortunately, sufficient numbers of Mexican Americans and other Hispanic Americans... have not been included in most of the major clinical trials to allow reaching strong conclusions about their responses to individual antihypertensive therapies." However, the recently published JNC 8 offers no comment regarding recommendations or guideline treatment suggestions on Hispanics. The purpose of this article not only is to raise awareness of the lack of epidemiological data and treatment options regarding high blood pressure in the US Hispanic population; but also to make a case of the racial, cultural and social makeup of this ethnic group that places them at risk of cardiovascular complications related to hypertension.

  8. Involving South Asian patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain-Gambles, M; Leese, B; Atkin, K; Brown, J; Mason, S; Tovey, P

    2004-10-01

    To investigate how South Asian patients conceptualise the notion of clinical trials and to identify key processes that impact on trial participation and the extent to which communication difficulties, perceptions of risk and attitudes to authority influence these decisions. Also to identify whether 'South Asian' patients are homogeneous in these issues, and which factors differ between different South Asian subgroups and finally how professionals regard the involvement of South Asian patients and their views on strategies to increase participation. A review of the literature on minority ethnic participation in clinical trials was followed by three qualitative interview studies. Interviews were taped and transcribed (and translated if required) and subjected to framework analysis. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 25 health professionals; 60 South Asian lay people who had not taken part in a trial and 15 South Asian trial participants. Motivations for trial participation were identified as follows: to help society, to improve own health or that of family and friends, out of obligation to the doctor and to increase scientific knowledge. Deterrents were concerns about drug side-effects, busy lifestyles, language, previous bad experiences, mistrust and feelings of not belonging to British society. There was no evidence of antipathy amongst South Asians to the concept of clinical trials and, overall, the younger respondents were more knowledgeable than the older ones. Problems are more likely to be associated with service delivery. Lack of being approached was a common response. Lay-reported factors that might affect South Asian participation in clinical trials include age, language, social class, feeling of not belonging/mistrust, culture and religion. Awareness of clinical trials varied between each group. There are more similarities than differences in attitudes towards clinical trial participation between the South Asian and the general population

  9. Clinical Trials in Your Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP conducts multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States and Puerto Rico.

  10. Glossary of Clinical Trials Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Institutes of Health grant numbers. (See also Secondary IDs data element on ClinicalTrials.gov.) OUTCOME MEASURE A planned ... and Secondary Outcome Measure . (See also Primary and Secondary Outcome Measures data element and Outcome Measure results data element on ...

  11. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting ...

  12. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting ...

  13. Marginal prescription equivalent to the isocenter prescription in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy: preliminary study for Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG1408)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Daisuke; Ozawa, Shuichi; Kimura, Tomoki; Saito, Akito; Nishio, Teiji; Nakashima, Takeo; Ohno, Yoshimi; Murakami, Yuji; Nagata, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    A new randomized Phase III trial, the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 1408, which compares two dose fractionations (JCOG 0403 and JCOG 0702) for medically inoperable Stage IA NSCLC or small lung lesions clinically diagnosed as primary lung cancer, involves the introduction of a prescribed dose to the D95% of the planning target volume (PTV) using a superposition/convolution algorithm. Therefore, we must determine the prescribed dose in the D95% prescribing method to begin JCOG1408. JCOG 0702 uses density correction and the D95% prescribing method. However, JCOG 0403 uses no density correction and isocenter- prescribing method. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prescribed dose to the D95% of the PTV equivalent to a dose of 48 Gy to the isocenter (JCOG 0403) using a superposition algorithm. The peripheral isodose line, which has the highest conformity index, and the D95% of the PTV were analyzed by considering the weighting factor, i.e. the inverse of the difference between the doses obtained using the superposition and Clarkson algorithms. The average dose at the isodose line of the highest conformity index and the D95% of the PTV were 41.5 ± 0.3 and 42.0 ± 0.3 Gy, respectively. The D95% of the PTV had a small correlation with the target volume (r2 = 0.0022) and with the distance between the scatterer and tumor volumes (r2 = 0.19). Thus, the prescribed dose of 48 Gy using the Clarkson algorithm (JCOG0403) was found to be equivalent to the prescribed dose of 42 Gy to the D95% of the PTV using the superposition algorithm. PMID:28115532

  14. Clinical Trials in Peripheral Vascular Disease: Pipeline and Trial Designs: An Evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R.; Chiswell, Karen; Tidemann-Miller, Beth A.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Conte, Michael S.; White, Christopher J.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Laird, John R.; Hiatt, William R.; Tasneem, Asba; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tremendous advances have occurred in therapies for peripheral vascular disease (PVD); however, until recently it has not been possible to examine the entire clinical trial portfolio of studies for treatment of PVD (both arterial and venous disease). Methods and Results We examined interventional trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov from October 2007 through September 2010 (n=40,970) and identified 676 (1.7%) PVD trials (n=493 arterial only, n=170 venous only, n=13 both arterial and venous). Most arterial studies investigated lower extremity peripheral artery disease and acute stroke (35% and 24%, respectively), while most venous studies examined deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prevention (42%) or venous ulceration (25%). A placebo-controlled trial design was used in 27% of the PVD trials, and 4% of the PVD trials excluded patients aged >65 years. Enrollment in at least 1 US site decreased from 51% in 2007 to 41% of trials in 2010. Compared with non-cardiology disciplines, PVD trials were more likely to be double-blinded, investigate use of devices and procedures, and have industry sponsorship and assumed funding source, and less likely to investigate drug and behavioral therapies. Geographic access to PVD clinical trials within the United States is limited to primarily large metropolitan areas. Conclusions PVD studies represent a small group of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, despite the high prevalence of vascular disease in the general population. This low number, compounded by the decreasing number of PVD trials in the United States, is concerning and may limit the ability to inform current clinical practice of patients with PVD. PMID:25239436

  15. Target Temperature Management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--a randomized, parallel-group, assessor-blinded clinical trial--rationale and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; al-Subaie, Nawaf

    2012-01-01

    from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A systematic review indicates that the evidence for recommending this intervention is inconclusive, and the GRADE level of evidence is low. Previous trials were small, with high risk of bias, evaluated select populations, and did not treat hyperthermia......Experimental animal studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurologic function with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest. International guidelines advocate the use of a target temperature management of 32°C to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours after resuscitation...... in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management strategy is not known....

  16. Selecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) clinical trials: first report of the MRI in JIA special interest group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemke, Robert; Doria, Andrea S; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Maas, Mario; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M; van Rossum, Marion A J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have substantially improved the evaluation of joint pathologies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Because of the current availability of highly effective antirheumatic therapies and the unique and useful features of MRI, there is a growing need for an accurate and reproducible MRI assessment scoring system for JIA, such as the rheumatoid arthritis MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To effectively evaluate the efficacy of treatment in clinical research trials, we need to develop and validate scoring methods to accurately measure joint outcomes, standardize imaging protocols for data acquisition and interpretation, and create imaging atlases to differentiate physiologic and pathologic joint findings in childhood and adolescence. Such a standardized, validated, JIA-MRI scoring method could be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  17. EFSPI/PSI working group on data sharing: accessing and working with pharmaceutical clinical trial patient level datasets – a primer for academic researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca Sudlow; Janice Branson; Tim Friede; David Morgan; Caroline Whately-Smith

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Access to patient level datasets from clinical trial sponsors continues to be an important topic for the Pharmaceutical Industry as well as academic institutions and researchers. How to make access to patient level data actually happen raises many questions from the perspective of the researcher. Methods Patient level data access models of all major pharmaceutical companies were surveyed and recommendations made to guide academic researchers in the most efficient way throu...

  18. Clinical trials on AIDS start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 6-month clinical trial in the Philippines sought to determine the efficacy of coconut oil and of "monolaurin," a coconut oil byproduct, in killing HIV by breaking down its coating. This research is based on the theory that medium-chain fatty acids, like monolaurin, can have this effect on certain viruses. The trial involves 12 women and 3 men in the early stage of HIV infection. 10 patients will take different doses of monolaurin, and 5 will consume coconut oil. It is hypothesized that the regimen will lead to higher CD4 counts and a lower viral load. The trial was almost abandoned because it received only lukewarm approval from the Health Secretary.

  19. Clinical Trials in Noninfectious Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane S.; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of noninfectious uveitis continues to remain a challenge for many ophthalmologists. Historically, clinical trials in uveitis have been sparse, and thus, most treatment decisions have largely been based on clinical experience and consensus guidelines. The current treatment paradigm favors initiation then tapering of corticosteroids with addition of steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents for persistence or recurrence of disease. Unfortunately, in spite of a multitude of highly unfavorable systemic effects, corticosteroids are still regarded as the mainstay of treatment for many patients with chronic and refractory noninfectious uveitis. However, with the success of other conventional and biologic immunomodulatory agents in treating systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, interest in targeted treatment strategies for uveitis has been renewed. Multiple clinical trials on steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents, biologic agents, intraocular corticosteroid implants, and topical ophthalmic solutions have already been completed, and many more are ongoing. This review discusses the results and implications of these clinical trials investigating both alternative and novel treatment options for noninfectious uveitis. PMID:26035763

  20. A randomized phase 3 trial of thalidomide and prednisone as maintenance therapy after ASCT in patients with MM with a quality-of-life assessment: the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinicals Trials Group Myeloma 10 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A Keith; Trudel, Suzanne; Bahlis, Nizar J; White, Darrell; Sabry, Waleed; Belch, Andrew; Reiman, Tony; Roy, Jean; Shustik, Chaim; Kovacs, Michael J; Rubinger, Morel; Cantin, Guy; Song, Kevin; Tompkins, Kirsty A; Marcellus, Deb C; Lacy, Martha Q; Sussman, Jonathan; Reece, Donna; Brundage, Michael; Harnett, Erica L; Shepherd, Lois; Chapman, Judy-Anne W; Meyer, Ralph M

    2013-02-28

    We conducted a randomized, controlled trial comparing thalidomide-prednisone as maintenance therapy with observation in 332 patients who had undergone autologous stem cell transplantation with melphalan 200 mg/m2. The primary end point was overall survival (OS); secondary end points were myeloma-specific progression-free survival,progression-free survival, incidence of venous thromboembolism, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). With a median follow-up of 4.1 years, no differences in OS between thalidomide-prednisone and observation were detected (respective 4-year estimates of 68% vs 60%, respectively; hazard ratio = 0.77; P = .18); thalidomide-prednisone was associated with superior myeloma-specific progression-free survival and progression-free survival (for both outcomes, the 4-year estimates were 32% vs 14%; hazard ratio = 0.56; P prednisone and 34.1 months in the observation group. Nine second malignancies were observed with thalidomide-prednisone versus 6 in the observation group. Those allocated to thalidomide-prednisone reported worse HRQoL with respect to cognitive function, dyspnea, constipation, thirst, leg swelling, numbness, dry mouth, and balance problems. We conclude that maintenance therapy with thalidomide-prednisone after autologous stem cell transplantation improves the duration of disease control, but is associated with worsening of patient-reported HRQoL and no detectable OS benefit.

  1. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  2. Anthropometric differences between HIV-infected individuals prior to antiretroviral treatment and the general population from 1998-2007: the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials (ALLRT cohort and NHANES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E Atkinson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess differences in body circumferences and body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2 between antiretroviral treatment (ART naïve HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected persons. METHODS: Waist, arm, and thigh circumferences and BMI were measured within the ALLRT and NHANES cohorts between 1998 and 2007. ALLRT is a prospective, longitudinal study of U.S. participants enrolled in randomized HIV treatment studies conducted by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG. NHANES is a representative group of the US population. The cohorts were analyzed in two time periods, to account for trends towards increased adiposity. Anthropometrics were displayed in percentiles by age and sex. Multiple linear regression models examined differences between cohorts. RESULTS: ALLRT had more males (82% versus 48%, p<0.0001, more black participants (32% versus 23%, p<0.0001, and less Hispanics (21% versus 30%, p<0.0001 than NHANES. Mean BMI was smaller in ALLRT males and females compared to NHANES by 1.6-2.4 kg/m(2 (p<0.0001. Mean waist and arm circumferences in both sexes and time periods were significantly smaller in ALLRT than in NHANES (p<0.0001. Mean thigh circumference in ALLRT was also smaller than NHANES among males (p<0.0001 in both time periods and females (p = 0.01 in the early time period. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in anthropometrics existed prior to ART initiation, in this large national cohort of HIV-infected individuals, compared to a representative HIV-uninfected cohort, indicating that HIV and its complications have important effects on body shape. Further longitudinal examination of anthropometrics in this HIV-infected cohort may provide additional insight into disease risk. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT00001137 at www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  3. Anthropometric Differences between HIV-Infected Individuals Prior to Antiretroviral Treatment and the General Population from 1998–2007: The AIDS Clinical Trials Group Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials (ALLRT) Cohort and NHANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Benjamin E.; Krishnan, Supriya; Cox, Gary; Hulgan, Todd; Collier, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in body circumferences and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) between antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected persons. Methods Waist, arm, and thigh circumferences and BMI were measured within the ALLRT and NHANES cohorts between 1998 and 2007. ALLRT is a prospective, longitudinal study of U.S. participants enrolled in randomized HIV treatment studies conducted by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). NHANES is a representative group of the US population. The cohorts were analyzed in two time periods, to account for trends towards increased adiposity. Anthropometrics were displayed in percentiles by age and sex. Multiple linear regression models examined differences between cohorts. Results ALLRT had more males (82% versus 48%, p<0.0001), more black participants (32% versus 23%, p<0.0001), and less Hispanics (21% versus 30%, p<0.0001) than NHANES. Mean BMI was smaller in ALLRT males and females compared to NHANES by 1.6–2.4 kg/m2 (p<0.0001). Mean waist and arm circumferences in both sexes and time periods were significantly smaller in ALLRT than in NHANES (p<0.0001). Mean thigh circumference in ALLRT was also smaller than NHANES among males (p<0.0001 in both time periods) and females (p = 0.01 in the early time period). Conclusions Differences in anthropometrics existed prior to ART initiation, in this large national cohort of HIV-infected individuals, compared to a representative HIV-uninfected cohort, indicating that HIV and its complications have important effects on body shape. Further longitudinal examination of anthropometrics in this HIV-infected cohort may provide additional insight into disease risk. Trial Registration NCT00001137 at www.clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:23755215

  4. The ethics of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have prevailed over clinical judgement, case reports, and observational studies and became the gold evidential standard in medicine. Furthermore, during the same time frame, RCTs became a crucial part of the regulatory process whereby a new therapeutic can gain access to the drug market. Today, clinical trials are large and tightly regulated enterprises that have to comply with ethical requirements while maintaining high epistemic standards, a balance that becomes increasingly difficult as the research questions become more sophisticated. In this review, the author will discuss some of the most important ethical issues surrounding RCTs, with an eye to the most recent debates and the context of oncological research in particular. PMID:24482672

  5. Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo iStock Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new ...

  6. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  7. Robust inference for group sequential trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Jitendra; Lin, Yunzhi; Zhou, Kefei

    2017-03-01

    For ethical reasons, group sequential trials were introduced to allow trials to stop early in the event of extreme results. Endpoints in such trials are usually mortality or irreversible morbidity. For a given endpoint, the norm is to use a single test statistic and to use that same statistic for each analysis. This approach is risky because the test statistic has to be specified before the study is unblinded, and there is loss in power if the assumptions that ensure optimality for each analysis are not met. To minimize the risk of moderate to substantial loss in power due to a suboptimal choice of a statistic, a robust method was developed for nonsequential trials. The concept is analogous to diversification of financial investments to minimize risk. The method is based on combining P values from multiple test statistics for formal inference while controlling the type I error rate at its designated value.This article evaluates the performance of 2 P value combining methods for group sequential trials. The emphasis is on time to event trials although results from less complex trials are also included. The gain or loss in power with the combination method relative to a single statistic is asymmetric in its favor. Depending on the power of each individual test, the combination method can give more power than any single test or give power that is closer to the test with the most power. The versatility of the method is that it can combine P values from different test statistics for analysis at different times. The robustness of results suggests that inference from group sequential trials can be strengthened with the use of combined tests. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  9. EFSPI/PSI working group on data sharing: accessing and working with pharmaceutical clinical trial patient level datasets – a primer for academic researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Sudlow

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Access to patient level datasets from clinical trial sponsors continues to be an important topic for the Pharmaceutical Industry as well as academic institutions and researchers. How to make access to patient level data actually happen raises many questions from the perspective of the researcher. Methods Patient level data access models of all major pharmaceutical companies were surveyed and recommendations made to guide academic researchers in the most efficient way through the process of requesting and accessing patient level data. Results The key considerations for researchers covered here are finding information; writing a research proposal to request data access; the review process; how data are shared; and the expectations of the data holder. A lot of clinical trial information is available on public registries and so these are great sources of information. Depending on the research proposal the required information may be available in Clinical Study Reports and therefore patient level data may not need to be requested. Many data sharing systems have an electronic form or template but in cases where these are not available the proposal needs to be created as a stand-alone document outlining the purpose, statistical analysis plan, identifying the studies for which data are required, the research team members involved, any conflicts of interest and the funding for the research. There are three main review processes - namely having an internal review board, external review board selected by the data holder or an external review board selected by a third party. Data can be shared through Open access i.e. on a public website, direct sharing between the data holder and the researcher, controlled access or the data holder identifies a contract organization to access the data and perform the analyses on behalf of the researcher. The data that are shared will have accompanying documentation to assist the researcher in

  10. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram;

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...... variable. Generation of trial databases and/or biobanks originating in large randomized clinical trials has successfully increased the knowledge obtained from those trials. At the 10th Cardiovascular Trialist Workshop, possibilities and pitfalls in designing and accessing clinical trial databases were......, in particular with respect to collaboration with the trial sponsor and to analytic pitfalls. The advantages of creating screening databases in conjunction with a given clinical trial are described; and finally, the potential for posttrial database studies to become a platform for training young scientists...

  11. Pulmonary perfusion with oxygenated blood or custodiol HTK solution during cardiac surgery for postoperative pulmonary function in COPD patients: a trial protocol for the randomized, clinical, parallel group, assessor and data analyst blinded Pulmonary Protection Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buggeskov Katrine B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Five to thirty percent of patients undergoing cardiac surgery present with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and have a 2- to 10-fold higher 30-day mortality risk. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB creates a whole body systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS that could impair pulmonary function. Impaired pulmonary function can, however, be attenuated by pulmonary perfusion with oxygenated blood or custodiol HTK (histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution. Methods/Design The Pulmonary Protection Trial (PP-Trial randomizes 90 patients undergoing CPB-dependent cardiac surgery to evaluate whether pulmonary perfusion with oxygenated blood or custodiol HTK solution reduces postoperative pulmonary dysfunction in COPD patients. Further, we aim for a non-randomized evaluation of postoperative pulmonary function after transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI. The primary outcome measure is the oxygenation index measured from anesthesia induction to the end of surgery and until 24 hours after anesthesia induction for a total of six evaluations. Discussion Patients with COPD may be impaired by hypoxemia and SIRS. Thus, prolonged recovery and even postoperative complications and death may be reflected by the degree of hypoxemia and SIRS. The limited sample size does not aim for confirmatory conclusions on mortality, cardiovascular complications or risk of pneumonia and sepsis, but the PP-Trial is considered an important feasibility trial paving the road for a multicenter confirmatory trial. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01614951.

  12. Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C

    2016-07-01

    Accrual to cancer clinical trials (CCT) is imperative to safeguard continued improvement in cancer outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients (n=140) starting a new anti-cancer agent in a north Dublin cancer centre. This review was performed over a four-month period, beginning in November 2015. Only 29% (n=41) had a CCT option. The overall accrual rate to CCT was 5% (n=7), which is comparable to internationally reported figures. The main reasons for failure to recruit to CCT included the lack of a CCT option for cancer type (n=30, 23%), stage (n=25, 19%), and line of treatment (n=23, 17%). Over the last decade, the rate of accrual to CCTs has in fact doubled and the number of trials open to recruitment has tripled. Ongoing governmental and philanthropic support is necessary to continue this trend to further expand CCT patient options with a target accrual rate of 10%.

  13. Impact of a cancer clinical trials web site on discussions about trial participation: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, R F; Barratt, A L; Askie, L M; Butow, P N; McGeechan, K; Crossing, S; Currow, D C; Tattersall, M H N

    2012-07-01

    Cancer patients want access to reliable information about currently recruiting clinical trials. Oncologists and their patients were randomly assigned to access a consumer-friendly cancer clinical trials web site [Australian Cancer Trials (ACT), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au] or to usual care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome, measured from audio recordings of oncologist-patient consultations, was the proportion of patients with whom participation in any clinical trial was discussed. Analysis was by intention-to-treat accounting for clustering and stratification. Thirty medical oncologists and 493 patients were recruited. Overall, 46% of consultations in the intervention group compared with 34% in the control group contained a discussion about clinical trials (P=0.08). The mean consultation length in both groups was 29 min (P=0.69). The proportion consenting to a trial was 10% in both groups (P=0.65). Patients' knowledge about randomized trials was lower in the intervention than the control group (mean score 3.0 versus 3.3, P=0.03) but decisional conflict scores were similar (mean score 42 versus 43, P=0.83). Good communication between patients and physicians is essential. Within this context, a web site such as Australian Cancer Trials may be an important tool to encourage discussion about clinical trial participation.

  14. Overestimation of the effect size in group sequential trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jenny J; Blumenthal, Gideon M; He, Kun; Tang, Shenghui; Cortazar, Patricia; Sridhara, Rajeshwari

    2012-09-15

    Group sequential designs (GSD), which provide for interim monitoring of efficacy data and allow potential early trial termination while preserving the type I error rate, have become commonplace in oncology clinical trials. Although ethically appealing, GSDs tend to overestimate the true treatment effect size at early interim analyses. Overestimation of the treatment effect may exaggerate the benefit of a drug and provide imprecise information for physicians and their patients about a drug's true effect. The cause and effect of such a phenomenon are generally not well understood by many in clinical trial practice. In this article, we provide a graphical explanation for why the phenomenon of overestimation in GSDs occurs. The potential overestimation of the magnitude of the treatment effect is of particular concern in oncology, in which the more subjective endpoint of progression-free survival has increasingly been adopted as the primary endpoint in pivotal phase III trials. ©2012 AACR.

  15. a randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in chronic neck pain by means of a randomized clinical trial. 77 with chronic neck pain who scored > 40 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) were randomized to a nine week Iyengar yoga program with weekly 90-minute classes or to a self-care/exercise program. The primary outcome measure was change of mean pain at rest (VAS) from baseline to week ten. Secondary outcomes included pain at motion, functional disabilit...

  16. Clinical trials and gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Cassese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22% which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  17. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...

  18. Clinical trials: innovation, progress and controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin GS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Greg S MartinDepartment of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAThe Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials began in 2009 with the goal of being an authoritative, open access source for international, peer-reviewed publications in the field of human research and clinical trials. Since then, the Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials has published approximately 30 high-quality articles on original research, innovative reviews, and critical commentaries. These articles have spanned many aspects of clinical trials wonderfully, including trial design and management; legal, ethical and regulatory issues of clinical trials; subject participation and retention in clinical trials; and data collection and data management.

  19. Bayesian adaptive methods for clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, Scott M; Muller, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Already popular in the analysis of medical device trials, adaptive Bayesian designs are increasingly being used in drug development for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, from Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis to obesity, diabetes, hepatitis C, and HIV. Written by leading pioneers of Bayesian clinical trial designs, Bayesian Adaptive Methods for Clinical Trials explores the growing role of Bayesian thinking in the rapidly changing world of clinical trial analysis. The book first summarizes the current state of clinical trial design and analysis and introduces the main ideas and potential benefits of a Bayesian alternative. It then gives an overview of basic Bayesian methodological and computational tools needed for Bayesian clinical trials. With a focus on Bayesian designs that achieve good power and Type I error, the next chapters present Bayesian tools useful in early (Phase I) and middle (Phase II) clinical trials as well as two recent Bayesian adaptive Phase II studies: the BATTLE and ISP...

  20. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Adult Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G; Ruperto, Nicolino; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Oddis, Chester V; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James D; Mammen, Andrew; de Visser, Marianne; Ytterberg, Steven R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Song, Yeong Wook; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Expert surveys, logistic regression, and conjoint analysis were used to develop 287 definitions using core set measures. Myositis experts rated greater improvement among multiple pairwise scenarios in conjoint analysis surveys, where different levels of improvement in 2 core set measures were presented. The PAPRIKA (Potentially All Pairwise Rankings of All Possible Alternatives) method determined the relative weights of core set measures and conjoint analysis definitions. The performance characteristics of the definitions were evaluated on patient profiles using expert consensus (gold standard) and were validated using data from a clinical trial. The nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model using absolute percent change in core set measures (physician, patient, and extramuscular global activity, muscle strength, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and muscle enzyme levels). A total improvement score (range 0-100), determined by summing scores for each core set measure, was based on improvement in and relative weight of each core set measure. Thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement were ≥20, ≥40, and ≥60 points in the total improvement score. The same criteria were chosen for juvenile DM, with different improvement thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity in DM/PM patient cohorts were 85% and 92%, 90% and 96%, and 92% and 98% for minimal, moderate, and major improvement, respectively. Definitions were validated in the clinical trial analysis for differentiating the physician rating of improvement (P < 0.001). The response criteria for adult DM/PM consisted of the conjoint analysis model based on absolute percent change in 6 core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Resistance to group clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Delgado, Cynthia; Traynor, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has traditiona......This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has...... traditionally been theorized as a supervisee's maladaptive coping with anxiety in the supervision process. The aim of the present study was to examine resistance to group clinical supervision by interviewing nurses who did not participate in supervision. In 2015, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24...

  2. Exploring Willingness to Participate in Clinical Trials by Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariera, Katrina L; Murphy, Sheila T; Meng, Jingbo; McLaughlin, Margaret L

    2016-09-07

    African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans are disproportionately affected by cancer, yet underrepresented in cancer clinical trials. Because of this, it is important to understand how attitudes and beliefs about clinical trials vary by ethnicity. A national, random sample of 860 adults was given an online survey about attitudes toward clinical trials. We examined willingness to participate in clinical trials, attitudes toward clinical trials, trust in doctors, attitudes toward alternative and complementary medicine, and preferred information channels. Results indicate that African-American and Hispanic-American participants have more negative attitudes about clinical trials, more distrust toward doctors, more interest in complementary and alternative medicine, and less willingness to participate in clinical trials than white/non-Hispanics, although specific factors affecting willingness to participate vary. The channels people turn to for information on clinical trials also varied by ethnicity. These results help explain the ethnic disparities in cancer clinical trial enrollment by highlighting some potential underlying causes and drawing attention to areas of importance to these groups.

  3. Comparing the effect of auditory-only and auditory-visual modes in two groups of Persian children using cochlear implants: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryadi Zanjani, Mohammad Majid; Hasanzadeh, Saeid; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Shemshadi, Hashem; Purdy, Suzanne C; Mahmudi Bakhtiari, Behrooz; Vahab, Maryam

    2013-09-01

    Since the introduction of cochlear implantation, researchers have considered children's communication and educational success before and after implantation. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare auditory, speech, and language development scores following one-sided cochlear implantation between two groups of prelingual deaf children educated through either auditory-only (unisensory) or auditory-visual (bisensory) modes. A randomized controlled trial with a single-factor experimental design was used. The study was conducted in the Instruction and Rehabilitation Private Centre of Hearing Impaired Children and their Family, called Soroosh in Shiraz, Iran. We assessed 30 Persian deaf children for eligibility and 22 children qualified to enter the study. They were aged between 27 and 66 months old and had been implanted between the ages of 15 and 63 months. The sample of 22 children was randomly assigned to two groups: auditory-only mode and auditory-visual mode; 11 participants in each group were analyzed. In both groups, the development of auditory perception, receptive language, expressive language, speech, and speech intelligibility was assessed pre- and post-intervention by means of instruments which were validated and standardized in the Persian population. No significant differences were found between the two groups. The children with cochlear implants who had been instructed using either the auditory-only or auditory-visual modes acquired auditory, receptive language, expressive language, and speech skills at the same rate. Overall, spoken language significantly developed in both the unisensory group and the bisensory group. Thus, both the auditory-only mode and the auditory-visual mode were effective. Therefore, it is not essential to limit access to the visual modality and to rely solely on the auditory modality when instructing hearing, language, and speech in children with cochlear implants who are exposed to spoken language both at home and at school

  4. Control groups in recent septic shock trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Jakob, Stephan M; Wilkman, Erika; Perner, Anders; Takala, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    The interpretation of septic shock trial data is profoundly affected by patients, control intervention, co-interventions and selected outcome measures. We evaluated the reporting of control groups in recent septic shock trials. We searched for original articles presenting randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in adult septic shock patients from 2006 to 2016. We included RCTs focusing on septic shock patients with at least two parallel groups and at least 50 patients in the control group. We selected and evaluated data items regarding patients, control group characteristics, and mortality outcomes, and calculated a data completeness score to provide an overall view of quality of reporting. A total of 24 RCTs were included (mean n = 287 patients and 71 % of eligible patients were randomized). Of the 24 studies, 14 (58 %) presented baseline data on vasopressors and 58 % the proportion of patients with elevated lactate values. Five studies (21 %) provided data to estimate the proportion of septic shock patients fulfilling the Sepsis-3 definition. The mean data completeness score was 19 out of 36 (range 8-32). Of 18 predefined control group characteristics, a mean of 8 (range 2-17) were reported. Only 2 (8 %) trials provided adequate data to confirm that their control group treatment represented usual care. Recent trials in septic shock provide inadequate data on the control group treatment and hemodynamic values. We propose a standardized trial dataset to be created and validated, comprising characteristics of patient population, interventions administered, hemodynamic values achieved, surrogate organ dysfunction, and mortality outcomes, to allow better analysis and interpretation of future trial results.

  5. Future vision for the quality assurance of oncology clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzGerald, MD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence based process improvements for clinical oncology patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process as we further integrate molecular biology into personalized patient care and move to incorporate international partners in clinical trials. To support this vision, data acquisition and data management informatics tools must become both nimble and robust to support transformational research at an enterprise level. Information, including imaging, pathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, surgery, systemic therapy and patient outcome data needs to be integrated into the clinical trial charter using adaptive clinical trial mechanisms for design of the trial. This information needs to be made available to investigators using digital processes for real time data analysis. Future clinical trials will need to be designed and completed in a timely manner facilitated by nimble informatics processes for data management. This paper discusses both past experience and future vision for clinical trials as we move to develop data management and quality assurance processes to meet the needs of the modern trial.

  6. The state of infectious diseases clinical trials: a systematic review of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Neela D; Pfeiffer, Christopher D; Horton, John R; Chiswell, Karen; Tasneem, Asba; Tsalik, Ephraim L

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of clinical trials informing specific questions faced by infectious diseases (ID) specialists. The ClinicalTrials.gov registry offers an opportunity to evaluate the ID clinical trials portfolio. We examined 40,970 interventional trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007-2010, focusing on study conditions and interventions to identify ID-related trials. Relevance to ID was manually confirmed for each programmatically identified trial, yielding 3570 ID trials and 37,400 non-ID trials for analysis. The number of ID trials was similar to the number of trials identified as belonging to cardiovascular medicine (n = 3437) or mental health (n = 3695) specialties. Slightly over half of ID trials were treatment-oriented trials (53%, vs. 77% for non-ID trials) followed by prevention (38%, vs. 8% in non-ID trials). ID trials tended to be larger than those of other specialties, with a median enrollment of 125 subjects (interquartile range [IQR], 45-400) vs. 60 (IQR, 30-160) for non-ID trials. Most ID studies are randomized (73%) but nonblinded (56%). Industry was the funding source in 51% of ID trials vs. 10% that were primarily NIH-funded. HIV-AIDS trials constitute the largest subset of ID trials (n = 815 [23%]), followed by influenza vaccine (n = 375 [11%]), and hepatitis C (n = 339 [9%]) trials. Relative to U.S. and global mortality rates, HIV-AIDS and hepatitis C virus trials are over-represented, whereas lower respiratory tract infection trials are under-represented in this large sample of ID clinical trials. This work is the first to characterize ID clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, providing a framework to discuss prioritization, methodology, and policy.

  7. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials-Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bruner, Deborah [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Dignam, James [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); FitzGerald, T.J. [University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels (Belgium); Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Michalski, Jeff [University of Washington, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Simon, Richard [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ten Haken, Randal K. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Tunis, Sean [Center for Medical Technology Policy, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  8. [Profile of clinical trials enrolling Brazilian children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jean Mendes de Lucena; Lima, Elisangela da Costa; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Ventura, Miriam; Coelho, Helena Lutescia Luna

    2017-06-12

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical trials with medicines enrolling Brazilian children and adolescents, registered in the databases of Clinical Trials and the Brazilian Clinical Trials Network (ReBEC) from 1994 to 2014. Only 462 clinical trials enrolled Brazilian children and adolescents. There was an increase in registrations beginning in 2003, with an important drop in 2011. Among these trials, 35.5% were hosted in Brazil. The international clinical trials were mostly conducted by North American companies. In both cases, multinational industry was the principal source of funding. The clinical trials were predominantly phase III with injectable and solid oral pharmaceutical forms of antiviral drugs. Domestic clinical trials showed wider variation in the pharmaceutical forms and higher percentage of liquid formulations, when compared to the international trials. In addition to heavy external dependence for conducting clinical trials, the study emphasized the challenge for pediatric care in Brazil, which presents epidemiological peculiarities in an environment prone to the use of unlicensed medicines for children.

  9. Adult cancer clinical trials that fail to complete: an epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensland, Kristian D; McBride, Russell B; Latif, Asma; Wisnivesky, Juan; Hendricks, Ryan; Roper, Nitin; Boffetta, Paolo; Hall, Simon J; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-09-01

    The number and diversity of cancer therapeutics in the pipeline has increased over the past decade due to an enhanced understanding of cancer biology and the identification of novel therapeutic targets. At the same time, the cost of bringing new drugs to market and the regulatory burdens associated with clinical drug development have progressively increased. The finite number of eligible patients and limited financial resources available to evaluate promising new therapeutics represent rate-limiting factors in the effort to translate preclinical discoveries into the next generation of standard therapeutic approaches. Optimal use of resources requires understanding and ultimately addressing inefficiencies in the cancer clinical trials system. Prior analyses have demonstrated that a large proportion of trials initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Group system are never completed. While NCI Cooperative Group trials are important, they represent only a small proportion of all cancer clinical trials performed. Herein, we explore the problem of cancer clinical trials that fail to complete within the broader cancer clinical trials enterprise. Among 7776 phase II-III adult cancer clinical trials initiated between 2005-2011, we found a seven-year cumulative incidence of failure to complete of approximately 20% (95% confidence interval = 18% to 22%). Nearly 48000 patients were enrolled in trials that failed to complete. These trials likely contribute little to the scientific knowledge base, divert resources and patients from answering other critical questions, and represent a barrier to progress.

  10. Changes in sexual behavior of HIV-infected older adults enrolled in a clinical trial of standalone group psychotherapies targeting depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Travis I; Heckman, Timothy G; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Hansen, Nathan B; Kochman, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    By 2015, one-half of all HIV-positive persons in the U.S. will be 50-plus years of age, and as many as 30 % of older adults living with HIV/AIDS continue to engage in unprotected sexual intercourse. Contemporary positive prevention models often include mental health treatment as a key component of HIV prevention interventions. This secondary data analysis characterized longitudinal patterns of sexual behavior in HIV-positive older adults enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of group mental health interventions and assessed the efficacy of psychosocial treatments that targeted depression to reduce sexual risk behavior. Participants were 295 HIV-positive adults ≥50 years of age experiencing mild to severe depressive symptoms, randomized to one of three study conditions: a 12-session coping improvement group intervention, a 12-session interpersonal support group intervention, or individual therapy upon request. Approximately one-fifth of participants reported one or more occasions of unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse with HIV-negative sexual partners or persons of unknown HIV serostatus over the study period. Changes in sexual behavior did not vary by intervention condition, indicating that standalone treatments that target and reduce depression may be insufficient to reduce sexual risk behavior in depressed HIV-positive older adults.

  11. Changes in sexual behavior of HIV-infected older adults enrolled in a clinical trial of standalone group psychotherapies targeting depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Travis I.; Heckman, Timothy G.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    By 2015, one-half of all HIV-positive persons in the U.S. will be 50-plus years of age, and as many as 30% of older adults living with HIV/AIDS continue to engage in unprotected sexual intercourse. Contemporary positive prevention models often include mental health treatment as a key component of HIV prevention interventions. This secondary data analysis characterized longitudinal patterns of sexual behavior in HIV-positive older adults enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of group mental health interventions and assessed the efficacy of psychosocial treatments that targeted depression to reduce sexual risk behavior. Participants were 295 HIV-positive adults ≥ 50 years of age experiencing mild to severe depressive symptoms, randomized to one of three study conditions: a 12-session coping improvement group intervention, a 12-session interpersonal support group intervention, or individual therapy upon request. Approximately one-fifth of participants reported one or more occasions of unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse with HIV-negative sexual partners or persons of unknown HIV serostatus over the study period. Changes in sexual behavior did not vary by intervention condition, indicating that standalone treatments that target and reduce depression may be insufficient to reduce sexual risk behavior in depressed HIV-positive older adults. PMID:24668254

  12. Uncertainty and the ethics of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic explication is offered of equipoise and uncertainty in clinical trials. In order to be useful in the justification of clinical trials, equipoise has to be interpreted in terms of overlapping probability distributions of possible treatment outcomes, rather than point estimates representing expectation values. Uncertainty about treatment outcomes is shown to be a necessary but insufficient condition for the ethical defensibility of clinical trials. Additional requirements are proposed for the nature of that uncertainty. The indecisiveness of our criteria for cautious decision-making under uncertainty creates the leeway that makes clinical trials defensible.

  13. [Situation analysis for drug clinical trial institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Ying; Wu, Ping; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Drug clinical trial is an important link in the chain of new drug research and development. The results of drug discovery and development directly depend on the extent of standardization of clinical trials. Therefore, improving the quality of drug clinical trials is of great importance, and drug clinical trial institutions play a crucial role in the quality management of drug clinical trials. After years of development, the overall level of drug clinical trials has advanced rapidly in China, and a large number of clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine have also been carried out. However, there is still a big gap between our country and developed countries. Therefore, for the construction and management of Chinese drug clinical trial institutions, there is still a long way to go. This study aims to analyze the current development of drug clinical trial institutions in China and explore the existing problems from three aspects, including current situations of institutional organization and management, regional and professional distributions, and quality control. And some suggestions are put forward finally, including support of traditional Chinese medicine, introduction of drug-risk management system, and construction of information management.

  14. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database

    OpenAIRE

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Miguelez, Cristina Gutierrez; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. Methods The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type, location, p...

  15. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database

    OpenAIRE

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Gutierrez Miguelez, Cristina; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. Methods The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type,...

  16. Lack of relationship between EGFR-1 immunohistochemical expression and prognosis in a multicentre clinical trial of 93 patients with advanced primary ovarian epithelial cancer (GINECO group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elie, C; Geay, J F; Morcos, M; Le Tourneau, A; Girre, V; Broët, P; Marmey, B; Chauvenet, L; Audouin, J; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Camilleri-Broët, S

    2004-08-02

    Epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR-1) overexpression is usually described as linked with a worse prognosis in a variety of tumours of epithelial origin. However, its role in ovarian cancer is still controversial. The aim of the present study was to analyse the prognostic impact of EGFR-1 in a retrospective series of 93 stage III-IV primary ovarian epithelial tumours. All patients, enrolled in a multicentre GINECO prospective clinical trial, were treated with the same platinum-based combination chemotherapy, and were followed up with a median of 69 months. Epidermal growth factor receptor 1 plasma membrane expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissues, was correlated with clinical parameters as well as immunohistochemical expression results of HER-2 (c-erbB-2), BAX, BCL-2, p53 and anti-Ki-67, previously studied in the same series of patients. Positive immunostaining for EGFR-1 was seen in 31 of the 93 analysed cases (33%). No correlation was found between EGFR-1 expression and clinical parameters. No correlation was found between EGFR-1 expression and other biological markers, except for HER-2, which was limit for significance. Indeed, among the EGFR-1-negative cases, 10.3% expressed HER-2, whereas the HER-2-expressing tumours accounted for 27.6% of EGFR-1-positive cases (P=0.06). Epidermal growth factor receptor 1 overexpression had no prognostic impact on both overall and progression-free survival through univariate and multivariate analyses. The potential effect of EGFR-1 and HER-2 co-expression on targeted therapy against EGFR-1 and/or HER-2 molecules has to be further analysed.

  17. Cognitive behavior therapy-based psychoeducational groups for adults with ADHD and their significant others (PEGASUS): an open clinical feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvikoski, T; Waaler, E; Lindström, T; Bölte, S; Jokinen, J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of a new psychoeducative intervention program (PEGASUS) for adults with ADHD and their significant others in a psychiatric outpatient context. At three outpatient psychiatric clinics, adults with ADHD and their significant others took part in PEGASUS, a psychoeducational program based on theories from cognitive behavioral therapy, neuropsychology, and cross-disciplinary evidence regarding ADHD. In total, 108 adults were allocated to treatment (51 with ADHD and their 57 significant others). Feasibility was evaluated regarding suitability of the intervention at a psychiatric outpatient clinic and treatment completion. Preliminary efficacy was evaluated per protocol from baseline to post-intervention (n = 41 adults with ADHD and 40 significant others). In a feasibility analysis, the intervention was judged to be a suitable treatment option for 94.5 % of all individuals with a primary diagnosis of ADHD at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. In total, 43 out of 51 allocated individuals with ADHD (84.3 %) completed the intervention. The corresponding figures for their significant others were 42 out of 57 (73.7 %). Knowledge about ADHD increased, and both the quality of relationships and psychological well-being improved from baseline to post-intervention in all participants. The significant others reported a reduction in the subjective burden of care, such as worry and guilt. The objective burden of care (such as financial problems) did not change. The findings support the potential value of psychoeducation for adults with ADHD and their significant others. An ongoing randomized controlled trial will generate further evidence concerning the PEGASUS program.

  18. Trial analytics--a tool for clinical trial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Anindya; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged timelines and large expenses associated with clinical trials have prompted a new focus on improving the operational efficiency of clinical trials by use of Clinical Trial Management Systems (CTMS) in order to improve managerial control in trial conduct. However, current CTMS systems are not able to meet the expectations due to various shortcomings like inability of timely reporting and trend visualization within/beyond an organization. To overcome these shortcomings of CTMS, clinical researchers can apply a business intelligence (BI) framework to create Clinical Research Intelligence (CLRI) for optimization of data collection and analytics. This paper proposes the usage of an innovative and collaborative visualization tool (CTA) as CTMS "add-on" to help overwhelm these deficiencies of traditional CTMS, with suitable examples.

  19. Data monitoring committees for pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Susan S; Culbertson, Richard; Gillen, Daniel L; Goodman, Steven; Schrandt, Suzanne; Zirkle, Maryan

    2015-10-01

    In any clinical trial, it is essential to monitor the accumulating data to be sure that the trial continues to be safe for participants and that the trial is being conducted properly. Data monitoring committees, independent expert panels who undertake regular reviews of the data as the trial progresses, serve an important role in safeguarding the interests of research participants and ensuring trial integrity in many trials. Many pragmatic clinical trials, which aim to inform healthcare decisions by comparing alternate interventions in heterogeneous healthcare delivery settings, will warrant review by an independent data monitoring committee due to their potential impact on clinical practice. However, the very features that make a trial "pragmatic" may pose challenges in terms of which aspects of a trial to monitor and when it is appropriate for a data monitoring committee to intervene. Using the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary tool that draws distinctions between pragmatic and explanatory clinical trials, we review characteristics of pragmatic clinical trials that may have implications for data monitoring committees and interim monitoring plans. These include broad eligibility criteria, a focus on subjective patient-centered outcomes, and in some cases a lack of standardized follow-up procedures across study sites. Additionally, protocol adherence is often purposefully not addressed in pragmatic trials in order to accurately represent the clinical practice setting and maintain practicability of implementation; there are differing viewpoints as to whether adherence should be assessed and acted upon by data monitoring committees in these trials. Some other issues not specifically related to the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary criteria may also merit special consideration in pragmatic trials. Thresholds for early termination of a pragmatic clinical trial might be controversial. The distinguishing features of pragmatic clinical

  20. Clinical Trials.Gov: A Topical Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vibha; Cahan, Amos; Ghosh, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov was established as a web-based registry for clinical trials of human participants in 2000. Mandatory registration started in 2008. Given more than a decade of registered trials, it's important to understand the "topic" areas and their evolution over time from this resource. This information may help in identifying current knowledge gaps. We use dynamic topic model (DTM) methods to discover topics and their evolution over last 17 years. Our model suggests that there are disease or organ specific trials such as 'Cardiovascular disorders', Heart & Brain conditions', or 'Breast & Prostate cancer' as well as trials registered for general health. General health trials are less likely to be FDA regulated, but both health and pain management, as well as surgical, heart, and brain trials have upward trend in recent years while advanced cancer trials have downward trended. Our model derives unique insights from metadata associated with each topic area.

  1. The application of disease management to clinical trial designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterman, Jared; Alter, David A

    2009-08-01

    The utilization of disease management (DM) as a minimum standard of care is believed to facilitate pronounced benefits in overall patient outcome and cost management. Randomized clinical trials remain the gold standard evaluative tool in clinical medicine. However, the extent to which contemporary cardiovascular clinical trials incorporate DM components into their treatment or control arms is unknown. Our study is the first to evaluate the extent to which clinical trials incorporate DM as a minimum standard of care for both the intervention and control groups. In total, 386 clinical trials published in 3 leading medical journals between 2003 and 2006 were evaluated. For each study, elements related to DM care, as defined using the American Heart Association Taxonomy, were abstracted and characterized. Our results demonstrate that while the application of DM has increased over time, only 3.4% of the clinical trials examined incorporated all 8 DM elements (and only 11% of such trials incorporated 4 DM elements). A significant association was found between study year and the inclusion of more than 3 elements of DM (chi(2) = 10.10 (3); p = 0.018). In addition, associations were found between study objective and DM criteria, as well as between cohort type and domains described. Our study serves as a baseline reference for the tracking of DM within, and its application to, randomized clinical trials. Moreover, our results underscore the need for broader implementation and evaluation of DM as a minimum care standard within clinical trial research.

  2. Why are clinical trials necessary in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani Poongothai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials are emerging as an important activity in India as it is an essential component of the drug discovery and development program to which India is committed. The only robust way to evaluate a new medicine is by doing properly designed clinical trials. In addition to advancing science, clinical trials offer myriad benefits to the participants. The recent hue that created in India about clinical trials is probably an exaggeration of facts. However, these points to the need for ensuring proper compliance with the regulatory norms and proper training of concerned personnel in good clinical practice (GCP. This will ensure that India continues to reap the benefits of clinical trials and also become a world leader in this field.

  3. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick I Okonta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria.

  4. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonta, Patrick I

    2014-05-01

    The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria.

  5. Reforms speed initiation of NCI-sponsored clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The process of opening a cancer clinical trial for patient accrual often takes years, and research has shown that trials which are slow to register patients often fail to finish. Following a thorough review, NCI’s Operational Efficiency Working Group prod

  6. About the Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group supports clinical oncology trials in cancer prevention and control in community settings. The group also supports investigator-initiated research projects in supportive, palliative and end-of-life care, and coordinates clinical oncology research projects with other NCI programs to be done in the community setting. |

  7. The unintended consequences of clinical trials regulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D McMahon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alex McMahon and colleagues critique the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH guidance on good clinical practice (GCP, arguing that it is having a disastrous effect on noncommerical randomized clinical trials in Europe.

  8. The unintended consequences of clinical trials regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Alex D McMahon; Conway, David I; MacDonald, Tom M; McInnes, Gordon T

    2009-01-01

    Alex McMahon and colleagues critique the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidance on good clinical practice (GCP), arguing that it is having a disastrous effect on noncommerical randomized clinical trials in Europe.

  9. Meta-analysis of five photodisinfection clinical trials for periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy(PDT) has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. To evaluate the efficacy of PDT in vivo a series of clinical trials was carried out in multiple centers and populations. Clinical parameters including clinical attachment level, pocket probing depth and bleeding on probing were all evaluated. All groups received the standard of care, scaling and root planing, and the treatment group additionally received a single treatment of PDT. Of the total 309 patients and over 40,000 pockets treated in these 5 trials it was determined that photodynamic therapy provided a statistically significant improvement in clinical parameters over scaling and root planing alone.

  10. Clinical analysis of 670 cases in two trials of the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Lymphoma Cooperative Group subtyped according to the Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms: a comparison with the Working Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaluga, S; Bijnens, L; Teodorovic, I; Hagenbeek, A; Meerwaldt, J H; Somers, R; Thomas, J; Noordijk, E M; De Wolf-Peeters, C

    1996-05-15

    In the Working Formulation (WF), non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are grouped according to their clinical behavior. These disorders are listed as entities defined by morphology, phenotype, and cytogenetics in the proposed Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms (REAL), the clinical relevance of which is still debated. We analyzed 670 NHL cases included in two randomized clinical trials (EORTC 20855 WF-intermediate/high-grade and 20856 WF-low-grade malignancy) with histologic material available for review. Based on hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections, 77% of cases could be subtyped. Immunophenotyping was considered to be mandatory only in diagnosing T-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Of 522 cases subtyped, 11% were mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 5% were marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (MZBCL), 46% were follicle center lymphoma, and 32% were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Statistical analysis and comparisons between classifications were made only within each trial and treatment group. MCL and MZBCL were characterized by a shorter median survival (3.4 and 4.1 years, respectively) in comparison with low- and intermediate-grade WF groups (> 9.3 and 5.8 years, respectively). In terms of progression-free survival, MCL showed a behavior similar to the low-grade group, with frequent relapses. Follicle center cell lymphomas behaved as low-grade lymphomas as defined by the WF and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas as the WF-intermediate grade group. Because several NHL entities have a clinical behavior of their own, their recognition by the REAL classification offers clinicians additional information that is not obtained when the WF is used.

  11. Construction of ethics in clinical research: clinical trials registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Caramori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific development that has been achieved through decades finds in clinical research a great possibility of translating findings to human health application. Evidence given by clinical trials allows everyone to have access to the best health services. However, the millionaire world of pharmaceutical industries has stained clinical research with doubt and improbability. Study results (fruits of controlled clinical trials and scientific publications (selective, manipulated and with wrong conclusions led to an inappropriate clinical practice, favoring the involved economic aspect. In 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE, supported by the World Association of Medical Editors, started demanding as a requisite for publication that all clinical trials be registered at the database ClinicalTrials.gov. In 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO created the International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP, which gathers several registry centers from all over the world, and required that all researchers and pharmaceutical industries register clinical trials. Such obligatory registration has progressed and will extend to all scientific journals indexed in all worldwide databases. Registration of clinical trials means another step of clinical research towards transparency, ethics and impartiality, resulting in real evidence to the forthcoming changes in clinical practice as well as in the health situation.

  12. Acute Stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n(s) being investigated Acute Stroke MedDRA Classification E.1.3Condition being s... General Information on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical conditio

  13. Healthcare Costs Reduced After Incorporating the Results of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z0011 Trial into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Michelle M; Glass, Katherine E; Hayek, Joe; Wehr, Allison; Phillips, Gary; Terando, Alicia; Agnese, Doreen M

    2016-11-30

    The purpose of our study was to quantitate the changes in axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), frozen section (FS), and the impact on costs after the publication of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z0011 trial. We compared axillary nodal management and cost data in breast cancer patients who met Z0011 criteria and were treated with lumpectomy and sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) biopsy from 2007 to July 2013. Of 800 patients, 67 (13.5%) and 34 (12.5%) patients in the pre- and post-Z0011 era had 1-2 positive SLN. ALND decreased from 78% to 21% (p < 0.001) after publication of Z0011. The mean overall cost of SLN biopsy was $41,059 per patient, while SLN biopsy with completion ALND was $50,999 (p < 0.001). Intraoperative FS use decreased from 95% to 66% (p = 0.015). Omitting the FS decreased mean costs from $4,319 to $2,036. The application of Z0011 resulted in an overall mean cost savings of $571,653 from 2011 to July 2013. ACOSOG Z0011 significantly impacted axillary management resulting in a 20% reduction in the mean overall cost per patient by omitting ALND. In these patients, intraoperative FS analysis had poor sensitivity (56%) and doubled the cost of pathologic examination. Fewer ALND and intraoperative FS were performed after the publication of ACOSOG Z0011. Eliminating FS and ALND in patients who met Z0011 criteria, results in significant cost savings.

  14. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process. PMID:26288464

  15. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep K Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process.

  16. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep K

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process.

  17. Use of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin in HIV type 1-infected children (Pediatric AIDS clinical trials group protocol 273).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehm, E R; Fletcher, C V; Mofenson, L M; Palumbo, P E; Kang, M; Fenton, T; Sapan, C V; Meyer, W A; Shearer, W T; Hawkins, E; Fowler, M G; Bouquin, P; Purdue, L; Sloand, E M; Nemo, G J; Wara, D; Bryson, Y J; Starr, S E; Petru, A; Burchett, S

    2000-02-01

    The clinical, immunologic, and virologic effects and the pharmacokinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) human hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were assessed in 30 HIV-infected children aged 2-11 years. All had moderately advanced disease with an immune complex-dissociated (ICD) p24 antigen >70 pg/mL and were on stable antiviral therapy. Three groups of 10 children received 6 monthly infusions of 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg of HIVIG, and serial immunologic and virologic assays were performed. HIVIG doses as high as 800 mg/kg were safe and well tolerated. The half-life of HIVIG, determined by serial p24 antibody titers, was 13-16 days, the volume of distribution was 102-113 mL/kg, and clearance was 5.6-6.0 mL/kg/day. Plasma ICD p24 decreased during the infusions, but CD4 cell levels, plasma RNA copy number, cellular virus, immunoglobulin levels, and neutralizing antibody titers were minimally affected by the infusions. Clinical status did not change during the 6-month infusion and 3-month follow-up periods.

  18. Construction of ethics in clinical research: clinical trials registration

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. Caramori

    2007-01-01

    Scientific development that has been achieved through decades finds in clinical research a great possibility of translating findings to human health application. Evidence given by clinical trials allows everyone to have access to the best health services. However, the millionaire world of pharmaceutical industries has stained clinical research with doubt and improbability. Study results (fruits of controlled clinical trials) and scientific publications (selective, manipulated and with wrong c...

  19. Drug interactions in controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, S

    1982-12-01

    As much information as possible should be obtained in clinical trials to assess possible interactions between test drugs and concomitant medications prescribed for other medical indications. Side effect profiles were compared in patients taking buspirone, mean = 20 mg/day; diazepam, 20 mg/day; clorazepate, 23 mg/day; and placebo, with or without concomitant medications. Approximately 1,000 anxious patients were included in the analysis; 700 received buspirone. The use of a variety of common medications did not affect the side effect profile in the buspirone, clorazepate, and placebo groups, but did increase the incidence of side effects in the diazepam group. The increased incidence of sedation noted with diazepam and clorazepate, however, was not due to concomitant medication.

  20. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Grignolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI is a public-private partnership created in 2007 between the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA and Duke University for the purpose of identifying practices that will increase the quality and efficiency of clinical trials. The initiative was generated from the realization that the clinical trials system in the United States has been suffering as a result of increasingly longer study start-up times, slowing enrollment of patients into trials, increasing clinical trial costs, and declining investigator interest in participating in clinical trials. Although CTTI was created to address a crisis for US clinical research, it seeks to identify practice improvements that can be applied internationally, and is therefore engaging international collaborators with international efforts that have similar objectives. CTTI's approach is to involve all sectors in the selection, conduct, and interpretation of its projects; to keep the dialogue open across sectors; to provide evidence that can influence regulatory guidance, and to attempt to create a "level playing field" when recommending change. The hope is that a broad and diverse data-driven discussion of the important issues in clinical trials will lead to meaningful change for the benefit of all concerned, and importantly for patients.

  1. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Woodsong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1 Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2 Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3 Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4 Partner influence on use, (5 Retention and continuation and (6 Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs.

  2. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial of group psychoeducation versus group support in the maintenance of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-didactically delivered curriculum based group psychoeducation has been shown to be more effective than both group support in a specialist mood disorder centre in Spain (with effects lasting up to five years, and treatment as usual in Australia. It is unclear whether the specific content and form of group psychoeducation is effective or the chance to meet and work collaboratively with other peers. The main objective of this trial is to determine whether curriculum based group psychoeducation is more clinically and cost effective than unstructured peer group support. Methods/design Single blind two centre cluster randomised controlled trial of 21 sessions group psychoeducation versus 21 sessions group peer support in adults with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder, not in current episode but relapsed in the previous two years. Individual randomisation is to either group at each site. The groups are carefully matched for the number and type of therapists, length and frequency of the interventions and overall aim of the groups but differ in content and style of delivery. The primary outcome is time to next bipolar episode with measures of the therapeutic process, barriers and drivers to the effective delivery of the interventions and economic analysis. Follow up is for 96 weeks after randomisation. Discussion The trial has features of both an efficacy and an effectiveness trial design. For generalisability in England it is set in routine public mental health practice with a high degree of expert patient involvement. Trial Registration ISRCTN62761948 Funding National Institute for Health Research, England.

  3. Can emergency medicine research benefit from adaptive design clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flight, Laura; Julious, Steven A; Goodacre, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive design clinical trials use preplanned interim analyses to determine whether studies should be stopped or modified before recruitment is complete. Emergency medicine trials are well suited to these designs as many have a short time to primary outcome relative to the length of recruitment. We hypothesised that the majority of published emergency medicine trials have the potential to use a simple adaptive trial design. We reviewed clinical trials published in three emergency medicine journals between January 2003 and December 2013. We determined the proportion that used an adaptive design as well as the proportion that could have used a simple adaptive design based on the time to primary outcome and length of recruitment. Only 19 of 188 trials included in the review were considered to have used an adaptive trial design. A total of 154/165 trials that were fixed in design had the potential to use an adaptive design. Currently, there seems to be limited uptake in the use of adaptive trial designs in emergency medicine despite their potential benefits to save time and resources. Failing to take advantage of adaptive designs could be costly to patients and research. It is recommended that where practical and logistical considerations allow, adaptive designs should be used for all emergency medicine clinical trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Registration of randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østervig, R M; Sonne, A; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Registration of interventional studies is necessary according to the Declaration of Helsinki but implementation has been a challenge for many journals. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (Acta) requires registration for studies conducted after January 1(st) 2010. We aimed to assess...... registered when it could be verified that patient enrolment was started after registration in a trial registry. RESULTS: We identified 200 RCTs. Dates for patient enrolment were not specified in 51 (25.5%). The proportion of correctly registered trials increased significantly from 17.1% (19/111) for trials...

  5. Acute Schizophrenia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nter, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial of Three Fixed Doses of OPC-34712 in the Treatment of Adults With Acute...2 in the Treatment of Adults With Acute Schizophrenia A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code number331-10-231 A.5.2US ... Information on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...ition or disease under investigation E.1.2Version 14.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10001064 E.1.2Term Acute

  6. Acute Schizophrenia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2, and 1 mg/day) in the Treatment of Adults With Acute Schizophrenia A.3.1Title ...of the trial for lay people, in easily understood, i.e. non-technical, language Efficacy Study of OPC-34712 in Adults With Acute...e Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...nder investigation E.1.2Version 14.0 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10001064 E.1.2Term Acute schizo

  7. Clinical Trial: Marine Lipid Suppositories as Laxatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormarsson, Orri Thor; Geirsson, Thormodur; Bjornsson, Einar Stefan; Jonsson, Tomas; Moller, Pall; Loftsson, Thorsteinn; Stefansson, Einar

    2012-01-01

    Cod-liver oil and other marine products containing polyunsaturated fatty acids have anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-viral effects and may be useful in the treatment of various inflammatory and infectious diseases. We developed suppositories and ointment with 30% free fatty acid (FFA) extract from omega-3 fish oil. Our purpose was to evaluate the safety of marine lipid suppositories and ointment in healthy volunteers and to explore the laxative effect of the suppositories. Thirty healthy volunteers were randomized either to a study group administrating 30% FFA suppositories and applying 30% FFA ointment to the perianal region twice per day for two weeks, or to a control group using placebo suppositories and ointment in a double blinded manner. Results: No serious toxic effects or irritation were observed. In the study group 93% felt the urge to defecate after administration of the suppositories as compared to 37% in the control group (P = 0.001). Subsequently 90% in the study group defecated, compared to 33% in the control group (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The marine lipid suppositories and ointment were well tolerated with no significant toxic side effects observed during the study period. The suppositories have a distinct laxative effect and we aim to explore this effect in further clinical trials. PMID:23118720

  8. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  9. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials of rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G K; Hinman, R S; Zeni, J; Risberg, M A; Snyder-Mackler, L; Bennell, K L

    2015-05-01

    A Task Force of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has previously published a set of guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. Limited material available on clinical trials of rehabilitation in people with OA has prompted OARSI to establish a separate Task Force to elaborate guidelines encompassing special issues relating to rehabilitation of OA. The Task Force identified three main categories of rehabilitation clinical trials. The categories included non-operative rehabilitation trials, post-operative rehabilitation trials, and trials examining the effectiveness of devices (e.g., assistive devices, bracing, physical agents, electrical stimulation, etc.) that are used in rehabilitation of people with OA. In addition, the Task Force identified two main categories of outcomes in rehabilitation clinical trials, which include outcomes related to symptoms and function, and outcomes related to disease modification. The guidelines for rehabilitation clinical trials provided in this report encompass these main categories. The report provides guidelines for conducting and reporting on randomized clinical trials. The topics include considerations for entering patients into trials, issues related to conducting trials, considerations for selecting outcome measures, and recommendations for statistical analyses and reporting of results. The focus of the report is on rehabilitation trials for hip, knee and hand OA, however, we believe the content is broad enough that it could be applied to rehabilitation trials for other regions as well.

  10. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-11-20

    Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in - hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors.

  11. Acute pancreatitis | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lot Trial of Indomethacin in Acute Pancreatitis Ensayo piloto controlado y aleatorizado con indometacina en ....1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...n criteria Patients ages 18 or above admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of Acute pancreatitis (AP) based

  12. Acute Rhinosinusitis | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available edical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Rhinosinu....2.3Trial contains a sub-study No E.3Principal inclusion criteria 1. Adult male and female outpatients aged ≥ 18 - 75 years 2. Acute

  13. Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders What are clinical trials? Clinical trials are research studies involving people, which ...

  14. Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Clinical Trials, A Healthier Future for All Past Issues / Fall ... in was reviewed by an IRB. Find a Clinical Trial Near You Health research takes place at hospitals, ...

  15. International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The mission of the WHO Intemational Clinical Trials Registry Platform is to ensure that a complete view of research is accessible to all those involved in health care decision making.This will improve research transparency and will ultimately strengthen tha validity and value of the scientific evidence base.The registration of all interventional trials is a scientific, ethical and moral responsibility.

  16. First-Stage Development and Validation of a Web-Based Automated Dietary Modeling Tool: Using Constraint Optimization Techniques to Streamline Food Group and Macronutrient Focused Dietary Prescriptions for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Evan; Sullivan, Emma; Dam, Hoa Khanh

    2016-01-01

    Background Standardizing the background diet of participants during a dietary randomized controlled trial is vital to trial outcomes. For this process, dietary modeling based on food groups and their target servings is employed via a dietary prescription before an intervention, often using a manual process. Partial automation has employed the use of linear programming. Validity of the modeling approach is critical to allow trial outcomes to be translated to practice. Objective This paper describes the first-stage development of a tool to automatically perform dietary modeling using food group and macronutrient requirements as a test case. The Dietary Modeling Tool (DMT) was then compared with existing approaches to dietary modeling (manual and partially automated), which were previously available to dietitians working within a dietary intervention trial. Methods Constraint optimization techniques were implemented to determine whether nonlinear constraints are best suited to the development of the automated dietary modeling tool using food composition and food consumption data. Dietary models were produced and compared with a manual Microsoft Excel calculator, a partially automated Excel Solver approach, and the automated DMT that was developed. Results The web-based DMT was produced using nonlinear constraint optimization, incorporating estimated energy requirement calculations, nutrition guidance systems, and the flexibility to amend food group targets for individuals. Percentage differences between modeling tools revealed similar results for the macronutrients. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids showed greater variation between tools (practically equating to a 2-teaspoon difference), although it was not considered clinically significant when the whole diet, as opposed to targeted nutrients or energy requirements, were being addressed. Conclusions Automated modeling tools can streamline the modeling process for dietary intervention trials

  17. Defining responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical trials of invasive fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus criteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segal, B.H.; Herbrecht, R.; Stevens, D.A.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Sobel, J.; Viscoli, C.; Walsh, T.J.; Maertens, J.; Patterson, T.F.; Perfect, J.R.; Dupont, B.; Wingard, J.R.; Calandra, T.; Kauffman, C.A.; Graybill, J.R.; Baden, L.R.; Pappas, P.G.; Bennett, J.E.; Kontoyiannis, D.P.; Cordonnier, C.; Viviani, M.A.; Bille, J.; Almyroudis, N.G.; Wheat, L.J.; Graninger, W.; Bow, E.J.; Holland, S.M.; Kullberg, B.J.; Dismukes, W.E.; Pauw, B.E. de

    2008-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) have become major causes of morbidity and mortality among highly immunocompromised patients. Authoritative consensus criteria to diagnose IFD have been useful in establishing eligibility criteria for antifungal trials. There is an important need for generation of cons

  18. Quality assessment of randomized clinical trial in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Giulliano Peixoto; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Luciano Timbó; Duarte, José Lira

    2009-03-01

    A randomized clinical trial is a prospective study that compares the effect and value of interventions in human beings, of one or more groups vs. a control group. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of published randomized clinical trials in Intensive care in Brazil. All randomized clinical trials in intensive care found by manual search in Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva from January 2001 to March 2008 were assessed to evaluate their description by the quality scale. Descriptive statistics and a 95 % confidence interval were used for the primary outcome. Our primary outcome was the randomized clinical trial quality. Our search found 185 original articles, of which 14 were randomized clinical trials. Only one original article (7.1%) showed good quality. There was no statistical significance between the collected data and the data shown in the hypothesis of this search. It can be concluded that in the sample of assessed articles 7% of the randomized clinical trials in intensive care published in a single intensive care journal in Brazil, present good methodological quality.

  19. Randomized Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Address Barriers to Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Wong, Yu-Ning; Albrecht, Terrance; Manne, Sharon; Miller, Suzanne M; Flamm, Anne Lederman; Benson, Al Bowen; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael; Egleston, Brian; Fleisher, Linda; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G; Liu, Tasnuva M; Margevicius, Seunghee; Miller, Dawn M; Poole, David; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric; Schluchter, Mark D

    2016-02-10

    Lack of knowledge and negative attitudes have been identified as barriers to participation in clinical trials by patients with cancer. We developed Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials (PRE-ACT), a theory-guided, Web-based, interactive computer program, to deliver tailored video educational content to patients in an effort to overcome barriers to considering clinical trials as a treatment option. A prospective, randomized clinical trial compared PRE-ACT with a control condition that provided general clinical trials information produced by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in text format. One thousand two hundred fifty-five patients with cancer were randomly allocated before their initial visit with an oncologist to PRE-ACT (n = 623) or control (n = 632). PRE-ACT had three main components: assessment of clinical trials knowledge and attitudinal barriers, values assessment with clarification back to patients, and provision of a video library tailored to address each patient's barriers. Outcomes included knowledge and attitudes and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both PRE-ACT and control interventions improved knowledge and attitudes (all P < .001) compared with baseline. Patients randomly allocated to PRE-ACT showed a significantly greater increase in knowledge (P < .001) and a significantly greater decrease in attitudinal barriers (P < .001) than did their control (text-only) counterparts. Participants in both arms significantly increased their preparedness to consider clinical trials (P < .001), and there was a trend favoring the PRE-ACT group (P < .09). PRE-ACT was also associated with greater patient satisfaction than was NCI text alone. These data show that patient education before the first oncologist visit improves knowledge, attitudes, and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both text and tailored video were effective. The PRE-ACT interactive video program was more effective than NCI text in improving

  20. Blinding in randomized clinical trials: imposed impartiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, A; Boutron, I

    2011-01-01

    Blinding, or "masking," is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. In this paper, we review important methodological aspects of blinding, emphasizing terminology, reporting, bias mechanisms, empirical evidence, and the risk of unblinding. Theoretical considerations...

  1. Monitoring clinical trials: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Síle F; Henley, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the processes and procedures involved in planning, conducting and reporting monitoring activities for large Clinical Trials of Investigational Medicinal Products (CTIMPs), focusing on those conducted in resource-limited settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The New Math of Clinical Trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennifer Couzin

    2004-01-01

    ... altering them as they run to take into account accumulating results. Although Bayesian designs are now widely used in everything from astrophysics to ecology, they've been slower to catch on in medical research, particularly clinical trials...

  3. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... Manufacturers Association, on the basis of a survey of its members ... from this information. The US database, on the other hand, clearly identifies 172 ... workforce involved in clinical trials outside the public sector. This figure ...

  5. Characteristics of clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, Robert M; Zarin, Deborah A; Kramer, Judith M; Sherman, Rachel E; Aberle, Laura H; Tasneem, Asba

    2012-05-02

    Recent reports highlight gaps between guidelines-based treatment recommendations and evidence from clinical trials that supports those recommendations. Strengthened reporting requirements for studies registered with ClinicalTrials.gov enable a comprehensive evaluation of the national trials portfolio. To examine fundamental characteristics of interventional clinical trials registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. A data set comprising 96,346 clinical studies from ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded on September 27, 2010, and entered into a relational database to analyze aggregate data. Interventional trials were identified and analyses were focused on 3 clinical specialties-cardiovascular, mental health, and oncology-that together encompass the largest number of disability-adjusted life-years lost in the United States. Characteristics of registered clinical trials as reported data elements in the trial registry; how those characteristics have changed over time; differences in characteristics as a function of clinical specialty; and factors associated with use of randomization, blinding, and data monitoring committees (DMCs). The number of registered interventional clinical trials increased from 28,881 (October 2004-September 2007) to 40,970 (October 2007-September 2010), and the number of missing data elements has generally declined. Most interventional trials registered between 2007 and 2010 were small, with 62% enrolling 100 or fewer participants. Many clinical trials were single-center (66%; 24,788/37,520) and funded by organizations other than industry or the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (47%; 17,592/37,520). Heterogeneity in the reported methods by clinical specialty; sponsor type; and the reported use of DMCs, randomization, and blinding was evident. For example, reported use of DMCs was less common in industry-sponsored vs NIH-sponsored trials (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.11; 95% CI, 0.09-0.14), earlier-phase vs phase 3 trials (adjusted OR, 0

  6. Acute Gout | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Gou...t E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute Gout E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Diseases [C] - M...n the trial (if it is different from the expected normal treatment of that condition) Acute gout is a self l

  7. Randomized clinical trials in HEPATOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, L L; Nikolova, D; Gluud, C

    1999-01-01

    . Quality was assessed by means of a validated 5-point scale and separate quality components associated with empirical evidence of bias. Only 26% of all RCTs reported sample size calculations, 52% adequate generation of the allocation sequence, 34% adequate allocation concealment and 34% double......, single-center trials, and trials with no external funding. Quality did not improve with time and was not associated with country of origin. The main conclusions are that the quality of RCTs in HEPATOLOGY needs improvement and that the probability of high quality increased with the number of centers...

  8. Clinical Trials and their Impact on Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lidia Cuevas Pérez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Today there are countless examples that illustrate the nature of technoscience, including biotechnology and pharmacology. The clinical trial is the appropriate methodology used by clinical pharmacology to test the efficacy and safety of a treatment or intervention in humans. It constitutes the cornerstone of research. Once the preclinical research is completed, one of the biggest challenges currently facing the Cuban Pharmaceutical and Biotechnological Industry is precisely the clinical evaluation. Therefore, this work aims to provide a reflection on the most significant aspects of clinical trials and their impact on society.

  9. Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Okunieff, Paul; Bernhard, Eric J.; Stone, Helen B.; Yoo, Stephen; Coleman, C. Norman; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Brown, Martin; Buatti, John; Guha, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    A Workshop entitled “Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Trials” was held on December 7–8th, 2011 in Bethesda, MD, to present and discuss some of the recently conducted Radiation Oncology clinical trials with a focus on those that failed to refute the null hypothesis. The objectives of this Workshop were to summarize and examine the questions that these trials provoked, to assess the quality and limitations of the pre-clinical data that supported the hypotheses underlying these trials, an...

  10. Developments in statistical evaluation of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Oud, Johan; Ghidey, Wendimagegn

    2014-01-01

    This book describes various ways of approaching and interpreting the data produced by clinical trial studies, with a special emphasis on the essential role that biostatistics plays in clinical trials. Over the past few decades the role of statistics in the evaluation and interpretation of clinical data has become of paramount importance. As a result the standards of clinical study design, conduct and interpretation have undergone substantial improvement. The book includes 18 carefully reviewed chapters on recent developments in clinical trials and their statistical evaluation, with each chapter providing one or more examples involving typical data sets, enabling readers to apply the proposed procedures. The chapters employ a uniform style to enhance comparability between the approaches.

  11. [Standard Cancer Therapy Are Established by the Investigator-Initiated Post-Marketing Clinical Trials, Not by the Indication-Directed Clinical Trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The financial supports for investigator-initiated post-marketing clinical trial in clinical oncology are reduced after scandals related to the other fields of clinical trials in Japan. These clinical trials are the essential final steps of clinical development in newer cancer therapy, which should be conducted in the investigator-initiated clinical trial groups with well-organized infrastructure and continuous financial supports. The present problems are discussed and summarized. Future perspectives with the national viewpoints needed to be included the idea of "health technology assessment".

  12. Results of a phase II trial with second-line cystemustine at 60 mg/m{sup 2} in advanced soft tissue sarcoma: A trial of the EORTC early clinical studies group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollet, P. [Centre Jean Perrin and Inserm U71, 58 rue Montalembert, B.P. 392, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1 (France); Fumoleau, P. [Centre Rene Gauducheau, Site Hospitalier Nord, Boulevard Jacques Monod, 44805 Saint-Herblain Cedex (France); Lentz, M.A. [EORTC Data Center, Avenue E. Mounier, 83-B. 11, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Chevallier, B. [Centre Henri Becquerel, Rue d' Amiens, 76038 Rouen Cedex (France); Roche, H. [Centre Claudius Regaud, 20-24 rue du Pont-Saint-Pierre, 31052 Toulouse Cedex (France); Kerbrat, P. [Centre Eugene Marquis, Rue de la bataille Flandre-Dunkerque, B.P. 6279, 35062 Rennes Cedex (France); Tubiana, N. [C.H.U. Dupuytren, 2 avenue Martin Luther King, 87042 Limoges Cedex (France); Adenis, A. [Centre Oscar Lambret, Rue Frederic Combemale, B.P. 307, 59020 Lille Cedex (France); Krakowski, I. [Centre Alexis Vautrin, Avenue de Bourgogne, 54511 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Cure, H. [Centre Jean Perrin and Inserm U71, 58 rue Montalembert, B.P. 392, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1 (France)

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this phase II trial was to examine the efficacy of a new nitrosourea, cystemustine, in soft tissue sarcoma. Between January 1990 and March 1991, 32 pretreated patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma were enrolled. Cystemustine was given every 2 weeks at 60 mg/m{sup 2} via a 15-min i.v. infusion. All eligible patients were considered evaluable for response and toxicity (WHO criteria). Of the 32 enrolled patients, 4 were ineligible, leaving 28 evaluable patients. All but 1 had been pretreated: 6 with adjuvant chemotherapy, 18 patients with first-line palliative chemotherapy without nitrosourea, 3 with both treatments, and 18 had received radiotherapy. Median age was 54 years (range 20-73) and median performance status was 1 (0-2). One partial response (PR, duration 12 weeks), 2 stable disease and 25 progressions were observed, giving an overall response rate of 3.57% (confidence interval: 0.1-18.4%). Toxicity was mild, and was mainly neutropenia (no grade 3 or 4), thrombocytopenia (3.57% grade 3 and grade 4) and nausea-vomiting (no grade 3 or 4). It should be noted that the treatment for the patient who obtained a PR was third line with no previous response. Cystemustine with this schedule appears to have a low clinical activity and toxicity in advanced soft tissue sarcoma. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Safety and pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoglobulin administered to HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 185 Pharmacokinetic Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Fletcher, C V; Moye, J; Stiehm, E R; Meyer, W A; Nemo, G J; Mathieson, B J; Hirsch, G; Sapan, C V; Cummins, L M; Jimenez, E; O'Neill, E; Kovacs, A; Stek, A

    1997-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intravenous immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were evaluated in the first 28 maternal-infant pairs enrolled in a randomized, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-controlled trial of HIVIG maternal-infant HIV transmission prophylaxis. Using 200 mg/kg, mean half-life and volume of distribution (Vd) in women were 15 days and 72 mL/kg, respectively, after one and 32 days and 154 mL/kg after three monthly infusions, with stable 4 mL/kg/day clearance. Transplacental passage occurred. Newborn single-dose half-life, Vd, and clearance were 30 days, 143 mL/kg, and 4 mL/kg/day, respectively. HIVIG rapidly cleared maternal serum immune complex-dissociated p24 antigen, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were stable. Mild to moderate adverse clinical effects occurred in 2 of 103 maternal and 2 of 25 infant infusions. No adverse hematologic, blood chemistry, or immunologic effects were seen. HIVIG is well-tolerated in HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns, clears antigenemia, crosses the placenta, and exhibits pharmacokinetics similar to those of other immunoglobulin preparations.

  14. Clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindryckx, Pieter; Baert, Filip; Hart, Ailsa; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Panès, Julian; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    It goes back to 1932 when Dr. Burrill Bernard Crohn and co-workers published their landmark paper, describing regional ileitis as a disease entity. However, clinical trial research has been developing rather slowly in luminal Crohn's disease. It took until the early seventies before the first randomized clinical trial was set up by the National Co-operative Crohn's Disease Study (NCCDS) group. Although the efforts of this group triggered a first wave of clinical trials in Crohn's disease, the lack of guidelines for conducting a clinical trial in this research area resulted in a variety of study designs and much criticism. Besides having a rather small sample size and a short follow-up time, they were often characterized by vague and subjective assessment of disease activity and treatment response. Following the advent of a new and very potent drug class in the late nineties, the anti-TNF agents, investigators started to re-think their study protocols and the first guidelines were set up by the regulatory authorities. Over the last 15years, clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease have been evolving significantly. Inclusion criteria have been shifting from clinical scores such as Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) to more objective disease activity parameters such as biomarkers (C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin) and endoscopic lesions. Primary endpoints have been developing from clinical response to corticosteroid-free remission and more ambitious end-points such as mucosal healing. In this paper, we will give a historical overview on clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease, before and within the biologic era, and provide insight into how they have shaped our current understanding of trial designs in Crohn's disease.

  15. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mankoff, David A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Lieberman, Frank S; Buatti, John M; Mountz, James M; Erickson, Bradley J; Fennessy, Fiona M M; Huang, Wei; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wahl, Richard L; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E; Zhao, Binsheng; Hylton, Nola M; Gillies, Robert J; Clarke, Laurence; Nordstrom, Robert; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-01-15

    As anticancer therapies designed to target specific molecular pathways have been developed, it has become critical to develop methods to assess the response induced by such agents. Although traditional, anatomic CT, and MRI examinations are useful in many settings, increasing evidence suggests that these methods cannot answer the fundamental biologic and physiologic questions essential for assessment and, eventually, prediction of treatment response in the clinical trial setting, especially in the critical period soon after treatment is initiated. To optimally apply advances in quantitative imaging methods to trials of targeted cancer therapy, new infrastructure improvements are needed that incorporate these emerging techniques into the settings where they are most likely to have impact. In this review, we first elucidate the needs for therapeutic response assessment in the era of molecularly targeted therapy and describe how quantitative imaging can most effectively provide scientifically and clinically relevant data. We then describe the tools and methods required to apply quantitative imaging and provide concrete examples of work making these advances practically available for routine application in clinical trials. We conclude by proposing strategies to surmount barriers to wider incorporation of these quantitative imaging methods into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. Our goal is to encourage and guide the oncology community to deploy standardized quantitative imaging techniques in clinical trials to further personalize care for cancer patients and to provide a more efficient path for the development of improved targeted therapies.

  16. Acute cough | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute cough Akuter Husten E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acu...igation E.1.2Version 17.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10066522 E.1.2Term Acute cough E.1.2System...igible for inclusion in this trial must fulfill all of the following criteria:1. Acute cough with symptoms l...based on medical history and physical examination7. CS score of at least 50 mm on a 100 mm VAS at V1 8. Acute...te cough Akuter Husten E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Diseases [C] - Respiratory Tract Dis

  17. Belonging to a peer support group enhance the quality of life and adherence rate in patients affected by breast cancer: A non-randomized controlled clinical trialFNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Malekpour Tehrani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It seems that breast cancer patients benefit from meeting someone who had a similar experience. This study evaluated the effect of two kinds of interventions (peer support and educational program on quality of life in breast cancer patients. Methods: This study was a controlled clinical trial on women with non-metastatic breast cancer. The patients studied in two experimental and control groups. Experimental group took part in peer support program and control group passed a routine educational program during 3 months. The authors administered SF-36 for evaluating the quality of life pre-and post intervention. Also, patient′s adherence was assessed by means of a simple checklist. Results: Two groups were similar with respect of age, age of onset of the disease, duration of having breast cancer, marital status, type of the treatment receiving now, and type of the received surgery. In the control group, there were statistically significant improvements in body pain, role-physical, role-emotional and social functioning. In experimental group, role-physical, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional and mental health showed significant improvement. Vitality score and mental health score in experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group, both with p < 0.001. Also, it was shown that adherence was in high levels in both groups and no significant difference was seen after the study was done. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, supporting the patients with breast cancer by forming peer groups or by means of educational sessions could improve their life qualities.

  18. A method for demonstrating clinical trial principles to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, O; Modiselle, G C; Dali, P K; Joubert, P H

    1982-07-17

    Randomized clinical trials are necessary for the valid assessment of treatment efficacy. To expose medical students to trial aims, techniques and terminology, we developed a scheme for active student involvement without facing the ethical problem of drug administration or application of invasive methods to a captive group of subjects. As an active drug, coffee is used and compared with an identical placebo (decaffeinated coffee). The effects on heart rate and urine volume are determined.

  19. Characteristics of pediatric pulmonary hypertension trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awerbach, Jordan D; Krasuski, Richard A; Hill, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) drugs has been identified as a high priority by the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH). Studying pediatric PH is challenging due to the rare and heterogeneous nature of the disease. We sought to define the pediatric PH clinical trials landscape, to evaluate areas of trial success or failure, and to identify potential obstacles to the study of pediatric PH drugs. Interventional pediatric (ages 0-17 years) PH trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov from June 2005 through December 2014 were analyzed. There were 45 pediatric PH trials registered during the study period. Median (IQR) projected trial enrollment was 40 (24-63), with seven trials (16%) targeting > 100 participants. Industry was the most common trial sponsor (n = 23, 50%), with only two (4.4%) NIH-sponsored trials. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors were the most frequently studied drug (n = 18, 39%). Single group study designs were used in 44% (n = 20) with an active comparator (parallel, factorial, or cross-over designs) in 25 trials, including 22 with randomization and ten that were double-blinded. Study outcomes varied markedly with inconsistent use of known surrogate and composite endpoints. One-third of trials (n = 15, 33%) were terminated, predominantly due to poor participant enrollment. Of the 17 completed trials, 11 had published results and only three efficacy trials met their primary endpoint. There are unique challenges to drug development in pediatric PH, including enrolling patients, identifying appropriate study endpoints, and conducting randomized, controlled, double-blind trials where the likelihood of meeting the study endpoint is optimized.

  20. [Clinical trials: principles of the method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulker, J P

    2000-04-15

    Comparative judgement, which is seminal to any kind of science performing measurements, has been applied to clinical reasoning for many centuries. The need for systematizing the observational methods used in medicine in order to draw more reliable inferences about the effects of therapies has been active all along the 19th century. This has resulted in controlled studies which yielded important advances in clinical and therapeutic knowledge, although their designs were not fully satisfactory. Clinical trials have gained their status of "hard science", methodology allowing causal inference, by the end of the 1940s after having adopted the statistical theories developed in the 1930s by Fisher for experimental design in agronomy. A long way has been run since the first controlled randomized trial. However, half a century later, modern clinical trial remains essentially a controlled randomized prospective study using methods to limit potential biases and to establish statistical significance.

  1. [Ethical implications of clinical trials in Tunisia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadly, Ali

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials are necessary for medical advancement. They must respect legal obligations. Ethical questions related to protection of the human being's rights are yielded by these trials. Joining research to medical core is problematical in consideration of patient's consent to clinical trial. Exclusion by the Tunisian law of persons under age, pregnant or breast-feeding women from medical experimentation in the aim of protecting them against clinical research adverse events or abuses is ethically questionable since it deprives them from a possible medical progress. So why not to involve them in clinical research when there is an expected benefit, after bringing them protection as vulnerable persons like we should do for instance for the elderly, handicapped persons or prisoners. Legal creation of research ethics committees is important for the respect of experimentation rules on human beings.

  2. Design and implementation of clinical trials in rehabilitation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Tessa; Bagiella, Emilia

    2012-08-01

    The growth of evidence-based medicine means that both researchers and clinicians must grasp the complex issues involved in implementing clinical trials, which are especially challenging for the behavioral (experience-based) treatments that predominate in rehabilitation. In this article we discuss selected issues germane to the design, implementation, and analysis of group-level clinical trials in rehabilitation. We review strengths, weaknesses, and best applications of 1-sample, between-subjects, and within-subjects study designs, including newer models such as practical clinical trials and point-of-care trials. We also discuss the selection of appropriate control conditions against which to test rehabilitation treatments, as well as issues related to trial blinding. In a section on treatment definition, we discuss the challenges of specifying the active ingredients in the complex interventions that are widely used in rehabilitation, and present an illustration of 1 approach to defining treatments via the learning mechanisms that underlie them. Issues related to treatment implementation are also discussed, including therapist allocation and training, and assessment of treatment fidelity. Finally we consider 2 statistical topics of particular importance to many rehabilitation trials: the use of multiple or composite outcomes, and factors that must be weighed in estimating sample size for clinical trials.

  3. Genome-wide association study of virologic response with efavirenz-containing or abacavir-containing regimens in AIDS clinical trials group protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, David S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Daar, Eric S; Gulick, Roy M; Haubrich, Richard H; Robbins, Gregory K; de Bakker, Paul I W; Haas, David W; McLaren, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efavirenz and abacavir are components of recommended first-line regimens for HIV-1 infection. We used genome-wide genotyping and clinical data to explore genetic associations with virologic failure among patients randomized to efavirenz-containing or abacavir-containing regimens in AIDS

  4. Quality of clinical trials: A moving target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Bhatt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of clinical trials depends on data integrity and subject protection. Globalization, outsourcing and increasing complexicity of clinical trials have made the target of achieving global quality challenging. The quality, as judged by regulatory inspections of the investigator sites, sponsors/contract research organizations and Institutional Review Board, has been of concern to the US Food and Drug Administration, as there has been hardly any change in frequency and nature of common deficiencies. To meet the regulatory expectations, the sponsors need to improve quality by developing systems with specific standards for each clinical trial process. The quality systems include: personnel roles and responsibilities, training, policies and procedures, quality assurance and auditing, document management, record retention, and reporting and corrective and preventive action. With an objective to improve quality, the FDA has planned new inspection approaches such as risk-based inspections, surveillance inspections, real-time oversight, and audit of sponsor quality systems. The FDA has partnered with Duke University for Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative, which will conduct research projects on design principles, data quality and quantity including monitoring, study start-up, and adverse event reporting. These recent initiatives will go a long way in improving quality of clinical trials.

  5. Establishing a clinical trials network in nephrology: experience of the Australasian Kidney Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrish, Alicia T; Hawley, Carmel M; Johnson, David W; Badve, Sunil V; Perkovic, Vlado; Reidlinger, Donna M; Cass, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem globally. Despite this, there are fewer high-quality, high-impact clinical trials in nephrology than other internal medicine specialties, which has led to large gaps in evidence. To address this deficiency, the Australasian Kidney Trials Network, a Collaborative Research Group, was formed in 2005. Since then, the Network has provided infrastructure and expertise to conduct patient-focused high-quality, investigator-initiated clinical trials in nephrology. The Network has not only been successful in engaging the nephrology community in Australia and New Zealand but also in forming collaborations with leading researchers from other countries. This article describes the establishment, development, and functions of the Network. The article also discusses the current and future funding strategies to ensure uninterrupted conduct of much needed clinical trials in nephrology to improve the outcomes of patients affected by kidney diseases with cost-effective interventions.

  6. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  7. Clinical trial network for the promotion of clinical research for rare diseases in Japan: muscular dystrophy clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Reiko; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Tamaura, Akemi; Kimura, En; Ohata, Maki; Takeshita, Eri; Nakamura, Harumasa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Komaki, Hirofumi

    2016-07-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. Therapeutic agents for the treatment of rare disease, namely "orphan drugs", have recently drawn the attention of researchers and pharmaceutical companies. To ensure the successful conduction of clinical trials to evaluate novel treatments for patients with rare diseases, an appropriate infrastructure is needed. One of the effective solutions for the lack of infrastructure is to establish a network of rare diseases. To accomplish the conduction of clinical trials in Japan, the Muscular dystrophy clinical trial network (MDCTN) was established by the clinical research group for muscular dystrophy, including the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, as well as national and university hospitals, all which have a long-standing history of research cooperation. Thirty-one medical institutions (17 national hospital organizations, 10 university hospitals, 1 national center, 2 public hospitals, and 1 private hospital) belong to this network and collaborate to facilitate clinical trials. The Care and Treatment Site Registry (CTSR) calculates and reports the proportion of patients with neuromuscular diseases in the cooperating sites. In total, there are 5,589 patients with neuromuscular diseases in Japan and the proportion of patients with each disease is as follows: DMD, 29 %; myotonic dystrophy type 1, 23 %; limb girdle muscular dystrophy, 11 %; Becker muscular dystrophy, 10 %. We work jointly to share updated health care information and standardized evaluations of clinical outcomes as well. The collaboration with the patient registry (CTSR), allows the MDCTN to recruit DMD participants with specific mutations and conditions, in a remarkably short period of time. Counting with a network that operates at a national level is important to address the corresponding national issues. Thus, our network will be able to contribute with international research activity, which can lead to

  8. Efficacy of zidovudine and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin for reducing perinatal HIV transmission from HIV-infected women with advanced disease: results of Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehm, E R; Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Bethel, J; Whitehouse, J; Nugent, R; Moye, J; Glenn Fowler, M; Mathieson, B J; Reichelderfer, P; Nemo, G J; Korelitz, J; Meyer, W A; Sapan, C V; Jimenez, E; Gandia, J; Scott, G; O'Sullivan, M J; Kovacs, A; Stek, A; Shearer, W T; Hammill, H

    1999-03-01

    Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185 evaluated whether zidovudine combined with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hyperimmune immunoglobulin (HIVIG) infusions administered monthly during pregnancy and to the neonate at birth would significantly lower perinatal HIV transmission compared with treatment with zidovudine and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) without HIV antibody. Subjects had baseline CD4 cell counts /=200/microL) but not with time of zidovudine initiation (5.6% vs. 4.8% if started before vs. during pregnancy; P=. 75). The Kaplan-Meier transmission rate for HIVIG recipients was 4. 1% (95% confidence interval, 1.5%-6.7%) and for IVIG recipients was 6.0% (2.8%-9.1%) (P=.36). The unexpectedly low transmission confirmed that zidovudine prophylaxis is highly effective, even for women with advanced HIV disease and prior zidovudine therapy, although it limited the study's ability to address whether passive immunization diminishes perinatal transmission.

  9. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplant, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, S; Garderet, L; Durie, B

    2015-01-01

    not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation...... convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop...... autologous HCT in patients with MM relapsing after primary therapy comparing it to "best non-HCT" therapy. The expert committee also underscored the importance of collecting enough hematopoietic stem cells to perform 2 transplantations early in the course of the disease. Regarding allogeneic HCT, the expert...

  10. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, John G

    2010-08-24

    PURPOSE: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng\\/mL, Gleason score >\\/=7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  11. Cognitive behavior therapy-based psychoeducational groups for adults with ADHD and their significant others (PEGASUS): an open clinical feasibility trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hirvikoski, T.; Waaler, E.; Lindström, T; Bölte, S.; Jokinen, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of a new psychoeducative intervention program (PEGASUS) for adults with ADHD and their significant others in a psychiatric outpatient context. At three outpatient psychiatric clinics, adults with ADHD and their significant others took part in PEGASUS, a psychoeducational program based on theories from cognitive behavioral therapy, neuropsychology, and cross-disciplinary evidence regarding ADHD. In total, 108 adul...

  12. Clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, A; Jefferson, L; Baker, P; Cook, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to review the role of clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery. A total of two electronic databases (MEDLINE and EMBASE) were searched from inception to September 2013 with no language restrictions. Articles related to randomised controlled trials (RCTs), research networks and orthopaedic research, were identified and reviewed. The usefulness of trainee-led research collaborations is reported and our knowledge of current clinical trial infrastructure further supplements the review. Searching yielded 818 titles and abstracts, of which 12 were suitable for this review. Results are summarised and presented narratively under the following headings: 1) identifying clinically relevant research questions; 2) education and training; 3) conduct of multicentre RCTs and 4) dissemination and adoption of trial results. This review confirms growing international awareness of the important role research networks play in supporting trials in orthopaedic surgery. Multidisciplinary collaboration and adequate investment in trial infrastructure are crucial for successful delivery of RCTs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:169-74. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  13. Recommendations for imaging tumor response in neurofibromatosis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Eva; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barker, Fred G; Connor, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Fisher, Michael J; Goutagny, Stephane; Harris, Gordon J; Jaramillo, Diego; Karajannis, Matthias A; Korf, Bruce R; Mautner, Victor; Plotkin, Scott R; Poussaint, Tina Y; Robertson, Kent; Shih, Chie-Schin; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2013-11-19

    Neurofibromatosis (NF)-related benign tumors such as plexiform neurofibromas (PN) and vestibular schwannomas (VS) can cause substantial morbidity. Clinical trials directed at these tumors have become available. Due to differences in disease manifestations and the natural history of NF-related tumors, response criteria used for solid cancers (1-dimensional/RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors] and bidimensional/World Health Organization) have limited applicability. No standardized response criteria for benign NF tumors exist. The goal of the Tumor Measurement Working Group of the REiNS (Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis) committee is to propose consensus guidelines for the evaluation of imaging response in clinical trials for NF tumors. Currently used imaging endpoints, designs of NF clinical trials, and knowledge of the natural history of NF-related tumors, in particular PN and VS, were reviewed. Consensus recommendations for response evaluation for future studies were developed based on this review and the expertise of group members. MRI with volumetric analysis is recommended to sensitively and reproducibly evaluate changes in tumor size in clinical trials. Volumetric analysis requires adherence to specific imaging recommendations. A 20% volume change was chosen to indicate a decrease or increase in tumor size. Use of these criteria in future trials will enable meaningful comparison of results across studies. The proposed imaging response evaluation guidelines, along with validated clinical outcome measures, will maximize the ability to identify potentially active agents for patients with NF and benign tumors.

  14. The AIDS Clinical Trials Information Service (ACTIS): a decade of providing clinical trials information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Deborah G; Dutcher, Gale A; Toigo, Theresa A; Bates, Ruthann; Temple, Freda; Cadden, Cynthia G

    2002-01-01

    The AIDS Clinical Trials Information Service (ACTIS) is a central resource for information about federally and privately funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials. Sponsored by four components of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, ACTIS has been a key part of U.S. HIV/AIDS information and education services since 1989. ACTIS offers a toll-free telephone service, through which trained information specialists can provide callers with information about AIDS clinical trials in English or Spanish, and a website that provides access to clinical trials databases and a variety of educational resources. Future priorities include the development of new resources to target diverse and underserved populations. In addition, research needs to be conducted on the use of telephone services vs. Web-based information exchange to ensure the broadest possible dissemination of up-to-date information on HIV infection and clinical trials.

  15. Effectiveness of Multidisciplinary Group-Based Intervention versus Individual Physiotherapy for Improving Chronic Low Back Pain in Nursing Staff: A Clinical Trial with 3- and 6-Month Follow-Up Visits from Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyani, Leila; Tavafian, Sedigheh Sadat; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Wagner, Joan

    2017-06-01

    Clinical trial. To evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary group-based intervention on improving pain and disability among Iranian nurses with chronic low back pain in Tehran, Iran. Although low back pain (LBP) is one of the most important health problems, the challenge remains on how to find an effective intervention to reduce pain and related disabilities. Overall, 136 eligible nurses with chronic mechanical LBP were classified into two groups. The intervention group (n=66 participants) participated in a physiotherapy educational program (for 120 minutes) plus a health educational program based on predictive constructs of the social cognitive theory (for 120 minutes). These interventions were delivered by a physiotherapist and a health education specialist. The control group (n=70 participants) participated in a physiotherapy educational program (for 120 minutes). Disability rate, pain severity, and back pain prevention behavior were measured initially and at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits using the visual analogue scale, Roland-Morris Disability, and Nursing Low Back Pain Preventive Behaviors Questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver. 16. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the main outcome measures immediately after the educational program and at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits. Preventive behaviors of participants in the intervention group were improved at 3- and 6- month follow-up visits (ppreventive behaviors in the intervention group were improved after 3 and 6 months (p<0.001). Finally, in the intervention group, pain severity and disability were decreased significantly. This study showed that a multidisciplinary educational program intervention can be an effective approach for reducing LBP and related disabilities among nurses.

  16. Comparison of the administration of progesterone versus progesterone and vitamin D in improvement of outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury: A randomized clinical trial with placebo group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Aminmansour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the heterogeneity of traumatic brain injury (TBI, many of single treatments have not been successful in prevention and cure of these kinds of injuries. The neuroprotective effect of progesterone drug on severe brain injuries has been identified, and recently, the neuroprotective effect of vitamin D has also been studied as the combination of these two drugs has shown better effects on animal samples in some studies. This study was conducted to examine the effect of vitamin D and progesterone on brain injury treatment after brain trauma. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on patients with severe brain trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS ≤ 8 from April to September, 2011. The patients were divided to 3 groups (placebo, progesterone, progesterone-vitamin D, each with 20 people. Upon the patients′ admission, their GCS and demographic information were recorded. After 3 months, they were reassessed, and their GCS and GOS (Glasgow outcome scale were recorded. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA. Results: Before intervention, GCS mean of the placebo, progesterone, and progesterone-vitamin D groups were 6.3 ± 0.88, 6.31 ± 0.87, and 6 ± 0.88, respectively. They increased to 9.16 ± 1.11, 10.25 ± 1.34, and 11.27 ± 2.27, respectively 3 months after intervention. There was a significant difference among GCS means of the 3 groups (P-value = 0.001. GOS was classified to 2 main categories of favorable and unfavorable recovery, of which, favorable recovery in placebo, progesterone, and progesterone-vitamin D was 25%, 45%, and 60%, respectively which showed a statistical significant difference among the groups (P-value = 0.03. Conclusion: The results showed that recovery rate in patients with severe brain trauma in the group receiving progesterone and vitamin D together was significantly higher than that of progesterone group, which was in turn higher than that of placebo group.

  17. Effects of Group-Based Exercise on Range of Motion, Muscle Strength, Functional Ability, and Pain During the Acute Phase After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Yoshinori; Kamitani, Tsukasa; Wada, Osamu; Mizuno, Kiyonori; Yamada, Minoru

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study including a historical control group. Background The extent to which group-based exercise (G-EXE) improves knee range of motion (ROM), quadriceps strength, and gait ability is similar to that of individualized exercise (I-EXE) at 6 weeks and 8 months after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the benefits of G-EXE for patients during the acute recovery phase after TKA remain unclear. Objective To determine the effects of G-EXE during the acute recovery phase after TKA on knee ROM, quadriceps strength, functional ability, and knee pain. Methods Two hundred thirty-one patients participated in G-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises twice daily during the hospital stay. Outcomes were compared to those of a retrospectively identified, historical control group (I-EXE group [n = 206]) that included patients who performed exercises identical to those performed by the G-EXE group. The outcomes included knee ROM, quadriceps strength, pain intensity, and timed up-and-go test score at 1 month before surgery and at discharge. Analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, length of hospital stay, and preoperative values. Results Changes in ROM of knee flexion and extension (Pexercises demonstrated greater changes in knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and knee pain than those performing I-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises. The nonrandomized, asynchronous design decreases certainty of these findings. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):742-748. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6409.

  18. Weight and Lean Body Mass Change with Antiretroviral Initiation and Impact on Bone Mineral Density: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5224s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Kristine Mace; Kitch, Douglas; Tierney, Camlin; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Tebas, Pablo; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; Jahed, Nasreen C.; Mccomsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect initiating different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens have on weight, body mass index (BMI), and lean body mass (LBM) and explore how changes in body composition are associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Methods A5224s was a substudy of A5202, a prospective trial of 1857 ART-naïve participants randomized to blinded abacavir-lamivudine (ABC/3TC) or tenofovir DF-emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) with open-label efavirenz (EFV) or atazanavir-ritonavir (ATV/r). All subjects underwent dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal CT for body composition. Analyses used 2-sample t-tests and linear regression. Results A5224s included 269 subjects: 85% male, 47% white non-Hispanic, median age 38 years, HIV-1 RNA 4.6 log10 copies/mL, and CD4 233 cells/µL. Overall, significant gains occurred in weight, BMI, and LBM at 96 weeks post randomization (all p<0.001). Assignment to ATV/r (vs EFV) resulted in significantly greater weight (mean difference 3.35 kg) and BMI gain (0.88 kg/m2; both p=0.02), but not LBM (0.67 kg; p=0.15), while ABC/3TC and TDF/FTC were not significantly different (p≥0.10). In multivariable analysis, only lower baseline CD4 count and higher HIV-1 RNA were associated with greater increase in weight, BMI, or LBM. In multivariable analyses, increased LBM was associated with an increased hip BMD. Conclusions ABC/3TC vs. TDF/FTC did not differ in change in weight, BMI, or LBM; ATV/r vs. EFV resulted in greater weight and BMI gain but not LBM. A positive association between increased LBM and increased hip BMD should be further investigated through prospective interventional studies to verify the impact of increased LBM on hip BMD. PMID:24384588

  19. Using e-technologies in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Miele, Gloria M; Brunner, Meg; Winstanley, Erin L

    2015-11-01

    Clinical trials have been slow to incorporate e-technology (digital and electronic technology that utilizes mobile devices or the Internet) into the design and execution of studies. In the meantime, individuals and corporations are relying more on electronic platforms and most have incorporated such technology into their daily lives. This paper provides a general overview of the use of e-technologies in clinical trials research, specifically within the last decade, marked by rapid growth of mobile and Internet-based tools. Benefits of and challenges to the use of e-technologies in data collection, recruitment and retention, delivery of interventions, and dissemination are provided, as well as a description of the current status of regulatory oversight of e-technologies in clinical trials research. As an example of ways in which e-technologies can be used for intervention delivery, a summary of e-technologies for treatment of substance use disorders is presented. Using e-technologies to design and implement clinical trials has the potential to reach a wide audience, making trials more efficient while also reducing costs; however, researchers should be cautious when adopting these tools given the many challenges in using new technologies, as well as threats to participant privacy/confidentiality. Challenges of using e-technologies can be overcome with careful planning, useful partnerships, and forethought. The role of web- and smartphone-based applications is expanding, and the increasing use of those platforms by scientists and the public alike make them tools that cannot be ignored.

  20. [Clinical trials with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler-Lenz, M; Schneider, C K

    2010-01-01

    For advanced therapies, the same basic principles for assessment apply as for any other biotechnological medicinal product. Nevertheless, the extent of data for quality, safety, and efficacy can be highly specific. Until recently, advanced therapies were not uniformly regulated across Europe, e.g., tissue engineered products were regulated either as medicinal products or medical devices. Thus, for some products no data from clinical studies are available, e.g., for autologous chondrocyte products. The draft guideline on Good Clinical Practice for clinical trials with advanced therapies describes specific additional requirements, e.g., ensuring traceability. Most clinical studies with advanced therapies in Germany are still in early phase I or II trials with highly divergent types of products and clinical indications. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) has been established to meet the scientific and regulatory challenges with advanced therapies.

  1. [How may practitioners interpret the results of clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin, J-M; Adida, M; Blin, O; Simon, N; Fakra, E; Cermolacce, M; Bottai, T; Pringuey, D; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Belzeaux, R; Kaladjian, A

    2016-12-01

    To correctly interpret the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT), practitioners have to spot bias and other potential problems present in the trial. Internal as well as external validity of the trial are linked to the presence of such bias. The internal validity is ensured by a clear definition of the objectives of the trial. The number of patients to be included in the trial is calculated on the basis of the main objective of the trial and more precisely on the basis of the primary endpoint selected to assess the efficacy of treatment. This is the best way to ensure that the statistical significance of the result may have a clinical relevance. Internal validity depends also on the process of patients selection, the methods used to ensure comparability of groups and treatments, the criteria employed to assess efficacy, and the methods for the analysis of data. External validity refers to subjects that have been excluded from the trial, limitations of RCTs, as well as the coherence and clinical relevance of the trial. Internal validity has to be fueled by external validity. © L’Encéphale, Paris, 2016.

  2. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Followill, David S; Galvin, James; Knopp, Michael V; Michalski, Jeff M; Rosen, Mark A; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Shankar, Lalitha K; Laurie, Fran; Cicchetti, M Giulia; Moni, Janaki; Coleman, C Norman; Deye, James A; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2016-02-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  3. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Bernstein, Anke; Feucht, Matthias J;

    2016-01-01

    clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n = 76) was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical......-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which...... is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG....

  4. Clinical Research Methodology 3: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Imrey, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    Randomized assignment of treatment excludes reverse causation and selection bias and, in sufficiently large studies, effectively prevents confounding. Well-implemented blinding prevents measurement bias. Studies that include these protections are called randomized, blinded clinical trials and, when conducted with sufficient numbers of patients, provide the most valid results. Although conceptually straightforward, design of clinical trials requires thoughtful trade-offs among competing approaches-all of which influence the number of patients required, enrollment time, internal and external validity, ability to evaluate interactions among treatments, and cost.

  5. Clinical Trials in Male Hormonal Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieschlag E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has established the principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers.

  6. Responsiveness of endpoints in osteoporosis clinical trials--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranney, A; Welch, V; Tugwell, P; Wells, G; Adachi, J D; McGowan, J; Shea, B

    1999-01-01

    As an update of our earlier paper, published as part of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT 3) proceedings in 1996, we surveyed the types of outcomes incorporated in recent clinical trials. A literature search was conducted on MEDLINE and Current Contents, from January 1996 to March 1998, using the search strategy recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration for the identification of randomized controlled trials (RCT). Two independent reviewers selected trials according to inclusion criteria. The same reviewers extracted data on clinical and radiographic fractures, pain, quality of life, and bone mineral density (BMD). Seventy-four RCT conducted on bone loss in postmenopausal women were identified. Most trials incorporated biochemical markers and BMD as outcome measures. Fewer trials included vertebral fractures, pain, height, and quality of life. The responsiveness is presented in terms of the sample size needed per group to show a statistically significant difference. The most responsive outcomes were pain, BMD, and biochemical markers. The number needed to treat to prevent one vertebral fracture ranged from 13 to 54, depending on the intervention and population. Investigators should examine the characteristics of the patient population and the nature of the intervention in determining the sample size required to demonstrate a significant effect. The selection of endpoints should be based on their responsiveness, feasibility, and the importance of using standardized outcomes. Standardized outcomes greatly facilitate the synthesis of available information into systematic reviews by groups such as the Cochrane Collaboration.

  7. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton;

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding...

  8. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton;

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding and k...

  9. Clinical trial registration in oral health journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaïl-Faugeron, V; Fron-Chabouis, H; Durieux, P

    2015-03-01

    Prospective registration of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) represents the best solution to reporting bias. The extent to which oral health journals have endorsed and complied with RCT registration is unknown. We identified journals publishing RCTs in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine in the Journal Citation Reports. We classified journals into 3 groups: journals requiring or recommending trial registration, journals referring indirectly to registration, and journals providing no reference to registration. For the 5 journals with the highest 2012 impact factors in each group, we assessed whether RCTs with results published in 2013 had been registered. Of 78 journals examined, 32 (41%) required or recommended trial registration, 19 (24%) referred indirectly to registration, and 27 (35%) provided no reference to registration. We identified 317 RCTs with results published in the 15 selected journals in 2013. Overall, 73 (23%) were registered in a trial registry. Among those, 91% were registered retrospectively and 32% did not report trial registration in the published article. The proportion of trials registered was not significantly associated with editorial policies: 29% with results in journals that required or recommended registration, 15% in those that referred indirectly to registration, and 21% in those providing no reference to registration (P = 0.05). Less than one-quarter of RCTs with results published in a sample of oral health journals were registered with a public registry. Improvements are needed with respect to how journals inform and require their authors to register their trials.

  10. Point-of-Care Sexually Transmitted Infection Diagnostics: Proceedings of the STAR Sexually Transmitted Infection-Clinical Trial Group Programmatic Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristillo, Anthony D; Bristow, Claire C; Peeling, Rosanna; Van Der Pol, Barbara; de Cortina, Sasha Herbst; Dimov, Ivan K; Pai, Nitika Pant; Jin Shin, Dong; Chiu, Ricky Y T; Klapperich, Catherine; Madhivanan, Purnima; Morris, Sheldon R; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-01

    The goal of the point-of-care (POC) sexually transmitted infection (STI) Diagnostics meeting was to review the state-of-the-art research and develop recommendations for the use of POC STI diagnostics. Experts from academia, government, nonprofit, and industry discussed POC diagnostics for STIs such as Chlamydia trachomatis, human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Treponema pallidum. Key objectives included a review of current and emerging technologies, clinical and public health benefits, POC STI diagnostics in developing countries, regulatory considerations, and future areas of development. Key points of the meeting are as follows: (i) although some rapid point-of-care tests are affordable, sensitive, specific, easy to perform, and deliverable to those who need them for select sexually transmitted infections, implementation barriers exist at the device, patient, provider, and health system levels; (ii) further investment in research and development of point-of-care tests for sexually transmitted infections is needed, and new technologies can be used to improve diagnostic testing, test uptake, and treatment; (iii) efficient deployment of self-testing in supervised (ie, pharmacies, clinics, and so on) and/or unsupervised (ie, home, offices, and so on) settings could facilitate more screening and diagnosis that will reduce the burden of sexually transmitted infections; (iv) development of novel diagnostic technologies has outpaced the generation of guidance tools and documents issued by regulatory agencies; and (v) questions regarding quality management are emerging including the mechanism by which poor-performing diagnostics are removed from the market and quality assurance of self-testing is ensured.

  11. Overall survival and local recurrence of 406 completely resected stage IIIa-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients: questionnaire survey of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group to plan for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Y; Kato, H; Koike, T; Tsuchiya, R; Fujisawa, T; Shimizu, N; Watanabe, Y; Mitsudomi, T; Yoshimura, M

    2001-10-01

    the group of completely resected stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSCLC) is considered to be heterogeneous in various aspects including survival and the recurrent pattern. In the present study, we attempted to clarify the factors which separate these patients into high and low risk groups based on the survival and local recurrence. a questionnaire survey on the survival and local recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer patients with pathological stage IIIA-N2 disease who underwent a complete resection from January 1992 to December 1993 was performed by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group as of July 1999. The information on the survival of 406 patients and that of local recurrence in 332 of them was available. the 5-year survival of the 406 patients was 31.0%. In a univariate analysis, the age, clinical and pathological T status, number of N2 stations, pathological N1 disease, operative modality and postoperative radiotherapy were all found to be important prognostic factors. Clinical N2 disease marginally influenced the survival (P=0.07). In a multivariate analysis of these variables including clinical N2 disease, the survival was significantly worse in the case of multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=1.741), the presence of pathological N1 disease (1.403), pathological T2 or 3 disease (1.399) and an age older than 65 (1.327). The rate of freedom from any local recurrence at the bronchial stump, or in the hilar, mediastinal or supraclavicular lymph nodes at 5 years was 64%. In a univariate analysis of the freedom from local recurrence, the clinical N status, pathological T status, pathological N1 disease and number of N2 stations were all found to be important prognostic factors. A multivariate analysis revealed the freedom from local recurrence to be adversely influenced by multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=2.05), and the presence of either clinical N1 or 2 (1.733) disease. The 5-year survival and the rate of freedom from local recurrence at 5

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Crocus sativus L. in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment: One Year Single-Blind Randomized, with Parallel Groups, Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolaki, Magda; Karathanasi, Elina; Lazarou, Ioulietta; Dovas, Kostas; Verykouki, Eleni; Karacostas, Anastasios; Georgiadis, Kostas; Tsolaki, Anthoula; Adam, Katerina; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis; Sinakos, Zacharias

    2016-07-27

    There is evidence to suggest the efficacy of Crocus (saffron) in the management of cognitive decline. This study examined the efficacy of Crocus in patients with amnesic and multi domain MCI (aMCImd). The participants included 17 patients on Crocus and 18 on a waiting list, who were examined with a short neuropsychological battery, MRI 3T, while some patients were examined via 256-channel electroencephalogram (HD-EEG) at baseline and after 12 months. The results showed that patients on Crocus had improved Mini-Mental State Examination scores (p = 0.015), while the control group deteriorated. Also, MRI, EEG, and ERP showed improvement in specific domains. This led us to conclude that Crocus is a good choice for management of aMCImd.

  13. Clinical predictors of reinfarction among men and women after a first myocardial infarction. SPRINT Study Group. Secondary Prevention Reinfarction Israeli Nifedipine Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornowski, R; Goldbourt, U; Boyko, V; Behar, S

    1995-01-01

    Independent clinical factors predicting reinfarction in the 1st year following an initial myocardial infarction were identified among 900 women and 2,795 men. Women were older (65.8 vs. 59.3 years; p men (6.9 vs. 5.6%, p = 0.17). Cumulative 1-month, 1- and 5.5-year all-cause mortality following the first infarction was higher among women who sustained reinfarction (43, 52 and 74%, respectively) than among men (29, 30 and 51%, respectively, p women were (adjusted relative odds): peripheral vascular disease (3.2), postinfarction angina (2.3), diabetes mellitus (2.2), radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly (1.9), anterior location of the first infarction (2.0), congestive heart failure (1.8), prior angina (1.6) and age (10 years) increment (1.2). Predictive variables for men were: anterior infarct location (1.7), peripheral vascular disease (1.6, prior stroke (1.5), prior angina (1.4), systemic hypertension (1.3) and age (10 years) increment (1.1). Our data indicate (a) different cardiac risk factors for reinfarction among men and women after a first myocardial infarction, and (b) a prognostic advantage for men over women following reinfarction.

  14. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  15. Clobazam: uncontrolled and standard controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, T A; Amin, M M

    1979-01-01

    1 In an uncontrolled clinical trial, carried out in 11 psychiatric patients with the clinical diagnoses of anxiety neurosis and depressive neurosis, clobazam, a new benzodiazepine preparation, in the dosage range 10-60 mg daily produced statistically significant improvement in the total and both factor scores of the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A). The lowest mean total HAM-A scores occurred with a mean clobazam dosage of 48 mg daily. 2 Results of the uncontrolled clinical trial were further substantiated in a standard-controlled clinical study in which no statistically significant difference between the therapeutic effectiveness of clobazam and diazepam could be revealed. The lowest mean total HAM-A scores occurred with a mean clobazam dosage of 49 mg daily. There was a lower incidence of adverse effects reported in patients receiving clobazam than in those taking the control drug (diazepam).

  16. Novel ocular antihypertensive compounds in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available June Chen1, Stephen A Runyan1, Michael R Robinson21Department of Biological Sciences, 2Ophthalmology Clinical Research, Allergan, Inc, Irvine, CA, USAIntroduction: Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease characterized by progressive optic nerve injury and visual field defects. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is the most widely recognized risk factor for the onset and progression of open-angle glaucoma, and IOP-lowering medications comprise the primary treatment strategy. IOP elevation in glaucoma is associated with diminished or obstructed aqueous humor outflow. Pharmacotherapy reduces IOP by suppressing aqueous inflow and/or increasing aqueous outflow.Purpose: This review focuses on novel non-FDA approved ocular antihypertensive compounds being investigated for IOP reduction in ocular hypertensive and glaucoma patients in active clinical trials within approximately the past 2 years.Methods: The mode of IOP reduction, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of these new agents were assessed. Relevant drug efficacy and safety trials were identified from searches of various scientific literature databases and clinical trial registries. Compounds with no specified drug class, insufficient background information, reformulations, and fixed-combinations of marketed drugs were not considered.Results: The investigational agents identified comprise those that act on the same targets of established drug classes approved by the FDA (ie, prostaglandin analogs and β-adrenergic blockers as well as agents belonging to novel drug classes with unique mechanisms of action. Novel targets and compounds evaluated in clinical trials include an actin polymerization inhibitor (ie, latrunculin, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitors, adenosine receptor analogs, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a serotonin receptor antagonist.Conclusion: The clinical value of novel compounds for the treatment of glaucoma will depend

  17. Auricular Acupuncture Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients with Anxiety Disorders or Major Depressive Disorder: A Prospective Parallel Group Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas de Lorent

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although acupuncture treatment is increasingly in demand among psychiatric patients, to date no studies have investigated the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture (AA in treating anxiety disorders or major depressive disorder. Thus, this study aimed to compare the effectiveness of AA versus progressive muscle relaxation (PMR, a standardized and accepted relaxation method. We examined 162 patients with a primary diagnosis of anxiety disorder or major depressive disorder, and each patient chose between treatment with AA, executed according to the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association protocol, and treatment with PMR. Each group had treatments twice a week for 4 weeks. Before and after treatment, each participant rated four items on a visual analog scale: anxiety, tension, anger/aggression, and mood. Statistical analyses were performed with the original visual analog scale scores and the Change-Intensity Index, an appropriate indicator of the difference between two values of a variable. Our results show that treatment with AA significantly decreased tension, anxiety, and anger/aggression throughout the 4 weeks, but did not elevate mood. Between AA and PMR, no statistically significant differences were found at any time. Thus, we suggest that both AA and PMR may be useful, equally-effective additional interventions in the treatment of the above-mentioned disorders.

  18. Linagliptin and pioglitazone combination therapy versus monotherapy with linagliptin or pioglitazone: A randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, multinational clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauck, Michael Albrecht; di Domenico, Maximiliano; Patel, Sanjay; Kobe, Maureen; Toorawa, Robert; Woerle, Hans-Juergen

    2016-07-01

    Linagliptin plus pioglitazone single-pill combinations were evaluated. Patients (n = 936) with insufficient glycaemic control, despite lifestyle interventions, were randomised for 30 weeks to either monotherapy with linagliptin 5 mg; pioglitazone 15, 30 or 45 mg; or single-pill combination with linagliptin 5 mg plus pioglitazone 15, 30 or 45 mg. An extension (⩽54 weeks) planned to evaluate linagliptin plus pioglitazone 30 or 45 mg single-pill combinations was not completed due to a protocol amendment. Adjusted mean (95% confidence interval) differences in HbA1c change from baseline at week 30 for linagliptin plus pioglitazone 15, 30 and 45 mg were -0.17% (-0.41, 0.07), -0.37% (-0.60, -0.14) and -0.41% (-0.64, -0.18) versus pioglitazone monotherapies, respectively, and -0.44% (-0.67, -0.20), -0.68% (-0.91, -0.44) and -0.89% (-1.12, -0.66) versus linagliptin monotherapy, respectively. Single-pill combinations were generally well tolerated. Hypoglycaemia frequency was ⩽1.5% per group. Linagliptin plus pioglitazone combinations were efficacious, with safety profiles comparable to the individual monotherapies.

  19. Auricular Acupuncture Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients with Anxiety Disorders or Major Depressive Disorder: A Prospective Parallel Group Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorent, Lukas; Agorastos, Agorastos; Yassouridis, Alexander; Kellner, Michael; Muhtz, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Although acupuncture treatment is increasingly in demand among psychiatric patients, to date no studies have investigated the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture (AA) in treating anxiety disorders or major depressive disorder. Thus, this study aimed to compare the effectiveness of AA versus progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), a standardized and accepted relaxation method. We examined 162 patients with a primary diagnosis of anxiety disorder or major depressive disorder, and each patient chose between treatment with AA, executed according to the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association protocol, and treatment with PMR. Each group had treatments twice a week for 4 weeks. Before and after treatment, each participant rated four items on a visual analog scale: anxiety, tension, anger/aggression, and mood. Statistical analyses were performed with the original visual analog scale scores and the Change-Intensity Index, an appropriate indicator of the difference between two values of a variable. Our results show that treatment with AA significantly decreased tension, anxiety, and anger/aggression throughout the 4 weeks, but did not elevate mood. Between AA and PMR, no statistically significant differences were found at any time. Thus, we suggest that both AA and PMR may be useful, equally-effective additional interventions in the treatment of the above-mentioned disorders.

  20. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  1. Information on blinding in registered records of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viergever Roderik F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on blinding is part of the data that should be provided upon registration of a trial at a clinical trials registry. Reporting of blinding is often absent or of low quality in published articles of clinical trials. This study researched the presence and quality of information on blinding in registered records of clinical trials and highlights the important role of data-recording formats at clinical trial registries in ensuring high-quality registration.

  2. Clobazam is equally safe and efficacious for seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome across different age groups: Post hoc analyses of short- and long-term clinical trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yu-Tze; Conry, Joan; Mitchell, Wendy G; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Isojarvi, Jouko; Lee, Deborah; Drummond, Rebecca; Chung, Steve

    2015-05-01

    The peak age at onset of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is between 3 and 5years. Patients with LGS frequently experience multiple types of treatment-refractory seizures and require lifelong therapy with several antiepileptic drugs. Here, post hoc analyses of clinical trials (phase III trial OV-1012 and open-label extension trial OV-1004) provide short- and long-term efficacy and safety data of adjunctive clobazam in patients with LGS stratified by age at baseline (≥2 to clobazam over the short and longterm was similarly effective and well-tolerated in both pediatric and adult patients with LGS.

  3. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials for hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppenburg, M; Maheu, E; Kraus, V B; Cicuttini, F; Doherty, M; Dreiser, R-L; Henrotin, Y; Jiang, G-L; Mandl, L; Martel-Pelletier, J; Nelson, A E; Neogi, T; Pelletier, J-P; Punzi, L; Ramonda, R; Simon, L S; Wang, S

    2015-05-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a very frequent disease, but yet understudied. However, a lot of works have been published in the past 10 years, and much has been done to better understand its clinical course and structural progression. Despite this new knowledge, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in hand OA. The last OARSI recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA dates back to 2006. The present recommendations aimed at updating previous recommendations, by incorporating new data. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven exercise is to provide evidence-based guidance on the design, execution and analysis of clinical trials in hand OA, where published evidence is available, supplemented by expert opinion, where evidence is lacking, to perform clinical trials in hand OA, both for symptom and for structure-modification. They indicate core outcome measurement sets for studies in hand OA, and list the methods and instruments that should be used to measure symptoms or structure. For both symptom- and structure-modification, at least pain, physical function, patient global assessment, HR-QoL, joint activity and hand strength should be assessed. In addition, for structure-modification trials, structural progression should be measured by radiographic changes. We also provide a research agenda listing many unsolved issues that seem to most urgently need to be addressed from the perspective of performing "good" clinical trials in hand OA. These updated OARSI recommendations should allow for better standardizing the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA in the next future.

  4. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  5. Improved outcome in acute myeloid leukemia patients enrolled in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Mette; Sengeløv, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are critical to improve AML treatment. It remains, however, unclear if clinical trial participation per se affects prognosis and to what extent the patients selected for trials differ from those of patients receiving intensive therapy off-trial.We conducted a population-based cohort...... study of newly diagnosed Danish AML patients treated with intensive chemotherapy between 2000-2013. We estimated accrual rates and compared characteristics, complete remission (CR) rates, and relative risks (RRs) of death at 90-day, 1-year, and 3-years in clinical trial patients to patients treated off......-trial.Of 867 patients, 58.3% (n = 504) were included in a clinical trial. Accrual rates were similar across age groups (p = 0.55). Patients with poor performance status, comorbidity, therapy-related and secondary AML were less likely to be enrolled in trials. CR rates were 80.2% in trial-patients versus 68...

  6. Optimizing biologically targeted clinical trials for neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, David H; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Korf, Bruce R; Packer, Roger J

    2013-04-01

    The neurofibromatoses (neurofibromatosis type 1, NF1 and neurofibromatosis type 2, NF2) comprise the most common inherited conditions in which affected children and adults develop tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, the authors discuss how the establishment of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium (NFCTC) has positively impacted on the design and execution of treatment studies for individuals with NF1 and NF2. Using an extensive PUBMED search in collaboration with select NFCTC members expert in distinct NF topics, the authors discuss the clinical features of NF1 and NF2, the molecular biology of the NF1 and NF2 genes, the development and application of clinically relevant Nf1 and Nf2 genetically engineered mouse models and the formation of the NFCTC to enable efficient clinical trial design and execution. The NFCTC has resulted in a more seamless integration of mouse preclinical and human clinical trials efforts. Leveraging emerging enabling resources, current research is focused on identifying subtypes of tumors in NF1 and NF2 to deliver the most active compounds to the patients most likely to respond to the targeted therapy.

  7. Analysis of opioid consumption in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Nyberg, Joakim; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Inconsistent trial design and analysis is a key reason that few advances in postoperative pain management have been made from clinical trials analyzing opioid consumption data. This study aimed to compare four different approaches to analyze opioid consumption data. A repeated time-to-event (RTTE...... of potency was obtained with a RTTE model accounting for both morphine effects and time-varying covariates on opioid consumption. An RTTE analysis approach proved better suited for demonstrating efficacy of opioid sparing analgesics than traditional statistical tests as a lower sample size was required due...

  8. Guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials for spinal cord injury as developed by the ICCP panel: clinical trial design

    OpenAIRE

    Lammertse, D; Tuszynski, MH; Steeves, JD; Curt, A; Fawcett, JW; Rask, C; Ditunno, JF; Fehlings, MG; Guest, JD; Ellaway, PH; Kleitman, N; Blight, AR; Dobkin, BH; Grossman, R.; Katoh, H.

    2006-01-01

    The International Campaign for Cures of Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis established a panel tasked with reviewing the methodology for clinical trials for spinal cord injury (SCI), and making recommendations on the conduct of future trials. This is the fourth of four papers. Here, we examine the phases of a clinical trial program, the elements, types, and protocols for valid clinical trial design. The most rigorous and valid SCI clinical trial would be a prospective double-blind randomized contro...

  9. Analysis of regulatory-ethical framework of clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević-Georgiev Andrijana; Krajnović Dušanka; Milovanović Srđan; Ignjatović Svetlana; Đurić Dušan; Marinković Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Every clinical trial has to meet all ethical criteria in addition to the scientific ones. The basic ethical principles in the clinical trials are the following: nonmaleficence, beneficence, respect for autonomy and the principle of justice. Objective. The aim of the study was to analyze clinical cases with the outcomes leading to the changes in regulatory­ethical framework related to the clinical trials, as well as the outcomes of key clinical trials that influenced the in...

  10. Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, T M; Kihlbom, U; Nordin, K; Silén, M; Nygren, P

    2016-05-01

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups.

  11. The therapeutic effect of clinical trials: understanding placebo response rates in clinical trials – A secondary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walach Harald

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Placebo response rates in clinical trials vary considerably and are observed frequently. For new drugs it can be difficult to prove effectiveness superior to placebo. It is unclear what contributes to improvement in the placebo groups. We wanted to clarify, what elements of clinical trials determine placebo variability. Methods We analysed a representative sample of 141 published long-term trials (randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled; duration > 12 weeks to find out what study characteristics predict placebo response rates in various diseases. Correlational and regression analyses with study characteristics and placebo response rates were carried out. Results We found a high and significant correlation between placebo and treatment response rate across diseases (r = .78; p Conclusion Medication response rates and placebo response rates in clinical trials are highly correlated. Trial characteristics can explain some portion of the variance in placebo healing rates in RCTs. Placebo response in trials is only partially due to methodological artefacts and only partially dependent on the diagnoses treated.

  12. Disclosure of investigators' recruitment performance in multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Moher, David; Gluud, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends.......Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends....

  13. Randomization in substance abuse clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolson Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A well designed randomized clinical trial rates as the highest level of evidence for a particular intervention's efficacy. Randomization, a fundamental feature of clinical trials design, is a process invoking the use of probability to assign treatment interventions to patients. In general, randomization techniques pursue the goal of providing objectivity to the assignment of treatments, while at the same time balancing for treatment assignment totals and covariate distributions. Numerous randomization techniques, each with varying properties of randomness and balance, are suggested in the statistical literature. This paper reviews common randomization techniques often used in substance abuse research and an application from a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA-funded clinical trial in substance abuse is used to illustrate several choices an investigator faces when designing a clinical trial. Results Comparisons and contrasts of randomization schemes are provided with respect to deterministic and balancing properties. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulation is used to explore the balancing nature of randomization techniques for moderately sized clinical trials. Results demonstrate large treatment imbalance for complete randomization with less imbalance for the urn or adaptive scheme. The urn and adaptive randomization methods display smaller treatment imbalance as demonstrated by the low variability of treatment allocation imbalance. For all randomization schemes, covariate imbalance between treatment arms was small with little variation between adaptive schemes, stratified schemes and unstratified schemes given that sample sizes were moderate to large. Conclusion We develop this paper with the goal of reminding substance abuse researchers of the broad array of randomization options available for clinical trial designs. There may be too quick a tendency for substance abuse researchers to implement the fashionable urn

  14. Patient representatives' views on patient information in clinical cancer trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    of future simplified and more attractive informed consent forms. CONCLUSIONS: The emotional and cognitive responses to written patient information reported by patient representatives provides a basis for revised formats in future trials and add to the body of information that support use of plain language......BACKGROUND: Patient enrolment into clinical trials is based on oral information and informed consent, which includes an information sheet and a consent certificate. The written information should be complete, but at the same time risks being so complex that it may be questioned if a fully informed......-III trials, randomized and non-randomized trials that evaluated chemotherapy/targeted therapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and palliative settings. Data were collected through focus groups and were analysed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: Two major themes emerged: emotional responses and cognitive...

  15. Privacy and confidentiality in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Deven; Greene, Sarah M; Miner, Caroline S; Staman, Karen L; Welch, Mary Jane; Rubel, Alan

    2015-10-01

    With pragmatic clinical trials, an opportunity exists to answer important questions about the relative risks, burdens, and benefits of therapeutic interventions. However, concerns about protecting the privacy of this information are significant and must be balanced with the imperative to learn from the data gathered in routine clinical practice. Traditional privacy protections for research uses of identifiable information rely disproportionately on informed consent or authorizations, based on a presumption that this is necessary to fulfill ethical principles of respect for persons. But frequently, the ideal of informed consent is not realized in its implementation. Moreover, the principle of respect for persons—which encompasses their interests in health information privacy—can be honored through other mechanisms. Data anonymization also plays a role in protecting privacy but is not suitable for all research, particularly pragmatic clinical trials. In this article, we explore both the ethical foundation and regulatory framework intended to protect privacy in pragmatic clinical trials. We then review examples of novel approaches to respecting persons in research that may have the added benefit of honoring patient privacy considerations.

  16. Clinical trials integrity: a CRO perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, J E

    2001-01-01

    When contract research organizations (CROs) were first formed, pharmaceutical companies outsourced to them only certain aspects of the conduct of their clinical trials. At first CROs were highly specialized entities, providing, for example, either biostatistical advice, clinical research associates who monitored investigational sites for regulatory compliance, or regulatory support. Gradually, full service CROs emerged, offering a full range of services for clinical trials, including the selection of investigators and investigational sites, assistance with patient recruitment, safety surveillance and reporting, site audits, and data management and biostatistics. This evolving relationship between CROs and the pharmaceutical and medical device industries has resulted in CROs assuming more and more of the regulatory and ethical risks and responsibilities inherent in the conduct of clinical trials. In this full service role, CROs, unlike sponsors, are not interested in the outcome of study, but like sponsors, are subject to heavy regulation by the federal government, must follow applicable state laws, must respect international guidelines, and are obliged to follow their own operating procedures. Moreover, they are judged by the industry on the basis of the scope and quality of services provided, including the degree of adherence to the research protocol, regulatory requirements, and timelines; the quality of the professional working relationships with investigators and institutions, both academic and community-based; and the validity of the data. Further, CROs are subject to comprehensive audits by sponsoring companies, FDA, and other regulatory authorities. For all these reasons, CROs are being tasked with strict vigilance of all stages of the clinical trial process to ensure that the laws, regulations, and industry standards designed for the protection of human subjects and data integrity are maintained.

  17. Registration of clinical trials: Is it really needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer Aslam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Withholding findings of clinical trials for publication or presentation to the regulatory authorities is a major concern. We aimed to address the importance of clinical trial registration and whether it is needed or not. Discussion: For ethical conduct of clinical trial, registration is an important but debatable issue due to proprietary interest of the pharmaceutical industry. Over the years, investigating agencies uncovered several instances of misconduct during the clinical trial. The International committee of medical journal editors requires registration of trial methodology, but does not require registration of trial results; however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Amendments does require researchers to register results. Conclusion: Prospective registration of clinical trial is mandatory for more transparent research and sustaining the validity of evidence based practice and availability of reliable data. Clinical trials registration has the potential to contribute substantially to improve clinical trial transparency and reducing publication bias and selective reporting.

  18. ClinicalTrials.gov and Drugs@FDA: A Comparison of Results Reporting for New Drug Approval Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lisa M; Woloshin, Steven; Zheng, Eugene; Tse, Tony; Zarin, Deborah A

    2016-09-20

    Pharmaceutical companies and other trial sponsors must submit certain trial results to ClinicalTrials.gov. The validity of these results is unclear. To validate results posted on ClinicalTrials.gov against publicly available U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviews on Drugs@FDA. ClinicalTrials.gov (registry and results database) and Drugs@FDA (medical and statistical reviews). 100 parallel-group, randomized trials for new drug approvals (January 2013 to July 2014) with results posted on ClinicalTrials.gov (15 March 2015). 2 assessors extracted, and another verified, the trial design, primary and secondary outcomes, adverse events, and deaths. Most trials were phase 3 (90%), double-blind (92%), and placebo-controlled (73%) and involved 32 drugs from 24 companies. Of 137 primary outcomes identified from ClinicalTrials.gov, 134 (98%) had corresponding data at Drugs@FDA, 130 (95%) had concordant definitions, and 107 (78%) had concordant results. Most differences were nominal (that is, relative difference gov, Drugs@FDA mentioned 1061 (55%) and included results data for 367 (19%). Of 96 trials with 1 or more serious adverse events in either source, 14 could be compared and 7 had discordant numbers of persons experiencing the adverse events. Of 62 trials with 1 or more deaths in either source, 25 could be compared and 17 were discordant. Unknown generalizability to uncontrolled or crossover trial results. Primary outcome definitions and results were largely concordant between ClinicalTrials.gov and Drugs@FDA. Half the secondary outcomes, as well as serious events and deaths, could not be validated because Drugs@FDA includes only "key outcomes" for regulatory decision making and frequently includes only adverse event results aggregated across multiple trials. National Library of Medicine.

  19. Group sequential designs for stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayling, Michael J; Wason, James Ms; Mander, Adrian P

    2017-06-01

    The stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial design has received substantial attention in recent years. Although various extensions to the original design have been proposed, no guidance is available on the design of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. In an individually randomised trial setting, group sequential methods can provide notable efficiency gains and ethical benefits. We address this by discussing how established group sequential methodology can be adapted for stepped-wedge designs. Utilising the error spending approach to group sequential trial design, we detail the assumptions required for the determination of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. We consider early stopping for efficacy, futility, or efficacy and futility. We describe first how this can be done for any specified linear mixed model for data analysis. We then focus on one particular commonly utilised model and, using a recently completed stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial, compare the performance of several designs with interim analyses to the classical stepped-wedge design. Finally, the performance of a quantile substitution procedure for dealing with the case of unknown variance is explored. We demonstrate that the incorporation of early stopping in stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial designs could reduce the expected sample size under the null and alternative hypotheses by up to 31% and 22%, respectively, with no cost to the trial's type-I and type-II error rates. The use of restricted error maximum likelihood estimation was found to be more important than quantile substitution for controlling the type-I error rate. The addition of interim analyses into stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials could help guard against time-consuming trials conducted on poor performing treatments and also help expedite the implementation of efficacious treatments. In future, trialists should consider incorporating early stopping of some kind into

  20. [Key aspects in interpreting clinical trials in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Gómez, L; García Villar, C; Seguro Fernández, Á

    2015-01-01

    A clinical trial is an experimental study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a treatment or diagnostic technique in human beings. To ensure the methodological quality of a clinical trial and the validity of its results, various checklists have been elaborated to identify biases that could invalidate its conclusions. This article focuses on the points we need to consider in the critical evaluation of a clinical trial. We can usually find this information in the "materials and methods" and "results" sections of articles. Randomization, follow-up (or analysis of losses), blinding, and equivalence between groups (apart from the intervention itself) are some key aspects related to design. In the "results" section, we need to consider what measures of clinical efficacy were used (relative risk, odds ratio, or number needed to treat, among others) and the precision of the results (confidence intervals). Once we have confirmed that the clinical trial fulfills these criteria, we need to determine whether the results can be applied in our environment and whether the benefits obtained justify the risks and costs involved.

  1. How do researchers decide early clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grankvist, Hannah; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Launch of clinical investigation represents a substantial escalation in commitment to a particular clinical translation trajectory; it also exposes human subjects to poorly understood interventions. Despite these high stakes, there is little to guide decision-makers on the scientific and ethical evaluation of early phase trials. In this article, we review policies and consensus statements on human protections, drug regulation, and research design surrounding trial launch, and conclude that decision-making is largely left to the discretion of research teams and sponsors. We then review what is currently understood about how research teams exercise this discretion, and close by laying out a research agenda for characterizing the way investigators, sponsors, and reviewers approach decision-making in early phase research.

  2. FDA Encourages More Participation, Diversity in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Updates FDA Encourages More Participation, Diversity in Clinical Trials Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... while research is conducted. back to top Do clinical trials have possible risks and benefits? Yes. Sometimes patients ...

  3. ClinicalTrials.gov | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Clinical Trials.gov Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents “...a ... help with a clinical trial: Visit www.clinicaltrials.gov Brought to you by the National Library of ...

  4. Cross-System Evaluation of Clinical Trial Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Silis Y.; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are fundamental to the advancement of medicine but constantly face recruitment difficulties. Various clinical trial search engines have been designed to help health consumers identify trials for which they may be eligible. Unfortunately, knowledge of the usefulness and usability of their designs remains scarce. In this study, we used mixed methods, including time-motion analysis, think-aloud protocol, and survey, to evaluate five popular clinical trial search engines with 11 users. Differences in user preferences and time spent on each system were observed and correlated with user characteristics. In general, searching for applicable trials using these systems is a cognitively demanding task. Our results show that user perceptions of these systems are multifactorial. The survey indicated eTACTS being the generally preferred system, but this finding did not persist among all mixed methods. This study confirms the value of mixed-methods for a comprehensive system evaluation. Future system designers must be aware that different users groups expect different functionalities. PMID:25954590

  5. Cross-system evaluation of clinical trial search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Silis Y; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are fundamental to the advancement of medicine but constantly face recruitment difficulties. Various clinical trial search engines have been designed to help health consumers identify trials for which they may be eligible. Unfortunately, knowledge of the usefulness and usability of their designs remains scarce. In this study, we used mixed methods, including time-motion analysis, think-aloud protocol, and survey, to evaluate five popular clinical trial search engines with 11 users. Differences in user preferences and time spent on each system were observed and correlated with user characteristics. In general, searching for applicable trials using these systems is a cognitively demanding task. Our results show that user perceptions of these systems are multifactorial. The survey indicated eTACTS being the generally preferred system, but this finding did not persist among all mixed methods. This study confirms the value of mixed-methods for a comprehensive system evaluation. Future system designers must be aware that different users groups expect different functionalities.

  6. Differences Between Clinical Trials of Medical Devices and Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-jun; LIU Wei

    2014-01-01

    How to design clinical trials for medical devices is a problem plaguing the industry today. As there are many differences in clinical trials of medical devices and drugs. This paper describes the differences of the two points from the perspectivs of defi-nition of medical devices and drugs, scope, phasing, subjects and design of clinical trials in details, aiming to help the related personnel make scientific decisions while conduct-ing clinical trial design for medical devices.

  7. Overview of phase IV clinical trials for postmarket drug safety surveillance: a status report from the ClinicalTrials.gov registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinji; Zhang, Yuan; Ye, Xiaofei; Guo, Xiaojing; Zhang, Tianyi; He, Jia

    2016-11-23

    Phase IV trials are often used to investigate drug safety after approval. However, little is known about the characteristics of contemporary phase IV clinical trials and whether these studies are of sufficient quality to advance medical knowledge in pharmacovigilance. We aimed to determine the fundamental characteristics of phase IV clinical trials that evaluated drug safety using the ClinicalTrials.gov registry data. A data set of 19 359 phase IV clinical studies registered in ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded. The characteristics of the phase IV trials focusing on safety only were compared with those evaluating both safety and efficacy. We also compared the characteristics of the phase IV trials in three major therapeutic areas (cardiovascular diseases, mental health and oncology). Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with the use of blinding and randomisation. A total of 4772 phase IV trials were identified, including 330 focusing on drug safety alone and 4392 evaluating both safety and efficacy. Most of the phase IV trials evaluating drug safety (75.9%) had enrolment gov registry were dominated by small trials that might not have sufficient power to detect less common adverse events. An adequate sample size should be emphasised for phase IV trials with safety surveillance as main task. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. The Egyptian clinical trials’ registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Zeeneldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Registering clinical trials (CTs in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP, the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR. In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage was 686 (0.30% in ICTRP, 56 (11.3% in PACTR and 548 (0.34% in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended.

  9. To fail or not to fail : clinical trials in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, Gijs Willem Eduard

    2008-01-01

    To fail or not to fail – Clinical trials in depression investigates the causes of the high failure rate of clinical trials in depression research. Apart from the difficulties in the search for new antidepressants during drug discovery, faulty clinical trial designs hinder their evaluation during dru

  10. [Ethical aspects of randomized clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, E; Sorrentino, D; Trevisi, A

    1997-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials represent the final, essential link between basic medical research and human health. However, their conduction presents very complex ethical problems, since the patient is the actual target of the experiment. Proper randomization, informed consent, and preliminary disclosure of results create deep ethical conflicts between the role of caretaker and that of impartial observer, both played by the same doctor. The dilemma reproduces the conflict between two different ethics. One is based on the inalienable individual rights stemming from the concept of man as an end in himself and not a means to an end. The other, derived from utilitarian philosophies, is based on the benefit for society as a whole. If we agree that randomized clinical trials represent the best method to test the validity of a new treatment, there is no easy solution. The dilemma could be solved by separating the role of the family doctor, committed to the best treatment possible for his patient, from the role of the scientist, committed to the progress of science and humanity. The former is involved in the treatment of individual patients, the latter in clinical and scientific experiments of a therapeutic nature. The patient may trade his rights to the best possible cure for the safety and the efficiency guaranteed by the scientific institution conducting the trial. Trials on relevant issues--expected to produce important results and impeccably designed scientifically--could be endowed with the ethics of science per se and this could be considered equivalent to the individual rights waived by the patient.

  11. RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL IN CHIKUNGUNYA ARTHRITIS CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Chikungunya virus is no stranger to the Indian sub- continent. Since its first isolation in Calcutta [1] in 1963, there have been several reports of chikung unya virus infection in different parts of India [2], [3], [4]. The last outbreak of chikungunya virus infection o ccurred in India in 1971. Subsequently there has been no activ e or passive surveillance carried out in the country and therefore, it ‘seemed’ that the virus h ad ‘disappeared’ from the subcontinent [5] However, recent reports of large scale outbreaks of fever caused by chikungunya virus infection in several parts of Southern India have confirmed th e re-emergence of this virus. It has been estimated that over 1,80,000 cases have occurred in India since December 2005 [6] Andhra Pradesh (AP was the first state to report this dise ase in December 2005, and one of the worst affected (over 80,000 suspected cases . Over 12% of patients who contract chikungunya virus infection develop chronic joint symptoms [7] . OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of chloroquine in reducing the pain of chikungunya induced arthritis a s compared to paracetamol. METHODOLOGY: A Randomized Clinical Trial was carried out in a c ommunity attached to urban health centre of PESIMSR, Kuppam during August 2006. Among the 132 cases of arthritis, 86 persons were selected based on their availability and consent to participate. They were divided into two randomly assigned groups namely Cat egory–1(Chloroquine group and Category–2 ( Paracetamol group. Chloroquine tablet -155 mg and Paracetamol tablet - 500 mg were administered as a single dose to the two groups respectively. The groups were followed up for 8 days and the results were analyzed. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Analysis was carried out by using S.P.S.S. package. Asymptoic test statistic an d X 2 MH (Chi square test were used to evaluate the effect of the drugs. RESULTS OF THE STUDY: The decrease of pain in chikungunya arthritis cases was

  12. Clinical trials in Brazilian journals of ophthalmology: where we are

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pessoa Cavalcanti Lira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare clinical trials published in Brazilian journals of ophthalmology and in foreign journals of ophthalmology with respect to the number of citations and the quality of reporting [by applying the Consolidated Standards for Reporting Trials (CONSORT statement writing standards]. METHODS: The sample of this systematic review comprised the two Brazilian journals of ophthalmology indexed at Science Citation Index Expanded and six of the foreign journals of ophthalmology with highest Impact Factor® according ISI. All clinical trials (CTs published from January 2009 to December 2010 at the Brazilians journals and a 1:1 randomized sample of the foreign journals were included. The primary outcome was the number of citations through the end of 2011. Subgroup analysis included language. The secondary outcome included likelihood of citation (cited at least once versus no citation, and presence or absence of CONSORT statement indicators. RESULTS: The citation counts were statistically significantly higher (P<0.001 in the Foreign Group (10.50 compared with the Brazilian Group (0.45. The likelihood citation was statistically significantly higher (P<0.001 in the Foreign Group (20/20 - 100% compared with the Brazilian Group (8/20 - 40%. The subgroup analysis of the language influence in Brazilian articles showed that the citation counts were statistically significantly higher in the papers published in English (P<0.04. Of 37 possible CONSORT items, the mean for the Foreign Group was 20.55 and for the Brazilian Group was 13.65 (P<0.003. CONCLUSION: The number of citations and the quality of reporting of clinical trials in Brazilian journals of ophthalmology still are low when compared with the foreign journals of ophthalmology with highest Impact Factor®.

  13. Clinical Trials and Treatment of ATL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Tsukasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ATL is a distinct peripheral T-lymphocytic malignancy associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1. The diversity in clinical features and prognosis of patients with this disease has led to its subtype-classification into four categories, acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types, defined by organ involvement, and LDH and calcium values. In case of acute, lymphoma, or unfavorable chronic subtypes (aggressive ATL, intensive chemotherapy like the LSG15 regimen (VCAP-AMP-VECP is usually recommended if outside of clinical trials, based on the results of a phase 3 trial. In case of favorable chronic or smoldering ATL (indolent ATL, watchful waiting until disease progression has been recommended, although the long-term prognosis was inferior to those of, for instance, chronic lymphoid leukemia. Retrospective analysis suggested that the combination of interferon alpha and zidovudine was apparently promising for the treatment of ATL, especially for types with leukemic manifestation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is also promising for the treatment of aggressive ATL possibly reflecting graft versus ATL effect. Several new agent trials for ATL are ongoing and in preparation, including a defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 monoclonal antibody, IL2-fused with diphtheria toxin, histone deacetylase inhibitors, a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor, a proteasome inhibitor, and lenalidomide.

  14. Interpreting the clinical importance of treatment outcomes in chronic pain clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, R.H.; Turk, D.C.; Wyrwich, K.W.;

    2008-01-01

    . Provisional benchmarks for identifying clinically important changes in specific outcome measures that can be used for outcome studies of treatments for chronic pain are proposed. PERSPECTIVE: Systematically collecting and reporting the recommended information needed to evaluate the clinical importance......A consensus meeting was convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) to provide recommendations for interpreting clinical importance of treatment outcomes in clinical trials of the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic pain treatments. A group...... of 40 participants from universities, governmental agencies, a patient self-help organization, and the pharmaceutical industry considered methodologic issues and research results relevant to determining the clinical importance of changes in the specific outcome measures previously recommended by IMMPACT...

  15. A matched crossover design for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laura J; Chinchilli, Vernon M

    2007-09-01

    Two design principles are used frequently in clinical trials: 1) A subject is "matched" or "paired" with a similar subject to reduce the chance that other variables obscure the primary comparison of interest. 2) A subject serves as his/her own control by "crossing over" from one treatment to another during the course of an experiment. There are situations in which it may be advantageous to use the two design principles - crossing over and matching - simultaneously. That is, it may be advantageous to conduct a "paired crossover design," in which each subject, while paired with a similar subject, crosses over and receives each experimental treatment. In this paper, we describe two clinical trials conducted by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Asthma Clinical Research Network that used a paired 2x2 crossover design. The Beta Adrenergic Response by GEnotype (BARGE) Study compared the effects of regular use of inhaled albuterol on mildly asthmatic patients with different genotypes at the 16th position of the beta-agonist receptor gene. The Smoking Modulates Outcomes of Glucocorticoid (SMOG) Therapy in Asthma Study evaluated the hypothesis that smoking reduces the response to inhaled corticosteroids. For such paired crossover designs, the primary parameter of interest is typically the treatment-by-pairing interaction term. In evaluating the relative efficiency of the paired 2x2 crossover design to two independent crossover designs with respect to this interaction term, we show that the paired 2x2 crossover design is more efficient if the correlations between the paired members on the same treatments are greater than their correlations on different treatments. This condition should hold in most circumstances, and therefore the paired crossover design deserves serious consideration for any clinical trial in which the crossing over and matching of subjects is deemed simultaneously beneficial.

  16. Clinical trials in Ayurveda: Analysis of clinical trial registry of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Kannan; Sivaramakrishnan, Gowri

    Ayurveda is one of the complementary and alternative systems of medicine requiring generation of high quality evidence for rational practice. Evidence can be generated from study designs and the present study is an attempt to critically assess the registered studies in the field of Ayurveda from clinical trial registry of India. We found low number of trials conducted with more focus required on the quality of these studies to contribute to high quality evidence.

  17. Effect of acupressure on preoperative anxiety: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Bassampour, Shiva Sadat; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Pouresmaeil, Zahra; Mehran, Abbas

    2012-08-01

    Preoperative anxiety, as an emotional reaction, is common among patients undergoing surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupressure on preoperative anxiety before abdominal surgery. The 70 subjects of this clinical trial were randomly assigned into the acupressure group (n=35), which received acupressure at the true points, or the placebo group (n=35), which received acupressure at sham (false) points. Preoperative anxiety and vital signs before and after the intervention were measured in both groups. The findings demonstrated a reduction in the level of preoperative anxiety for both groups (Pacupressure group (Pacupressure at true points (third eye and Shen men) can reduce higher preoperative anxiety of patients before abdominal surgery and that it has had a more clinically beneficial effect than sham points.

  18. The ethics and regulatory landscape of including vulnerable populations in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Mary Jane; Lally, Rachel; Miller, Jennifer E; Pittman, Stephanie; Brodsky, Lynda; Caplan, Arthur L; Uhlenbrauck, Gina; Louzao, Darcy M; Fischer, James H; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    Policies have been developed to protect vulnerable populations in clinical research, including the US federal research regulations (45 Code of Federal Regulations 46 Subparts B, C, and D). These policies generally recognize vulnerable populations to include pregnant women, fetuses, neonates, children, prisoners, persons with physical handicaps or mental disabilities, and disadvantaged persons. The aim has been to protect these populations from harm, often by creating regulatory and ethical checks that may limit their participation in many clinical trials. The recent increase in pragmatic clinical trials raises at least two questions about this approach. First, is exclusion itself a harm to vulnerable populations, as these groups may be denied access to understanding how health interventions work for them in clinical settings? Second, are groups considered vulnerable in traditional clinical trials also vulnerable in pragmatic clinical trials? We argue first that excluding vulnerable subjects from participation in pragmatic clinical trials can be harmful by preventing acquisition of data to meaningfully inform clinical decision-making in the future. Second, we argue that protections for vulnerable subjects in traditional clinical trial settings may not be translatable, feasible, or even ethical to apply in pragmatic clinical trials. We conclude by offering specific recommendations for appropriately protecting vulnerable research subjects in pragmatic clinical trials, focusing on pregnant women, fetuses, neonates, children, prisoners, persons with physical handicaps or mental disabilities, and disadvantaged persons.

  19. What is the impact of ethics on clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    Ethics has often been ignored or evaded in clinical trials, and the conditions under which global clinical trials are conducted make this problem likely to persist. Ethics can, however, have an impact at any of several stages of a trial when the individuals involved are committed. This editorial provides historical examples of ignoring, evading or, alternatively, using ethical help to improve clinical trials, and suggests that the actual role of ethics depends on the individuals involved.

  20. Estimating Statistical Power for Open Enrollment Group Treatment Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A.; Saavedra, Lissette M.; Hien, Denise A.; Fals-Stewart, William

    2010-01-01

    Modeling turnover in group membership has been identified as a key barrier contributing to a disconnect between the manner in which behavioral treatment is conducted (open enrollment groups) and the designs of substance abuse treatment trials (closed enrollment groups, individual therapy). Latent class pattern mixture models (LCPMM) are an emerging tool for modeling data from open enrollment groups with membership turnover in recently proposed treatment trials. The current article illustrates an approach to conducting power analyses for open enrollment designs based on Monte Carlo simulation of LCPMM models using parameters derived from published data from an RCT comparing Seeking Safety to a Community Care condition for women presenting with comorbid PTSD and substance use disorders. The example addresses discrepancies between the analysis framework assumed in power analyses of many recently-proposed open enrollment trials and the proposed use of LCPMM for data analysis. PMID:20832971

  1. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical trial... Pharmaceutical Clinical Trial; (3) Medical Device Aspects of Clinical Research; (4) Adverse Event...

  2. Addiction treatment trials: how gender, race/ethnicity, and age relate to ongoing participation and retention in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korte JE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey E Korte1, Carmen L Rosa2, Paul G Wakim2, Harold I Perl21Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, 2Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD, USAIntroduction: Historically, racial and ethnic minority populations have been underrepresented in clinical research, and the recruitment and retention of women and ethnic minorities in clinical trials has been a significant challenge for investigators. The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN conducts clinical trials in real-life settings and regularly monitors a number of variables critical to clinical trial implementation, including the retention and demographics of participants.Purpose: The examination of gender, race/ethnicity, and age group differences with respect to retention characteristics in CTN trials.Methods: Reports for 24 completed trials that recruited over 11,000 participants were reviewed, and associations of gender, race/ethnicity, and age group characteristics were examined along with the rate of treatment exposure, the proportion of follow-up assessments obtained, and the availability of primary outcome measure(s.Results: Analysis of the CTN data did not indicate statistical differences in retention across gender or race/ethnicity groups; however, retention rates increased for older participants.Conclusion: These results are based on a large sample of patients with substance use disorders recruited from a treatment-seeking population. The findings demonstrate that younger participants are less likely than older adults to be retained in clinical trials.Keywords: addiction treatment, age, ethnic minorities, gender difference, substance use disorders, race, recruitment, retention, clinical trials

  3. Does clinical trial participation improve outcomes in patients with ovarian cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, L; Horsley, L; Heesters, A; Machin, J D; Mitchell, C; Clamp, A R; Jayson, G C; Hasan, J

    2016-01-01

    Treatment on a clinical trial is considered to be beneficial to oncology patients. However, supportive evidence for this is scarce. Trial effect describes the phenomenon of improved health outcomes in patients treated with standard of care (SOC) on trial compared to those receiving SOC outside of a clinical trial. We evaluated trial effect in patients with ovarian cancer treated at our tertiary cancer centre. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with ovarian cancer treated at The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust. Patients treated on one of three first-line clinical trials: (SCOTROC-4, ICON-5, ICON-7) were matched (for age, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stage, surgical status and performance status) with individuals receiving the same SOC off trial. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier methodology. 60 patients were evaluated; 30 on trial and 30 on SOC off trial. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 21.8 months (control group) and 25.9 months (trial group), median overall survival (OS) was 64.3 months (control group) and 68.9 months (trial group). There was no difference in PFS (log-rank test: HR 0.87 (95% CI 0.48 to 1.54), p=0.6) or OS (log-rank test: HR 0.87 (95% CI 0.46 to 1.64), p=0.7) between groups. Patient survival was similar regardless if treated on trial or as SOC. Our findings do not support trial effect, at least in a tertiary cancer centre. Clinical trial participation in specialised cancer centres promotes best practice to the benefit of all patients. These findings may impact discussions round consent of patients to trials and organisation of oncology services.

  4. Use of crowdsourcing for cancer clinical trial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Amanda; Sablinski, Tomasz; Diefenbach, Michael; Foster, Marc; Greenberg, Alex; Holland, John; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Patient and physician awareness and acceptance of trials and patient ineligibility are major cancer clinical trial accrual barriers. Yet, trials are typically conceived and designed by small teams of researchers with limited patient input. We hypothesized that through crowdsourcing, the intellectual and creative capacity of a large number of researchers, clinicians, and patients could be harnessed to improve the clinical trial design process. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and utility of using an internet-based crowdsourcing platform to inform the design of a clinical trial exploring an antidiabetic drug, metformin, in prostate cancer. Over a six-week period, crowd-sourced input was collected from 60 physicians/researchers and 42 patients/advocates leading to several major (eg, eligibility) and minor modifications to the clinical trial protocol as originally designed. Crowdsourcing clinical trial design is feasible, adds value to the protocol development process, and may ultimately improve the efficiency of trial conduct.

  5. Globalization of clinical trials - where are we heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Melvin; Selvarajan, Sandhiya; S, Suresh-Kumar; Dkhar, Steven A; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2013-05-01

    The last decade has witnessed a greater transparency in clinical research with the advent of clinical trial registries. The aim of the study was to describe the trends in the globalization of clinical trials in the last five years. We performed an internet search using the WHO International clinical trials registry platform (WHO ICTRP) to identify the clinical trials conducted from January 2007 to December 31, 2011 among 25 countries. Among the 25 countries, the United States, Japan and Germany occupy the top positions in the total number of clinical trials conducted. Clinical trials in the US (36312) constituted 31.5% of the total number of trials performed during this period. However over a period of five years both US and Western Europe appear to show a decline, while the emerging countries show a rise in clinical trials registered. Among the emerging countries China, India and Republic of Korea are most active regions involved in clinical trials. Cancer, diabetes and respiratory diseases were most widely researched areas overall. Although the study confirms the transition in the clinical trials research towards emerging countries, the developed regions of the world still contribute to more than 70% of the trials registered worldwide.

  6. The efficacy and safety of fixed-dose combination of amlodipine/benazepril in Chinese essential hypertensive patients not adequately controlled with benazepril monotherapy: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pingping; Fan, Weihu

    2014-01-01

    This double-blind, double-dummy clinical trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of two strengths of fixed-dose combination of amlodipine/benazepril in Chinese hypertensive patients not adequately controlled with benazepril. Of 442 patients who received treatment with benazepril 10 mg for 4 weeks, 341 patients failed to achieve to diastolic blood pressure (DBP) amlodipine/benazepril 2.5/10 mg, or amlodipine/benazepril 5/10 mg, or benazepril 10 mg for 8 weeks. BP reductions with amodipinel/benazepril 2.5/10 mg (15.2/11.8 mmHg) or amlodipine/benazepril 5/10 mg (15.4/12.4 mmHg) were significantly greater than that with benazepril 10 mg (9.88/9.46 mmHg) at study end (p benazepril). BP control rate was 83.8% with amlodipine/benazepril 2.5/10 mg, 80.2% with amlodipine/benazepril 5/10 mg, 64.9% with benazepril 10 mg at study end (p benazepril). Three groups were generally well tolerated. Our study indicated that amlodipine/benazepril fixed-dose combination offered significant additional BP reductions and BP control rate compared with the continuation of benazepril monotherapy. No significant differences were observed in both BP reductions and BP control rate between amlodipine/benazepril 2.5/10 mg and amlodipine/benazepril 5/10 mg.

  7. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-04-27

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies.

  8. The classic caries clinical trial: constraints and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, J W

    2004-01-01

    The history of clinical trials would include events in 1747 on board the Salisbury, a British Navy vessel at sea with 12 seamen critically ill with scurvy. Involving these 12 sailors in a study, an officer on board by the name of Lind evaluated six potential treatments for scurvy, and rapidly reached the conclusion that daily consumption of citrus fruits returned the men fit for duty in approximately six days (Bull, 1959). The concept of experimental randomization was first developed by Sir R.A. Fisher (1925, 1926), and the method was introduced to medical research via a study of tuberculosis treatment by Amberson and co-workers (1931), who randomized 24 TB patients into two groups, one to receive the experimental therapy, the other serving as the control. Amberson et al. also incorporated the concept of blinding into their study. Sir Austin Bradford Hill codified and built on the principles of scientific experimentation developed by Fisher, and introduced the use of random numbers in the allocation of patients in the British Medical Research Council (1948) study of the effect of streptomycin in the treatment of tuberculosis (Daniels and Hill, 1952; Hill, 1952). The first applications of clinical trial methodology for testing interventions on dental, oral, and maxillofacial diseases and conditions are more difficult to determine. For dental caries prevention, however, Chilton and Fertig (1958) and Slack and Martin (1964) were certainly among the early caries clinical trial pioneers. As clinical trials have come into the mainstream of clinical research in medicine and dentistry, a great deal of developmental work has focused on their methodological enhancement. The most successful of these efforts have come from fruitful, ongoing collaborations among clinician investigators, biostatisticians, data management specialists, biomedical ethicists, and others with an academic interest in clinical trial design and utilization. During the past 25 years, the emergence of

  9. Real-time enrollment dashboard for multisite clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Mattingly

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: We have designed and implemented a visualization dashboard for managing multi-site clinical trial enrollment in two community acquired pneumonia studies. Information dashboards are useful for clinical trial management. They can be used in a standalone trial or can be included into a larger management system.

  10. Challenges and guidelines for clinical trial of herbal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abida Parveen

    2015-01-01

    of the trial drug has to be tested for batch-to-batch uniformity of the active constituents. It is very difficult to have active and control groups with identical color, smell and taste of the herbal drug, which cannot be imitated while manufacturing a placebo. These challenges can be reduced or overcome by applying most recent methodologies and guidelines for clinical trials. Since the quality control of herbal medicines is complicated and difficult, relevant and appropriate requirements should be established for the assessment of safety and efficacy for different categorized herbal medicines to reduce cost and expenditure. And, efforts should be made for the integration of traditional medicine into national healthcare systems. Different challenges and regulatory guidelines discussed for the clinical trial of herbal drugs will be useful for various industries for considering it before going ahead for clinical trial of their product.

  11. Randomized Clinical Trial of Interceptive and Comprehensive Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G.J.; Spiekerman, C.F.; Greenlee, G.M.; Huang, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Focusing public insurance programs on interceptive orthodontics (IO) may increase access for low-income children. This report presents outcomes from a randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing IO with comprehensive orthodontics (CO) in Medicaid patients. One hundred seventy pre-adolescents with Medicaid-eligible malocclusions were randomized to IO (n = 86) followed by observation (OBS) or OBS followed by CO (n = 84). One hundred thirty-four completed the trial. Models at pre-treatment (baseline) and following ≤ 2 years of intervention and 2 years of OBS (48 mos) were scored by calibrated examiners using the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) and Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON). Overall outcomes and clinically meaningful categorical ICON data on need/acceptability, complexity, and improvement were compared. At baseline, groups were balanced by age, gender, ethnicity, and PAR/ICON scores. Most were minorities. Most (77%) were rated as difficult-to-very difficult. Scores improved significantly for both groups, but CO more than IO (PAR, 18.6 [95%CI 15.1, 22.1] vs.10.1 [95%CI 6.7, 13.4]; ICON, 44.8 [95% CI 39.7, 49.9] vs. 35.2 [95%CI 29.7, 40.6], respectively). On average, IO is effective at reducing malocclusions in Medicaid patients, but less than CO. (ClinicalTrials.gov number CT00067379) PMID:22699670

  12. Randomized clinical trial of interceptive and comprehensive orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G J; Spiekerman, C F; Greenlee, G M; Huang, G J

    2012-07-01

    Focusing public insurance programs on interceptive orthodontics (IO) may increase access for low-income children. This report presents outcomes from a randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing IO with comprehensive orthodontics (CO) in Medicaid patients. One hundred seventy pre-adolescents with Medicaid-eligible malocclusions were randomized to IO (n = 86) followed by observation (OBS) or OBS followed by CO (n = 84). One hundred thirty-four completed the trial. Models at pre-treatment (baseline) and following ≤ 2 years of intervention and 2 years of OBS (48 mos) were scored by calibrated examiners using the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) and Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON). Overall outcomes and clinically meaningful categorical ICON data on need/acceptability, complexity, and improvement were compared. At baseline, groups were balanced by age, gender, ethnicity, and PAR/ICON scores. Most were minorities. Most (77%) were rated as difficult-to-very difficult. Scores improved significantly for both groups, but CO more than IO (PAR, 18.6 [95%CI 15.1, 22.1] vs.10.1 [95%CI 6.7, 13.4]; ICON, 44.8 [95% CI 39.7, 49.9] vs. 35.2 [95%CI 29.7, 40.6], respectively). On average, IO is effective at reducing malocclusions in Medicaid patients, but less than CO. (ClinicalTrials.gov number CT00067379).

  13. 76 FR 51375 - Dialogues in Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dialogues in Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials....

  14. ClinicalTrials.gov Turns 10! | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials ClinicalTrials.gov Turns 10! Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of ... and whom to contact for more information. ClinicalTrials.gov's Helpful Features ClinicalTrials.gov has many helpful consumer ...

  15. [Clinical trials: vulnerability and ethical relativism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Research in human beings is an important chapter of medical ethics. In recent years, investigation has been taken over by profit driven corporations that must guarantee the medical and commercial application of results. This new model of investigation has generated conflicts of interest in doctor-patient, researcher-subject relationship. The inevitable debate and media reaction has led. These trials of controversial design to regions of the globe where the vulnerability of the populations continues to allow their undertaking. This article includes a historical perspective on experimentation in human beings and the conditions that led to its regulation: the Nuremberg CODE, followed by the Helsinky Declaration in its different versions, and the Belmont Report, that defend the subject according to the ethic of principles used in western medicine. There is then a review of the attempts to change international regulation to reintroduce clinical trials with placebo--which since 1996 is only permitted where there are no therapeutic or diagnostic methods--on populations that would otherwise have no access to treatment. This then leads on to the issue of double standards in medical investigation defended by many investigators and some official entities. The article concludes that it may be prudent to allow local ethical commissions to approve deviation from the established norm if such is necessary to resolve urgent questions of health in the country, but it is unacceptable that any such emergency is used as a reason to reduce the ethical prerequisites, in clinical trials. It also concludes that true urgency is in making available to all who need it the effective products already in existence. Furthermore, that the acceptance of ethical relativism can result in the exploitation of vulnerable third world populations for research programmes that cannot be undertaken in their sponsoring countries due to the ethical restrictions in place.

  16. Specification of phase I of new drugs' clinical tolerance trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-xin

    2008-01-01

    Phase I of clinical trials is the first stage of clinical pharmacology and body safety evaluation, including body tolerance test and pharmacokinetics test. The aim is providing evidence for dosage regimen and be the cornerstone of the preliminary assessment of efficacy and safety of phase II of clinical trials. This text discussed the technique and requirement of phase I of new drugs' clinical tolerance trials.

  17. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain. PMID:26958274

  18. Statistical reasoning in clinical trials: hypothesis testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelen, G D; Brown, C G; Ashton, J

    1988-01-01

    Hypothesis testing is based on certain statistical and mathematical principles that allow investigators to evaluate data by making decisions based on the probability or implausibility of observing the results obtained. However, classic hypothesis testing has its limitations, and probabilities mathematically calculated are inextricably linked to sample size. Furthermore, the meaning of the p value frequently is misconstrued as indicating that the findings are also of clinical significance. Finally, hypothesis testing allows for four possible outcomes, two of which are errors that can lead to erroneous adoption of certain hypotheses: 1. The null hypothesis is rejected when, in fact, it is false. 2. The null hypothesis is rejected when, in fact, it is true (type I or alpha error). 3. The null hypothesis is conceded when, in fact, it is true. 4. The null hypothesis is conceded when, in fact, it is false (type II or beta error). The implications of these errors, their relation to sample size, the interpretation of negative trials, and strategies related to the planning of clinical trials will be explored in a future article in this journal.

  19. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain.

  20. Subgroup identification from randomized clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jared C; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Ruberg, Stephen J

    2011-10-30

    We consider the problem of identifying a subgroup of patients who may have an enhanced treatment effect in a randomized clinical trial, and it is desirable that the subgroup be defined by a limited number of covariates. For this problem, the development of a standard, pre-determined strategy may help to avoid the well-known dangers of subgroup analysis. We present a method developed to find subgroups of enhanced treatment effect. This method, referred to as 'Virtual Twins', involves predicting response probabilities for treatment and control 'twins' for each subject. The difference in these probabilities is then used as the outcome in a classification or regression tree, which can potentially include any set of the covariates. We define a measure Q(Â) to be the difference between the treatment effect in estimated subgroup  and the marginal treatment effect. We present several methods developed to obtain an estimate of Q(Â), including estimation of Q(Â) using estimated probabilities in the original data, using estimated probabilities in newly simulated data, two cross-validation-based approaches, and a bootstrap-based bias-corrected approach. Results of a simulation study indicate that the Virtual Twins method noticeably outperforms logistic regression with forward selection when a true subgroup of enhanced treatment effect exists. Generally, large sample sizes or strong enhanced treatment effects are needed for subgroup estimation. As an illustration, we apply the proposed methods to data from a randomized clinical trial.

  1. Future clinical trials in DIPG: bringing epigenetics to the clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres E. Morales La Madrid

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In spite of major recent advances in DIPG molecular characterization, this body of knowledge has not yet translated into better treatments.To date,more than 250 clinical trials evaluating radiotherapy along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy as well as newer biologic agents,have failed to improve the dismal outcome when compared to palliative radiation alone.The biology of DIPG remained unknown until recently when the neurosurgical expertise along with the recognition by the scientific and clinical community of the importance of tissue sampling at diagnosis;ideally in the context of a clinical trial and by trained neurosurgical teams to maximize patient safety.These pre-treatment tumor samples,and others coming from tissue obtained post-mortem,have yielded new insights into DIPG molecular biology.We now know that DIPG comprises a heterogeneous disease with variable molecular phenotypes, different from adult high grade glioma,other non-pontine pediatric high grade gliomas and even between pontine gliomas.The discovery of histone H3.3 or H3.1 mutations has been an important step forward in understanding tumor formation,maintenance and progression.Pharmacologic reversal of DIPG histone demethylation therefore offers an important potential intervention strategy for the treatment of DIPG.To date,clinical trials of newly diagnosed or progressive DIPG with epigenetic modifiers have been unsuccessful.Whether this failure represents limited activity of the agents used,their CNS penetration,redundant pathways within the tumor,or the possibility that histone mutations are necessary only to initiate DIPGs but not maintain their growth,suggest that a great deal still needs to be elucidated in both the underlying biology of these pathways,and the drugs designed to target them.In this review, we discuss the role of both epigenetic and genetic mutations within DIPG and the development of treatment strategies directed against the unique abnormalities

  2. Adjuvant low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus interferon-α (IFN-α) in operable renal cell carcinoma (RCC): a phase III, randomized, multicentre trial of the Italian Oncology Group for Clinical Research (GOIRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Caminiti, Caterina; Buti, Sebastiano; Porta, Camillo; Camisa, Roberta; Braglia, Luca; Tomasello, Gianluca; Vaglio, Augusto; Labianca, Roberto; Rondini, Ermanno; Sabbatini, Roberto; Nastasi, Giuseppe; Artioli, Fabrizio; Prati, Andrea; Potenzoni, Michele; Pezzuolo, Debora; Oliva, Elena; Alberici, Federico; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no standard therapy to reduce the recurrence rate after surgery for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of adjuvant treatment with low doses of interleukin-2 (IL-2)+interferon-α (IFN-α) in operable RCC. The patients were randomized 1:1 to receive a 4-week cycle of low-dose IL-2+IFN-α or observation after primary surgery for RCC. Treatment cycles were repeated every 4 months for the first 2 years and every 6 months for the subsequent 3 years. The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS); safety; and overall survival (OS) were secondary endpoints. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number was NCT00502034. 303/310 randomized patients (156 in the immunotherapy arm and 154 in the observation group) were evaluable at the intention-to-treat analyses. The 2 arms were well balanced. At a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 12-151 mo), RFS, and OS were similar, with an estimated hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.54-1.31; P=0.44] and of 1.07 (95% CI, 0.64-1.79; P=0.79), respectively in the 2 groups. Unplanned, subgroup analysis showed a positive effect of the treatment for patients with age 60 years and younger, pN0, tumor grades 1-2, and pT3a stage. Among patients with the combined presence of ≥ 2 of these factors, immunotherapy had a positive effect on RFS (HR=0.44; 95% CI, 0.24-0.82; P ≤ 0.01), whereas patients with <2 factors in the treatment arm exhibited a significant poorer OS (HR=2.27; 95% CI, 1.03-5.03 P=0.037). Toxicity of immunotherapy was mild and limited to World Health Organization grade 1-2 in most cases. Adjuvant immunotherapy with IL-2+IFN-α showed no RFS or OS improvement in RCC patients who underwent radical surgery. The results of subset analysis here presented are only hypothesis generating.

  3. Empowering natural clinical trial advocates: nurses and outreach workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschke, Diane B; Cassel, Kevin; Higuchi, Paula

    2007-03-01

    Cancer clinical trials are essential to advancing the prevention and treatment of cancer, yet adult participation rates in clinical trials remain abysmal. Despite the essential contributions of clinical trials to science and medicine, adult participation in clinical trials remains exceedingly low, with only 2%-4% of all adult patients with cancer in the U.S. participating in clinical trials. Clinical trials accrual rates in Hawai'i follow this national trend of less than 3% of eligible patients participating in trials. Recognizing the need to increase awareness about clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service-Pacific Region, through the Hawai'i Clinical Trials Education Coalition, has employed strategic dissemination plans to train and educate key target audiences, including registered nurses, nursing students, and community outreach workers about the availability of over 90 cancer clinical trials in Hawai'i. Previous research suggests that nurses often play a vital role in increasing a patient's understanding of clinical trials and may also act as a patient advocate in regards to participation in a clinical trial. A train-the-trainer model curriculum was developed using the Clinical Trials Education Series (CTES), a collection of multi-level resources designed by the National Cancer Institute, to educate various constituents about clinical trials. The training curriculum and workshop format is adapted based on both formal and informal needs assessments conducted with audiences prior to the planned training, yet key elements remain central to the training model. In addition, an interactive, internet-based case study was developed using local place names and cultural cues to allow training participants to engage in realistic and practical methods for locating and sharing information about clinical trials with patients and the public. This training model has been implemented in a variety of settings including three statewide nursing

  4. Magnesium treatment in alcoholics: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poikolainen Kari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnesium (Mg deficiency is common among alcoholics. Earlier research suggests that Mg treatment may help to normalize elevated enzyme activities and some other clinically relevant parameters among alcoholics but the evidence is weak. Methods The effect of Mg was studied in a randomized, parallel group, double-blind trial. The patients were first treated for alcohol withdrawal symptoms and then received for 8 weeks either 500 mg of Mg divided into two tablets or matching placebo. Measurements were made at the beginning and in the end of the Mg treatment period. The primary outcome was serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (S-GGT activity; secondary outcomes included aspartate-aminotransferase (S-AST and alanine-aminotransferase (S-ALT activity. Results The number of randomized patients (completers was 64 (27 in the treatment and 54 (31 in the control group. In intention-to-treat-analyses and in most analyses of study completers, there were no significant differences between the Mg-treated and placebo groups in the outcome variables. When baseline serum Mg level, coffee intake, and the number of unused Mg tablets were controlled for in a multivariate regression model, after-treatment serum Mg levels were found to be higher among the Mg-treated group than in the placebo group (t-test 3.334, df = 53, p = 0.002. After controlling for age, body weight, baseline alcohol intake, subsequent change in alcohol intake and baseline S-AST, the after-treatment S-AST levels were found to be lower among the Mg-treated group than in the placebo group (t-test 2.061, df = 49, p = 0.045. Conclusion Mg treatment may speed up the S-AST decrease in compliant patients. This might decrease the risk of death from alcoholic liver disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00325299

  5. Planning future clinical trials in Machado Joseph disease: Lessons from a phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Rieder, Carlos R M; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur Francisco; Donis, Karina Carvalho; D'Ávila, Rui; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Russo, Aline Dutra; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise Conte; Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Portela, Luis Valmor Cruz; Camey, Suzi; Torman, Vanessa Bielefeld Leotti; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2015-11-15

    In a recent phase 2 clinical trial in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD), a neurogenetic disorder without specific therapy, benefits of lithium carbonate were found only on secondary efficacy outcomes, all related to ataxic features. In order to help designing future studies, we further analyzed the trial data searching for treatment response modifiers and metric properties of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) scales. Efficacy analysis was performed with the Neurological Examination Score for the Assessment of Spinocerebellar Ataxia (NESSCA) and the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) subscores and with the subgroup of patients with independent gait according to the 8-meter walking-time (8MW). Interactions of clinical/molecular findings with treatment response, minimally important differences (MIDs), and sample size estimations for NESSCA, SARA, Spinocerebellar Ataxia Functional Index (SCAFI) and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were evaluated. 62 SCA3/MJD patients had been randomly assigned (1:1) for the double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. While cerebellar NESSCA (range: 0-7 points) differed between groups 0.64 points (95% CI 0.23 to 1.05, p<0.001) over the whole 48weeks of study, favoring lithium, no effect was found on non-ataxia subscores. Among patients able to perform the 8MW on baseline, NESSCA (p=0.010) and SCAFI (p=0.015) differed between groups favoring lithium. Finally, estimated sample sizes for the scales were provided. Lithium efficacy on cerebellar NESSCA, and on SCAFI and CCFS in the primary analysis, together with the lack of effect on non-ataxia features suggests that lithium should be tested in phase 3 trials in SCA3/MJD and that ataxia scales should be preferred to multisystem neurological instruments as the primary outcome. The inclusion of early stage patients is advisable in future clinical trials in SCA3/MJD. clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01096082. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  6. A new model for developing and executing culturally appropriate behavior modification clinical trials for African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, Jamy D; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Svetkey, Laura P

    2003-01-01

    Past clinical trials addressing behavior modification for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention have not been culturally appropriate for African Americans. This supposition is borne out by the continued challenges researchers face not only in recruiting and retaining African Americans in clinical trials, but also in achieving the desired outcomes among this population. Investigators have limited resources to develop culturally appropriate CVD prevention trials. The scientific literature reveals 2 models for implementing culturally appropriate interventions applicable to CVD prevention among African Americans; however, these models are not easily applied to the clinical trial setting. We propose a new model for developing a culturally appropriate clinical trial. The clinical trial is a function of the investigator's cultural framework, meaning that an investigator will have more difficulty designing clinical trials appropriate for use with cultures other than his or her own, a definite limitation when attempting to effectively reach diverse populations. Differences between the cultural frameworks of most clinical trials and African Americans' cultural frameworks lead to intrinsic biases, limiting the ability of African Americans to achieve the desired outcomes for any particular trial. An African-American participant's degree of immersion in traditional African-American culture, or acculturation, influences the magnitude of these biases. Investigators must be aware of, and attempt to mitigate, such biases so that the trial's potential for success is equitable across ethnic groups. In addition, investigators must understand how to effectively address relevant biases of African Americans without challenging their ethnic identity. Steps to decrease biases are described.

  7. Doppler bubble detection and decompression sickness: a prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, C G; Hunt, W S; Johanson, D C; Flynn, E T; Weathersby, P K

    1985-09-01

    Decompression sickness in human beings exposed to high ambient pressure is thought to follow from gas bubble formation and growth in the body during return to low pressure. Detection of Doppler-shifted ultrasonic reflections in major blood vessels has been promoted as a noninvasive and sensitive indicator of the imminence of decompression sickness. We have conducted a double-blind, prospective clinical trial of Doppler ultrasonic bubble detection in simulated diving using 83 men, of whom 8 were stricken and treated for the clinical disease. Diagnosis based only on the Doppler signals had no correlation with clinical diagnosis. Bubble scores were only slightly higher in the stricken group. The Doppler technique does not appear to be of diagnostic value in the absence of other clinical information.

  8. Biological and clinical evaluation of lanreotide (BIM 23014), a somatostatin analogue, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. A pilot study by the I.T.M.O. Group. Italian Trials in Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, A; Ferrari, L; Bajetta, E; Bartoli, C; Vicario, G; Moglia, D; Miceli, R; Callegari, M; Bono, A

    1995-06-01

    Biological data support the development of clinical trials designed to evaluate the activity of somatostatin (SMS) analogues in advanced breast cancer (ABC). Although previous clinical trials have failed to show antitumor activity, various factors may have biased their results. In an attempt to improve our understanding of the role of SMS analogues in ABC, 10 patients with favourable prognostic factors and who had not been heavily pretreated for advanced disease were treated with lanreotide 30 mg i.m. fortnightly (depot formulation). Blood samples were periodically taken to evaluate the effect of the drug on growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and to determine drug serum levels. Although the drug was well tolerated, no clinical activity was observed. Serum GH and IGF-1 levels were not properly suppressed over time and drug serum concentrations fluctuated widely. In conclusion, SMS analogues cannot be recommended even as palliative treatment of ABC. Further studies should be undertaken to investigate the effect of higher drug doses, given subcutaneously or by means of continuous infusion, in suppressing GH and IGF-1 serum levels.

  9. Bacteriophage Therapy: Advances in Formulation Strategies and Human Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Lavigne, Rob; Brüssow, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of phage therapy phase I and II safety trials have been concluded, showing no notable safety concerns associated with the use of phage. Though hurdles for efficient treatment remain, these trials hold promise for future phase III clinical trials. Interestingly, most phage formulations used in these clinical trials are straightforward phage suspensions, and not much research has focused on the processing of phage cocktails in specific pharmaceutical dosage forms. Additional research on formulation strategies and the stability of phage-based drugs will be of key importance, especially with phage therapy advancing toward phase III clinical trials.

  10. Sponsorship and design characteristics of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumiantseva, Dina; Carini, Simona; Sim, Ida; Wagner, Todd H

    2013-03-01

    We examine the extent to which ClinicalTrials.gov is meeting its goal of providing oversight and transparency of clinical trials with human subjects. We analyzed the ClinicalTrials.gov database contents as of June 2011, comparing interventions, medical conditions, and trial characteristics by sponsor type. We also conducted a detailed analysis of incomplete data. Among trials with only government sponsorship (N=9252), 36% were observational and 64% interventional; in contrast, almost all (90%) industry-only sponsored trials were interventional. Industry-only sponsored interventional trials (N=30,036) were most likely to report a drug intervention (81%), followed by biologics (9%) and devices (8%). Government-only interventional trials (N=5886) were significantly more likely to test behavioral interventions (28%) and procedures (13%) than industry-only trials (pgov. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Clinical trials in allied medical fields: A cross-sectional analysis of World Health Organization International Clinical Trial Registry Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kannan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The number of clinical trials done in allied fields of medicine other than the allopathic system has lowered down, and furthermore focus is required regarding the methodological quality of these trials and more support from various organizations.

  12. Immune checkpoints in cancer clinical trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elad Sharon; Howard Streicher; Priscila Goncalves; Helen XChen

    2014-01-01

    Immunology-based therapy is rapidly developing into an effective treatment option for a surprising range of cancers. We have learned over the last decade that powerful immunologic effector cells may be blocked by inhibitory regulatory pathways controlled by specific molecules often called“immune checkpoints.” These checkpoints serve to control or turn off the immune response when it is no longer needed to prevent tissue injury and autoimmunity. Cancer cells have learned or evolved to use these mechanisms to evade immune control and elimination. The development of a new therapeutic class of drugs that inhibit these inhibitory pathways has recently emerged as a potent strategy in oncology. Three sets of agents have emerged in clinical trials exploiting this strategy. These agents are antibody-based therapies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death1 (PD-1), and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). These inhibitors of immune inhibition have demonstrated extensive activity as single agents and in combinations. Clinical responses have been seen in melanoma, renal cellcarcinoma, non-smal celllung cancer, and several other tumor types. Despite the autoimmune or inflammatory immune-mediated adverse effects which have been seen, the responses and overall survival benefits exhibited thus far warrant further clinical development.

  13. Clinical trials in branch retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandava Krishnan Panakanti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO is the second most common retinal vascular disorder. The management of macular edema has changed considerably over time. The laser is considered the gold standard treatment for over two decades. However, visual recovery with laser is usually slow and incomplete. The advent of intravitreal agents, specifically anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF have heralded a new era which promises rapid recovery of vision and quality of vision. Randomized clinical trials have reported optimal results with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept compared to laser therapy or steroids. However, nearly 50% of the patients require repeat intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy up to 4 years after initiating therapy to sustain the visual gains. The adverse events (systemic and ocular of these agents are minimal. Monotherapy with anti-VEGF agents have been found to provide better results than any combination with laser. This review article summarizes evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment options for the treatment of macular edema secondary to BRVO with a special focus on anti-VEGF therapy.

  14. Clinical Trials in Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panakanti, Tandava Krishnan; Chhablani, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) is the second most common retinal vascular disorder. The management of macular edema has changed considerably over time. The laser is considered the gold standard treatment for over two decades. However, visual recovery with laser is usually slow and incomplete. The advent of intravitreal agents, specifically anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) have heralded a new era which promises rapid recovery of vision and quality of vision. Randomized clinical trials have reported optimal results with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept) compared to laser therapy or steroids. However, nearly 50% of the patients require repeat intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy up to 4 years after initiating therapy to sustain the visual gains. The adverse events (systemic and ocular) of these agents are minimal. Monotherapy with anti-VEGF agents have been found to provide better results than any combination with laser. This review article summarizes evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment options for the treatment of macular edema secondary to BRVO with a special focus on anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26957837

  15. A Dynamical Modeling Approach for Analysis of Longitudinal Clinical Trials in the Presence of Missing Endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, H T; Hu, Shuhua; Rosenberg, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Randomized longitudinal clinical trials are the gold standard to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions among different patient treatment groups. However, analysis of such clinical trials becomes difficult in the presence of missing data, especially in the case where the study endpoints become difficult to measure because of subject dropout rates or/and the time to discontinue the assigned interventions are different among the patient groups. Here we report on using a validated mathematical model combined with an inverse problem approach to predict the values for the missing endpoints. A small randomized HIV clinical trial where endpoints for most of patients are missing is used to demonstrate this approach.

  16. Clinical trials of antihypertensives: Nature of control and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaswat S Chakraborty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the critical issues in the control and design of antihypertension (anti-HT clinical trials. The international guidelines and current clinical and biostatistical practices were reviewed for relevant clinical, design, end-point assessments and regulatory issues. The results are grouped mainly into ethical, protocol and assessment issues. Ethical issues arise as placebo-controlled trials (PCTs for HT-lowering agents in patients with moderate to severe HT are undertaken. Patients with organ damage due to HT should not be included in long-term PCT. Active-control trials, however, are suitable for all randomized subsets of patients, including men and women, and different ethnic and age groups. Severity subgroups must be studied separately with consideration to specific study design. Mortality and morbidity outcome studies are not required in anti-HT trials except when significant mortality and cardiovascular morbidity are suspected. Generally, changes in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BP at the end of the dosing interval from the baseline are compared between the active and the control arms as the primary endpoint of anti-HT effect. Onset of the anti-HT effect can be studied as the secondary endpoint. For maintenance of efficacy, long-term studies of ≥6 months need to be undertaken. Error-free measurement of BP is a serious issue as spontaneous changes in BP are large and active drug effect on diastolic BP is often small. Placebo-controlled short-term studies (of ~12 weeks for dose-response and titration are very useful. Safety studies must be very vigilant on hypotension, orthostatic hypotension and effects on heart. In dose-response studies, at least three doses in addition to placebo should be used to well characterize the benefits and side-effects.

  17. Publication bias in clinical trials of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawdrey, David K; Hripcsak, George

    2013-02-01

    To measure the rate of non-publication and assess possible publication bias in clinical trials of electronic health records. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov to identify registered clinical trials of electronic health records and searched the biomedical literature and contacted trial investigators to determine whether the results of the trials were published. Publications were judged as positive, negative, or neutral according to the primary outcome. Seventy-six percent of trials had publications describing trial results; of these, 74% were positive, 21% were neutral, and 4% were negative (harmful). Of unpublished studies for which the investigator responded, 43% were positive, 57% were neutral, and none were negative; the lower rate of positive results was significant (pelectronic health record studies is similar to that in other biomedical studies. There appears to be a bias toward publication of positive trials in this domain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recruitment and Retention of Patients into Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Cofield,Stacey; Conwit, Robin; Barsan, William; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    The emergency medicine and pre-hospital environments are unlike any other clinical environments and require special consideration to allow the successful implementation of clinical trials. This article reviews the specific issues involved in Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials (EMCT), and provides strategies from emergency medicine and non-emergency medicine trials to maximize recruitment and retention. While the evidence supporting some of these strategies is deficient, addressing recruitment...

  19. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries

    OpenAIRE

    Lenio Souza Alvarenga; Elisabeth Nogueira Martins

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. METHODS: Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial pl...

  20. Phase III trial to confirm the superiority of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy to pelvic lymphadenectomy alone for endometrial cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study 1412 (SEPAL-P3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Hidemichi; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shibata, Taro; Ushijima, Kimio; Satoh, Toyomi; Onda, Takashi; Aoki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2017-10-01

    To prospectively investigate the survival benefit of para-aortic lymphadenectomy, we launched a new study, the JCOG1412. This is a randomized Phase III trial to confirm the superiority of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy to pelvic lymphadenectomy alone. Patients corresponding to possible FIGO Stage IB, II, IIIA, IIIB, and a part of IIIC1 are eligible for the first registration before surgery. Next, those patients without evidence of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and multiple pelvic lymph node metastasis during surgery will be included in the second registration and randomized to either the pelvic lymphadenectomy alone arm or the pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy arm. After the initial surgery, patients with post-operative recurrence risks receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is overall survival. Secondary endpoints include relapse-free survival, short-term surgical outcomes, adverse events related to adjuvant chemotherapy and recurrence patterns. This trial has been registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm] as UMIN000025399. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Perceptions of reimbursement for clinical trial participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Loza, Melissa; Vincent, Kathleen; Moench, Thomas; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2011-09-01

    A greater understanding of participant views regarding reimbursement will help investigators plan studies that have better potential for reaching target enrollment, maximize efficient recruitment, maintain scientific integrity, and enhance retention over time. As part of a clinical trial in the area of sexual health, healthy women's perceptions of reimbursement for research participation were investigated. Semi-structured, audio-recorded, qualitative interviews were conducted immediately upon women's completion of the clinical trial to enable a participant-driven understanding of perceptions about monetary reimbursement. Audio-recordings were transcribed and analyzed using framework analysis. Women (N = 30) had a mean age of 29.5 ± 5.7 years (range 22-45 years). Sixty-three percent of participants (n = 19) were non-Hispanic (white n = 13, black n = 4, and Asian n = 2), while the remaining were Hispanic (n = 11). Seventy-three percent (n = 22) reported previous participation in research. In general, women viewed reimbursement as a benefit to research participation, the amount of which should reflect time, the inconvenience to the research subject, and the potential for unknown risks in the short- and long-term. They believed reimbursement should take into account the degree of risk of the study, with investigations of experimental products offering greater reimbursement. Women believed that monetary reimbursement is unlikely to coerce an individual to volunteer for a study involving procedures or requirements that they found unacceptable. The results of this study can be used to provide guidance to those planning and evaluating reimbursement for research participation.

  2. Incidence and clinical relevance of TEL/AML1 fusion genes in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia enrolled in the German and Italian multicenter therapy trials. Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica and the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkhardt, A; Cazzaniga, G; Viehmann, S; Valsecchi, M G; Ludwig, W D; Burci, L; Mangioni, S; Schrappe, M; Riehm, H; Lampert, F; Basso, G; Masera, G; Harbott, J; Biondi, A

    1997-07-15

    The molecular approach for the analysis of leukemia associated chromosomal translocations has led to the identification of prognostic relevant subgroups. In pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common translocations, t(9;22) and t(4;11), have been associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Recently the TEL gene at chromosome 12p13 and the AML1 gene at chromosome 21q22 were found to be involved in the translocation t(12;21)(p13;q22). By conventional cytogenetics, however, this chromosomal abnormality is barely detectable and occurs in less than 0.05% of childhood ALL. To investigate the frequency of the molecular equivalent of the t(12;21), the TEL/AML1 gene fusion, we have undertaken a prospective screening in the running German Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) and Italian Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) multicenter ALL therapy trials. We have analyzed 334 unselected cases of pediatric ALL patients consecutively referred over a period of 5 and 9 months, respectively. The overall incidence of the t(12;21) in pediatric ALL is 18.9%. The 63 cases positive for the TEL/AML1 chimeric products ranged in age between 1 and 12 years, and all but one showed CD10 and pre-B immunophenotype. Interestingly, one case displayed a pre-pre-B immunophenotype. Among the B-lineage subgroup, the t(12;21) occurs in 22.0% of the cases. Fifteen of 61 (24.6%) cases coexpressed at least two myeloid antigens (CD13, CD33, or CDw65) in more than 20% of the gated blast cells. DNA index was available for 59 of the 63 TEL/AML1 positive cases; a hyperdiploid DNA content (> or = 1.16) was detected in only four patients, being nonhyperdiploid in the remaining 55. Based on this prospective analysis, we retrospectively evaluated the impact of TEL/AML1 in prognosis by identifying the subset of B-lineage ALL children enrolled in the closed German ALL-BFM-90 and Italian ALL-AIEOP-91 protocols who had sufficient material for analysis. A total of 342 children

  3. Assessing clinical competency: reports from discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, Grant; Stone, Elizabeth; Bristol, David; Fuentealba, Carmen; Hardie, Lizette; Hellyer, Peter; Jaeger, Laurie; Kerwin, Sharon; Kochevar, Deborah; Lissemore, Kerry; Olsen, Christopher; Rogers, Kenita; Sabin, Beth; Swanson, Cliff; Warner, Angeline

    2008-01-01

    This report describes proposed new models for assessment of eight of the nine clinical competencies the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requires for accreditation. The models were developed by discussion groups at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges' Clinical Competency Symposium. Clinical competencies and proposed models (in parentheses) are described. Competency 1: comprehensive patient diagnosis (neurologic examination on a dog, clinical reasoning skills); Competency 2: comprehensive treatment planning (concept mapping, computerized case studies); Competency 3: anesthesia, pain management (student portfolio); Competency 4: surgery skills (objective structured clinical examination, cased-based examination, "super dog" model); Competency 5: medicine skills (clinical reasoning and case management, skills checklist); Competency 6: emergency and intensive care case management (computerized case study or scenario); Competency 7: health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity (360 degrees evaluation, case-based computer simulation); Competency 8: client communications and ethical conduct (Web-based evaluation forms, client survey, communicating with stakeholders, telephone conversation, written scenario-based cases). The report also describes faculty recognition for participating in clinical competency assessments.

  4. Early treatment of posterior crossbite - a randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this randomised clinical trial was to assess the effect of early orthodontic treatment in contrast to normal growth effects for functional unilateral posterior crossbite in the late deciduous and early mixed dentition by means of three-dimensional digital model analysis. Methods This randomised clinical trial was assessed to analyse the orthodontic treatment effects for patients with functional unilateral posterior crossbite in the late deciduous and early mixed dentition using a two-step procedure: initial maxillary expansion followed by a U-bow activator therapy. In the treatment group 31 patients and in the control group 35 patients with a mean age of 7.3 years (SD 2.1) were monitored. The time between the initial assessment (T1) and the follow-up (T2) was one year. The orthodontic analysis was done by a three-dimensional digital model analysis. Using the ‘Digimodel’ software, the orthodontic measurements in the maxilla and mandible and for the midline deviation, the overjet and overbite were recorded. Results Significant differences between the control and the therapy group at T2 were detected for the anterior, median and posterior transversal dimensions of the maxilla, the palatal depth, the palatal base arch length, the maxillary arch length and inclination, the midline deviation, the overjet and the overbite. Conclusions Orthodontic treatment of a functional unilateral posterior crossbite with a bonded maxillary expansion device followed by U-bow activator therapy in the late deciduous and early mixed dentition is an effective therapeutic method, as evidenced by the results of this RCT. It leads to three-dimensional therapeutically induced maxillary growth effects. Dental occlusion is significantly improved, and the prognosis for normal craniofacial growth is enhanced. Trial registration Registration trial DRKS00003497 on DRKS PMID:23339736

  5. Trial publication after registration in ClinicalTrials.Gov: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Ross

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ClinicalTrials.gov is a publicly accessible, Internet-based registry of clinical trials managed by the US National Library of Medicine that has the potential to address selective trial publication. Our objectives were to examine completeness of registration within ClinicalTrials.gov and to determine the extent and correlates of selective publication. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We examined reporting of registration information among a cross-section of trials that had been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov after December 31, 1999 and updated as having been completed by June 8, 2007, excluding phase I trials. We then determined publication status among a random 10% subsample by searching MEDLINE using a systematic protocol, after excluding trials completed after December 31, 2005 to allow at least 2 y for publication following completion. Among the full sample of completed trials (n = 7,515, nearly 100% reported all data elements mandated by ClinicalTrials.gov, such as intervention and sponsorship. Optional data element reporting varied, with 53% reporting trial end date, 66% reporting primary outcome, and 87% reporting trial start date. Among the 10% subsample, less than half (311 of 677, 46% of trials were published, among which 96 (31% provided a citation within ClinicalTrials.gov of a publication describing trial results. Trials primarily sponsored by industry (40%, 144 of 357 were less likely to be published when compared with nonindustry/nongovernment sponsored trials (56%, 110 of 198; p<0.001, but there was no significant difference when compared with government sponsored trials (47%, 57 of 122; p = 0.22. Among trials that reported an end date, 75 of 123 (61% completed prior to 2004, 50 of 96 (52% completed during 2004, and 62 of 149 (42% completed during 2005 were published (p = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: Reporting of optional data elements varied and publication rates among completed trials registered within ClinicalTrials.gov were low

  6. Recruitment and Retention of Patients into Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofield, Stacey; Conwit, Robin; Barsan, William; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    The emergency medicine and pre-hospital environments are unlike any other clinical environments and require special consideration to allow the successful implementation of clinical trials. This article reviews the specific issues involved in Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials (EMCT), and provides strategies from emergency medicine and non-emergency medicine trials to maximize recruitment and retention. While the evidence supporting some of these strategies is deficient, addressing recruitment and retention issues with specific strategies will help researchers deal with these issues in their funding applications and in turn develop the necessary infrastructure to participate in emergency medicine clinical trials. PMID:21040112

  7. The clinically-integrated randomized trial: proposed novel method for conducting large trials at low cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scardino Peter T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Randomized controlled trials provide the best method of determining which of two comparable treatments is preferable. Unfortunately, contemporary randomized trials have become increasingly expensive, complex and burdened by regulation, so much so that many trials are of doubtful feasibility. Discussion Here we present a proposal for a novel, streamlined approach to randomized trials: the "clinically-integrated randomized trial". The key aspect of our methodology is that the clinical experience of the patient and doctor is virtually indistinguishable whether or not the patient is randomized, primarily because outcome data are obtained from routine clinical data, or from short, web-based questionnaires. Integration of a randomized trial into routine clinical practice also implies that there should be an attempt to randomize every patient, a corollary of which is that eligibility criteria are minimized. The similar clinical experience of patients on- and off-study also entails that the marginal cost of putting an additional patient on trial is negligible. We propose examples of how the clinically-integrated randomized trial might be applied in four distinct areas of medicine: comparisons of surgical techniques, "me too" drugs, rare diseases and lifestyle interventions. Barriers to implementing clinically-integrated randomized trials are discussed. Conclusion The proposed clinically-integrated randomized trial may allow us to enlarge dramatically the number of clinical questions that can be addressed by randomization.

  8. The effect of resveratrol on hypertension: A clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodotou, Marios; Fokianos, Konstantinos; Mouzouridou, Alexia; Konstantinou, Cornelia; Aristotelous, Andrea; Prodromou, Dafni; Chrysikou, Asimina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate the effects of Evelor, a micronized formulation of resveratrol (RESV; 3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), in patients with primary hypertension. RESV is a stilbenoid and phytoalexin produced by several plants in response to injury or attack by pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi. Patients included in the clinical trial were split into the following two groups, based on the severity of their disease: Group A (n=46), stage I hypertension [systolic blood pressure (SBP), 140–159 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure (DBP), 90–99 mmHg] and Group B (n=51), stage II hypertension (SBP, 160–179 mmHg; DBP, 100–109 mmHg). Each group was divided into two subgroups: A1 and B1, patients treated with standard antihypertensive therapy (A1, 10 mg Dapril; B1, 20 mg Dapril), and A2 and B2, patients treated with antihypertensive therapy (Dapril) plus Evelor. The present study aimed to determine the effects of Evelor, in addition to the standard hypertension treatment, and its effect on the hepatic enzymes serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT). Following the trial, which lasted two years (October 2010 to October 2012), the mean blood pressure of both groups lay within the normal range, indicating that blood pressure was efficiently controlled. The results of the present study demonstrate that the addition of RESV to standard antihypertensive therapy is sufficient to reduce blood pressure to normal levels, without the need for additional antihypertensive drugs. In addition, statistical analysis of the results identified a significant reduction in plasma concentration levels of SGPT (P<0.001) and gamma-GT (P<0.001) with the addition of RESV, indicating that RESV prevents liver damage. PMID:28123505

  9. [Acupuncture clinical trials published in high impact factor journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Liu, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2014-12-01

    Acupuncture clinical trials are designed to provide reliable evidence of clinical efficacy, and SCI papers is one of the high-quality clinical efficacy of acupuncture research. To analyze these papers published in high impact factor journals on acupuncture clinical trials, we can study clinical trials from design to implementation, the efficacy of prevention and cure, combined with international standard practices to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture. That is the core of acupuncture clinical trials, as well as a prerequisite for outstanding academic output. A scientific and complete acupuncture clinical trial should be topically novel, designed innovative, logically clear, linguistically refining, and the most important point lies in a great discovery and solving the pragmatic problem. All of these are critical points of papers to be published in high impact factor journal, and directly affect international evaluation and promotion of acupuncture.

  10. Random allocation software for parallel group randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghaei Mahmood

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typically, randomization software should allow users to exert control over the different aspects of randomization including block design, provision of unique identifiers and control over the format and type of program output. While some of these characteristics have been addressed by available software, none of them have all of these capabilities integrated into one package. The main objective of the Random Allocation Software project was to enhance the user's control over different aspects of randomization in parallel group trials, including output type and format, structure and ordering of generated unique identifiers and enabling users to specify group names for more than two groups. Results The program has different settings for: simple and blocked randomizations; length, format and ordering of generated unique identifiers; type and format of program output; and saving sessions for future use. A formatted random list generated by this program can be used directly (without further formatting by the coordinator of the research team to prepare and encode different drugs or instruments necessary for the parallel group trial. Conclusions Random Allocation Software enables users to control different attributes of the random allocation sequence and produce qualified lists for parallel group trials.

  11. Open-access clinical trial registries: the Italian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosconi Paola

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citizens, patients and their representatives are increasingly insisting on working with health professionals to organize and discuss research protocols. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors recommended setting up a public clinical trial registry where anyone can find key information about a trial. Around the world, governments have, in fact, now begun to legislate mandatory disclosure of all clinical trials. The aims of the present survey were to assess the availability of clinical trial registries for Italian citizens and to examine the transparency of the data items reported. Methods The availability of open-access clinical trial registries was surveyed on a sample of 182 websites, including research institutes and centers of excellence (IRCCS-teaching hospitals, hospitals and associations. For each registry we downloaded a sample of two trials to assess the correspondence of the data items reported. Results from the Italian and international registries were compared. Results Fifteen percent of the sample had an open-access registry of clinical trials. Comparison of the data items available, in terms of completeness and transparency, from institutional and international registries indicated wide variability. Conclusions Italian citizens, patients and their associations have scant access to local registries of clinical trials, and international registries are generally more informative. On the European level, advocacy and lobby actions are needed among citizens and patients to boost the diffusion of open-access clinical trial registries without language barriers, thereby facilitating participation, access to information, and the coordination of clinical research.

  12. Clinical trials of chemotherapy for falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, P; Olliaro, P

    1998-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum remains one of the World's most prevalent and devastating pathogens. Mainly for economic reasons, the parasite's ability to develop resistance to drugs has not been matched by the rate at which new compounds are developed. Even so, there are new drugs (or new combinations of old drugs) currently under investigation, or in the process of development (at the moment): Pyronaridine, a well-tolerated, synthetic drug that may have utility for multi-resistant falciparum malaria in many parts of the world; however,problems remain over the formulation of this drug (which is a major determinant of its bioavailability) and its eventual cost. Chlorproguanil-dapsone (lap dap) is being studied as a possible low-cost'successor' to pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine; the utility of chlorproguanil-dapsone as 'salvage' therapy for clinical cases of pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine failure has yet to be tested in clinical trials. Atovaquone-proguanil (malarone) has utility against multi-resistant parasites; however, it is likely to be expensive (but is currently being provided free-of-charge in certain areas of Africa). Artemether-benflumetol (coartemether) combines the advantages of artemether (a rapid reduction in parasite load) with a second drug that reduces the risk of recrudescence; the cost of this combination is unclear. Rectal artesunate is being studied as an intervention to reduce the proportion of children with falciparum malaria who deteriorate to severe disease; the formulation is appropriate for use in rural health centres.

  13. [Prevalence and clinical characteristics of the IBS subtypes according to the Rome III criteria in patients from a clinical, multicentric trial. A report from the Mexican IBS Working Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmulson, M; Vargas, J A; López-Colombo, A; Remes-Troche, J M; López-Alvarenga, J C

    2010-01-01

    In Mexico the prevalence of irritable bowel síndrome (IBS) using Rome II criteria varies between 16 and 35%. To analyze the relative frequency of the IBS subtypes according to the Rome III criteria. A multicentric study in 1677 IBS-Rome III patients that consulted private medical clinics. They all answered a structured interview by their physicians to determine the IBS subtype and to evaluate their symptoms intensity (Likert Scales). Patients self-evaluated their symptoms as well by using 10 cm visual analog scales for each one. Women represented 76.8% of the patients for a F:M ratio of 3.3:1. The relative frequencies of the IBS subtypes were IBS-M: 48.4%, IBS-E: 43.0%, IBS-D: 5.6% and IBS-U: 2.8% with females predominating among all. However, IBS-D included 1.7 to 2.4 times more men than any of the other subtypes. The IBS-M reported a higher frequency and intensity of halitosis and vomiting and a higher intensity of burping; while those with IBS-E reported a higher frequency and intensity of straining and the IBS-D more urgency for a bowel movement, fecal incontinence and mucous in the stools. In IBS-Rome III patients in Mexico, IBS-M is the most common subtype and is more commonly associated with dyspeptic symptoms while the IBS-E reported more outlet symptoms and the IBS-D fecal incontinence. There is a higher female predominance amongst all, however men are more likely to be in IBS-D.

  14. Consensus recommendations for a standardized Brain Tumor Imaging Protocol in clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Ellingson (Benjamin M.); M. Bendszus (Martin); J. Boxerman (Jerrold); D. Barboriak (Daniel); B.J. Erickson (Bradley J.); M. Smits (Marion); S.J. Nelson (Sarah J.); E. Gerstner (Elizabeth); B. Alexander (Brian); G. Goldmacher (Gregory); W. Wick (Wolfgang); M.A. Vogelbaum (Michael); M. Weller (Michael); E. Galanis (Evanthia); J. Kalpathy-Cramer (Jayashree); L. Shankar; P. Jacobs (Paula); W.B. Pope (Whitney B.); D. Yang (Dewen); C. Chung (Caroline); R.H. Knopp; S. Cha (Soonme); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); S.M. Chang (Susan); W.K. Al Yung; T.F. Cloughesy (Timothy F.); P.Y. Wen (Patrick Y.); M.R. Gilbert (Mark R.); A. Whitney (Andrew); D. Sandak (David); A. Musella (Al); C. Haynes (Chas); M. Wallace (Max); D.F. Arons (David F.); A. Kingston (Ann)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA recent joint meeting was held on January 30, 2014, with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Cancer Institute (NCI), clinical scientists, imaging experts, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, clinical trials cooperative groups, and patient advocate groups to discuss ima

  15. Factors predicting publication of spinal cord injury trials registered on www.ClinicalTrials. gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasse, J Mason; Park, Sara; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-08-11

    Treatment options for spinal cord injuries are currently limited, but multiple clinical trials are underway for a variety of interventions, drugs, and devices. The Food and Drug Administration website www.ClinicalTrials.gov catalogues these trials and includes information on the status of the trial, date of initiation and completion, source of funding, and region. This investigation assesses the factors associated with publication and the publication rate of spinal cord injury trials. Retrospective analysis of publically available data on www.ClinicalTrials.gov. The www.ClinicalTrials.gov was queried for all trials on patients with spinal cord injury, and these trials were assessed for status, type of intervention, source of funding, and region. Multiple literature searches were performed on all completed trials to determine publication status. There were 626 studies identified concerning the treatment of patients with spinal cord injury, of which 250 (39.9%) were completed. Of these, only 119 (47.6%) were published. There was no significant difference in the rate of publication between regions (p> 0.16) or by study type (p> 0.29). However, trials that were funded by the NIH were more likely to be published than trials funded by industry (p= 0.01). The current publication rate of spinal cord injury trials is only 47.6%, though this rate is similar to the publication rate for trials in other fields. NIH-funded trials are significantly more likely to become published than industry-funded trials, which could indicate that some trials remain unpublished due to undesirable results. However, it is also likely that many trials on spinal cord injury yield negative results, as treatments are often ineffective.

  16. Resolving ethical issues in stem cell clinical trials: the example of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials of stem cell transplantation raise ethical issues that are intertwined with scientific and design issues, including choice of control group and intervention, background interventions, endpoints, and selection of subjects. We recommend that the review and IRB oversight of stem cell clinical trials should be strengthened. Scientific and ethics review should be integrated in order to better assess risks and potential benefits. Informed consent should be enhanced by assuring that participants comprehend key aspects of the trial. For the trial to yield generalizable knowledge, negative findings and serious adverse events must be reported.

  17. eTACTS: a method for dynamically filtering clinical trial search results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Riccardo; Jiang, Silis; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-12-01

    Information overload is a significant problem facing online clinical trial searchers. We present eTACTS, a novel interactive retrieval framework using common eligibility tags to dynamically filter clinical trial search results. eTACTS mines frequent eligibility tags from free-text clinical trial eligibility criteria and uses these tags for trial indexing. After an initial search, eTACTS presents to the user a tag cloud representing the current results. When the user selects a tag, eTACTS retains only those trials containing that tag in their eligibility criteria and generates a new cloud based on tag frequency and co-occurrences in the remaining trials. The user can then select a new tag or unselect a previous tag. The process iterates until a manageable number of trials is returned. We evaluated eTACTS in terms of filtering efficiency, diversity of the search results, and user eligibility to the filtered trials using both qualitative and quantitative methods. eTACTS (1) rapidly reduced search results from over a thousand trials to ten; (2) highlighted trials that are generally not top-ranked by conventional search engines; and (3) retrieved a greater number of suitable trials than existing search engines. eTACTS enables intuitive clinical trial searches by indexing eligibility criteria with effective tags. User evaluation was limited to one case study and a small group of evaluators due to the long duration of the experiment. Although a larger-scale evaluation could be conducted, this feasibility study demonstrated significant advantages of eTACTS over existing clinical trial search engines. A dynamic eligibility tag cloud can potentially enhance state-of-the-art clinical trial search engines by allowing intuitive and efficient filtering of the search result space. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel clinical trial recruitment strategy for women's cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimel, B J; Lester, Jenny; Sabacan, Leah; Park, Diane; Bresee, Catherine; Dang, Catherine; Karlan, Beth

    2015-08-01

    To address a deficiency in clinical trial and research enrollment in gynecologic cancer studies, we launched a paper based patient research registry. To improve registry enrollment, we transitioned to an online registry and trial matching mechanism to aid women in accessing open studies. Utilizing a validated verification platform, we designed a web-based registry and trial matching mechanism for women over age 18. Participants completed a questionnaire to provide information for trial matching. A focus group of registry participants was held 9 months after the start of the study to evaluate barriers to participation. A total of 322 women were enrolled in the online registry over a 14 month period which was a 4.3 fold increase over the paper-based registry (p<0.0001). Two hundred and sixty three (82%) women were matched to at least one study. Fifteen percent (39/263) of those eligible for studies went on to enroll. The online enrollment rate to studies was not different from that observed in the paper-based registry (26/172, p=0.934), however, the web-based registry linked participants to subsequent studies 27% more rapidly (68 (+/-98) days vs. 93 (+/-81) days for the paper-based registry, p=0.017). Focus group participants identified areas for improvement. Web-based patient driven registry provides dramatic improvement in the number of participants enrolled and the time to trial linkage compared to a paper based registry at a single institution. Further studies of barriers to research participation are necessary to improve on this model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Alzheimer’s disease multiple intervention trial (ADMIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callahan Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    to subjects treated in the control group. Outcomes The primary outcome is the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Studies Group Activities of Daily Living Scale; secondary outcome measures are two performance-based measures including the Short Physical Performance Battery and Short Portable Sarcopenia Measure. Outcome assessments for both the caregiver-reported scale and subjects’ physical performance scales are completed in the subject’s home. Randomization Eligible patient-care giver dyads will be stratified by clinic type and block randomized with a computer developed randomization scheme using a 1:1 allocation ratio. Blinding Single blinded. Research assistants completing the outcome assessments were blinded to the subjects’ treatment group. Trial status Ongoing ClinicalTrial.Gov identifier NCT01314950; date of completed registration 10 March 2011; date first patient randomized 9 March 2011

  20. Do Implant Overdentures Improve Dietary Intake? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, N.M.; Gray-Donald, K.; Awad, M.A.; Johnson-Down, L.; Wollin, S.; Feine, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    People wearing mandibular two-implant overdentures (IOD) chew food with less difficulty than those wearing conventional complete dentures (CD). However, there is still controversy over whether or not this results in better dietary intake. In this randomized clinical trials (RCT), the amounts of total dietary fiber (TDF), macronutrients, 9 micronutrients, and energy in diets consumed by persons with IOD and CD were compared. Male and female edentate patients ≥ 65 yrs (n = 255) were randomly divided into 2 groups and assigned to receive a maxillary CD and either a mandibular IOD or a CD. One year following prosthesis delivery, 217 participants (CD = 114, IOD = 103) reported the food and quantities they consumed to a registered dietician through a standard 24-hour dietary recall method. The mean and median values of TDF, macro- and micronutrients, and energy consumed by both groups were calculated and compared analytically. No significant between-group differences were found (ps > .05). Despite quality-of-life benefits from IODs, this adequately powered study reveals no evidence of nutritional advantages for independently living medically healthy edentate elders wearing two-implant mandibular overdentures over those wearing conventional complete dentures in their dietary intake at one year following prosthesis delivery (International Clinical Trials ISRCTN24273915). PMID:24158335

  1. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past ... the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use human volunteers to help medical ...

  2. Laboratory research at the clinical trials of Veterinary medicinal Products

    OpenAIRE

    ZHYLA M.I.

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the importance of laboratory test methods, namely pathomorfological at conduct of clinical trials. The article focuses on complex laboratory diagnostics at determination of clinical condition of animals, safety and efficacy of tested medicinal product.

  3. Metaanalysis vs large clinical trials: which should guide our management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scifres, Christina M; Iams, Jay D; Klebanoff, Mark; Macones, George A

    2009-05-01

    Large, randomized clinical trials have long been considered the gold standard to guide clinical care. Metaanalysis is a type of analysis in which results of a number of randomized clinical trials are combined and a summary measure of effect for a given treatment is ascertained. The clinician in practice often is faced with a dilemma regarding the type of evidence that should be used to guide clinical practice; for many clinical problems, there are both randomized controlled trials and metaanalyses available. The cases of calcium and aspirin therapy for the prevention of preeclampsia afford an opportunity to explore the benefits and limitations of each type of study to guide clinical practice. We conclude that, when available, large randomized clinical trials should be used to guide clinical practice.

  4. Compliance with results reporting at ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L; Chiswell, Karen; Peterson, Eric D; Tasneem, Asba; Topping, James; Califf, Robert M

    2015-03-12

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) mandates timely reporting of results of applicable clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov. We characterized the proportion of applicable clinical trials with publicly available results and determined independent factors associated with the reporting of results. Using an algorithm based on input from the National Library of Medicine, we identified trials that were likely to be subject to FDAAA provisions (highly likely applicable clinical trials, or HLACTs) from 2008 through 2013. We determined the proportion of HLACTs that reported results within the 12-month interval mandated by the FDAAA or at any time during the 5-year study period. We used regression models to examine characteristics associated with reporting at 12 months and throughout the 5-year study period. From all the trials at ClinicalTrials.gov, we identified 13,327 HLACTs that were terminated or completed from January 1, 2008, through August 31, 2012. Of these trials, 77.4% were classified as drug trials. A total of 36.9% of the trials were phase 2 studies, and 23.4% were phase 3 studies; 65.6% were funded by industry. Only 13.4% of trials reported summary results within 12 months after trial completion, whereas 38.3% reported results at any time up to September 27, 2013. Timely reporting was independently associated with factors such as FDA oversight, a later trial phase, and industry funding. A sample review suggested that 45% of industry-funded trials were not required to report results, as compared with 6% of trials funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and 9% of trials that were funded by other government or academic institutions. Despite ethical and legal obligations to disclose findings promptly, most HLACTs did not report results to ClinicalTrials.gov in a timely fashion during the study period. Industry-funded trials adhered to legal obligations more often than did trials funded by the NIH or other government or academic

  5. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS......:We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two......%). Heterogeneity was moderate (I(2) = 46%, p = 0.02) and unexplained by metaregression. INTERPRETATION:We provide empirical evidence for observer bias in randomized clinical trials with subjective measurement scale outcomes. A failure to blind assessors of outcomes in such trials results in a high risk...

  6. Simulating Clinical Trials With and Without Intracranial EEG Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenholz, Daniel M; Tharayil, Joseph J; Kuzniecky, Rubin; Karoly, Philippa; Theodore, William H; Cook, Mark J

    2017-06-01

    It is currently unknown if knowledge of clinically silent (electrographic) seizures improves the statistical efficiency of clinical trials. Using data obtained from 10 patients with chronically implanted subdural electrodes over an average of 1 year, a Monte Carlo bootstrapping simulation study was performed to estimate the statistical power of running a clinical trial based on A) patient reported seizures with intracranial EEG (icEEG) confirmation, B) all patient reported events, or C) all icEEG confirmed seizures. A "drug" was modeled as having 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% efficacy in 1000 simulated trials each. Outcomes were represented as percentage of trials that achieved pseizures (pseizure detection using chronically implanted icEEG improves statistical power of clinical trials. Newer invasive and noninvasive seizure detection devices may have the potential to provide greater statistical efficiency, accelerate drug discovery and lower trial costs.

  7. Phases I–III Clinical Trials Using Adult Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Sanz-Ruiz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available First randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that stem cell therapy can improve cardiac recovery after the acute phase of myocardial ischemia and in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Nevertheless, some trials have shown that conflicting results and uncertainties remain in the case of mechanisms of action and possible ways to improve clinical impact of stem cells in cardiac repair. In this paper we will examine the evidence available, analyze the main phase I and II randomized clinical trials and their limitations, discuss the key points in the design of future trials, and depict new directions of research in this fascinating field.

  8. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract...... knowledge gained by physicians in the process of clinical trials. These restrictions to knowledge-transfer between site and sponsor are further challenged if CRO partners are integrated in the trial process. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  9. A REVIEW ON CLINICAL TRIALS: WHY TO INTRODUCE ZERO PHASE

    OpenAIRE

    MANINDER KAUR; AMRITPAL SINGH

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of this study is to know clinical trials in nutshell and phase 0 clinical trial are to establish at the very earliest opportunity-before large numbers of patients have been accrued and exposed to potential drug-associated toxicity-whether an agent is modulating its target in a tumor, and consequently whether further clinical development is warranted. We review here the fundamental requirements of clinical studies conducted under an exploratory IND and address som...

  10. Inability of positive phase II clinical trials of investigational treatments to subsequently predict positive phase III clinical trials in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob J; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Patel, Akash J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Park, Minjeong; Yuan, Ying; A Kent, Thomas; de Groot, John F

    2017-07-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, but effective therapies are lacking. With the scarcity of positive phase III trials, which are increasing in cost, we examined the ability of positive phase II trials to predict statistically significant improvement in clinical outcomes of phase III trials. A PubMed search was conducted to identify phase III clinical trials performed in the past 25 years for patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma. Trials were excluded if they did not examine an investigational chemotherapy or agent, if they were stopped early owing to toxicity, if they lacked prior phase II studies, or if a prior phase II study was negative. Seven phase III clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 4 phase III clinical trials in recurrent glioblastoma met the inclusion criteria. Only 1 (9%) phase III study documented an improvement in overall survival and changed the standard of care. The high failure rate of phase III trials demonstrates the urgent need to increase the reliability of phase II trials of treatments for glioblastoma. Strategies such as the use of adaptive trial designs, Bayesian statistics, biomarkers, volumetric imaging, and mathematical modeling warrant testing. Additionally, it is critical to increase our expectations of phase II trials so that positive findings increase the probability that a phase III trial will be successful.

  11. Facilitating recruitment of patients with schizophrenia to a clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Bettina Ellen

    People with severe mental illness, such as schizophrenia have higher rates of mortality especially due to cardiovascular disease. We have established a clinical trial named “Coronary artery disease and schizophrenia”. However, patients with schizophrenia have cognitive disturbances, which make re...... recruitment of patients challenging. The purpose of this study is to understand which type of recruitment strategy is needed in clinical trials....

  12. Observer bias in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes.......To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes....

  13. Review on clinical trials of targeted treatments in malignant mesothelioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive tumor of the serosal surfaces with a poor prognosis. Advances in the understanding of tumor biology have led to the development of several targeted treatments, which have been evaluated in clinical trials. This article is a comprehensive review of all...... clinical trials evaluating the effect of targeted treatments in MM....

  14. Perspectives on randomized clinical trials : the case for albuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo Jan

    2008-01-01

    Large scale randomized clinical trials are needed to detect small but meaningful effects of new drugs. However, large scale randomized clinical trials are expensive undertakings and they are in imbalance with the scientific output. As a consequence there is a strong voice for more efficacious random

  15. Implementation of the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is launching a new clinical trials research network intended to improve treatment for the more than 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year. The new system, NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), will facilitate the rapid initia

  16. Observer bias in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes.......To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes....

  17. Acupressure therapy for morning sickness. A controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E

    1989-01-01

    A prospective, controlled clinical trial examined the efficacy of acupressure therapy for morning sickness, using a two group, random assignment, crossover design. Subjects in Group 1 (N = 8) used acupressure wristbands for five days, followed by five days without therapy. Subjects in Group 2 (N = 8) had no therapy for five days, followed by five days use of wristbands. The Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist and Sickness Impact Profile were used, and extent of nausea was assessed at baseline, day five, and day ten. Use of acupressure wristbands relieved morning sickness for 12 of 16 subjects (chi 2 = 5.31 with Yates' correction factor, df = 1, p less than .025). Acupressure therapy resulted in statistically significant (p less than .05) reductions in anxiety, depression, behavioral dysfunction, and nausea. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are presented.

  18. Health providers' perceptions of clinical trials: lessons from Ghana, Kenya and Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibian Angwenyi

    Full Text Available Clinical trials conducted in Africa often require substantial investments to support trial centres and public health facilities. Trial resources could potentially generate benefits for routine health service delivery but may have unintended consequences. Strengthening ethical practice requires understanding the potential effects of trial inputs on the perceptions and practices of routine health care providers. This study explores the influence of malaria vaccine trials on health service delivery in Ghana, Kenya and Burkina Faso.We conducted: audits of trial inputs in 10 trial facilities and among 144 health workers; individual interviews with frontline providers (n=99 and health managers (n=14; and group discussions with fieldworkers (n=9 discussions. Descriptive summaries were generated from audit data. Qualitative data were analysed using a framework approach.Facilities involved in trials benefited from infrastructure and equipment upgrades, support with essential drugs, access to trial vehicles, and placement of additional qualified trial staff. Qualified trial staff in facilities were often seen as role models by their colleagues; assisting with supportive supervision and reducing facility workload. Some facility staff in place before the trial also received formal training and salary top-ups from the trials. However, differential access to support caused dissatisfaction, and some interviewees expressed concerns about what would happen at the end of the trial once financial and supervisory support was removed.Clinical trials function as short-term complex health service delivery interventions in the facilities in which they are based. They have the potential to both benefit facilities, staff and communities through providing the supportive environment required for improvements in routine care, but they can also generate dissatisfaction, relationship challenges and demoralisation among staff. Minimising trial related harm and maximising

  19. Clinical and radiographic comparison of primary molars after formocresol and electrosurgical pulpotomy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Moeintaghavi, Amir; Emtiazi, Maryam; Hosseini, Ghofran

    2008-01-01

    Vital pulpotomy is a single-stage procedure defined as the surgical amputation of the coronal portion of exposed vital pulp, usually as a means of preserving the vitality and function of the remaining radicular portion. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic success rates for electrosurgical vs formocresol pulpotomy in human primary molar teeth. This was a prospective, randomized clinical trial. In this randomized clinical trial, pulpotomies were performed on 70 primary molars in children aged 5-10 years. The teeth were treated using either a conventional formocresol (35 teeth) or electrosurgical technique (35 teeth). Following the pulpotomy procedure, the teeth were evaluated for clinical and radiographic success for three, six and nine months. The teeth were evaluated for the presence of pain, abscess, fistula, mobility, internal and external resorption, and radiolucency. The data were assessed with Fishers' Exact test. After nine months of follow-up, the clinical and radiographic success rates were 96 and 84% respectively in the electrosurgical group and 100 and 96.8% respectively in the formocresol group. There was no statistically significant difference between the success rates in the two groups ( P > 0.05). Our results showed the failure rates for electrosurgical pulpotomy to be equal to those for formocresol pulpotomy. Although electrosurgical pulpotomy is a nonpharmacological technique giving favorable results, it is still a preservative technique. Further studies using larger samples and longer evaluation periods are recommended.

  20. [Clinical research IX. From the clinical judgment to the clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Two strategies to understand and document causality are: 1) clinical reasoning (CR) and 2) clinical trial (CT). CR identifies: basal state, maneuver and outcome. These components show us the complex of causality, its identification and control allows us to avoid systematic errors, such as: at baseline-improper assembly and susceptibility bias, during the application of the maneuver-performance bias, and at measurement of outcome-detection and transfer bias. In the CT tactics attempt to separate the effect of the main maneuver from the effect of other components that participate in causality previously described in CR. CT takes advantage of its characteristics: the opportunity to manipulate the maneuver and the temporality into the causal relationship. Some features to highlight are: the allocation of the maneuver, blinding of the maneuver, the feasibility of early interruption of the maneuver, the analysis according to maneuver adherence, the groups to compare, the timing of comparative maneuver, and the informed consent. Each occasion the clinician applies all this knowledge and skills, in a conscious way and structured, he improves his efficiency and align medical practice with clinical research.

  1. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide to 2012 - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Samantha L; Alexander, Ian E; Edelstein, Michael L; Abedi, Mohammad R; Wixon, Jo

    2013-02-01

    To date, over 1800 gene therapy clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. Our database brings together global information on gene therapy clinical trials from official agency sources, published literature, conference presentations and posters kindly provided to us by individual investigators or trial sponsors. This review presents our analysis of clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. As of our June 2012 update, we have entries on 1843 trials undertaken in 31 countries. We have analysed the geographical distribution of trials, the disease indications (or other reasons) for trials, the proportions to which different vector types are used, and which genes have been transferred. Details of the analyses presented, and our searchable database are available on The Journal of Gene Medicine Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website at: http://www.wiley.co.uk/genmed/clinical. We also provide an overview of the progress being made in clinical trials of gene therapy approaches around the world and discuss the prospects for the future.

  2. Placebos used in clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guan D; We, Ding A; Chung, Leung P; Fai, Cheng K

    2008-06-01

    One of the important components in randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) is blinding. The gold standard of clinical trials is to achieve a double blind design. However, only a small number of randomized controlled trials in traditional Chinese medicine have been reported, most of them are of poor quality in methodology including placebo preparation and verification. The purpose of the article is to review the validity of placebo used in blinded clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in recent years and related patents. We searched the Wanfang Database (total of 827 Chinese journals of medicine and/or pharmacy, from 1999 to 2005) and 598 full-length articles related to placebo clinical trials were found. 77 placebo blinded clinical trials for Chinese medicine were extracted by manual search from the 598 articles. After reviewing the 77 full-length articles, we found that nearly half of the clinical trials did not pay attention to the physical quality of the testing drug and placebo and whether they were of comparable physical quality. The rest provided very limited placebo information so that blinding assurance could not be assumed. Only 2 articles (2.6%) specifically validated the comparability between the testing drug and the placebo. Researchers in Chinese medicine commonly ignored the quality of the placebo in comparison to the test drug. This may be causing bias in the clinical trials. Quality specifications and evaluation of the placebo should deserve special attention to reduce bias in randomized controlled trials in TCM study.

  3. [Multi-national clinical trial in circulatory disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kihito

    2009-02-01

    As Japan becomes more integrated into the global market, pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) in Japan faces considerable challenges. While global simultaneous development including Asian countries has become a common strategy for multi-national pharmaceutical companies, Japan has been frequently set aside because of its provincial regulatory and clinical trial infrastructure. Meanwhile, many improvement programs in pharmaceutical area have been initiated in Japan. With this increased scrutiny, significant improvements in regulatory process, clinical trial costs, and site performance are anticipated over the next few years. RENAAL is the first multi-national clinical trial involving Japanese patients diabetic nephropathy associated with type II diabetes mellitus. In this article, issues which have been observed in the process of conducting multi-national clinical trial were discussed based on the experience with RENAAL. It is hoped that, as we gain more experiences in multi-national clinical trials, solutions for these issues are found in near future.

  4. Towards a framework of success factors for clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buonansegna, Erika; Salomo, Søren; Maier, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry are the most critical part of the drug development process with respect to obtaining the market approval from the authorities. Clinical trials are highly expensive, time-consuming and often unsuccessful. While new product development (NPD) literature...... clinical trials reducing failures and increasing profits. The framework directs managerial focus on the most important factors for success and helps managers in decision-making of operational tasks. The framework can also be applied as a checklist for assessing the status of a clinical trial and later...... as a benchmarking tool to compare clinical trial processes. Dependencies among the identified factors seem to exist, thus a set of propositions, can be developed from the success factors and be the basis for future empirical testing....

  5. Towards a framework of success factors for clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buonansegna, Erika; Salomo, Søren; Maier, Anja

    2012-01-01

    of success factors. This paper creates the new framework by combining success factors from NPD literature and from empirical evidence collected through 11 semi-structured interviews with experts in clinical trials. The framework of success factors provides managerial guidelines for practitioners to optimize...... clinical trials reducing failures and increasing profits. The framework directs managerial focus on the most important factors for success and helps managers in decision-making of operational tasks. The framework can also be applied as a checklist for assessing the status of a clinical trial and later......Clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry are the most critical part of the drug development process with respect to obtaining the market approval from the authorities. Clinical trials are highly expensive, time-consuming and often unsuccessful. While new product development (NPD) literature...

  6. Clinical evidence for Japanese population based on prospective studies--linking clinical trials and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kojima, Sunao

    2009-10-01

    "Evidence-based medicine (EBM)" implies effective and high quality practice for patients based on well-grounded medical science. The success of clinical trials in Japan is essential to build original evidence specific for Japanese patients. Based on this concept, we have performed several large-scale clinical trials to provide EBM, including the Japanese Antiplatelets Myocardial Infarction Study [JAMIS; clinical improvement in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with antiplatelet therapy], the Japanese beta-Blockers and Calcium Antagonists Myocardial Infarction (JBCMI; comparison of the effects of beta-blockers and calcium antagonists on cardiovascular events in post-AMI patients), a multicenter study for aggressive lipid-lowering strategy by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in patients with AMI (MUSASHI; effects of statin therapy on cardiovascular events in patients with AMI), and the Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis with Aspirin for Diabetes (JPAD trial; efficacy of low-dose aspirin therapy for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in type 2 diabetic patients). The results of these prospective studies were directly linked with clinical practice. We have acquired the know-how of large-scale clinical trials; an important point is to have passion for "buildup evidence specific for the Japanese" and to recruit subjects for enrollment after explaining the significance of "clinical trials for the Japanese".

  7. Anethum graveolens and hyperlipidemia: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mirhosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been established that hyperlipidemia increases the incidence and mortality associated with coronary heart disease. In this study, the effects of Dill (Anethum graveolens were evaluated on lipid profile of hypercholesterolemic patients. Materials and Methods: In this clinical study, 91 hyperlipidemic patients were randomly designated into two groups. One group received gemfibrozil (900 mg daily and the other group received Dill tablet (six tablets daily for 2 months. The blood lipids including total cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol from each group were assessed at the beginning and end of the trial. Results: Use of gemfibrozil brought about increased HDL-cholesterol by 3.91% (P < 0.05 and reduced triglyceride and total cholesterol by 32.7% (P < 0.05 and 9.41% (P < 0.05, respectively. Applying Dill tablet for 2 months resulted in reduction of total cholesterol up to 18% (P < 0.05 and triglyceride by 7.38% (P < 0.05. However, circulating HDL-cholesterol was not affected by this treatment. In this study, gemfibrozil decreased triglyceride and increased HDL-cholesterol more than anethum (P < 0.05. Anethum decreased total cholesterol more than gemfibrozil (P < 0.05. Patients treated with anethum did not report any side effects. Conclusion: The results of this trial indicate that Dill might be beneficial for hypercholesterolemic and hypertriglycemic patients.

  8. Patient reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials: is 'in-trial' guidance lacking? a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Kyte, DG; Draper, H; Ives, J.; Liles, C; Gheorghe, A.; Calvert, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on 'in-trial' activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting) and the management of 'concerning' PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant) appears to be lacking. The purpose of this revie...

  9. The Brave New World of clinical cancer research: Adaptive biomarker-driven trials integrating clinical practice with clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donald A

    2015-05-01

    Clinical trials are the final links in the chains of knowledge and for determining the roles of therapeutic advances. Unfortunately, in an important sense they are the weakest links. This article describes two designs that are being explored today: platform trials and basket trials. Both are attempting to merge clinical research and clinical practice.

  10. Tools in a clinical information system supporting clinical trials at a Swiss University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Michael; Bucklar, Guido; Blaser, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    Issues concerning inadequate source data of clinical trials rank second in the most common findings by regulatory authorities. The increasing use of electronic clinical information systems by healthcare providers offers an opportunity to facilitate and improve the conduct of clinical trials and the source documentation. We report on a number of tools implemented into the clinical information system of a university hospital to support clinical research. In 2011/2012, a set of tools was developed in the clinical information system of the University Hospital Zurich to support clinical research, including (1) a trial registry for documenting metadata on the clinical trials conducted at the hospital, (2) a patient-trial-assignment-tool to tag patients in the electronic medical charts as participants of specific trials, (3) medical record templates for the documentation of study visits and trial-related procedures, (4) online queries on trials and trial participants, (5) access to the electronic medical records for clinical monitors, (6) an alerting tool to notify of hospital admissions of trial participants, (7) queries to identify potentially eligible patients in the planning phase as trial feasibility checks and during the trial as recruitment support, and (8) order sets to facilitate the complete and accurate performance of study visit procedures. The number of approximately 100 new registrations per year in the voluntary trial registry in the clinical information system now matches the numbers of the existing mandatory trial registry of the hospital. Likewise, the yearly numbers of patients tagged as trial participants as well as the use of the standardized trial record templates increased to 2408 documented trial enrolments and 190 reports generated/month in the year 2013. Accounts for 32 clinical monitors have been established in the first 2 years monitoring a total of 49 trials in 16 clinical departments. A total of 15 months after adding the optional feature of

  11. Ethical responsibilities toward indirect and collateral participants in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Jaye Bea; Merritt, Maria W; Al-Khatib, Sana M; McCall, Debbe; Staman, Karen L; Stepnowsky, Carl

    2015-10-01

    Pragmatic clinical trials are designed to inform decision makers about the benefits, burdens, and risks of health interventions in real-world settings. Pragmatic clinical trials often use for research purposes data collected in the course of clinical practice. The distinctive features of pragmatic clinical trials demand fresh thinking about what is required to act properly toward people affected by their conduct, in ways that go beyond ensuring the protection of rights and welfare for "human research subjects" under conventional research ethics regulations. To stimulate such work, we propose to distinguish among categories of research participants in pragmatic clinical trials as follows: Direct participants: (1) individuals being directly intervened upon and/or (2) individuals from whom personal identifiable data are being collected for the purposes of the pragmatic clinical trial. Indirect participants: individuals who are (1) not identified as direct participants and (2) whose rights and welfare may be affected by the intervention through their routine exposure to the environment in which the intervention is being deployed. Collateral participants: patient groups and other stakeholder communities who may be otherwise affected by the occurrence and findings of the pragmatic clinical trial. We illustrate these distinctions with case examples and discuss the distinctive responsibilities of researchers and pragmatic clinical trial leadership toward each type of participant. We suggest that pragmatic clinical trial investigators, institutional review boards, health systems leaders, and others engaged in the research enterprise work together to identify these participants. For indirect participants, risks and benefits to which they are exposed should be weighed to ensure that their rights and welfare are protected accordingly, and communication strategies should be considered to help them make well-informed decisions. Collateral participants could provide input on the

  12. Clinical research in surgical oncology: an analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Amber S; Barnes, Alison; Scheer, Adena S; Martel, Guillaume; Moloo, Husein; Boushey, Robin P; Sabri, Elham; Auer, Rebecca C

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a descriptive analysis of registered clinical trials in surgical oncology at ClinicalTrials.gov. Data was extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov using the following search engine criteria: "Cancer" as Condition, "Surgery OR Operation OR Resection" as Intervention, and Non-Industry sponsored. The search was limited to Canada and the United States and included trials registered from January 1, 2001 to January 1, 2011. Of 9,961 oncology trials, 1,049 (10.5%) included any type of surgical intervention. Of these trials, 125 (11.9%, 1.3% of all oncology trials) assessed a surgical variable, 773 (73.7%) assessed adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapies, and 151 (14.4%) were observational studies. Of the trials assessing adjuvant therapies, systemic treatment (362 trials, 46.8%) and multimodal therapy (129 trials, 16.7%) comprised a large focus. Of the 125 trials where surgery was the intervention, 59 trials (47.2%) focused on surgical techniques or devices, 45 trials (36.0%) studied invasive diagnostic methods, and 21 trials (16.8%) evaluated surgery versus no surgery. The majority of the 125 trials were nonrandomized (72, 57.6%). The number of registered surgical oncology trials is small in comparison to oncology trials as a whole. Clinical trials specifically designed to assess surgical interventions are vastly outnumbered by trials focusing on adjuvant therapies. Randomized surgical oncology trials account for <1% of all registered cancer trials. Barriers to the design and implementation of randomized trials in surgical oncology need to be clarified in order to facilitate higher-level evidence in surgical decision-making.

  13. Key considerations for conducting Chinese medicine clinical trials in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shergis Johannah L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Conducting clinical trials of Chinese medicines (CM in hospitals presents challenges for researchers. The success of hospital-based CM clinical trials may be influenced by the protocol design, including the maintenance of CM theory in compliance with scientific rigour and hospital guidelines and justified treatment approaches with results that can translate into clinical practice. Other influences include personnel and resources such as a dedicated team open to CM with an established research culture and the ability to maximise participant recruitment. This article identifies the key challenges and limitations of conducting CM clinical trials in Australian hospitals.

  14. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features. A total of 8,501 trials were then active and 1,170 (13.8%) included sites in emerging countries (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and South Africa). South Korea and China presented a significantly higher proportion of sites when compared to other countries (plogistic regressions detected no negative correlation between placement in other countries when compared to Brazil. Trials involving subjects with less than 15 years of age, those with targeted recruitment of at least 1,000 subjects, and seven sponsors were identified as significant predictors of trial placement in Brazil. No clear direct competition between Brazil and other emerging countries was detected. South Korea showed the higher proportion of sites and ranked third in total number of trials, appearing as a major player in attractiveness for biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

  15. Improving the relationship between the randomized clinical trial and real-world clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottdiener, William H

    2011-09-01

    I comment on the article by Krause (see record 2011-19228-002), which discusses a number of ways for clinical psychotherapy outcome researchers to make the results of randomized controlled trials (RCT) more useful to practicing psychotherapists primarily by making the distributions of raw data from those studies available to the public. In this way, it would be possible for psychotherapists to determine which treatment of an RCT (experimental or control) would be best for a specific patient. Problems with this proposal are discussed and an alternative model that integrates psychotherapy outcome data from group means and clinical case studies is offered. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Statistical challenges for central monitoring in clinical trials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the complexity and costs of clinical trials have increased dramatically, especially in the area of new drug development. Risk-based monitoring (RBM) has been attracting attention as an efficient and effective trial monitoring approach, which can be applied irrespectively of the trial sponsor, i.e., academic institution or pharmaceutical company. In the RBM paradigm, it is expected that a statistical approach to central monitoring can help improve the effectiveness of on-site monitoring by prioritizing and guiding site visits according to central statistical data checks, as evidenced by examples of actual trial datasets. In this review, several statistical methods for central monitoring are presented. It is important to share knowledge about the role and performance capabilities of statistical methodology among clinical trial team members (i.e., sponsors, investigators, data managers, monitors, and biostatisticians) in order to adopt central statistical monitoring for assessing data quality in the actual clinical trial.

  17. Clinical trial registration was not an indicator for low risk of bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Cynthia M; Showell, Marian G; Showell, Emily A E; Beetham, Penny; Baak, Nora; Mourad, Selma; Jordan, Vanessa M B

    2017-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of registered trials and to evaluate the risk of bias between registered and unregistered clinical trials. The Cochrane Gynecology and Fertility Group's specialized register was searched on November 5, 2015, for randomized controlled trials published from 2010 to 2014. Studies were selected if they had randomized women or men for fertility treatments, were published in full text and written in English. Two reviewers then independently assessed trial registration status for each trial, by searching the publication, trial registries, and by contacting the original authors. Of 693 eligible randomized controlled trials, only 44% were found to be registered. Unregistered clinical trials had smaller sample sizes than registered trials (P risk of bias using five of the Cochrane Risk of Bias "domains." Registered and unregistered trials differed in their risk of bias for random sequence generation (P = 0.001), allocation concealment (P = 0.003), and selective reporting (P  0.05) domains. Only 54 (43.2%) of the 125 registered trials were registered prospectively. This study has the following limitations. Only English language trials were included in this review. We were unable to obtain protocols for the unregistered trials and therefore were unable to assess the risk of bias in the selective reporting domain. All available trials should be included in systematic reviews and assessed for risk of bias as there are both registered trials with high risk of bias and unregistered trials with low risk of bias and by excluding unregistered trials more than half of the available evidence will be lost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Zardavas; Martine Piccart-Gebhart

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials.

  19. Guidance for researchers developing and conducting clinical trials in practice-based research networks (PBRNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Schmit, Kristine M; Graham, Deborah G; Fox, Chester H; Baldwin, Laura Mae

    2014-01-01

    There is increased interest nationally in multicenter clinical trials to answer questions about clinical effectiveness, comparative effectiveness, and safety in real-world community settings. Primary care practice-based research networks (PBRNs), comprising community- and/or academically affiliated practices committed to improving medical care for a range of health problems, offer ideal settings for these trials, especially pragmatic clinical trials. However, many researchers are not familiar with working with PBRNs. Experts in practice-based research identified solutions to challenges that researchers and PBRN personnel experience when collaborating on clinical trials in PBRNs. These were organized as frequently asked questions in a draft document presented at a 2013 Agency for Health care Research and Quality PBRN conference workshop, revised based on participant feedback, then shared with additional experts from the DARTNet Institute, Clinical Translational Science Award PBRN, and North American Primary Care Research Group PBRN workgroups for further input and modification. The "Toolkit for Developing and Conducting Multi-site Clinical Trials in Practice-Based Research Networks" offers guidance in the areas of recruiting and engaging practices, budgeting, project management, and communication, as well as templates and examples of tools important in developing and conducting clinical trials. Ensuring the successful development and conduct of clinical trials in PBRNs requires a highly collaborative approach between academic research and PBRN teams. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  20. Key Concepts of Clinical Trials: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umscheid, Craig A.; Margolis, David J.; Grossman, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    The recent focus of federal funding on comparative effectiveness research underscores the importance of clinical trials in the practice of evidence-based medicine and health care reform. The impact of clinical trials not only extends to the individual patient by establishing a broader selection of effective therapies, but also to society as a whole by enhancing the value of health care provided. However, clinical trials also have the potential to pose unknown risks to their participants, and biased knowledge extracted from flawed clinical trials may lead to the inadvertent harm of patients. Although conducting a well-designed clinical trial may appear straightforward, it is founded on rigorous methodology and oversight governed by key ethical principles. In this review, we provide an overview of the ethical foundations of trial design, trial oversight, and the process of obtaining approval of a therapeutic, from its pre-clinical phase to post-marketing surveillance. This narrative review is based on a course in clinical trials developed by one of the authors (DJM), and is supplemented by a PubMed search predating January 2011 using the keywords “randomized controlled trial,” “patient/clinical research,” “ethics,” “phase IV,” “data and safety monitoring board,” and “surrogate endpoint.” With an understanding of the key principles in designing and implementing clinical trials, health care providers can partner with the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory bodies to effectively compare medical therapies and thereby meet one of the essential goals of health care reform. PMID:21904102

  1. Are clinical trial results transferable in the real life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Enrico; Marsocci, Alfiera

    2016-06-22

    Generally in the clinical practice patients are more complex in comparison with those included in the clinical trials. In this article, we discuss three relevant items, which may implement the transferability of the clinical trial results in the real world. The observational studies have fewer restrictions on the number of patients included, due to more relaxed inclusion and exlusion criteria than in randomized clinical trials. The absence of randomization however may lead to potential for bias. The recurrent event analysis may extend the positive results of clinical trials regarding the reductions of the first primary endpoint event to total events, including those beyond the first event. This analysis is of great interest in the clinical practice, where recurrent events are common. Finally the reliability of subgroup analysis is discussed. Pre-specified subgroup analyses are more credible and valuable than post-hoc analyses.

  2. Does Quality of Radiation Therapy Predict Outcomes of Multicenter Cooperative Group Trials? A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, Alysa, E-mail: alysa.fairchild@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Straube, William [Advanced Technology Consortium, Imaged-Guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Followill, David [Radiological Physics Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Central review of radiation therapy (RT) delivery within multicenter clinical trials was initiated in the early 1970s in the United States. Early quality assurance publications often focused on metrics related to process, logistics, and timing. Our objective was to review the available evidence supporting correlation of RT quality with clinical outcomes within cooperative group trials. A MEDLINE search was performed to identify multicenter studies that described central subjective assessment of RT protocol compliance (quality). Data abstracted included method of central review, definition of deviations, and clinical outcomes. Seventeen multicenter studies (1980-2012) were identified, plus one Patterns of Care Study. Disease sites were hematologic, head and neck, lung, breast, and pancreas. Between 0 and 97% of treatment plans received an overall grade of acceptable. In 7 trials, failure rates were significantly higher after inadequate versus adequate RT. Five of 9 and 2 of 5 trials reported significantly worse overall and progression-free survival after poor-quality RT, respectively. One reported a significant correlation, and 2 reported nonsignificant trends toward increased toxicity with noncompliant RT. Although more data are required, protocol-compliant RT may decrease failure rates and increase overall survival and likely contributes to the ability of collected data to answer the central trial question.

  3. Perception of the informed consent form by participants in clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Meneguin, Silmara [UNESP; Ayres, Jairo Aparecido

    2014-01-01

    To understand the perception of the participants in controlled clinical trials (CCTs) about the informed consent and describe the meaning of their participation in the research. Qualitative study using the focus group technique. The sample was composed of 19 patients who participated in clinical trials about hypertension and coronary disease in a specialized cardiologic hospital located in the city of Sao Paulo. The methodological framework used was the content analysis. Some of the participa...

  4. Evaluating dose response from flexible dose clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baron David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The true dose effect in flexible-dose clinical trials may be obscured and even reversed because dose and outcome are related. Methods To evaluate dose effect in response on primary efficacy scales from 2 randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose trials of patients with bipolar mania who received olanzapine (N = 234, 5–20 mg/day, or patients with schizophrenia who received olanzapine (N = 172, 10–20 mg/day, we used marginal structural models, inverse probability of treatment weighting (MSM, IPTW methodology. Dose profiles for mean changes from baseline were evaluated using weighted MSM with a repeated measures model. To adjust for selection bias due to non-random dose assignment and dropouts, patient-specific time-dependent weights were determined as products of (i stable weights based on inverse probability of receiving the sequence of dose assignments that was actually received by a patient up to given time multiplied by (ii stable weights based on inverse probability of patient remaining on treatment by that time. Results were compared with those by unweighted analyses. Results While the observed difference in efficacy scores for dose groups for the unweighted analysis strongly favored lower doses, the weighted analyses showed no strong dose effects and, in some cases, reversed the apparent "negative dose effect." Conclusion While naïve comparison of groups by last or modal dose in a flexible-dose trial may result in severely biased efficacy analyses, the MSM with IPTW estimators approach may be a valuable method of removing these biases and evaluating potential dose effect, which may prove useful for planning confirmatory trials.

  5. Sample size determination in clinical trials with multiple endpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Sozu, Takashi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    This book integrates recent methodological developments for calculating the sample size and power in trials with more than one endpoint considered as multiple primary or co-primary, offering an important reference work for statisticians working in this area. The determination of sample size and the evaluation of power are fundamental and critical elements in the design of clinical trials. If the sample size is too small, important effects may go unnoticed; if the sample size is too large, it represents a waste of resources and unethically puts more participants at risk than necessary. Recently many clinical trials have been designed with more than one endpoint considered as multiple primary or co-primary, creating a need for new approaches to the design and analysis of these clinical trials. The book focuses on the evaluation of power and sample size determination when comparing the effects of two interventions in superiority clinical trials with multiple endpoints. Methods for sample size calculation in clin...

  6. [Placebo control and clinical trial of Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing

    2010-10-01

    World Health Organization aims to develop safe, effective and practical traditional medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and other complementary and alternative medicine are being recognized in the whole world nowadays. However, the definite effect of Chinese medicine is still in need of scientific research proof. Placebo control is of equal importance to active control and blank control in clinical trial of TCM. This article briefly reviewed the importance of placebo control and commented on its present situation in clinical trial of TCM. This article also brought up the preliminary proposals of placebo application in TCM clinical trial. We should emphasize scientific placebo preparation and good design of placebo-controlled trial, which are directed by International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. A good clinical trial project will avoid unnecessary wastes and provide safe and effective treatment for people.

  7. The conduct and principles of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Some of the guiding principles as well as the pitfall of long-term randomized clinical trials are presented. Examples have been chosen from trials in the cardiovascular field. A typical long-term clinical trial is divided into five phases: planning, preparation, recruitment, clinical follow-up and termination, and finally analysis. Administrative, legal, and ethical aspects of a trial are discussed, as well as the cost of clinical trials. Organization patterns are described and some prevalent ones are criticized. Further, practical matters such as recruitment techniques, obtaining informed consent from the patients, determining drug dosage and formulation as well as the problem of interaction with nonstudy drugs are referred to. Adherence testing remains a problem, because of our inability to test for placebo adherence.

  8. Adverse event reporting in nonpharmacologic, noninterventional pain clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsinger, Matthew; Smith, Shannon M; Rothstein, Daniel; McKeown, Andrew; Parkhurst, Melissa; Hertz, Sharon; Katz, Nathaniel P; Lin, Allison H; McDermott, Michael P; Rappaport, Bob A; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of treatment safety is 1 of the primary goals of clinical trials. Organizations and working groups have created reporting guidelines for adverse events (AEs). Previous research examining AE reporting for pharmacologic clinical trials of analgesics in major pain journals found many reporting inadequacies, suggesting that analgesic trials are not adhering to existing AE reporting guidelines. The present systematic review documented AE reporting in 3 main pain journals for nonpharmacologic, noninterventional (NP/NI) trials examining pain treatments. To broaden our pool of nonpharmacologic trials, we also included trials examining acupuncture, leech therapy, and noninvasive stimulation techniques (eg, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). We documented AE reporting at 2 levels of specificity using coding manuals based on the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) harms reporting standards and Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) AE reporting checklist. We identified a number of inadequacies in AE reporting across the 3 journals. For example, using the ACTTION coding manual, we found that less than one-half of the trials reported specific AE assessment methods; approximately one-third of the trials reported withdrawals due to AEs for each study arm; and about one-fourth of the trials reported all specific AEs. We also examined differences in AE reporting across several trial characteristics, finding that AE reporting was generally more detailed in trials with patients versus those using healthy volunteers undergoing experimentally evoked pain. These results suggest that investigators conducting and reporting NP/NI clinical trials are not adequately describing the assessment and occurrence of AEs.

  9. Outcome Measures for Clinical Drug Trials in Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Aman, Michael G; Novotny, Sherie; Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Lecavalier, Luc; Leonard, Elizabeth; Gadow, Kenneth D.; King, Bryan H; Pearson, Deborah A.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Chez, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper identifies instruments and measures that may be appropriate for randomized clinical trials in participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The Clinical Global Impressions scale was recommended for all randomized clinical trials. At this point, however, there is no “perfect” choice of outcome measure for core features of autism, although we will discuss five measures of potential utility. Several communication instruments are recommended, based in part on suitability across t...

  10. Strategic Analysis of Clinical Trial Outsourcing to China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Haiyan

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing amounts of clinical data required for drug regulatory approval and the fierce competition for patients in the Western countries, the cost of clinical trials continues to rise considerably. This study suggests that outsourcing clinical trials to China is an effective strategy to reduce cost and cycle time of drug development. China offers a high market potential and strong research capacity that can provide long term benefits to pharmaceutical and biotech companies. An inte...

  11. Key considerations for conducting Chinese medicine clinical trials in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Shergis Johannah L; Parker Shefton; Coyle Meaghan E; Zhang Anthony L; Xue Charlie C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Conducting clinical trials of Chinese medicines (CM) in hospitals presents challenges for researchers. The success of hospital-based CM clinical trials may be influenced by the protocol design, including the maintenance of CM theory in compliance with scientific rigour and hospital guidelines and justified treatment approaches with results that can translate into clinical practice. Other influences include personnel and resources such as a dedicated team open to CM with an establishe...

  12. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    gene therapy program with Oxford Biomedica to bring gene therapy for juvenile macular degeneration (Stargardt’s disease). This phase I clinical trial...working with Oxford Biomedica and a separate project with academic investigators on gene therapy for Usher lb syndrome (deaf-blindness due to a gene... Biomedica collaboration will begin no later than 04 2011. 3. NNRI has held multiple clinical investigator meetings to define clinical trial outcomes for

  13. The clinical and financial impact of a pediatric surgical neuro-oncology clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric M; Gururangan, Sridharan; Grant, Gerald; Mitchell, Duane; Sampson, John H

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric surgical trials are rare and the impact of such trials on the institutions in which they are conducted is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical and financial impact of The Re-MATCH trial, a Phase I clinical trial requiring the biopsy or resection of recurrent medulloblastoma or PNET for enrollment. Inpatient financial and clinical volume information was collected during the 3 years of trial enrollment and the years preceding and following it. The primary endpoints were the difference in direct contribution margin (DCM), or net gain, of study and non-study patients and the difference in surgical volume during the study and non-study periods. The trial enrolled 18 patients; 15 had surgery at the sponsor institution and three had surgery at their home institution, then transferred tumor material to the sponsor institution. There were no differences between the two groups for potentially confounding variables such as neurosurgical procedure work relative value units (P = 0.13) or insurance provider (P = 0.26). There was no difference between the inpatient DCM per case for the institution for non-study patients (mean ± SD, $9039 ± $28,549) and study patients ($14,332 ± $20,231) (P = 0.4819). During the non-study period, there were a mean of 2.78 ± 1.65 pediatric brain tumor resections per month compared to 3.34 ± 1.66 cases per month during the study period, a 17% increase. When the 15 study patients were excluded, there were 2.97 ± 1.64 cases per month, a 7% increase. However, this increase in total case volume including study and non-study patients was not significant (P = 0.121). Phase I investigator-initiated surgically-based clinical trials may increase institutional surgical volume without imposing a financial burden. Finances are unlikely to be a barrier for researchers negotiating for resources to conduct such trials.

  14. Good Clinical Practice Guidance and Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing the Best of Both Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Berdan, Lisa G; Rorick, Tyrus; O'Brien, Emily C; Ibarra, Jenny C; Curtis, Lesley H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-03-01

    Randomized, clinical trials are commonly regarded as the highest level of evidence to support clinical decisions. Good Clinical Practice guidelines have been constructed to provide an ethical and scientific quality standard for trials that involve human subjects in a manner aligned with the Declaration of Helsinki. Originally designed to provide a unified standard of trial data to support submission to regulatory authorities, the principles may also be applied to other studies of human subjects. Although the application of Good Clinical Practice principles generally led to improvements in the quality and consistency of trial operations, these principles have also contributed to increasing trial complexity and costs. Alternatively, the growing availability of electronic health record data has facilitated the possibility for streamlined pragmatic clinical trials. The central tenets of Good Clinical Practice and pragmatic clinical trials represent potential tensions in trial design (stringent quality and highly efficient operations). In the present article, we highlight potential areas of discordance between Good Clinical Practice guidelines and the principles of pragmatic clinical trials and suggest strategies to streamline study conduct in an ethical manner to optimally perform clinical trials in the electronic age.

  15. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Santos Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  16. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L.; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  17. Uncaria tomentosa-Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma-Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  18. Pediatric Clinical Trials Conducted in South Korea from 2006 to 2015: An Analysis of the South Korean Clinical Research Information Service, US ClinicalTrials.gov and European Clinical Trials Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sheung-Nyoung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, Hee-Soo

    2017-08-02

    The status of pediatric clinical trials performed in South Korea in the last decade, including clinical trials of drugs with unapproved indications for children, has not been previously examined. The aim was to provide information regarding the current state of pediatric clinical trials and create a basis for future trials performed in South Korea by reviewing three databases of clinical trials registrations. We searched for pediatric clinical studies (participants gov, and the European Clinical Trials Registry (EuCTR). Additionally, we reviewed whether unapproved indications were involved in each trial by comparing the trials with a list of authorized trials provided by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS). The primary and secondary outcomes were to determine the change in number of pediatric clinical trials with unapproved indications over time and to assess the status of unauthorized pediatric clinical trials from the MFDS and the publication of articles after these clinical trials, respectively. We identified 342 clinical studies registered in the CRIS (n = 81), ClinicalTrials.gov (n = 225), and EuCTR (n = 36), of which 306 were reviewed after excluding duplicate registrations. Among them, 181 studies were interventional trials dealing with drugs and biological agents, of which 129 (71.3%) involved unapproved drugs. Of these 129 trials, 107 (82.9%) were authorized by the MFDS. Pediatric clinical trials in South Korea aiming to establish the safety and efficacy of drugs in children are increasing; however, non-MFDS-authorized studies remain an issue.

  19. Evaluation of an Intervention among Adolescents to Reduce Preventive Misconception in HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Michelle; Goldsworthy, Richard; Sarr, Moussa; Kahn, Jessica; Brown, Larry; Peralta, Ligia; Zimet, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Placebo and randomization are important concepts that must be understood before youth can safely participate in HIV vaccine studies or other biomedical trials for HIV prevention. These concepts are central to the phenomenon of preventive misconception which may be associated with an increase in risk behavior among study participants related to mistaken beliefs. Persuasive messaging, traditionally used in the field of marketing, could enhance educational efforts associated with randomized clinical trials. Methods Two educational brochures were designed to increase knowledge about HIV vaccine clinical trials via 1 and 2-sided persuasive messaging. Through the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network, 120 youth were enrolled, administered a mock HIV vaccine trial consent, and then randomized to receive either no supplemental information or one of the two brochures. Results The 2-sided brochure group in which common clinical trial misconceptions were acknowledgedand then refuted had significantly higher scores on knowledge of randomization and interpretation of side effects than the consent-only control group, and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial was not decreased with the use of this brochure. Conclusion Two sided persuasive messaging improves understanding of the concepts of randomization and placebo among youth who would consider participating in an HIV vaccine trial. Further evaluation of this approach should be considered for at-risk youth participating in an actual trial of a biomedical intervention for HIV prevention. PMID:24613097

  20. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Fiona F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. Methods The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day. A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers. Secondary outcomes include: (i time to healing; (ii global assessment of improvement; (iii PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv self-reported pain; (v health-related quality of life; (vi time to recurrence; (vii treatment failures; (viii adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG; measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG; and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size

  1. Porcine collagen matrix for treating gingival recession. Randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Castro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Achieving root coverage after exposure caused by gingival recession is one of the main goals of reconstructive periodontal surgery. Even though a large variety of techniques and mucogingival grafting procedures are available, their long-term results are not clear yet. Therefore, this study aimed to compare clinical effectiveness of the porcine collagen matrix with subepithelial connective graft for treating Miller class I and II gingival recessions. Materials and methods: The randomized clinical trial included twelve patients assigned to two groups. In the first group (experimental, six patients were treated using collagen matrix (mean age, 54.3±5.6 years; mean recession 2. 67±1.03mm. Another group (control of six patients was treated using connective grafts (mean age, 57.1± 2.7 years; mean recession 4.33±1.03mm. All patients underwent periodontal evaluation and pre-surgical preparation including oral hygiene instruction and supragingival scaling. Gingival recessions were exposed through partial thickness flaps where the grafts and matrices were placed. Patients were assessed periodically until complete healing of tissue. Results: Root coverage parameters, amount of keratinized gingiva, gingival biotype and clinical attachment level were evaluated. The root coverage percentage for the group using connective graft was 24.7±13.5% and 16.6±26.8% for the one treated with the matrix. The amount of increased keratinized tissue was 4.33±2.06mm and 4.5±0.83mm for the control and experimental group respectively. Both groups increased gingival biotypes from thin to thick at 100%. The final clinical attachment level was 4.17±3.17±04mm for the control group and 0.98mm for the experimental group. There were significant differences between the outcome of gingival recession and clinical attachment. Conclusion: Results indicate both techniques, besides being predictable, are useful for improving clinical parameters when treating gingival recessions

  2. Health literacy and usability of clinical trial search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Dina; Bickmore, Timothy W; Barry, Barbara; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Several web-based search engines have been developed to assist individuals to find clinical trials for which they may be interested in volunteering. However, these search engines may be difficult for individuals with low health and computer literacy to navigate. The authors present findings from a usability evaluation of clinical trial search tools with 41 participants across the health and computer literacy spectrum. The study consisted of 3 parts: (a) a usability study of an existing web-based clinical trial search tool; (b) a usability study of a keyword-based clinical trial search tool; and (c) an exploratory study investigating users' information needs when deciding among 2 or more candidate clinical trials. From the first 2 studies, the authors found that users with low health literacy have difficulty forming queries using keywords and have significantly more difficulty using a standard web-based clinical trial search tool compared with users with adequate health literacy. From the third study, the authors identified the search factors most important to individuals searching for clinical trials and how these varied by health literacy level.

  3. Automated information extraction of key trial design elements from clinical trial publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Berry; Carini, Simona; Kiritchenko, Svetlana; Martin, Joel; Sim, Ida

    2008-11-06

    Clinical trials are one of the most valuable sources of scientific evidence for improving the practice of medicine. The Trial Bank project aims to improve structured access to trial findings by including formalized trial information into a knowledge base. Manually extracting trial information from published articles is costly, but automated information extraction techniques can assist. The current study highlights a single architecture to extract a wide array of information elements from full-text publications of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). This architecture combines a text classifier with a weak regular expression matcher. We tested this two-stage architecture on 88 RCT reports from 5 leading medical journals, extracting 23 elements of key trial information such as eligibility rules, sample size, intervention, and outcome names. Results prove this to be a promising avenue to help critical appraisers, systematic reviewers, and curators quickly identify key information elements in published RCT articles.

  4. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide 1989-2004-an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael L; Abedi, Mohammad R; Wixon, Jo; Edelstein, Richard M

    2004-06-01

    In 1989, Rosenberg et al. performed the first human gene therapy trial when they used a retrovirus to introduce the gene coding for resistance to neomycin into human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes before infusing them into five patients with advanced melanoma. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using retroviral gene transduction in humans and set the stage for further studies. Since then, over 900 clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. These trials have been designed to establish feasibility and safety, to demonstrate the reality of expression of therapeutic protein(s) in vivo by the genes transferred and, in some cases, to show therapeutic benefit. There is no single source of information that presents an overview of all the clinical trials undertaken worldwide. In 1997 we set up a database to bring all the information on clinical trials together as comprehensively and as globally as possible. The data were compiled and are regularly updated from official agency sources, the published literature, presentations at conferences and from information kindly provided by investigators or trial sponsors themselves. As of January 31, 2004, we have identified 918 trials in 24 countries. The USA accounts for two-thirds of these trials. Cancer is by far the most common disease indication, followed by inherited monogenic diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Viral vectors have been the most frequently used vehicles for transferring genes into human cells, with retroviruses and adenoviruses representing the vast majority. Plasmid (naked) DNA and other non-viral vectors have been used in one-quarter of the trials. Over 100 distinct genes have been transferred. This article aims to provide a descriptive overview of the clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. Details of the data presented, including an interactive, searchable database that currently holds information on 918

  5. Standard versus prosocial online support groups for distressed breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golant Mitch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internet can increase access to psychosocial care for breast cancer survivors through online support groups. This study will test a novel prosocial online group that emphasizes both opportunities for getting and giving help. Based on the helper therapy principle, it is hypothesized that the addition of structured helping opportunities and coaching on how to help others online will increase the psychological benefits of a standard online group. Methods/Design A two-armed randomized controlled trial with pretest and posttest. Non-metastatic breast cancer survivors with elevated psychological distress will be randomized to either a standard facilitated online group or to a prosocial facilitated online group, which combines online exchanges of support with structured helping opportunities (blogging, breast cancer outreach and coaching on how best to give support to others. Validated and reliable measures will be administered to women approximately one month before and after the interventions. Self-esteem, positive affect, and sense of belonging will be tested as potential mediators of the primary outcomes of depressive/anxious symptoms and sense of purpose in life. Discussion This study will test an innovative approach to maximizing the psychological benefits of cancer online support groups. The theory-based prosocial online support group intervention model is sustainable, because it can be implemented by private non-profit or other organizations, such as cancer centers, which mostly offer face-to-face support groups with limited patient reach. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01396174

  6. Lobeglitazone and pioglitazone as add-ons to metformin for patients with type 2 diabetes: a 24-week, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, active-controlled, phase III clinical trial with a 28-week extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S-M; Park, C-Y; Cho, Y M; Ku, B J; Ahn, C W; Cha, B-S; Min, K W; Sung, Y A; Baik, S H; Lee, K W; Yoon, K-H; Lee, M-K; Park, S W

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of lobeglitazone and pioglitazone as add-ons to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients who were inadequately controlled by metformin were randomized and treated once daily with either lobeglitazone (0.5 mg, n = 128) or pioglitazone (15 mg, n = 125) for 24 weeks, with a 28-week extension trial of lobeglitazone treatment in patients who consented. The primary endpoint was the change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration from baseline to week 24. At week 24, the mean change from baseline in HbA1c was -0.74% for the lobeglitazone group and -0.74% for the pioglitazone group, with a mean difference of 0.01% [95% confidence interval (CI) of difference, -0.16 to 0.18]. The effects of lobeglitazone on lipid variables and the adverse events associated with lobeglitazone were similar to those observed with pioglitazone. Lobeglitazone was not inferior to pioglitazone as an add-on to metformin in terms of their efficacy and safety.

  7. The database for aggregate analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov (AACT and subsequent regrouping by clinical specialty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asba Tasneem

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ClinicalTrials.gov registry provides information regarding characteristics of past, current, and planned clinical studies to patients, clinicians, and researchers; in addition, registry data are available for bulk download. However, issues related to data structure, nomenclature, and changes in data collection over time present challenges to the aggregate analysis and interpretation of these data in general and to the analysis of trials according to clinical specialty in particular. Improving usability of these data could enhance the utility of ClinicalTrials.gov as a research resource. METHODS/PRINCIPAL RESULTS: The purpose of our project was twofold. First, we sought to extend the usability of ClinicalTrials.gov for research purposes by developing a database for aggregate analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov (AACT that contains data from the 96,346 clinical trials registered as of September 27, 2010. Second, we developed and validated a methodology for annotating studies by clinical specialty, using a custom taxonomy employing Medical Subject Heading (MeSH terms applied by an NLM algorithm, as well as MeSH terms and other disease condition terms provided by study sponsors. Clinical specialists reviewed and annotated MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms, and an algorithm was created to classify studies into clinical specialties based on both MeSH and non-MeSH annotations. False positives and false negatives were evaluated by comparing algorithmic classification with manual classification for three specialties. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The resulting AACT database features study design attributes parsed into discrete fields, integrated metadata, and an integrated MeSH thesaurus, and is available for download as Oracle extracts (.dmp file and text format. This publicly-accessible dataset will facilitate analysis of studies and permit detailed characterization and analysis of the U.S. clinical trials enterprise as a whole. In

  8. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer has been proven efficacious but morbidity and oncological outcome need to be investigated in a randomized clinical trial. Trial design: Non-inferiority randomized clinical trial. METHODS: The COLOR II trial is an ongoing international randomized...... clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...... analysis. RESULTS: By July 2008, 27 hospitals from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Denmark, South Korea and Canada had included 739 patients. The intra-operative conversion rate in the laparoscopic group was 17%. Distribution of age, location of the tumor and radiotherapy were equal...

  9. 'Cloud computing' and clinical trials: report from an ECRIN workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Danielyan, Edgar; Robertshaw, Steve; Legré, Yannick; Clivio, Luca; Demotes, Jacques

    2015-07-29

    Growing use of cloud computing in clinical trials prompted the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network, a European non-profit organisation established to support multinational clinical research, to organise a one-day workshop on the topic to clarify potential benefits and risks. The issues that arose in that workshop are summarised and include the following: the nature of cloud computing and the cloud computing industry; the risks in using cloud computing services now; the lack of explicit guidance on this subject, both generally and with reference to clinical trials; and some possible ways of reducing risks. There was particular interest in developing and using a European 'community cloud' specifically for academic clinical trial data. It was recognised that the day-long workshop was only the start of an ongoing process. Future discussion needs to include clarification of trial-specific regulatory requirements for cloud computing and involve representatives from the relevant regulatory bodies.

  10. Challenges in recruitment and retention of clinical trial subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Ashish Kadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Successful recruitment of patients is known to