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Sample records for group agatston score

  1. Controversies about effects of low-kilovoltage MDCT acquisition on Agatston calcium scoring.

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    Deprez, Fabrice C; Vlassenbroek, Alain; Ghaye, Benoît; Raaijmakers, Rolf; Coche, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Recent articles have advocated the possibility of obtaining Agatston coronary calcium scoring at 100 kVp by using a single adapted elevated calcium threshold. To evaluate the influence of kilovoltage potential protocols on the Agatston score, we acquired successive scans of a calcium scoring phantom at 4 levels of kilovoltage potential (80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp, 55 mAs) and measured semiautomatically the individual and the total Agatston score of 6 inserts (of 5-mm and 3-mm diameter) containing hydroxyapatite at different concentrations (800, 400, 200 mg/cm(3)). Our results showed that Agatston scores obtained at various low-kilovoltage potential protocols can be highly overestimated in some particular cases. At 80 kVp, for example, mean measured Agatston score was multiplied by a factor from 1.06 (5-mm highest density insert) to 2.67 (3-mm lowest density insert) compared with the Agatston scores performed at 120 kVp. Indeed in the one hand, reducing kilovoltage potential in multidetector CT acquisitions increase the CT density of coronary calcifications that can be measured on the reconstructed images. On the other hand, Agatston score is a multi-threshold measurement (with a step weighting function). Consequently low kilovoltage potential can lead to overweight some calcifications scores. For these reasons, Agatston score with low kilovoltage potential acquisition cannot be reliably adapted by a unique recalibration of the standard calcium attenuation threshold of 130 HU and requires a standardized CT acquisition protocol at 120 kVp. Alternatives to performing low-dose coronary artery calcium scans are either using coronary calcium scans with reduced tube current (low mAs) at 120 kVp with the iterative reconstructions or using mass/volume scoring (not influenced by kilovoltage potential variations). Finally, we emphasized that incorrect Agatston score evaluation may have important clinical, financial, and health care implications.

  2. AUTOMATED AGATSTON SCORE COMPUTATION IN A LARGE DATASET OF NON ECG-GATED CHEST COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

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    González, Germán; Washko, George R; Estépar, Raúl San José

    2016-04-01

    The Agatston score, computed from ECG-gated computed tomography (CT), is a well established metric of coronary artery disease. It has been recently shown that the Agatston score computed from chest CT (non ECG-gated) studies is highly correlated with the Agatston score computed from cardiac CT scans. In this work we present an automated method to compute the Agatston score from chest CT images. Coronary arteries calcifications (CACs) are defined as voxels contained within the coronary arteries with a value greater or equal to 130 Hounsfield Units (HU). CACs are automatically detected in chest CT studies by locating the heart, generating a region of interest around it, thresholding the image in such region and applying a set of rules to discriminate CACs from calcifications in the main vessels or from metallic implants. We evaluate the methodology in a large cohort of 1500 patients for whom manual reference standard is available. Our results show that the Pearson correlation coefficient between manual and automated Agatston score is ρ = 0.86 (p < 0.0001).

  3. Cardiovascular events in acromegaly: distinct role of Agatston and Framingham score in the 5-year prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragonese, Marta; Alibrandi, Angela; Di Bella, Gianluca; Salamone, Ignazio; Puglisi, Soraya; Cotta, Oana Ruxandra; Torre, Maria Luisa; Ferrau, Francesco; Ruggeri, Rosaria Maddalena; Trimarchi, Francesco; Cannavo, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    Prediction of ischemic cardiovascular events (ICE) in acromegalic patients stratified accordingly with Framingham (FS) and Agatston score (AS). 32 patients with active (group A (0)) and 20 with controlled (group B (0)) acromegaly have been enrolled. During the 5-year follow-up, 19 out of 32 patients in group A (0) reached disease control. At entry, FS and AS, by an eight-slice MDCT scanner, were calculated in all patients. ICE were diagnosed by autopsy, if lethal, and by electrocardiography and/or echocardiography, if non-lethal. Overall, 9.6 % of patients died for lethal ICE. AS >400, but not high FS at entry, was associated with increased risk of lethal ICE. Lethal ICE had occurred in two patients of group A (0) and three of group B (0) (p NS), while a non-lethal ICE had occurred in two cases of the former and in other two of the latter group (p NS). Either FS or AS was correlated with the risk for ICE overall (p 400 is associated with increased risk of lethal ICE, while high FS is associated with reduced life expectancy, regardless of disease control.

  4. Impact of hybrid iterative reconstruction on Agatston coronary artery calcium scores in comparison to filtered back projection in native cardiac CT; Einfluss der hybriden iterativen Rekonstruktion bei der nativen CT des Herzens auf die Agatston-Kalziumscores der Koronararterien

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    Obmann, V.C.; Heverhagen, J.T. [Inselspital - University Hospital Bern (Switzerland). University Inst. for Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology; Klink, T. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Stork, A.; Begemann, P.G.C. [Roentgeninstitut Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Laqmani, A.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-05-15

    To investigate whether the effects of hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) on coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurements using the Agatston score lead to changes in assignment of patients to cardiovascular risk groups compared to filtered back projection (FBP). 68 patients (mean age 61.5 years; 48 male; 20 female) underwent prospectively ECG-gated, non-enhanced, cardiac 256-MSCT for coronary calcium scoring. Scanning parameters were as follows: Tube voltage, 120 kV; Mean tube current time-product 63.67 mAs (50 - 150 mAs); collimation, 2 x 128 x 0.625 mm. Images were reconstructed with FBP and with HIR at all levels (L1 to L7). Two independent readers measured Agatston scores of all reconstructions and assigned patients to cardiovascular risk groups. Scores of HIR and FBP reconstructions were correlated (Spearman). Interobserver agreement and variability was assessed with k-statistics and Bland-Altmann-Plots. Agatston scores of HIR reconstructions were closely correlated with FBP reconstructions (L1, R = 0.9996; L2, R = 0.9995; L3, R = 0.9991; L4, R = 0.986; L5, R = 0.9986; L6, R = 0.9987; and L7, R = 0.9986). In comparison to FBP, HIR led to reduced Agatston scores between 97% (L1) and 87.4% (L7) of the FBP values. Using HIR iterations L1-L3, all patients were assigned to identical risk groups as after FPB reconstruction. In 5.4% of patients the risk group after HIR with the maximum iteration level was different from the group after FBP reconstruction. There was an excellent correlation of Agatston scores after HIR and FBP with identical risk group assignment at levels 1 - 3 for all patients. Hence it appears that the application of HIR in routine calcium scoring does not entail any disadvantages. Thus, future studies are needed to demonstrate whether HIR is a reliable method for reducing radiation dose in coronary calcium scoring.

  5. Estimation of cardiovascular risk on routine chest CT: Ordinal coronary artery calcium scoring as an accurate predictor of Agatston score ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azour, Lea; Kadoch, Michael A; Ward, Thomas J; Eber, Corey D; Jacobi, Adam H

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) is often identified on routine chest computed tomography (CT). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether ordinal scoring of CAC on non-gated, routine chest CT is an accurate predictor of Agatston score ranges in a community-based population, and in particular to determine the accuracy of an ordinal score of zero on routine chest CT. Two thoracic radiologists reviewed consecutive same-day ECG-gated and routine non-gated chest CT scans of 222 individuals. CAC was quantified using the Agatston scoring on the ECG-gated scans, and using an ordinal method on routine scans, with a score from 0 to 12. The pattern and distribution of CAC was assessed. The correlation between routine exam ordinal scores and Agatston scores in ECG-gated exams, as well as the accuracy of assigning a zero calcium score on routine chest CT was determined. CAC was most prevalent in the left anterior descending coronary artery in both single and multi-vessel coronary artery disease. There was a strong correlation between the non-gated ordinal and ECG-gated Agatston scores (r = 0.811, p < 0.01). Excellent inter-reader agreement (k = 0.95) was shown for the presence (total ordinal score ≥1) or absence (total ordinal score = 0) of CAC on routine chest CT. The negative predictive value for a total ordinal score of zero on routine CT was 91.6% (95% CI, 85.1-95.9). Total ordinal scores of 0, 1-3, 4-5, and ≥6 corresponded to average Agatston scores of 0.52 (0.3-0.8), 98.7 (78.2-117.1), 350.6 (264.9-436.3) and 1925.4 (1526.9-2323.9). Visual assessment of CAC on non-gated routine chest CT accurately predicts Agatston score ranges, including the zero score, in ECG-gated CT. Inclusion of this information in radiology reports may be useful to convey important information on cardiovascular risk, particularly premature atherosclerosis in younger patients. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Prognostic Value of Gai's Plaque Score and Agatston Coronary Artery Calcium Score for Functionally Significant Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Zhang; Shuang Yang; Lu-Yue Gai; Zhi-Qi Han; Qian Xin; Xiao-Bo Yang; Jun-Jie Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background:The prognostic values of the coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) score for predicting future cardiovascular events have been previously demonstrated in numerous studies.However,few studies have used the rich information available from CCTA to detect functionally significant coronary lesions.We sought to compare the prognostic values of Gai's plaque score and the coronary artery calcium score (CACS) of CCTA for predicting functionally significant coronary lesions,using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the gold standard.Methods:We retrospectively analyzed 107 visually assessed significant coronary lesions in 88 patients (mean age,59.6 ± 10.2 years;76.14% of males) who underwent CCTA,invasive coronary angiography,and invasive FFR measurement.An FFR <0.80 indicated hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis.Lesions were divided into two groups using an FFR cutoff value of 0.80.We compared Gai's plaque scores and CACS between the two groups and evaluated the correlations of these scores with FFR.The statistical methods included unpaired t-test,Mann-Whitney U-test,and Spearman's correlation coefficients.Results:Coronary lesions with FFR <0.80 had higher Gai's scores than those with FFR ≥0.80.Gai's score had the strongest correlation with FFR (r =-0.48,P < 0.01) and had a greater area under the curve =0.72 (95% confidence interval:0.61-0.82;P < 0.01) than the CACS of whole arteries and a single artery.Conclusions:Both CACS in a single artery and Gai's plaque score demonstrated a good capacity to assess functionally significant coronary artery stenosis when compared to the gold standard FFR.However,Gai's plaque score was more predictive of FFR <0.80.Gai's score can be easily calculated in daily clinical practice and could be used when considering revascularization.

  7. Reliable categorisation of visual scoring of coronary artery calcification on low-dose CT for lung cancer screening: validation with the standard Agatston score

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    Huang, Yi-Luan; Wu, Fu-Zong; Wang, Yen-Chi [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung 813 (China); National Yang Ming University, Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Ju, Yu-Jeng [National Taiwan University, Department of Psychology, Taipei (China); Mar, Guang-Yuan [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Kaohsiung 813 (China); Chuo, Chiung-Chen [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung 813 (China); Lin, Huey-Shyan [Fooyin University, School of Nursing, Kaohsiung (China); Wu, Ming-Ting [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung 813 (China); National Yang Ming University, Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China)

    2013-05-15

    To validate the reliability of the visual coronary artery calcification score (VCACS) on low-dose CT (LDCT) for concurrent screening of CAC and lung cancer. We enrolled 401 subjects receiving LDCT for lung cancer screening and ECG-gated CT for the Agatston score (AS). LDCT was reconstructed with 3- and 5-mm slice thickness (LDCT-3mm and LDCT-5mm respectively) for VCACS to obtain VCACS-3mm and VCACS-5mm respectively. After a training session comprising 32 cases, two observers performed four-scale VCACS (absent, mild, moderate, severe) of 369 data sets independently, the results were compared with four-scale AS (0, 1-100, 101-400, >400). CACs were present in 39.6 % (146/369) of subjects. The sensitivity of VCACS-3mm was higher than for VCACS-5mm (83.6 % versus 74.0 %). The median of AS of the 24 false-negative cases in VCACS-3mm was 2.3 (range 1.1-21.1). The false-negative rate for detecting AS {>=} 10 on LDCT-3mm was 1.9 %. VCACS-3mm had higher concordance with AS than VCACS-5mm (k = 0.813 versus k = 0.685). An extended test of VCACS-3mm for four junior observers showed high inter-observer reliability (intra-class correlation = 0.90) and good concordance with AS (k = 0.662-0.747). This study validated the reliability of VCACS on LDCT for lung cancer screening and showed that LDCT-3mm was more feasible than LDCT-5mm for CAD risk stratification. (orig.)

  8. Stability of cooperation under image scoring in group interactions.

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    Nax, Heinrich H; Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-07-15

    Image scoring sustains cooperation in the repeated two-player prisoner's dilemma through indirect reciprocity, even though defection is the uniquely dominant selfish behaviour in the one-shot game. Many real-world dilemma situations, however, firstly, take place in groups and, secondly, lack the necessary transparency to inform subjects reliably of others' individual past actions. Instead, there is revelation of information regarding groups, which allows for 'group scoring' but not for image scoring. Here, we study how sensitive the positive results related to image scoring are to information based on group scoring. We combine analytic results and computer simulations to specify the conditions for the emergence of cooperation. We show that under pure group scoring, that is, under the complete absence of image-scoring information, cooperation is unsustainable. Away from this extreme case, however, the necessary degree of image scoring relative to group scoring depends on the population size and is generally very small. We thus conclude that the positive results based on image scoring apply to a much broader range of informational settings that are relevant in the real world than previously assumed.

  9. Group differences in the heritability of items and test scores

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    Wicherts, J.M.; Johnson, W.

    2009-01-01

    It is important to understand potential sources of group differences in the heritability of intelligence test scores. On the basis of a basic item response model we argue that heritabilities which are based on dichotomous item scores normally do not generalize from one sample to the next. If groups

  10. Development of Copeland Score Methods for Determine Group Decisions

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    Ermatita

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Voting method requires to determine group decision of decision by each decision maker in group. Determination of decisions by group of decision maker requires voting methods. Copeland score is one of voting method that has been developed by previous researchers. This method does not accommodate the weight of the expertise and interests of each decision maker. This paper proposed the voting method using Copeland score with added weighting. The method has developed of considering the weight of the expertise and interests of the decision maker. The method accordance with the problems encountered of group decision making . Expertise and interests of decision makers are given weight based on their expertises of decision maker contribution of the problems faced by the group to determine the decision.

  11. Functional movement screen scores in a group of running athletes.

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    Loudon, Janice K; Parkerson-Mitchell, Amy J; Hildebrand, Laurie D; Teague, Connie

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mean values of the functional movement screen (FMS) in a group of long-distance runners. The secondary aims were to investigate whether the FMS performance differed between sexes and between young and older runners. Forty-three runners, 16 women (mean age = 33.5 years, height = 165.2 cm, weight = 56.3 kg, and body mass index [BMI] = 20.6) and 27 men (mean age = 39.3 years, height = 177.6 cm, weight = 75.8 kg, and BMI = 24.2) performed the FMS. All the runners were injury-free and ran >30 km·wk. Independent t-tests were performed on the composite scores to examine the differences between men and women and also between young (40 years). Contingency tables (2 × 2) were developed for each of the 7 screening tests to further look at the differences in groups for each single test. The χ values were calculated to determine significant differences. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. There was no significant difference in the composite score between women and men. There were significant differences between the sexes in the push-up and straight leg test scores, with the women scoring better on each test. A significant difference was found in the composite scores between younger and older runners (p score differences were found for the squat, hurdle step, and in-line lunge tests with the younger runners scoring better. This study provided mean values for the FMS in a cohort of long-distance runners. These values can be used as a reference for comparing FMST scores in other runners who are screened with this tool.

  12. The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative: Working to Reverse the Obesity Epidemic through Academically Based Community Service

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    Johnston, Francis E.

    2009-01-01

    The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative (AUNI) presents a fruitful partnership between faculty and students at a premier research university and members of the surrounding community aimed at addressing the problem of childhood obesity. AUNI uses a problem-solving approach to learning by focusing course activities, including service-learning, on…

  13. The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative: Working to Reverse the Obesity Epidemic through Academically Based Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Francis E.

    2009-01-01

    The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative (AUNI) presents a fruitful partnership between faculty and students at a premier research university and members of the surrounding community aimed at addressing the problem of childhood obesity. AUNI uses a problem-solving approach to learning by focusing course activities, including service-learning, on…

  14. Multidimensional Linking for Domain Scores and Overall Scores for Nonequivalent Groups

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    Yao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act requires state assessments to report not only overall scores but also domain scores. To see the information on students' overall achievement, progress, and detailed strengths and weaknesses, and thereby identify areas for improvement in educational quality, students' performances across years or across forms need to be…

  15. Technical feasibility and validation of a coronary artery calcium scoring system using CT coronary angiography images

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    Pavitt, Christopher W. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Cardiology, London (United Kingdom); Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Harron, Katie [Institute of Child Health, UCL, Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, London (United Kingdom); Lindsay, Alistair C.; Ray, Robin [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Cardiology, London (United Kingdom); Zielke, Sayeh; Rubens, Michael B. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Gordon, Daniel [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Padley, Simon P. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Nicol, Edward D. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Cardiology, London (United Kingdom); Royal Brompton Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    We validate a novel CT coronary angiography (CCTA) coronary calcium scoring system. Calcium was quantified on CCTA images using a new patient-specific attenuation threshold: mean + 2SD of intra-coronary contrast density (HU). Using 335 patient data sets a conversion factor (CF) for predicting CACS from CCTA scores (CCTAS) was derived and validated in a separate cohort (n = 168). Bland-Altman analysis and weighted kappa for MESA centiles and Agatston risk groupings were calculated. Multivariable linear regression yielded a CF: CACS = (1.185 x CCTAS) + (0.002 x CCTAS x attenuation threshold). When applied to CCTA data sets there was excellent correlation (r = 0.95; p < 0.0001) and agreement (mean difference -10.4 [95 % limits of agreement -258.9 to 238.1]) with traditional calcium scores. Agreement was better for calcium scores below 500; however, MESA percentile agreement was better for high risk patients. Risk stratification was excellent (Agatston groups k = 0.88 and MESA centiles k = 0.91). Eliminating the dedicated CACS scan decreased patient radiation exposure by approximately one-third. CCTA calcium scores can accurately predict CACS using a simple, individualized, semiautomated approach reducing acquisition time and radiation exposure when evaluating patients for CAD. This method is not affected by the ROI location, imaging protocol, or tube voltage strengthening its clinical applicability. (orig.)

  16. Prediction of WAIS Scores from Group Ability Tests

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    Watson, Charles G.; Klett, William G.

    1973-01-01

    In a search for an adequate but efficient substitute, the authors have instituted three evaluations of the relationships between potential WAIS-substitutes and the WAIS itself. The present report describes the first of these researches-- a study of the relationships between the four group ability tests and the WAIS in a mental hospital setting.…

  17. Does Matching Student and Teacher Racial/Ethnic Group Improve Math Scores

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    2001-03-01

    We investigated whether students earn higher math test scores when they have a teacher whose racial/ ethnic group is the same as their own. Using data...students score higher when they have teachers whose racial/ ethnic group is the same as their own. In contrast, Hispanic and black examinees did not...earn higher scores when they had teachers whose racial/ ethnic group was the same as their own.

  18. Parametric analyses of summative scores may lead to conflicting inferences when comparing groups: A simulation study.

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    Khan, Asaduzzaman; Chien, Chi-Wen; Bagraith, Karl S

    2015-04-01

    To investigate whether using a parametric statistic in comparing groups leads to different conclusions when using summative scores from rating scales compared with using their corresponding Rasch-based measures. A Monte Carlo simulation study was designed to examine between-group differences in the change scores derived from summative scores from rating scales, and those derived from their corresponding Rasch-based measures, using 1-way analysis of variance. The degree of inconsistency between the 2 scoring approaches (i.e. summative and Rasch-based) was examined, using varying sample sizes, scale difficulties and person ability conditions. This simulation study revealed scaling artefacts that could arise from using summative scores rather than Rasch-based measures for determining the changes between groups. The group differences in the change scores were statistically significant for summative scores under all test conditions and sample size scenarios. However, none of the group differences in the change scores were significant when using the corresponding Rasch-based measures. This study raises questions about the validity of the inference on group differences of summative score changes in parametric analyses. Moreover, it provides a rationale for the use of Rasch-based measures, which can allow valid parametric analyses of rating scale data.

  19. The Effects of Group Members' Personalities on a Test Taker's L2 Group Oral Discussion Test Scores

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    Ockey, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    The second language group oral is a test of second language speaking proficiency, in which a group of three or more English language learners discuss an assigned topic without interaction with interlocutors. Concerns expressed about the extent to which test takers' personal characteristics affect the scores of others in the group have limited its…

  20. The Effect of Small Group Discussion on Cutoff Scores during Standard Setting

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    Deunk, Marjolein I.; van Kuijk, Mechteld F.; Bosker, Roel J.

    2014-01-01

    Standard setting methods, like the Bookmark procedure, are used to assist education experts in formulating performance standards. Small group discussion is meant to help these experts in setting more reliable and valid cutoff scores. This study is an analysis of 15 small group discussions during two standards setting trajectories and their effect…

  1. Prognostic Gleason grade grouping: data based on the modified Gleason scoring system

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    Pierorazio, Phillip M.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Partin, Alan W.; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective • To investigate pathological and short-term outcomes since the most recent Gleason system modifications by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) in an attempt to divide the current Gleason grading system into prognostically accurate Gleason grade groups. Patients and Methods • We queried the Johns Hopkins Radical Prostatectomy Database (1982–2011), approved by the institutional review board, for men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) without a tertiary pattern since 2004 and identified 7869 men. • Multivariable models were created using preoperative and postoperative variables; prognostic grade group (Gleason grade ≤6; 3 + 4; 4 + 3; 8; 9–10) was among the strongest predictors of biochemical recurrence-free (BFS) survival. Results • Significant differences were noted among the Gleason grade groups at biopsy; differences were noted in the race, PSA level, clinical stage, number of positive cores at biopsy and the maximum percentage of positive cores among the Gleason grade groups at RP. • With a median (range) follow-up of 2 (1–7) years, 5-year BFS rates for men with Gleason grade ≤6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8 and 9–10 tumours at biopsy were 94.6, 82.7, 65.1, 63.1 and 34.5%, respectively (P ISUP modifications to the Gleason grading system for prostate carcinoma accurately categorize patients by pathological findings and short-term biochemical outcomes but, while retaining the essence of the Gleason system, there is a need for a change in its reporting to more closely reflect tumour behaviour. • We propose reporting Gleason grades, including prognostic grade groups which accurately reflect prognosis as follows: Gleason score ≤6 (prognostic grade group I); Gleason score 3+4=7 (prognostic grade group II); Gleason score 4+3=7 (prognostic grade group III); Gleason score 4+4=8 (prognostic grade group (IV); and Gleason score 9–10 (prognostic grade group (V). PMID:23464824

  2. An Evaluation of Latent Growth Models for Propensity Score Matched Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Walter L.; Sandbach, Robert; Jin, Rong; MacInnes, Jann W.; Jackman, M. Grace-Anne

    2012-01-01

    Because random assignment is not possible in observational studies, estimates of treatment effects might be biased due to selection on observable and unobservable variables. To strengthen causal inference in longitudinal observational studies of multiple treatments, we present 4 latent growth models for propensity score matched groups, and…

  3. Predictive Value of Tokuhashi Scoring Systems in Spinal Metastases, Focusing on Various Primary Tumor Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Miao; Bünger, Cody; Haisheng, Li

    2012-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 448 patients with spinal metastases from a variety of cancer groups. OBJECTIVE: To determine the specific predictive value of the Tokuhashi scoring system (T12) and its revised version (T15) in spinal metastases of various primary tumors. S...

  4. Ethnic group differences in cardiovascular risk assessment scores: national cross-sectional study.

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    Dalton, Andrew R H; Bottle, Alex; Soljak, Michael; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    There are marked inequalities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and outcomes between ethnic groups. CVD risk scores are increasingly used in preventive medicine and should aim to accurately reflect differences between ethnic groups. Ethnicity, as an independent risk factor for CVD, can be accounted for in CVD risk scores primarily using two methods, either directly incorporating it as a risk factor in the algorithm or through a post hoc adjustment of risk. We aim to compare these two methods in terms of their prediction of CVD across ethnic groups using representative national data from England. A cross-sectional study using data from the Health Survey for England. We measured ethnic group differences in risk estimation between the QRISK2, which includes ethnicity and Joint British Societies 2 (JBS2) algorithm, which uses post hoc risk adjustment factor for South Asian men. The QRISK2 score produces lower median estimates of CVD risk than JBS2 overall (6.6% [lower quartile-upper quartile (LQ-UQ)=4.0-18.6] compared with 9.3% [LQ-UQ=2.3-16.9]). Differences in median risk scores are significantly greater in South Asian men (7.5% [LQ-UQ=3.6-12.5]) compared with White men (3.0% [LQ-UQ=0.7-5.9]). Using QRISK2, 19.1% [95% confidence interval (CI)=16.2-22.0] fewer South Asian men are designated at high risk compared with 8.8% (95% CI=5.9-7.8) fewer in White men. Across all ethnic groups, women had a lower median QRISK2 score (0.72 [LQ-UQ=- 0.6 to 2.13]), although relatively more (2.0% [95% CI=1.4-2.6]) were at high risk than with JBS2. Ethnicity is an important CVD risk factor. Current scoring tools used in the UK produce significantly different estimates of CVD risk within ethnic groups, particularly in South Asian men. Work to accurately estimate CVD risk in ethnic minority groups is important if CVD prevention programmes are to address health inequalities.

  5. Grouped to Achieve: Are There Benefits to Assigning Students to Heterogeneous Cooperative Learning Groups Based on Pre-Test Scores?

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    Werth, Arman Karl

    Cooperative learning has been one of the most widely used instructional practices around the world since the early 1980's. Small learning groups have been in existence since the beginning of the human race. These groups have grown in their variance and complexity overtime. Classrooms are getting more diverse every year and instructors need a way to take advantage of this diversity to improve learning. The purpose of this study was to see if heterogeneous cooperative learning groups based on student achievement can be used as a differentiated instructional strategy to increase students' ability to demonstrate knowledge of science concepts and ability to do engineering design. This study includes two different groups made up of two different middle school science classrooms of 25-30 students. These students were given an engineering design problem to solve within cooperative learning groups. One class was put into heterogeneous cooperative learning groups based on student's pre-test scores. The other class was grouped based on random assignment. The study measured the difference between each class's pre-post gains, student's responses to a group interaction form and interview questions addressing their perceptions of the makeup of their groups. The findings of the study were that there was no significant difference between learning gains for the treatment and comparison groups. There was a significant difference between the treatment and comparison groups in student perceptions of their group's ability to stay on task and manage their time efficiently. Both the comparison and treatment groups had a positive perception of the composition of their cooperative learning groups.

  6. CDI Scores in Pediatric Psychiatric Inpatients: A Brief Retrospective Static Group Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Friedberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Children's Depression Inventory is a widely researched and clinically useful measurement tool. However, research on the CDI is limited by an overreliance on outpatient samples. This is unfortunate because the CDI holds potential for use in inpatient settings. Method. This retrospective static group comparison examined the CDI total scores contained in 69 pediatric psychiatric inpatients treated at a large academic medical center. Patients were sorted into static groups (depressive spectrum, nondepressive spectrum based on their diagnoses at admission. Results. Independent t-tests revealed that the CDI total scores discriminated between patients presenting with depressive spectrum disorders and youngsters admitted with non-depressive disorders. Conclusion. The results suggested that the CDI is a rather dimensional measure, which reflects broad negative affectivity as well as particular depressive symptoms in pediatric psychiatric inpatients.

  7. "Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery?: Response"

    OpenAIRE

    González-Pérez Antonio; Gayán Javier; Ruiz Agustín

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A response to Toplak et al: Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery? BMC Genomics 2010, 11:58. Background The genomewide evaluation of genetic epistasis is a computationally demanding task, and a current challenge in Genetics. HFCC (Hypothesis-Free Clinical Cloning) is one of the methods that have been suggested for genomewide epistasis analysis. In order to perform an exhaustive search of epistasis, HFCC has implemented several tools ...

  8. The impact of CT radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction algorithms from four different vendors on coronary calcium scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Jong, Pim A. de; Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Leiner, Tim [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bleys, Ronald L.A.W. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Anatomy, Utrecht (Netherlands); Das, Marco; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Buls, Nico; Mey, Johan de [UZ Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-09-15

    To analyse the effects of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on coronary calcium scoring (CCS). Fifteen ex vivo human hearts were examined in an anthropomorphic chest phantom using computed tomography (CT) systems from four vendors and examined at four dose levels using unenhanced prospectively ECG-triggered protocols. Tube voltage was 120 kV and tube current differed between protocols. CT data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and reduced dose CT data with IR. CCS was quantified with Agatston scores, calcification mass and calcification volume. Differences were analysed with the Friedman test. Fourteen hearts showed coronary calcifications. Dose reduction with FBP did not significantly change Agatston scores, calcification volumes and calcification masses (P > 0.05). Maximum differences in Agatston scores were 76, 26, 51 and 161 units, in calcification volume 97, 27, 42 and 162 mm{sup 3}, and in calcification mass 23, 23, 20 and 48 mg, respectively. IR resulted in a trend towards lower Agatston scores and calcification volumes with significant differences for one vendor (P < 0.05). Median relative differences between reference FBP and reduced dose IR for Agatston scores remained within 2.0-4.6 %, 1.0-5.3 %, 1.2-7.7 % and 2.6-4.5 %, for calcification volumes within 2.4-3.9 %, 1.0-5.6 %, 1.1-6.4 % and 3.7-4.7 %, for calcification masses within 1.9-4.1 %, 0.9-7.8 %, 2.9-4.7 % and 2.5-3.9 %, respectively. IR resulted in increased, decreased or similar calcification masses. CCS derived from standard FBP acquisitions was not affected by radiation dose reductions up to 80 %. IR resulted in a trend towards lower Agatston scores and calcification volumes. (orig.)

  9. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the environmental effect of the atom under consideration. We have developed a novel knowledge-based statistical energy function for protein-ligand complexes which takes atomic environment in to account hence functional group as a singular entity. The proposed knowledge based scoring function is fast, simple to construct, easy to use and moreover it tackle the existing problem of handling molecular orientation in active site pocket. We have designed and used Functional group based Ligand retrieval (FBLR) system which can identify and detect the orientation of functional groups in ligand. This decoy searching was used to build the above KBSF to quantify the activity and affinity of high resolution protein-ligand complexes. We have proposed the probable use of these decoys in molecular build-up as a de-novo drug designing approach. We have also discussed the possible use of the said KSBF in pharmacophore fragment detection and pseudo center based fragment alignment procedure. PMID:19255647

  10. Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demsar Janez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational methods that infer single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP interactions from phenotype data may uncover new biological mechanisms in non-Mendelian diseases. However, practical aspects of such analysis face many problems. Present experimental studies typically use SNP arrays with hundreds of thousands of SNPs but record only hundreds of samples. Candidate SNP pairs inferred by interaction analysis may include a high proportion of false positives. Recently, Gayan et al. (2008 proposed to reduce the number of false positives by combining results of interaction analysis performed on subsets of data (replication groups, rather than analyzing the entire data set directly. If performing as hypothesized, replication groups scoring could improve interaction analysis and also any type of feature ranking and selection procedure in systems biology. Because Gayan et al. do not compare their approach to the standard interaction analysis techniques, we here investigate if replication groups indeed reduce the number of reported false positive interactions. Results A set of simulated and false interaction-imputed experimental SNP data sets were used to compare the inference of SNP-SNP interactions by means of replication groups to the standard approach where the entire data set was directly used to score all candidate SNP pairs. In all our experiments, the inference of interactions from the entire data set (e.g. without using the replication groups reported fewer false positives. Conclusions With respect to the direct scoring approach the utility of replication groups does not reduce false positive rates, and may, depending on the data set, often perform worse.

  11. The Adjustment of Offspring of Within-Group and Interracial/Intercultural Marriages: A Comparison of Personality Factor Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Nagoshi, Craig T.

    1986-01-01

    Results indicated offspring of within-group versus across-racial/ethnic marriages did not differ in personality test scores. As compared with offspring of within-group marriages, male offspring of across-group marriages scored higher on a factor measuring socially desirable traits and lower on a factor measuring intraception, while female…

  12. Assessment of the EuroSCORE risk scoring system for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery in a group of Iranian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Jamaati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Previous studies around the world indicated validity and accuracy of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE risk scoring system we evaluated the EuroSCORE risk scoring system for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery in a group of Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: In this cohort 2220 patients more than 18 years, who were performed CABG surgery in Massih Daneshvari Hospital, from January 2004 to March 2010 were recruited. Predicted mortality risk scores were calculated using logistic EuroSCORE and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and compared with observed mortality. Calibration was measured by the Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL test and discrimination by using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve area. Results: Of the 2220 patients, in hospital deaths occurred in 270 patients (mortality rate of 12.2%. The accuracy of mortality prediction in the logistic EuroSCORE and APACHE II model was 89.1%; in the local EuroSCORE (logistic was 91.89%; and in the local EuroSCORE support vector machines (SVM was 98.6%. The area under curve for ROC curve, was 0.724 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.88 for logistic EuroSCORE; 0.836 (95% CI: 0.731-0.942 for local EuroSCORE (logistic; 0.978 (95% CI: 0.937-1 for Local EuroSCORE (SVM; and 0.832 (95% CI: 0.723-0.941 for APACHE II model. The HL test showed good calibration for the local EuroSCORE (SVM, APACHE II model and local EuroSCORE (logistic (P = 0.823, P = 0.748 and P = 0.06 respectively; but there was a significant difference between expected and observed mortality according to EuroSCORE model (P = 0.033. Conclusion: We detected logistic EuroSCORE risk model is not applicable on Iranian patients undergoing CABG surgery.

  13. Application of a Propensity Score Approach for Risk Adjustment in Profiling Multiple Physician Groups on Asthma Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Chan; Frangakis, Constantine; Dominici, Francesca; Diette, Gregory B; Wu, Albert W

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To develop a propensity score-based risk adjustment method to estimate the performance of 20 physician groups and to compare performance rankings using our method to a standard hierarchical regression-based risk adjustment method. Data Sources/Study Setting Mailed survey of patients from 20 California physician groups between July 1998 and February 1999. Study Design A cross-sectional analysis of physician group performance using patient satisfaction with asthma care. We compared the performance of the 20 physician groups using a novel propensity score-based risk adjustment method. More specifically, by using a multinomial logistic regression model we estimated for each patient the propensity scores, or probabilities, of having been treated by each of the 20 physician groups. To adjust for different distributions of characteristics across groups, patients cared for by a given group were first stratified into five strata based on their propensity of being in that group. Then, strata-specific performance was combined across the five strata. We compared our propensity score method to hierarchical model-based risk adjustment without using propensity scores. The impact of different risk-adjustment methods on performance was measured in terms of percentage changes in absolute and quintile ranking (AR, QR), and weighted κ of agreement on QR. Results The propensity score-based risk adjustment method balanced the distributions of all covariates among the 20 physician groups, providing evidence for validity. The propensity score-based method and the hierarchical model-based method without propensity scores provided substantially different rankings (75 percent of groups differed in AR, 50 percent differed in QR, weighted κ=0.69). Conclusions We developed and tested a propensity score method for profiling multiple physician groups. We found that our method could balance the distributions of covariates across groups and yielded substantially different profiles

  14. "Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery?: Response"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Pérez Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A response to Toplak et al: Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery? BMC Genomics 2010, 11:58. Background The genomewide evaluation of genetic epistasis is a computationally demanding task, and a current challenge in Genetics. HFCC (Hypothesis-Free Clinical Cloning is one of the methods that have been suggested for genomewide epistasis analysis. In order to perform an exhaustive search of epistasis, HFCC has implemented several tools and data filters, such as the use of multiple replication groups, and direction of effect and control filters. A recent article has claimed that the use of multiple replication groups (as implemented in HFCC does not reduce the false positive rate, and we hereby try to clarify these issues. Results/Discussion HFCC uses, as an analysis strategy, the possibility of replicating findings in multiple replication groups, in order to select a liberal subset of preliminary results that are above a statistical criterion and consistent in direction of effect. We show that the use of replication groups and the direction filter reduces the false positive rate of a study, although at the expense of lowering the overall power of the study. A post-hoc analysis of these selected signals in the combined sample could then be performed to select the most promising results. Conclusion Replication of results in independent samples is generally used in scientific studies to establish credibility in a finding. Nonetheless, the combined analysis of several datasets is known to be a preferable and more powerful strategy for the selection of top signals. HFCC is a flexible and complete analysis tool, and one of its analysis options combines these two strategies: A preliminary multiple replication group analysis to eliminate inconsistent false positive results, and a post-hoc combined-group analysis to select the top signals.

  15. "Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery?: Response"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A response to Toplak et al: Does replication groups scoring reduce false positive rate in SNP interaction discovery? BMC Genomics 2010, 11:58. Background The genomewide evaluation of genetic epistasis is a computationally demanding task, and a current challenge in Genetics. HFCC (Hypothesis-Free Clinical Cloning) is one of the methods that have been suggested for genomewide epistasis analysis. In order to perform an exhaustive search of epistasis, HFCC has implemented several tools and data filters, such as the use of multiple replication groups, and direction of effect and control filters. A recent article has claimed that the use of multiple replication groups (as implemented in HFCC) does not reduce the false positive rate, and we hereby try to clarify these issues. Results/Discussion HFCC uses, as an analysis strategy, the possibility of replicating findings in multiple replication groups, in order to select a liberal subset of preliminary results that are above a statistical criterion and consistent in direction of effect. We show that the use of replication groups and the direction filter reduces the false positive rate of a study, although at the expense of lowering the overall power of the study. A post-hoc analysis of these selected signals in the combined sample could then be performed to select the most promising results. Conclusion Replication of results in independent samples is generally used in scientific studies to establish credibility in a finding. Nonetheless, the combined analysis of several datasets is known to be a preferable and more powerful strategy for the selection of top signals. HFCC is a flexible and complete analysis tool, and one of its analysis options combines these two strategies: A preliminary multiple replication group analysis to eliminate inconsistent false positive results, and a post-hoc combined-group analysis to select the top signals. PMID:20576100

  16. Internal Consistency and Power When Comparing Total Scores from Two Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchard, Kimberly A; Brouwers, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Researchers now know that when theoretical reliability increases, power can increase, decrease, or stay the same. However, no analytic research has examined the relationship of power to the most commonly used type of reliability-internal consistency-and the most commonly used measures of internal consistency, coefficient alpha and ICC(A,k). We examine the relationship between the power of independent samples t tests and internal consistency. We explicate the mathematical model upon which researchers usually calculate internal consistency, one in which total scores are calculated as the sum of observed scores on K measures. Using this model, we derive a new formula for effect size to show that power and internal consistency are influenced by many of the same parameters but not always in the same direction. Changing an experiment in one way (e.g., lengthening the measure) is likely to influence multiple parameters simultaneously; thus, there are no simple relationships between such changes and internal consistency or power. If researchers revise measures to increase internal consistency, this might not increase power. To increase power, researchers should increase sample size, select measures that assess areas where group differences are largest, and use more powerful statistical procedures (e.g., ANCOVA).

  17. Stability analysis of group decision-making under weighted scoring rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Yang

    2016-12-01

    The result of group decision-making is always unstable, influenced by some uncertain factors. It is necessary to measure and analyse the stability of the result. A measurement based on the inclined angle of two vectors is proposed in this paper, in order to measure the stabilities of the results of weighted scoring rules. The concepts of stability degree and stability angle are given, whose geometric interpretations are displayed in the case of three candidates. Then an extended measurement called the relative stability degree is discussed to analyse the comparability of stability measurements for different numbers of candidates. Furthermore, this measurement and its extension are used to aid the decision-making of new project development in a software company.

  18. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Propensity scores as a basis for equating groups: basic principles and application in clinical treatment outcome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Stephen G; Cham, Heining; Thoemmes, Felix; Renneberg, Babette; Schulze, Julian; Weiler, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    A propensity score is the probability that a participant is assigned to the treatment group based on a set of baseline covariates. Propensity scores provide an excellent basis for equating treatment groups on a large set of covariates when randomization is not possible. This article provides a nontechnical introduction to propensity scores for clinical researchers. If all important covariates are measured, then methods that equate on propensity scores can achieve balance on a large set of covariates that mimics that achieved by a randomized experiment. We present an illustration of the steps in the construction and checking of propensity scores in a study of the effectiveness of a health coach versus treatment as usual on the well-being of seriously ill individuals. We then consider alternative methods of equating groups on propensity scores and estimating treatment effects including matching, stratification, weighting, and analysis of covariance. We illustrate a sensitivity analysis that can probe for the potential effects of omitted covariates on the estimate of the causal effect. Finally, we briefly consider several practical and theoretical issues in the use of propensity scores in applied settings. Propensity score methods have advantages over alternative approaches to equating groups particularly when the treatment and control groups do not fully overlap, and there are nonlinear relationships between covariates and the outcome.

  20. Calcium score of small coronary calcifications on multidetector computed tomography: Results from a static phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groen, J.M., E-mail: jaap.groen@slaz.nl [Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Kofoed, K.F., E-mail: kkofoed@dadlnet.dk [Department of Cardiology and Radiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Zacho, M., E-mail: dls332089@vip.cybercity.dk [Department of Cardiology and Radiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Vliegenthart, R., E-mail: r.vliegenthart@umcg.nl [Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Willems, T.P., E-mail: t.p.willems@umcg.nl [Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Greuter, M.J.W., E-mail: m.j.w.greuter@umcg.nl [Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    Introduction: Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) underestimates the coronary calcium score as compared to electron beam tomography (EBT). Therefore clinical risk stratification based on MDCT calcium scoring may be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a new phantom which enables establishment of a calcium scoring protocol for MDCT that yields a calcium score comparable to the EBT values and to the physical mass. Materials and methods: A phantom containing 100 small calcifications ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 mm was scanned on EBT using a standard coronary calcium protocol. In addition, the phantom was scanned on a 320-row MDCT scanner using different scanning, reconstruction and scoring parameters (tube voltage 80–135 kV, slice thickness 0.5–3.0 mm, reconstruction kernel FC11–FC15 and threshold 110–150 HU). The Agatston and mass score of both modalities was compared and the influence of the parameters was assessed. Results: On EBT the Agatston and mass scores were between 0 and 20, and 0 and 3 mg, respectively. On MDCT the Agatston and mass scores were between 0 and 20, and 0 and 4 mg, respectively. All parameters showed an influence on the calcium score. The Agatston score on MDCT differed 52% between the 80 and 135 kV, 65% between 0.5 and 3.0 mm and 48% between FC11 and FC15. More calcifications were detected with a lower tube voltage, a smaller slice thickness, a sharper kernel and a lower threshold. Based on these observations an acquisition protocol with a tube voltage of 100 kV and two reconstructions protocols were defined with a FC12 reconstruction kernel; one with a slice thickness of 3.0 mm and a one with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm. This protocol yielded an Agatston score as close to the EBT as possible, but also a mass score as close to the physical phantom value as possible, respectively. Conclusion: With the new phantom one acquisition protocol and two reconstruction protocols can be defined which produces

  1. Reliability and validity of the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale scores: a group intelligence test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yota Uno

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study evaluated the reliability and concurrent validity of the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale, which is an intelligence test that can be administered on groups within a short period of time. METHODS: The new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition were administered to 81 subjects (mean age ± SD 15.2 ± 0.7 years residing in a juvenile detention home; reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and concurrent validity was assessed using the one-way analysis of variance intraclass correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operating characteristic analysis for screening for individuals who have a deficit in intellectual function (an FIQ<70 was performed. In addition, stratum-specific likelihood ratios for detection of intellectual disability were calculated. RESULTS: The Cronbach's alpha for the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale IQ (BIQ was 0.86, and the intraclass correlation coefficient with FIQ was 0.83. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.96. In addition, the stratum-specific likelihood ratio for the BIQ≤65 stratum was 13.8 (95% CI: 3.9-48.9, and the stratum-specific likelihood ratio for the BIQ≥76 stratum was 0.1 (95% CI: 0.03-0.4. Thus, intellectual disability could be ruled out or determined. CONCLUSION: The present results demonstrated that the new Tanaka B Intelligence Scale score had high reliability and concurrent validity with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition score. Moreover, the post-test probability for the BIQ could be calculated when screening for individuals who have a deficit in intellectual function. The new Tanaka B Intelligence Test is convenient and can be administered within a variety of settings. This enables evaluation of intellectual development even in settings where performing intelligence tests have previously been difficult.

  2. Comparison of MMPI Scores of Drug Abusers and Mayo Clinic Normative Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalano, Frank

    1980-01-01

    Compared MMPIs of 80 male and 80 female drug abusers with MMPIs of 550 male and 695 female medical patients. Male drug abusers obtained significantly higher scores than male medical patients on all clinical scales. Female drug abusers obtained significantly higher scores than female medical patients on seven scales. (Author)

  3. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    OpenAIRE

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the env...

  4. Mean Deviation of Inter-rater Scoring (MDIS): a simple tool for introducing conformity into groups of clinical investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourin, Michel; Deplanque, Dominique; Zins-Ritter, Marcel

    2004-07-01

    In spite of considerable progress over the past decade, training investigators for inter-rater reliability for clinical trials remains a major problem. The aim of the present study was to promote a new tool to increase data homogeneity by introducing conformity into groups of clinical investigators. The investigators scoring grid we are proposing-the Mean Deviation of Inter-rater Scoring (MDIS)-involves the calculation of the score deviation for each investigator relative to the median score of an expert group who had evaluated the same videotape-recorded clinical case. Whatever the scale, the score deviation is calculated as the absolute deviation value from the median score obtained by the experts for each item. The MDIS value is then evaluated from all the scores given by an investigator by dividing the total sum of the previously defined values by the number of items of the scale. Some examples from practice are given using several rating scales: (i) Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale; (ii) Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; (iii) Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale; and (iv) Positive And Negative Symptoms Scale. Finally, such a method could also be employed by experts to evaluate the quality of videotape-recorded clinical cases used in clinical trials, as well as by teachers to evaluate initial or continuous medical training.

  5. Getting into a Russell Group University: High Scores and Private Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley-Brown, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial prior research on higher education choice, top universities in the UK continue to stand accused of favouring socio-economically advantaged students, to the detriment of those from poorer backgrounds. The objectives of this study are to test whether students with the same or equivalent entry scores are more or less likely to…

  6. Assessment of the reliability in two groups of age, using the Qualitative Scoring System for the Bender Gestalt Test - Modified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Ayax Merino Soto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is looking for evidences of reliability, for the Qualification Qua- litative System (Brannigan y Brunner, 2002 applied to the Bender Gestalt Test – Modified. The participants were 86 children, divided in two groups: pre- school and school; and three students who scored the designs in both groups. The analysis was done in the final grade and the item. The results pointed to the good levels of results of external reliability and internal consistence in the pre- school group, while these levels were scored in the school group. These differences establish the relation between these two aspects of measurement error and the emphasis in an appropriate training of measurements that require the examiner’s judgments. We discussed our results considering the potential utility of this relative version of the Bender Gestalt Test for the clinical practice and investigation as well.

  7. Measuring Small-Group Environments: A Validity Study of Scores from the Salter Environmental Type Assessment and the Group Environment Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Daniel W.; Junco, Reynol

    2007-01-01

    This concurrent validity study of Salter Environmental Type Assessment scores was conducted with the Group Environment Scale. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation of 191 college students' responses suggested two factors that accounted for 51% of the variance. The factor-analytic results and concurrent validity coefficients…

  8. Measuring Small-Group Environments: A Validity Study of Scores from the Salter Environmental Type Assessment and the Group Environment Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Daniel W.; Junco, Reynol

    2007-01-01

    This concurrent validity study of Salter Environmental Type Assessment scores was conducted with the Group Environment Scale. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation of 191 college students' responses suggested two factors that accounted for 51% of the variance. The factor-analytic results and concurrent validity coefficients…

  9. Coronary Artery Calcification Scoring with State-of-the-Art CT Scanners from Different Vendors Has Substantial Effect on Risk Classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Takx, Richard A. P.; Leiner, Tim; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Bleys, Ronald L. A. W.; Das, Marco; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Prokop, Mathias; Buls, Nico; de Mey, Johan; Schilham, Arnold M. R.; de Jong, Pim A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the intervendor variability of Agatston scoring determined with state-of-the-art computed tomographic (CT) systems from the four major vendors in an ex vivo setup and to simulate the subsequent effects on cardiovascular risk reclassification in a large populationbased cohort.

  10. The Differences between High-Score Group and Low-Score Group In Modifiable Learner Variables%英语专业高/低分学生学习者可控因素的差异研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 侯润颖

    2013-01-01

    The research reports a study on the differences between high-score group and low-score group in modifiable learner variables such as level of effort, learning motivations, learning beliefs and learning strategies. The subjects for the survey are 96 English majors. Statistical results show that: 1) Students from low-score group seem to spend more time learning English every week; their intrinsic motivations are significantly stronger than those of high-score group, whereas there is no big difference in extrinsic motivations. 2) Students from two groups are significantly different in management belief, form- focused belief and meaning-focused belief. 3) Students from two groups display significant differences in management strategies, form-focused strat⁃egies and meaning-focused strategies, and the high-score group tends to make more frequent use.%  该研究以96名英语专业大学生为研究对象进行了问卷调查,分析了高分组与低分组学生在努力程度、学习动机、学习观念及学习策略等学习者可控因素方面的差异。研究发现,1)低分组每周课外学习英语的时间显著高于高分组,深层动机均值显著低于高分组,表层动机方面则与高分组没有显著差异;2)高分组在管理观念、形式操练观念和功能操练观念上的均值显著高于低分组,依赖母语观念不存在显著差异;3)高分组使用管理策略、形式操练策略和功能操练策略的频率显著高于低分组,而在依赖母语策略使用上则没有显著差异。

  11. The Norwegian Voice Handicap Index (VHI-N) patient scores are dependent on voice-related disease group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Tom; Heimdal, John-Helge; Grieg, Anne Rita Hella; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine to what extent the Voice Handicap Index-Norwegian (VHI-N) is scored depending on specific laryngological disease. In a multi-center study, 126 healthy subjects and 355 patients with different voice-related diseases answered the VHI-N. The VHI-N scores showed high Cronbach's alpha. Analyses of variance were performed with VHI-N dependent and specific voice-related disease as independent variable, and showed highly significant dependence by group allocation (F(7,461) = 28.0; p VHI-N scores. The VHI-N is a psychometrically well-functioning instrument, also at disease-specific levels and discriminates well between health and voice diseases, as well as between different voice-related diseases. The VHI-N may be recommended to be used when monitoring voice-related disease treatment.

  12. Using Propensity Scores in Quasi-Experimental Designs to Equate Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Forrest C.; Henson, Robin K.

    2010-01-01

    Education research rarely lends itself to large scale experimental research and true randomization, leaving the researcher to quasi-experimental designs. The problem with quasi-experimental research is that underlying factors may impact group selection and lead to potentially biased results. One way to minimize the impact of non-randomization is…

  13. High-resolution computed tomography in patients with atypical 'cardiac' chest pain: a study investigating patients at 10-year cardiovascular risks defined by the Framingham and PROCAM scores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon Kiat ANG; Kui Hian SIM; Alan Yean Yip FONG; Sze Piaw CHIN; Tiong Kiam ONG; Seyfarth M Tobias; Wei Ling CHAN; Chee Khoon LIEW; Rapaee ANNUAR; Houng Bang LIEW

    2006-01-01

    Background and objective Atypical 'cardiac' chest pain (ACCP) is not usually caused by myocardial ischaemia. Current noninvasive investigations for these symptoms are not yet as accurate as invasive coronary angiography. The latest 64-row multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) technology is non-invasive, has high specificity and negative predictive values for the detection of significant coronary disease. Our aim was to investigate if this modality can provide more information in the assessment of outpatients with ACCP in addition to established cardiovascular risk scores. Methods Seventy consecutive patients presenting to the outpatient clinic with ACCP underwent 64-row MDCT scan of the coronary arteries. They were categorized into low, medium or high risk groups based upon the Framingham and PROCAM scores. We defined a clinically abnormal MDCT scan as coronary stenosis =50% or calcium score >400 Agatston. Results Fifty-three (75.7%) patients did not have clinically abnormal scans. Framingham score classified 43 patients as low-risk while PROCAM classified 59 patients as low-risk. MDCT scans were abnormal for 18.6% and 22.0% of the respective low-risk group of patients. For patients with medium-to-high risk, 33.3% and 36.4% of Framingham and PROCAM patient groups respectively had abnormal MDCT scans. Conclusion MDCT adds valuable information in the assessment of patients with ACCP by identifying a significant proportion of patients categorized as low-risk to have underlying significant coronary stenosis and coronary calcification by established cardiovascular risk scores.

  14. Escore de cálcio coronariano prediz estenose e eventos na insuficiência renal crônica pré-transplante Score de calcio coronario predice estenosis y eventos en la insuficiencia renal crónica pre trasplante Coronary calcium score as predictor of stenosis and events in pretransplant renal chronic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Abraão Rosário

    2010-02-01

    este grupo. La evaluación del score de calcio coronario (SCC por tomografía computarizada ha estado comprobando valor pronóstico en la población sin enfermedad renal. OBJETIVO: Evaluar la exactitud del SCC para detectar EAC obstructiva y prever eventos cardiovasculares en candidatos a trasplante renal comparada a la angiografía coronaria invasiva (ACI cuantitativa. MÉTODOS: Se evaluaron a 97 pacientes con IRC y edad > 35 años. Se consideró como EAC obstructiva la presencia de estenosis > 50% o > 70% por la ACI. Datos descriptivos, concordancia, pruebas diagnósticas, Kaplan-Meier y análisis multivariado se utilizaron. RESULTADOS: El score de Agatston promedio fue de 580,6 ± 1.102,2; los valores mínimos y máximos fueron 0 y 7.994, y mediana de 176. Solamente 14 pacientes tenían score de calcio de cero. No hubo diferencias entre las etnias y la mayor presencia de calcio regional se asoció a la mayor probabilidad de estenosis coronaria en el mismo segmento. El score de calcio de Agatston presentó buena exactitud para el diagnóstico de estenosis, > 50% y > 70% con área bajo la curva ROC de 0,75 y 0,70, respectivamente. En el umbral de 400, el score de calcio identificó el subgrupo con mayor tasa de eventos cardiovasculares en tiempo promedio de seguimiento de 29,1 ± 11,0 meses. CONCLUSIÓN: El SCC en la evaluación de EAC presentó una buena performance diagnóstica y pronostica para eventos cardiovasculares en pacientes con insuficiencia renal crónica (IRC.BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD is the major cause of death among chronic renal failure (CRF patients. Traditional, non-invasive exams to detect CAD and to predict events have shown insufficient results in this group. CT Scan evaluation of Coronary Calcium Score (CCS has proven to be of prognostic value for the population reporting no renal condition. OBJECTIVE: To investigate CCS accuracy in detecting obstructive CAD and in predicting cardiovascular events in candidates to renal transplant

  15. Impact of Students' Participation to a Facebook Group on their Motivation and Scores and on Teacher's Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Montoneri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of Information and communications technology (ICT has brought rapid and profound changes in the field of Education. Nowadays, teachers and students alike are engaging on social networks such as Facebook. This study discusses the benefits of using social network in the classroom. It aims at assessing the impact of Facebook on students' motivation and scores in a course of European Literature in a university of central Taiwan. A class of students was taught during the first semester of academic year 2013-2014 (September-January using a traditional way of teaching. During the second semester (February-June 2014, the teacher used multimedia and Facebook to teach to the same students. They joined a "secret group", that is a group in which only students from the class can join, post, view posts, like, and comment. This research compares various data from the first and second semester to measure students' improvement in motivation, their participation to the group and their scores. The data collected from the Facebook group during the whole second semester and students' evaluation of the educator at the end of each semester. Students are expected to make some progress and teacher's evaluation should improve. Even though Taiwanese students generally read and write in Chinese on Facebook, it is expected that they exclusively use English to read, share, and comment texts and information concerning the books studied during the second semester, thus increasing their chances to improve their reading and writing skills.

  16. PENENTUAN Streptococcus Group A PENYEBAB FARINGITIS PADA ANAK MENGGUNAKAN McIsaac SCORE DAN RAPID ANTIGEN DETECTION TEST (RADT DALAM UPAYA PENGGUNAAN ANTIBIOTIKA SECARA BIJAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Agustia Sinta Dewi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharyngitis can be caused by viruses and bacteria. The bacteria that most commonly causes pharyngitis is Streptococcus Group A. In the treatment of pharyngitis, it is very important to ensure the cause for determining the appropriate treatments, therefore unnecessary use of antibiotics can be avoided. Antibiotics should be prescribed in patients with pharyngitis caused by bacteria. Diagnostic test that can be applied to determine the causes of pharyngitis are McIsaac score and Rapid Antigen Detection Test (RADT. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of Streptococcus Group A as the cause of pharyngitis applying McIsaac scores and the RADT. This study was cross-sectional. Patients with the inclusion and exclusion criteria were given an initial assessment using the McIsaac score, subsequently tested with the RADT. The results gained from the McIsaac scores and subsequent RADT were compared.  It was found that as many as 124 patients suspected of having bacterial pharyngitis. Forty two of them were scored 3; 55 patients scored 4, and  27 patients scored 5. All patients tested with the RADT, only 18 patients gave positive results. Out of those 18 patients positively tested, 6 patients scored 3; 8 patients scored 4, and 4 patients scored 5. In was concluded that the use of RADT was better than McIsaac scores in determining pharyngitis caused by Streptococcus Group A.

  17. Validation of a New Pediatric Joint Scoring System From the International Hemophilia Prophylaxis Study Group: Validity of the Hemophilia Joint Health Score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman , M. Brian; Funk, M. Sharon; Bergstrom, Britt-Marie; Zourikian, Nichan; Hillard, Pamela; Net, van der Janjaap; Engelbert , H.H. Raoul; Petrini, Pia; Berg, Marijke van den H.; Manco-Johnson, J. Marilyn; Rivard, E. Georges; Abad, Audrey; Blanchette , S. Victor

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Repeated hemarthrosis in hemophilia causes arthropathy with pain and dysfunction. The Hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS) was developed to be more sensitive for detecting arthropathy than the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) physical examination scale, especially for children and tho

  18. Development of a Food Group-Based Diet Score and Its Association with Bone Mineral Density in the Elderly: The Rotterdam Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Ester A. L.; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Voortman, Trudy; Schoufour, Josje D.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Franco, Oscar H.; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    No diet score exists that summarizes the features of a diet that is optimal for bone mineral density (BMD) in the elderly. Our aims were (a) to develop a BMD-Diet Score reflecting a diet that may be beneficial for BMD based on the existing literature, and (b) to examine the association of the BMD-Diet Score and the Healthy Diet Indicator, a score based on guidelines of the World Health Organization, with BMD in Dutch elderly participating in a prospective cohort study, the Rotterdam Study (n = 5144). Baseline dietary intake, assessed using a food frequency questionnaire, was categorized into food groups. Food groups that were consistently associated with BMD in the literature were included in the BMD-Diet Score. BMD was measured repeatedly and was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD-Diet Score considered intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, whole grains, legumes/beans and dairy products as “high-BMD” components and meat and confectionary as “low-BMD” components. After adjustment, the BMD-Diet Score was positively associated with BMD (β (95% confidence interval) = 0.009 (0.005, 0.012) g/cm2 per standard deviation). This effect size was approximately three times as large as has been observed for the Healthy Diet Indicator. The food groups included in our BMD-Diet Score could be considered in the development of future dietary guidelines for healthy ageing. PMID:26295256

  19. Development of a Food Group-Based Diet Score and Its Association with Bone Mineral Density in the Elderly: The Rotterdam Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester A.L. de Jonge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No diet score exists that summarizes the features of a diet that is optimal for bone mineral density (BMD in the elderly. Our aims were (a to develop a BMD-Diet Score reflecting a diet that may be beneficial for BMD based on the existing literature, and (b to examine the association of the BMD-Diet Score and the Healthy Diet Indicator, a score based on guidelines of the World Health Organization, with BMD in Dutch elderly participating in a prospective cohort study, the Rotterdam Study (n = 5144. Baseline dietary intake, assessed using a food frequency questionnaire, was categorized into food groups. Food groups that were consistently associated with BMD in the literature were included in the BMD-Diet Score. BMD was measured repeatedly and was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD-Diet Score considered intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, whole grains, legumes/beans and dairy products as “high-BMD” components and meat and confectionary as “low-BMD” components. After adjustment, the BMD-Diet Score was positively associated with BMD (β (95% confidence interval = 0.009 (0.005, 0.012 g/cm2 per standard deviation. This effect size was approximately three times as large as has been observed for the Healthy Diet Indicator. The food groups included in our BMD-Diet Score could be considered in the development of future dietary guidelines for healthy ageing.

  20. Assessment of calcium scoring performance in cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulzheimer, Stefan; Kalender, Willi A. [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Krankenhausstrasse 12, 91054, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Electron beam tomography (EBT) has been used for cardiac diagnosis and the quantitative assessment of coronary calcium since the late 1980s. The introduction of mechanical multi-slice spiral CT (MSCT) scanners with shorter rotation times opened new possibilities of cardiac imaging with conventional CT scanners. The purpose of this work was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the performance for EBT and MSCT for the task of coronary artery calcium imaging as a function of acquisition protocol, heart rate, spiral reconstruction algorithm (where applicable) and calcium scoring method. A cardiac CT semi-anthropomorphic phantom was designed and manufactured for the investigation of all relevant image quality parameters in cardiac CT. This phantom includes various test objects, some of which can be moved within the anthropomorphic phantom in a manner that mimics realistic heart motion. These tools were used to qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrate the accuracy of coronary calcium imaging using typical protocols for an electron beam (Evolution C-150XP, Imatron, South San Francisco, Calif.) and a 0.5-s four-slice spiral CT scanner (Sensation 4, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). A special focus was put on the method of quantifying coronary calcium, and three scoring systems were evaluated (Agatston, volume, and mass scoring). Good reproducibility in coronary calcium scoring is always the result of a combination of high temporal and spatial resolution; consequently, thin-slice protocols in combination with retrospective gating on MSCT scanners yielded the best results. The Agatston score was found to be the least reproducible scoring method. The hydroxyapatite mass, being better reproducible and comparable on different scanners and being a physical quantitative measure, appears to be the method of choice for future clinical studies. The hydroxyapatite mass is highly correlated to the Agatston score. The introduced phantoms can be used to quantitatively assess the

  1. Coronary artery calcium score using electron beam tomography in the patients with acute obstructive coronary arterial disease : comparative study within asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive coronary arterial disease group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seok Jong; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To compare, through analysis of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and the risk factors for atherosclerosis, the characteristics of acute coronary syndrome between an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients and a chronic coronary arterial obstructive disease(CAOD) group. The CAC scores of an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients (group I, n=284), a chronic CAOD croup (group II, n=39) and an acute coronary syndrome group (group III, n=21) were measured by electron beam tomography. Forty-seven patients with CAOD from groups II and III underwent coronary angiography, and we scrutinized age, sex and risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and low high-density lipoproteinemia. The numbers of stenotic coronary arterial branches and degree of stenosis revealed by coronary angiography were also recorded. We determined the differences between the three groups in terms of CAC score and the risk factors, the relationship between CAC score and risk factors, and the characteristic features of each type of CAOD group. The mean CA score of group III (135.1) was not statistically different from that of group I (135.7) or group II (365.8). Among patients aged below 50, the mean CAC score of group III (127.4) was significantly higher than that of group I (6.2), (p=0.0006). The mean CAC score at the sixth decade was also significantly different between group I(81.5) and group II (266.9). The mean age of group III (54.2 years) was significantly lower than that of group I (58.1 years) (p=0.047) and of group II (60.1) (p=0.022). There was significant correlation between the number of stenotic coronary arterial branches and log(CAC +1) (p<.01). The square root of the CAC score and the maximal degree of stenosis was also well correlated (p<.01). There was no difference in the mean number of risk factors among the three groups, though the incidence of smoking in group III was significantly

  2. Evaluation of coronary calcifications with 64-slice CT - variability of the scores and the influence of the reconstruction interval; Bestimmung des koronaren Kalzium-Scores mittels 64-Zeilen-CT - Variabilitaet der Scores und Einfluss des Rekonstruktionszeitpunktes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weininger, M.; Ritter, C.O.; Beer, M.; Hahn, D.; Beissert, M. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the variability of coronary calcium scores depending on the image reconstruction interval using a 64-slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: 30 patients (18 male, 12 female; mean age 57 {+-} 9 yrs; mean heart rate 66 {+-} 10 bpm) underwent coronary calcium scoring using a 64-slice CT scanner (Somatom Sensation 64, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen) and a standardized scanning protocol. Oral {beta}-blockers were administered to 12 patients with a baseline heart rate > 70 bpm. Images were reconstructed in 10 % increments from 10 - 100 % of the RR interval. Two blinded experienced observers independently calculated Agatston (AS), calcium mass (MS) and volume scores (VS) for every reconstructed image series. The results were compared to similar studies for 16-slice CT scanners. Results: The mean values and mean coefficients of variation among all patients were as follows: AS, 397 {+-} 829, 109 % MS, 88 {+-} 225, 154 % VS, 335 {+-} 669, 100 %. Regarding the reconstruction intervals, the mean coefficients of variation were as follows: 107 % (AS), 97 % (VS), 116 % (MS). No specific image reconstruction interval with statistically significant lower variability for each score could be identified. High inter-observer agreement was achieved (K = 0.98). With statistical significance (p < 0.05) 10/30 patients (pts) were able to be allocated to more than one risk group (RG): 6 pts = 2 RG; 3 pts = 3 RG; 1 pts = 4 RG. The scores for 5/30 patients were zero for at least one reconstruction interval, but further reconstructions revealed calcifications. The number of patients assignable to different risk groups was significantly lower compared to published data using a 16-slice scanner (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Coronary calcium scores determined using a 64-slice scanner display a wide range of variability depending on the image reconstruction interval as already described for 16-slice CT scanners. However, compared to previous studies, our data indicate that this

  3. An Examination of Skill Groups, Traditional Groups, and Attendance Patterns in Third-Grade Classrooms: Their Effects on Student Achievement Based on Discovery Assessment Test C Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofton, Kelly Jean Clothier

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine third-grade student achievement in mathematics and reading for students who were in skill groups, as compared to those who were traditionally grouped, with student attendance being taken into consideration as a variable of additional comparison. Skill groups are a type of flexible ability grouping, where…

  4. The criterion-related validity of the Northwick Park Dependency Score as a generic nursing dependency instrument for different rehabilitation patient groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, E.; Tiesinga, L. J.; van der Schans, C. P.; Middel, B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the criterion or concurrent validity of the Northwick Park Dependency Score (NPDS) for determining nursing dependence in different rehabilitation groups, with the Barthel Index (BI) and the Care Dependency Scale (C D S). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Centre for Re

  5. Validation of cytogenetic risk groups according to International Prognostic Scoring Systems by peripheral blood CD34+FISH: results from a German diagnostic study in comparison with an international control group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braulke, Friederike; Platzbecker, Uwe; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Götze, Katharina; Germing, Ulrich; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Nolte, Florian; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A. N.; Lübbert, Michael; Greenberg, Peter L.; Bennett, John M.; Solé, Francesc; Mallo, Mar; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Tüchler, Heinz; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Shirneshan, Katayoon; Aul, Carlo; Stauder, Reinhard; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Valent, Peter; Fonatsch, Christa; Trümper, Lorenz; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie

    2015-01-01

    International Prognostic Scoring Systems are used to determine the individual risk profile of myelodysplastic syndrome patients. For the assessment of International Prognostic Scoring Systems, an adequate chromosome banding analysis of the bone marrow is essential. Cytogenetic information is not available for a substantial number of patients (5%–20%) with dry marrow or an insufficient number of metaphase cells. For these patients, a valid risk classification is impossible. In the study presented here, the International Prognostic Scoring Systems were validated based on fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses using extended probe panels applied to cluster of differentiation 34 positive (CD34+) peripheral blood cells of 328 MDS patients of our prospective multicenter German diagnostic study and compared to chromosome banding results of 2902 previously published patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. For cytogenetic risk classification by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of CD34+ peripheral blood cells, the groups differed significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival by uni- and multivariate analyses without discrepancies between treated and untreated patients. Including cytogenetic data of fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of peripheral CD34+ blood cells (instead of bone marrow banding analysis) into the complete International Prognostic Scoring System assessment, the prognostic risk groups separated significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival. Our data show that a reliable stratification to the risk groups of the International Prognostic Scoring Systems is possible from peripheral blood in patients with missing chromosome banding analysis by using a comprehensive probe panel (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01355913). PMID:25344522

  6. Validation of Victoria Symptom Validity Test Cutoff Scores among Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Litigants Using a Known-Groups Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk-Eglit, Graham M; Lynch, Julie K; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    The Victoria Symptom Validity Test (VSVT) is one of the most accurate performance validity tests. Previous research has recommended several cutoffs for performance invalidity classification on the VSVT. However, only one of these studies used a known groups design and no study has investigated these cutoffs in an exclusively mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) medico-legal sample. The current study used a known groups design to validate VSVT cutoffs among mild traumatic brain injury litigants and explored the best approach for using the multiple recommended cutoffs for this test. Cutoffs of 6, and <5 items correct on any block yielded the strongest classification accuracy. Using multiple cutoffs in conjunction reduced classification accuracy. Given convergence across studies, a cutoff of <18 Hard items correct is the most appropriate for use with mTBI litigants.

  7. Reproducibility of the International Endometrial Analysis Group Color Score for Assigning the Amount of Flow Within the Endometrium Using Stored 3-Dimensional Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcázar, Juan Luis; Pascual, María Ángela; Ajossa, Silvia; de Lorenzo, Cristina; Piras, Alba; Hereter, Lourdes; Juez, Leire; Fabbri, Paola; Graupera, Betlem; Guerriero, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    To estimate intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility for assigning an International Endometrial Tumor Analysis (IETA) group color score for endometrial vascularization on color Doppler imaging. Sixty-eight endometrial 3-dimensional volumes from endometrial color Doppler assessments of women with different endometrial disorders were evaluated by 8 different examiners (4 skilled examiners and 4 obstetric and gynecologic trainees). One skilled examiner who did not participate in the assessments selected the 68 volumes from a database to select a balanced number of each IETA score. Each examiner evaluated the 68 endometrial volumes to assign the IETA color score (1, absence of vascularization; 2, low vascularization; 3, moderate vascularization; or 4, abundant vascularization) using tomographic ultrasound imaging. The analysis was repeated 4 weeks later, and interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility was analyzed by calculating the weighted κ index. The second of the measurements made by each observer was used to estimate interobserver reproducibility. The intraobserver reproducibility was very good for all examiners, with a weighted κ index ranging from 0.84 to 0.91. The interobserver reproducibility was good or very good for all estimated comparisons, with a weighted κ index ranging from 0.77 to 0.96, regardless of experience level. The reproducibility of assigning the IETA color score for assessing endometrial vascularization using 3-dimensional volumes is good or very good regardless of the experience of the examiner. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. The Five Score and Percentage of Group Test Scores of Measurement Standard in Ancient Imperial Examination%中国科举“五级百分”计量标准研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄裕泉; 干有成; 刘立云; 赵霖

    2016-01-01

    群体考试成绩如何计量,时至今日仍属研究领域。美国大学入学考试、托福、GRE、雅思英语考试、中国国际汉语等级考试、中国大学招生考试、各级学校学生的学期考试等,其计量标准和方法都不相同!中国国家计量法要求计量应建立国家统一标准,计量要有统一的计量单位和统一的计量基准、计量还必须有统一的监管。我国古代科举考试“五级百分”计量标准是古今中外最科学简便精准的计量标准。%How to measure the group test scores, which are still in the research category. For example, the entrance examin-ation of American University GRE TOEFL IELTS exam China international Chinese language Test, the measurement stan-dards and methods are not the same. China national measurement law requires measurement should establish a national unified standard, measurement must also have a unified supervision. Chinese ancient imperial examination“Five score and percentage scoring method”is the most scientific the most simple and convenient and the most accurate measurement standard at all times and in all over the world.

  9. A Comparative Study of English Audio Typing(EAT) Str-ategies Employed by High-scored Group and Low-scored Group%英语同声打字高分组和低分组学习策略研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏

    2014-01-01

    英语同声打字(EAT)策略决定着英语同声打字的结果。本文试图对比高分组和低分组EAT策略使用差异,进而探讨有效的EAT学习方法。%English Audio Typing (EAT)strategies determine the outcome of EAT process. This paper tries to compare the EAT strategies employed by high-scored group and low-scored group, intending to discuss the effective way of learning EAT.

  10. Cutoff Scores for MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF Cognitive-Somatic Validity Scales for Psychometrically Defined Malingering Groups in a Military Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alvin

    2016-07-12

    This research examined cutoff scores for MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF validity scales specifically developed to assess non-credible reporting of cognitive and/or somatic symptoms. The validity scales examined included the Response Bias Scale (RBS), the Symptom Validity Scales (FBS, FBS-r), Infrequent Somatic Responses scale (Fs), and the Henry-Heilbronner Indexes (HHI, HHI-r). Cutoffs were developed by comparing a psychometrically defined non-malingering group with three psychometrically defined malingering groups (probable, probable to definite, and definite malingering) and a group that combined all malingering groups. The participants in this research were drawn from a military sample consisting largely of patients with traumatic brain injury (mostly mild traumatic brain injury). Specificities for cutoffs of at least 0.90 are provided. Sensitivities, predictive values, and likelihood ratios are also provided. RBS had the largest mean effect size (d) when the malingering groups were compared to the non-malingering group (d range = 1.23-1.58). Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Value of coronary artery calcium score to predict severity or complexity of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Kalaycıoğlu, Ezgi; Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı; Boyacı, Faruk; Turan, Turhan; Gül, İlker; Çavuşoğlu, Gökhan; Dursun, İhsan

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediction of severity or complexity of coronary artery disease (CAD) is valuable owing to increased risk for cardiovascular events. Although the association between total coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and severity of CAD, Gensini score was not used, it has been previously demonstrated. There is no information about the association between total CAC score and complexity of CAD. Objectives To investigate the association between severity or complexity of coronary artery disease (CAD) assessed by Gensini score and SYNTAX score (SS), respectively, and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, which is a noninvasive method for CAD evaluation in symptomatic patients with accompanying significant CAD. Methods Two-hundred-fourteen patients were enrolled. Total CAC score was obtained before angiography. Severity and complexity of CAD was assessed by Gensini score and SS, respectively. Associations between clinical and angiographic parameters and total CAC score were analyzed. Results Median total CAC score was 192 (23.0-729.8), and this was positively correlated with both Gensini score (r: 0.299, p 809 for SS >32 (high SS tertile). Conclusion In symptomatic patients with accompanying significant CAD, total CAC score was independently associated with SS and patients with SS >32 may be detected through high Agatston score. PMID:24676367

  12. The Group Decision Support System to Evaluate the ICT Project Performance Using the Hybrid Method of AHP, TOPSIS and Copeland Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herri Setiawan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a concept of the Group Decision Support System (GDSS to evaluate the performance of Information and Communications Technology (ICT Projects in Indonesian regional government agencies to overcome any possible inconsistencies which may occur in a decision-making process. By considering the aspect of the applicable legislation, decision makers involved to provide an assessment and evaluation of the ICT project implementation in regional government agencies consisted of Executing Parties of Government Institutions, ICT Management Work Units, Business Process Owner Units, and Society, represented by DPRD (Regional People’s Representative Assembly. The contributions of those decision makers in the said model were in the form of preferences to evaluate the ICT project-related alternatives based on the predetermined criteria for the method of Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM. This research presented a GDSS framework integrating the Methods of Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP, Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS and Copeland Score. The AHP method was used to generate values for the criteria used as input in the calculation process of the TOPSIS method. Results of the TOPSIS calculation generated a project rank indicated by each decision maker, and to combine the different preferences of these decision makers, the Copeland Score method was used as one of the voting methods to determine the best project rank of all the ranks indicated by the desicion makers.

  13. Apgar score

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003402.htm Apgar score To use the sharing features on this page, ... birth. Virginia Apgar, MD (1909-1974) introduced the Apgar score in 1952. How the Test is Performed The ...

  14. Prevalence and Distribution of Abdominal Aortic Calcium by Sex and Age-Group in a Community-based Cohort (From The Framingham Heart Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Michael L.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Levitzky, Yamini S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Manders, Emily S.; Hoffmann, Udo; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic calcium (AAC) is associated with incident cardiovascular disease but the age and sex-related distribution of AAC in a community-dwelling population free of standard cardiovascular disease risk factors has not been described. A total of 3285 participants (aged 50.2±9.9 years) in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts underwent abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanning during 1998-2005. The presence and amount of AAC was quantified (Agatston score) by an experienced reader using standardized criteria. A healthy referent subsample (N=1656, 803 men) free of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity and smoking was identified, and participants were stratified by sex and age group (0 AAC. Across the entire study sample, AAC prevalence and burden similarly increased with greater age. Defining the 90th percentile of referent group AAC as “high,” the prevalence of high AAC was 19% for each sex in the overall study sample. AAC also increased across categories of 10-year coronary heart disease risk, as calculated using the Framingham Risk Score, in the entire study sample. We found AAC to be widely prevalent, with the burden of AAC associated with 10-year coronary risk, in a white, free-living adult cohort. PMID:22727181

  15. Baseline fatty acids, food groups, a diet score and 50-year all-cause mortality rates. An ecological analysis of the Seven Countries Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, Alessandro; Kromhout, Daan; Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Alberti-Fidanza, Adalberta; Hollman, Peter; Kafatos, Anthony; Tolonen, Hanna; Adachi, Hisashi; Jacobs, David R

    2017-09-06

    This analysis deals with the ecologic relationships of dietary fatty acids, food groups and the Mediterranean Adequacy Index (MAI, derived from 15 food groups) with 50-year all-cause mortality rates in 16 cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. A dietary survey was conducted at baseline in cohorts subsamples including chemical analysis of food samples representing average consumptions. Ecologic correlations of dietary variables were computed across cohorts with 50-year all-cause mortality rates, where 97% of men had died. There was a 12-year average age at death population difference between extreme cohorts. In the 1960s the average population intake of saturated (S) and trans (T) fatty acids and hard fats was high in the northern European cohorts while monounsaturated (M), polyunsaturated (P) fatty acids and vegetable oils were high in the Mediterranean areas and total fat was low in Japan. The 50-year all-cause mortality rates correlated (r= -0.51 to -0.64) ecologically inversely with the ratios M/S, (M + P)/(S + T) and vegetable foods and the ratio hard fats/vegetable oils. Adjustment for high socio-economic status strengthened (r= -0.62 to -0.77) these associations including MAI diet score. The protective fatty acids and vegetable oils are indicators of the low risk traditional Mediterranean style diets. KEY MESSAGES We aimed at studying the ecologic relationships of dietary fatty acids, food groups and the Mediterranean Adequacy Index (MAI, derived from 15 food groups) with 50-year all-cause mortality rates in the Seven Countries Study. The 50-year all-cause mortality rates correlated (r = -0.51 to -0.64) ecologically inversely with the ratios M/S [monounsaturated (M) + polyunsaturated (P)]/[saturated (S) + trans (T)] fatty acids and vegetable foods and the ratio hard fats/vegetable oils. After adjustment for high socio-economic status, associations with the ratios strengthened (r = -0.62 to -0.77) including also the MAI diet score

  16. Childhood Hodgkin International Prognostic Score (CHIPS) Predicts event-free survival in Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Cindy L; Chen, Lu; McCarten, Kathleen; Wolden, Suzanne; Constine, Louis S; Hutchison, Robert E; de Alarcon, Pedro A; Keller, Frank G; Kelly, Kara M; Trippet, Tanya A; Voss, Stephan D; Friedman, Debra L

    2017-04-01

    Early response to initial chemotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) measured by computed tomography (CT) and/or positron emission tomography (PET) after two to three cycles of chemotherapy may inform therapeutic decisions. Risk stratification at diagnosis could, however, allow earlier and potentially more efficacious treatment modifications. We developed a predictive model for event-free survival (EFS) in pediatric/adolescent HL using clinical data known at diagnosis from 1103 intermediate-risk HL patients treated on Children's Oncology Group protocol AHOD0031 with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, cyclophosphamide (ABVE-PC) chemotherapy and radiation. Independent predictors of EFS were identified and used to develop and validate a prognostic score (Childhood Hodgkin International Prognostic Score [CHIPS]). A training cohort was randomly selected to include approximately half of the overall cohort, with the remainder forming the validation cohort. Stage 4 disease, large mediastinal mass, albumin (<3.5), and fever were independent predictors of EFS that were each assigned one point in the CHIPS.  Four-year EFS was 93.1% for patients with CHIPS = 0, 88.5% for patients with CHIPS = 1, 77.6% for patients with CHIPS = 2, and 69.2% for patients with CHIPS = 3. CHIPS was highly predictive of EFS, identifying a subset (with CHIPS 2 or 3) that comprises 27% of intermediate-risk patients who have a 4-year EFS of <80% and who may benefit from early therapeutic augmentation.  Furthermore, CHIPS identified higher risk patients who were not identified by early PET or CT response. CHIPS is a robust and inexpensive approach to predicting risk in patients with intermediate-risk HL that may improve ability to tailor therapy to risk factors known at diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of Heart Rate and Body Mass Index on the Interscan and Interobserver Variability of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring at Prospective ECG-Triggered 64-Slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiguchi, Jun; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako [Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsuura, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Ito, Katsuhide [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    To test the effects of heart rate, body mass index (BMI) and noise level on interscan and interobserver variability of coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring on a prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered 64-slice CT. One hundred and ten patients (76 patients with CAC) were scanned twice on prospective ECG-triggered scans. The scan parameters included 120 kV, 82 mAs, a 2.5 mm thickness, and an acquisition center at 45% of the RR interval. The interscan and interobserver variability on the CAC scores (Agatston, volume, and mass) was calculated. The factors affecting the variability were determined by plotting it against heart rate, BMI, and noise level (defined as the standard deviation: SD). The estimated effective dose was 1.5 {+-} 0.2 mSv. The mean heart rate was 63 {+-} 12 bpm (range, 44-101 bpm). The patient BMIs were 24.5 {+-} 4.5 kg/m{sup 2} (range, 15.5-42.3 kg/m2). The mean and median interscan variabilities were 11% and 6%, respectively by volume, and 11% and 6%, respectively, by mass. Moreover, the mean and median of the algorithms were lower than the Agatston algorithm (16% and 9%, respectively). The mean and median interobserver variability was 10% and 4%, respectively (average of algorithms). The mean noise levels were 15 {+-} 4 Hounsfield unit (HU) (range, 8-25 HU). The interscan and interobserver variability was not correlated with heart rate, BMI, or noise level. The interscan and interobserver variability of CAC on a prospective ECG-triggered 64-slice CT with high image quality and 45% of RR acquisition is not significantly affected by heart rate, BMI, or noise level. The volume or mass algorithms show reduced interscan variability compared to the Agatston scoring (p < 0.05)

  18. Prevalence and distribution of abdominal aortic calcium by gender and age group in a community-based cohort (from the Framingham Heart Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Michael L; Massaro, Joseph M; Levitzky, Yamini S; Fox, Caroline S; Manders, Emily S; Hoffmann, Udo; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2012-09-15

    Abdominal aortic calcium (AAC) is associated with incident cardiovascular disease. However, the age- and gender-related distribution of AAC in a community-dwelling population free of standard cardiovascular disease risk factors has not been described. A total of 3,285 participants (aged 50.2 ± 9.9 years) in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts underwent abdominal multidetector computed tomography from 1998 to 2005. The presence and amount of AAC was quantified (Agatston score) by an experienced reader using standardized criteria. A healthy referent subsample (n = 1,656, 803 men) free of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity, and smoking was identified, and participants were stratified by gender and age (65 years old, nearly 90% of the referent participants had >0 AAC. Across the entire study sample, AAC prevalence and burden similarly increased with greater age. Defining the 90th percentile of the referent group AAC as "high," the prevalence of high AAC was 19% for each gender in the overall study sample. The AAC also increased across categories of 10-year coronary heart disease risk, as calculated using the Framingham Risk Score, in the entire study sample. We found AAC to be widely prevalent, with the burden of AAC associated with 10-year coronary risk, in a white, free-living adult cohort.

  19. Apgar Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Apgar Scores Page Content Article Body As soon as your ... the syringe, but is blue; her one minute Apgar score would be 8—two points off because she ...

  20. Development of a food group-based diet score and its assocation with bone mineral density in the elderly: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de E.A.L.; Kiefte-de Jong, J.C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Voortman, T.; Schoufour, J.D.; Zillikens, M.C.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Franco, O.H.; Rivadeneira, F.

    2015-01-01

    No diet score exists that summarizes the features of a diet that is optimal for bone mineral density (BMD) in the elderly. Our aims were (a) to develop a BMD-Diet Score reflecting a diet that may be beneficial for BMD based on the existing literature, and (b) to examine the association of the BMD-Di

  1. Development of a food group-based diet score and its association with bone mineral density in the elderly: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.L. de Jonge (Ester); J.C. Kiefte-de Jong (Jessica); L.C.P.G.M. de Groot (Lisette); R.G. Voortman (Trudy); J.D. Schoufour (Josje); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); O.H. Franco (Oscar); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractNo diet score exists that summarizes the features of a diet that is optimal for bone mineral density (BMD) in the elderly. Our aims were (a) to develop a BMD-Diet Score reflecting a diet that may be beneficial for BMD based on the existing literature, and (b) to examine the association o

  2. Carga de trabajo en tres grupos de pacientes de UCI Española según el Nursing Activities Score Carga de trabalho em três grupos de pacientes em uma UTI espanhola segundo Nursing Activites Score Assessment of nursing workload in three groups of patients in a Spanish ICU using the Nursing Activities Score Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Carmona-Monge

    2013-04-01

    diferentes grupos de pacientes que passam com mais frequência pelas unidades de cuidados intensivos.The purpose of this study was to assess the nursing workload at admission to and discharge from intensive care of three groups of patients (i.e., acute coronary syndrome, acute respiratory failure, and sepsis. A prospective, descriptive study was performed over a 27-month period and included 563 patients. The workload was assessed using the Nursing Activities Score scale. Significant differences in the workload were determined on the days of admission and discharge: the workload was higher in both cases for patients with acute respiratory failure and sepsis compared with patients diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome. This difference was maintained over the first seven days of their hospital stay. From day 8 on, the difference disappeared, and a workload balance was achieved in the three groups. Good staffing requires adequate tools for measuring care needs and understanding the workload required in the groups of patients who are most frequently admitted to intensive care.

  3. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: proposal of a paediatric synovitis score by a consensus of an international working group. Results of a multicentre reliability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Mattiuz, Chiara; Magnano, GianMichele [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto [University of Genova, Department of Paediatrics, Genova (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Toma, Paolo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Pistorio, Angela [Ospedale pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Genova (Italy); Bracaglia, Claudia [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Rheumatology, Rome (Italy); Boavida, Peter; Ording, Lil Sophie Mueller [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Juhan, Karen Lambot [Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Rosendahl, Karen [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway)

    2012-09-15

    MRI is a sensitive tool for the evaluation of synovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel MRI-based score for synovitis in children and to examine its inter- and intraobserver variability in a multi-centre study. Wrist MRI was performed in 76 children with JIA. On postcontrast 3-D spoiled gradient-echo and fat-suppressed T2-weighted spin-echo images, joint recesses were scored for the degree of synovial enhancement, effusion and overall inflammation independently by two paediatric radiologists. Total-enhancement and inflammation-synovitis scores were calculated. Interobserver agreement was poor to moderate for enhancement and inflammation in all recesses, except in the radioulnar and radiocarpal joints. Intraobserver agreement was good to excellent. For enhancement and inflammation scores, mean differences (95 % CI) between observers were -1.18 (-4.79 to 2.42) and -2.11 (-6.06 to 1.83). Intraobserver variability (reader 1) was 0 (-1.65 to 1.65) and 0.02 (-1.39 to 1.44). Intraobserver agreement was good. Except for the radioulnar and radiocarpal joints, interobserver agreement was not acceptable. Therefore, the proposed scoring system requires further refinement. (orig.)

  4. Score Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Fabián, Z. (Zdeněk)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study a distribution-dependent correlation coefficient based on the concept of scalar score. This new measure of association of continuous random variables is compared by means of simulation experiments with the Pearson, Kendall and Spearman correlation coefficients.

  5. The ability of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cardiovascular risk score to identify rheumatoid arthritis patients with high coronary artery calcification scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Vivian K; Chung, Cecilia P; Solus, Joseph F; Oeser, Annette; Raggi, Paolo; Stein, C Michael

    2015-02-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease that is underestimated by the Framingham Risk Score (FRS). We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) 10-year risk score would perform better than the FRS and the Reynolds Risk Score (RRS) in identifying RA patients known to have elevated cardiovascular risk based on high coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores. Among 98 RA patients eligible for risk stratification using the ACC/AHA risk score, we identified 34 patients with high CAC (defined as ≥300 Agatston units or ≥75th percentile of expected coronary artery calcium for age, sex, and ethnicity) and compared the ability of the 10-year FRS, RRS, and ACC/AHA risk scores to correctly assign these patients to an elevated risk category. All 3 risk scores were higher in patients with high CAC (P risk category was similar among the 3 scores (FRS 32%, RRS 32%, ACC/AHA risk score 41%) (P = 0.223). The C statistics for the FRS, RRS, and ACC/AHA risk score predicting the presence of high CAC were 0.65, 0.66, and 0.65, respectively. The ACC/AHA 10-year risk score does not offer any advantage compared to the traditional FRS and RRS in the identification of RA patients with elevated risk as determined by high CAC. The ACC/AHA risk score assigned almost 60% of patients with high CAC to a low risk category. Risk scores and standard risk prediction models used in the general population do not adequately identify many RA patients with elevated cardiovascular risk.

  6. Very high coronary artery calcium score with normal myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is associated with a moderate incidence of severe coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuoness, Salem A.; Goha, Ahmed M.; Romsa, Jonathan G.; Akincioglu, Cigdem; Warrington, James C.; Datta, Sudip; Gambhir, Sanjay; Urbain, Jean-Luc C.; Vezina, William C. [London Health Sciences Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London, ON (Canada); Massel, David R. [London Health Sciences Centre, Division of Cardiology, London, ON (Canada); Martell, Rafael [Private Practice, London, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has limitations in the presence of balanced multivessel disease (MVD) and left main (LM) coronary artery disease, occasionally resulting in false-normal results despite the high cardiovascular risk associated with this condition. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of severe coronary artery disease (CAD) in the presence of a very high Agatston coronary artery calcium (CAC) score (>1,000) in stable symptomatic patients without known CAD but with normal MPI results. A total of 2,659 prospectively acquired consecutive patients were referred for MPI and evaluation of CAC score by CT. Of this patient population, 8 % (222/2,659) had ischemia without myocardial infarction (MI) on MPI and 11 % (298/2,659) had abnormal MPI (MI and/or ischemia). On presentation 1 % of the patients (26/2,659) were symptomatic, had a CAC score >1,000 and normal MPI results. The definition of normal MPI was strict and included a normal hemodynamic response without ischemic ECG changes and normal imaging, particularly absence of transient ischemic dilation. All of these 26 patients with a CAC score >1,000 and normal MPI findings underwent cardiac catheterization. Of these 26 patients, 58 % (15/26) had severe disease (≥70 % stenosis) leading to revascularization. Of this group, 47 % (7/15) underwent percutaneous intervention, and 53 % (8/15) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. All of these 15 patients had either MVD (14/15) or LM coronary artery disease (1/15), and represented 0.6 % (15/2,659) of all referred patients (95 % CI 0.3 - 0.9 %). The majority, 90 % (8/9), had severe CAD with typical chest pain. A very high CAC score (>1,000) with normal MPI in a small subset of symptomatically stable patients was associated with a moderate incidence of severe CAD (95 % CI 37 - 77 %). Larger studies and/or a meta-analysis of small studies are needed to more precisely estimate the incidence of CAD in this population. This study also supports

  7. Differential Effects on Student Demographic Groups of Using ACT® College Readiness Assessment Composite Score, Act Benchmarks, and High School Grade Point Average for Predicting Long-Term College Success through Degree Completion. ACT Research Report Series, 2013 (5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunzel, Justine; Noble, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the differential effects on racial/ethnic, family income, and gender groups of using ACT® College Readiness Assessment Composite score and high school grade point average (HSGPA) for predicting long-term college success. Outcomes included annual progress towards a degree (based on cumulative credit-bearing hours…

  8. Developmental Sentence Scoring for Japanese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Susanne; MacWhinney, Brian; Otomo, Kiyoshi; Sirai, Hidetosi; Oshima-Takane, Yuriko; Hirakawa, Makiko; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Sugiura, Masatoshi; Itoh, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the development and use of the Developmental Sentence Scoring for Japanese (DSSJ), a new morpho-syntactical measure for Japanese constructed after the model of Lee's English Developmental Sentence Scoring model. Using this measure, the authors calculated DSSJ scores for 84 children divided into six age groups between 2;8…

  9. Characteristics and Behavioral Outcomes for Youth in Group Care and Family-Based Care: A Propensity Score Matching Approach Using National Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sigrid; Roesch, Scott; Zhang, Jin Jin

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to answer two questions: (a) Given expected differences in children who are placed in group care compared to those in family-based settings, is it possible to match children on baseline characteristics? (b) Are there differences in behavioral outcomes for youth with episodes in group care versus those in family-based care? Using…

  10. Implementation of standardized international karyotype scoring practices is needed to provide uniform and systematic evaluation for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome using IPSS criteria: An International Working Group on MDS Cytogenetics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kathy; Hagemeijer, Anne; Iqbal, Anwar; Slovak, Marilyn L

    2010-02-01

    Karyotype status and complexity are key components of the IPSS; however, emerging data suggest the use of cytogenetics at disease presentation is not applied uniformly among MDS patients. To investigate the degree of consistency of scoring karyotypes, the International Working Group on MDS Cytogenetics (IWGMC) conducted a survey of 32 abnormal karyotype challenges carried out in two phases: (a) an initial survey without any specified karyotype counting guidelines and (b) a second survey conducted after the development of IWGMC consensus guidelines for scoring karyotype complexity. Results indicate that IWGMC guidelines were simple and clear for the cytogeneticists in scoring karyotype complexity, but not as clear for the hematologists. We propose an immediate need for standardized international karyotype counting practices and a corresponding IPSS cytogenetic risk that can be incorporated into the cytogenetics reports of all newly diagnosed MDS patients.

  11. The Research on Objectivity of the E Group of Judges Giving Scores in Beijing Olympic Male Gymnastics Competitions%北京奥运会男子体操单项决赛E组评分研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐瑞芳

    2009-01-01

    采用文献资料法、数理统计法对奥运会男子体操比赛中6个单项决赛项目的E组裁判评分数据进行了客观性分析,结果表明:6个单项决赛项目的E组裁判员评分的客观性系数都比较高,但评分的随机误差较大;6个项目的评分差异不显著,裁判员评分的标准比较一致,对运动员最后得分的可信度影响不大;极差值和无效分的出现机率较大.建议:合理控制和处理评分误差,减少无效分的出现机率,确保体操裁判评分的客观性.%In this paper,the literature method and mathematical statistics are adopted to analyze E group score data of six individual finals in the O-lympic Male Gymnastics Competitions. Result shows that : the score data of all six individual finals have high objectivity coefficient, but random error of the score is big too;there isn't much difference in the six projects' score,the judging standards of referees are basically the same,which takes little effect on the reliability of athletes' final score;there is a large chance of the emergence of poor and invalid value, this paper then gives some mendations to improve the referees' judging objectivity: oontrol and handle score error reasonably,and reduce the chance of giving a score with inva-lid value.

  12. Beta-mapping and beta-regression for changes of ordinal-rating measurements on Likert scales: a comparison of the change scores among multiple treatment groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Kelly H; Carlsson, Martin O; Quinn, Sheila A

    2010-10-30

    Patient reported outcome and observer evaluative studies in clinical trials and post-hoc analyses often use instruments that measure responses on ordinal-rating or Likert scales. We propose a flexible distributional approach by modeling the change scores from the baseline to the end of the study using independent beta distributions. The two shape parameters of the fitted beta distributions are estimated by matching-moments. Covariates and the interaction terms are included in multivariate beta-regression analyses under generalized linear mixed models. These methods are illustrated on the treatment satisfaction data in an overactive bladder drug study with four treatment arms. Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to compare the Type 1 errors and statistical powers using a beta likelihood ratio test of the proposed method against its fully nonparametric or parametric alternatives. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. CT-based abdominal aortic calcification score as a surrogate marker for predicting the presence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Chansik; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, 50 Yonsei-Ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Sun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Department of Research Affairs, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To assess the value of a CT-based abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) score as a surrogate marker for the presence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). The AAC scores of 373 patients without cardiac symptoms who underwent both screening coronary CT angiography and abdominal CT within one year were calculated according to the Agatston method. Logistic regression was used to derive two multivariate models from traditional cardiovascular risk factors, with and without AAC scores, to predict the presence of CAD. The AAC score and the two multivariate models were compared by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the net reclassification improvement (NRI). The AAC score alone showed a marginally higher AUC (0.823 vs. 0.767, P = 0.061) and significantly better risk classification (NRI = 0.158, P = 0.048) than the multivariate model without AAC. The multivariate model using traditional factors and AAC did not show a significantly higher AUC (0.832 vs. 0.823, P = 0.616) or NRI (0.073, P = 0.13) than the AAC score alone. The optimal cutoff value of the AAC score for predicting CAD was 1025.8 (sensitivity, 79.5 %; specificity, 75.9 %). AAC scores may serve as a surrogate marker for the presence or absence of asymptomatic CAD. (orig.)

  14. Similar group mean scores, but large individual variations, in patient-relevant outcomes over 2 years in meniscectomized subjects with and without radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, Przemyslaw T; Englund, Martin; Roos, Ewa M.;

    2004-01-01

    or individual levels. Such information is needed for identification of study cohorts and planning of clinical trials. The aim of the study was, thus, to assess the variation in pain and function on group and individual level over 2 years in previously meniscectomized individuals with and without radiographic...

  15. World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM) 2016 standards for recording and scoring leg movements in polysomnograms developed by a joint task force from the International and the European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Groups (IRLSSG and EURLSSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, R; Fulda, S; Allen, R P; Zucconi, M; Bruni, O; Chokroverty, S; Ferini-Strambi, L; Frauscher, B; Garcia-Borreguero, D; Hirshkowitz, M; Högl, B; Inoue, Y; Jahangir, A; Manconi, M; Marcus, C L; Picchietti, D L; Plazzi, G; Winkelman, J W; Zak, R S

    2016-10-01

    This report presents the results of the work by a joint task force of the International and European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Groups and World Association of Sleep Medicine that revised and updated the current standards for recording and scoring leg movements (LM) in polysomnographic recordings (PSG). First, the background of the decisions made and the explanations of the new rules are reported and then specific standard rules are presented for recording, detecting, scoring and reporting LM activity in PSG. Each standard rule has been classified with a level of evidence. At the end of the paper, Appendix 1 provides algorithms to aid implementation of these new standards in software tools. There are two main changes introduced by these new rules: 1) Candidate LM (CLM), are any monolateral LM 0.5-10 s long or bilateral LM 0.5-15 s long; 2) periodic LM (PLM) are now defined by runs of at least four consecutive CLM with an intermovement interval ≥10 and ≤ 90 s without any CLM preceded by an interval  0.5 s regardless of duration, otherwise the technician scores the LM as for the old standards. There is a new criterion for the morphology of LM that applies only to computerized LM detection to better match expert visual detection. Available automatic scoring programs will incorporate all the new rules so that the new standards should reduce technician burden for scoring PLMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased plasma levels of the high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) are associated with a higher score of gastrointestinal dysfunction in individuals with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinská, K; Bucová, M; Ďurmanová, V; Lakatošová, S; Jánošíková, D; Bakoš, J; Hlavatá, A; Ostatníková, D

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a disorder of neural development characterized by impairments in communication, social interaction, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. The etiology of autism is poorly understood, the evidence indicates that inflammation may play a key role. In autism a high prevalence of gastrointestinal disturbances is reported, that are linked to a low-grade chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is an intranuclear protein that can be passively released from necrotic cells or actively secreted under inflammatory conditions as alarmin or late proinflammatory cytokine. The objective of this study was to measure plasma levels of HMGB1 in individuals with autism and to analyze their association with gastrointestinal symptoms. The study involved 31 subjects with low-functioning autistic disorder aged 2-22 years and 16 healthy controls. Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly higher in individuals with autism than in controls (13.8+/-11.7 ng/ml vs. 7.90+/-4.0 ng/ml, pautism and its possible association with GI symptoms.

  17. From Rasch scores to regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karl Bang

    2006-01-01

    Rasch models provide a framework for measurement and modelling latent variables. Having measured a latent variable in a population a comparison of groups will often be of interest. For this purpose the use of observed raw scores will often be inadequate because these lack interval scale propertie....... This paper compares two approaches to group comparison: linear regression models using estimated person locations as outcome variables and latent regression models based on the distribution of the score....

  18. An Analysis of Language Coding Ability Difference Between High/Low Score Group Students%英语高/低分组语言编码能力差异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丽林; 黄琴

    2016-01-01

    文章采取量性研究和质性研究相结合的方式,以长沙两所高校的200名大三学生为调查对象,通过问卷调查和半开放式访谈采集数据,用SPSS20.0的描述性统计分析、T检验、相关关系来分析高低分组语言编码能力差异,继而对这种差异的原因进行探究。研究结果表明:高分组学生和低分组学生在语言编码能力上有不同的倾向,针对调查所发现的两组学生的差异,对其原因进行了分析。%In this research ,200 students of grade three in two universities in Changsha are selected as subjects .With both the quantitative and qualitative methods ,the differences of lan-guage coding ability between high and low group students are analyzed by using questionnaire and taking semi-open interviews .The data are treated with descriptive statistics analysis , T-test and correlation by SPSS 20.0.Then,the writers explore the reasons for these differences . The results shows that the high score and low score group students have different tendencies in language coding abilities .And finally the writers analyze the reasons to the differences between the two groups found in the survey .

  19. Reliability analysis of visual ranking of coronary artery calcification on low-dose CT of the thorax for lung cancer screening: comparison with ECG-gated calcium scoring CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Sung, Yon Mi; Cho, So Hyun; Park, Young Nam; Choi, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is frequently detected on low-dose CT (LDCT) of the thorax. Concurrent assessment of CAC and lung cancer screening using LDCT is beneficial in terms of cost and radiation dose reduction. The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability of visual ranking of positive CAC on LDCT compared to Agatston score (AS) on electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated calcium scoring CT. We studied 576 patients who were consecutively registered for health screening and undergoing both LDCT and ECG-gated calcium scoring CT. We excluded subjects with an AS of zero. The final study cohort included 117 patients with CAC (97 men; mean age, 53.4 ± 8.5). AS was used as the gold standard (mean score 166.0; range 0.4-3,719.3). Two board-certified radiologists and two radiology residents participated in an observer performance study. Visual ranking of CAC was performed according to four categories (1-10, 11-100, 101-400, and 401 or higher) for coronary artery disease risk stratification. Weighted kappa statistics were used to measure the degree of reliability on visual ranking of CAC on LDCT. The degree of reliability on visual ranking of CAC on LDCT compared to ECG-gated calcium scoring CT was excellent for board-certified radiologists and good for radiology residents. A high degree of association was observed with 71.6% of visual rankings in the same category as the Agatston category and 98.9% varying by no more than one category. Visual ranking of positive CAC on LDCT is reliable for predicting AS rank categorization.

  20. 基于利益相关者/平衡记分卡的集团公司绩效评价研究%Study on Performance Evaluation of Group Companies based on Stakeholder Theory and Balanced - score Card

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵春彦

    2011-01-01

    本文基于利益相关者理论,并借鉴平衡计分卡的原理,设计了集团公司对子公司的绩效评价体系.并以S集团公司为案例,按照所设计的绩效评价体系,运用突变级数评价法对该集团公司18个子公司的绩效进行了计算和评价.运用平衡记分卡设计的评价体系更加全面,且考虑了诸多利益相关者的诉求,选择的突变级数评价法计算简单,不存在确定权重的问题,减少了主观性.%In this paper, a performance evaluation system is put forward based on stakeholder theory and balanced-score card. Then S Group is taken as an example to carry out this system while catastrophe progression method is used. Balanced-score card thinking may led an all-round evaluation system, and different stakeholder's demand may be considered in this system, catastrophe progression method may be used simply, and we are not required to weigh each index which may lower the subjectivity.

  1. An automated multi-modal object analysis approach to coronary calcium scoring of adaptive heart isolated MSCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. This can be challenging for a human observer as it is difficult to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. The inclusion or exclusion of false positive or true positive calcified plaques respectively will alter the patient calcium score incorrectly, thus leading to the possibility of incorrect treatment prescription. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the Volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the requirement and

  2. Test Scoring [book review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Rob R.

    2003-01-01

    This book discusses how to obtain test scores and, in particular, how to obtain test scores from tests that consist of a combination of multiple choice and open-ended questions. The strength of the book is that scoring solutions are presented for a diversity of real world scoring problems. (SLD)

  3. A fully automated multi-modal computer aided diagnosis approach to coronary calcium scoring of MSCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-03-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. However, it can be difficult for a human observer to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the feasibility and requirement for an automated scoring method to reduce the subjectivity and reproducibility error inherent with manual clinical calcium scoring.

  4. Prognostic value of coronary artery calcium score in patients with stable an-gina pectoris after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-Fang WANG; Jiang-Li HAN; Rong HE; Xiang-Zhu ZENG; Fu-Chun ZHANG; Li-Jun GUO; Wei GAO

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prognostic value of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score in patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods A total of 334 consecutive patients with SAP who underwent first PCI following multi-slice computer tomography (MSCT) were enrolled from our institution between January 2007 and June 2012. The CAC score was calculated according to the standard Agatston calcium scoring algorithm. Complex PCI was defined as use of high pressure bal-loon, kissing balloon and/or rotablator. Procedure-related complications included dissection, occlusion, perforation, no/slow flow and emer-gency coronary artery bypass grafting. Main adverse cardiac events (MACE) were defined as a combined end point of death, non-fatal myo-cardial infarction, target lesion revascularization and rehospitalization for cardiac ischemic events. Results Patients with a CAC score>300 (n=145) had significantly higher PCI complexity (13.1%vs. 5.8%, P=0.017) and rate of procedure-related complications (17.2%vs. 7.4%, P=0.005) than patients with a CAC score≤300 (n=189). After a median follow-up of 22.5 months (4-72 months), patients with a CAC score≤300 differ greatly than those patients with CAC score>300 in cumulative non-events survival rates (88.9 vs. 79.0%, Log rank 4.577, P=0.032). After adjusted for other factors, the risk of MACE was significantly higher [hazard ratio (HR):4.3, 95%confidence inter-val (95%CI):2.4-8.2, P=0.038] in patients with a CAC score>300 compared to patients with a lower CAC score. Conclusions The CAC score is an independent predictor for MACE in SAP patients who underwent PCI and indicates complexity of PCI and proce-dure-related complications.

  5. SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging as an adjunct to coronary calcium score for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Ziegler Franz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery calcifications (CAC are markers of coronary atherosclerosis, but do not correlate well with stenosis severity. This study intended to evaluate clinical situations where a combined approach of coronary calcium scoring (CS and nuclear stress test (SPECT-MPI is useful for the detection of relevant CAD. Methods Patients with clinical indication for invasive coronary angiography (ICA were included into our study during 08/2005-09/2008. At first all patients underwent CS procedure as part of the study protocol performed by either using a multidetector computed tomography (CT scanner or a dual-source CT imager. CAC were automatically defined by dedicated software and the Agatston score was semi-automatically calculated. A stress-rest SPECT-MPI study was performed afterwards and scintigraphic images were evaluated quantitatively. Then all patients underwent ICA. Thereby significant CAD was defined as luminal stenosis ≥75% in quantitative coronary analysis (QCA in ≥1 epicardial vessel. To compare data lacking Gaussian distribution an unpaired Wilcoxon-Test (Mann–Whitney was used. Otherwise a Students t-test for unpaired samples was applied. Calculations were considered to be significant at a p-value of Results We consecutively included 351 symptomatic patients (mean age: 61.2±12.3 years; range: 18–94 years; male: n=240 with a mean Agatston score of 258.5±512.2 (range: 0–4214. ICA verified exclusion of significant CAD in 66/67 (98.5% patients without CAC. CAC was detected in remaining 284 patients. In 132/284 patients (46.5% with CS>0 significant CAD was confirmed by ICA, and excluded in 152/284 (53.5% patients. Sensitivity for CAD detection by CS alone was calculated as 99.2%, specificity was 30.3%, and negative predictive value was 98.5%. An additional SPECT in patients with CS>0 increased specificity to 80.9% while reducing sensitivity to 87.9%. Diagnostic accuracy was 84.2%. Conclusions In patients

  6. Rationale and study protocol for the supporting children’s outcomes using rewards, exercise and skills (SCORES group randomized controlled trial: A physical activity and fundamental movement skills intervention for primary schools in low-income communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubans David R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Australian children are insufficiently active to accrue health benefits and physical activity (PA levels are consistently lower among youth of low socio-economic position. PA levels decline dramatically during adolescence and evidence suggests that competency in a range of fundamental movement skills (FMS may serve as a protective factor against this trend. Methods/design The Supporting Children’s Outcomes Using Rewards Exercise and Skills (SCORES intervention is a multi-component PA and FMS intervention for primary schools in low-income communities, which will be evaluated using a group randomized controlled trial. The socio-ecological model provided a framework for the 12-month intervention, which includes the following components: teacher professional learning, student leadership workshops (including leadership accreditation and rewards, e.g., stickers, water bottles, PA policy review, PA equipment packs, parental engagement via newsletters, FMS homework and a parent evening, and community partnerships with local sporting organizations. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 6- and 12-months. The primary outcomes are PA (accelerometers, FMS (Test of Gross Motor Development II and cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage fitness test. Secondary outcomes include body mass index [using weight (kg/height (m2], perceived competence, physical self-esteem, and resilience. Individual and environmental mediators of behavior change (e.g. social support and enjoyment will also be assessed. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time will be used to assess the impact of the intervention on PA within physical education lessons. Statistical analyses will follow intention-to-treat principles and hypothesized mediators of PA behavior change will be explored. Discussion SCORES is an innovative primary school-based PA and FMS intervention designed to support students attending schools in low-income communities to be more skilled

  7. Subgroup Balancing Propensity Score

    OpenAIRE

    DONG, JING; Zhang, Junni L; Li, Fan

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the estimation of subgroup treatment effects with observational data. Existing propensity score matching and weighting methods are mostly developed for estimating overall treatment effect. Although the true propensity score should balance covariates for the subgroup populations, the estimated propensity score may not balance covariates for the subgroup samples. We propose the subgroup balancing propensity score (SBPS) method, which selects, for each subgroup, to use either the ...

  8. A head-to-head comparison of the coronary calcium score by computed tomography with myocardial perfusion imaging in predicting coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mansour Almoudi; Zhong-Hua Sun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The coronary artery calcium (CAC) score has been shown to predict future cardiac events. However the extent to which the added value of a CAC score to the diagnostic performance of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation between CAC score and SPECT in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Methods A retrospective review of the CAC scores by use of the Agatston calcium scoring method and cardiac SPECT diagnostic reports was conducted in 48 patients, who underwent both coronary computed tomography (CT) and SPECT examinations due to suspected coronary artery disease. A Pearson correlation test was used to determine the relation between CAC scores and MPI-SPECT assessments with regard to the evaluation of the extent of disease. Results Forty-seven percent of the patients had CAC scores more than 100, while 42% of these patients demonstrated abnormal, or probably abnormal, MPI-SPECT. Of the 23% of patients with a zero CAC score, only 7% had normal MPI-SPECT findings. No significant correlation was found between the CAC scores and MPISPECT assessments (r value ranged from 0.012 to 0.080), regardless of the degree of coronary calcification. Conclusions There is a lack of correlation between the CAC scores and the MPI-SPECT findings in the assessment of the extent of coronary artery disease. CAC scores and MPI-SPECT should be considered complementary approaches in the evaluation of patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

  9. The Apgar Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Apgar score provides an accepted and convenient method for reporting the status of the newborn infant immediately after birth and the response to resuscitation if needed. The Apgar score alone cannot be considered as evidence of, or a consequence of, asphyxia; does not predict individual neonatal mortality or neurologic outcome; and should not be used for that purpose. An Apgar score assigned during resuscitation is not equivalent to a score assigned to a spontaneously breathing infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourage use of an expanded Apgar score reporting form that accounts for concurrent resuscitative interventions.

  10. 颈内动脉颅内段常规头颅CT钙化斑块评分对其狭窄的筛检作用%Screening Effect of the Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery' s Plaque Calcium Score by Using Conventional Brain Unenhanced CT on Artery stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立勋; 张婷; 赵衡; 肖文连; 吴晓东; 刘进才; 游咏

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨常规头颅CT平扫对颈内动脉颅内段钙化斑块评分及对该段血管狭窄程度的筛检作用.方法 行头颈部CT动脉造影(含常规头颅CT平扫,CTA)的病例110例,按照目测和软件评分相结合的方法将斑块分为4级,选取能成功进行Agatston钙化评分的3、4级斑块并能进行CT动脉造影狭窄分析(AVA)的病例26例,记录斑块的Agatston钙化评分值;采用AVA软件分析该斑块的血管狭窄程度及相应的北美症状性颈动脉内膜切除术(NASCET)标准分级.结果 26例中,轻度狭窄18例,Agatston钙化评分值2.69±1.01;中度狭窄5例,Agatston 钙化评分值5.25±0.88;重度狭窄及闭塞3例,Agatston钙化评分值6.80±0.30.中、重度狭窄与轻度狭窄的血管斑块Agatston钙化评分差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),中、重度狭窄之间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).狭窄程度与斑块的Agaston钙化评分正相关(r=0.938,P<0.05).结论 常规头颅CT平扫颈内动脉颅内段钙化斑块Agatston评分对该段血管狭窄程度有筛检作用,血管斑块Agatston钙化评分值5.25以上患者应进一步行CTA检查.%Aim To investigate the preliminary scanning significance of artery stenosis with intracranial internal carotid artery' s plaque calcium score using conventional brain unenhanced computed tomography (CT).Methods By retrospectively analyzing brain and neck CT artery imaging (including conventional brain unenhanced CT,CTA) of 110 cases,the intracranial internal carotid artery' s calcification were classified into 4 grades.Of them,there are 26 cases which can be successfully classified into 3/4 grade by Agatston Calcium Score and receive CT artery imaging analysis of vascular and artery (AVA) software.AVA software was used to analyse the calcification segment artery' s stenosis degree and its North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial criteria (NASCET) classification.Results In the 26 cases,there are 18 cases of mild grade

  11. SCORE - A DESCRIPTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLACK, CHARLES W.

    REINFORCEMENT AND ROLE-REVERSAL TECHNIQUES ARE USED IN THE SCORE PROJECT, A LOW-COST PROGRAM OF DELINQUENCY PREVENTION FOR HARD-CORE TEENAGE STREET CORNER BOYS. COMMITTED TO THE BELIEF THAT THE BOYS HAVE THE POTENTIAL FOR ETHICAL BEHAVIOR, THE SCORE WORKER FOLLOWS B.F. SKINNER'S THEORY OF OPERANT CONDITIONING AND REINFORCES THE DELINQUENT'S GOOD…

  12. Cardiovascular risk score in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagan, Abrar Ahmed; Mahmud, Tafazzul E Haque; Rasheed, Aflak; Zafar, Zafar Ali; Rehman, Ata ur; Ali, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the 10-year Cardiovascular risk score with QRISK-2 and Framingham risk calculators in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Non Rheumatoid Arthritis subjects and asses the usefulness of QRISK-2 and Framingham calculators in both groups. Methods: During the study 106 RA and 106 Non RA patients age and sex matched participants were enrolled from outpatient department. Demographic data and questions regarding other study parameters were noted. After 14 hours of fasting 5 ml of venous blood was drawn for Cholesterol and HDL levels, laboratory tests were performed on COBAS c III (ROCHE). QRISK-2 and Framingham risk calculators were used to get individual 10-year CVD risk score. Results: In this study the mean age of RA group was (45.1±9.5) for Non RA group (43.7±8.2), with female gender as common. The mean predicted 10-year score with QRISK-2 calculator in RA group (14.2±17.1%) and Non RA group was (13.2±19.0%) with (p-value 0.122). The 10-year score with Framingham risk score in RA group was (12.9±10.4%) and Non RA group was (8.9±8.7%) with (p-value 0.001). In RA group QRISK-2 (24.5%) and FRS (31.1%) cases with predicted score were in higher risk category. The maximum agreement scores between both calculators was observed in both groups (Kappa = 0.618 RA Group; Kappa = 0.671 Non RA Group). Conclusion: QRISK-2 calculator is more appropriate as it takes RA, ethnicity, CKD, and Atrial fibrillation as factors in risk assessment score. PMID:27375684

  13. The Bandim tuberculosis score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Joaquim, Luis Carlos; Vieira, Cesaltina

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out in Guinea-Bissau ’ s capital Bissau among inpatients and outpatients attending for tuberculosis (TB) treatment within the study area of the Bandim Health Project, a Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. Our aim was to assess the variability between 2...... physicians in performing the Bandim tuberculosis score (TBscore), a clinical severity score for pulmonary TB (PTB), and to compare it to the Karnofsky performance score (KPS). Method : From December 2008 to July 2009 we assessed the TBscore and the KPS of 100 PTB patients at inclusion in the TB cohort and...

  14. Reporting Valid and Reliable Overall Scores and Domain Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    In educational assessment, overall scores obtained by simply averaging a number of domain scores are sometimes reported. However, simply averaging the domain scores ignores the fact that different domains have different score points, that scores from those domains are related, and that at different score points the relationship between overall…

  15. Volleyball Scoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, William; Dargahi-Noubary, G. R.; Shi, Yixun

    2002-01-01

    The widespread interest in sports in our culture provides an excellent opportunity to catch students' attention in mathematics and statistics classes. One mathematically interesting aspect of volleyball, which can be used to motivate students, is the scoring system. (MM)

  16. Volleyball Scoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, William; Dargahi-Noubary, G. R.; Shi, Yixun

    2002-01-01

    The widespread interest in sports in our culture provides an excellent opportunity to catch students' attention in mathematics and statistics classes. One mathematically interesting aspect of volleyball, which can be used to motivate students, is the scoring system. (MM)

  17. Deep convolutional neural networks for automatic coronary calcium scoring in a screening study with low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessmann, Nikolas; Išgum, Ivana; Setio, Arnaud A. A.; de Vos, Bob D.; Ciompi, Francesco; de Jong, Pim A.; Oudkerk, Matthjis; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Viergever, Max A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-03-01

    The amount of calcifications in the coronary arteries is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular events and is used to identify subjects at high risk who might benefit from preventive treatment. Routine quantification of coronary calcium scores can complement screening programs using low-dose chest CT, such as lung cancer screening. We present a system for automatic coronary calcium scoring based on deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). The system uses three independently trained CNNs to estimate a bounding box around the heart. In this region of interest, connected components above 130 HU are considered candidates for coronary artery calcifications. To separate them from other high intensity lesions, classification of all extracted voxels is performed by feeding two-dimensional 50 mm × 50 mm patches from three orthogonal planes into three concurrent CNNs. The networks consist of three convolutional layers and one fully-connected layer with 256 neurons. In the experiments, 1028 non-contrast-enhanced and non-ECG-triggered low-dose chest CT scans were used. The network was trained on 797 scans. In the remaining 231 test scans, the method detected on average 194.3 mm3 of 199.8 mm3 coronary calcifications per scan (sensitivity 97.2 %) with an average false-positive volume of 10.3 mm3 . Subjects were assigned to one of five standard cardiovascular risk categories based on the Agatston score. Accuracy of risk category assignment was 84.4 % with a linearly weighted κ of 0.89. The proposed system can perform automatic coronary artery calcium scoring to identify subjects undergoing low-dose chest CT screening who are at risk of cardiovascular events with high accuracy.

  18. Prediction of late distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine treatment: a combined analysis of patients from the Austrian breast and colorectal cancer study group 8 and arimidex, tamoxifen alone or in combination randomized trials using the PAM50 risk of recurrence score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Ivana; Cuzick, Jack; Dowsett, Mitch; Lopez-Knowles, Elena; Filipits, Martin; Dubsky, Peter; Cowens, John Wayne; Ferree, Sean; Schaper, Carl; Fesl, Christian; Gnant, Michael

    2015-03-10

    We have previously shown that the PAM50-based risk of recurrence (ROR) score is significantly correlated with distant recurrence in both the translational research cohort within the Arimidex, Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination (ATAC) trial (TransATAC) and Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group 8 (ABCSG 8) randomized trials. Here, we focus on the ROR score for predicting distant recurrence after 5 years of follow-up in a combined analysis of these two randomized trials. Long-term follow-up data and tissue samples were obtained from 2,137 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer from the ABCSG 8 and TransATAC trials. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to determine the prognostic value of ROR for distant recurrence beyond 5 years in the combined data set. A total of 2,137 women who did not have a recurrence 5 years after diagnosis were included in the combined analyses. The Clinical Treatment Score (CTS) was the strongest prognostic factor 5 years after diagnosis (univariable: likelihood ratio [LR] χ(2) = 94.12, bivariable: LR χ(2) = 61.43). The ROR score was significantly prognostic by itself in years 5 to 10. In the node-negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative subgroup, more prognostic value for late distant recurrence was added by the ROR score compared with the CTS. The ROR score added clinically meaningful prognostic information to the CTS in all patients and all subgroups in the late follow-up period. These results suggest that the ROR score may be helpful for separating patients into risk groups who could be spared or potentially benefit from extended hormonal therapy beyond 5 years of treatment. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Propensity score matching: A conceptual review for radiology researchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Hee; Park, Seong Ho; Park, Yu Rang; Kim, Hwa Jung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Eugene [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The propensity score is defined as the probability of each individual study subject being assigned to a group of interest for comparison purposes. Propensity score adjustment is a method of ensuring an even distribution of confounders between groups, thereby increasing between group comparability. Propensity score analysis is therefore an increasingly applied statistical method in observational studies. The purpose of this article was to provide a step-by-step nonmathematical conceptual guide to propensity score analysis with particular emphasis on propensity score matching. A software program code used for propensity score matching was also presented.

  20. Instant MuseScore

    CERN Document Server

    Shinn, Maxwell

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Instant MuseScore is written in an easy-to follow format, packed with illustrations that will help you get started with this music composition software.This book is for musicians who would like to learn how to notate music digitally with MuseScore. Readers should already have some knowledge about musical terminology; however, no prior experience with music notation software is necessary.

  1. Tensorial Orientation Scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Gronde, Jasper J.; Azzopardi, George; Petkov, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    Orientation scores are representations of images built using filters that only select on orientation (and not on the magnitude of the frequency). Importantly, they allow (easy) reconstruction, making them ideal for use in a filtering pipeline. Traditionally a specific set of orientations has to be c

  2. Developing Scoring Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed scoring procedures to convert screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for fruits and vegetables, dairy, added sugars, whole grains, fiber, and calcium using the What We Eat in America 24-hour dietary recall data from the 2003-2006 NHANES.

  3. The lod score method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J P; Saccone, N L; Corbett, J

    2001-01-01

    The lod score method originated in a seminal article by Newton Morton in 1955. The method is broadly concerned with issues of power and the posterior probability of linkage, ensuring that a reported linkage has a high probability of being a true linkage. In addition, the method is sequential, so that pedigrees or lod curves may be combined from published reports to pool data for analysis. This approach has been remarkably successful for 50 years in identifying disease genes for Mendelian disorders. After discussing these issues, we consider the situation for complex disorders, where the maximum lod score (MLS) statistic shares some of the advantages of the traditional lod score approach but is limited by unknown power and the lack of sharing of the primary data needed to optimally combine analytic results. We may still learn from the lod score method as we explore new methods in molecular biology and genetic analysis to utilize the complete human DNA sequence and the cataloging of all human genes.

  4. Nursing activities score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda, DR; Nap, R; de Rijk, A; Schaufeli, W; Lapichino, G

    Objectives. The instruments used for measuring nursing workload in the intensive care unit (e.g., Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System-28) are based on therapeutic interventions related to severity of illness. Many nursing activities are not necessarily related to severity of illness, and

  5. Automated Essay Scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semire DIKLI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated Essay Scoring Semire DIKLI Florida State University Tallahassee, FL, USA ABSTRACT The impacts of computers on writing have been widely studied for three decades. Even basic computers functions, i.e. word processing, have been of great assistance to writers in modifying their essays. The research on Automated Essay Scoring (AES has revealed that computers have the capacity to function as a more effective cognitive tool (Attali, 2004. AES is defined as the computer technology that evaluates and scores the written prose (Shermis & Barrera, 2002; Shermis & Burstein, 2003; Shermis, Raymat, & Barrera, 2003. Revision and feedback are essential aspects of the writing process. Students need to receive feedback in order to increase their writing quality. However, responding to student papers can be a burden for teachers. Particularly if they have large number of students and if they assign frequent writing assignments, providing individual feedback to student essays might be quite time consuming. AES systems can be very useful because they can provide the student with a score as well as feedback within seconds (Page, 2003. Four types of AES systems, which are widely used by testing companies, universities, and public schools: Project Essay Grader (PEG, Intelligent Essay Assessor (IEA, E-rater, and IntelliMetric. AES is a developing technology. Many AES systems are used to overcome time, cost, and generalizability issues in writing assessment. The accuracy and reliability of these systems have been proven to be high. The search for excellence in machine scoring of essays is continuing and numerous studies are being conducted to improve the effectiveness of the AES systems.

  6. Fetal Biophysical Profile Scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. HaghighatKhah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nFetal biophysical profile scoring is a sonographic-based method of fetal assessment first described by Manning and Platt in 1980. "nThe biophysical profile score was developed as a method to integrate real-time observations of the fetus and his/her intrauterine environment in order to more comprehensively assess the fetal condition. These findings must be evaluated in the context of maternal/fetal history (i.e., chronic hypertension, post-dates, intrauterine growth restriction, etc, fetal structural integrity (presence or absence of congenital anomalies, and the functionality of fetal support structures (placental and umbilical cord. For example, acute asphyxia due to placental abruption may result in an absence of the acute variables of the biophysical profile score (fetal breathing movements, fetal movement, fetal tone, and fetal heart rate reactivity with a normal amniotic fluid volume. With post maturity the asphyxial event may be intermittent and chronic resulting in a decrease in amniotic fluid volume, but with the acute variables remaining normal. "nWhile the 5 components of the biophysical profile score have remained unchanged since 1980 (Manning, 1980, the definitions of a normal and abnormal parameter have evolved with increasing experience. "nIn 1984 the definition of oligohydramnios was increased from < 1cm pocket of fluid to < 2.0 x 1.0 cm pocket. Oligohydramnios is now defined as a pocket of amniotic fluid < 2.0 x 2.0 cm (Manning, 1995a "nIf the four ultrasound variables are normal, the accuracy of the biophysical profile score was not found to be significantly improved by adding the non-stress test. As a result, in 1987 the profile score was modified to incorporate the non-stress test only when one of the ultrasound variables was abnormal (Manning 1987. Table 1 outlines the current definitions for quantifying a variable as present or absent. "nEach of the 5 components of the biophysical profile score does not have equal

  7. Influence of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction on CT calcium scores: a multi-manufacturer dynamic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, N R; Willemink, M J; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W; Leiner, T

    2017-01-19

    To evaluate the influence of dose reduction in combination with iterative reconstruction (IR) on coronary calcium scores (CCS) in a dynamic phantom on state-of-the-art CT systems from different manufacturers. Calcified inserts in an anthropomorphic chest phantom were translated at 20 mm/s corresponding to heart rates between 60 and 75 bpm. The inserts were scanned five times with routinely used CCS protocols at reference dose and 40 and 80% dose reduction on four high-end CT systems. Filtered back projection (FBP) and increasing levels of IR were applied. Noise levels were determined. CCS, quantified as Agatston and mass scores, were compared to physical mass and scores at FBP reference dose. For the reference dose in combination with FBP, noise level variation between CT systems was less than 18%. Decreasing dose almost always resulted in increased CCS, while at increased levels of IR, CCS decreased again. The influence of IR on CCS was smaller than the influence of dose reduction. At reference dose, physical mass was underestimated 3-30%. All CT systems showed similar CCS at 40% dose reduction in combinations with specific reconstructions. For some CT systems CCS was not affected at 80% dose reduction, in combination with IR. This multivendor study showed that radiation dose reductions of 40% did not influence CCS in a dynamic phantom using state-of-the-art CT systems in combination with specific reconstruction settings. Dose reduction resulted in increased noise and consequently increased CCS, whereas increased IR resulted in decreased CCS.

  8. Measurement of coronary calcium scores by electron beam computed tomography or exercise testing as initial diagnostic tool in low-risk patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geluk, Christiane A.; Perik, Patrick J.; Tio, Rene A.; Goette, Marco J.W.; Hillege, Hans L.; Zijlstra, Felix [University Medical Center Groningen, Thoraxcenter, Department of Cardiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Dikkers, Riksta; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Houwers, Janneke B.; Willems, Tineke P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    We determined the efficiency of a screening protocol based on coronary calcium scores (CCS) compared with exercise testing in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), a normal ECG and troponin levels. Three-hundred-and-four patients were enrolled in a screening protocol including CCS by electron beam computed tomography (Agatston score), and exercise testing. Decision-making was based on CCS. When CCS{>=}400, coronary angiography (CAG) was recommended. When CCS<10, patients were discharged. Exercise tests were graded as positive, negative or nondiagnostic. The combined endpoint was defined as coronary event or obstructive CAD at CAG. During 12{+-}4 months, CCS{>=}400, 10-399 and <10 were found in 42, 103 and 159 patients and the combined endpoint occurred in 24 (57%), 14 (14%) and 0 patients (0%), respectively. In 22 patients (7%), myocardial perfusion scintigraphy was performed instead of exercise testing due to the inability to perform an exercise test. A positive, nondiagnostic and negative exercise test result was found in 37, 76 and 191 patients, and the combined endpoint occurred in 11 (30%), 15 (20%) and 12 patients (6%), respectively. Receiver-operator characteristics analysis showed that the area under the curve of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.93) for CCS was superior to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.61-0.78) for exercise testing (P<0.0001). In conclusion, measurement of CCS is an appropriate initial screening test in a well-defined low-risk population with suspected CAD. (orig.)

  9. Credit scoring for individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria DIMITRIU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lending money to different borrowers is profitable, but risky. The profits come from the interest rate and the fees earned on the loans. Banks do not want to make loans to borrowers who cannot repay them. Even if the banks do not intend to make bad loans, over time, some of them can become bad. For instance, as a result of the recent financial crisis, the capability of many borrowers to repay their loans were affected, many of them being on default. That’s why is important for the bank to monitor the loans. The purpose of this paper is to focus on credit scoring main issues. As a consequence of this, we presented in this paper the scoring model of an important Romanian Bank. Based on this credit scoring model and taking into account the last lending requirements of the National Bank of Romania, we developed an assessment tool, in Excel, for retail loans which is presented in the case study.

  10. Earthquake forecast enrichment scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Smyth

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP is a global project aimed at testing earthquake forecast models in a fair environment. Various metrics are currently used to evaluate the submitted forecasts. However, the CSEP still lacks easily understandable metrics with which to rank the universal performance of the forecast models. In this research, we modify a well-known and respected metric from another statistical field, bioinformatics, to make it suitable for evaluating earthquake forecasts, such as those submitted to the CSEP initiative. The metric, originally called a gene-set enrichment score, is based on a Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic. Our modified metric assesses if, over a certain time period, the forecast values at locations where earthquakes have occurred are significantly increased compared to the values for all locations where earthquakes did not occur. Permutation testing allows for a significance value to be placed upon the score. Unlike the metrics currently employed by the CSEP, the score places no assumption on the distribution of earthquake occurrence nor requires an arbitrary reference forecast. In this research, we apply the modified metric to simulated data and real forecast data to show it is a powerful and robust technique, capable of ranking competing earthquake forecasts.

  11. Propensity score weighting with multilevel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Landrum, Mary Beth

    2013-08-30

    Propensity score methods are being increasingly used as a less parametric alternative to traditional regression to balance observed differences across groups in both descriptive and causal comparisons. Data collected in many disciplines often have analytically relevant multilevel or clustered structure. The propensity score, however, was developed and has been used primarily with unstructured data. We present and compare several propensity-score-weighted estimators for clustered data, including marginal, cluster-weighted, and doubly robust estimators. Using both analytical derivations and Monte Carlo simulations, we illustrate bias arising when the usual assumptions of propensity score analysis do not hold for multilevel data. We show that exploiting the multilevel structure, either parametrically or nonparametrically, in at least one stage of the propensity score analysis can greatly reduce these biases. We applied these methods to a study of racial disparities in breast cancer screening among beneficiaries of Medicare health plans.

  12. The International Bleeding Risk Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Laine, L.; Dalton, H.

    2017-01-01

    The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding.......The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding....

  13. Fingerprinting of music scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Jonathan; Schmucker, Martin

    2004-06-01

    Publishers of sheet music are generally reluctant in distributing their content via the Internet. Although online sheet music distribution's advantages are numerous the potential risk of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) infringement, e.g. illegal online distributions, disables any innovation propensity. While active protection techniques only deter external risk factors, additional technology is necessary to adequately treat further risk factors. For several media types including music scores watermarking technology has been developed, which ebeds information in data by suitable data modifications. Furthermore, fingerprinting or perceptual hasing methods have been developed and are being applied especially for audio. These methods allow the identification of content without prior modifications. In this article we motivate the development of watermarking and fingerprinting technologies for sheet music. Outgoing from potential limitations of watermarking methods we explain why fingerprinting methods are important for sheet music and address potential applications. Finally we introduce a condept for fingerprinting of sheet music.

  14. [Scoring--criteria for operability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestern, H J

    1997-01-01

    For therapeutic recommendations three different kinds of scores are essential: 1. The severity scores for trauma; 2. Severity scores for mangled extremities; 3. Intensive care scores. The severity of polytrauma patients is measurable by the AIS, ISS, RTS, PTS and TRISS which is a combination of RTS, ISS, age, and mechanism of injury. For mangled extremities there are also different scores available: MESI (Mangled Extremity Syndrome Index) and MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score). The aim of these scores is to assist in the indication with regard to amputate or to save the extremity. These scoring indices can be used to evaluate the severity of a systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome with respect to multiple organ failure. All scores are dynamic values which are variable with improvement of therapy.

  15. Relationship of Apgar Scores and Bayley Mental and Motor Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serunian, Sally A.; Broman, Sarah H.

    1975-01-01

    Examined the relationship of newborns' 1-minute Apgar scores to their 8-month Bayley mental and motor scores and to 8-month classifications of their development as normal, suspect, or abnormal. Also investigated relationships between Apgar scores and race, longevity, and birth weight. (JMB)

  16. Evaluation of the influence of acquisition and reconstruction parameters for 16-row multidetector CT on coronary calcium scoring using a stationary and dynamic cardiac phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begemann, Philipp G.C.; Koops, Andreas; Adam, Gerhard; Nolte-Ernsting, Claus [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Center of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Stevendaal, Udo van; Grass, Michael [Philips Research Laboratories Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Koester, Ralph [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Center of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Cardiology/Angiology, Hamburg (Germany); Mahnken, Andreas H. [University of Technology Aachen, University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    A calcium-scoring phantom with hydroxyapatite-filled cylindrical holes (0.5 to 4 mm) was used. High-resolution scans were performed for an accuracy baseline. The phantom was mounted to a moving heart phantom. Non-moving data with the implementation of an ECG-signal were acquired for different pitches (0.2/0.3), heart rates (60/80/95 bpm) and collimations (16 x 0.75/16 x 1.5 mm). Images were reconstructed with a cone-beam multi-cycle algorithm at a standard thickness/increment of 3 mm/1.5 mm and the thinnest possible thickness (0.8/0.4 and 2/1). Subsequently, ECG-gated moving calcium-scoring phantom data were acquired. The calcium volume and Agatston score were measured. The temporal resolution and reconstruction cycles were calculated. High-resolution scans determine the calcium volume with a high accuracy (mean overestimation, 0.8%). In the non-moving measurements, the volume underestimation ranged from about 6% (16 x 0.75 mm; 0.8/0.4 mm) to nearly 25% (16 x 1.5 mm; 3/1.5 mm). Moving scans showed increased measurement errors depending on the reconstructed RR interval, collimation, pitch, heart rate and gantry rotation time. Also, a correlation with the temporal resolution could be found. The reliability of calcium-scoring results can be improved with the use of a narrower collimation, a lower pitch and the reconstruction of thinner images, resulting in higher patient doses. The choice of the correct cardiac phase within the RR interval is essential to minimize measurement errors. (orig.)

  17. Credit Scoring Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siana Halim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally easier to predict defaults accurately if a large data set (including defaults is available for estimating the prediction model. This puts not only small banks, which tend to have smaller data sets, at disadvantage. It can also pose a problem for large banks that began to collect their own historical data only recently, or banks that recently introduced a new rating system. We used a Bayesian methodology that enables banks with small data sets to improve their default probability. Another advantage of the Bayesian method is that it provides a natural way for dealing with structural differences between a bank’s internal data and additional, external data. In practice, the true scoring function may differ across the data sets, the small internal data set may contain information that is missing in the larger external data set, or the variables in the two data sets are not exactly the same but related. Bayesian method can handle such kind of problem.

  18. Do Test Scores Buy Happiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Neal

    2017-01-01

    Since at least the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, standardized test scores have served as the primary measures of public school effectiveness. Yet, such scores fail to measure the ultimate goal of education: maximizing happiness. This exploratory analysis assesses nation level associations between test scores and happiness, controlling…

  19. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  20. The Washback Effect of Automated Essay Scoring on Undergraduates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Dao-yu; YAO Hui

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the washback effect that automated essay scoring has on undergraduates of China. The main pur-pose of this study is to explore the effect that the automated essay scoring has on the writing ability of undergraduates. There are some significant differences in scores of composition between the experimental group and the control group. It is found that the holistic scores of the experimental group are higher than those of the control group. Some striking differences are found in syn-tactic fluency and complexity. It is found that the experimental group is more complex in syntactic fluency and complexity than the control group. The research indicates that, under the proper guidance of teachers, the AES can effectively improve the writ-ing scores of undergraduates.

  1. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  2. The t-core of an s-core

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We consider the $t$-core of an $s$-core partition, when $s$ and $t$ are coprime positive integers. Olsson has shown that the $t$-core of an $s$-core is again an $s$-core, and we examine certain actions of the affine symmetric group on $s$-cores which preserve the $t$-core of an $s$-core. Along the way, we give a new proof of Olsson's result. We also give a new proof of a result of Vandehey, showing that there is a simultaneous $s$- and $t$-core which contains all others.

  3. [Propensity score matching in SPSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fuqiang; DU, Chunlin; Sun, Menghui; Ning, Bing; Luo, Ying; An, Shengli

    2015-11-01

    To realize propensity score matching in PS Matching module of SPSS and interpret the analysis results. The R software and plug-in that could link with the corresponding versions of SPSS and propensity score matching package were installed. A PS matching module was added in the SPSS interface, and its use was demonstrated with test data. Score estimation and nearest neighbor matching was achieved with the PS matching module, and the results of qualitative and quantitative statistical description and evaluation were presented in the form of a graph matching. Propensity score matching can be accomplished conveniently using SPSS software.

  4. Confidence scores for prediction models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; van de Wiel, MA

    2011-01-01

    modelling strategy is applied to different training sets. For each modelling strategy we estimate a confidence score based on the same repeated bootstraps. A new decomposition of the expected Brier score is obtained, as well as the estimates of population average confidence scores. The latter can be used...... to distinguish rival prediction models with similar prediction performances. Furthermore, on the subject level a confidence score may provide useful supplementary information for new patients who want to base a medical decision on predicted risk. The ideas are illustrated and discussed using data from cancer...

  5. Modelling sequentially scored item responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, W.

    2000-01-01

    The sequential model can be used to describe the variable resulting from a sequential scoring process. In this paper two more item response models are investigated with respect to their suitability for sequential scoring: the partial credit model and the graded response model. The investigation is c

  6. Classification of current scoring functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Renxiao

    2015-03-23

    Scoring functions are a class of computational methods widely applied in structure-based drug design for evaluating protein-ligand interactions. Dozens of scoring functions have been published since the early 1990s. In literature, scoring functions are typically classified as force-field-based, empirical, and knowledge-based. This classification scheme has been quoted for more than a decade and is still repeatedly quoted by some recent publications. Unfortunately, it does not reflect the recent progress in this field. Besides, the naming convention used for describing different types of scoring functions has been somewhat jumbled in literature, which could be confusing for newcomers to this field. Here, we express our viewpoint on an up-to-date classification scheme and appropriate naming convention for current scoring functions. We propose that they can be classified into physics-based methods, empirical scoring functions, knowledge-based potentials, and descriptor-based scoring functions. We also outline the major difference and connections between different categories of scoring functions.

  7. The Machine Scoring of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, Doug

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the kind of computer software that is used to score student writing in some high stakes testing programs, and that is being promoted as a teaching and learning tool to schools. It sketches the state of play with machines for the scoring of writing, and describes how these machines work and what they do.…

  8. Skyrocketing Scores: An Urban Legend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashen, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A new urban legend claims, "As a result of the state dropping bilingual education, test scores in California skyrocketed." Krashen disputes this theory, pointing out that other factors offer more logical explanations of California's recent improvements in SAT-9 scores. He discusses research on the effects of California's Proposition 227,…

  9. Quadratic prediction of factor scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansbeek, T

    1999-01-01

    Factor scores are naturally predicted by means of their conditional expectation given the indicators y. Under normality this expectation is linear in y but in general it is an unknown function of y. II is discussed that under nonnormality factor scores can be more precisely predicted by a quadratic

  10. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  11. D-score: a search engine independent MD-score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudel, Marc; Breiter, Daniela; Beck, Florian; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Martens, Lennart; Zahedi, René P

    2013-03-01

    While peptides carrying PTMs are routinely identified in gel-free MS, the localization of the PTMs onto the peptide sequences remains challenging. Search engine scores of secondary peptide matches have been used in different approaches in order to infer the quality of site inference, by penalizing the localization whenever the search engine similarly scored two candidate peptides with different site assignments. In the present work, we show how the estimation of posterior error probabilities for peptide candidates allows the estimation of a PTM score called the D-score, for multiple search engine studies. We demonstrate the applicability of this score to three popular search engines: Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem, and evaluate its performance using an already published high resolution data set of synthetic phosphopeptides. For those peptides with phosphorylation site inference uncertainty, the number of spectrum matches with correctly localized phosphorylation increased by up to 25.7% when compared to using Mascot alone, although the actual increase depended on the fragmentation method used. Since this method relies only on search engine scores, it can be readily applied to the scoring of the localization of virtually any modification at no additional experimental or in silico cost.

  12. Heart valve surgery: EuroSCORE vs. EuroSCORE II vs. Society of Thoracic Surgeons score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sharoz Rabbani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background This is a validation study comparing the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE II with the previous additive (AES and logistic EuroSCORE (LES and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons’ (STS risk prediction algorithm, for patients undergoing valve replacement with or without bypass in Pakistan. Patients and Methods Clinical data of 576 patients undergoing valve replacement surgery between 2006 and 2013 were retrospectively collected and individual expected risks of death were calculated by all four risk prediction algorithms. Performance of these risk algorithms was evaluated in terms of discrimination and calibration. Results There were 28 deaths (4.8% among 576 patients, which was lower than the predicted mortality of 5.16%, 6.96% and 4.94% by AES, LES and EuroSCORE II but was higher than 2.13% predicted by STS scoring system. For single and double valve replacement procedures, EuroSCORE II was the best predictor of mortality with highest Hosmer and Lemmeshow test (H-L p value (0.346 to 0.689 and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (0.637 to 0.898. For valve plus concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG patients actual mortality was 1.88%. STS calculator came out to be the best predictor of mortality for this subgroup with H-L p value (0.480 to 0.884 and ROC (0.657 to 0.775. Conclusions For Pakistani population EuroSCORE II is an accurate predictor for individual operative risk in patients undergoing isolated valve surgery, whereas STS performs better in the valve plus CABG group.

  13. The Alvarado score for predicting acute appendicitis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Alvarado score can be used to stratify patients with symptoms of suspected appendicitis; the validity of the score in certain patient groups and at different cut points is still unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the discrimination (diagnostic accuracy) and calibration performance of the Alvarado score. Methods A systematic search of validation studies in Medline, Embase, DARE and The Cochrane library was performed up to April 2011. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the score at the two cut-off points: score of 5 (1 to 4 vs. 5 to 10) and score of 7 (1 to 6 vs. 7 to 10). Calibration was analysed across low (1 to 4), intermediate (5 to 6) and high (7 to 10) risk strata. The analysis focused on three sub-groups: men, women and children. Results Forty-two studies were included in the review. In terms of diagnostic accuracy, the cut-point of 5 was good at 'ruling out' admission for appendicitis (sensitivity 99% overall, 96% men, 99% woman, 99% children). At the cut-point of 7, recommended for 'ruling in' appendicitis and progression to surgery, the score performed poorly in each subgroup (specificity overall 81%, men 57%, woman 73%, children 76%). The Alvarado score is well calibrated in men across all risk strata (low RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.28; intermediate 1.09, 0.86 to 1.37 and high 1.02, 0.97 to 1.08). The score over-predicts the probability of appendicitis in children in the intermediate and high risk groups and in women across all risk strata. Conclusions The Alvarado score is a useful diagnostic 'rule out' score at a cut point of 5 for all patient groups. The score is well calibrated in men, inconsistent in children and over-predicts the probability of appendicitis in women across all strata of risk. PMID:22204638

  14. The effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who underwent assisted ... using a semi-structured questionnaire and the Turkish version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Beck .... tics (age, education, marriage history and infertility) of couples ..... however, for both groups, the mean trait anxiety scores.

  15. Obstetrical disseminated intravascular coagulation score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao

    2014-06-01

    Obstetrical disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is usually a very acute, serious complication of pregnancy. The obstetrical DIC score helps with making a prompt diagnosis and starting treatment early. This DIC score, in which higher scores are given for clinical parameters rather than for laboratory parameters, has three components: (i) the underlying diseases; (ii) the clinical symptoms; and (iii) the laboratory findings (coagulation tests). It is justifiably appropriate to initiate therapy for DIC when the obstetrical DIC score reaches 8 points or more before obtaining the results of coagulation tests. Improvement of blood coagulation tests and clinical symptoms are essential to the efficacy evaluation for treatment after a diagnosis of obstetrical DIC. Therefore, the efficacy evaluation criteria for obstetrical DIC are also defined to enable follow-up of the clinical efficacy of DIC therapy.

  16. What Is the Apgar Score?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... 2 being the best score: A ppearance (skin color) P ulse (heart rate) G rimace response (reflexes) ...

  17. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-05-26

    This software (Asset Scoring Tool) is designed to help building owners and managers to gain insight into the as-built efficiency of their buildings. It is a web tool where users can enter their building information and obtain an asset score report. The asset score report consists of modeled building energy use (by end use and by fuel type), building systems (envelope, lighting, heating, cooling, service hot water) evaluations, and recommended energy efficiency measures. The intended users are building owners and operators who have limited knowledge of building energy efficiency. The scoring tool collects minimum building data (~20 data entries) from users and build a full-scale energy model using the inference functionalities from Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS). The scoring tool runs real-time building energy simulation using EnergyPlus and performs life-cycle cost analysis using FEDS. An API is also under development to allow the third-party applications to exchange data with the web service of the scoring tool.

  18. 老年患者慢性肾功能不全与冠状动脉钙化积分的相关性%Association between chronic kidney dysfunction and coronary artery calcification score in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜利求; 曹绪芬; 郑晔; 郭楠; 熊立新; 曹艳超; 赵世龙; 郭艳芬; 韩立宪

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between chronic kidney dysfunction and coronary artery calcification score(CACS) in the elderly.Methods We prospectively studied 795 consecutive elderly patients with clinically suspected coronary artery disease who underwent 64-multidetector row computed tomography coronary angiography from January 2006 to December 2010.CACS was quantified using Agatston method.eGFR was calculated by the simplified modification of diet in renal disease(MDRD)equation.Patients were divided into four groups according to CACS as follows:No CACS(CACS =0),low CACS(0<CACS≤100),medium CACS(100<CACS≤400) and high CACS (CACS> 400).Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association of chronic kidney dysfunction with CACS.Results Patients with higher CACS were older (F=4.99,P<0.01),had lower eGFR(F=10.16,P<0.001)and higher level of C-reactive protein(F=39.36,P <0.001),and were more likely to have a history of hypertension(x2 =18.59,P<0.001) and diabetes (x2=14.03,P<0.01)than patients without coronary artery calcification(CAC) or with lower CACS.Ordinal logistic regression showed that age,hypertension,diabetes,C-reactive protein and eGFR were independent risk factors for CAC.Conclusions Age,hypertension,diabetes mellitus,C-reactive protein and eGFR were independent risk factors for CAC in elderly patients.%目的 分析老年患者慢性肾功能不全与冠状动脉(冠脉)钙化积分(CACS)的相关性.方法 前瞻性连续性入选2006年1月至2010年12月因疑诊冠心病于我院行64层螺旋CT的老年患者795例,应用Agatston方法计算CACS,应用简化MDRD公式计算估算肾小球滤过率(eGFR).根据CACS将患者分为4组:无冠脉钙化组(CACS=0)、低冠脉钙化组(CACS 1~100)、中冠脉钙化组(CACS 101~400)以及高冠脉钙化组(CACS>400).通过有序Logistic回归分析慢性肾功能不全与冠状动脉钙化积分的相关性. 结果 高冠脉钙化组患者年龄大(F=4.99,P=0

  19. Prognostic scores in brain metastases from breast cancer

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    Astner Sabrina T

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic scores might be useful tools both in clinical practice and clinical trials, where they can be used as stratification parameter. The available scores for patients with brain metastases have never been tested specifically in patients with primary breast cancer. It is therefore unknown which score is most appropriate for these patients. Methods Five previously published prognostic scores were evaluated in a group of 83 patients with brain metastases from breast cancer. All patients had been treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with or without radiosurgery or surgical resection. In addition, it was tested whether the parameters that form the basis of these scores actually have a prognostic impact in this biologically distinct group of brain metastases patients. Results The scores that performed best were the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA classes and the score index for radiosurgery (SIR. However, disagreement between the parameters that form the basis of these scores and those that determine survival in the present group of patients and many reported data from the literature on brain metastases from breast cancer was found. With the four statistically significant prognostic factors identified here, a 3-tiered score can be created that performs slightly better than RPA and SIR. In addition, a 4-tiered score is also possible, which performs better than the three previous 4-tiered scores, incl. graded prognostic assessment (GPA score and basic score for brain metastases (BSBM. Conclusion A variety of prognostic models describe the survival of patients with brain metastases from breast cancer to a more or less satisfactory degree. However, the standard brain metastases scores might not fully appreciate the unique biology and time course of this disease, e.g., compared to lung cancer. It appears possible that inclusion of emerging prognostic factors will improve the results and allow for development and validation

  20. The Kernel Levine Equipercentile Observed-Score Equating Function. Research Report. ETS RR-13-38

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Davier, Alina A.; Chen, Haiwen

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the observed-score equating methods for the nonequivalent groups with anchor test design, there are 3 fundamentally different ways of using the information provided by the anchor scores to equate the scores of a new form to those of an old form. One method uses the anchor scores as a conditioning variable, such as the Tucker…

  1. Development of the Crohn's disease digestive damage score, the Lémann score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pariente, Benjamin; Cosnes, Jacques; Danese, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic progressive destructive disease. Currently available instruments measure disease activity at a specific point in time. An instrument to measure cumulative structural damage to the bowel, which may predict long-term disability, is needed. The aim of this article...... is to outline the methods to develop an instrument that can measure cumulative bowel damage. The project is being conducted by the International Program to develop New Indexes in Crohn's disease (IPNIC) group. This instrument, called the Crohn's Disease Digestive Damage Score (the Lémann score), should take...

  2. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    in a randomized study of systemic versus psychodynamic group therapy, that the short-term outcome for patients who received systemic group psychotherapy was significantly better than the outcome for patients who received psychodynamic group psychotherapy. The current study assessed the group milieu in both groups....... Methods: This randomized prospective study included 106 women: 52 assigned to psychodynamic group psychotherapy and 54 assigned to systemic group psychotherapy. The Group Environment Scale (GES) was filled in the mid phase of therapy and analysed in three dimensions and 10 subscales. Results: The systemic...... group was characterized by statistically significant highest scores on Relationship (ES = 1.27) and System Maintenance / Change Dimension (ES= 1.28), while the scores for Personal Growth Dimension were comparable in the two groups. Group S had statistically significant higher scores on the following...

  3. Automatic coronary artery calcium scoring in cardiac CT angiography using paired convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M; Leiner, Tim; de Vos, Bob D; van Hamersvelt, Robbert W; Viergever, Max A; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-12-01

    Pairs, were evaluated by a comparison with reference annotations in CCTA and CSCT. In all cases, ensembles of ConvPairs outperformed their individual members. The best performing individual ConvPair detected 72% of lesions in the test set, with on average 0.85 false positive (FP) errors per scan. The best performing ensemble combined all ConvPairs and obtained a sensitivity of 71% at 0.48 FP errors per scan. For this ensemble, agreement with the reference mass score in CSCT was excellent (ICC 0.944 [0.918-0.962]). Aditionally, based on the Agatston score in CCTA, this ensemble assigned 83% of patients to the same cardiovascular risk category as reference CSCT. In conclusion, CAC can be accurately automatically identified and quantified in CCTA using the proposed pattern recognition method. This might obviate the need to acquire a dedicated CSCT scan for CAC scoring, which is regularly acquired prior to a CCTA, and thus reduce the CT radiation dose received by patients.

  4. Saturation biopsy improves preoperative Gleason scoring of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Philip; Wolf, Susanne; Adam, Alexander; Heukamp, Lukas Carl; Ellinger, Jörg; Vorreuther, Roland; Solleder, Gerold; Buettner, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the differences between conventional needle biopsy (CB) and saturation biopsy (SB) techniques with regard to the prediction of Gleason score, tumor stage, and insignificant prostate cancer. Data from a total number of 240 patients were analyzed. The main group, consisting of 185 patients, was diagnosed according to a saturation prostate needle biopsy protocol (SB), by which more than 12 cores were taken per biopsy. The control group was diagnosed using CB, by which 12 or less than 12 cores were taken per biopsy (n=55). In the main group, the Gleason score of the biopsy was confirmed in 19.5%, in the control group in 23.5% according to the prostatectomy specimen (p=0.50). Upgrading after the operation was found in 56.7% in the main group and in 60% in the control group (p=0.24). Downgrading after the operation was found in 23.9% in the main group and in 16.3% in the control group (p=0.24). If the Gleason score of the postoperative specimens differed by only one point from the biopsy, we considered this a minor deviation. In the main group, 59% of the carcinomas were preoperatively classified correctly or revealed minor deviation in Gleason scores. In contrast, only 47% of the carcinomas in the control group were assessed correctly or with minor deviation in Gleason scores. Thus, the main group demonstrated a better rate of preoperative prediction in tumor grading assessed by Gleason score (p=0.05). In addition, the Gleason scores of both protocols were assigned to three groups (Gleason 7), and the group changes from the biopsy to the prostatectomy specimen were found to be significantly more frequent in the CB group (p=0.04). There was no significant difference between the two types of biopsy techniques regarding tumor stage or the detection of insignificant carcinomas. The advantage of the extensive prostate needle biopsy technique (SB) is a better preoperative prediction of the Gleason score as well as the risk groups with Gleason scores 7. Both

  5. Progression of coronary calcification in healthy postmenopausal women

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    Burt Jeremy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery calcium score incrementally improves coronary risk prediction beyond that provided by conventional risk factors. Limited information is available regarding rates of progression of coronary calcification in women, particularly those with baseline scores above zero. Further, determinants of progression of coronary artery calcification in women are not well understood. This study prospectively evaluated rates and determinants of progression of coronary artery calcium score in a group of healthy postmenopausal women. Methods We determined coronary calcium score by computed tomography and recorded demographic, lifestyle and health characteristics of 914 postmenopausal women, a subset of those enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. The 305 women with calcium score ≥10 Agatston units at baseline were invited for repeat scan. This analysis includes the 94 women who underwent second scans. Results Mean age of study participants was 65 ± 9 years (mean ± SD, body mass index was 26.1 ± 6.1 kg/m2, and baseline calcium score was 162 ± 220 Agatston units. Mean interval between scans was 3.3 ± 0.7 years. A wide range of changes in coronary calcium score was observed, from -53 to +452 Agatston units/year. Women with lower scores at baseline had smaller annual increases in absolute calcium score. Coronary calcium scores increased 11, 31 and 79 Agatston units/year among women with baseline calcium score in the lowest, middle and highest tertiles. In multivariate analysis, age was not an independent predictor of absolute change in coronary calcium score. Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin use at baseline was a negative predictor (p = 0.015, whereas baseline calcium score was a strong, positive predictor (p Conclusion Among postmenopausal women with coronary calcium score ≥ 10 Agatston units, rates of change of coronary calcium score varied widely. In multivariate analysis

  6. Best waveform score for diagnosing keratoconus

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    Allan Luz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test whether corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF can discriminate between keratoconus and normal eyes and to evaluate whether the averages of two consecutive measurements perform differently from the one with the best waveform score (WS for diagnosing keratoconus. METHODS: ORA measurements for one eye per individual were selected randomly from 53 normal patients and from 27 patients with keratoconus. Two groups were considered the average (CH-Avg, CRF-Avg and best waveform score (CH-WS, CRF-WS groups. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate whether the variables had similar distributions in the Normal and Keratoconus groups. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves were calculated for each parameter to assess the efficacy for diagnosing keratoconus and the same obtained for each variable were compared pairwise using the Hanley-McNeil test. RESULTS: The CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS and CRF-WS differed significantly between the normal and keratoconus groups (p<0.001. The areas under the ROC curve (AUROC for CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS, and CRF-WS were 0.824, 0.873, 0.891, and 0.931, respectively. CH-WS and CRF-WS had significantly better AUROCs than CH-Avg and CRF-Avg, respectively (p=0.001 and 0.002. CONCLUSION: The analysis of the biomechanical properties of the cornea through the ORA method has proved to be an important aid in the diagnosis of keratoconus, regardless of the method used. The best waveform score (WS measurements were superior to the average of consecutive ORA measurements for diagnosing keratoconus.

  7. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores

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    Sung Uk Chae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE. Methods The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. Results The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%. NK doctors’ lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. Conclusion The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also.

  8. Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Development of the Severity Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikitamnuaychok, Rangson; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2012-01-01

    Background Emergency endoscopy for every patient with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is not possible in many medical centers. Simple guidelines to select patients for emergency endoscopy are lacking. The aim of the present report is to develop a simple scoring system to classify upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) severity based on patient clinical profiles at the emergency departments. Methods Retrospective data of patients with UGIH in a university affiliated hospital were analyzed. Patients were criterion-classified into 3 severity levels: mild, moderate and severe. Clinical and laboratory information were compared among the 3 groups. Significant parameters were selected as indicators of severity. Coefficients of significant multivariable parameters were transformed into item scores, which added up as individual severity scores. The scores were used to classify patients into 3 urgency levels: non-urgent, urgent and emergent groups. Score-classification and criterion-classification were compared. Results Significant parameters in the model were age ≥ 60 years, pulse rate ≥ 100/min, systolic blood pressure 16, n = 121, 11.9%). The score correctly classified 81.4% of the patients into their original (criterion-classified) severity groups. Under-estimation (7.5%) and over-estimation (11.1%) were clinically acceptable. Conclusions Our UGIH severity scoring system classified patients into 3 urgency groups: non-urgent, urgent and emergent, with clinically acceptable small number of under- and over-estimations. Its discriminative ability and precision should be validated before adopting into clinical practice. PMID:27785211

  9. Skin scoring in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Hugh; Bjerring, Peter; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis were investigated with a new and simple skin score method measuring the degree of thickening and pliability in seven regions together with area involvement in each region. The highest values were, as expected, found in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis...... (type III SS) and the lowest in limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (type I SS) with no lesions extending above wrists and ancles. A positive correlation was found to the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen, a serological marker for synthesis of type III collagen. The skin score...

  10. Skin scoring in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Hugh; Bjerring, Peter; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one patients with systemic sclerosis were investigated with a new and simple skin score method measuring the degree of thickening and pliability in seven regions together with area involvement in each region. The highest values were, as expected, found in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis...... (type III SS) and the lowest in limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (type I SS) with no lesions extending above wrists and ancles. A positive correlation was found to the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen, a serological marker for synthesis of type III collagen. The skin score...

  11. Use of coronary calcium score scans from stand-alone multislice computed tomography for attenuation correction of myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepis, Tiziano; Gaemperli, Oliver; Koepfli, Pascal [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Nuclear Cardiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Rueegg, Christine; Burger, Cyrill [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Nuclear Cardiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Leschka, Sebastian; Desbiolles, Lotus; Husmann, Lars; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Nuclear Cardiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Centre for Integrative Human Physiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-01-15

    To evaluate the use of CT attenuation maps, generated from coronary calcium scoring (CCS) scans at in- and expiration with a 64-slice CT scanner, for attenuation correction (AC) of myocardial perfusion SPECT images. Thirty-two consecutive patients underwent{sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin gated adenosine stress/rest SPECT scan on an Infinia Hawkeye SPECT-CT device (GE Medical Systems) followed by CCS and CT angiography on a 64-slice CT. AC of the iteratively reconstructed images was performed with AC maps obtained: (a) from the ''Hawkeye'' low-resolution X-ray CT facility attached to the Infinia camera (IRAC); (b) from the CCS scan acquired on a 64-slice CT scanner during maximal inspiration (AC{sub INSP}) and (c) during normal expiration (AC{sub EXP}). Automatically determined uptake values of stress scans (QPS, Cedars Medical Sinai) from AC{sub INSP} and AC{sub EXP} were compared with IRAC. Agatston score (AS) values using AC{sub INSP}versus AC{sub EXP} were also compared. AC{sub INSP} and AC{sub EXP} resulted in identical findings versus IRAC by visual analysis. A good correlation for uptake values between IRAC and AC{sub INSP} was found (apex, r=0.92; anterior, r=0.85; septal, r=0.91; lateral, r=0.86; inferior, r=0.90; all p<0.0001). The correlation was even closer between IRAC and AC{sub EXP} (apex, r=0.97; anterior, r=0.91; septal, r=0.94; lateral, r=0.92; inferior, r=0.97; all p<0.0001). The mean AS during inspiration (319{+-}737) and expiration(317{+-}778) was comparable (p=NS). Attenuation maps from CCS allow accurate AC of SPECT MPI images. AC{sub EXP} proved superior to AC{sub INSP}, suggesting that in hybrid scans CCS may be performed during normal expiration to allow its additional use for AC of SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  12. Effectiveness of Propensity Score Methods in a Multilevel Framework: A Monte Carlo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellara, Aarti P.

    2013-01-01

    Propensity score analysis has been used to minimize the selection bias in observational studies to identify causal relationships. A propensity score is an estimate of an individual's probability of being placed in a treatment group given a set of covariates. Propensity score analysis aims to use the estimate to create balanced groups, akin to a…

  13. The SAT® and SAT Subject Tests™: Discrepant Scores and Incremental Validity. Research Report 2012-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrin, Jennifer L.; Patterson, Brian F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines student performance on the SAT and SAT Subject Tests in order to identify groups of students who score differently on these two tests, and to determine whether certain demographic groups score higher on one test compared to the other. Discrepancy scores were created to capture individuals' performance differences on the…

  14. Developing Scoring Algorithms (Earlier Methods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed scoring procedures to convert screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for fruits and vegetables, dairy, added sugars, whole grains, fiber, and calcium using the What We Eat in America 24-hour dietary recall data from the 2003-2006 NHANES.

  15. Re-Scoring the Game’s Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasselseder, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study explores immersive presence as well as emotional valence and arousal in the context of dynamic and non-dynamic music scores in the 3rd person action-adventure video game genre while also considering relevant personality traits of the player. 60 subjects answered self-report questionnai......This study explores immersive presence as well as emotional valence and arousal in the context of dynamic and non-dynamic music scores in the 3rd person action-adventure video game genre while also considering relevant personality traits of the player. 60 subjects answered self...... that a compatible integration of global and local goals in the ludonarrative contributes to a motivational-emotional reinforcement that can be gained through musical feedback. Shedding light on the implications of music dramaturgy within a semantic ecology paradigm, the perception of varying relational attributes...

  16. Estimating Decision Indices Based on Composite Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupp, Tawnya Lee

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an IRT model that would enable the estimation of decision indices based on composite scores. The composite scores, defined as a combination of unidimensional test scores, were either a total raw score or an average scale score. Additionally, estimation methods for the normal and compound multinomial models…

  17. Scoring ordinal variables for constructing composite indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Manisera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide composite indicators of latent variables, for example of customer satisfaction, it is opportune to identify the structure of the latent variable, in terms of the assignment of items to the subscales defining the latent variable. Adopting the reflective model, the impact of four different methods of scoring ordinal variables on the identification of the true structure of latent variables is investigated. A simulation study composed of 5 steps is conducted: (1 simulation of population data with continuous variables measuring a two-dimensional latent variable with known structure; (2 draw of a number of random samples; (3 discretization of the continuous variables according to different distributional forms; (4 quantification of the ordinal variables obtained in step (3 according to different methods; (5 construction of composite indicators and verification of the correct assignment of variables to subscales by the multiple group method and the factor analysis. Results show that the considered scoring methods have similar performances in assigning items to subscales, and that, when the latent variable is multinormal, the distributional form of the observed ordinal variables is not determinant in suggesting the best scoring method to use.

  18. Quality scores for 32,000 genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Land, Miriam L.; Hyatt, Doug; Jun, Se-Ran;

    2014-01-01

    public databases, and assigned quality scores for more than 30,000 prokaryotic genome sequences. Results Scores were assigned using four categories: the completeness of the assembly, the presence of full-length rRNA genes, tRNA composition and the presence of a set of 102 conserved genes in prokaryotes...... or not applicable. The scores highlighted organisms for which commonly used tools do not perform well. This information can be used to improve tools and to serve a broad group of users as more diverse organisms are sequenced. Unexpectedly, the comparison of predicted tRNAs across 15,000 high quality genomes showed......Background More than 80% of the microbial genomes in GenBank are of ‘draft’ quality (12,553 draft vs. 2,679 finished, as of October, 2013). We have examined all the microbial DNA sequences available for complete, draft, and Sequence Read Archive genomes in GenBank as well as three other major...

  19. Coronary calcium score in 12-year breast cancer survivors after adjuvant radiotherapy with low to moderate heart exposure - Relationship to cardiac radiation dose and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjessem, Kristin Holm; Bosse, Gerhard; Fosså, Kristian; Reinertsen, Kristin V; Fosså, Sophie D; Johansen, Safora; Fosså, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We explored the relation between coronary artery calcium (CAC) and cardiac radiation doses in breast cancer survivors (BCS) treated with radiotherapy (RT). Additionally, we examined the impact of other risk factors and biomarkers of coronary artery disease (CAD). 236 BCS (median age 51years [range 30-70], median observation time 12years [9.2-15.7]), treated with 4-field RT of 50GY, were included and examined in 2004 (T1), 2007 (T2) and 2011 (T3) with clinical examination, blood tests and questionnaires. At T3, cardiac computed tomography was performed with quantification of CAC using Agatston score (AS). For 106 patients cardiac dose volume histograms were available. The cohort-based median of the mean cardiac dose was 2.5 (range 0.5-7.0) Gy. There was no correlation between measures of cardiac dose and AS. AS was correlated with high cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.022), high proBNP at T1/T2 (p<0.022) and T3 (p<0.022) and high HbA1c at T3 (p=0.022). In addition, a high AS was significantly associated with hypertension (p=0.022). Age (p<0.001) and cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.001) retained significant associations in multivariate analysis. Traditional, modifiable risk factors of CAD correlate with CAC and may be important for the long term risk of CAD after RT. With low to moderate cardiac radiation exposure, a contribution of radiation dose to CAC could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic effect on apgar score

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    Carla Franchi-Pinto

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Intraclass correlation coefficients for one- and five-min Apgar scores of 604 twin pairs born at a southeastern Brazilian hospital were calculated, after adjusting these scores for gestational age and sex. The data support a genetic hypothesis only for 1-min Apgar score, probably because it is less affected by the environment than 4 min later, after the newborns have been under the care of a neonatology team. First-born twins exhibited, on average, better clinical conditions than second-born twins. The former showed a significantly lower proportion of Apgar scores under seven than second-born twins, both at 1 min (17.5% vs. 29.8% and at 5 min (7.2% vs. 11.9%. The proportion of children born with "good" Apgar scores was significantly smaller among twins than among 1,522 singletons born at the same hospital. Among the latter, 1- and 5-min Apgar scores under seven were exhibited by 9.2% and 3.4% newborns, respectively.Os coeficientes de correlação intraclasse foram calculados para os índices de Apgar 1 e 5 minutos após o nascimento de 604 pares de gêmeos em uma maternidade do sudeste brasileiro, depois que esses índices foram ajustados para idade gestacional e sexo. Os dados obtidos apoiaram a hipótese genética apenas em relação ao primeiro índice de Apgar, provavelmente porque ele é menos influenciado pelo ambiente do que 4 minutos depois, quando os recém-nascidos já estiveram sob os cuidados de uma equipe de neonatologistas. Os gêmeos nascidos em primeiro lugar apresentaram, em média, melhor estado clínico que os nascidos em segundo lugar, visto que os primeiros mostraram uma proporção de índices de Apgar inferiores a 7 significativamente menor do que os nascidos em segundo lugar, tanto um minuto (17,5% contra 29,8% quanto cinco minutos após o nascimento (7,2% contra 11,9%. A proporção de recém-nascidos com índices de Apgar que indicam bom prognóstico foi significativamente menor nos gêmeos do que em 1.522 conceptos

  1. Comparison between needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy samples in assessing Gleason score and modified Gleason score in prostatic adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu DOĞAN GÜN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Histologic grading is an important predictor of prostatic disease stage and prognosis. We aimed to assess the degree of concordance between pathologic characteristics of the specimens obtained from biopsy and radical prostatectomy materials.Gleason scores and modified Gleason scores calculated for 25 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma from both needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens were analyzed.Mean Gleason scores for biopsy and radical specimens were 6.4 (SD:±0.7 and 6.64 (SD:±1.3; and corresponding modified Gleason scores were 7.32 (SD:±1.43 and 7.32 (SD:±0.98, respectively. The Gleason scores of biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens were identical in 48% (12/25 of the cases, while 32% (8/25 of the biopsy specimens were over-and 20% (5/25 of them were undergraded. While assessing modified Gleason scores, the exact degree of concordance of biopsy specimens with radical prostatectomy materials was 56% (14/25 and of the 11 (44% cases not correlated exactly, 6 (24% were over- and 5 (20% were undergraded. When the exact, over- and underestimated scores of Gleason and modified Gleason grading systems were compared statistically, no difference between two groups was seen (p>0.05. Overgrading errors were found to be more than undergrading errors for both of the scoring systems. Using either the modified Gleason or traditional Gleason scoring

  2. Interpreting force concept inventory scores: Normalized gain and SAT scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent P. Coletta

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G on the force concept inventory (FCI were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335 and one university (N=292, and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations (r=0.57 and r=0.46, respectively. These correlations are likely due to the importance of cognitive skills and abstract reasoning in learning physics. The larger correlation coefficient for the high school population may be a result of the much shorter time interval between taking the SAT and studying mechanics, because the SAT may provide a more current measure of abilities when high school students begin the study of mechanics than it does for college students, who begin mechanics years after the test is taken. In prior research a strong correlation between FCI G and scores on Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning for students from the same two schools was observed. Our results suggest that, when interpreting class average normalized FCI gains and comparing different classes, it is important to take into account the variation of students’ cognitive skills, as measured either by the SAT or by Lawson’s test. While Lawson’s test is not commonly given to students in most introductory mechanics courses, SAT scores provide a readily available alternative means of taking account of students’ reasoning abilities. Knowing the students’ cognitive level before instruction also allows one to alter instruction or to use an intervention designed to improve students’ cognitive level.

  3. Interpreting force concept inventory scores: Normalized gain and SAT scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Steinert

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G on the force concept inventory (FCI were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335 and one university (N=292 , and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations ( r=0.57 and r=0.46 , respectively. These correlations are likely due to the importance of cognitive skills and abstract reasoning in learning physics. The larger correlation coefficient for the high school population may be a result of the much shorter time interval between taking the SAT and studying mechanics, because the SAT may provide a more current measure of abilities when high school students begin the study of mechanics than it does for college students, who begin mechanics years after the test is taken. In prior research a strong correlation between FCI G and scores on Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning for students from the same two schools was observed. Our results suggest that, when interpreting class average normalized FCI gains and comparing different classes, it is important to take into account the variation of students’ cognitive skills, as measured either by the SAT or by Lawson’s test. While Lawson’s test is not commonly given to students in most introductory mechanics courses, SAT scores provide a readily available alternative means of taking account of students’ reasoning abilities. Knowing the students’ cognitive level before instruction also allows one to alter instruction or to use an intervention designed to improve students’ cognitive level.

  4. Examining alternative scoring rubrics on a statewide test: The impact of different scoring methods on science and social studies performance assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Susan Dabney

    There is no consensus regarding the most reliable and valid scoring methods for the assessment of higher order thinking skills. Most of the research on alternative formats has focused on the scoring of writing ability. This study examined the value of different types of performance assessment scoring guides on state mandated science and social studies tests. A proportional stratified sample of raters were randomly assigned to one of four scoring groups: checklist, analytic rubric, holistic rubric, and generic rubrics. A fifth method, the weighted analytic rubric, was included by applying an algorithmic formula to the scores assigned by raters using the analytic rubric. A comparison of the mean scores for the five scoring groups suggests that there may be a difference in the way raters applied the rubric for each group. Although the literature suggests that it is possible to achieve high levels of inter-rater reliability, across forms of scoring, phi coefficients of moderate strength were obtained for three of the four constructed-response items. Results for each scoring group were compared indicating that item complexity may impact the level of inter-rate, reliability and the selection of the most reliable rubric for each discipline. Analytic rubrics appear to achieve more reliable results with less complex items. A multitrait-multimethod approach was utilized to investigate the external validity of the social studies and science tasks. As expected, there tended to be a stronger association between the PACT science constructed-response scores with scores based on science multiple-choice scores than between the science constructed-response scores and the writing ability subtest scores. A similar pattern was seen with social studies items. These results provide some evidence for the validity of the performance assessments. A post study survey completed by raters provided qualitative information regarding their thought processes and their primary focus during the

  5. Vertebral heart scores in eight dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen-Grant, K; Pollard, R E; Johnson, L R

    2013-01-01

    The vertebral heart score (VHS) measurement is commonly used to provide a more objective measurement of cardiomegaly in canines. However, several studies have shown significant breed variations from the value previously established by Buchanan and Bücheler (9.7 ± 0.5). This study describes VHS measurements in Pug, Pomeranian, Yorkshire Terrier, Dachshund, Bulldog, Shih Tzu, Lhasa Apso, and Boston Terrier dog breeds. Dogs with two or three view thoracic radiographs, no subjective radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly, and no physical examination findings of heart murmurs or gallop rhythms were included in the study. The Pug, Pomeranian, Bulldog, and Boston Terrier groups were found to have a VHS significantly greater than 9.7 ± 0.5 (P Bulldog (P = 0.028) and Boston Terrier (P = 0.0004) groups. Thoracic depth to width ratio did not have a significant effect on VHS.

  6. Haemophilia Joint Health Score in healthy adults playing sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluiter, D; Foppen, W; de Kleijn, P; Fischer, K

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate outcome of prophylactic clotting factor replacement in children with haemophilia, the Haemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS) was developed aiming at scoring early joint changes in children aged 4-18. The HJHS has been used for adults on long-term prophylaxis but interpretation of small changes remains difficult. Some changes in these patients may be due to sports-related injuries. Evaluation of HJHS score in healthy adults playing sports could improve the interpretation of this score in haemophilic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the HJHS scores in a cohort of young, healthy men participating in sports. Concomitant with a project collecting MRI images of ankles and knees in normal young adults, HJHS scores were assessed in 30 healthy men aged 18-26, participating in sports one to three times per week. One physiotherapist assessed their clinical function using the HJHS 2.1. History of joint injuries was documented. MRI images were scored by a single radiologist, using the International Prophylaxis Study Group additive MRI score. Median age of the study group was 24.3 years (range 19.0-26.4) and median frequency of sports activities was three times per week (range 1-4). Six joints (five knees, one ankle) had a history of sports-related injury. The median overall HJHS score was 0 out of 124 (range 0-3), with 60% of subjects showing no abnormalities on HJHS. All joints were normal on MRI. These results suggest that frequent sports participation and related injuries are not related with abnormalities in HJHS scores.

  7. CATTELL AND EYSENCK FACTOR SCORES RELATED TO COMREY PERSONALITY FACTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comrey, A L; Duffy, K E

    1968-10-01

    The Eysenck Personality Inventory, the Cattell 16 PF Inventory, and the Comrey Personality Inventory were administered to 272 volunteers. Eysenck and Cattell factor scores were correlated with scores over homogeneous item groups (FHIDs) which define the Comrey test factors. This matrix was factor analyzed to relate the Eysenck and Cattell factor scores to the factor structure underlying the Comrey test. The Eysenck Neuroticism, Comrey Neuroticism, and Cattell second-order Anxiety factors appeared to match. The Eysenck Introversion and the Comrey Shyness factors also matched. The 16 Cattell primary factors overlapped but did not match with the Comrey factors.

  8. Relationship between maternal periodontal disease and Apgar score of newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Abdollahifard, Sedigeh; Chitsazi, Mohammad-Taghi; Behlooli, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between maternal periodontal disease and the health status of newborns using Apgar scores. Methods One hundred pregnant women with periodontal disease were included in the case series and 100 pregnant women without periodontal disease were placed in the control group, respectively. The periodontal parameters of bleeding on probing (BOP), clinical attachment loss (CAL), probing depth (PD), birth weight, and Apgar scores were record...

  9. Bias Adjusted Precipitation Threat Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mesinger

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the wide variety of performance measures available for the assessment of skill of deterministic precipitation forecasts, the equitable threat score (ETS might well be the one used most frequently. It is typically used in conjunction with the bias score. However, apart from its mathematical definition the meaning of the ETS is not clear. It has been pointed out (Mason, 1989; Hamill, 1999 that forecasts with a larger bias tend to have a higher ETS. Even so, the present author has not seen this having been accounted for in any of numerous papers that in recent years have used the ETS along with bias "as a measure of forecast accuracy".

    A method to adjust the threat score (TS or the ETS so as to arrive at their values that correspond to unit bias in order to show the model's or forecaster's accuracy in extit{placing} precipitation has been proposed earlier by the present author (Mesinger and Brill, the so-called dH/dF method. A serious deficiency however has since been noted with the dH/dF method in that the hypothetical function that it arrives at to interpolate or extrapolate the observed value of hits to unit bias can have values of hits greater than forecast when the forecast area tends to zero. Another method is proposed here based on the assumption that the increase in hits per unit increase in false alarms is proportional to the yet unhit area. This new method removes the deficiency of the dH/dF method. Examples of its performance for 12 months of forecasts by three NCEP operational models are given.

  10. The HEART score for chest pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, B.E.

    2012-01-01

    The HEART score was developed to improve risk stratification in chest pain patients in the emergency department (ED). This thesis describes series of validation studies of the HEART score and sub studies for individual elements of the score. The predictive value of the HEART score for the occurrence

  11. Scoring and Standard Setting with Standardized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, John J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The continuous method of scoring a performance test composed of standardized patients was compared with a derivative method that assigned each of the 131 examinees (medical residents) a dichotomous score, and use of Angoff's method with these scoring methods was studied. Both methods produce reasonable means and distributions of scores. (SLD)

  12. [Respective analysis of dead patients with cirrhosis by Child-Pugh score and model of end-stage liver disease score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Fanggen; Ouyang, Chunhui; Cheng, Zongyong; Wang, Xuehong; Liu, Xiaowei

    2012-10-01

    To understand the value of Child-Pugh (CP) classification and model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score for patients with cirrhosis and their prognosis by retrospectively analyzing the two methods in hemorrhage death and non-hemorrhage death in patients with liver cirrhosis. A total of 72 patients who died of cirrhosis (the death group) were analyzed retrospectively, and the initial data in the hospital before death were collected. The initial information of the control group (88 patients) at the same time was also obtained. The death group was divided into two subgroups: esophagus varicosity burst massive hemorrhage death group and non-hemorrhage death group. MELD score and CP score of the death group (22.230±13.451, 10.264±2.028) were significantly higher than those of the control group (15.370±6.201, 9.318±1.644; PCP score for the massive bleeding death group were close to those of the control group. There was significant difference between the non-hemorrhage death group and the control group. The ratio of patients with CP grade A and MELD scoresCP grade C and MELD scores ≥ 30 in the death group was higher. ROC surve analysis found the accuracy of short-term predication of survival by MELD score and CP classification was improved after eliminating the risk factors of hemorrage. MELD and CP play a role in evaluating the state and prognosis of patients with cirrhosis. MELD score and CP classification predict the short-term survival efficiently on the premise of excluding the risk factors of esophagus and/or stomach bottom varicosity burst massive bleeding. CP and MELD scores are deficiencies, especially for low MELD score (CP level A patients. The prognostic accuracy may be improved when combining esophageal gastric fundal varices.

  13. Score lists in multipartite hypertournaments

    CERN Document Server

    Pirzada, Shariefuddin; Iványi, Antal

    2010-01-01

    Given non-negative integers $n_{i}$ and $\\alpha_{i}$ with $0 \\leq \\alpha_{i} \\leq n_i$ $(i=1,2,...,k)$, an $[\\alpha_{1},\\alpha_{2},...,\\alpha_{k}]$-$k$-partite hypertournament on $\\sum_{1}^{k}n_{i}$ vertices is a $(k+1)$-tuple $(U_{1},U_{2},...,U_{k},E)$, where $U_{i}$ are $k$ vertex sets with $|U_{i}|=n_{i}$, and $E$ is a set of $\\sum_{1}^{k}\\alpha_{i}$-tuples of vertices, called arcs, with exactly $\\alpha_{i}$ vertices from $U_{i}$, such that any $\\sum_{1}^{k}\\alpha_{i}$ subset $\\cup_{1}^{k}U_{i}^{\\prime}$ of $\\cup_{1}^{k}U_{i}$, $E$ contains exactly one of the $(\\sum_{1}^{k} \\alpha_{i})!$ $\\sum_{1}^{k}\\alpha_{i}$-tuples whose entries belong to $\\cup_{1}^{k}U_{i}^{\\prime}$. We obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for $k$ lists of non-negative integers in non-decreasing order to be the losing score lists and to be the score lists of some $k$-partite hypertournament.

  14. Disclosure Risk from Factor Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drechsler Jörg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Remote access can be a powerful tool for providing data access for external researchers. Since the microdata never leave the secure environment of the data-providing agency, alterations of the microdata can be kept to a minimum. Nevertheless, remote access is not free from risk. Many statistical analyses that do not seem to provide disclosive information at first sight can be used by sophisticated intruders to reveal sensitive information. For this reason the list of allowed queries is usually restricted in a remote setting. However, it is not always easy to identify problematic queries. We therefore strongly support the argument that has been made by other authors: that all queries should be monitored carefully and that any microlevel information should always be withheld. As an illustrative example, we use factor score analysis, for which the output of interest - the factor loading of the variables - seems to be unproblematic. However, as we show in the article, the individual factor scores that are usually returned as part of the output can be used to reveal sensitive information. Our empirical evaluations based on a German establishment survey emphasize that this risk is far from a purely theoretical problem.

  15. Discrepancies between modified Medical Research Council dyspnea score and COPD assessment test score in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhee CK

    2015-08-01

    more symptomatic. We aimed to identify the ideal CAT score that exhibits minimal discrepancy with the mMRC score.Methods: A receiver operating characteristic curve of the CAT score was generated for an mMRC scores of 1 and 2. A concordance analysis was applied to quantify the association between the frequencies of patients categorized into GOLD groups A–D using symptom cutoff points. A κ-coefficient was calculated.Results: For an mMRC score of 2, a CAT score of 15 showed the maximum value of Youden’s index with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.70 and 0.66, respectively (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70–0.77. For an mMRC score of 1, a CAT score of 10 showed the maximum value of Youden’s index with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.77 and 0.65, respectively (AUC 0.77; 95% CI, 0.72–0.83. The κ value for concordance was highest between an mMRC score of 1 and a CAT score of 10 (0.66, followed by an mMRC score of 2 and a CAT score of 15 (0.56, an mMRC score of 2 and a CAT score of 10 (0.47, and an mMRC score of 1 and a CAT score of 15 (0.43.Conclusion: A CAT score of 10 was most concordant with an mMRC score of 1 when classifying patients with COPD into GOLD groups A–D. However, a discrepancy remains between the CAT and mMRC scoring systems. Keywords: COPD, CAT, mMRC, concordance, discrepancy

  16. The Effect of Ligamentum Teres Integrity on Hip Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Desteli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare the clinical functioning of the hips with an intact Ligamentum Teres (LT to ruptured LT. Patients with resected LT have feelings of instability and discomfort. The effect of LT on hip stability in dysplastic hips and hyperlaxity has been emphasized before. Existence of sensory nerve endings demonstrates that LT has a function in joint proprioception and nociception. LT test was conducted to 92 consecutive patients with Grade 2-3 coxarthrosis. Pain on either internal or external rotation is consistent with a positive LT test result. Following LT test, Hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS and Harris Hip Score (HHS were conducted to all of the patients. Each patient underwent MRI Scanning of the involved hip. The efficacy of LT test was evaluated in comparison to MRI findings, sensitivity of the test was 87.37 % and spesificity was 73.47 positive and negative predictive values were found to be 74.51 % nd 80.43 % respectively. 36 hips which had intact LT according to MRI and LT test (Group 1 was compared to the 38 hips with ruptured LT in both LT test and MRI (Group 2 regarding HOOS and Harris Hip Scores. HOOS and Harris Hip Scores of Group 1 were found to be significantly higher than Group 2. As far as we know from the literature this is the first clinical study to investigate the effect of LT integrity on hip scores by comparing hips with ruptured LT to hips with intact LT.

  17. Cutoff value of Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score in patients with rotator cuff repair: Based on the University of California at Los Angeles shoulder score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takaki; Gotoh, Masafumi; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Kawakami, Jyunichi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Fukuda, Keiji; Ogino, Misa; Okawa, Takahiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2017-05-01

    The Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score cutoff values were calculated in patients with rotator cuff repair using the University of California at Los Angeles shoulder score. Overall, 175 patients with rotator cuff repair were subjects in this study. The University of California at Los Angeles and Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder scores were evaluated before surgery and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after surgery. The cutoff value of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score was determined using the 4-stage criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles shoulder score and a University of California at Los Angeles shoulder score of 28 points, which is the boundary between an excellent/good group and a fair/poor group. Both the JOA shoulder and UCLA shoulder scores showed significant improvement at 6, 9, and 12 months from the preoperative scores (p values of the two scores (r = 0.85, p value of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score based on the highest accuracy from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was 83 points. A Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score cutoff value of 83 was equivalent to a University of California at Los Angeles shoulder score cutoff value of 28 for distinguishing between excellent/good and fair/poor outcomes after rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Literature in focus: How to Score

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    What is the perfect way to take a free kick? Which players are under more stress: attackers, midfielders or defenders? How do we know when a ball has crossed the goal-line? And how can teams win a penalty shoot out? From international team formations to the psychology of the pitch and the changing room... The World Cup might be a time to forget about physics for a while, but not for Ken Bray, a theoretical physicist and visiting Fellow of the Sport and Exercise Science Group at the University of Bath who specializes in the science of football. Dr Bray will visit CERN to talk exclusively about his book: How to Score. As a well-seasoned speaker and advisor to professional football teams, this presentation promises to be a fascinating and timely insight into the secret science that lies behind 'the beautiful game'. If you play or just watch football, don't miss this event! Ken Bray - How to Score Thursday 22 June at 3 p.m. (earlier than usual to avoid clashes with World Cup matches!) Central Library reading ...

  19. Comparing Propensity Score Methods in Balancing Covariates and Recovering Impact in Small Sample Educational Program Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Clement A.; Tang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Propensity score applications are often used to evaluate educational program impact. However, various options are available to estimate both propensity scores and construct comparison groups. This study used a student achievement dataset with commonly available covariates to compare different propensity scoring estimation methods (logistic…

  20. Comparison of simplified score with the revised original score for the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis: a new or a complementary diagnostic score?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatselis, Nikolaos K; Zachou, Kalliopi; Papamichalis, Panagiotis; Koukoulis, George K; Gabeta, Stella; Dalekos, George N; Rigopoulou, Eirini I

    2010-11-01

    The International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group developed a simplified score for autoimmune hepatitis. We assessed this "new scoring system" and compared it with the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group original revised score. 502 patients were evaluated namely, 428 had liver diseases of various etiology [hepatitis B (n=109), hepatitis C (n=100), hepatitis D (n=4), alcoholic liver disease (n=28), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (n=55), autoimmune cholestatic diseases (n=77), liver disorders of undefined origin (n=32) and miscellaneous hepatic disorders (n=23)], 13 had autoimmune hepatitis/overlap syndromes, 18 had autoimmune hepatitis/concurrent with other liver diseases and 43 had autoimmune hepatitis. The specificity of the simplified score was similar to that of the revised score (97% vs. 97.9%). The sensitivity in unmasking autoimmune hepatitis in autoimmune hepatitis/overlap syndromes was also similar in both systems (53.8% and 61.5%). However, the sensitivity for autoimmune hepatitis diagnosis in autoimmune hepatitis patients with concurrent liver disorders was lower by the new score (p=0.001). Liver biopsy proved to be the only independent factor for unmasking autoimmune hepatitis component among patients (p=0.003). The simplified score is a reliable and simple tool for excluding autoimmune hepatitis. However, both systems cannot unmask autoimmune hepatitis component efficiently in autoimmune hepatitis patients with concurrent autoimmune or non-autoimmune liver diseases. This study also strongly reiterates the importance of liver biopsy in the work-up of patients. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased discordance between HeartScore and coronary artery calcification score after introduction of the new ESC prevention guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel C P; Mahabadi, Amir-Abbas; Gerke, Oke;

    2015-01-01

    -contrast Cardiac-CT scan was performed to detect coronary artery calcification (CAC). RESULTS: Agreement of HeartScore risk groups with CAC groups was poor, but higher when applying the algorithm for the low-risk compared to the high-risk country model (agreement rate: 77% versus 63%, and weighted Kappa: 0.......22 versus 0.15). However, the number of subjects with severe coronary calcification (CAC score ≥400) increased in the low and intermediate HeartScore risk group from 78 to 147 participants (from 2.7 % to 4.2 %, p = 0.001), when estimating the risk based on the algorithm for low-risk countries. CONCLUSION...

  2. Evaluation of Stress Scores Throughout Radiological Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkoglu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Ultrasound-guided biopsy procedures are the most prominent methods that increase the trauma, stress and anxiety experienced by the patients. Objectives Our goal was to examine the level of stress in patients waiting for radiologic biopsy procedures and determine the stress and anxiety level arising from waiting for a biopsy procedure. Patients and Methods This prospective study included 35 female and 65 male patients who were admitted to the interventional radiology department of Kartal Dr. Lütfi Kirdar training and research hospital, Istanbul between the years 2014 and 2015. They filled out the adult resilience scale consisting of 33 items. Patients who were undergoing invasive radiologic interventions were grouped according to their phenotypic characteristics, education level (low, intermediate, and high, and biopsy features (including biopsy localization: neck, thorax, abdomen, and bone; and the number of procedures performed, 1 or more than 1. Before the biopsy, they were also asked to complete the depression-anxiety-stress scale (DASS 42, state-trait anxiety inventory scale (STAI-I, and continuous anxiety scale STAI-II. A total of 80 patients were biopsied (20 thyroid and parathyroid, 20 thorax, 20 liver and kidney, and 20 bone biopsies. The association between education levels (primary- secondary, high school and postgraduate and the number of biopsies (1 and more than 1 with the level of anxiety and stress were evaluated using the above-mentioned scales. Results Evaluation of sociodemographic and statistical characteristics of the patients showed that patients with biopsy in the neck region were moderately and severely depressed and stressed. In addition, the ratio of severe and extremely severe anxiety scores was significantly high. While the STAI-I and II scores were lined up as neck > bone > thorax > abdomen, STAI-I was higher in neck biopsies compared to thorax and abdomen biopsies. Regarding STAI-I and II scales, patients

  3. ABOUT PSYCHOLOGICAL VARIABLES IN APPLICATION SCORING MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Rogers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the contribution of psychological variables and scales suggested by Economic Psychology in predicting individuals’ default. Therefore, a sample of 555 individuals completed a self-completion questionnaire, which was composed of psychological variables and scales. By adopting the methodology of the logistic regression, the following psychological and behavioral characteristics were found associated with the group of individuals in default: a negative dimensions related to money (suffering, inequality and conflict; b high scores on the self-efficacy scale, probably indicating a greater degree of optimism and over-confidence; c buyers classified as compulsive; d individuals who consider it necessary to give gifts to children and friends on special dates, even though many people consider this a luxury; e problems of self-control identified by individuals who drink an average of more than four glasses of alcoholic beverage a day.

  4. Mangled extremity severity score in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagelman, Mitchell F; Epps, Howard R; Rang, Mercer

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of the severely traumatized or mangled lower extremity poses significant challenges. The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) is a scale that uses objective criteria to assist with acute management decisions. Most research on the MESS has been in adults or combined series with few children. The study was performed to investigate the MESS in children exclusively. The MESS was applied retrospectively to 36 patients with grades IIIB and IIIC open lower extremity fractures collected from two level 1 pediatric trauma centers. Patients were divided into limb salvage and primary amputation groups based on the decision of the treating surgeon. In the salvage group there were 18 grade IIIB fractures and 10 grade IIIC fractures. The MESS prediction was accurate in 93% of the injured limbs. In the amputation group eight limbs met the inclusion criteria; the MESS agreed with the treating surgeon in 63% of cases. These findings suggest the MESS should be considered when managing a child with severe lower extremity trauma.

  5. Modified EBMT Pretransplant Risk Score Can Identify Favorable-risk Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for AML, Not Identified by the HCT-CI Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelis, Fotios V; Messner, Hans A; Uhm, Jieun; Alam, Naheed; Lambie, Anna; McGillis, Laura; Seftel, Matthew D; Gupta, Vikas; Kuruvilla, John; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2015-05-01

    Risk scores have been developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes, such as the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI) and the modified European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation risk score (mEBMT) for acute leukemia. We investigated the influence of these scores for 350 patients who underwent transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The HCT-CI scores were grouped as 0 to 2 and ≥ 3 (231 and 119 patients, respectively) and the mEBMT scores as 0 to 2 and ≥ 3 (166 and 184 patients, respectively). Univariate analysis showed a significant association between the HCT-CI score and overall survival (OS) (P = .01), as did the mEBMT score (P = .002). The 5-year OS rate was 50% and 34% for a mEBMT score of 0 to 2 and ≥ 3, respectively. A subgroup of patients with a mEBMT score of 0 to 1 (n = 32) demonstrated a favorable OS of 75% at 5 years. This subgroup was younger (median age, 31 years), in first remission at transplantation, and had related donors. For the HCT-CI, the 5-year OS was 46% and 34% for a score of 0 to 2 and ≥ 3, respectively. Patients with an HCT-CI score of 0 (n = 94) had a 5-year OS of 44%. Multivariable analysis confirmed both the HCT-CI score and the mEBMT score, as previously grouped, as independent prognostic variables for both OS (P = .02 and P = .001, respectively) and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (P = .01 and P = .003, respectively). The results of the present study have demonstrated that the HCT-CI and mEBMT are both prognostic for OS and NRM in our cohort. However, the mEBMT score can identify a favorable-risk subgroup of patients not identifiable using the HCT-CI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiovascular risk scores for coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Murat; Kardesoglu, Ejder; Aparci, Mustafa; Isilak, Zafer; Uz, Omer; Yiginer, Omer; Ozmen, Namik; Cingozbay, Bekir Yilmaz; Uzun, Mehmet; Cebeci, Bekir Sitki

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare frequently used cardiovascular risk scores in predicting the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and 3-vessel disease. In 350 consecutive patients (218 men and 132 women) who underwent coronary angiography, the cardiovascular risk level was determined using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), the Modified Framingham Risk Score (MFRS), the Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) score, and the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The area under the curve for receiver operating characteristic curves showed that FRS had more predictive value than the other scores for CAD (area under curve, 0.76, P MFRS, PROCAM, and SCORE) may predict the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis.The FRS had better predictive value than the other scores.

  7. Acupuncture/electroacupuncture enhances anti-depressant effect of Seroxat:the Symptom Checklist-90 scores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junqi Chen; Weirong Lin; Shengxu Wang; Chongqi Wang; Ganlong Li; Shanshan Qu; Yong Huang; Zhangjin Zhang; Wei Xiao

    2014-01-01

    One hundred and ifve patients with primary unipolar depression were randomly divided into three groups:drug group (Seroxat administration), acupuncture group (Seroxat plus acupunc-ture), and electroacupuncture group (Seroxat plus acupuncture plus electroacupuncture). Patients’ symptoms were evaluated using a psychometric questionnaire, the Symptom Check-list-90, before intervention and after 2, 4, 6 and 10 weeks of treatment. The individual factor scores and the total score from the Symptom Checklist-90 reduced in all three groups as treat-ment progressed. In the acupuncture and electroacupuncture groups, the total score and the factor scores for obsessive-compulsive symptoms, depression, and anxiety were significantly lower than those in the drug group. There was no signiifcant difference in the factor scores or total scores between the acupuncture and electroacupuncture groups. Some factor scores in the electroacupuncture group, such as somatization, depression, hostility, and phobic anxiety, were increased at 10 weeks compared with the respective score immediately after the course of electroacupuncture at 6 weeks. Our ifndings indicate that administration of Seroxat alone or in combination with acupuncture/electroacupuncture can produce a signiifcant effect in patients with primary unipolar depression. Furthermore, acupuncture/electroacupuncture has a rapid onset of therapeutic effect and produces a noticeable improvement in obsessive-compulsive, de-pressive and anxiety symptoms.

  8. An ultrasound score for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, B F; Christensen, R.; Torp-Pedersen, S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop standardized musculoskeletal ultrasound (MUS) procedures and scoring for detecting knee osteoarthritis (OA) and test the MUS score's ability to discern various degrees of knee OA, in comparison with plain radiography and the 'Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score' (KO...

  9. Breaking of scored tablets : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, E; Barends, D M; Frijlink, H W

    2002-01-01

    The literature was reviewed regarding advantages, problems and performance indicators of score lines. Scored tablets provide dose flexibility, ease of swallowing and may reduce the costs of medication. However, many patients are confronted with scored tablets that are broken unequally and with diffi

  10. Developing Score Reports for Cognitive Diagnostic Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Mary Roduta; Gierl, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a framework to provide a structured approach for developing score reports for cognitive diagnostic assessments ("CDAs"). Guidelines for reporting and presenting diagnostic scores are based on a review of current educational test score reporting practices and literature from the area of information design. A sample diagnostic…

  11. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  12. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  13. Semiparametric score sevel susion: Gaussian sopula approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susyanyo, N.; Klaassen, C.A.J.; Veldhuis, R.N.J.; Spreeuwers, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Score level fusion is an appealing method for combining multi-algorithms, multi- representations, and multi-modality biometrics due to its simplicity. Often, scores are assumed to be independent, but even for dependent scores, accord- ing to the Neyman-Pearson lemma, the likelihood ratio is the opti

  14. An objective fluctuation score for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm K Horne

    Full Text Available Establishing the presence and severity of fluctuations is important in managing Parkinson's Disease yet there is no reliable, objective means of doing this. In this study we have evaluated a Fluctuation Score derived from variations in dyskinesia and bradykinesia scores produced by an accelerometry based system.The Fluctuation Score was produced by summing the interquartile range of bradykinesia scores and dyskinesia scores produced every 2 minutes between 0900-1800 for at least 6 days by the accelerometry based system and expressing it as an algorithm.This Score could distinguish between fluctuating and non-fluctuating patients with high sensitivity and selectivity and was significant lower following activation of deep brain stimulators. The scores following deep brain stimulation lay in a band just above the score separating fluctuators from non-fluctuators, suggesting a range representing adequate motor control. When compared with control subjects the score of newly diagnosed patients show a loss of fluctuation with onset of PD. The score was calculated in subjects whose duration of disease was known and this showed that newly diagnosed patients soon develop higher scores which either fall under or within the range representing adequate motor control or instead go on to develop more severe fluctuations.The Fluctuation Score described here promises to be a useful tool for identifying patients whose fluctuations are progressing and may require therapeutic changes. It also shows promise as a useful research tool. Further studies are required to more accurately identify therapeutic targets and ranges.

  15. Calibration of unified Parkinson's disease rating scale scores to Movement Disorder Society-unified Parkinson's disease rating scale scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G; Stebbins, Glenn T; Tilley, Barbara C

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop formulas to convert the UPDRS to Movement Disorder Society (MDS)-UPDRS scores. The MDS-UPDRS is a revision of the UPDRS with sound clinimetric properties. Reliable formulas to recalculate UPDRS scores into MDS-UPDRS equivalents are pivotal to the practical transition and definitive adoption of the MDS-UPDRS. UPDRS and MDS-UPDRS scores were collected on 875 PD patients. A developmental sample was used to regress UPDRS scores on corresponding MDS-UPDRS scores based on three H & Y groupings (I/II, III, and IV/V). Regression weighting factors and intercept terms provided formulas for UPDRS conversions to be tested in a validation sample. Concordance between the true MDS-UPDRS Part scores and those derived from the formulas was compared using Bland-Altman's plots and Lin's concordance coefficient (LCC). Significant concordance between UPDRS-estimated MDS-UPDRS scores was achieved for Parts II (Motor Experiences of Daily Living) (LCC = 0.93) and III (Motor Examination) (LCC = 0.97). The formulas resulted in mean differences between the true MDS-UPDRS and estimated MDS-UPDRS scores of less than 1 point for both Parts II and III. Concordance was not achieved for Parts I and IV (Non-motor Experiences of Daily Living and Complications of Therapy). Formulas allow archival UPDRS Parts II and III individual patient data to be accurately transferred to MDS-UPDRS scores. Because Part I collects data on much more extensive information than the UPDRS, and because Part IV is structured differently in the two versions, old ratings for these parts cannot be converted. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF LRINEC SCORE: PROCALCITONIN AND LRINEC SCORE: C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN PREDICTING DURATION OF HOSPITAL STAY AND SEVERITY IN NECROTISING FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gowda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC score is a simple laboratory tool used to distinguish between Necrotizing Soft-Tissue Infections (NSTI and other soft-tissue infections. A LRINEC score of ≥6 is considered as denoting a high risk of necrotizing fasciitis. A very high LRINEC score might also be associated with mortality and other outcomes of patients with NSTI. METHODS A review of the medical charts of patients was carried out in a tertiary academic Centre. All adult patients with necrotizing softtissue infections from 2010 to 2011 were selected and LRINEC scores were calculated for each patient. The enrolled patients had sufficient information to determine the LRINEC score. Serum Procalcitonin (PCT was used in place of serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP to improve the efficacy of LRINEC score. Serum PCT was considered positive if the value was >0.56 ng/mL. LRINEC score-PCT and LRINEC score-CRP were compared in predicting duration of hospital stay and severity. RESULTS In this study of 50 patients 64% of them were males, majority of the patients were between the age group of 40-80 years. LRINEC score PCT had better predictability for severity and duration of hospital stay when compared to LRINEC score with CRP. Pearson correlation of LRINEC score PCT vs LRINEC score, CRP was statistically significant with LRINEC score, PCT having 30% of patients with longer duration of hospital stay in comparison to LRINEC score CRP which had 12%. CONCLUSION LRINEC score: PCT had better probability in predicting severity and duration of hospital stay when compared to LRINEC score: CRP.

  17. Measuring balance and model selection in propensity score methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belitser, S.; Martens, Edwin P.; Pestman, Wiebe R.; Groenwold, Rolf H.H.; De Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Propensity score (PS) methods focus on balancing confounders between groups to estimate an unbiased treatment or exposure effect. However, there is lack of attention in actually measuring, reporting and using the information on balance, for instance for model selection. Objectives: To de

  18. Low IQ scores in schizophrenia : primary or secondary deficit?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, M; Withaar, F; van Zomeren, AH; van den Bosch, R

    2002-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is consistently associated with lower IQ compared to the IQ of control groups, or estimated premorbid IQ. It is not likely that the IQ scores deteriorate during the prodromal phase or first psychotic episode; they are already present before the onset of the prodromal phase

  19. Low IQ scores in schizophrenia : primary or secondary deficit?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, M; Withaar, F; van Zomeren, AH; van den Bosch, R

    2002-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is consistently associated with lower IQ compared to the IQ of control groups, or estimated premorbid IQ. It is not likely that the IQ scores deteriorate during the prodromal phase or first psychotic episode; they are already present before the onset of the prodromal phase

  20. Interrater Reliability of a Team-Scored Electronic Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuankun; Foster, Karen; Aldrich, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This study applied generalizability theory to investigate the interrater reliability of a team-scored electronic portfolio required for initial teacher certification. The sample consisted of 31 preservice teacher portfolios which were assigned to three groups of portfolio review teams. The review teams, which had received several rounds of…

  1. Propensity Score Analysis: An Alternative Statistical Approach for HRD Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiffer, Greggory L.; Lane, Forrest C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to introduce matching in propensity score analysis (PSA) as an alternative statistical approach for researchers looking to make causal inferences using intact groups. Design/methodology/approach: An illustrative example demonstrated the varying results of analysis of variance, analysis of covariance and PSA on a heuristic…

  2. Automatic Sleep Scoring in Normals and in Individuals with Neurodegenerative Disorders According to New International Sleep Scoring Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter S.; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Leonthin, Helle

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a fully automatic sleep scoring algorithm on the basis of a reproduction of new international sleep scoring criteria from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. A biomedical signal processing algorithm was developed, allowing for automatic sleep depth...... quantification of routine polysomnographic recordings through feature extraction, supervised probabilistic Bayesian classification, and heuristic rule-based smoothing. The performance of the algorithm was tested using 28 manually classified day-night polysomnograms from 18 normal subjects and 10 patients....... Based on an observed reliability of the manual scorer of 92.5% (Cohen's Kappa: 0.87) in the normal group and 85.3% (Cohen's Kappa: 0.73) in the abnormal group, this study concluded that although the developed algorithm was capable of scoring normal sleep with an accuracy around the manual interscorer...

  3. Automatic sleep scoring in normals and in individuals with neurodegenerative disorders according to new international sleep scoring criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter S; Sorensen, Helge B D; Jennum, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a fully automatic sleep scoring algorithm on the basis of a reproduction of new international sleep scoring criteria from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. A biomedical signal processing algorithm was developed, allowing for automatic sleep depth...... quantification of routine polysomnographic recordings through feature extraction, supervised probabilistic Bayesian classification, and heuristic rule-based smoothing. The performance of the algorithm was tested using 28 manually classified day-night polysomnograms from 18 normal subjects and 10 patients....... Based on an observed reliability of the manual scorer of 92.5% (Cohen's Kappa: 0.87) in the normal group and 85.3% (Cohen's Kappa: 0.73) in the abnormal group, this study concluded that although the developed algorithm was capable of scoring normal sleep with an accuracy around the manual interscorer...

  4. Committee Opinion No. 644: The Apgar Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Apgar score provides an accepted and convenient method for reporting the status of the newborn infant immediately after birth and the response to resuscitation if needed. The Apgar score alone cannot be considered to be evidence of or a consequence of asphyxia, does not predict individual neonatal mortality or neurologic outcome, and should not be used for that purpose. An Apgar score assigned during a resuscitation is not equivalent to a score assigned to a spontaneously breathing infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourage use of an expanded Apgar score reporting form that accounts for concurrent resuscitative interventions.

  5. A Soft Intelligent Risk Evaluation Model for Credit Scoring Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Khashei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Risk management is one of the most important branches of business and finance. Classification models are the most popular and widely used analytical group of data mining approaches that can greatly help financial decision makers and managers to tackle credit risk problems. However, the literature clearly indicates that, despite proposing numerous classification models, credit scoring is often a difficult task. On the other hand, there is no universal credit-scoring model in the literature that can be accurately and explanatorily used in all circumstances. Therefore, the research for improving the efficiency of credit-scoring models has never stopped. In this paper, a hybrid soft intelligent classification model is proposed for credit-scoring problems. In the proposed model, the unique advantages of the soft computing techniques are used in order to modify the performance of the traditional artificial neural networks in credit scoring. Empirical results of Australian credit card data classifications indicate that the proposed hybrid model outperforms its components, and also other classification models presented for credit scoring. Therefore, the proposed model can be considered as an appropriate alternative tool for binary decision making in business and finance, especially in high uncertainty conditions.

  6. Relationship between Pronuclear Scoring and Embryo Quality and Implantation Potential in IVF-ET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun LIU; Guijin ZHU; Juan HU; Yulan WEI; Xinling REN; Hanwang ZHANG; Yufeng LI; Lei JIN; Jing YUE

    2008-01-01

    To assess the relationship between pronuclear scoring and day-3 embryo quality and pregnancy outcome and to determine the clinical value of pronuclear stage scoring system in human in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (WF-ET) program, a pronuclear scoring system was used to score zygotes 16-20 h after insemination during conventional WF or intracytoplasmic sperm injec- tion (ICS1). The embryos were classified into groups Z1, Z2, Z3 and Z4. Comparisons were made of the rates of arrested embryos and excellent embryos on day 3. Comparisons of pregnancy outcome were made only in those patients in whom cohorts of similarly Z-scored embryos were transferred. The results showed that there were less arrested embryos and more excellent embryos on day 3 in groups Z1 and Z2 than those in group Z3 and Z4. More embryos arrested and less excellent embryos developed in group Z4 than group Z3. The clinical pregnancy rates resulting from the transfer of single pronuclear score homologous embryo types were similar among groups Z1, Z2 and Z3. Implanta- tion rates of group Z1 were higher (P<0.05) than that of group Z3. These findings suggests that pro- nuclear scoring can predict developmental ability on day 3 and implantation potential. A evaluation that combines the Z-score and day 3 embryo morphology is useful in the determination of the most viable embryos and the number of embryos for transfer.

  7. A Novel scoring system for distinguishing keratoconus from normal eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruçoğlu, Faik; Toker, Ebru

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a novel scoring system in differentiation of keratoconus (KC) eyes from normal eyes using a Scheimpflug camera system tomography. Marmara University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey and Birinci Eye Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Retrospective case-control study. The study included 624 keratoconus eyes and 512 healthy eyes. Thirty nine significant parameters obtained from the Scheimpflug imaging system (Pentacam-Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany) were studied. The cut-off value and area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve analysis for each studied parameter were established in the previous study. Minus three and plus three standard deviations of the cut-off value were scored after multiplication of AUROC for each parameter. The sum of all scores (TKS; Total Keratoconus Score) was compared between keratoconus and normal eyes. Average TKS value was -29.57±5.65 (Range from -43.11 to -7.09) in normal eyes and 36.23±24.3 (Range from -16.82 to 97.45) in keratoconus eyes (pkeratoconus group from the normal group with 99% sensitivity and 99% specificity at the best cut-off point of -12.45. The new scoring system measured by the Scheimpflug imaging system provides perfect discrimination of keratoconus from normal corneas. Copyright © 2016 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Conditional Reliability Coefficients for Test Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicewander, W Alan

    2017-04-06

    The most widely used, general index of measurement precision for psychological and educational test scores is the reliability coefficient-a ratio of true variance for a test score to the true-plus-error variance of the score. In item response theory (IRT) models for test scores, the information function is the central, conditional index of measurement precision. In this inquiry, conditional reliability coefficients for a variety of score types are derived as simple transformations of information functions. It is shown, for example, that the conditional reliability coefficient for an ordinary, number-correct score, X, is equal to, ρ(X,X'|θ)=I(X,θ)/[I(X,θ)+1] Where: θ is a latent variable measured by an observed test score, X; p(X, X'|θ) is the conditional reliability of X at a fixed value of θ; and I(X, θ) is the score information function. This is a surprisingly simple relationship between the 2, basic indices of measurement precision from IRT and classical test theory (CTT). This relationship holds for item scores as well as test scores based on sums of item scores-and it holds for dichotomous as well as polytomous items, or a mix of both item types. Also, conditional reliabilities are derived for computerized adaptive test scores, and for θ-estimates used as alternatives to number correct scores. These conditional reliabilities are all related to information in a manner similar-or-identical to the 1 given above for the number-correct (NC) score. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Novel prognostic scoring system after surgery for Klatskin tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Gernot M; Paul, Andreas; Sgourakis, George; Molmenti, Ernesto P; Dechêne, Alexander; Trarbach, Tanja; Stuschke, Martin; Baba, Hideo A; Gerken, Guido; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C

    2013-01-01

    Klatskin tumor is a rare hepatobiliary malignancy whose outcome and prognostic factors are not clearly documented. Between April 1998 and January 2007, 96 patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma underwent resection. Data were collected prospectively. Thirty-one variables were evaluated for prognostic significance. There were 40 trisectionectomies, 40 hemihepatectomies, five central hepatectomies, and 11 biliary hilar resections. Thirty-seven (n = 37) patients required vascular reconstruction. There were 68 R0, 26 R1, and two R2 resections. Age (P = 0.048), pT status (P = 0.046), R class (P = 0.034), and adjuvant chemoradiation (P = 0.045) showed predictive significance by multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. A point scoring system was determined as follows: age younger than 62 years:age 62 years or older = 1:2 points; pT1:pT2 to 4 = 1:2 points; R0:R1/2 = 1:2 points; and chemoradiation yes:no = 1:2 points. The only model that reached statistical significance (P = 0.0332) described the following three groups: score 6 or less; score = 7; and score = 8. Median survival for score 6 or less, score = 7, and score = 8 was 26.5, 12, and 2.2 months, respectively (P = 0.032). The corresponding 1- and 3-year survival rates were 73 to 56 per cent, 52 to 38 per cent, and 17 to 0 per cent, respectively. We propose a scoring system predictive of long-term surgical outcome that could potentially improve patient selection for further postoperative oncologic treatment for Klatskin tumors.

  10. The Effect of Clinical, Radiographic and Functional Scores on the Total Score in the Evaluation of Congenital Clubfoot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakonjac, Zoran; Brdar, Radivoj; Popovic, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The use of radical surgical treatments in treating congenital clubfoot is decreasing. Minimally invasive surgical treatment (MIST) is a way of treating congenital clubfoot, which is a kind of compromise between a radical surgical treatment and non-operational one. A few protocols of different authors McKay, Macnicol, Stevens, Meyer, G.W.Simons and Laaveg-Ponseti were used in the evaluation of the results. SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIVE: To determine the importance and role of groups of parameters (clinical, radiographic and functional) in the evaluation of the results in patients treated with the two methods (radical operation and MIST). Subjects and methods: This paper covers children who were treated for structural (idiopathic) form of PEVC. The testing is a prospective study and was conducted in two groups of patients. Group A (radical surgical treatment) – control group, where the total number of subjects was 50, out of which 35 male (70%) and 15 female (30%). The number of feet tested was 88. Group B (minimally invasive surgical treatment–MIST)–experimental group. The total number of subjects was 48, out of which 35 male (73%) and 13 female (27%). The number of feet tested was 84. For the analysis of the results, we used a questionnaire. The total number of parameters was fifteen, clinical, radiographic and functional, five parameters of each. Normal findings or measured value was determined by 0 points. The range of the total score (TS-a- total score range) 0-27 points, and the results were sorted out into the folowing categories: good result (0-5) satisfactory (6-11), poor (12-19) and deformity recrudescence (20-27) points. Results: The proportion of good results at 88 feet in group A was 0,477 as at 84 feet in group B it was significantly higher and came to 0,893. The difference between these proportions is statistically highly significant (t = 5.84, p <0.001). Chi-square test (χ2 = 30.083 df = 1 N = 172, p <0.001) indicated that there is a

  11. Dietary diversity scores can be improved through the use of portion requirements: an analysis in young Filipino children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M C; Adair, L S; Popkin, B M; Truong, Y K

    2009-02-01

    Early childhood malnutrition is a pressing international concern which dietary diversity scores (summary scores of food groups in the diet) may be helpful in addressing. We explored three current research needs surrounding diversity scores: the impact of portion size on score function, the relationship of scores to nutrient adequacy and density and the ability of scores to function as screening tools. 1810 children, age 24 months. Cross sectional study of a birth cohort. We evaluated two nine food group dietary diversity scores based on 0 and 10 g minimum food group requirements for their relationship to nutrient adequacy and nutrient density. Both scores were significantly correlated with nutrient adequacy and density and predicted statistically significant increases (Pdiversity scores is desirable through the application of minimum portion requirements.

  12. Serum iron and A(2)DS(2) score in stroke-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, You; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Juan; Yu, Jing; Yin, Shao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of serum biomarkers such as iron, procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP) and A(2)DS(2) scores at hospital admission to predict the onset and severity of stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP), 101 patients with acute stroke were selected and divided into the control and SAP group. Compared with control group, no significant differences were discovered in age, sex, vascular risk factors including hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia, chronic lung disease of SAP group, while a significantly higher level was found in incidence of dysphagia, NIHSS score, A(2)DS(2) score, CURB-65 score, serum iron, serum ferritin, PCT and CRP (P DS(2) score and CURB-65 score had relatively high values in the SAP prediction (all P 0.5). When combined ferritin, PCT, and A(2)DS(2) scores and other indicators with CRP for SAP prediction, the model had a larger area under the curve (AUC) and higher specificity than individual prediction models. Spearman regression analysis presented that serum iron, serum ferritin and A(2)DS(2) score were highly correlated with CURB-65 score (P DS(2) score measured at admission were effective indicators in SAP prediction which could be used for SAP screening and severity prediction. Besides, the specificity in SAP prediction could be improved when Serum iron and A(2)DS(2) score combined with CRP.

  13. Prognostic Value of AIMS65 Score in Cirrhotic Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya Gaduputi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Unlike Rockall scoring system, AIMS65 is based only on clinical and laboratory features. In this study we investigated the correlation between the AIMS65 score and Endoscopic Rockall score, in cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients. Methods. This is a retrospective study of patients admitted with overt UGIB and undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD. AIMS65 and Rockall scores were calculated at the time of admission. We investigated the correlation between both scores along with stigmata of bleed seen on endoscopy. Results. A total of 1255 patients were studied. 152 patients were cirrhotic while 1103 patients were noncirrhotic. There was significant correlation between AIMS65 and Total Rockall scores in patients of both groups. There was significant correlation between AIMS65 score and Endoscopic Rockall score in noncirrhotics but not cirrhotics. AIMS65 scores in both cirrhotic and noncirrhotic groups were significantly higher in patients who died from UGIB than in patients who did not. Conclusion. We observed statistically significant correlation between AIMS65 score and length of hospitalization and mortality in noncirrhotic patients. We found that AIMS65 score paralleled the endoscopic grading of lesion causing UGIB in noncirrhotics. AIMS65 score correlated only with mortality but not the length of hospitalization or endoscopic stigmata of bleed in cirrhotics.

  14. Proposal of a Mediterranean Diet Serving Score.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Monteagudo

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated a relationship between Mediterranean Diet (MD adherence and the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and diabetes, etc. The study aim was to validate a novel instrument to measure MD adherence based on the consumption of food servings and food groups, and apply it in a female population from southern Spain and determining influential factors.The study included 1,155 women aged 12-83 yrs, classified as adolescents, adults, and over-60-yr-olds. All completed a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. The Mediterranean Dietary Serving Score (MDSS is based on the latest update of the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid, using the recommended consumption frequency of foods and food groups; the MDSS ranges from 0 to 24. The discriminative power or correct subject classification capacity of the MDSS was analyzed with the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve, using the MDS as reference method. Predictive factors for higher MDSS adherence were determined with a logistic regression model, adjusting for age. According to ROC curve analysis, MDSS evidenced a significant discriminative capacity between adherents and non-adherents to the MD pattern (optimal cutoff point=13.50; sensitivity=74%; specificity=48%. The mean MDSS was 12.45 (2.69 and was significantly higher with older age (p<0.001. Logistic regression analysis showed highest MD adherence by over 60-year-olds with low BMI and no habit of eating between meals.The MDSS is an updated, easy, valid, and accurate instrument to assess MD adherence based on the consumption of foods and food groups per meal, day, and week. It may be useful in future nutritional education programs to prevent the early onset of chronic non-transmittable diseases in younger populations.

  15. Automated essay scoring and the future of educational assessment in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Mark J; Latifi, Syed; Lai, Hollis; Boulais, André-Philippe; De Champlain, André

    2014-10-01

    Constructed-response tasks, which range from short-answer tests to essay questions, are included in assessments of medical knowledge because they allow educators to measure students' ability to think, reason, solve complex problems, communicate and collaborate through their use of writing. However, constructed-response tasks are also costly to administer and challenging to score because they rely on human raters. One alternative to the manual scoring process is to integrate computer technology with writing assessment. The process of scoring written responses using computer programs is known as 'automated essay scoring' (AES). An AES system uses a computer program that builds a scoring model by extracting linguistic features from a constructed-response prompt that has been pre-scored by human raters and then, using machine learning algorithms, maps the linguistic features to the human scores so that the computer can be used to classify (i.e. score or grade) the responses of a new group of students. The accuracy of the score classification can be evaluated using different measures of agreement. Automated essay scoring provides a method for scoring constructed-response tests that complements the current use of selected-response testing in medical education. The method can serve medical educators by providing the summative scores required for high-stakes testing. It can also serve medical students by providing them with detailed feedback as part of a formative assessment process. Automated essay scoring systems yield scores that consistently agree with those of human raters at a level as high, if not higher, as the level of agreement among human raters themselves. The system offers medical educators many benefits for scoring constructed-response tasks, such as improving the consistency of scoring, reducing the time required for scoring and reporting, minimising the costs of scoring, and providing students with immediate feedback on constructed-response tasks. © 2014

  16. Prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy Gleason score correlation in heterogenous tumors: proposal for a composite Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Stella, Javier A; Shah, Alpa B; Montoya-Cerrillo, Diego; Williamson, Sean R; Gupta, Nilesh S

    2015-09-01

    When prostate biopsy cores are separately identified in multiple containers, current recommendations are to grade each specimen individually. For treatment algorithms, the highest Gleason score (HGS) is typically used as the overall score, even if a lower score predominates. This practice has the potential to misrepresent the overall cancer in the entire gland for some patients and place them in a higher-grade group. We compare a novel composite Gleason score (CGS), integrating grade patterns from contiguous positive biopsy sites, with HGS to determine correlation with the radical prostatectomy (RP) Gleason score (GS). One hundred needle biopsy cases from 2008 to 2012 with >2 GSs in a biopsy set (eg, 3+3=6, 3+4=7, and 4+3=7) or more than a 1-step difference in GS (eg, 3+4=7 and 4+4=8 without 4+3=7) were analyzed. Grades were assigned using both methods (HGS and CGS) and compared with RPGS. Grade groups I to V were used to define downgrade and upgrade. Comparing HGS with RPGS, 31% remained the same and 69% had a change in GS (87% downgraded and 13% upgraded). Comparing CGS with RPGS, 59% remained the same and 41% had a change in GS (10% downgraded and 90% upgraded). Of the 2 methods, the CGS showed better overall correlation with RP (P2 grades are present in a biopsy set. CGS has a significantly lower rate of downgrade and predicts the RPGS more accurately than HGS.

  17. Forecasting the value of credit scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Shakila; Ahmad, Noryati; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, credit scoring system plays an important role in banking sector. This process is important in assessing the creditworthiness of customers requesting credit from banks or other financial institutions. Usually, the credit scoring is used when customers send the application for credit facilities. Based on the score from credit scoring, bank will be able to segregate the "good" clients from "bad" clients. However, in most cases the score is useful at that specific time only and cannot be used to forecast the credit worthiness of the same applicant after that. Hence, bank will not know if "good" clients will always be good all the time or "bad" clients may become "good" clients after certain time. To fill up the gap, this study proposes an equation to forecast the credit scoring of the potential borrowers at a certain time by using the historical score related to the assumption. The Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) is used to measure the accuracy of the forecast scoring. Result shows the forecast scoring is highly accurate as compared to actual credit scoring.

  18. The Mystery of the Z-Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Alexander E; Smith, Tanya A; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2016-08-01

    Reliable methods for measuring the thoracic aorta are critical for determining treatment strategies in aneurysmal disease. Z-scores are a pragmatic alternative to raw diameter sizes commonly used in adult medicine. They are particularly valuable in the pediatric population, who undergo rapid changes in physical development. The advantage of the Z-score is its inclusion of body surface area (BSA) in determining whether an aorta is within normal size limits. Therefore, Z-scores allow us to determine whether true pathology exists, which can be challenging in growing children. In addition, Z-scores allow for thoughtful interpretation of aortic size in different genders, ethnicities, and geographical regions. Despite the advantages of using Z-scores, there are limitations. These include intra- and inter-observer bias, measurement error, and variations between alternative Z-score nomograms and BSA equations. Furthermore, it is unclear how Z-scores change in the normal population over time, which is essential when interpreting serial values. Guidelines for measuring aortic parameters have been developed by the American Society of Echocardiography Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Council, which may reduce measurement bias when calculating Z-scores for the aortic root. In addition, web-based Z-score calculators have been developed to aid in efficient Z-score calculations. Despite these advances, clinicians must be mindful of the limitations of Z-scores, especially when used to demonstrate beneficial treatment effect. This review looks to unravel the mystery of the Z-score, with a focus on the thoracic aorta. Here, we will discuss how Z-scores are calculated and the limitations of their use.

  19. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  20. The examination of the relationship between YGS scores and music field scores in music teaching programme with special talent examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Sağer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Every year, with special aptitude exams students are taken to undergraduate programs as a music teacher in Turkey .Although applications for these exam show differences according to the difficulty level of the questions and evaluations criterias, all the areas that would be measured show similarities to each other. The areas showing the similarity are classified as Musical hearing-reading-writing fields (MİOY , musical playing area and musical singing area. Special Ability Test score (ÖYSP Transition to Higher Education Exam scores, as well as forming the points (YGS-P and the weighted scores of Secondary Education (AOBP takes place mainly among the scores of the candidates. It is used according to the circumstances of different coefficients Placement Scores (YP in the calculation. The types of score that form YGS-P and ÖYS, which mainly affect the placemet of the students to the university, the relationship between the musical areas in ÖYSP and all correlations of the areas to each other have been seen as a basical problem of this study.761 candidates who auditioned for Music Education Program in the years 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 academic Inonu University Faculty of Education constitutes the study group . As a result of the analysis made, between the MİOY scores and YGS-P there is a meaningful relationship in positive direction and low level (r =. 08, p <. 05 In adddition, There are positive correlation and low level (r=.32, p<.01; between the musical play and MİOY area points, playing field between the musical scores of MİOY there are positive direction, the low level (r = .21, p <.05 relationship, and it has been found that there is meaningful relationship between musical play area and the Musical direction at a high level. (r=.79, p<.01

  1. The AIMS65 Score Is a Useful Predictor of Mortality in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Urgent Endoscopy in Patients with High AIMS65 Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Wook; Song, Young Wook; Tak, Dae Hyun; Ahn, Byung Moo; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2015-11-01

    To validate the AIMS65 score for predicting mortality of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to evaluate the effectiveness of urgent (Nonvariceal, upper gastrointestinal bleeding was assessed by using the AIM65 and Rockall scores. Scores for mortality were assessed by calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Patients with high AIMS65 scores (≥2) were allocated to either the urgent or non-urgent endoscopic procedure group. In-hospital mortality, success of endoscopic procedure, recurrence of bleeding, admission period, and dose of transfusion were compared between groups. A total of 634 patients were analyzed. The AIMS65 score successfully predicted mortality (AUROC=0.943; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.876 to 0.99) and was superior to the Rockall score (AUROC=0.856; 95% CI, 0.743 to 0.969) in predicting mortality. The group with high AIMS65 score included 200 patients. The urgent endoscopic procedure group had reduced hospitalization periods (pnonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Urgent endoscopic procedures in patients with high scores may be related to reduced hospitalization periods.

  2. A Comparison between Linear IRT Observed-Score Equating and Levine Observed-Score Equating under the Generalized Kernel Equating Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, linear item response theory (IRT) observed-score equating is compared under a generalized kernel equating framework with Levine observed-score equating for nonequivalent groups with anchor test design. Interestingly, these two equating methods are closely related despite being based on different methodologies. Specifically, when…

  3. Correlation between the FINish diabetes risk score and the severity of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The FINish Diabetes RIsk SCore (FINDRISC which includes age, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, physical (in activity, diet, arterial hypertension, history of high glucose levels, and family history of diabetes, is of a great significance in identifying patients with impaired glucose tolerance and a 10-year risk assessment of developing type 2 diabetes in adults. Due to the fact that the FINDRISC score includes parameters which are risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD, our aim was to determine a correlation between this score, and some of its parameters respectively, with the severity of angiographically verified CAD in patients with stable angina in two ways: according to the Synergy between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX score and the number of diseased coronary arteries. Methods. The study included 70 patients with stable angina consecutively admitted to the Clinic of Cardiology, Military Medical Academy, Belgrade. The FINDRISC score was calculated in all the patients immediately prior to angiography. Venous blood samples were collected and inflammatory markers [erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, leucocytes, C-reactive protein (CRP, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting glucose] determined. Coronary angiography was performed in order to determine the severity of coronary artery disease according to the SYNTAX score and the number of affected coronary vessels: 1-vessel, 2-vessel or 3-vessel disease (hemodynamically significant stenoses: more than 70% of the blood vessel lumen. The patients were divided into three groups regarding the FINDRISC score: group I: 5-11 points; group II: 12-16 points; group III: 17-22 points. Results. Out of 70 patients (52 men and 18 women enrolled in this study, 14 had normal coronary angiogram. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the FINDRISC score and its parameters respectively

  4. Screening for recombinant human erythropoietin using [Hb], reticulocytes, the OFF(hr score), OFF(z score) and Hb(z score): status of the Blood Passport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornø, Andreas; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels J; Munch-Andersen, Thor; Hulston, Carl J; Lundby, Carsten

    2010-06-01

    Haemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), reticulocyte percentage (retic%) and OFF(hr score) are well-implemented screening tools to determine potential recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) abuse in athletes. Recently, the International Cycling Union implemented the OFF(z score) and the Hb(z score) in their anti-doping testing programme. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sensitivity of these indirect screening methods. Twenty-four human subjects divided into three groups with eight subjects each (G1; G2 and G3) were injected with rHuEpo. G1 and G2 received rHuEpo for a 4-week period with 2 weeks of "boosting" followed by 2 weeks of "maintenance" and a wash-out period of 3 weeks. G3 received rHuEpo for a 10-week period (boost = 3 weeks; maintenance = 7 weeks; wash out = 1 week). Three, seven and eight of the 24 volunteers exceeded the cut-off limits for OFF(hr score), [Hb] and retic%, respectively. One subject from G1, nobody from G2, and seven subjects from G3 exceeded the cut-off limit for Hb(z score.) In total, ten subjects exceeded the cut-off limit for the OFF(z score); two subjects from G1, two subjects from G2 and six subjects from G3. In total, indirect screening methods were able to indicate rHuEpo injections in 58% of subjects. However, 42% of our rHuEpo-injected subjects were not detected. It should be emphasised that the test frequency in real world anti-doping is far less than the present study, and hence the detection rate will be lower.

  5. The relationship between second-year medical students' OSCE scores and USMLE Step 1 scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven R; Volkan, Kevin; Hamann, Claus; Duffey, Carol; Fletcher, Suzanne W

    2002-09-01

    The relationship between objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) and standardized tests is not well known. We linked second-year medical students' physical diagnosis OSCE scores from 1998, 1999 and 2000 (n = 355) with demographic information, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores, and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores. The correlation coefficient for the total OSCE score with USMLE Step 1 score was 0.41 (p USMLE Step 1 score. OSCE station scores accounted for approximately 22% of the variability in USMLE Step 1 scores. A second-year OSCE in physical diagnosis is correlated with scores on the USMLE Step 1 exam, with skills that foreshadow the clinical clerkships most predictive of USMLE scores. This correlation suggests predictive validity of this OSCE and supports the use of OSCEs early in medical school.

  6. Random Walk Picture of Basketball Scoring

    CERN Document Server

    Gabel, Alan

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence, based on play-by-play data from all 6087 games from the 2006/07--2009/10 seasons of the National Basketball Association (NBA), that basketball scoring is well described by a weakly-biased continuous-time random walk. The time between successive scoring events follows an exponential distribution, with little memory between different scoring intervals. Using this random-walk picture that is augmented by features idiosyncratic to basketball, we account for a wide variety of statistical properties of scoring, such as the distribution of the score difference between opponents and the fraction of game time that one team is in the lead. By further including the heterogeneity of team strengths, we build a computational model that accounts for essentially all statistical features of game scoring data and season win/loss records of each team.

  7. Comparison of risk scoring systems for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding: international multicentre prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian J; Laine, Loren; Dalton, Harry R; Ngu, Jing H; Schultz, Michael; Abazi, Roseta; Zakko, Liam; Thornton, Susan; Wilkinson, Kelly; Khor, Cristopher J L; Murray, Iain A; Laursen, Stig B

    2017-01-04

    of stay.  The Glasgow Blatchford score has high accuracy at predicting need for hospital based intervention or death. Scores of ≤1 appear the optimum threshold for directing patients to outpatient management. AUROCs of scores for the other endpoints are less than 0.80, therefore their clinical utility for these outcomes seems to be limited.Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN16235737. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Scoring functions for AutoDock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anthony D; Reilly, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Automated docking allows rapid screening of protein-ligand interactions. A scoring function composed of a force field and linear weights can be used to compute a binding energy from a docked atom configuration. For different force fields or types of molecules, it may be necessary to train a custom scoring function. This chapter describes the data and methods one must consider in developing a custom scoring function for use with AutoDock.

  9. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  10. Pneumonia severity scores in resource poor settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Rylance

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical prognostic scores are increasingly used to streamline care in well-resourced settings. The potential benefits of identifying patients at risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome, delivering appropriate higher level clinical care, and increasing efficiency are clear. In this focused review, we examine the use and applicability of severity scores applied to patients with community acquired pneumonia in resource poor settings. We challenge clinical researchers working in such systems to consider the generalisability of existing severity scores in their populations, and where performance of scores is suboptimal, to promote efforts to develop and validate new tools for the benefit of patients and healthcare systems.

  11. Security Risk Scoring Incorporating Computers' Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Weintraub

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A framework of a Continuous Monitoring System (CMS is presented, having new improved capabilities. The system uses the actual real-time configuration of the system and environment characterized by a Configuration Management Data Base (CMDB which includes detailed information of organizational database contents, security and privacy specifications. The Common Vulnerability Scoring Systems' (CVSS algorithm produces risk scores incorporating information from the CMDB. By using the real updated environmental characteristics the system enables achieving accurate scores compared to existing practices. Framework presentation includes systems' design and an illustration of scoring computations.

  12. Coronary artery calcium score: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Priscilla Ornellas; Andrade, Joalbo; Monção, Henry

    2017-01-01

    The coronary artery calcium score plays an Important role In cardiovascular risk stratification, showing a significant association with the medium- or long-term occurrence of major cardiovascular events. Here, we discuss the following: protocols for the acquisition and quantification of the coronary artery calcium score by multidetector computed tomography; the role of the coronary artery calcium score in coronary risk stratification and its comparison with other clinical scores; its indications, interpretation, and prognosis in asymptomatic patients; and its use in patients who are symptomatic or have diabetes. PMID:28670030

  13. [The cardiovascular surgeon and the Syntax score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sánchez, Mario; Soulé-Egea, Mauricio; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín; Barragán-García, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The Syntax score has been established as a tool to determine the complexity of coronary artery disease and as a guide for decision-making among coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine what the Syntax score is, and how the surgeon should integrate the information in the selection and treatment of patients. We reviewed the results of the SYNTAX Trial, the clinical practice guidelines, as well as the benefits and limitations of the score. Finally we discuss the future directions of the Syntax score.

  14. Clinical significance of scoring system for systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jian; LIANG Hua-ping

    2006-01-01

    The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and scoring system were defined by the journal of Bone in 1992. SIRS was described as occurrence of two or more clinical criteria in four ones (fever or hypothermia, tachypnea, tachycardia, and leukocytosis).An early diagnosis and estimation of systemic inflammation in patients is helpful for treatment selection. This paper reviews the application of SIRS scoring system, which has been extensively validated for large groups of critical care patients with severe injury and critical surgical diseases.Recent studies have documented SIRS score as a significant predictive parameter of adverse outcome in critical care patients. Furthermore, some studies also give us a suggestion on how to reduce the overload systemic response.

  15. The fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX® score in subclinical hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Snežana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX® score is the 10-year estimated risk calculation tool for bone fracture that includes clinical data and hip bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to elucidate the ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and post-menopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Methods. The bone mineral density (by DXA, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH level, free thyroxine (fT4 level, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb titre, osteocalcin and beta-cross-laps were measured in 27 pre- and post-menopausal women with newly discovered subclinical hyperthyroidism [age 58.85 ± 7.83 years, body mass index (BMI 27.89 ± 3.46 kg/m2, menopause onset in 46.88 ± 10.21 years] and 51 matched euthyroid controls (age 59.69 ± 5.72 years, BMI 27.68 ± 4.66 kg/m2, menopause onset in 48.53 ± 4.58 years. The etiology of subclinical hyperthyroisims was autoimmune thyroid disease or toxic goiter. FRAX® score calculation was performed in both groups. Results. In the group with subclinical hyperthyroidism the main FRAX® score was significantly higher than in the controls (6.50 ± 1.58 vs 4.35 ± 1.56 respectively; p = 0.015. The FRAX® score for hip was also higher in the evaluated group than in the controls (1.33 ± 3.92 vs 0.50 ± 0.46 respectively; p = 0.022. There was no correlations between low TSH and fracture risk (p > 0.05. The ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and postmenopausal female subjects (p < 0.001 is presented by the area under the curve (AUC plotted via ROC analysis. The determined FRAX score cut-off value by this analysis was 6%, with estimated sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 75.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Pre- and postmenopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism have higher FRAX® scores and thus

  16. Widening clinical applications of the SYNTAX Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Vasim; Head, Stuart J; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Serruys, Patrick W

    2014-02-01

    The SYNTAX Score (http://www.syntaxscore.com) has established itself as an anatomical based tool for objectively determining the complexity of coronary artery disease and guiding decision-making between coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Since the landmark SYNTAX (Synergy between PCI with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery) Trial comparing CABG with PCI in patients with complex coronary artery disease (unprotected left main or de novo three vessel disease), numerous validation studies have confirmed the clinical validity of the SYNTAX Score for identifying higher-risk subjects and aiding decision-making between CABG and PCI in a broad range of patient types. The SYNTAX Score is now advocated in both the European and US revascularisation guidelines for decision-making between CABG and PCI as part of a SYNTAX-pioneered heart team approach. Since establishment of the SYNTAX Score, widening clinical applications of this clinical tool have emerged. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine the widening applications of tools based on the SYNTAX Score: (1) by improving the diagnostic accuracy of the SYNTAX Score by adding a functional assessment of lesions; (2) through amalgamation of the anatomical SYNTAX Score with clinical variables to enhance decision-making between CABG and PCI, culminating in the development and validation of the SYNTAX Score II, in which objective and tailored decisions can be made for the individual patient; (3) through assessment of completeness of revascularisation using the residual and post-CABG SYNTAX Scores for PCI and CABG patients, respectively. Finally, the future direction of the SYNTAX Score is covered through discussion of the ongoing development of a non-invasive, functional SYNTAX Score and review of current and planned clinical trials.

  17. Application of consensus scoring and principal component analysis for virtual screening against β-secretase (BACE-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to identify novel chemical classes of β-secretase (BACE-1 inhibitors, an alternative scoring protocol, Principal Component Analysis (PCA, was proposed to summarize most of the information from the original scoring functions and re-rank the results from the virtual screening against BACE-1. METHOD: Given a training set (50 BACE-1 inhibitors and 9950 inactive diverse compounds, three rank-based virtual screening methods, individual scoring, conventional consensus scoring and PCA, were judged by the hit number in the top 1% of the ranked list. The docking poses were generated by Surflex, five scoring functions (Surflex_Score, D_Score, G_Score, ChemScore, and PMF_Score were used for pose extraction. For each pose group, twelve scoring functions (Surflex_Score, D_Score, G_Score, ChemScore, PMF_Score, LigScore1, LigScore2, PLP1, PLP2, jain, Ludi_1, and Ludi_2 were used for the pose rank. For a test set, 113,228 chemical compounds (Sigma-Aldrich® corporate chemical directory were docked by Surflex, then ranked by the same three ranking methods motioned above to select the potential active compounds for experimental test. RESULTS: For the training set, the PCA approach yielded consistently superior rankings compared to conventional consensus scoring and single scoring. For the test set, the top 20 compounds according to conventional consensus scoring were experimentally tested, no inhibitor was found. Then, we relied on PCA scoring protocol to test another different top 20 compounds and two low micromolar inhibitors (S450588 and 276065 were emerged through the BACE-1 fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay. CONCLUSION: The PCA method extends the conventional consensus scoring in a quantitative statistical manner and would appear to have considerable potential for chemical screening applications.

  18. Using family atopy scores to identify the risk of atopic dermatitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Anggraeni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Atopic dermatitis is the first manifestation of allergic disease in early life. Early interventions may prevent the development of allergy disease. Allergy trace cards have been used to identify the level of allergic risk, based on family atopy scores. Because environmental factors may also influence the development of atopic dermatitis, the usefulness of the allergy trace card needs to be reevaluated. Objective To compare the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants aged 0-4 months with total family atopy scores of > 0 to those with scores of 0. Methods We conducted this cohort study from June 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Family atopy score was tabulated from all pregnant woman in the Obstetric Outpatient Clinic and the Maternity Room. Subjects were divided into two groups based on their total family atopy score: those with scores > 0 and those with scores of 0. The appearance of atopic dermatitis symptoms in the infants were evaluated until they reached 4 months of age. The incidence of atopic dermatitis in two groups was compared using Chi-square test. Results The incidence of atopic dermatitis in this study was 10.9%. The group with total family atopy scores of 0 had a significantly higher incidence of atopic dermatitis than the group with scores > 0 (adjusted RR 22.5; 95%CI 8.8 to 57.0; P = 0.001. Conclusion The incidence of atopic dermatitis is higher in infants with total family atopy score > 0 and this group has a 22.5 times higher risk of atopic dermatitis compared to infants with total family atopy score of 0. Allergy trace cards are relevant in differentiating the risk of atopy with regards to development of atopic dermatitis. We suggest that family atopy scores be evaluated during antenatal care in order to limit the development of atopic dermatitis in infants. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:330-7.].

  19. MONITORING DEPTH OF ANAESTHESIA USING PRST SCORE AND BISPECTRAL INDEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Intraoperative awareness is a frightening experience for any patient for it has long term psychological consequences. Among the various tools available for monitoring depth of anaesthesia, Bispectral index monitoring (BIS is one of the recent and widely accepted techniques. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : The present study was carried out to evaluate and correlate the efficacy of BIS monitoring along with PRST score in assessment of depth of anaesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A prospective clinical study was conducted on 160 patients undergoing surgery in various specialties, in the department of Anaesthesiology at Rajarajeswari Medical College and Hospital which included adult patients between the ages of 18 and 65 years and of ASA I/II posted for elective surgeries under general anaesthesia. Conditions and drugs likely to interfere with BIS values were excluded. Anaesthesia protocol was kept uniform. These patients were divided into two groups of 80 patients each by consecutive selection. In Group 1 - depth of anaesthesia was assessed by PRST score, in Group 2 - by BIS monitoring and PRST score. Statistical analysis was performed by descriptive statistics to calculate the mean and standard deviation, the t - test, χ² test s for calculating the materiality for establishing the results. RESULTS: We saw that the Bispectral index varied with various stages of anaesthesia, almost simultaneous changes in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures occurred in both groups in T1 and T2. On intubation, both blood pressure and heart rate increased but BIS showed a very minimal increase, which was because of adequate depth of anaesthesia and analgesia . There was a statistically significant difference in PRST scores between the two groups. There was no incidence of awareness among our study population. CONCLUSION : Evaluation of intraoperative depth of anaesthesia is one of the major tasks of anaesthesiologist. In patients with higher

  20. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order manip

  1. On k-hypertournament losing scores

    CERN Document Server

    Pirzada, Shariefuddin

    2010-01-01

    We give a new and short proof of a theorem on k-hypertournament losing scores due to Zhou et al. [G. Zhou, T. Yao, K. Zhang, On score sequences of k-tournaments, European J. Comb., 21, 8 (2000) 993-1000.

  2. ON HOW CULTURAL KNOWLEDGE AFFECTS TOEFL SCORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of cultur-al background on TOEFL scores.It proceeds from therelation between culture and language,then illus-trates with actual questions from various sections ofTOEFL tests how American cultural background exertsa remarkable influence on TOEFL scores,and con-cludes with revelations with regard to English teachingin this country.

  3. Causal Moderation Analysis Using Propensity Score Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on previous studies in applying propensity score methods to study multiple treatment variables to examine the causal moderator effect. The propensity score methods will be demonstrated in a case study to examine the causal moderator effect, where the moderators are categorical and continuous variables. Moderation analysis is an…

  4. Comparability of IQ scores over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Must, O.; te Nijenhuis, J.; Must, A.; van Vianen, A.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the comparability of IQ scores. Three cohorts (1933/36, 1997/98, 2006) of Estonian students (N = 2173) are compared using the Estonian National Intelligence Test. After 72 years the secular rise of the IQ test scores is.79 SD. The mean .16 SD increase in the last 8 years

  5. Bayesian Model Averaging for Propensity Score Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David; Chen, Jianshen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore Bayesian model averaging in the propensity score context. Previous research on Bayesian propensity score analysis does not take into account model uncertainty. In this regard, an internally consistent Bayesian framework for model building and estimation must also account for model uncertainty. The…

  6. Diagnosis. Severity scoring system for paediatric FMF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Avi

    2012-04-17

    Severity scoring systems for adult familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) are established and used as important clinical and analytical tools in disease management and research. A recent paper highlights the need for a paediatric FMF severity measure. How should such a score be built and what challenges might be faced?

  7. Clinical scoring scales in thyroidology: A compendium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This compendium brings together traditional as well as contemporary scoring and grading systems used for the screening and diagnosis of various thyroid diseases, dysfunctions, and complications. The article discusses scores used to help diagnose hypo-and hyperthyroidism, to grade and manage goiter and ophthalmopathy, and to assess the risk of thyroid malignancy.

  8. Starreveld scoring method in diagnosing childhood constipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokke, F.T.; Sittig, J.S.; de Bruijn, A.; Wiersma, T.; van Rijn, R.R.; Limpen, J.L.; Houwen, R.H.; Fischer, K.; Benninga, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Four scoring methods exist to assess severity of fecal loading on plain abdominal radiographs in constipated patients (Barr-, Starreveld-, Blethyn- and Leech). So far, the Starreveld score was used only in adult patients. To determine accuracy and intra- and inter-observer agreement of the Starrevel

  9. What do educational test scores really measure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    measure of pure cognitive ability. We find that variables which are not closely associated with traditional notions of intelligence explain a significant proportion of the variation in test scores. This adds to the complexity of interpreting test scores and suggests that school culture, attitudes...

  10. A Bayesian Approach to Learning Scoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Şeyda; Rudin, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    We present a Bayesian method for building scoring systems, which are linear models with coefficients that have very few significant digits. Usually the construction of scoring systems involve manual effort-humans invent the full scoring system without using data, or they choose how logistic regression coefficients should be scaled and rounded to produce a scoring system. These kinds of heuristics lead to suboptimal solutions. Our approach is different in that humans need only specify the prior over what the coefficients should look like, and the scoring system is learned from data. For this approach, we provide a Metropolis-Hastings sampler that tends to pull the coefficient values toward their "natural scale." Empirically, the proposed method achieves a high degree of interpretability of the models while maintaining competitive generalization performances.

  11. New clinical score to diagnose nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulzi Fernanda BU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most frequent disease associated with abnormal liver tests that is characterized by a wide spectrum of liver damage, ranging from simple macro vesicular steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH, cirrhosis or liver carcinoma. Liver biopsy is the most precise test to differentiate NASH from other stages of NAFLD, but it is an invasive and expensive method. This study aimed to create a clinical laboratory score capable of identify individual with NASH in severely obese patients submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods The medical records from 66 patients submitted to gastroplasty were reviewed. Their chemistry profile, abdominal ultrasound (US and liver biopsy done during the surgical procedure were analyzed. Patients were classified into 2 groups according to liver biopsy: Non-NASH group - those patients without NAFLD or with grade I, II or III steatosis; and NASH group - those with steatohepatitis or fibrosis. The t-test was used to compare each variable with normal distribution between NASH and Non-NASH groups. When comparing proportions of categorical variables, we used chi-square or z-test, where appropriate. A p-value Results 83% of patients with obesity grades II or III showed NAFLD, and the majority was asymptomatic. Total Cholesterol (TC≥200 mg/dL, alanine aminotransferase (ALT ≥30, AST/ALT ratio (AAR≤ 1, gammaglutaril-transferase (γGT≥30 U/L and abdominal US, compatible with steatosis, showed association with NASH group. We proposed 2 scores: Complete score (TC, ALT, AAR, γGT and US and the simplified score, where US was not included. The combination of biochemical and imaging results improved accuracy to 84.4% the recognition of NASH (sensitivity 70%, specificity 88.6%, NPV 91.2%, PPV 63. 6%. Conclusion Alterations in TC, ALT, AAR, γGT and US are related to the most risk for NASH. The combination of biochemical and imaging results improved accuracy to 84.4% the

  12. A new adult appendicitis score improves diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis - a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to construct a new scoring system for more accurate diagnostics of acute appendicitis. Applying the new score into clinical practice could reduce the need of potentially harmful diagnostic imaging. Methods This prospective study enrolled 829 adults presenting with clinical suspicion of appendicitis, including 392 (47%) patients with appendicitis. The collected data included clinical findings and symptoms together with laboratory tests (white cell count, neutrophil count and C-reactive protein), and the timing of the onset of symptoms. The score was constructed by logistic regression analysis using multiple imputations for missing values. Performance of the constructed score in patients with complete data (n = 725) was compared with Alvarado score and Appendicitis inflammatory response score. Results 343 (47%) of patients with complete data had appendicitis. 199 (58%) patients with appendicitis had score value at least 16 and were classified as high probability group with 93% specificity.Patients with score below 11 were classified as low probability of appendicitis. Only 4% of patients with appendicitis had a score below 11, and none of them had complicated appendicitis. In contrast, 207 (54%) of non-appendicitis patients had score below 11. There were no cases with complicated appendicitis in the low probability group. The area under ROC curve was significantly larger with the new score 0.882 (95% CI 0.858 – 0.906) compared with AUC of Alvarado score 0.790 (0.758 – 0.823) and Appendicitis inflammatory response score 0.810 (0.779 – 0.840). Conclusions The new diagnostic score is fast and accurate in categorizing patients with suspected appendicitis, and roughly halves the need of diagnostic imaging. PMID:24970111

  13. A comparison between modified Alvarado score and RIPASA score in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Anand; Singla, Satpaul; Singh, Mohinder; Singla, Deeksha

    2016-12-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common but elusive surgical condition and remains a diagnostic dilemma. It has many clinical mimickers and diagnosis is primarily made on clinical grounds, leading to the evolution of clinical scoring systems for pin pointing the right diagnosis. The modified Alvarado and RIPASA scoring systems are two important scoring systems, for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We prospectively compared the two scoring systems for diagnosing acute appendicitis in 50 patients presenting with right iliac fossa pain. The RIPASA score correctly classified 88 % of patients with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis compared with 48.0 % with modified Alvarado score, indicating that RIPASA score is more superior to Modified Alvarado score in our clinical settings.

  14. THE EFFICIENCY OF TENNIS DOUBLES SCORING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Pollard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a family of scoring systems for tennis doubles for testing the hypothesis that pair A is better than pair B versus the alternative hypothesis that pair B is better than A, is established. This family or benchmark of scoring systems can be used as a benchmark against which the efficiency of any doubles scoring system can be assessed. Thus, the formula for the efficiency of any doubles scoring system is derived. As in tennis singles, one scoring system based on the play-the-loser structure is shown to be more efficient than the benchmark systems. An expression for the relative efficiency of two doubles scoring systems is derived. Thus, the relative efficiency of the various scoring systems presently used in doubles can be assessed. The methods of this paper can be extended to a match between two teams of 2, 4, 8, …doubles pairs, so that it is possible to establish a measure for the relative efficiency of the various systems used for tennis contests between teams of players.

  15. Do MCAT scores predict USMLE scores? An analysis on 5 years of medical student data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline L. Gauer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the associations and predictive values of Medical College Admission Test (MCAT component and composite scores prior to 2015 with U.S. Medical Licensure Exam (USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK scores, with a focus on whether students scoring low on the MCAT were particularly likely to continue to score low on the USMLE exams. Method: Multiple linear regression, correlation, and chi-square analyses were performed to determine the relationship between MCAT component and composite scores and USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores from five graduating classes (2011–2015 at the University of Minnesota Medical School (N=1,065. Results: The multiple linear regression analyses were both significant (p<0.001. The three MCAT component scores together explained 17.7% of the variance in Step 1 scores (p<0.001 and 12.0% of the variance in Step 2 CK scores (p<0.001. In the chi-square analyses, significant, albeit weak associations were observed between almost all MCAT component scores and USMLE scores (Cramer's V ranged from 0.05 to 0.24. Discussion: Each of the MCAT component scores was significantly associated with USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores, although the effect size was small. Being in the top or bottom scoring range of the MCAT exam was predictive of being in the top or bottom scoring range of the USMLE exams, although the strengths of the associations were weak to moderate. These results indicate that MCAT scores are predictive of student performance on the USMLE exams, but, given the small effect sizes, should be considered as part of the holistic view of the student.

  16. Do MCAT scores predict USMLE scores? An analysis on 5 years of medical student data

    OpenAIRE

    Gauer, Jacqueline L.; Wolff, Josephine M.; Jackson, J. Brooks

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the associations and predictive values of Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) component and composite scores prior to 2015 with U.S. Medical Licensure Exam (USMLE) Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) scores, with a focus on whether students scoring low on the MCAT were particularly likely to continue to score low on the USMLE exams.Method: Multiple linear regression, correlation, and chi-square analyses were performed to determi...

  17. Assessment of cardiovascular risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using the SCORE risk index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Otávio Augusto Martins; Nazário, Nazaré Otília; de Magalhães Souza Fialho, Sônia Cristina; Fialho, Guilherme Loureiro; de Oliveira, Fernando José Savóia; de Castro, Gláucio Ricardo Werner; Pereira, Ivânio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that causes systemic involvement and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To analyze the prediction index of 10-year risk of a fatal cardiovascular disease event in female RA patients versus controls. Case-control study with analysis of 100 female patients matched for age and gender versus 100 patients in the control group. For the prediction of 10-year risk of a fatal cardiovascular disease event, the SCORE and modified SCORE (mSCORE) risk indexes were used, as suggested by EULAR, in the subgroup with two or more of the following: duration of disease ≥10 years, RF and/or anti-CCP positivity, and extra-articular manifestations. The prevalence of analyzed comorbidities was similar in RA patients compared with the control group (p>0.05). The means of the SCORE risk index in RA patients and in the control group were 1.99 (SD: 1.89) and 1.56 (SD: 1.87) (p=0.06), respectively. The means of mSCORE index in RA patients and in the control group were 2.84 (SD=2.86) and 1.56 (SD=1.87) (p=0.001), respectively. By using the SCORE risk index, 11% of RA patients were classified as of high risk, and with the use of mSCORE risk index, 36% were at high risk (p<0.001). The SCORE risk index is similar in both groups, but with the application of the mSCORE index, we recognized that RA patients have a higher 10-year risk of a fatal cardiovascular disease event, and this reinforces the importance of factors inherent to the disease not measured in the SCORE risk index, but considered in mSCORE risk index. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Kernel score statistic for dependent data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malzahn, Dörthe; Friedrichs, Stefanie; Rosenberger, Albert; Bickeböller, Heike

    2014-01-01

    The kernel score statistic is a global covariance component test over a set of genetic markers. It provides a flexible modeling framework and does not collapse marker information. We generalize the kernel score statistic to allow for familial dependencies and to adjust for random confounder effects. With this extension, we adjust our analysis of real and simulated baseline systolic blood pressure for polygenic familial background. We find that the kernel score test gains appreciably in power through the use of sequencing compared to tag-single-nucleotide polymorphisms for very rare single nucleotide polymorphisms with <1% minor allele frequency.

  19. Facilitating the Interpretation of English Language Proficiency Scores: Combining Scale Anchoring and Test Score Mapping Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald; Schedl, Mary; Papageorgiou, Spiros

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, for the benefit of both test takers and test score users, enhanced "TOEFL ITP"® test score reports that go beyond the simple numerical scores that are currently reported. To do so, we applied traditional scale anchoring (proficiency scaling) to item difficulty data in order to develop performance…

  20. A comprehensive score to diagnose Hashimoto's thyroiditis: a proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grani, Giorgio; Carbotta, Giovanni; Nesca, Angela; D'Alessandri, Mimma; Vitale, Martina; Del Sordo, Marianna; Fumarola, Angela

    2015-06-01

    The heterogeneity of diagnostic criteria of Hashimoto's thyroiditis leads to overdiagnosis and prevents strong conclusions from being drawn in clinical studies. The aim of this study is to propose a comprehensive scoring system. A case-control study compared a set of presurgical features of patients with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) and controls, in order to design a multi-criteria scoring system. Given a dichotomous outcome (lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid), a set of covariates was analyzed in 180 patients after total thyroidectomy. A different validation cohort of 1,171 patients was reviewed and classified according to the score. Variables associated with the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis were first assessed by univariate analysis. Analysis showed that TPOAb (area under the ROC curve (AUC), 0.67; 95 % CI 0.57-0.77) and TgAb (0.63; 95 % CI 0.54-0.74) were univariate predictors of the diagnosis of HT, which is largely recognized. Combined covariates were then tested using stepwise logistic regression analysis. The final regression model included TPOAb, TgAb, and thyroid vascularity (AUC 0.72; 95 % CI 0.62-0.81). A scoring system was developed, which has a sensitivity of 45.5 % and a specificity of 89.0 %, with a cutoff of 1.7. The likelihood of incident hypothyroidism was higher (OR 2.30; p = 0.004) in the positive (≥1.7) score group. A scoring system has a better performance than any single predictor and is able to identify the subgroup of individuals at higher risk to develop subsequent hypothyroidism.

  1. Development of a difficulty score for spinal anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, M M; Demian, A D; Shorrab, A A

    2004-03-01

    Multiple attempts at spinal puncture may be hazardous. Accurate preoperative prediction of difficulty adds to the delivery of high quality care. This clinical trial was designed to: (i). determine the predictive performance of difficulty variables; (ii). compare senior and junior anaesthetists; (iii). develop a score to predict difficulty during the performance of spinal anaesthesia. A total of 300 patients subjected to urological procedures and scheduled for spinal anaesthesia were independently assessed and stratified according to the categories of the difficulty predictors of spinal anaesthesia into one of nine grades (0-8) and randomized according to the experience of the anaesthetist into two groups (group A, staff with more than 15 yrs' experience; group B, resident with more than 6 months but less than 1 yr in training). The number of attempts and levels, and success rate of the technique were the outcome variables. Data were analysed by multivariate analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The bony landmarks of the back and the radiological characteristics of the lumbar vertebrae were two independent predictors of difficulty. Multivariate analysis indicated differences between junior and senior staff but ROC curves indicated no difference. Grade 4 was the difficulty score at or above which difficulty was expected whether or not radiological characteristics of the vertebrae were included. Spinal bony landmarks and radiological characteristics of the lumbar vertebrae are independent predictors of difficulty during spinal anaesthesia. There is no difference between senior and junior anaesthetists. Grade 4 is the difficulty score at or above which difficulty is expected.

  2. Trainee Occupational Therapists Scoring the Barthel ADL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth; Nugent, Chris; Bond, Raymond; Martin, Suzanne

    2015-09-01

    Within medical applications there are two main types of information design; paper-based and digital information [1]. As technology is constantly changing, information within healthcare management and delivery is continually being transitioned from traditional paper documents to digital and online resources. Activity of Daily Living (ADL) charts are still predominantly paper based and are therefore prone to "human error" [2]. In light of this, an investigation has taken place into the design for reducing the amount of human error, between a paper based ADL, specifically the Barthel Index, and the same ADL created digitally. The digital ADL was developed as an online platform as this offers the best method of data capture for a large group of participants all together [3]. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usability of the Barthel Index ADL in paper format and then reproduce the same ADL digitally. This paper presents the findings of a study involving 26 participants who were familiar with ADL charts, and used three scenarios requiring them to complete both a paper ADL and a digital ADL. An evaluation was undertaken to ascertain if there were any 'human errors' in completing the paper ADL and also to find similarities/differences through using the digital ADL. The results from the study indicated that 22/26 participants agreed that the digital ADL was better, if not the same as a paper based ADL. Further results indicated that participants rate highly the added benefit of the digital ADL being easy to use and also that calculation of assessment scores were performed automatically. Statistically the digital BI offered a 100 % correction rate in the total calculation, in comparison to the paper based BI where it is more common for users to make mathematical calculation errors. Therefore in order to minimise handwriting and calculation errors, the digital BI proved superior than the traditional paper based method.

  3. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The workshop continued a series of Oberwolfach meetings on algebraic groups, started in 1971 by Tonny Springer and Jacques Tits who both attended the present conference. This time, the organizers were Michel Brion, Jens Carsten Jantzen, and Raphaël Rouquier. During the last years, the subject...... of algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group......-theorists, and to stimulate contacts between participants. Each of the first four days was dedicated to one area of research that has recently seen decisive progress: \\begin{itemize} \\item structure and classification of wonderful varieties, \\item finite reductive groups and character sheaves, \\item quantum cohomology...

  4. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  5. Bispectral index score and observer′s assessment of awareness/sedation score may manifest divergence during onset of sedation: Study with midazolam and propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Bagchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Correlation between the clinical and electroencephalogram-based monitoring has been documented sporadically during the onset of sedation. Propofol and midazolam have been studied individually using the observer′s assessment of awareness/sedation (OAA/S score and Bispectral index score (BIS. The present study was designed to compare the time to onset of sedation for propofol and midazolam using both BIS and OAA/S scores, and to find out any correlation. Methods: A total of 46 patients (18-60 years, either sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I/II posted for infraumbilical surgeries under spinal anaesthesia were randomly allocated to receive either injection propofol 1 mg/kg bolus followed by infusion 3 mg/kg/h (Group P, n=23 or injection midazolam 0.05 mg/kg bolus followed by infusion 0.06 mg/kg/h (Group M, n=23. Spinal anaesthesia was given with 2.5 ml to 3.0 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine heavy. When sensory block reached T6 level, sedation was initiated. The time to reach BIS score 70 and time to achieve OAA/S score 3 from the start of study drug were noted. OAA/S score at BIS score 70 was noted. Data from 43 patients were analyzed using SPSS 12 for Windows. Results: Time to reach BIS score 70 using propofol was significantly lower than using the midazolam (P<0.05. Time to achieve OAA/S score 3 using propofol was comparable with midazolam (P=0.358. Conclusion: A divergence exists between the time to reach BIS score 70 and time to achieve OAA/S score 3 using midazolam, compared with propofol, during the onset of sedation.

  6. MUYANG GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With its headquarters in the historic city of Yangzhou,Jiangsu Muyang Group Co.,Ltd has since its founding in 1967 grown into a well-known group corporation whose activities cover research&development.project design,manufacturing,installation and services in a multitude of industries including feed machinery and engineering,storage engineering,grain machinery and engineering,environmental protection,conveying equipment and automatic control systems.

  7. Pathological extension of prostate cancer as defined by gleason score on biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall'oglio

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Based on the importance of the Gleason score on the behavior of prostate adenocarcinoma, this study attempts to predict the extension of prostate adenocarcinoma pre-operatively, as defined by the Gleason score on biopsy, in individuals who will undergo radical prostatectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We selected 899 individuals who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy from 1988 to 2004. Clinical and pathological data obtained in the preoperative period were retrospectively analyzed through digital rectal examinations of the prostate, initial serum PSA levels and pathological data provided by biopsy. The Gleason score on biopsy was assessed and divided into 3 groups: 2 to 6, 7, and 8 to 10, and correlated with the possibility of the disease being confined to the prostate. RESULTS: From the 899 selected patients, 654 (74% showed Gleason scores of 2 to 6, 165 (18% had a score of 7 and 80 (9% had scores of 8 to 10 on biopsy. The likelihood of confined diseases, extraprostatic extensions, invasion of seminal vesicles and lymph nodal involvement were respectively: 74%, 18%, 8% and 0.8% for a Gleason score of 2 to 6, 47%, 30%, 19% and 4% for a Gleason score of 7, and 49%, 29%, 18% and 4% for a Gleason score of 8 to 10. CONCLUSION: In patients who will undergo radical prostatectomy due to prostate adenocarcinoma, a Gleason score of 7 on biopsy shows the same behavior as a Gleason score of 8 to 10 in relation to extension of disease.

  8. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  9. The Reliability and Validity of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory Scores in Academically Talented Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Frank C.; Mello, Zena R.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the reliability, structural validity, and concurrent validity of Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) scores in a group of 815 academically talented adolescents. Reliability estimates of the purported factors' scores were in the low to moderate range. Exploratory factor analysis supported a five-factor…

  10. Correcting for Test Score Measurement Error in ANCOVA Models for Estimating Treatment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    A common strategy for estimating treatment effects in observational studies using individual student-level data is analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) or hierarchical variants of it, in which outcomes (often standardized test scores) are regressed on pretreatment test scores, other student characteristics, and treatment group indicators. Measurement…

  11. Does coronary calcium scoring with a SCORE better predict significant coronary artery stenosis than without? Correlation with computed tomography coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durhan, Gamze; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Akata, Deniz [Hacettepe University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Sunman, Hamza; Aytemir, Kudret [Hacettepe University Medical School, Department of Cardiology, Ankara (Turkey); Karakaya, Jale; Karaagaoglu, Ergun [Hacettepe University, Department of Biostatistics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-12-03

    To determine effectiveness of coronary artery calcium score (CACS) alone and combined with Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) in adult patients for significant coronary artery stenosis by using computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) as reference standard. Two thousand twenty-one patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent CACS test and CTCA. Patients were examined with dual-source CT and were grouped according to their age, gender, CACS, and estimated SCORE risk. Coronary plaque existence and degree of stenosis were assessed with CTCA. Sensitivity, specificity, and ROC curves were analyzed. CACS was the single independent variable in estimating relative risk of critical stenosis and had superior outcome when compared with SCORE risk in logistic regression and ROC curve. Area under the ROC curve was greatest in the interval between 50-59 years. When SCORE was combined with CACS in patients with zero CACS, percentage of significant stenosis increased from 1.4% to 7.0% in patients with high or very high SCORE risk, and decreased to 0.9 % in patients with low or moderate SCORE risk. CACS combination with SCORE risk predicts coronary artery stenosis. When CACS is zero, CTCA can be performed in patients with high or very high SCORE risk. (orig.)

  12. GMAT Scores of Undergraduate Economics Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Paul A.; Monson, Terry D.

    2008-01-01

    The average score of economics majors on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) exceeds those of nearly all humanities and arts, social sciences, and business undergraduate majors but not those of most science, engineering, and mathematics majors. (Contains 1 table.)

  13. GMAT Scores of Undergraduate Economics Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Paul A.; Monson, Terry D.

    2008-01-01

    The average score of economics majors on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) exceeds those of nearly all humanities and arts, social sciences, and business undergraduate majors but not those of most science, engineering, and mathematics majors. (Contains 1 table.)

  14. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Postoperative Complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neurotrauma patients by using an effective scoring system can reduce ... complications was 7.04 while for patients with complications was ... their SAS for purposes of risk stratification; high risk. (0-4), medium .... Deep Venous. Thrombosis. 0.

  15. Multifactor Screener in OPEN: Scoring Procedures & Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoring procedures were developed to convert a respondent's screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for percentage energy from fat, grams of fiber, and servings of fruits and vegetables.

  16. Film scoring today - Theory, practice and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Flach, Paula Sophie

    2012-01-01

    This thesis considers film scoring by taking a closer look at the theoretical discourse throughout the last decades, examining current production practice of film music and showcasing a musical analysis of the film Inception (2010).

  17. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, N J; Prinsen, C A C; Christensen, R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize evidence regarding measurement properties of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). DESIGN: A comprehensive literature search identified 37 eligible papers evaluating KOOS measurement properties in partici...

  18. Use score card to boost quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Keeping a score card can identify problem areas and track improvements. When specific goals are reached, staff are given rewards such as thank-you letters, tokens, or pizza parties. Staff are kept informed about the results of the score card through bulletin board postings, staff meetings, and the hospital Intranet. Data are collected with manual entry by nursing staff, chart review by performance improvement, and a computerized program.

  19. When Compatibility Interferes with Group Effectiveness: Facilitation of Learning in Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Marvin, E.; Webb, Jeaninne N.

    1982-01-01

    Examined whether compatible groups facilitate learning more than incompatible groups. Used peer groups to facilitate learning in college courses. Computed compatibility scores for pairs and four-person groups working together. Used examinations to measure peer group procedure effectiveness. Results did not indicate a positive relationship between…

  20. Pharmacophore-based similarity scoring for DOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingling; Rizzo, Robert C

    2015-01-22

    Pharmacophore modeling incorporates geometric and chemical features of known inhibitors and/or targeted binding sites to rationally identify and design new drug leads. In this study, we have encoded a three-dimensional pharmacophore matching similarity (FMS) scoring function into the structure-based design program DOCK. Validation and characterization of the method are presented through pose reproduction, crossdocking, and enrichment studies. When used alone, FMS scoring dramatically improves pose reproduction success to 93.5% (∼20% increase) and reduces sampling failures to 3.7% (∼6% drop) compared to the standard energy score (SGE) across 1043 protein-ligand complexes. The combined FMS+SGE function further improves success to 98.3%. Crossdocking experiments using FMS and FMS+SGE scoring, for six diverse protein families, similarly showed improvements in success, provided proper pharmacophore references are employed. For enrichment, incorporating pharmacophores during sampling and scoring, in most cases, also yield improved outcomes when docking and rank-ordering libraries of known actives and decoys to 15 systems. Retrospective analyses of virtual screenings to three clinical drug targets (EGFR, IGF-1R, and HIVgp41) using X-ray structures of known inhibitors as pharmacophore references are also reported, including a customized FMS scoring protocol to bias on selected regions in the reference. Overall, the results and fundamental insights gained from this study should benefit the docking community in general, particularly researchers using the new FMS method to guide computational drug discovery with DOCK.

  1. Introducing the SKIN score: a validated scoring system to assess severity of mastectomy skin flap necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaine, Valerie; Hoskin, Tanya L; Farley, David R; Grant, Clive S; Boughey, Judy C; Torstenson, Tiffany A; Jacobson, Steven R; Jakub, James W; Degnim, Amy C

    2015-09-01

    With increasing use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR), mastectomy skin flap necrosis (MSFN) is a clinical problem that deserves further study. We propose a validated scoring system to discriminate MSFN severity and standardize its assessment. Women who underwent skin-sparing (SSM) or nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and IBR from November 2009 to October 2010 were studied retrospectively. A workgroup of breast and plastic surgeons scored postoperative photographs using the skin ischemia necrosis (SKIN) score to assess depth and surface area of MSFN. We evaluated correlation of the SKIN score with reoperation for MSFN and its reproducibility in an external sample of surgeons. We identified 106 subjects (175 operated breasts: 103 SSM, 72 NSM) who had ≥1 postoperative photograph within 60 days. SKIN scores correlated strongly with need for reoperation for MSFN, with an AUC of 0.96 for SSM and 0.89 for NSM. External scores agreed well with the gold standard scores for the breast mound photographs with weighted kappa values of 0.82 (depth), 0.56 (surface area), and 0.79 (composite score). The agreement was similar for the nipple-areolar complex photographs: 0.75 (depth), 0.63 (surface area), and 0.79 (composite score). A simple scoring system to assess the severity of MSFN is proposed, incorporating both depth and surface area of MSFN. The SKIN score correlates strongly with the need for reoperation to manage MSFN and is reproducible among breast and plastic surgeons.

  2. GalaxyDock BP2 score: a hybrid scoring function for accurate protein-ligand docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Minkyung; Shin, Woong-Hee; Chung, Hwan Won; Seok, Chaok

    2017-07-01

    Protein-ligand docking is a useful tool for providing atomic-level understanding of protein functions in nature and design principles for artificial ligands or proteins with desired properties. The ability to identify the true binding pose of a ligand to a target protein among numerous possible candidate poses is an essential requirement for successful protein-ligand docking. Many previously developed docking scoring functions were trained to reproduce experimental binding affinities and were also used for scoring binding poses. However, in this study, we developed a new docking scoring function, called GalaxyDock BP2 Score, by directly training the scoring power of binding poses. This function is a hybrid of physics-based, empirical, and knowledge-based score terms that are balanced to strengthen the advantages of each component. The performance of the new scoring function exhibits significant improvement over existing scoring functions in decoy pose discrimination tests. In addition, when the score is used with the GalaxyDock2 protein-ligand docking program, it outperformed other state-of-the-art docking programs in docking tests on the Astex diverse set, the Cross2009 benchmark set, and the Astex non-native set. GalaxyDock BP2 Score and GalaxyDock2 with this score are freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/softwares/galaxydock.html.

  3. Prehospital severity scoring at major rock concert events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, T B; Koenigsberg, M; Bunney, E B; Schurgin, B; Levy, P; Willens, J; Tanner, L

    1997-01-01

    Rock and contemporary music concerts are popular, recurrent events requiring on-site medical staffing. To describe a novel severity score used to stratify the level of acuity of patients presenting to first-aid stations at these events. Retrospective review of charts generated at the first-aid stations of five major rock concerts within a 60,000 spectator capacity, outdoor, professional sports stadium. Participants included all concert patrons presenting to the stadium's first-aid stations as patients. Data were collected on patient demographics, history of drug or ethanol usage while at the concert event, first-aid station time, treatment rendered, diagnosis, and disposition. All patients evaluated were retrospectively assigned a "DRUG-ROCK" Injury Severity Score (DRISS) to stratify their level of acuity. Individual concert events and patient dispositions were compared statistically using chi-square, Fisher's exact, and the ANOVA Mean tests. Approximately 250,000 spectators attended the five concert events. First-aid stations evaluated 308 patients (utilization rate of 1.2 per 1,000 patrons). The most common diagnosis was minor trauma (130; 42%), followed in frequency by ethanol/illicit drug intoxication (98; 32%). The average time in the first-aid station was 23.5 +/- 22.5 minutes (+/- standard deviation; range: 5-150 minutes). Disposition of patients included 100 (32.5%) who were treated and released; 98 (32%) were transported by paramedics to emergency departments (EDs); and 110 (35.5%) signed-out against medical advise (AMA), refusing transport. The mean DRISS was 4.1 (+/- 2.65). Two-thirds (67%) of the study population were ranked as mild by DRISS criteria (score = 1-4), with 27% rated as moderate (score = 5-9), and 6% severe (score > 10). The average of severity scores was highest (6.5) for patients transported to hospitals, and statistically different from the scores of the average of the treated and released and AMA groups (p < 0.005). The DRISS was useful

  4. The relation between vitamin B12 and SYNTAX score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerit, Levent; Duygu, Hamza; Gulsen, Kamil; Kemal, Hatice; Tosun, Ozgur; Ozcem, Barcin; Cerit, Zeynep; Gunsel, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is required in the metabolism of homocysteine. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease via hyperhomocysteinaemia. However, the association of vitamin B12 and the severity of coronary artery disease has not been studied to date. This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the relationship between vitamin B12 and SYNTAX score. Medical records of consecutive patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The study group consisted of 127 patients. Vitamin B12, other biochemical parameters, clinical and echocardiographic parameters, and SYNTAX score were evaluated for all patients. Patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, and history of transient ischaemic attack/stroke and heart failure. The SYNTAX score was significantly higher in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency (29.2 ± 4.9 vs. 22.5 ± 4.5, p vitamin B12 deficiency and SYNTAX score, demon-strating the severity and complexity of coronary artery disease.

  5. The role of coronary artery calcification score in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willems Tineke P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery calcification (CAC measured by electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT has been well studied in the prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD. We sought to evaluate the impact of the CAC score in the diagnostic process immediately after its introduction in a large tertiary referral centre. Methods 598 patients with no history of CAD who underwent EBCT for evaluation of CAD were retrospectively included into the study. Ischemia detection test results (exercise stress test, single photon emission computed tomography or ST segment analysis on 24 hours ECG detection, as well as the results of coronary angiography (CAG were collected. Results The mean age of the patients was 55 ± 11 years (57% male. Patients were divided according to CAC scores; group A Conclusion Our study showed that patients with a high CAC score are more often referred for CAG. The CAC scores can be used as an aid in daily cardiology practice to determine further decision making.

  6. Diffusion abnormality maps in demyelinating disease: correlations with clinical scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Mihaela; Roceanu, Adina; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Bendic, Robert; Tarta, Eugen; Preoteasa, Florentin; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been explored as a noninvasive tool to assess pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the correlation between classical MRI measures and physical disability is modest in MS. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI technique holds particular promise in this regard. The present study shows brain regions where FA and individual diffusivities abnormalities are present and check their correlations with physical disability clinical scores. Eight patients and 12 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR-DTI acquisitions, a Genesis Signa 1.5 T MR system, an EP/SE scanning sequence, 25 gradient directions were used. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) group comparisons showed reduced FA and increased individual diffusivities in several brain regions in patients. Significant correlations were found between FA and: EDSS, 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW score; between λ2 and: P100 (r&l), 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW; between λ3 and: 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25 FW score. Fractional anisotropy and individual radial diffusivities proved to be important markers of motor disabilities in MS patients when the disease duration mean and the disability scores values range are relatively high. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Verification of risk scores to predict i.v. immunoglobulin resistance in incomplete Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamitsu, Kiichiro; Kakimoto, Hisako; Shimada, Akira; Nakata, Yusei; Ochi, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Iwasaki, Yuka; Tokorodani, Chiho; Kanazawa, Akane; Maruyama, Hidehiko; Miyazawa, Mari; Nishiuchi, Ritsuo; Kikkawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    A recent study indicated the efficacy of the addition of prednisolone to i.v. immunoglobulin (IVIG) as initial treatment in patients with higher risk of IVIG resistance. Several different risk scores for predicting IVIG resistance have been proposed, mainly based on typical Kawasaki disease (KD) patients. We investigated the utility of the risk scores to predict IVIG resistance in incomplete KD. Clinical records of incomplete KD patients who received a single dose of IVIG between 2005 and 2012 at Kochi Health Sciences Center were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified into an IVIG-responsive group and an IVIG-resistant group. The Kobayashi, Egami, and Sano risk scores were calculated for each patient and the proportion of high-risk patients was compared between the two groups for each risk score. For 51 incomplete KD patients, Kobayashi (66.7% vs 47.6%, P = 0.253), Egami (55.6% vs 38.1%, P = 0.274), and Sano (57.1% vs 10.8%, P = 0.068) risk scores identified a higher proportion of high-risk patients in the IVIG-resistant group compared with the IVIG-responsive group, but significant difference was not observed. Sano risk score had the highest OR (6.19; 95%CI: 1.00-38.26). The proportion of patients identified as being at high risk for IVIG resistance using the Kobayashi, Egami, and Sano risk scores, respectively, was not significantly different between the IVIG-responsive group and the IVIG-resistant group for incomplete KD. Among the three risk scores, the Sano risk score has the best ability to predict IVIG resistance in incomplete KD. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Magnitude and meaningfulness of change in SF-36 scores in four types of orthopedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busija, Lucy; Osborne, Richard H; Nilsdotter, Anna

    2008-01-01

    (ES, magnitude of change) and minimal detectable change (sensitivity) at the group and individual level. To provide context for interpreting the magnitude of changes in SF-36 scores, we also compared patients' scores with age and sex-matched population norms. The studies were conducted in Sweden.......20-0.49) to moderate (0.50-0.79) effect sizes were found in subscales measuring mental and social aspects (role emotional, vitality, social functioning, and mental health). General health scores remained relatively unchanged during the follow-up. Despite improvements, post-surgery mean scores of patients were still...

  9. BANKRUPTCY PREDICTION MODEL WITH ZETAc OPTIMAL CUT-OFF SCORE TO CORRECT TYPE I ERRORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Iwan

    2005-06-01

    This research has successfully attained the following results: (1 type I error is in fact 59,83 times more costly compared to type II error, (2 22 ratios distinguish between bankrupt and non-bankrupt groups, (3 2 financial ratios proved to be effective in predicting bankruptcy, (4 prediction using ZETAc optimal cut-off score predicts more companies filing for bankruptcy within one year compared to prediction using Hair et al. optimum cutting score, (5 Although prediction using Hair et al. optimum cutting score is more accurate, prediction using ZETAc optimal cut-off score proved to be able to minimize cost incurred from classification errors.

  10. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  11. Koroner Arter Kalsiyum Skor İndeksi ile Karotis ve Yüzeyel Femoral Arterlerin İntima Media Kalınlıkları Arasındaki İlişkinin Değerlendirilmesi

    OpenAIRE

    VARDI, Eşref Cem; BOZGEYİK, Zülkif; POYRAZ, Ahmed Kürşad; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between intima-media thicknesses (IMT) of carotid and superficial femoral arteries and coronary artery calcium index quantified using Agatston score. Materials and Methods: Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography of 75 patients were included in the study. Coronary artery calcium scores were measured using a workstation. Calcium scores were calculated according to the Agatston method. Bilateral carotid artery and superficial f...

  12. Assessor-related factors and score differences between ethnically diverse Dutch police applicants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.L. de Meijer (Lonneke); M.Ph. Born (Marise); H. van Loon (Heleen); H.T. van der Molen (Henk)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe present study examined the effects of demographic and perceived similarity between assessors and applicants on assessors’ evaluations of Dutch ethnic majority and minority applicants. Results showed that demographic similarity did not explain score differences between ethnic groups.

  13. Injuries in group kept horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdell, C.M.; Jorgensen, G.M.; Keeling, L.

    2014-01-01

    Group housing of horses is not very widespread, despite obvious advantages for their development and mental well-being. One often expressed rationale for this is that horse owners are worried about the risk of injuries due to kicks, bites or being chased into obstacles. To address this concern, we...... developed and validated a scoring system for external injuries in horses to be able to record the severity of a lesion in a standardized and simple way under field conditions. The scoring system has five categories from insignificant loss of hair to severe, life threatening injuries. It was used...... to categorize 1124 injuries in 478 horses. Most of these horses were allocated to groups to study the effect of group composition (i.e. same age or mixed, same gender or mixed, socially stable or unstable groups) on behaviour and injuries. The material included mainly riding and leisure purpose horses...

  14. Informal groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van den Berg; P. van Houwelingen; J. de Hart

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Informele groepen Going out running with a group of friends, rather than joining an official sports club. Individuals who decide to take action themselves rather than giving money to good causes. Maintaining contact with others not as a member of an association, but through an Inter

  15. Increased correlation coefficient between the written test score and tutors' performance test scores after training of tutors for assessment of medical students during problem-based learning course in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiprakash, Heethal; Min, Aung Ko Ko; Ghosh, Sarmishtha

    2016-03-01

    This paper is aimed at finding if there was a change of correlation between the written test score and tutors' performance test scores in the assessment of medical students during a problem-based learning (PBL) course in Malaysia. This is a cross-sectional observational study, conducted among 264 medical students in two groups from November 2010 to November 2012. The first group's tutors did not receive tutor training; while the second group's tutors were trained in the PBL process. Each group was divided into high, middle and low achievers based on their end-of-semester exam scores. PBL scores were taken which included written test scores and tutors' performance test scores. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated between the two kinds of scores in each group. The correlation coefficient between the written scores and tutors' scores in group 1 was 0.099 (pcorrelation coefficient in the group where tutors received the PBL training reinforces the importance of tutor training before their participation in the PBL course.

  16. Validating a Prognostic Scoring System for Postmastectomy Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Skye Hung-Chun, E-mail: skye@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Clinical Research Office, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Tsai, Stella Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yu, Ben-Long [Department of Surgery, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Horng, Cheng-Fang [Clinical Research Office, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chii-Ming [Department of Surgery, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jian, James J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chu, Nan-Min [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsou, Mei-Hua [Department of Pathology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Mei-Ching [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Andrew T. [Department of Medical Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This study is designed to validate a previously developed locoregional recurrence risk (LRR) scoring system and further define which groups of patients with breast cancer would benefit from postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: An LRR risk scoring system was developed previously at our institution using breast cancer patients initially treated with modified radical mastectomy between 1990 and 2001. The LRR score comprised 4 factors: patient age, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor negativity, and number of involved lymph nodes. We sought to validate the original study by examining a new dataset of 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007. Results: The 1545 patients were scored according to the previously developed criteria: 920 (59.6%) were low risk (score 0-1), 493 (31.9%) intermediate risk (score 2-3), and 132 (8.5%) were high risk (score ≥4). The 5-year locoregional control rates with and without PMRT in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups were 98% versus 97% (P=.41), 97% versus 91% (P=.0005), and 89% versus 50% (P=.0002) respectively. Conclusions: This analysis of an additional 1545 patients treated between 2002 and 2007 validates our previously reported LRR scoring system and suggests appropriate patients for whom PMRT will be beneficial. Independent validation of this scoring system by other institutions is recommended.

  17. SIRS score on admission and initial concentration of IL-6 as severe acute pancreatitis outcome predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Pavle; Pavle, Gregoric; Sijacki, Ana; Ana, Sijacki; Stankovic, Sanja; Sanja, Stankovic; Radenkovic, Dejan; Dejan, Radenkovic; Ivancevic, Nenad; Nenad, Ivancevic; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandar, Karamarkovic; Popovic, Nada; Nada, Popovic; Karadzic, Borivoje; Borivoje, Karadzic; Stijak, Lazar; Stefanovic, Branislav; Branislav, Stefanovic; Milosevic, Zoran; Zoran, Milosević; Bajec, Djordje; Djordje, Bajec

    2010-01-01

    Early recognition of severe form of acute pancreatitis is important because these patients need more agressive diagnostic and therapeutical approach an can develope systemic complications such as: sepsis, coagulopathy, Acute Lung Injury (ALI), Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS), Multiple Organ Failure (MOF). To determine role of the combination of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) score and serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6) level on admission as predictor of illness severity and outcome of Severe Acute Pancreatitis (SAP). We evaluated 234 patients with first onset of SAP appears in last twenty four hours. A total of 77 (33%) patients died. SIRS score and serum IL-6 concentration were measured in first hour after admission. In 105 patients with SIRS score 3 and higher, initial measured IL-6 levels were significantly higher than in the group of remaining 129 patients (72 +/- 67 pg/mL, vs 18 +/- 15 pg/mL). All nonsurvivals were in the first group, with SIRS score 3 and 4 and initial IL-6 concentration 113 +/- 27 pg/mL. The values of C-reactive Protein (CRP) measured after 48h, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) score on admission and Ranson score showed the similar correlation, but serum amylase level did not correlate significantly with Ranson score, IL-6 concentration and APACHE II score. The combination of SIRS score on admission and IL-6 serum concentration can be early, predictor of illness severity and outcome in SAP.

  18. Propensity score and proximity matching using random forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Su, Xiaogang; Ge, Tingting; Fan, Juanjuan

    2016-03-01

    In order to derive unbiased inference from observational data, matching methods are often applied to produce balanced treatment and control groups in terms of all background variables. Propensity score has been a key component in this research area. However, propensity score based matching methods in the literature have several limitations, such as model mis-specifications, categorical variables with more than two levels, difficulties in handling missing data, and nonlinear relationships. Random forest, averaging outcomes from many decision trees, is nonparametric in nature, straightforward to use, and capable of solving these issues. More importantly, the precision afforded by random forest (Caruana et al., 2008) may provide us with a more accurate and less model dependent estimate of the propensity score. In addition, the proximity matrix, a by-product of the random forest, may naturally serve as a distance measure between observations that can be used in matching. The proposed random forest based matching methods are applied to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Our results show that the proposed methods can produce well balanced treatment and control groups. An illustration is also provided that the methods can effectively deal with missing data in covariates.

  19. The Effects of Using Selected Metacognitive Strategies on ACT Mathematics Sub-Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMay, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    This quasi-experimental post-test only control group designed quantitative study examined whether or not members of an experimental group of participants who utilized two metacognitive strategy training regimens experienced a significant increase in their ACT mathematics sub-test scores compared to a group of students who did not utilize either of…

  20. RISK FACTOR DIAGNOSTIC SCORE IN DIABETIC FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shameem P. M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diabetic foot ulcers vary in their clinical presentation and nature of severity and therefore create a challenging problem to the treating surgeon regarding the prediction of the clinical course and the end result of the treatment. Clinical studies have shown that there are certain risk factors for the progression of foot ulcers in diabetics and it may therefore be possible to predict the course of an ulcer foot at presentation itself, thus instituting proper therapy without delay. Spoken otherwise clinical scoring may tell that this particular ulcer is having highest chance of amputation, then one may be able to take an early decision for the same and avoid the septic complications, inconvenience to the patient, long hospital stay and cost of treatments. AIM OF THE STUDY Aim of the study is to evaluate the above-mentioned scoring system in predicting the course the diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with Diabetic Foot attending the OPD of Department of Surgery of Government Hospital attached to Calicut Medical College are included in the present study. After thorough history taking and clinical examination, six risk factors like Age, pedal vessels, renal function, neuropathy, radiological findings and ulcers were observed in the patients by giving certain scoring points to each of them. The total number of points scored by the patients at the time of admission or OPD treatment was correlated with the final outcome in these patients, whether leading to amputation or conservative management. All the data was analysed using standard statistical methods. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS There were 12 females and 38 males with a female to male ratio 1:3.1. All were aged above 30 years. Twenty-four (48% of them were between 30-60 years and twenty six (52% were above 60 years. 10 patients were treated conservatively with risk score range: 10 to 35. Six had single toe loss with risk score: 25 to 35. Six had multiple toe loss

  1. Revision Vodcast Influence on Assessment Scores and Study Processes in Secondary Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marencik, Joseph J.

    A quasi-experimental switching replications design with matched participants was employed to determine the influence of revision vodcasts, or video podcasts, on students' assessment scores and study processes in secondary physics. This study satisfied a need for quantitative results in the area of vodcast influence on students' learning processes. Thirty-eight physics students in an urban Ohio public high school participated in the study. The students in one Physics class were paired with students in another Physics class through the matching characteristics of current student cumulative test score mean and baseline study process as measured by the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ). Students in both classes were given identical pedagogic treatment and access to traditional revision tools except for the supplemental revision vodcasts given to the experimental group. After students in the experimental group viewed the revision vodcast for a particular topic, the assessment scores of the students in the experimental group were compared to the assessment scores of the control group through the direct-difference, D, test to determine any difference between the assessment score means of each group. The SPQ was given at the beginning of the experiment and after each physics assessment. The direct-difference method was again used to determine any difference between the SPQ deep approach scores of each group. The SPQ was also used to determine any correlative effects between study process and revision vodcast use on students' assessment scores through descriptive statistics and an analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Analysis indicated that revision vodcast use significantly increased students' assessment scores (p.05). There were no significant correlative effects of revision vodcast use and study processes on students' assessment scores (p>.05). This study offers educators the empirical support to devote the necessary effort, time, and resources into developing successful

  2. A scoring framework for predicting protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaoqin

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a statistical mechanics-based iterative method to extract statistical atomic interaction potentials from known, non-redundant protein structures. Our method circumvents the long-standing reference state problem in deriving traditional knowledge-based scoring functions, by using rapid iterations through a physical, global convergence function. The rapid convergence of this physics-based method, unlike other parameter optimization methods, warrants the feasibility of deriving distance-dependent, all-atom statistical potentials to keep the scoring accuracy. The derived potentials, referred to as ITScore/Pro, have been validated using three diverse benchmarks: the high-resolution decoy set, the AMBER benchmark decoy set, and the CASP8 decoy set. Significant improvement in performance has been achieved. Finally, comparisons between the potentials of our model and potentials of a knowledge-based scoring function with a randomized reference state have revealed the reason for the better performance of our scoring function, which could provide useful insight into the development of other physical scoring functions. The potentials developed in the present study are generally applicable for structural selection in protein structure prediction.

  3. SCORE SETS IN ORIENTED 3-PARTITE GRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Let D(U, V, W) be an oriented 3-partite graph with |U|=p, |V|=q and |W|= r. For any vertex x in D(U, V, W), let d+x and d-x be the outdegree and indegree of x respectively. Define aui (or simply ai) = q + r + d+ui - d-ui, bvj(or simply bj) = p + r + d+vj - d-vj and Cwk (or simply ck) = p + q + d+wk - d-wk as the scores of ui in U, vj in V and wk in Wrespectively. The set A of distinct scores of the vertices of D(U, V, W) is called its score set. In this paper, we prove that if a1 is a non-negative integer, ai(2≤i≤n - 1) are even positive integers and an is any positive integer, then for n≥3, there exists an oriented 3-partite graph with the score set A = {a1,2∑i=1 ai,…,n∑i=1 ai}, except when A = {0,2,3}. Some more results for score sets in oriented 3-partite graphs are obtained.

  4. Disease severity scoring systems in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Bilaç

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scoring systems have been developed to interpret the disease severity objectively by evaluating the parameters of the disease. Body surface area, visual analogue scale, and physician global assessment are the most frequently used scoring systems for evaluating the clinical severity of the dermatological diseases. Apart from these scoring systems, many specific scoring systems for many dermatological diseases, including acne (acne vulgaris, acne scars, alopecia (androgenetic alopecia, tractional alopecia, bullous diseases (autoimmune bullous diseases, toxic epidermal necrolysis, dermatitis (atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, dyshidrotic eczema, hidradenitis suppurativa, hirsutismus, connective tissue diseases (dermatomyositis, skin involvement of systemic lupus erythematosus (LE, discoid LE, scleroderma, lichen planoplaris, mastocytosis, melanocytic lesions, melasma, onychomycosis, oral lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris, psoriatic arthritis, nail psoriasis, sarcoidosis, urticaria, and vitiligo, have also been developed. Disease severity scoring methods are ever more extensively used in the field of dermatology for clinical practice to form an opinion about the prognosis by determining the disease severity; to decide on the most suitable treatment modality for the patient; to evaluate the efficacy of the applied medication; and to compare the efficiency of different treatment methods in clinical studies.

  5. Gambling scores for earthquake predictions and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiancang

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new method, namely the gambling score, for scoring the performance earthquake forecasts or predictions. Unlike most other scoring procedures that require a regular scheme of forecast and treat each earthquake equally, regardless their magnitude, this new scoring method compensates the risk that the forecaster has taken. Starting with a certain number of reputation points, once a forecaster makes a prediction or forecast, he is assumed to have betted some points of his reputation. The reference model, which plays the role of the house, determines how many reputation points the forecaster can gain if he succeeds, according to a fair rule, and also takes away the reputation points betted by the forecaster if he loses. This method is also extended to the continuous case of point process models, where the reputation points betted by the forecaster become a continuous mass on the space-time-magnitude range of interest. We also calculate the upper bound of the gambling score when the true model is a renewal process, the stress release model or the ETAS model and when the reference model is the Poisson model.

  6. [Overview of regulatory aspects guiding tablet scoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Maíra Teles; Sá-Barreto, Lívia Cristina Lira; Silva, Dayde Lane Mendonça; Cunha-Filho, Marcílio Sergio Soares

    2016-06-01

    Tablet scoring is a controversial but common practice used to adjust doses, facilitate drug intake, or lower the cost of drug treatment, especially in children and the elderly. The risks of tablet scoring are mainly related to inaccuracies in the resulting dose and stability problems. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of worldwide guidelines regarding tablet scoring. We found that regulatory health agencies in Mercosur countries as well as other South American countries do not have published standards addressing tablet splitting. Among the surveyed health agencies, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States is the only one to present standards, ranging from splitting instructions to regulation of the manufacturing process. The concept of functional scoring implemented by the FDA has introduced some level of guarantee as to the ability of tablets to be split. In conclusion, technical and scientific bases are still insufficient to guide health rules on this subject, making the decision on scoring, in certain situations, random and highly risky to public health. The need for more detailed regulation is vital to ensure the safety of tablet medications.

  7. The novel EuroSCORE II algorithm predicts the hospital mortality of thoracic aortic surgery in 461 consecutive Japanese patients better than both the original additive and logistic EuroSCORE algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Takahiro; Sonoda, Hiromichi; Oishi, Yasuhisa; Tanoue, Yoshihisa; Nakashima, Atsuhiro; Shiokawa, Yuichi; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) II was developed to improve the overestimation of surgical risk associated with the original (additive and logistic) EuroSCOREs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the EuroSCORE II by comparing its performance with that of the original EuroSCOREs in Japanese patients undergoing surgery on the thoracic aorta. METHODS We have calculated the predicted mortalities according to the additive EuroSCORE, logistic EuroSCORE and EuroSCORE II algorithms in 461 patients who underwent surgery on the thoracic aorta during a period of 20 years (1993–2013). RESULTS The actual in-hospital mortality rates in the low- (additive EuroSCORE of 3–6), moderate- (7–11) and high-risk (≥11) groups (followed by overall mortality) were 1.3, 6.2 and 14.4% (7.2% overall), respectively. Among the three different risk groups, the expected mortality rates were 5.5 ± 0.6, 9.1 ± 0.7 and 13.5 ± 0.2% (9.5 ± 0.1% overall) by the additive EuroSCORE algorithm, 5.3 ± 0.1, 16 ± 0.4 and 42.4 ± 1.3% (19.9 ± 0.7% overall) by the logistic EuroSCORE algorithm and 1.6 ± 0.1, 5.2 ± 0.2 and 18.5 ± 1.3% (7.4 ± 0.4% overall) by the EuroSCORE II algorithm, indicating poor prediction (P < 0.0001) of the mortality in the high-risk group, especially by the logistic EuroSCORE. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of the additive EuroSCORE, logistic EuroSCORE and EuroSCORE II algorithms were 0.6937, 0.7169 and 0.7697, respectively. Thus, the mortality expected by the EuroSCORE II more closely matched the actual mortality in all three risk groups. In contrast, the mortality expected by the logistic EuroSCORE overestimated the risks in the moderate- (P = 0.0002) and high-risk (P < 0.0001) patient groups. CONCLUSIONS Although all of the original EuroSCOREs and EuroSCORE II appreciably predicted the surgical mortality for thoracic aortic surgery in Japanese patients, the EuroSCORE

  8. A new scoring system to stratify risk in unstable angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzberg Simón

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed this study to develop a new scoring system to stratify different levels of risk in patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of unstable angina (UA, which is a complex syndrome that encompasses different outcomes. Many prognostic variables have been described but few efforts have been made to group them in order to enhance their individual predictive power. Methods In a first phase, 473 patients were prospectively analyzed to determine which factors were significantly associated with the in-hospital occurrence of refractory ischemia, acute myocardial infarction (AMI or death. A risk score ranging from 0 to 10 points was developed using a multivariate analysis. In a second phase, such score was validated in a new sample of 242 patients and it was finally applied to the entire population (n = 715. Results ST-segment deviation on the electrocardiogram, age ≥ 70 years, previous bypass surgery and troponin T ≥ 0.1 ng/mL were found as independent prognostic variables. A clear distinction was shown among categories of low, intermediate and high risk, defined according to the risk score. The incidence of the triple end-point was 6 %, 19.2 % and 44.7 % respectively, and the figures for AMI or death were 2 %, 11.4 % and 27.6 % respectively (p Conclusions This new scoring system is simple and easy to achieve. It allows a very good stratification of risk in patients having a clinical diagnosis of UA. They may be divided in three categories, which could be of help in the decision-making process.

  9. Thai venous stroke prognostic score: TV-SPSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poungvarin, Niphon; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Ratanakorn, Disya; Towanabut, Somchai; Tantirittisak, Tassanee; Suwanwela, Nijasri; Phanthumchinda, Kamman; Tiamkoa, Somsak; Chankrachang, Siwaporn; Nidhinandana, Samart; Laptikultham, Somsak; Limsoontarakul, Sansern; Udomphanthuruk, Suthipol

    2009-11-01

    Prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) has never been studied in Thailand. A simple prognostic score to predict poor prognosis of CVST has also never been reported. The authors are aiming to establish a simple and reliable prognostic score for this condition. The medical records of CVST patients from eight neurological training centers in Thailand who received between April 1993 and September 2005 were reviewed as part of this retrospective study. Clinical features included headache, seizure, stroke risk factors, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), blood pressure on arrival, papilledema, hemiparesis, meningeal irritation sign, location of occluded venous sinuses, hemorrhagic infarction, cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure, treatment options, length of stay, and other complications were analyzed to determine the outcome using modified Rankin scale (mRS). Poor prognosis (defined as mRS of 3-6) was determined on the discharge date. One hundred ninety four patients' records, 127 females (65.5%) and mean age of 36.6 +/- 14.4 years, were analyzed Fifty-one patients (26.3%) were in the poor outcome group (mRS 3-6). Overall mortality was 8.4%. Univariate analysis and then multivariate analysis using SPSS version 11.5 revealed only four statistically significant predictors influencing outcome of CVST They were underlying malignancy, low GCS, presence of hemorrhagic infarction (for poor outcome), and involvement of lateral sinus (for good outcome). Thai venous stroke prognostic score (TV-SPSS) was derived from these four factors using a multiple logistic model. A simple and pragmatic prognostic score for CVST outcome has been developed with high sensitivity (93%), yet low specificity (33%). The next study should focus on the validation of this score in other prospective populations.

  10. A survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Veninga, T. [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bajrovic, A. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Stalpers, L.J.A. [Academic Medical Center Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Hoskin, P.J. [Mount Vernon Center for Cancer Treatment, Northwood (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Oncology; Rudat, V. [Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-09-15

    Background: This study aimed to develop and validate a survival scoring system for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Of 436 patients, 218 patients were assigned to the test group and 218 patients to the validation group. Eight potential prognostic factors (age, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval from cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy of MSCC, time developing motor deficits) plus the fractionation regimen were retrospectively investigated for associations with survival. Factors significant in the multivariate analysis were included in the survival score. The score for each significant prognostic factor was determined by dividing the 6-month survival rate (%) by 10. The total score represented the sum of the scores for each factor. The prognostic groups of the test group were compared to the validation group. Results: In the multivariate analysis of the test group, performance status, ambulatory status, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, and interval from cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy were significantly associated with survival. Total scores including these factors were 20, 21, 22, 24, 26, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 37, or 39 points. In the test group, the 6-month survival rates were 6.5% for 20-24 points, 44.6% for 26-33 points, and 95.8% for 35-39 points (p < 0.0001). In the validation group, the 6-month survival rates were 7.4%, 45.4%, and 94.7%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Because the survival rates of the validation group were almost identical to the test group, this score can be considered valid and reproducible. (orig.)

  11. Opportunistic splitting for scheduling using a score-based approach

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Faraan

    2012-06-01

    We consider the problem of scheduling a user in a multi-user wireless environment in a distributed manner. The opportunistic splitting algorithm is applied to find the best group of users without reporting the channel state information to the centralized scheduler. The users find the best among themselves while requiring just a ternary feedback from the common receiver at the end of each mini-slot. The original splitting algorithm is modified to handle users with asymmetric channel conditions. We use a score-based approach with the splitting algorithm to introduce time and throughput fairness while exploiting the multi-user diversity of the network. Analytical and simulation results are given to show that the modified score-based splitting algorithm works well as a fair scheduling scheme with good spectral efficiency and reduced feedback. © 2012 IEEE.

  12. The APGAR rubric for scoring online discussion boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippi, Julia C; Schorn, Mavis N; Moore-Davis, Tonia

    2015-05-01

    The World Health Organization has called for a dramatic increase in the number of midwives and supports the use of innovative programs to assist students in achieving midwifery competencies. Online discussion boards are excellent educational tools for stimulating in-depth student engagement. However, complex discussions can be difficult to grade without a well-constructed rubric. The 'discussion-board APGAR' provides clear scoring criteria for discussions of midwifery care. The discussion-board APGAR has 5 components: Application, Professionalism, Group work, Analysis, and Rationale and provides scoring criteria for unacceptable, marginal, and proficient performance. The discussion-board APGAR is based on the Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice in the United States (US), consistent with the International Confederation of Midwives Essential Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice, and can be adjusted to be congruent with other midwifery standards.

  13. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  14. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...... of the production in high cost countries. Confident with the prospects of the new partnership, the company signed a long-term contract with Flextronics. This decision eventually proved itself to have been too hasty, however. Merely three years after the contracts were signed, LEGO management announced that it would...

  15. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...

  16. Neurofeedback for insomnia: a pilot study of Z-score SMR and individualized protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Barbara U; Colbert, Agatha P; Brown, Kimberly A; Ilioi, Elena C

    2011-12-01

    Insomnia is an epidemic in the US. Neurofeedback (NFB) is a little used, psychophysiological treatment with demonstrated usefulness for treating insomnia. Our objective was to assess whether two distinct Z-Score NFB protocols, a modified sensorimotor (SMR) protocol and a sequential, quantitative EEG (sQEEG)-guided, individually designed (IND) protocol, would alleviate sleep and associated daytime dysfunctions of participants with insomnia. Both protocols used instantaneous Z scores to determine reward condition administered when awake. Twelve adults with insomnia, free of other mental and uncontrolled physical illnesses, were randomly assigned to the SMR or IND group. Eight completed this randomized, parallel group, single-blind study. Both groups received fifteen 20-min sessions of Z-Score NFB. Pre-post assessments included sQEEG, mental health, quality of life, and insomnia status. ANOVA yielded significant post-treatment improvement for the combined group on all primary insomnia scores: Insomnia Severity Index (ISI pz-tests pZ-Score NFB groups improved in sleep and daytime functioning. Post-treatment, all participants were normal sleepers. Because there were no significant differences in the findings between the two groups, our future large scale studies will utilize the less burdensome to administer Z-Score SMR protocol.

  17. Clinical Survival of Rebonded Brackets with Different ARI Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Ahangar Atashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bracket debonding is one of the most common events in orthodontics. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively compare clinical survival of rebonded brackets with different ARI scores with new brackets rebonding. Materials and Methods: The subjects in the present study consisted of 74 patients with 76 debonded brackets on maxillary first and second premolars. After refreshing the bracket base of the debonded brackets, they were assigned in two groups: group A with 27 brackets of ARI≥4 and group B with 28 brackets of ARI≤2. In 21 cases, new brackets were used (group C. The frequency of the debonding in each rebonded group during treatment was calculated in intervals of 6,12,18 mounths after onset of bracket rebonding . Chi-squared test was used to compare the frequency of debonded brackets. Results: The frequency of debonded brackets was significantly higher in group B (ARI≤2 than those of groups A (ARI≥4 and C (new brackets. The number of debonded brackets were not significantly different between groups A (ARI≥4 and C (new brackets. Conclusion: Rebonding strength of debonded brackets in those that the failure is presented between adhesive and enamel (ARI≥4 could be clinically acceptable with no need to use new brackets.    Key words: dental bonding; orthodontic brackets; prevalence

  18. Prognostic Value of TIMI Score versus GRACE Score in ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. L. Correia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The TIMI Score for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI was created and validated specifically for this clinical scenario, while the GRACE score is generic to any type of acute coronary syndrome. Objective: Between TIMI and GRACE scores, identify the one of better prognostic performance in patients with STEMI. Methods: We included 152 individuals consecutively admitted for STEMI. The TIMI and GRACE scores were tested for their discriminatory ability (C-statistics and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow in relation to hospital death. Results: The TIMI score showed equal distribution of patients in the ranges of low, intermediate and high risk (39 %, 27 % and 34 %, respectively, as opposed to the GRACE Score that showed predominant distribution at low risk (80 %, 13 % and 7%, respectively. Case-fatality was 11%. The C-statistics of the TIMI score was 0.87 (95%CI = 0.76 to 0.98, similar to GRACE (0.87, 95%CI = 0.75 to 0.99 - p = 0.71. The TIMI score showed satisfactory calibration represented by χ2 = 1.4 (p = 0.92, well above the calibration of the GRACE score, which showed χ2 = 14 (p = 0.08. This calibration is reflected in the expected incidence ranges for low, intermediate and high risk, according to the TIMI score (0 %, 4.9 % and 25 %, respectively, differently to GRACE (2.4%, 25% and 73%, which featured middle range incidence inappropriately. Conclusion: Although the scores show similar discriminatory capacity for hospital death, the TIMI score had better calibration than GRACE. These findings need to be validated populations of different risk profiles.

  19. Apgar score after induction of anesthesia for canine cesarean section with alfaxalone versus propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebeli, A; Michel, E; Bettschart, R; Hartnack, S; Reichler, I M

    2013-11-01

    The effects of alfaxalone and propofol on neonatal vitality were studied in 22 bitches and 81 puppies after their use as anesthetic induction agents for emergency cesarean section. After assessment that surgery was indicated, bitches were randomly allocated to receive alfaxalone 1 to 2 mg/kg body weight or propofol 2 to 6 mg/kg body weight for anesthetic induction. Both drugs were administered intravenously to effect to allow endotracheal intubation, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Neonatal vitality was assessed using a modified Apgar score that took into account heart rate, respiratory effort, reflex irritability, motility, and mucous membrane color (maximum score = 10); scores were assigned at 5, 15, and 60 minutes after delivery. Neither the number of puppies delivered nor the proportion of surviving puppies up to 3 months after delivery differed between groups. Anesthetic induction drug and time of scoring were associated with the Apgar score, but delivery time was not. Apgar scores in the alfaxalone group were greater than those in the propofol group at 5, 15, and 60 minutes after delivery; the overall estimated score difference between the groups was 3.3 (confidence interval 95%: 1.6-4.9; P < 0.001). In conclusion, both alfaxalone and propofol can be safely used for induction of anesthesia in bitches undergoing emergency cesarean section. Although puppy survival was similar after the use of these drugs, alfaxalone was associated with better neonatal vitality during the first 60 minutes after delivery.

  20. Pain mystery score beliefs: a comparison of fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Robert; Russell, Anthony Science

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the mysteriousness scores of the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory in fibromyalgia. Methods. Two cohorts of patients, one with fibromyalgia (FM) and one with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), completed the Mystery Scale component of the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory to determine whether subjects in the two diagnostic groups had significantly different scores on the Mystery Scale. Results. A total of 126 subjects (64 FM, 62 RA) completed all questionnaires. The FM group had a greater percentage of female subjects, more severe pain, more severe anxiety, more severe depression, and a higher perceived injustice score. When the RA and FM group scores for the Mystery Scale were adjusted for age, sex, pain severity, HADS scores, and perceived injustice scores, the FM group still had a higher Mystery Scale score. Discussion. Fibromyalgia is associated with a higher level of perception of mysteriousness in the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory than is seen with rheumatoid arthritis. This difference appears to be independent of levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and perceived injustice. This sense of mysteriousness may reflect a lack of understanding of pain in fibromyalgia as previously reported and may be an area to be addressed in therapy.

  1. Evaluation of the "medication fall risk score".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Cyrus; Hall, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Results of a study evaluating the predictive validity of a fall screening tool in hospitalized patients are reported. Administrative claims data from two hospitals were analyzed to determine the discriminatory ability of the "medication fall risk score" (RxFS), a medication review fall-risk screening tool that is designed for use in conjunction with nurse-administered tools such as the Morse Fall Scale (MFS). Through analysis of data on administered medications and documented falls in a population of adults who underwent fall-risk screening at hospital admission over a 15-month period (n = 33,058), the predictive value of admission MFS scores, alone or in combination with retrospectively calculated RxFS-based risk scores, was assessed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and net reclassification improvement (NRI) analysis were used to evaluate improvements in risk prediction with the addition of RxFS data to the prediction model. The area under the ROC curve for the predictive model for falls compromising both MFS and RxFS scores was computed as 0.8014, which was greater than the area under the ROC curve associated with use of the MFS alone (0.7823, p = 0.0030). Screening based on MFS scores alone had 81.25% sensitivity and 61.37% specificity. Combined use of RxFS and MFS scores resulted in 82.42% sensitivity and 66.65% specificity (NRI = 0.0587, p = 0.0003). Reclassification of fall risk based on coadministration of the MFS and the RxFS tools resulted in a modest improvement in specificity without compromising sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Group Connections: Whole Group Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Dorothy

    2002-01-01

    A learner-centered approach to adult group instruction involved learners in investigating 20th-century events. The approach allowed learners to concentrate on different activities according to their abilities and gave them opportunities to develop basic skills and practice teamwork. (SK)

  3. NCACO-score: An effective main-chain dependent scoring function for structure modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiaoxi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of effective scoring functions is a critical component to the success of protein structure modeling. Previously, many efforts have been dedicated to the development of scoring functions. Despite these efforts, development of an effective scoring function that can achieve both good accuracy and fast speed still presents a grand challenge. Results Based on a coarse-grained representation of a protein structure by using only four main-chain atoms: N, Cα, C and O, we develop a knowledge-based scoring function, called NCACO-score, that integrates different structural information to rapidly model protein structure from sequence. In testing on the Decoys'R'Us sets, we found that NCACO-score can effectively recognize native conformers from their decoys. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NCACO-score can effectively guide fragment assembly for protein structure prediction, which has achieved a good performance in building the structure models for hard targets from CASP8 in terms of both accuracy and speed. Conclusions Although NCACO-score is developed based on a coarse-grained model, it is able to discriminate native conformers from decoy conformers with high accuracy. NCACO is a very effective scoring function for structure modeling.

  4. What Do Test Scores Really Mean? A Latent Class Analysis of Danish Test Score Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; McIntosh, James

    2014-01-01

    Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyze a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954-55, tested in 1968, and followed until 2011. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. We show that the test scores...... of intelligence explain a significant proportion of the variation in test scores. This adds to the complexity of interpreting test scores and suggests that school culture and possible incentive problems make it more di¢ cult to understand what the tests measure....

  5. Vinardo: A Scoring Function Based on Autodock Vina Improves Scoring, Docking, and Virtual Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Quiroga

    Full Text Available Autodock Vina is a very popular, and highly cited, open source docking program. Here we present a scoring function which we call Vinardo (Vina RaDii Optimized. Vinardo is based on Vina, and was trained through a novel approach, on state of the art datasets. We show that the traditional approach to train empirical scoring functions, using linear regression to optimize the correlation of predicted and experimental binding affinities, does not result in a function with optimal docking capabilities. On the other hand, a combination of scoring, minimization, and re-docking on carefully curated training datasets allowed us to develop a simplified scoring function with optimum docking performance. This article provides an overview of the development of the Vinardo scoring function, highlights its differences with Vina, and compares the performance of the two scoring functions in scoring, docking and virtual screening applications. Vinardo outperforms Vina in all tests performed, for all datasets analyzed. The Vinardo scoring function is available as an option within Smina, a fork of Vina, which is freely available under the GNU Public License v2.0 from http://smina.sf.net. Precompiled binaries, source code, documentation and a tutorial for using Smina to run the Vinardo scoring function are available at the same address.

  6. Vinardo: A Scoring Function Based on Autodock Vina Improves Scoring, Docking, and Virtual Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Rodrigo; Villarreal, Marcos A

    2016-01-01

    Autodock Vina is a very popular, and highly cited, open source docking program. Here we present a scoring function which we call Vinardo (Vina RaDii Optimized). Vinardo is based on Vina, and was trained through a novel approach, on state of the art datasets. We show that the traditional approach to train empirical scoring functions, using linear regression to optimize the correlation of predicted and experimental binding affinities, does not result in a function with optimal docking capabilities. On the other hand, a combination of scoring, minimization, and re-docking on carefully curated training datasets allowed us to develop a simplified scoring function with optimum docking performance. This article provides an overview of the development of the Vinardo scoring function, highlights its differences with Vina, and compares the performance of the two scoring functions in scoring, docking and virtual screening applications. Vinardo outperforms Vina in all tests performed, for all datasets analyzed. The Vinardo scoring function is available as an option within Smina, a fork of Vina, which is freely available under the GNU Public License v2.0 from http://smina.sf.net. Precompiled binaries, source code, documentation and a tutorial for using Smina to run the Vinardo scoring function are available at the same address.

  7. Algorithm improvement program nuclide identification algorithm scoring criteria and scoring application.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enghauser, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Algorithm Improvement Program (AIP) is to facilitate gamma-radiation detector nuclide identification algorithm development, improvement, and validation. Accordingly, scoring criteria have been developed to objectively assess the performance of nuclide identification algorithms. In addition, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application for automated nuclide identification scoring has been developed. This report provides an overview of the equations, nuclide weighting factors, nuclide equivalencies, and configuration weighting factors used by the application for scoring nuclide identification algorithm performance. Furthermore, this report presents a general overview of the nuclide identification algorithm scoring application including illustrative examples.

  8. Track score processing of multiple dissimilar sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Patsikas, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, a data fusion problem when a number of different types of sensors are deployed in the vicinity of a ballistic missile launch is studied. An objective of this thesis is to calculate a scoring function for each sensor track, and the track file with the best (optimum) track score can then be used for guiding an interceptor to the threat within the boost phase. Seven active ground-based radars, two space-based passive infrared sensors and two active light detection and rangin...

  9. Assigning Numerical Scores to Linguistic Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Campión

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study different methods of scoring linguistic expressions defined on a finite set, in the search for a linear order that ranks all those possible expressions. Among them, particular attention is paid to the canonical extension, and its representability through distances in a graph plus some suitable penalization of imprecision. The relationship between this setting and the classical problems of numerical representability of orderings, as well as extension of orderings from a set to a superset is also explored. Finally, aggregation procedures of qualitative rankings and scorings are also analyzed.

  10. A lumbar disc surgery predictive score card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finneson, B E

    1978-06-01

    A lumbar disc surgery predictive score card or questionnaire has been developed to assess potential candidates for excision of a herniated lumbar disc who have not previously undergone lumbar spine surgery. It is not designed to encompass patients who are being considered for other types of lumbar spine surgery, such as decompressive laminectomy or fusion. In an effort to make the "score card" usable by almost all physicians who are involved in lumbar disc surgery, only studies which have broad acceptance and are generally employed are included. Studies which have less widespread use such as electromyogram, discogram, venogram, special psychologic studies (MMPI, pain drawings) have been purposely excluded.

  11. Selection of treatment modality for hepatocellular carcinoma according to the modified Japan Integrated Staging score

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi Nanashima; Junichi Masuda; Satoshi Miuma; Yorihisa Sumida; Takashi Nonaka; Kenji Tanaka; Shigekazu Hidaka; Terumitsu Sawai; Takeshi Nagayasu

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To compare the prognosis of patients who underwent hepatectomy and ablation using the modified Japan Integrated Staging score (mJIS).METHODS: We examined the clinicopathologic records and patient outcomes in 278 HCC patients including 226 undergoing hepatectomy and 52 undergoing ablation therapy.RESULTS: Cirrhosis was more frequent in the ablation group. Tumor size, number and presence of vascular invasion were significantly higher in the operation group compared to the ablation group. The local recurrence rate adjacent to treated lesions was significantly higher in the ablation group compared to the operation group (P < 0.05). The 3- and 5-year survival rates in the ablation and the operation group were 66% and 78%,and 50% and 63%, respectively, but not significantly different. Over 50% survival rates were observed in patients with a mJIS score of 0-2 in both groups.However, survival rates with a score of 3-5 in both groups were significantly lower. CONCLUSION: According to the mJIS system, both local treatments could be selected for patients with a score of 0-2. However, for patients with a score more than 3, liver transplantation might be a better option in patients with HCC.

  12. Increased correlation coefficient between the written test score and tutors’ performance test scores after training of tutors for assessment of medical students during problem-based learning course in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heethal Jaiprakash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at finding if there was a change of correlation between the written test score and tutors’ performance test scores in the assessment of medical students during a problem-based learning (PBL course in Malaysia. This is a cross-sectional observational study, conducted among 264 medical students in two groups from November 2010 to November 2012. The first group’s tutors did not receive tutor training; while the second group’s tutors were trained in the PBL process. Each group was divided into high, middle and low achievers based on their end-of-semester exam scores. PBL scores were taken which included written test scores and tutors’ performance test scores. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated between the two kinds of scores in each group. The correlation coefficient between the written scores and tutors’ scores in group 1 was 0.099 (p<0.001 and for group 2 was 0.305 (p<0.001. The higher correlation coefficient in the group where tutors received the PBL training reinforces the importance of tutor training before their participation in the PBL course.

  13. The scoring system for patients with severe sepsis after orthotopic liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Wei Huang; Xiang-Dong Guan; Xiao-Shun He; Juan Chen; Bin Ouyang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Because of the complicated pathological features after liver transplantation, severe sepsis is dififcult to treat and often leads to death. This study was undertaken to analyze the role of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients with severe sepsis and to evaluate the effect of the scoring system. METHODS:Fifty-six patients conformed to the inclusion criteria. They were divided into two groups: non-OLT group (group A) and OLT group (group B). Besides the general data of the patients, the surveillance of blood lactate, the number of failed organs, acute physiology and chronic health evaluationⅡ(APACHEⅡ) and mutiple organ dysfunction score (MODS) were evaluated at the 1st, 3rd and 7th day after OLT. RESULTS:The mortality during hospitalization was 30%in the non-OLT group and 57.6%in the other group. The level of blood lactate at the 1st day of OLT increased more signiifcantly in the OLT group than in the non-OLT group (P CONCLUSIONS: The persistently higher level of blood lactate during 7 days may be a dependent risk factor. Immunosuppression may be another risk factor for OLT patients. The mortality of OLT in patients with severe sepsis in 28 days is almost double that in non-OLT patients. The MODS score is better than the APACHEⅡscore in the assessment of organ failure in OLT patients with severe sepsis. The standard scoring system could be improved or a new scoring system that includes the blood lactate score should be established for liver transplantation.

  14. Fuzzy group decision making in a competitive situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Jiang; Harten, van Aart; Wegen, van der Leo

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a group decision making problem in a competitive situation with two opponents is considered. Uncertainty in the score assessment for both opponents of any individual of the group as well as between group members is taken into account by means of fuzzy sets. The individual scores can be

  15. Guess the Score, fostering collective intelligence in the class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Monguet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of serious games as a tool to enhance collective intelligence of undergraduate and graduate students. The development of social skills of individuals in a group is related to the performance of the collective intelligence of the group manifested through the shared and collaborative development of intellectual tasks [1]. Guess the Score GS, is a serious game implemented by means of an online tool, created to foster the development, collaboration and engagement of students. It's has been designed with the intention of facilitating the development of individual’s social skills in a group in order to promote education of collective intelligence. This paper concludes that the design of learning activities using serious games as a support tool in education, generate awareness about of utilities of gaming in the collective learning environment and the fostering of collective intelligence education.

  16. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  17. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  18. [Intraoperative crisis and surgical Apgar score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Masakatsu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Intraoperative crisis is an inevitable event to anesthesiologists. The crisis requires effective and coordinated management once it happened but it is difficult to manage the crises properly under extreme stressful situation. Recently, it is reported that the use of surgical crisis checklists is associated with significant improvement in the management of operating-room crises in a high-fidelity simulation study. Careful preoperative evaluation, proper intraoperative management and using intraoperative crisis checklists will be needed for safer perioperative care in the future. Postoperative complication is a serious public health problem. It reduces the quality of life of patients and raises medical cost. Careful management of surgical patients is required according to their postoperative condition for preventing postoperative complications. A 10-point surgical Apgar score, calculated from intraoperative estimated blood loss, lowest mean arterial pressure, and lowest heart rate, is a simple and available scoring system for predicting postoperative complications. It undoubtedly predicts higher than average risk of postoperative complications and death within 30 days of surgery. Surgical Apgar score is a bridge between proper intraoperative and postoperative care. Anesthesiologists should make effort to reduce the postoperative complication and this score is a tool for it.

  19. Local Observed-Score Kernel Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, Marie; van der Linden, Wim J.; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    Three local observed-score kernel equating methods that integrate methods from the local equating and kernel equating frameworks are proposed. The new methods were compared with their earlier counterparts with respect to such measures as bias--as defined by Lord's criterion of equity--and percent relative error. The local kernel item response…

  20. Progress scored in forest pest studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Teaming up with co-workers from State Forestry Administration (SFA), researchers of the CAS Institute of Zoology (IOZ)have scored encouraging progress in their studies of pheromones-based technology against the red turpentine beetle (Dendroctonus valens LeConte).

  1. Stability of WISC-IV process scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph J; Umfleet, Laura Glass; Kane, Alexa

    2013-01-01

    Forty-three students were administered on two occasions approximately 11 months apart the complete Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition, including the seven process components of Block Design No Time Bonus, Digit Span Forward (DSF), Digit Span Backward (DSB), Cancellation Random (CAR), Cancellation Structured (CAS), Longest Digit Span Forward (LDSF), and Longest Digit Span Backward (LDSB). Mean ages at first and second testing were 7.77 years (SD = 1.91) and 8.74 years (SD = 1.93), respectively. Mean Full-Scale IQ at initial testing was 111.63 (SD = 10.71). Process score stability coefficients ranged from .75 on DSF to .32 on CAS. Discrepancy score stabilities ranged from .45 on DSF minus DSB to .05 on CAS minus CAR. Approximately 21% of participants increased their LDSF on retest, and 16.3% showed a gain on LDSB. Caution must be exercised when interpreting process scores, and interpretation of discrepancy scores should probably be avoided.

  2. What do educational test scores really measure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyze a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954-55 and tested in 1968. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. The bulk of unobservable effects are uncorrelate...

  3. The FAt Spondyloarthritis Spine Score (FASSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Zhao, Zheng; Lambert, Robert Gw

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that fat lesions follow resolution of inflammation in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Fat lesions at vertebral corners have also been shown to predict development of new syndesmophytes. Therefore, scoring of fat lesions in the spine may constitute both...

  4. Critical Thinking: More than Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vernon G.; Szymanski, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    This article is for practicing or aspiring school administrators. The demand for excellence in public education has lead to an emphasis on standardized test scores. This article explores the development of a professional enhancement program designed to prepare teachers to teach higher order thinking skills. Higher order thinking is the primary…

  5. Writing Plan Quality: Relevance to Writing Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Constance

    2006-01-01

    If writing matters, how can we improve it? This study investigated the nature of writing plan quality and its relationship to the ensuing writing scores. Data were drawn from the 1998 Provincial Learning Assessment Programme (PLAP) in Writing, which was administered to pupils in Grades 4, 7, and 10 across British Columbia, Canada. Common features…

  6. Multidimensional CAT Item Selection Methods for Domain Scores and Composite Scores: Theory and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional computer adaptive testing (MCAT) can provide higher precision and reliability or reduce test length when compared with unidimensional CAT or with the paper-and-pencil test. This study compared five item selection procedures in the MCAT framework for both domain scores and overall scores through simulation by varying the structure…

  7. Relationship between Students' Scores on Research Methods and Statistics, and Undergraduate Project Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossai, Peter Agbadobi Uloku

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between students' scores on Research Methods and statistics, and undergraduate project at the final year. The purpose was to find out whether students matched knowledge of research with project-writing skill. The study adopted an expost facto correlational design. Scores on Research Methods and Statistics for…

  8. Analysis of WAIS-IV Index Score Scatter Using Significant Deviation from the Mean Index Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Jacques; Coalson, Diane L.; Zhu, Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) does not include verbal IQ and performance IQ scores, as provided in previous editions of the scale; rather, this edition provides comparisons among four index scores, allowing analysis of an individual's WAIS-IV performance in more discrete domains of cognitive ability. To supplement…

  9. Multidimensional CAT Item Selection Methods for Domain Scores and Composite Scores: Theory and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional computer adaptive testing (MCAT) can provide higher precision and reliability or reduce test length when compared with unidimensional CAT or with the paper-and-pencil test. This study compared five item selection procedures in the MCAT framework for both domain scores and overall scores through simulation by varying the structure…

  10. Analysis of WAIS-IV Index Score Scatter Using Significant Deviation from the Mean Index Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Jacques; Coalson, Diane L.; Zhu, Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) does not include verbal IQ and performance IQ scores, as provided in previous editions of the scale; rather, this edition provides comparisons among four index scores, allowing analysis of an individual's WAIS-IV performance in more discrete domains of cognitive ability. To supplement…

  11. Caregiver Burden: Looking Beyond the Unidimensional Total Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sabrina; Chong, Mei Sian; Ali, Noorhazlina; Chan, Mark; Chua, Kia Chong; Lim, Wee Shiong

    2015-01-01

    The Zarit Burden Interview allows caregiver burden to be interpreted from a total score. However, recent studies propose a multidimensional Zarit Burden Interview model. This study aims to determine the agreement between unidimensional (UD) and multidimensional (MD) classification of burden, and differences in predictors among identified groups. We studied 165 dyads of dementia patients and primary caregivers. Caregivers were dichotomized into low-burden and high-burden groups based upon: (1) UD score using quartile cutoffs; and (2) MD model via exploratory cluster analysis. We compared UD versus MD 2×2 classification of burden using κ statistics. Caregivers not showing agreement by either definition were classified as "intermediate" burden. We performed binary logistic regression to ascertain differences in predictive factors. The 2 models showed moderate agreement (κ=0.72, P<0.01), yielding 104 low, 20 intermediate (UD "low burden"/MD "high burden"), and 41 high-burden caregivers. Neuropsychiatric symptoms [odds ratio (OR)=1.27, P=0.003], coresidence (OR=6.32, P=0.040), and decreased caregiving hours (OR=0.99, P=0.018) were associated with intermediate burden, whereas neuropsychiatric symptoms (OR=1.21, P=0.001) and adult children caregivers (OR=2.80, P=0.055) were associated with high burden. Our results highlight the differences between UD and MD classification of caregiver burden. Future studies should explore the significance of the noncongruent intermediate group and its predictors.

  12. Excitability scores of goats administered ascorbic acid and transported during hot-dry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayo, J O; Minka, N S; Mamman, M

    2006-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of ascorbic acid (AA) administration on goat excitability due to transportation. Ten goats administered AA (p.o.) at 100 mg/kg of body weight before transportation served as the experimental group, and seven goats administered only 10 ml/kg of sterile water (p.o.) served as controls. Excitability scores were recorded for each goat; when weighed, before, immediately after, and 3 h after 8 h of transportation. A score of one to four was allocated to each goat; higher scores represent greater excitability. Immediately after transportation, excitability scores decreased significantly, especially those of control goats (p 0.05) different from their pre-transportation normal values, whereas those of control goats were significantly lower (p < 0.01). The correlation i.e. the relationship between excitability score values and percent excitability (percentage of goat with particular excitability score) for different excitability score group 3 h post-transportation was positive and highly significant (p < 0.001), in both experimental and control goats. Our results indicate that road transportation induces considerable stress (depression) in goats as evidenced by a lower excitability score posttransportation. Moreover, the administration of AA pretransportation facilitated the transition from a state of depression to excitation. In conclusion, AA administration to animals prior to transportation may ameliorate the depression often encountered after road transportation.

  13. Neuropsychological test scores, academic performance, and developmental disorders in Spanish-speaking children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselli, M; Ardila, A; Bateman, J R; Guzmán, M

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is currently available about performance of Spanish-speaking children on different neuropsychological tests. This study was designed to (a) analyze the effects of age and sex on different neuropsychological test scores of a randomly selected sample of Spanish-speaking children, (b) analyze the value of neuropsychological test scores for predicting school performance, and (c) describe the neuropsychological profile of Spanish-speaking children with learning disabilities (LD). Two hundred ninety (141 boys, 149 girls) 6- to 11-year-old children were selected from a school in Bogotá, Colombia. Three age groups were distinguished: 6- to 7-, 8- to 9-, and 10- to 11-year-olds. Performance was measured utilizing the following neuropsychological tests: Seashore Rhythm Test, Finger Tapping Test (FTT), Grooved Pegboard Test, Children's Category Test (CCT), California Verbal Learning Test-Children's Version (CVLT-C), Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT), and Bateria Woodcock Psicoeducativa en Español (Woodcock, 1982). Normative scores were calculated. Age effect was significant for most of the test scores. A significant sex effect was observed for 3 test scores. Intercorrelations were performed between neuropsychological test scores and academic areas (science, mathematics, Spanish, social studies, and music). In a post hoc analysis, children presenting very low scores on the reading, writing, and arithmetic achievement scales of the Woodcock battery were identified in the sample, and their neuropsychological test scores were compared with a matched normal group. Finally, a comparison was made between Colombian and American norms.

  14. Lower bounds to the reliabilities of factor score estimators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessen, D.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/256041717

    2017-01-01

    Under the general common factor model, the reliabilities of factor score estimators might be of more interest than the reliability of the total score (the unweighted sum of item scores). In this paper, lower bounds to the reliabilities of Thurstone’s factor score estimators, Bartlett’s factor score

  15. Optimal cutting scores using a linear loss function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Wim J.; Mellenbergh, Gideon J.

    1977-01-01

    The situation is considered in which a total score on a test is used for classifying examinees into two categories: "accepted (with scores above a cutting score on the test) and "not accepted" (with scores below the cutting score). A value on the latent variable is fixed in advance; examinees above

  16. Effects of using a scoring guide on essay scores: generalizability theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Adnan

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to test the effect of task level and item consistency when two conditions, with and without the assistance of a scoring guide, were used to score essays. The use of generalization theory was proposed as a framework for examining the effect of task variability and use of the scoring guide on achievement measures. Participants were 21 students in Grade 9 enrolled in regular Turkish language and literature classes. Of these students 11 were men and 10 were women. Ten teachers from the city were raters. In the past, raters of essays have given varied judgements of writing quality. Utilizing decision and generalizability theories, variation in scores was evaluated using a three-way (person x rater x task) analysis of variance design. The scoring guide was beneficial in reducing variability of evaluating grammar and reading comprehension but not as helpful when assessing knowledge of concepts.

  17. Prediction of low birth weight using modified Indian council of medical research antenatal scoring method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metgud, Chandra; Naik, Vijaya; Mallapur, Maheshwar

    2013-12-01

    To study the prediction of low birth weight (LBW) using modified Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) antenatal scoring method. The present longitudinal study was carried out amongst 1138 pregnant women residing in area covered by Kinaye primary health centre (PHC) in rural Karnataka, India. Modified ICMR risk scoring revealed that 597 (52.5%) women had a risk score 6-10 (mild risk), 142 (12.5%) women had risk score 11-15 (moderate risk) and 29 (2.5%) had risk score ≥16 (severe risk), whereas, remaining 370 (32.5%) had a score of 0-5 considered as "no risk group". The incidence of LBW had direct relationship with the risk score. The sensitivity was high (80.6%), whereas, specificity was slightly low (70.4%), positive predictive value was low (43.8%) and negative predictive value high (92.7%) for LBW when the risk score cut-off point was >7. The modified ICMR antenatal scoring method can be used at all levels of health care and is an ideal instrument for prediction of LBW at the community level. It can be easily applied by even a health worker, not time consuming and at the same time does not lose its predictability.

  18. Impact of Science Tutoring on African Americans' Science Scores on the High School Students' Graduation Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Edward

    This study investigated the relationship between an after-school tutorial program for African American high school students at a Title I school and scores on the science portion of the High School Graduation Examination (HSGE). Passing the examination was required for graduation. The target high school is 99% African American and the passing rate of the target high school was 42%---lower than the state average of 76%. The purpose of the study was to identify (a) the relationship between a science tutorial program and scores on the science portion of the HSGE, (b) the predictors of tutoring need by analyzing the relationship between biology grades and scores on the science portion of the HSGE, and (c) the findings between biology grades and scores on the science portion of the HSGE by analyzing the relationship between tutorial attendance and HSGE scores. The study was based on Piaget's cognitive constructivism, which implied the potential benefits of tutorials on high-stakes testing. This study used a 1-group pretest-posttest, quantitative methodology. Results showed a significant relationship between tutoring and scores on the biology portion of the HSGE. Results found no significant relationship between the tutorial attendance and the scores on the biology portion of the HSGE or between the biology grades and scores on the biology portion of the HSGE before tutoring. It has implications for positive social change by providing educational stakeholders with empirically-based guidance in determining the potential benefit of tutorial intervention strategies on high school graduation examination scores.

  19. Accelerometry-based berg balance scale score estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simila, Heidi; Mantyjarvi, Jani; Merilahti, Juho; Lindholm, Mikko; Ermes, Miikka

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the validity of 3-D-accelerometry-based Berg balance scale (BBS) score estimation. In particular, acceleration patterns of BBS tasks and gait were the targets of analysis. Accelerations of the lower back were measured during execution of the BBS test and corridor walking for 54 subjects, consisting of neurological patients, older adults, and healthy young persons. The BBS score was estimated from one to three BBS tasks and from gait-related data, separately, through assessment of the similarity of acceleration patterns between subjects. The work also validated both approaches' ability to classify subjects into high- and low-fall-risk groups. The gait-based method yielded the best BBS score estimates and the most accurate BBS-task-based estimates were produced with the stand to sit, reaching, and picking object tasks. The proposed gait-based method can identify subjects with high or low risk of falling with an accuracy of 77.8% and 96.6%, respectively, and the BBS-task based method with corresponding accuracy of 89.5% and 62.1%.

  20. [Idiopathic mental retardation--importance of clinical diagnostic scores for case selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, Lavinia; Rusu, Cristina; Voloşciuc, M; Butnariu, Lăcrămioara; Braha, Elena; Grămescu, Mihaela; Bujoran, C; Gorduza, E V; Covic, M

    2009-01-01

    We present a retrospective study aimed to identify the correlation between de Vries clinical score and the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in mentally retarded (MR) children. We have used the score to identify patients who should be tested by karyotyping and subsequently MLPA (multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification) for subtelomeric rearrangements. Our group is formed of 36 children with variable MR associated with other anomalies. 18 children had chromosomal defects, whereas 18 had normal karyotypes. In the first group, total scores varied between 3 and 7. Chromosomal anomalies identified were: numerical (4) and structural (14). Chromosomes involved were: 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 17, X. Deletions were the most common and correlate with a greater score (> or = 4). Common clinical features were: short stature, microcephaly, nasal, ear and hand anomalies. In the second group the most frequent clinical feature was hand anomaly (61.2%) and cases with a high score have to be further tested (e.g. using MLPA) in order to identify minor defects. In our opinion a high score indicates the karyotype and then a MLPA testing. In conclusion, we present a retrospective study that proves the use of de Vries diagnostic score in the identification of chromosomal abnormalities in MR children.

  1. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  2. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  3. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  4. Above-knee vein harvest for coronary revascularization increases ASEPSIS score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akowuah, Enoch; Shrivastava, Vivek; Ponniah, Alan; Jamnadas, Binal; Chilton, Gary; Cooper, Graham

    2006-02-01

    The long saphenous vein may be harvested from the thigh or the lower leg, depending on the operating surgeon's preference. This prospective study compared the incidence of altered wound healing between these two sites in 175 patients undergoing routine coronary artery bypass grafting over a 3-month period. The patients were divided into 3 groups. In group A, the vein harvest site was restricted to above the upper border of the patella. Group B included harvest sites that started at the ankle but extended above the level of the upper border of the patella. In group C, the vein harvest site was restricted to below the upper border of the patella. The wounds were assessed daily using the ASEPSIS scoring system. In group A, significantly more patients (24%) had an ASEPSIS score > 10, compared to group B (3%) and group C (2%). The mean ASEPSIS score was significantly lower in group C than groups A or B, 1.5 +/- 2.4 vs. 6.5 +/- 3.2 or 3.7 +/- 1.7, respectively. The ASEPSIS score is reduced when vein harvest is restricted to below the level of the knee.

  5. One-to-many propensity score matching in cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassen, Jeremy A; Shelat, Abhi A; Myers, Jessica; Glynn, Robert J; Rothman, Kenneth J; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2012-05-01

    Among the large number of cohort studies that employ propensity score matching, most match patients 1:1. Increasing the matching ratio is thought to improve precision but may come with a trade-off with respect to bias. To evaluate several methods of propensity score matching in cohort studies through simulation and empirical analyses. We simulated cohorts of 20,000 patients with exposure prevalence of 10%-50%. We simulated five dichotomous and five continuous confounders. We estimated propensity scores and matched using digit-based greedy ("greedy"), pairwise nearest neighbor within a caliper ("nearest neighbor"), and a nearest neighbor approach that sought to balance the scores of the comparison patient above and below that of the treated patient ("balanced nearest neighbor"). We matched at both fixed and variable matching ratios and also evaluated sequential and parallel schemes for the order of formation of 1:n match groups. We then applied this same approach to two cohorts of patients drawn from administrative claims data. Increasing the match ratio beyond 1:1 generally resulted in somewhat higher bias. It also resulted in lower variance with variable ratio matching but higher variance with fixed. The parallel approach generally resulted in higher mean squared error but lower bias than the sequential approach. Variable ratio, parallel, balanced nearest neighbor matching generally yielded the lowest bias and mean squared error. 1:n matching can be used to increase precision in cohort studies. We recommend a variable ratio, parallel, balanced 1:n, nearest neighbor approach that increases precision over 1:1 matching at a small cost in bias. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of scoring models for identifying the need for therapeutic intervention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A new prediction score model for Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Chikara; Mikami, Tatsuya; Igarashi, Takasato; Aihara, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Jyuichi; Tono, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2016-11-01

    Multiple scoring systems have been developed to predict outcomes in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We determined how well these and a newly established scoring model predict the need for therapeutic intervention, excluding transfusion, in Japanese patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We reviewed data from 212 consecutive patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients requiring endoscopic intervention, operation, or interventional radiology were allocated to the therapeutic intervention group. Firstly, we compared areas under the curve for the Glasgow-Blatchford, Clinical Rockall, and AIMS65 scores. Secondly, the scores and factors likely associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding were analyzed with a logistic regression analysis to form a new scoring model. Thirdly, the new model and the existing model were investigated to evaluate their usefulness. Therapeutic intervention was required in 109 patients (51.4%). The Glasgow-Blatchford score was superior to both the Clinical Rockall and AIMS65 scores for predicting therapeutic intervention need (area under the curve, 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.81] vs 0.53 [0.46-0.61] and 0.52 [0.44-0.60], respectively). Multivariate logistic regression analysis retained seven significant predictors in the model: systolic blood pressure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. © 2016 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  7. The accuracy rate of Alvarado score, ultrasonography, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-30

    Sep 30, 2013 ... the patients have atypical clinical and laboratory findings. In ... recorded on the study form for data collection. The Alvarado score was calculated as described in the literature.[5] The Alvarado score is a 10-point scoring system.

  8. Usefulness of Regional Distribution of Coronary Artery Calcium to Improve the Prediction of All-Cause Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Tota-Maharaj, R; Joshi, PH; Budoff, MJ.; Whelton, SP; Zeb, I.; Rumberger, JA; Al-Mallah, MH; Blumenthal, RS; Nasir, K; Blaha, MJ

    2014-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Although the traditional Agatston coronary artery calcium (CAC) score is a powerful predictor of mortality, it is unknown if the regional distribution of CAC further improves cardiovascular risk prediction. We retrospectively studied 23,058 patients referred for Agatston CAC scoring, of whom 61% had CAC (n= 14,084). CAC distribution was defined as the number of vessels with CAC (0 to 4, including left main). For multivessel CAC, "diffuse" CAC was defined by decreasing per...

  9. Application of decision trees in credit scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljanka Kvesić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Banks are particularly exposed to credit risk due to the nature of their operations. Inadequate assessment of the borrower directly causes losses. The financial crisis the global economy is still going through has clearly shown what kind of problems can arise from an inadequate credit policy. Thus, the primary task of bank managers is to minimise credit risk. Credit scoring models were developed to support managers in assessing the creditworthiness of borrowers. This paper presents the decision tree based on exhaustive CHAID algorithm as one such model. Since the application of credit scoring models has not been adequately explored in the Croatian banking theory and practice, this paper aims not only to determine the characteristics that are crucial for predicting default, but also to highlight the importance of a quantitative approach in assessing the creditworthiness of borrowers.

  10. Sleep scoring using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzhina, Marina; Janoušek, Oto; Kolářová, Jana; Nováková, Marie; Honzík, Petr; Provazník, Ivo

    2012-06-01

    Rapid development of computer technologies leads to the intensive automation of many different processes traditionally performed by human experts. One of the spheres characterized by the introduction of new high intelligence technologies substituting analysis performed by humans is sleep scoring. This refers to the classification task and can be solved - next to other classification methods - by use of artificial neural networks (ANN). ANNs are parallel adaptive systems suitable for solving of non-linear problems. Using ANN for automatic sleep scoring is especially promising because of new ANN learning algorithms allowing faster classification without decreasing the performance. Both appropriate preparation of training data as well as selection of the ANN model make it possible to perform effective and correct recognizing of relevant sleep stages. Such an approach is highly topical, taking into consideration the fact that there is no automatic scorer utilizing ANN technology available at present.

  11. Shower reconstruction in TUNKA-HiSCORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porelli, Andrea; Wischnewski, Ralf [DESY-Zeuthen, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Tunka-HiSCORE detector is a non-imaging wide-angle EAS cherenkov array designed as an alternative technology for gamma-ray physics above 10 TeV and to study spectrum and composition of cosmic rays above 100 TeV. An engineering array with nine stations (HiS-9) has been deployed in October 2013 on the site of the Tunka experiment in Russia. In November 2014, 20 more HiSCORE stations have been installed, covering a total array area of 0.24 square-km. We describe the detector setup, the role of precision time measurement, and give results from the innovative WhiteRabbit time synchronization technology. Results of air shower reconstruction are presented and compared with MC simulations, for both the HiS-9 and the HiS-29 detector arrays.

  12. Right tail increasing dependence between scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M.; García, Jesús E.; González-López, V. A.; Romano, N.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the behavior of the conditional probability Prob(U > u|V > v) of two records coming from students of an undergraduate course, where U is the score of calculus I, scaled in [0, 1] and V is the score of physics scaled in [0, 1], the physics subject is part of the admission test of the university. For purposes of comparison, we consider two different undergraduate courses, electrical engineering and mechanical engineering, during nine years, from 2003 to 2011. Through a Bayesian perspective we estimate Prob(U > u|V > v) year by year and course by course. We conclude that U is right tail increasing in V, in both courses and for all the years. Moreover, over these nine years, we observe different ranges of variability for the estimated probabilities of electrical engineering when compared to the estimated probabilities of mechanical engineering.

  13. Predicting survival in malignant pleural effusion: development and validation of the LENT prognostic score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clive, Amelia O; Kahan, Brennan C; Hooper, Clare E; Bhatnagar, Rahul; Morley, Anna J; Zahan-Evans, Natalie; Bintcliffe, Oliver J; Boshuizen, Rogier C; Fysh, Edward T H; Tobin, Claire L; Medford, Andrew R L; Harvey, John E; van den Heuvel, Michel M; Lee, Y C Gary; Maskell, Nick A

    2014-12-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) causes debilitating breathlessness and predicting survival is challenging. This study aimed to obtain contemporary data on survival by underlying tumour type in patients with MPE, identify prognostic indicators of overall survival and develop and validate a prognostic scoring system. Three large international cohorts of patients with MPE were used to calculate survival by cell type (univariable Cox model). The prognostic value of 14 predefined variables was evaluated in the most complete data set (multivariable Cox model). A clinical prognostic scoring system was then developed and validated. Based on the results of the international data and the multivariable survival analysis, the LENT prognostic score (pleural fluid lactate dehydrogenase, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score (PS), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and tumour type) was developed and subsequently validated using an independent data set. Risk stratifying patients into low-risk, moderate-risk and high-risk groups gave median (IQR) survivals of 319 days (228-549; n=43), 130 days (47-467; n=129) and 44 days (22-77; n=31), respectively. Only 65% (20/31) of patients with a high-risk LENT score survived 1 month from diagnosis and just 3% (1/31) survived 6 months. Analysis of the area under the receiver operating curve revealed the LENT score to be superior at predicting survival compared with ECOG PS at 1 month (0.77 vs 0.66, pLENT scoring system is the first validated prognostic score in MPE, which predicts survival with significantly better accuracy than ECOG PS alone. This may aid clinical decision making in this diverse patient population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Soetomo score: score model in early identification of acute haemorrhagic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Hasan Machfoed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: On financial or facility constraints of brain imaging, score model is used to predict the occurrence of acute haemorrhagic stroke. Accordingly, this study attempts to develop a new score model, called Soetomo score. Material and methods: The researchers performed a cross-sectional study of 176 acute stroke patients with onset of ≤24 hours who visited emergency unit of Dr. Soetomo Hospital from July 14th to December 14th, 2014. The diagnosis of haemorrhagic stroke was confirmed by head computed tomography scan. There were seven predictors of haemorrhagic stroke which were analysed by using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Furthermore, a multiple discriminant analysis resulted in an equation of Soetomo score model. The receiver operating characteristic procedure resulted in the values of area under curve and intersection point identifying haemorrhagic stroke. Afterward, the diagnostic test value was determined. Results: The equation of Soetomo score model was (3 × loss of consciousness + (3.5 × headache + (4 × vomiting − 4.5. Area under curve value of this score was 88.5% (95% confidence interval = 83.3–93.7%. In the Soetomo score model value of ≥−0.75, the score reached the sensitivity of 82.9%, specificity of 83%, positive predictive value of 78.8%, negative predictive value of 86.5%, positive likelihood ratio of 4.88, negative likelihood ratio of 0.21, false negative of 17.1%, false positive of 17%, and accuracy of 83%. Conclusions: The Soetomo score model value of ≥−0.75 can identify acute haemorrhagic stroke properly on the financial or facility constrains of brain imaging.

  15. Evaluation of scoring system in cytological diagnosis and management of breast lesion with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N M Nandini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC breast is generally considered as a rapid, reliable, and safe diagnostic tool to distinguish non-neoplastic from neoplastic breast lesions. Masood′s Scoring Index has been proposed to help in sub-grouping of breast lesions so as to help in surgical management. Aims: To assess the accuracy of Modified Masood′s Scoring Index (MMSI in the diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions in patients with palpable breast lump, and review of literature. Settings and Design: A prospective study from a tertiary care center. Material and Methods: This prospective study included a total of 100 cases, both females and males, with palpable breast lump, in the age range of 10-80 years, over a period of 2 years from January 2007 to 2009, who underwent FNAC. They were cytologically grouped into five categories as suggested by Masood et al, and confirmed by histopathology. Results: Evaluation of Masood Scoring Index led to modification (Modified Masood Scoring Index; MMSI by shifting score 9 from Group I to Group II, thus increasing the diagnostic accuracy of the breast lesions. Conclusions: MMSI was found to be a useful, easily reproducible scoring method of breast lesions to improve diagnostic accuracy of nonproliferative breast disease and proliferative breast disease without atypia cases, as the prognosis and treatment of these cases varies.

  16. Malnutrition-Inflammation Score in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Behrooz Ebrahimzadehkor; Atamohammad Dorri; Abdolhamed Yapan-Gharavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is a prevalent complication in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS), comprehensive nutritional assessment tool, as the reference standard was used to examine protein-energy wasting (PEW) and inflammation in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive- analytical study, 48 hemodialysis patients were selected with random sampling. All the patients were interviewed and the MIS of the patients was recorded. T...

  17. MODELING CREDIT RISK THROUGH CREDIT SCORING

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Cantemir CALIN; Oana Cristina POPOVICI

    2014-01-01

    Credit risk governs all financial transactions and it is defined as the risk of suffering a loss due to certain shifts in the credit quality of a counterpart. Credit risk literature gravitates around two main modeling approaches: the structural approach and the reduced form approach. In addition to these perspectives, credit risk assessment has been conducted through a series of techniques such as credit scoring models, which form the traditional approach. This paper examines the evolution of...

  18. Credit Scoring Problem Based on Regression Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Khassawneh, Bashar Suhil Jad Allah

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This thesis provides an explanatory introduction to the regression models of data mining and contains basic definitions of key terms in the linear, multiple and logistic regression models. Meanwhile, the aim of this study is to illustrate fitting models for the credit scoring problem using simple linear, multiple linear and logistic regression models and also to analyze the found model functions by statistical tools. Keywords: Data mining, linear regression, logistic regression....

  19. CORRELATIVE ANALYSIS OF TOEFL iBT SCORES OF LISTENING SKILL VERSUS SCORES OF BUSINESS ENGLISH SPEAKING SKILL AMONG BINUS UNIVERSITY SOPHOMORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almodad Biduk Asmani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Article found out whether BINUS university sophomore’s TOEFL iBT scores of Listening skill are correlated with those of speaking skill. The research project was expected to result in the best teaching technique of delivering conversational tasks at BINUS University by using alternative approaches of integrated, isolated, or mixed skills. The research project applied the descriptive approach of quantitative method, and thus depends on numerical data. The research project examined the set of data under two skills of the same class groups, which were to compare the listening scores with the speaking ones. Then, the degree of correlation of the two skills was tested so as to find its significance. Interpretation and explanation of data was made based on the statistical results by using correlation research analysis. Based on the statistical results, the listening scores significantly correlated with those of the speaking skill, and there is a moderately linear relationship between these paired scores.

  20. CORRELATIVE ANALYSIS OF TOEFL iBT SCORES OF LISTENING SKILL VERSUS SCORES OF BUSINESS ENGLISH SPEAKING SKILL AMONG BINUS UNIVERSITY SOPHOMORES IN ACADEMIC YEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almodad Biduk Asmani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Article found out whether BINUS university sophomores TOEFL iBT scores of Listening skill are correlated with those of speaking skill. The research project was expected to result in the best teaching technique of delivering conversational tasks at BINUS University by using alternative approaches of integrated, isolated, or mixed skills. The research project applied the descriptive approach of quantitative method, and thus depends on numerical data. The research project examined the set of data under two skills of the same class groups, which were to compare the listening scores with the speaking ones. Then, the degree of correlation of the two skills was tested so as to find its significance. Interpretation and explanation of data was made based on the statistical results by using correlation research analysis. Based on the statistical results, the listening scores significantly correlated with those of the speaking skill, and there is a moderately linear relationship between these paired scores.

  1. Bodyweight and body condition score in rabbits on four different feeding regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebble, J L; Shaw, D J; Meredith, A L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of four diet regimes (extruded diet with ad lib hay, muesli with ad lib hay, ad lib hay only, ad lib muesli only) on bodyweight and body condition score in rabbits. Thirty-two Dutch rabbits were studied over 9 months. Bodyweight and body condition score were recorded weekly. All groups gained weight with age, but relative to the ad lib hay only group (mean, 1 · 77 ± 0 · 13 kg), after 9 months rabbits in the ad lib muesli only group were 146% heavier (2 · 59 ± 0 · 32 kg); extruded diet with ad lib hay group 125% heavier (2 · 21 ± 0 · 10 kg); and muesli with ad lib hay group 123% heavier (2 · 18 ± 0 · 13 kg). Median body condition score of the ad lib muesli only group was obese (4 · 5) and was higher than that in both the extruded diet with ad lib hay and muesli with ad lib hay (median = 3 · 5) groups (P lib hay and muesli with ad lib hay groups had above-ideal body condition score despite having bodyweights within the breed standard range. The ad lib hay only group had a median body condition score of 3 (ideal). There was an overall positive correlation between body condition score and weight (qs = 0 · 814, P < 0 · 001). The feeding of muesli without hay should be avoided, to prevent obesity. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Grouping Synonyms by Definitions

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, Ingrid; Jacquey, Evelyne; Venant, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for grouping the synonyms of a lemma according to its dictionary senses. The senses are defined by a large machine readable dictionary for French, the TLFi (Tr\\'esor de la langue fran\\c{c}aise informatis\\'e) and the synonyms are given by 5 synonym dictionaries (also for French). To evaluate the proposed method, we manually constructed a gold standard where for each (word, definition) pair and given the set of synonyms defined for that word by the 5 synonym dictionaries, 4 lexicographers specified the set of synonyms they judge adequate. While inter-annotator agreement ranges on that task from 67% to at best 88% depending on the annotator pair and on the synonym dictionary being considered, the automatic procedure we propose scores a precision of 67% and a recall of 71%. The proposed method is compared with related work namely, word sense disambiguation, synonym lexicon acquisition and WordNet construction.

  3. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eBrunborg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to high throughput are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. High throughput methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies, and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The high throughput modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring.

  4. Modelling the predictive performance of credit scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Shen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The article discussed the importance of rigour in credit risk assessment.Research purpose: The purpose of this empirical paper was to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems in Taiwan.Motivation for the study: Corporate lending remains a major business line for financial institutions. However, in light of the recent global financial crises, it has become extremely important for financial institutions to implement rigorous means of assessing clients seeking access to credit facilities.Research design, approach and method: Using a data sample of 10 349 observations drawn between 1992 and 2010, logistic regression models were utilised to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems.Main findings: A test of Goodness of fit demonstrated that credit scoring models that incorporated the Taiwan Corporate Credit Risk Index (TCRI, micro- and also macroeconomic variables possessed greater predictive power. This suggests that macroeconomic variables do have explanatory power for default credit risk.Practical/managerial implications: The originality in the study was that three models were developed to predict corporate firms’ defaults based on different microeconomic and macroeconomic factors such as the TCRI, asset growth rates, stock index and gross domestic product.Contribution/value-add: The study utilises different goodness of fits and receiver operator characteristics during the examination of the robustness of the predictive power of these factors.

  5. Validation of a new scoring system: Rapid assessment faecal incontinence score

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fernando; de; la; Portilla; Arantxa; Calero-Lillo; Rosa; M; Jiménez-Rodríguez; Maria; L; Reyes; Manuela; Segovia-González; María; Victoria; Maestre; Ana; M; García-Cabrera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To implement a quick and simple test- rapid assessment faecal incontinence score(RAFIS) and show its reliability and validity.METHODS: From March 2008 through March 2010, we evaluated a total of 261 consecutive patients, including 53 patients with faecal incontinence. Demographic and comorbidity information was collected. In a single visit, patients were administered the RAFIS. The results obtained with the new score were compared with those of both Wexner score and faecal incontinence quality of life scale(FIQL) questionnaire. The patient withoutinfluence of the surgeon completed the test. The role of surgeon was explaining the meaning of each section and how he had to fill. Reliability of the RAFIS score was measured using intra-observer agreement and Cronbach’s alpha(internal consistency) coefficient. Multivariate analysis of the main components within the different scores was performed in order to determine whether all the scores measured the same factor and to conclude whether the information could be encompassed in a single factor. A sample size of 50 patients with faecal incontinence was estimated to be enough to detect a correlation of 0.55 or better at 5% level of significance with 80% power.RESULTS: We analysed the results obtained by 53 consecutive patients with faecal incontinence(median age 61.55 ± 12.49 years) in the three scoring systems. A total of 208 healthy volunteers(median age 58.41 ± 18.41 years) without faecal incontinence were included in the study as negative controls. Pearson’s correlation coefficient between "state" and "leaks" was excellent(r = 0.92, P < 0.005). Internal consistency in the comparison of "state" and "leaks" yielded also excellent correlation(Cronbach’s α = 0.93). Results in each score were compared using regression analysis and a correlation value of r = 0.98 was obtained with Wexner score. As regards FIQL questionnaire, the values of "r " for the different subscales of the questionnaire were: "lifestyle" r

  6. Breast cancer acute radiotherapy morbidity evaluated by different scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Escarlata; Núñez, M Isabel; Guerrero, M Rosario; del Moral, Rosario; de Dios Luna, Juan; del Mar Rodríguez, M; Valenzuela, M Teresa; Villalobos, Mercedes; Ruiz de Almodóvar, José Mariano

    2002-05-01

    Reporting of the outcome of radiotherapy is not satisfactory without a description of the treatment-related side effects. The purposes of this paper were: (1) to evaluate the frequency and the severity of collateral skin reactions in a group of breast cancer patients; (2) to report the acute reactions using some current scoring systems and to compare the application of them, and (3) to investigate the variation between intra- and interobservers using these different scales. We studied 108 breast cancer patients who, after surgical treatment, received adjuvant radiotherapy. Clinical skin evaluation was always performed by the same radiotherapist the last day of treatment, and the collateral radiation effects were photographed at that moment to facilitate later evaluations by another two expert doctors. Normal tissue damage was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/The European Organisation for Research, and Treatment of Cancer/ (RTOG/EORTC), the Danish, the European, and the Biomed2 side-effect scales. The most frequent acute complications found were erythema (91.7%), dry desquamation (29.6%) and moist desquamation (35.2%). The reactions were classified as severe in 13.9, 23, 18.5 and 13% of the patients with each of the different systems used, respectively. The concordance between the scoring of radiation-induced side effects on the skin assessed by direct observation of the patients or by examination of the photographic document was sufficient. This is a warrant of accuracy in the evaluation of acute normal tissue lesions. Our results allow us to state the advantage of the RTOG system over the others in terms of evaluating the acute effects produced by radiotherapy of women with breast cancer.

  7. Clicker Score Trajectories and Concept Inventory Scores as Predictors for Early Warning Systems for Large STEM Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Un Jung; Sbeglia, Gena C.; Ha, Minsu; Finch, Stephen J.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing the retention of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors has recently emerged as a national priority in undergraduate education. Since poor performance in large introductory science and math courses is one significant factor in STEM dropout, early detection of struggling students is needed. Technology-supported "early warning systems" (EWSs) are being developed to meet these needs. Our study explores the utility of two commonly collected data sources—pre-course concept inventory scores and longitudinal clicker scores—for use in EWS, specifically, in determining the time points at which robust predictions of student success can first be established. The pre-course diagnostic assessments, administered to 287 students, included two concept inventories and one attitude assessment. Clicker question scores were also obtained for each of the 37 class sessions. Additionally, student characteristics (sex, ethnicity, and English facility) were gathered in a survey. Our analyses revealed that all variables were predictive of final grades. The correlation of the first 3 weeks of clicker scores with final grades was 0.53, suggesting that this set of variables could be used in an EWS starting at the third week. We also used group-based trajectory models to assess whether trajectory patterns were homogeneous in the class. The trajectory analysis identified three distinct clicker performance patterns that were also significant predictors of final grade. Trajectory analyses of clicker scores, student characteristics, and pre-course diagnostic assessment appear to be valuable data sources for EWS, although further studies in a diversity of instructional contexts are warranted.

  8. Exploring Content Validity of Shore Handwriting Screening and Newly Developed Score Sheet With Pre-Kindergarten Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise K. Donica

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limited tools exist to measure handwriting readiness skills of pre-kindergarten students. This study was a preliminary exploration of content validity of the Shore Handwriting Screening (SHS and the newly developed Score Sheet with the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2 in 4- and 5-year-old pre-kindergarten students. Because socioeconomic status (SES is known to impact handwriting skills, data from two different socioeconomic groups were collected. Method: Students from a Lower SES group (n = 36 and a Higher SES group (n = 14 completed the SHS and fine motor composite of the BOT-2. Pearson’s correlation was used to compare scores on the two assessments within the two groups. Results: SHS overall percentage scores were compared to standard scores and composite scores of the BOT-2. SHS scores displayed moderate to high correlation with fine manual control portions of the BOT-2 for the Lower SES group and low to moderate correlation for the same portion in the Higher SES group. Conclusion: SHS and the Score Sheet correlate to fine and visual-motor skill subtests on the fine manual control portions of the BOT-2, which supports the need for further research on the reliability and validity of the Score Sheet for use in practice.

  9. Evaluation of the current disease severity scores in paediatric FMF: is it necessary to develop a new one?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Gokhan; Demirkaya, Erkan; Acikel, Cengiz Han; Polat, Adem; Peru, Harun; Karaoglu, Abdulbaki; Sari, Erkan; Dursun, Ismail; Gok, Faysal; Ozen, Seza

    2012-04-01

    Modified adult disease severity scoring systems are being used for childhood FMF. We aim to test the clinical consistency of two common severity scoring systems and to evaluate the correlation of scores with the type of FMF mutations in paediatric FMF patients since certain mutations are prone to severe disease. Two hundred and fifty-eight children with FMF were cross-sectionally studied. Assessment of the disease severity was performed by using the modified scoring systems of Mor et al. and Pras et al. Genetic analysis was performed using PCR and restriction endonuclease digestion methods for the presence of 15 FMF gene mutations. FMF mutations were grouped into three based on well-known genotypic-phenotypic associations. Correlation between the mutation groups and the severity scoring systems was assessed. The consistency of the severity scoring systems was evaluated. The results of two scoring systems were not statistically consistent with each other (κ = 0.171). This inconsistency persisted even in a more homogeneous subgroup of patients with only homozygote mutations of M694V, M680I and M694I (κ = 0.125). There was no correlation between the mutation groups and either of the scoring systems (P = 0.002, r = 0,196 for scoring systems of Mor et al.; P = 0.009, r = 0.162 for Pras et al.). The inconsistency of the two scoring systems and lack of correlation between the scoring systems and mutation groups raises concerns about the reliability of these scoring systems in children. There is a need to develop a scoring system in children based on a prospective registry.

  10. Acute physiology, age, and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score is an alternative efficient predictor of mortality in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yohei; Shimizu, Mikio; Hirabayashi, Hidemitsu

    2007-05-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the prognostic value of the acute physiology, age, chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score in burn patients. We hypothesised that APACHE III score efficiently predicts mortality of burn patients as it reflects the physiological changes in the acute phase and the severity of the underlying illness. Data such as age, gender, inhalation injury, total burn surface area (TBSA), burn index (BI), prognostic burn index (PBI), APACHE III score and outcome of 105 hospitalised patients were analysed retrospectively. TBSA, BI, PBI, and APACHE III score in the mortality group were significantly higher than those of surviving group. The mean scores of surviving versus mortality groups were as follows: TBSA, 19.2+/-17.8% versus 69.1+/-28.4%, pAPACHE III score, 28.4+/-22.2% versus 71.3+/-32.1%, pAPACHE III score showed marked associations between higher scores and higher mortality. APACHE III score showed a significant correlation with PBI (pAPACHE III score could be used as an alternative efficient predictor of mortality in burn patients.

  11. House Staff Communication Training and Patient Experience Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladoyin A Oladeru MPH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess whether communication training for house staff via role-playing exercises (1 is well received and (2 improves patient experience scores in house staff clinics. Methods: We conducted a pre–post study in which the house staff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication training led by trained faculty in small groups. Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. House staff completed posttraining questionnaires. For 1 month prior to and 1 month following the training, patients in the house staff clinics completed surveys with Clinician and Group Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Preintervention and postintervention results for top-box scores were compared. Results: Forty-four of a possible 45 house staff (97.8% participated, with 31 (70.5% indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences in patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 preintervention surveys to 77 postintervention surveys. Conclusion: Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the “hidden curriculum” of training.

  12. Emotional intelligence score and performance of dental undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yuh; Ninomiya, Kazunori; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and undergraduate dental students' ability to deal with different situations of communication in a clinical dentistry practical training course of communication skills. Fourth-year students in 2012 and in 2013 at the Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata participated in the survey. The total number of participating students was 129 (88 males and 41 females). The students were asked to complete the Japanese version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test in communication skills. Female students tended to have significantly higher EI score than males. The EI score in the group with high-grade academic performers was higher than in the low-grade group. The influence of EI on academic performance appeared to be mainly due to the students' ability to accurately perceiving emotions and to their ability to understand emotional issues. The importance of EI may also lie in its ability to parse out personality factors from more changeable aspects of a person's behavior. Although further studies are required, we believe that dental educators need to assume the responsibility to help students develop their emotional competencies that they will need to prosper in their chosen careers. In our conclusion, dental educators should support low achievers to increase their levels of self-confidence instead of concentrating mainly on improving their technical skill and academic performance. This may lead to upgrading their skills for managing emotions and to changing their learning approach.

  13. Integrating GIS in the Middle School Curriculum: Impacts on Diverse Students' Standardized Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna; Alibrandi, Marsha

    2013-01-01

    This case study conducted with 1,425 middle school students in Palm Beach County, Florida, included a treatment group receiving GIS instruction (256) and a control group without GIS instruction (1,169). Quantitative analyses on standardized test scores indicated that inclusion of GIS in middle school curriculum had a significant effect on student…

  14. Empirical Bayes Estimates of Domain Scores under Binomial and Hypergeometric Distributions for Test Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Miao-Hsiang; Hsiung, Chao A.

    1994-01-01

    Two simple empirical approximate Bayes estimators are introduced for estimating domain scores under binomial and hypergeometric distributions respectively. Criteria are established regarding use of these functions over maximum likelihood estimation counterparts. (SLD)

  15. Hemophilic arthropathy. A scoring system for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Marini, M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, Coruna (Spain); Lopez-Fernandez, F. [Department of Hematology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, Coruna (Spain)

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to define a system for scoring hemophilic arthropathy (HA) based on MR findings, providing for objective evaluation of the degree of joint involvement and evolution after on-demand administration of FVIII substitutional therapy or prophylactic treatment. A total of 133 MR examinations (89 basal and 44 during follow-up) were performed in 25 patients. Patients were divided in two groups depending on the therapy received and the length of time that the disease had been evolving at the start of the study. Group I was composed of 10 patients with secondary prophylaxis and group II was composed by 15 treated on demand. T1-weighted and T2*-weighted images performed on a 0.5-T unit were prospectively evaluated. The joint involvement was established on a scale of 0 (no abnormalities), I (minimal amount of hemosiderin), II (large amount of hemosiderin and isolated cartilaginous erosion), III (cartilage destruction, bone erosions, and subchondral cysts) to IV (large internal joint derangement, secondary osteoarthritis and/or ankylosis). At basal MR examination, patients of group I showed no abnormalities (n=28, 75.6%), grade I (n=3), and grade II (n=6) of HA. Patients of group II corresponded to MR grades III (n=21) and IV (n=11) of HA. The MR follow-up showed improvement in three joints of group I and worsening in 5 joints in group I and 2 joints in group II. Early signs of HA were detected in 10 joints with MR imaging but were underestimated on plain radiographs. Advanced degrees of HA were classified as severe under both imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance is the preferred imaging technique to assess HA. The earliest signs of joint damage, detected by MR, are overlooked by plain radiography. The MR scoring system can be used for evaluating HA. Follow-up MR should be performed to evaluate regression or worsening of the abnormalities, primarily in the case of patients with prophylaxis who usually suffer normal or early joint involvement not

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) Physical Symptom Score: Development, Reliability, and Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A; Rudser, K; Kunin-Batson, A; Delaney, K; Whitley, C; Shapiro, E

    2016-01-01

    We quantified medical signs and symptoms to construct the Physical Symptom Score (PSS) for use in research to assess somatic disease burden in mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) to track disease and monitor treatments. We examined scoring reliability, its concurrent validity with other measures, and relationship to age in MPS type I. Fifty-four patients with MPS I (36 with Hurler syndrome treated with hematopoietic cell transplant and 18 with attenuated MPS I treated with enzyme replacement therapy), ages 5 to 18 years, were seen longitudinally over 5 years. The summation of frequency and severity of signs of specific organ involvement, surgeries, and hydrocephalus drawn from medical histories comprise the PSS. We examined relationship to age and to daily living skills (DLS) from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and physical quality of life from the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) for each group. The PSS was associated with age in both groups, indicating increase in disease burden over time. The PSS was significantly negatively associated with DLS (r = -0.48) and CHQ (r = -0.55) in the attenuated MPS I but not in the Hurler group. The association of somatic disease burden with physical quality of life and ability to carry out daily living skills suggests that the PSS will be useful in the measurement of disease and treatment effects in the attenuated MPS I group. Earlier treatment with transplant and differing parental expectations are possible explanations for its lack of association with other outcomes necessitating an adaptation for Hurler syndrome in the future.

  17. Outcome prediction in gastroschisis - The gastroschisis prognostic score (GPS) revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligandla, Pramod S; Baird, Robert; Skarsgard, Eric D; Emil, Sherif; Laberge, Jean-Martin

    2017-05-01

    The GPS enables risk stratification for gastroschisis and helps discriminate low from high morbidity groups. The purpose of this study was to revalidate GPS's characterization of a high morbidity group and to quantify relationships between the GPS and outcomes. With REB approval, complete survivor data from a national gastroschisis registry was collected. GPS bowel injury scoring was revalidated excluding the initial inception/validation cohorts (>2011). Length of stay (LOS), 1st enteral feed days (dFPO), TPN days (dTPN), and aggregate complications (COMP) were compared between low and high morbidity risk groups. Mathematical relationships between outcomes and integer increases in GPS were explored using the entire cohort (2005-present). Median (range) LOS, dPO, and dTPN for the entire cohort (n=849) was 36 (26,62), 13 (9,18), and 27 (20,46) days, respectively. High-risk patients (GPS≥2; n=80) experienced significantly worse outcomes than low risk patients (n=263). Each integer increase in GPS was associated with increases in LOS and dTPN by 16.9 and 12.7days, respectively (pGPS effectively discriminates low from high morbidity risk groups. Within the high risk group, integer increases in GPS produce quantitatively differentiated outcomes which may guide initial counseling and resource allocation. IIb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Comparison of Sleep Scored from Electroencephalography to Sleep Scored by Wrist Actigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    actigraphy in insomnia. S . 15(4): 293-301. Kripke, D. F., Mullaney, D. J., Messin, S., and Wyborney, V. G. 1978. Wrist actigraphic measures of sleep and...Cl•anificatiort) (U) A Comparison of Sleep Scored from Electroencephalography to Sleep Scored by Wrist Actigraphy 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) J.L. Caldwell...how much rest soldiers receive, various methods of monitoring activity have been used. One unobtrusive method is to use wrist activity monitors

  19. MELD-XI Scores Correlate with Post-Fontan Hepatic Biopsy Fibrosis Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William N; Acherman, Ruben J; Ciccolo, Michael L; Carrillo, Sergio A; Galindo, Alvaro; Rothman, Abraham; Winn, Brody J; Yumiaco, Noel S; Restrepo, Humberto

    2016-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that MELD-XI values correlated with hepatic total fibrosis scores obtained in 70 predominately stable, post-Fontan patients that underwent elective cardiac catheterization. We found a statistically significant correlation between MELD-XI values and total fibrosis scores (p = 0.003). Thus, serial MELD-XI values may be an additional useful clinical parameter for follow-up care in post-Fontan patients.

  20. The iScore predicts effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K; Tu, Jack V; Mamdani, Muhammad; Austin, Peter; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2012-05-01

    Tools to predict the clinical response after intravenous thrombolytic therapy (tPA) are scarce. The iScore is an existing validated tool to estimate outcomes after an acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of the iScore to predict clinical response and risk of hemorrhagic transformation after tPA. We applied the iScore (www.sorcan.ca/iscore) to patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke at 11 stroke centers in Ontario, Canada, between 2003 and 2009 identified from the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network. A cohort of patients with stroke treated at 154 centers in Ontario was used for external validation. We compared outcomes between patients receiving and not receiving tPA after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics using propensity-score matching. Patients were stratified into 3 a priori defined groups according to stroke severity using the iScore. Among 12 686 patients with an acute ischemic stroke, 1696 (13.4%) received intravenous thrombolysis. Higher iScores were associated with poor outcomes in both the tPA and non-tPA groups (Pacute ischemic stroke. Patients with high iScores may not have a clinically meaningful benefit from intravenous tPA at the time of carrying a higher risk of hemorrhagic complications.

  1. A new diagnostic score to detect osteoporosis in patients undergoing lumbar spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni; Papini, Giacomo Davide Edoardo [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo [IRCCS Fondazione Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata e Ambulatorio Malattie Metabolismo Minerale e Osseo, Servizio di Medicina Nucleare, Milano (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Signal intensity of lumbar-spine at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates to bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to define a quantitative MRI-based score to detect osteoporosis on lumbar-spine MRI. After Ethics Committee approval, we selected female patients who underwent both lumbar-spine MRI and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and a reference group of 131 healthy females (20-29 years) who underwent lumbar-spine MRI. We measured the intra-vertebral signal-to-noise ratio in L1-L4. We introduced an MRI-based score (M-score), on the model of T-score. M-score diagnostic performance in diagnosing osteoporosis was estimated against DXA using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. We included 226 patients (median age 65 years), 70 (31 %) being osteoporotic at DXA. MRI signal-to-noise ratio correlated to BMD (r = -0.677, P < 0.001). M-score negatively correlated to T-score (r = -0.682, P < 0.001). Setting a 90 %-specificity, an M-score threshold of 5.5 was found, distinguishing osteoporosis from non-osteoporosis (sensitivity 54 %; ROC AUC 0.844). Thirty-one (14 %) patients had a fragility fracture, with osteoporosis detected in 15 (48 %) according to M-score and eight (26 %) according to T-score (P = 0.016). M-score obtained on lumbar spine MRI is a quantitative method correlating with osteoporosis. Its diagnostic value remains to be demonstrated on a large prospective cohort of patients. (orig.)

  2. Editorial: risk scoring for colon cancer screening: validated, but still not ready for prime time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Otto S

    2011-06-01

    Risk stratification for colorectal cancer screening would allow us to use less expensive screening tests, such as sigmoidoscopy with or without fecal blood testing, on lower risk individuals, and reserve colonoscopy for those at higher risk. In this issue, Levitzky et al. validates a risk score that was previously developed by Imperiale et al., finding similar results among three ethnic groups. Risk scoring would detect 82-87% of proximal advanced neoplasia while decreasing colonoscopy use by 33-46%. However, before risk scoring is ready for widespread use, sigmoidoscopy access and performance issues need to be addressed, and we must be comfortable with missing some proximal neoplasms.

  3. Ossification score is a better indicator of maturity related changes in eating quality than animal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, S P F; Pethick, D W; Legrand, I; Wierzbicki, J; Allen, P; Farmer, L J; Polkinghorne, R J; Hocquette, J-F; Gardner, G E

    2016-04-01

    Ossification score and animal age are both used as proxies for maturity-related collagen crosslinking and consequently decreases in beef tenderness. Ossification score is strongly influenced by the hormonal status of the animal and may therefore better reflect physiological maturity and consequently eating quality. As part of a broader cross-European study, local consumers scored 18 different muscle types cooked in three ways from 482 carcasses with ages ranging from 590 to 6135 days and ossification scores ranging from 110 to 590. The data were studied across three different maturity ranges; the complete range of maturities, a lesser range and a more mature range. The lesser maturity group consisted of carcasses having either an ossification score of 200 or less or an age of 987 days or less with the remainder in the greater maturity group. The three different maturity ranges were analysed separately with a linear mixed effects model. Across all the data, and for the greater maturity group, animal age had a greater magnitude of effect on eating quality than ossification score. This is likely due to a loss of sensitivity in mature carcasses where ossification approached and even reached the maximum value. In contrast, age had no relationship with eating quality for the lesser maturity group, leaving ossification score as the more appropriate measure. Therefore ossification score is more appropriate for most commercial beef carcasses, however it is inadequate for carcasses with greater maturity such as cull cows. Both measures may therefore be required in models to predict eating quality over populations with a wide range in maturity.

  4. Interobserver Variability in Injury Severity Scoring After Combat Trauma: Different Perspectives, Different Values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    asymmetrically distributed around their medians by using the Shapiro–Wilk test . Therefore, medians were Figure 1 Injury scoring processes. Note: AIS...Medicine Volume 15, Edition 2/Summer 2015 compared by using the sign test . Reliability analysis was performed by grouping the scores according to...Injury severity scor - ing: influence of trauma surgeon involvement on accuracy. JTrauma Nurs. 2003;10:43–47. 28. Waydhas C, Nast-Kolb D, Trupka A

  5. Measuring sun exposure habits and sun protection behaviour using a comprehensive scoring instrument--an illustration of a possible model based on Likert scale scorings and on estimation of readiness to increase sun protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, M; Anderson, C D

    2012-08-01

    Few attempts to present a comprehensive scoring instrument for sun exposure and protection have been made. The present paper aims to describe a possible set of questions suitable for such an instrument, comprising the most important aspects of sun exposure and protection. The material from a previously performed intervention study, using a questionnaire based on Likert scales and on the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change (TTM), was utilised. 213 primary healthcare patients filled in the questionnaire and were randomised into two groups receiving sun protection advice, in Group 1 in letter-form, and in Group 2 orally during a doctor's consultation. In the original study, increased sun protection/readiness to increase sun protection was demonstrated for several items in Group 2, at six months. To compose a comprehensive scoring instrument, five questions concerning sun exposure/protection (intentional tanning, sunscreen use, choice of SPF, number of occasions with sunburn, and time spent in the sun at midday), were selected to give a 20 point behavioural score. Similarly, four TTM-based questions (giving up sunbathing, using clothes for sun protection, using sunscreens, and staying in the shade) gave a 16 point "propensity-to-change"-score. At follow-up, increased sun protection reflected in the behavioural score occurred only in Group 2 (p Likert scale behavioural score with a TTM-based propensity-to-change-score seems promising for the creation of a questionnaire-based, comprehensive scoring instrument for sun exposure and protection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparing the MMPI-2 scale scores of parents involved in parental competency and child custody assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendes, John; Lecci, Len

    2012-12-01

    MMPI-2 scores from a parent competency sample (N = 136 parents) are compared with a previously published data set of MMPI-2 scores for child custody litigants (N = 508 parents; Bathurst et al., 1997). Independent samples t tests yielded significant and in some cases substantial differences on the standard MMPI-2 clinical scales (especially Scales 4, 8, 2, and 0), with the competency sample obtaining higher clinical scores as well as higher scores on F, FB, VRIN, TRIN, and L, but lower scores on K, relative to the custody sample. Despite the higher scores in the competency sample, MMPI-2 mean scores did not exceed the clinical cutoff (T > 65). Moreover, the present competency sample essentially replicates the MMPI-2 scores of a previously published competency sample, suggesting that the present findings are representative of that population. The present findings suggest that separate reference groups be used when conducting child custody vs. parental competency evaluations, as these appear to be distinct populations despite there being similarities in the testing circumstances.

  7. The Clinical Importance of Changes in Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Michael S; Zhang, Jiameng; Ehrlich, Jason S

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the clinical importance of changes in diabetic retinopathy severity score (DRSS) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) treated with intravitreal ranibizumab. Post hoc analysis of the phase III RIDE and RISE studies of ranibizumab for treatment of DME. Four hundred sixty-eight eyes treated with ranibizumab from randomization with gradable DRSS on baseline fundus photographs. Visual and anatomic outcomes were examined in eyes grouped according to DRSS change from baseline to month 24. Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) letter score change, proportion of patients with 15 or more Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letter score change, mean contrast sensitivity change, proportion of patients with resolved macular edema, and leakage on fluorescein angiography. Most (56.8%) patients treated with ranibizumab experienced 1-step or more improvement in DRSS from baseline to month 24; 40.0% had no change, and 3.2% experienced DRSS worsening. Patients with DRSS stability or improvement had greater mean BCVA letter score changes (+15.1, +14.2, +11.3, and +11.2 letters for ≥3-step improvement, ≥2-step improvement, 1-step improvement, and no DRSS change, respectively) compared with +5.0 letters in patients who had any DRSS worsening. Best-corrected visual acuity letter score gain of 15 letters or more was more common in patients with 2-step or 3-step or more DRSS improvement (51.9% and 44.6%, respectively) compared with those with a 1-step DRSS improvement, no change, or worsening (37.9%, 39.6%, and 26.7%, respectively). A loss of 15 letters or more in BCVA was more common in patients with any DRSS worsening (13.3%) compared with patients who had stable or improved DRSS (0%-2.8%). Resolution of macular edema was more common in patients with DRSS improvement: 84.2%, 87.7%, and 92.3% of patients with 1-step, 2-step or more, and 3-step or more improvement in DRSS achieved central foveal thickness of 250 μm or less, compared with

  8. Diagnostic Efficacy of Vessel Specific Coronary Calcium Score in Detection of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevalli, Marzieh; Ghanaati, Hossein; Firouznia, Kavous; Kargar, Jalal; Aliyari Ghasabeh, Mounes; Shahriari, Mona; Jalali, Amir Hosein; Shakiba, Madjid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery calcification which is determined quantitatively by coronary calcium scoring has been known as a sign of coronary stenosis and thus future cardiac events; hence it has been noticed on spotlight of researchers in recent years. Developing different method for early and optimal detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) is really essential as CAD are the first cause of death in population. Objectives: To evaluate predictive value of vessel specific coronary artery calcium (CAC) score in predicting obstructive coronary artery disease. Patients and Methods: In this diagnostic test study we evaluated patients with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and CAC score which had been referred to two referral radiology center in Tehran, Iran and finally we selected 2525 patients in a single and sequential pattern to create a diagnostic study. The whole-heart CAC scores and vessel specific CAC scores were calculated individually for the 4 major epicardial coronary arteries in 2 distinct group; group A ( patients with previous history of CABG) and group B (patients without history of CABG). For evaluation of obstruction tree cut off points were described: 0 > ; at least 1 segment with any kind of stenosis, ≥ 50; at least 1 segment with stenosis ≥ 50, ≥ 70; at least 1 segment with stenosis ≥ 70. Results: Mean of coronary calcium scores in terms of each coronary artery vessel increase by increasing coronary stenosis grade in group B; LAD, RCA, LCX respectively have mean CAC score 6.06, 6.21 and 5.04 in normal patients and 221.6, 226.7 and 106.6 in patients with complete stenosis. As expected these findings don't work for group A. Also By increasing calcium score cutoff in all four vessels sensitivity decreased and specificity increased but steal LAD had higher sensitivity than other vessels and LM had higher specificity. Thus using calcium score method is useful for ruling out stenosis in LAD while calcium score of LM can predict

  9. Scoring function to predict solubility mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Christopher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutagenesis is commonly used to engineer proteins with desirable properties not present in the wild type (WT protein, such as increased or decreased stability, reactivity, or solubility. Experimentalists often have to choose a small subset of mutations from a large number of candidates to obtain the desired change, and computational techniques are invaluable to make the choices. While several such methods have been proposed to predict stability and reactivity mutagenesis, solubility has not received much attention. Results We use concepts from computational geometry to define a three body scoring function that predicts the change in protein solubility due to mutations. The scoring function captures both sequence and structure information. By exploring the literature, we have assembled a substantial database of 137 single- and multiple-point solubility mutations. Our database is the largest such collection with structural information known so far. We optimize the scoring function using linear programming (LP methods to derive its weights based on training. Starting with default values of 1, we find weights in the range [0,2] so that predictions of increase or decrease in solubility are optimized. We compare the LP method to the standard machine learning techniques of support vector machines (SVM and the Lasso. Using statistics for leave-one-out (LOO, 10-fold, and 3-fold cross validations (CV for training and prediction, we demonstrate that the LP method performs the best overall. For the LOOCV, the LP method has an overall accuracy of 81%. Availability Executables of programs, tables of weights, and datasets of mutants are available from the following web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/OptSolMut.html.

  10. Consider Propensity Scores to Compare Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence M. Rudner

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The underlying question when comparing treatments is usually whether an individual would do better with treatment X than they would with treatment Y. But there are often practical and theoretical problems in giving people both treatments and comparing the data. This paper presents the use of propensity score matching as a methodology that can be used to compare the effectiveness of different treatments. The method is applied to answer two questions: (1 - Should examinees take a college admissions test near or a few years after graduation?- and (2 - Do accommodated students receive an unfair advantage?- Data from a large admission testing program is used.

  11. Fingerprint Recognition Using Minutia Score Matching

    CERN Document Server

    J, Ravi; R, Venugopal K

    2010-01-01

    The popular Biometric used to authenticate a person is Fingerprint which is unique and permanent throughout a person's life. A minutia matching is widely used for fingerprint recognition and can be classified as ridge ending and ridge bifurcation. In this paper we projected Fingerprint Recognition using Minutia Score Matching method (FRMSM). For Fingerprint thinning, the Block Filter is used, which scans the image at the boundary to preserves the quality of the image and extract the minutiae from the thinned image. The false matching ratio is better compared to the existing algorithm.

  12. Reliability and validity of the Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting-Cursive (ETCH-C) using the general scoring criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Sharon; Goyen, Traci-Anne

    2010-01-01

    To determine the reliability and aspects of validity of the Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting-Cursive (ETCH-C; Amundson, 1995), using the general scoring criteria, when assessing children who use alternative writing scripts. Children in Years 5 and 6 with handwriting problems and a group of matched control participants from their respective classrooms were assessed with the ETCH-C twice, 4 weeks apart. Total Letter scores were most reliable; more variability should be expected for Total Word scores. Total Numeral scores showed unacceptable reliability levels and are not recommended. We found good discriminant validity for Letter and Word scores and established cutoff scores to distinguish children with and without handwriting dysfunction (Total Letter <90%, Total Word <85%). The ETCH-C, using the general scoring criteria, is a reliable and valid test of handwriting for children using alternative scripts.

  13. From mapping class groups to automorphism groups of free groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    We show that the natural map from the mapping class groups of surfaces to the automorphism groups of free groups, induces an infinite loop map on the classifying spaces of the stable groups after plus construction. The proof uses automorphisms of free groups with boundaries which play the role...... of mapping class groups of surfaces with several boundary components....

  14. Validating the Interpretations and Uses of Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    To validate an interpretation or use of test scores is to evaluate the plausibility of the claims based on the scores. An argument-based approach to validation suggests that the claims based on the test scores be outlined as an argument that specifies the inferences and supporting assumptions needed to get from test responses to score-based…

  15. Conditional Standard Errors of Measurement for Composite Scores Using IRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolen, Michael J.; Wang, Tianyou; Lee, Won-Chan

    2012-01-01

    Composite scores are often formed from test scores on educational achievement test batteries to provide a single index of achievement over two or more content areas or two or more item types on that test. Composite scores are subject to measurement error, and as with scores on individual tests, the amount of error variability typically depends on…

  16. 24 CFR 902.45 - Management operations scoring and thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management operations scoring and... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM PHAS Indicator #3: Management Operations § 902.45 Management operations scoring and thresholds. (a) Scoring. The Management Operations Indicator score...

  17. Construction of Chained True Score Equipercentile Equatings under the Kernel Equating (KE) Framework and Their Relationship to Levine True Score Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-09-24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiwen; Holland, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a new chained equipercentile equating procedure for the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design under the assumptions of the classical test theory model. This new equating is named chained true score equipercentile equating. We also apply the kernel equating framework to this equating design, resulting in a…

  18. The OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (PsAMRIS): definitions of key pathologies, suggested MRI sequences, and preliminary scoring system for PsA Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Wiell, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of important...

  19. Factors associated with dietary diversity score among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiew, Kee Fong; Chan, Yoke Mun; Lye, Munn Sann; Loke, Seng Cheong

    2014-12-01

    Studies on diet quality among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are scarce. This crosssectional study aimed to assess the diet quality and to determine its associated factors among individuals with T2DM at the Medical Outpatients Department, Serdang Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia, from July 2010 to March 2011. Subjects were interviewed for sociodemographic data. Diabetes history was retrieved from the hospital's e-database. Usual dietary intake was measured using a food frequency questionnaire, from which a dietary diversity score was obtained with two measures: Food Group Score and Serving Score were constructed based on the Malaysian Dietary Guidelines. Food Group Score was computed from the number of food groups consumed from five major food groups (grains, vegetables, fruits, meat, and dairy products) whereas Serving Score was computed from the number of servings consumed from the various food groups. Anthropometric measures, including weight, height, waist- and hip-circumference were examined. For data analyses, descriptive statistics, simple and multiple linear regression were conducted using IBM SPSS Statis- tics 20.0. A total of 113 subjects (50.4% female), with mean?SD age of 54.05 +/- 10.30 years and duration of diabetes of 11.25?9.05 years were studied. The mean Food Group Score and Serving Score were 4.12 +/- 0.79 and 12.75+3.50 respectively. Slightly more than one-third of the subjects achieved five food groups a day while less than 2% consumed a desirable number of servings from all food groups. Among the five food groups, dairy, and fruits were the least-frequently consumed foods. Lower education, lower personal income, working, non-insulin, overweight and obese subjects had significantly lower Food Group Score than their counterparts [F (6,106)=4.924, pnational dietary guidelines. The importance of taking a well-balanced diet in accordance with the guidelines should be emphasized, especially among those with lower educational level

  20. Teaching Group Work with "The Great Debaters"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffry; Autry, Linda; Olson, Joann S.; Johnson, Kaprea F.

    2014-01-01

    An experiential learning activity, based on the film "The Great Debaters" (Washington, D., 2007), was used during a group work class. Description and preliminary evaluation of the activity is provided, including analysis of participant scores on the group leader self-efficacy instrument at multiple points. Implications and future…

  1. Researching Group Assessment: Jazz in the Conservatoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Elisabeth; Moore, Hilary

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into methods and scorings for jazz assessment in Trinity College of Music, London, focusing on the possibility of introducing group assessment. It considers the advantages of group assessment methods, contrasting these with the more traditional approach, firmly established in conservatoires, of…

  2. Accuracy of a combined score of zygote and embryo morphology for selecting the best embryos for IVF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-li QIAN; Ying-hui YE; Chen-ming XU; Fan JIN; He-feng HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the accuracy of a scoring system combining zygote and embryo morphology in predicting the outcome of in vitro fertilization(IVF)treatment.Methods:In a study group,117 consecutive IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI) cycles with embryo transfer were carried out and 312 embryos were scored Using a combmed scoring system(CSS)of zygote and embryo morphology before transplantation.In a control group,a total of 420 IVF or ICSI cycles were carried out and 1176 embryos were scored using a cumulative embryo score(CES).The effects of the combined scoring system on the embryo implantation rate and pregnancy rate per cycle were analyzed.Results:Using the combined scoring system,the embryo implantation rate(27.6%)and the clinical pregnancy rate(48.7%)were significantly higher than those in the control group(20.8%and 38.6%,respectively).Also,the implantation rate of embryos scoring≥70 (38.5%:82 sacs/213 embryos)was significantly higher (P<0.001)than that of embryos scoring<70(4%:4 sacs/99 embryos).The pregnancy rate of patients with embryos scoring≥70 using the combined scoring system(66.7%)Was significantly higher(P<0.001)than that of patients with embryos scoring≥20 using the cumulative embryo score(59.0%).Conclusion:The results suggest that selecting embryos with a high Score(≥70)using the combined scoring system could inerease the implantation rate and pregnancy rate,and that using a scoring system combining assessments of human zygotes and pre-implantation embryos might predict IVF outcomes more accurately than using a cumulafive embryo score.

  3. Physics First: Impact on SAT Math Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Craig E.

    Improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has become a national priority and the call to modernize secondary science has been heard. A Physics First (PF) program with the curriculum sequence of physics, chemistry, and biology (PCB) driven by inquiry- and project-based learning offers a viable alternative to the traditional curricular sequence (BCP) and methods of teaching, but requires more empirical evidence. This study determined impact of a PF program (PF-PCB) on math achievement (SAT math scores) after the first two cohorts of students completed the PF-PCB program at Matteo Ricci High School (MRHS) and provided more quantitative data to inform the PF debate and advance secondary science education. Statistical analysis (ANCOVA) determined the influence of covariates and revealed that PF-PCB program had a significant (p < .05) impact on SAT math scores in the second cohort at MRHS. Statistically adjusted, the SAT math means for PF students were 21.4 points higher than their non-PF counterparts when controlling for prior math achievement (HSTP math), socioeconomic status (SES), and ethnicity/race.

  4. [Validation of a diagnostic scoring system (Ohmann score) in acute appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, A; Sitter, H; Rampp, T A; Schäfer, E; Hasse, C; Lorenz, W; Rothmund, M

    1999-07-01

    A diagnostic scoring system, recently published by Ohmann et al. in this journal, was validated by analyzing the clinicopathological data of a consecutive series of 2,359 patients, admitted for suspicion of acute appendicitis. The results of the scoring system were compared to the results of clinical evaluation by junior (provisional) and senior surgeons (final clinical diagnosis). To assess the diagnostic ability of the score, the accuracy and positive predictive value were defined as the major diagnostic performance parameters; the rate of theoretical negative laparotomies and that of diagnostic errors served as the major procedural performance parameters. Of 2,359 patients admitted for suspected acute appendicitis, 662 were proven to have acute appendicitis by histology, for a prevalence of 28%. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the provisional clinical diagnosis were 0.50, 0.94, 0.77, 0.83, and 0.82; 0.93, for the score 0.63, 0.93, 0.77, 0.86 and 0.84, and for the final clinical diagnosis 0.90, 0.94, 0.85, 0.96, and 0.93, respectively. Of the main diagnostic performance parameter, the accuracy of the score was significantly better than that of provisional clinical diagnosis (P apendicitis, the score demonstrated a superior performance, with only 6 cases missed (0.9%). However, the number of patients with acute appendicitis, including those with perforated disease, who were not identified by the score, was almost four times that of the final clinical diagnosis (245 vs 63). With regard to the main procedural performance parameter, the score resulted in a significantly smaller number of diagnostic errors than the provisional clinical investigator (P < 0.05, chi 2 test). The results of this study indicate that the diagnostic scoring system might be helpful when experienced investigators or additional diagnostic modalities such as ultrasonography are not available. It may therefore be of value

  5. Comparing Propofol with Sodium Thiopental on Neonatal Apgar Score after Elective Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Dadras

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Apgar score (Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, and Respiration of newborn babies immediately after birth is a determining factor involved with mortality of newborns after birth. Regarding the disagreement on advantages and possible disadvantages of propofol rather thiopental in the available references, the study was triggered with the aim of analyzing effects of two mentioned drugs on babies’ apgar score, mothers’ nausea, vomit and time necessary for mothers’ recovery. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, a total of 230 healthy women who were volunteered to undertake cesarean operation were selected and then divided randomly into two equal groups using statistical blocking. One group was treated by propofol while other one was treated by thiopental. The prescribed drugs for both groups were identical except the anesthesia induction drug. Babies’ Apgar score 1 and 5 minutes after birth and recovery period, mothers’ nausea and vomiting after operation were recorded. Results: Apgar score I minute 1 (p=0.041 and apgar score in minute 5 (p=0.034 for propofol group were meaningfully higher than those for thiopental group. Recovery time from anesthesia was not different meaningfully in two groups (p=0.67. Statistical analysis of nausea and vomit in both groups showed that they are lower in propofol group rather thiopental group (p=0.028.Conclusion: It seems that in cesarean operations, after sufficient fluid therapy, propofol can be a proper drug to achieve anesthesia. Moreover it exerts less impact on cesarean babies’ apgar and stimulates lower levels of nausea and vomiting in mothers.

  6. Correlation between Timi Risk Score and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Unstable Angina Pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savovic Zorica

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Given Taking that the TIMI score is a major predictor of MACE, this study aimed to determine the value of the TIMI risk score in predicting poor outcomes (death, myocardial infarction, recurrent pain in patients presenting with unstable angina pectoris in short-term observation. A total of 107 patients with APns were examined at the Clinical Centre Kragujevac and were included in the investigation. The TIMI score was determined on the first day of hospitalization. During hospitalization, the following factors were also observed: troponin, ECG evolution, further therapy (pharmacologic therapy and/or emergency PCI or CABG, age, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. The low-risk group (TIMI 0 - 2 included 30.8% of patients, whereas 47.6% of patients were in the intermediate-risk group (TIMI 3 - 4, and 21.5% of patients were in the high-risk group (TIMI 5 - 7. Good outcomes (without adverse event and poor outcomes (death, myocardial infarction, and recurring chest pain were dependent on the TIMI risk score. The increase in TIMI risk score per one unit increased the risk of a poor outcome by 54%. Troponin and TIMI risk score were positively correlated. Our results suggest that the TIMI risk score may be a reliable predictor of a poor outcome (MACE during the short-term observation of patients with APns. Moreover, patients identified as high-risk benefit from early invasive PCI, enoxaparin and Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitors. Th us, routine use of the TIMI risk score at admission may reduce the number of patients not recognized as high-risk.

  7. Spontaneous mentalizing in neurotypicals scoring high versus low on symptomatology of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Annabel D; Brass, Marcel; Wiersema, Jan R

    2017-09-25

    Spontaneous mentalizing ability has been linked to symptoms severity in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here we investigated whether in neurotypicals, higher levels of ASD symptomatology could also be linked to lower levels of spontaneous mentalizing, by comparing neurotypicals scoring high with those scoring low on the short Autism Spectrum Quotient. Participants watched movies during which they, and another agent, formed beliefs about the location of an object. These beliefs could influence reaction times (RT) to that object in the outcome phase. We expected participants with more ASD symptoms to show less spontaneous mentalizing, as reflected by a smaller effect of the other agent's beliefs on RT patterns (the ToM index). In contrast, the effect of own beliefs on RTs, reflecting an egocentric bias, was expected to be larger in the high-scoring group. Results showed that groups differed in the effect of the agent's beliefs; the ToM index was highly significant in the low-scoring group, while being absent in the high-scoring group. No difference in egocentric bias was observed. These findings suggest that the relationship between levels of ASD symptomatology and spontaneous mentalizing is not only present in individuals with ASD, but also in the neurotypical population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of New Ballards score and Parkins score for gestational age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumar, Kavita; d'Lima, Annely; Nesargi, Saudamini; Rao, Suman; Bhat, Swarnarekha

    2013-08-01

    This prospective analytical study was done to compare the accuracy of New Ballards score (NBS) and Parkins score (PS) in assessing the gestational age (GA) in newborns. The GA of 284 babies was assessed by the NBS and PS within 24 hours of birth. The two methods of assessment were compared using the Bland Altmann Plot. The mean difference between the two measurements was 1.530576. 95% of the values lay within the limits of agreement which are -1.82982 and 4.890974. The two methods are found to be in acceptable agreement. Parkins score enables us to easily assess the gestational age of babies within ±12 days, especially in sick and preterm babies.

  9. Field trials of the Baby Check score card: mothers scoring their babies at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, A J; Morley, C J; Green, S J; Cole, T J; Walker, K A; Bonnett, J M

    1991-01-01

    The Baby Check score card has been developed to help parents and health professionals grade the severity of acute illness in babies. This paper reports the results of two field trials in which mothers used Baby Check at home, 104 mothers scoring their babies daily for a week and 56 using it for six months. They all found Baby Check easy to use, between 68% and 81% found it useful, and 96% would recommended it to others. Over 70% of those using it daily used it very competently. Those using it infrequently did less well, suggesting that familiarity with the assessment is important. The scores obtained show that Baby Check's use would not increase the number of mothers seeking medical advice. With introduction and practice most mothers should be able to use Baby Check effectively. It should help them assess their babies' illnesses and make appropriate decisions about seeking medical advice.

  10. Prediction of true test scores from observed item scores and ancillary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Shelby J; Yao, Lili; Sinharay, Sandip

    2015-05-01

    In many educational tests which involve constructed responses, a traditional test score is obtained by adding together item scores obtained through holistic scoring by trained human raters. For example, this practice was used until 2008 in the case of GRE(®) General Analytical Writing and until 2009 in the case of TOEFL(®) iBT Writing. With use of natural language processing, it is possible to obtain additional information concerning item responses from computer programs such as e-rater(®). In addition, available information relevant to examinee performance may include scores on related tests. We suggest application of standard results from classical test theory to the available data to obtain best linear predictors of true traditional test scores. In performing such analysis, we require estimation of variances and covariances of measurement errors, a task which can be quite difficult in the case of tests with limited numbers of items and with multiple measurements per item. As a consequence, a new estimation method is suggested based on samples of examinees who have taken an assessment more than once. Such samples are typically not random samples of the general population of examinees, so that we apply statistical adjustment methods to obtain the needed estimated variances and covariances of measurement errors. To examine practical implications of the suggested methods of analysis, applications are made to GRE General Analytical Writing and TOEFL iBT Writing. Results obtained indicate that substantial improvements are possible both in terms of reliability of scoring and in terms of assessment reliability.

  11. Pediatric asthma severity score is associated with critical care interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maue, Danielle K; Krupp, Nadia; Rowan, Courtney M

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if a standardized asthma severity scoring system (PASS) was associated with the time spent on continuous albuterol and length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). METHODS This is a single center, retrospective chart review study at a major children’s hospital in an urban location. To qualify for this study, participants must have been admitted to the PICU with a diagnosis of status asthmaticus. There were a total of 188 participants between the ages of two and nineteen, excluding patients receiving antibiotics for pneumonia. PASS was calculated upon PICU admission. Subjects were put into one of three categories based on PASS: ≤ 7 (mild), 8-11 (moderate), and ≥ 12 (severe). The groups were compared based on different variables, including length of continuous albuterol and PICU stay. RESULTS The age distribution across all groups was similar. The median length of continuous albuterol was longest in the severe group with a duration of 21.5 h (11.5-27.5), compared to 15 (7.75-23.75) and 10 (5-15) in the moderate and mild groups, respectively (P = 0.001). The length of stay was longest in the severe group, with a stay of 35.6 h (22-49) compared to 26.5 (17-30) and 17.6 (12-29) in the moderate and mild groups, respectively (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION A higher PASS is associated with a longer time on continuous albuterol, an increased likelihood to require noninvasive ventilation, and a longer stay in the ICU. This may help safely distribute asthmatics to lower and higher levels of care in the future.

  12. Body condition score (BCS and metabolic status of shelter dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Andrighetto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A group of 147 shelter dogs were weighted and assigned a body condition score (BCS using a 9 point scale system, in order to evaluate the prevalence of obesity in the kennel. More than 60% of the animals showed a BCS³6 (overweight and obese and this condition was mainly attributed to an excess of carbohydrates and fat in the diet. In 67/147 dogs, a blood sample was drawn and the effects of BCS, age and time spent in the shelter were evaluated on biochemical parameters. Obese dogs showed significantly higher levels of triglycerides (P<0.01, while increasing BCS determined only an increasing non significant trend on cholesterol values. Age influenced creatinine (P<0.05 and the oldest dogs scoring BCS³6 registered significant higher NEFA (P<0.05 and CK (P=0.01 levels. Time spent in the shelter did not affect any parameter. The dogs’ metabolic condition reflects the need of taking more care of the quality of feed administered in the shelters to avoid the negative health effects caused by chronic obesity.

  13. Cluster analysis in retail segmentation for credit scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Scitovski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to segment retail clients by using adaptive Mahalanobis clustering in a way that each segment can be suitable for separate credit scoring development such that a better risk assessment of retail clients could be accomplished. A real data set on retail clients from a Croatian bank was used in the paper. Grouping of the data point set is carried out by using the adaptive Mahalanobis partitioning algorithm (see, e.g., [20]. It is an incremental algorithm, which recognizes ellipsoidal clusters with the main axes in the directions of eigenvectors of the corresponding covariance matrix of the data set. On the basis of the given data set, by using the well-known DIRECT algorithm for global optimization it is possible to search successively for an optimal partition with k=2, 3,... clusters. After that, a partition with the most appropriate number of clusters is determined by using various validity indexes. Based on the description of each cluster, banks could decide to develop a separate credit scoring model for each cluster as well as to create a business strategy customized to each cluster.

  14. House staff communication training and patient experience scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeru, Oladoyin A; Hamadu, Musleehat; Cleary, Paul D; Hittelman, Adam B; Bulsara, Ketan R; Laurans, Maxwell SH; DiCapua, Daniel B; Marcolini, Evie G; Moeller, Jeremy J; Khokhar, Babar; Hodge, Jeannette W; Fortin, Auguste H; Hafler, Janet P; Bennick, Michael C; Hwang, David Y

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess whether communication training for housestaff via role-playing exercises (1) is well-received and (2) improves patient experience scores in housestaff clinics. Methods We conducted a pre-post study in which the housestaff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication trainingled by trained faculty in small groups . Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. Housestaff completed post-training questionnaires. For one month prior to and one month following the training, patients in the housestaff clinics completed surveys with CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Pre-and post -intervention results for top-box scores were compared. Results Forty -four of a possible 45 housestaff (97.8%) participated, with 31 (70.5%) indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences on patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 pre-intervention patients surveys to 77 post-intervention surveys. Conclusion Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the “hidden curriculum” of training.

  15. Gray Matter Changes in Demyelinating Disease: Correlations with Clinical Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Mihaela; Aroceanu, Adina; Ferastraoaru, Victor; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2015-09-01

    Recent MR studies have shown that, in multiple sclerosis, selective regional, but not global gray matter atrophy occurs in multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to identify specific areas of gray matter volume changes and explore the relationship between atrophy and clinical motor outcomes. Nine patients with relapsing remitting MS and 9 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR acquisitions, a GE- Genesis- Signa, 1.5T MR system, was used. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM), subcortical structures segmentation (FIRST) and volumetric (SIENAx) FSL tools were used in the study. Group comparison showed atrophy for several gray matter regions. The most important volume reductions were found for subcortical deep gray matter areas. Correlations with clinical scores were checked and specific gray matter areas showed significant volume reductions associated with motor scores (9-hole peg time and 25-feet walk time) and EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale). We performed a voxelwise analysis of gray matter changes in MS and found a more prominent atrophy for the subcortical structures than for cortical gray matter. Using an additional analysis (FIRST and SIENAx segmentation/volumetry) we were able to confirm the VBM results and to quantify the degree of atrophy in specific structures. Specific gray matter regions which volume reductions correlate with 25-feet walk, 9-hole peg times and EDSS suggest that 25-feet walk time is the best predictor of disease progression in terms of gray matter reduction.

  16. What’s the Score? Walkable Environments and Subsidized Households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neighborhood walkability can influence individual health, social interactions, and environmental quality, but the relationships between subsidized households and their walkable environment have not been sufficiently examined in previous empirical studies. Focusing on two types of subsidized housing developments (Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC and Public Housing (PH in Austin, Texas, this study evaluates the neighborhood walkability of place-based subsidized households, utilizing objectively measured Walk Score and walking-related built environment data. We also used U.S. Census block group data to account for the socio-demographic covariates. Based on various data, we employed bivariate and multivariate analyses to specify the relationships between subsidized households and their neighborhood walkable environment. The results of our bivariate analyses show that LIHTC households tend to be located in car-dependent neighborhoods and have more undesirable walking-related built environment conditions compared with non-LIHTC neighborhoods. Our regression results also represent that LIHTC households are more likely to be exposed to neighborhoods with low Walk Score, less sidewalk coverage, and more highways and major roads, while there are no significant associations for PH households. These findings imply that more attention and effort toward reducing the inequitable distributions of walkable neighborhood features supporting rather than hindering healthy lifestyles must be provided to subsidized households.

  17. Gait Deviation Index, Gait Profile Score and Gait Variable Score in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg; Pedersen, Niels Wisbech;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Gait Deviation Index (GDI) and Gait Profile Score (GPS) are the most used summary measures of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, the reliability and agreement of these indices have not been investigated, limiting their clinimetric quality for research and clinical...... practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the intra-rater reliability and agreement of summary measures of gait (GDI; GPS; and the Gait Variable Score (GVS) derived from the GPS). The intra-rater reliability and agreement were investigated across two repeated sessions in 18 children aged 5...

  18. Do efficiency scores depend on input mix?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Kronborg, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we examine the possibility of using the standard Kruskal-Wallis (KW) rank test in order to evaluate whether the distribution of efficiency scores resulting from Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is independent of the input (or output) mix of the observations. Since the DEA frontier...... is estimated, many standard assumptions for evaluating the KW test statistic are violated. Therefore, we propose to explore its statistical properties by the use of simulation studies. The simulations are performed conditional on the observed input mixes. The method, unlike existing approaches...... the assumption of mix independence is rejected the implication is that it, for example, is impossible to determine whether machine intensive project are more or less efficient than labor intensive projects....

  19. Tools & techniques--statistics: propensity score techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Bruno R; Gahl, Brigitta; Jüni, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Propensity score (PS) techniques are useful if the number of potential confounding pretreatment variables is large and the number of analysed outcome events is rather small so that conventional multivariable adjustment is hardly feasible. Only pretreatment characteristics should be chosen to derive PS, and only when they are probably associated with outcome. A careful visual inspection of PS will help to identify areas of no or minimal overlap, which suggests residual confounding, and trimming of the data according to the distribution of PS will help to minimise residual confounding. Standardised differences in pretreatment characteristics provide a useful check of the success of the PS technique employed. As with conventional multivariable adjustment, PS techniques cannot account for confounding variables that are not or are only imperfectly measured, and no PS technique is a substitute for an adequately designed randomised trial.

  20. Reproducibility of scoring emphysema by HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinen, A.; Partanen, K.; Rytkoenen, H.; Vanninen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Erkinjuntti-Pekkanen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Pulmonary Diseases

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the reproducibility of three visual scoring methods of emphysema and compared these methods with pulmonary function tests (VC, DLCO, FEV1 and FEV%) among farmer's lung patients and farmers. Material and Methods: Three radiologists examined high-resolution CT images of farmer's lung patients and their matched controls (n=70) for chronic interstitial lung diseases. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver variability were assessed for three methods: severity, Sanders' (extent) and Sakai. Pulmonary function tests as spirometry and diffusing capacity were measured. Results: Intraobserver -values for all three methods were good (0.51-0.74). Interobserver varied from 0.35 to 0.72. The Sanders' and the severity methods correlated strongly with pulmonary function tests, especially DLCO and FEV1. Conclusion: The Sanders' method proved to be reliable in evaluating emphysema, in terms of good consistency of interpretation and good correlation with pulmonary function tests.

  1. Impact of SYNTAX score on 1-year clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for unprotected left main coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Kamijima, Ryo; Iwaki, Taku; Michishita, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    SYNTAX score is an angiographic scoring system that was developed to quantify the number, complexity, and location of lesions in patients undergoing coronary revascularization. Up to now, the impact of SYNTAX score on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for unprotected left main coronary artery (LMCA) lesions has not been fully examined. Therefore, we evaluate the usefulness of the SYNTAX score and identify the cutoff value of this score to predict 1-year clinical outcomes in patients undergoing PCI for unprotected LMCA lesions. This was a single-center retrospective study that included 49 consecutive patients undergoing elective PCI for unprotected LMCA lesions. We calculated the SYNTAX score and examined the correlations between this score and 1-year clinical outcomes. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) occurred in 12 patients (24%): target lesion revascularization in 9 patients (18%), myocardial infarction in 2 (4%), and cardiac death in 1 (2%). The frequency of MACE was significantly higher in the intermediate (47%) or high score group (50%) than in the low score group (4%). Furthermore, the SYNTAX score was significantly higher in the MACE group than in the non-MACE group (31 vs. 22, p = 0.008). Receiver-operating characteristic curve showed that the SYNTAX score exhibited 83% sensitivity and 76% specificity for predicting the development of MACE at a cutoff value 26. These results demonstrate that the SYNTAX score could be a useful tool to predict 1-year clinical outcomes in patients undergoing elective PCI for unprotected LMCA lesions.

  2. MELD score measured day 10 after orthotopic liver transplantation predicts death and re-transplantation within the first year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostved, Andreas A; Lundgren, Jens D; Hillingsø, Jens

    2016-01-01

    day 1 the MELD score significantly diversified and was higher in the poor outcome group (MELD score quartile 4 versus quartile 1-3 at day 10: HR 5.1, 95% CI: 2.8-9.0). This association remained after adjustment for non-identical blood type, autoimmune liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma...

  3. The Visual Aural Digit Span Test and Bender Gestalt Test as Predictors of Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Teresa C.; Smith, Billy L.

    1988-01-01

    Examined Visual Aural Digit Span Test (VADS) and Bender-Gestalt (BG) scores as predictors of Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised (WRAT-R) scores among 115 elementary school students referred for low academic achievement. Divided children into three age groups. Results suggest BG and VADS Test can be effective screening devices for young children…

  4. Effect of milk and yogurt on streptococcus sobrinus counts and caries score in rats

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    Maryam Ghasempour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An anti-cariogenic diet containing probiotics can be effective in caries prevention. This animal study compared the effects of milk and yogurt on Streptococcus sobrinus counts and caries score. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 male rats were infected with S. sobrinus (27,607 and divided into three groups. Group A and B received 200 mL of milk and 100 g of yogurt per day, respectively, and a control group received 2.5 mL of NCP number 2 diet twice daily for 21 days. After killing the animals, their lower left jaws were removed and sonicated to quantify the colonies of S. sobrinus. Dental caries was scored using Keyes technique. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon-Signed Rank tests. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean (±standard error of the mean of S. sobrinus colonies in the milk, yogurt and control groups were determined at 119666.67 (±20733, 46416.666 (±12846 and 163,250 (±33493, respectively. Microbial counts decreased in the yogurt group compared with the milk and control groups (P = 0.004 and P = 0.000; respectively. There were significant differences between caries scores of smooth surfaces in the milk and yogurt groups compared with the control group (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000, respectively. Both milk and yogurt significantly reduced caries score of fissured surfaces compared with controls (P = 0.004 and P = 0.000, respectively. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, yogurt administration reduces S. sobrinus counts. In addition, yogurt and milk regimens reduce the caries scores of smooth and fissured surfaces.

  5. Effect of milk and yogurt on streptococcus sobrinus counts and caries score in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Maryam; Rajabnia, Ramazam; Ashrafpour, Manouchehr; Ehsani, Atiyyeh; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Gharekhani, Samane; Shahandashti, Elaheh Ferdosi; Bagheri, Meghdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: An anti-cariogenic diet containing probiotics can be effective in caries prevention. This animal study compared the effects of milk and yogurt on Streptococcus sobrinus counts and caries score. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 male rats were infected with S. sobrinus (27,607) and divided into three groups. Group A and B received 200 mL of milk and 100 g of yogurt per day, respectively, and a control group received 2.5 mL of NCP number 2 diet twice daily for 21 days. After killing the animals, their lower left jaws were removed and sonicated to quantify the colonies of S. sobrinus. Dental caries was scored using Keyes technique. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon-Signed Rank tests. Statistical significance was set at P yogurt and control groups were determined at 119666.67 (±20733), 46416.666 (±12846) and 163,250 (±33493), respectively. Microbial counts decreased in the yogurt group compared with the milk and control groups (P = 0.004 and P = 0.000; respectively). There were significant differences between caries scores of smooth surfaces in the milk and yogurt groups compared with the control group (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000, respectively). Both milk and yogurt significantly reduced caries score of fissured surfaces compared with controls (P = 0.004 and P = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, yogurt administration reduces S. sobrinus counts. In addition, yogurt and milk regimens reduce the caries scores of smooth and fissured surfaces. PMID:26759594

  6. Proportional Distribution of Patient Satisfaction Scores by Clinical Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Leonard MD, MS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Proportional Responsibility for Integrated Metrics by Encounter (PRIME model is a novel means of allocating patient experience scores based on the proportion of each physician's involvement in care. Secondary analysis was performed on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys from a tertiary care academic institution. The PRIME model was used to calculate specialty-level scores based on encounters during a hospitalization. Standard and PRIME scores for services with the most inpatient encounters were calculated. Hospital medicine had the most discharges and encounters. The standard model generated a score of 74.6, while the PRIME model yielded a score of 74.9. The standard model could not generate a score for anesthesiology due to the lack of returned surveys, but the PRIME model yielded a score of 84.2. The PRIME model provides a more equitable method for distributing satisfaction scores and can generate scores for specialties that the standard model cannot.

  7. The Chemistry Scoring Index (CSI: A Hazard-Based Scoring and Ranking Tool for Chemicals and Products Used in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Verslycke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A large portfolio of chemicals and products is needed to meet the wide range of performance requirements of the oil and gas industry. The oil and gas industry is under increased scrutiny from regulators, environmental groups, the public, and other stakeholders for use of their chemicals. In response, industry is increasingly incorporating “greener” products and practices but is struggling to define and quantify what exactly constitutes “green” in the absence of a universally accepted definition. We recently developed the Chemistry Scoring Index (CSI which is ultimately intended to be a globally implementable tool that comprehensively scores and ranks hazards to human health, safety, and the environment for products used in oil and gas operations. CSI scores are assigned to products designed for the same use (e.g., surfactants, catalysts on the basis of product composition as well as intrinsic hazard properties and data availability for each product component. As such, products with a lower CSI score within a product use group are considered to have a lower intrinsic hazard compared to other products within the same use group. The CSI provides a powerful tool to evaluate relative product hazards; to review and assess product portfolios; and to aid in the formulation of products.

  8. Psychological wellness constructs: relationships and group differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezl Gropp

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine the relationships between several constructs that were hypothesised to be components underlying psychological wellness and to establish whether there were differences between managerial and non-managerial groups or between Black and White groups in respect of the wellness variables. The Personal Orientation Inventory (POI, Locus of Control Inventory (LOC, Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC, and the Bar-On EQ-I were administered to a random sample of 200 employees of a financial services company. Statistically significant differences were found between the groups on several of the wellness variables with the manager and White groups obtaining higher scores on these variables than their comparison groups. However, in respect of External Locus of Control, the non-manager and Black groups obtained the higher scores. Factor analytic results demonstrated that the wellness variables clustered in two correlated factors (r = 0,43 labeled psychological wellness and self-actualisation.

  9. Measurement Properties of the Smartphone-Based B-B Score in Current Shoulder Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Pichonnaz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at the determination of the measurement properties of the shoulder function B-B Score measured with a smartphone. This score measures the symmetry between sides of a power-related metric for two selected movements, with 100% representing perfect symmetry. Twenty healthy participants, 20 patients with rotator cuff conditions, 23 with fractures, 22 with capsulitis, and 23 with shoulder instabilities were measured twice across a six-month interval using the B-B Score and shoulder function questionnaires. The discriminative power, responsiveness, diagnostic power, concurrent validity, minimal detectable change (MDC, minimal clinically important improvement (MCII, and patient acceptable symptom state (PASS were evaluated. Significant differences with the control group and significant baseline—six-month differences were found for the rotator cuff condition, fracture, and capsulitis patient groups. The B-B Score was responsive and demonstrated excellent diagnostic power, except for shoulder instability. The correlations with clinical scores were generally moderate to high, but lower for instability. The MDC was 18.1%, the MCII was 25.2%, and the PASS was 77.6. No floor effect was observed. The B-B Score demonstrated excellent measurement properties in populations with rotator cuff conditions, proximal humerus fractures, and capsulitis, and can thus be used as a routine test to evaluate those patients.

  10. A muscle ultrasound score in the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yukiko; Noto, Yu-Ichi; Shiga, Kensuke; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Mizuno, Toshiki

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study are to elucidate the frequencies and distribution of fasciculations using muscle ultrasound in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and those with other conditions mimicking ALS, and subsequently to develop a novel fasciculation score for the diagnosis of ALS. Ultrasound of 21 muscles was performed to detect fasciculations in 36 consecutive patients suspected of having ALS. We developed a fasciculation ultrasound score that indicated the number of muscles with fasciculations in statistically selected muscles. A total of 525 muscles in 25 ALS patients and 231 in 11 non-ALS patients were analysed. Using relative operating characteristic and multivariate logistic regression analysis, we selected the trapezius, deltoid, biceps brachii, abductor pollicis brevis, abdominal, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, and gastrocnemius muscles for the fasciculation ultrasound score. The mean scores were higher in the ALS group than those in the non-ALS group (5.3±0.5vs. 0.3±0.7) (mean±SD); p<0.001. Two or more of the fasciculation ultrasound scores showed high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating ALS patients from non-ALS patients. The fasciculation ultrasound score can be a simple and useful diagnostic marker of ALS. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reassessing the "traditional background hypothesis" for elevated MMPI and MMPI-2 Lie-scale scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gerald M; Baldwin, Scott A; Smith, Ronald E

    2016-10-01

    The Lie (L) scale of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) is widely regarded as a measure of conscious attempts to deny common human foibles and to present oneself in an unrealistically positive light. At the same time, the current MMPI-2 manual states that "traditional" and religious backgrounds can account for elevated L scale scores as high as 65T-79T, thereby tempering impression management interpretations for faith-based individuals. To assess the validity of the traditional background hypothesis, we reviewed 11 published studies that employed the original MMPI with religious samples and found that only 1 obtained an elevated mean L score. We then conducted a meta-analysis of 12 published MMPI-2 studies in which we compared L scores of religious samples to the test normative group. The meta-analysis revealed large between-study heterogeneity (I2 = 87.1), L scale scores for religious samples that were somewhat higher but did not approach the upper limits specified in the MMPI-2 manual, and an overall moderate effect size (d¯ = 0.54, p < .001; 95% confidence interval [0.37, 0.70]). Our analyses indicated that religious-group membership accounts, on average, for elevations on L of about 5 t-score points. Whether these scores reflect conscious "fake good" impression management or religious-based virtuousness remains unanswered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Measurement properties of the smartphone-based B-B Score in current shoulder pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichonnaz, Claude; Duc, Cyntia; Gleeson, Nigel; Ancey, Céline; Jaccard, Hervé; Lécureux, Estelle; Farron, Alain; Jolles, Brigitte M; Aminian, Kamiar

    2015-10-22

    This study is aimed at the determination of the measurement properties of the shoulder function B-B Score measured with a smartphone. This score measures the symmetry between sides of a power-related metric for two selected movements, with 100% representing perfect symmetry. Twenty healthy participants, 20 patients with rotator cuff conditions, 23 with fractures, 22 with capsulitis, and 23 with shoulder instabilities were measured twice across a six-month interval using the B-B Score and shoulder function questionnaires. The discriminative power, responsiveness, diagnostic power, concurrent validity, minimal detectable change (MDC), minimal clinically important improvement (MCII), and patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) were evaluated. Significant differences with the control group and significant baseline-six-month differences were found for the rotator cuff condition, fracture, and capsulitis patient groups. The B-B Score was responsive and demonstrated excellent diagnostic power, except for shoulder instability. The correlations with clinical scores were generally moderate to high, but lower for instability. The MDC was 18.1%, the MCII was 25.2%, and the PASS was 77.6. No floor effect was observed. The B-B Score demonstrated excellent measurement properties in populations with rotator cuff conditions, proximal humerus fractures, and capsulitis, and can thus be used as a routine test to evaluate those patients.

  13. Role of the Egami Score in Predicting Intravenous Immunoglobulin Resistance in Kawasaki Disease Among Different Ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Raskin, Alexander; Gudausky, Todd M; Kirkpatrick, Edward

    Early treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is necessary to help reduce the risk of coronary artery abnormalities, such as coronary artery aneurysms and to help alleviate symptoms, in Kawasaki disease. Some patients, however, do not respond to an initial dose of IVIG and require additional doses. Prediction of these IVIG nonresponders may be of assistance in altering initial therapy to make it more effective. The Egami score has been validated in the Japanese population to predict IVIG nonresponders but has shown to be ineffective in US populations. This study evaluates the Egami score in a Midwest US population, subdividing patients by race and the diagnosis of typical or atypical type of Kawasaki disease. Patients were included in the study if they met criteria for Kawasaki disease and received IVIG in the inpatient setting. A total of 182 patients were studied, and in all studied groups, the Egami score had poor sensitivity at predicting IVIG nonresponders. Sensitivity of the score differed between races and differed between typical and atypical Kawasaki disease. The Egami score, as well as other systems, have been validated to predict IVIG nonresponders. These, however, lack sensitivity in the US population. Other scores developed in the United States have also lacked sensitivity, likely due to the absence of race or Kawasaki disease classification as variables. The development of a sensitive scoring system to predict IVIG nonresponders in US populations will require the incorporation of race and Kawasaki disease classification, factors that seem to alter IVIG response.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF SCORES IN DECISION MAKING IN METASTASES OF THE SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius de Oliveira Ferreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim of this study is to assess the intra- and interobserver concordance of SINS, Harrington, Tokuhashi and Tomita scores among general orthopedic surgeons and spine surgeons with experience above 5 and 10 years in the evaluation of patients with spinal metastasis. Methods : Twenty cases of patients with metastatic lesion of the spine were presented to 10 examiners and the scores aforementioned have been applied. After six weeks, the cases were reintroduced in a different order and data were analyzed. Results : The intraobserver reliability showed better agreement in SINS score among examiners with less experience and Harrington and Tomita scores among those who had more than 10-year experience. The interobserver reliability of the examiners of the group with over 10-year experience showed higher precision when using these scores, especially Harrington and Tomita. The SINS score was the choice for daily practice and was able to modify the management more often. Conclusions : This study demonstrated that the use of predictive scores of instability, Harrington, and prognosis, Tomita, had a higher intra- and interobserver reliability particularly among spine surgeons with experience above 10 years.

  15. Influence of credit scoring on the dynamics of Markov chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galina, Timofeeva

    2015-11-01

    Markov processes are widely used to model the dynamics of a credit portfolio and forecast the portfolio risk and profitability. In the Markov chain model the loan portfolio is divided into several groups with different quality, which determined by presence of indebtedness and its terms. It is proposed that dynamics of portfolio shares is described by a multistage controlled system. The article outlines mathematical formalization of controls which reflect the actions of the bank's management in order to improve the loan portfolio quality. The most important control is the organization of approval procedure of loan applications. The credit scoring is studied as a control affecting to the dynamic system. Different formalizations of "good" and "bad" consumers are proposed in connection with the Markov chain model.

  16. Patterns of adaptation to conflict and schizoid personality scale scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, I Alex; Mascis, Maria Cristina; Siracusano, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    A previous investigation gave no evidence of a significant relationship of patterns of adaptation to conflict, as measured with the Serial Color-Word Test, with the Schizoid Personality Scale of the Coolidge Axis II Inventory. As a new scoring algorithm has subsequently been proposed for the latter scale, a replication was done with the modified schizoid scale. A group of 75 consecutive nonpsychotic women outpatients was given the Serial Color-Word Test and Coolidge's inventory. Both multiple and logistic regressions selected two significant predictors of schizoid personality, corresponding to high values of linear change in reading times during Trials 3 and 5 of the Serial Color-Word Test, i.e., to an increasingly rigid and inflexible style of the adaptive process. A multivariate analysis of variance yielded an effect size of .22 (partial eta2).

  17. Spatial and verbal memory test scores following yoga and fine arts camps for school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, N K; Telles, Shirley

    2004-07-01

    The performance scores of children (aged 11 to 16 years) in verbal and spatial memory tests were compared for two groups (n = 30, each), one attending a yoga camp and the other a fine arts camp. Both groups were assessed on the memory tasks initially and after ten days of their respective interventions. A control group (n = 30) was similarly studied to assess the test-retest effect. At the final assessment the yoga group showed a significant increase of 43% in spatial memory scores (Multivariate analysis, Tukey test), while the fine arts and control groups showed no change. The results suggest that yoga practice, including physical postures, yoga breathing, meditation and guided relaxation improved delayed recall of spatial information.

  18. Predicting Successful Recanalization in Patients with Native Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion: The Busan CTO Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cai De; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Kwang Min; Kim, Tae Hyung; Cho, Young-Rak; Serebruany, Victor L

    2017-01-01

    The optimal strategy to manage chronic total occlusion (CTO) remains unclear. The Japanese CTO multicenter registry (J-CTO) score is an established tool for predicting successful recanalization. However, it does not take into account nonangiographic predictors for final technique success. In the present study, we designed and tested a scoring model called the Busan single-center CTO registry (B-CTO) score combining clinical and angiographic characteristics to predict successful CTO recanalization in Korean patients. Prospectively enrolled CTO patients (n = 438) undergoing coronary intervention (1999-2015) were assessed. The B-CTO score comprises 6 independent predictors: age 60-74 years and lesion length ≥20 mm were assigned 1 point each, while age ≥75 years, female gender, lesion location in the right coronary artery, blunt stump, and bending >45° were assigned 2 points each. For each predictor, the points assigned were based on the associated odds ratio by multivariate analysis. The lesions were classified into 4 groups according to the summation of points scored to assess the probability of successful CTO recanalization: easy (score 0-1), intermediate (score 2-3), difficult (score 4-5), and very difficult (score ≥6). CTO opening was designated as the primary endpoint regardless of the interventional era or the skill of the operator. The final success rate for B-CTO was 81.1%. The probability of successful recanalization for patient groups classified as easy (n = 64), intermediate (n = 148), difficult (n = 134), and very difficult (n = 92) was 95.3, 86.5, 79.1 and 65.2%, respectively (p for trend CTO, the B-CTO score demonstrated a significant improvement in discrimination as indicated by the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC 0.083; 95% CI 0.025-0.141), with a positive integrated discrimination improvement of 0.042 and a net reclassification improvement of 56.0%. The B-CTO score has been designed and validated in Korean patients

  19. EQ-5D Health Utility Scores: Data from a Comprehensive Canadian Cancer Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Hiten; Howell, Doris; Su, Susie; Qiu, Xin; Brown, M Catherine; Vennettilli, Ashlee; Irwin, Margaret; Pat, Vivien; Solomon, Hannah; Wang, Tian; Hon, Henrique; Eng, Lawson; Mahler, Mary; Thai, Henry; Ho, Valerie; Xu, Wei; Seung, Soo Jin; Mittmann, Nicole; Liu, Geoffrey

    2017-02-01

    To improve the precision of health economics analyses in oncology, reference datasets of health utility (HU) scores are needed from cancer survivors across different disease sites. These data are particularly sparse amongst Canadian survivors. A survey was completed by 1759 ambulatory cancer survivors at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre which contained demographic questions and the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) instrument. Clinical information was abstracted from electronic records and HU scores were calculated using Canadian health state valuations. Construct validity was assessed through correlation of HU and visual analog scale (VAS) scores (Spearman) and by comparing HU scores between performance status groups (effect size). The influence of socio-demographic clinical variables on HU was analyzed by non-parametric between-group comparisons and multiple linear regression. Mean EQ-5D HU scores were derived for 26 cancers. Among all survivors, the mean ± standard error of the mean EQ-5D utility score was 0.81 ± 0.004. Scores varied significantly by performance status (p < 0.0001) and correlated with VAS (Spearman r = 0.61). The cancer sites with the lowest mean HU scores were acute lymphoblastic leukemia (0.70 ± 0.03) and pancreatic cancer (0.76 ± 0.03); testicular cancer (0.89 ± 0.02) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (0.90 ± 0.05) had the highest mean scores. A multiple regression model showed that scores were influenced by disease site (p < 0.001), education level (p < 0.001), partner status (p < 0.001), disease extent (p = 0.0029), and type of most recent treatment (p = 0.0061). This work represents the first set of HU scores for numerous cancer sites derived using Canadian preference weights. The dataset demonstrated construct validity and HU scores varied by general socio-demographic and clinical parameters.

  20. Rates of computational errors for scoring the SIRS primary scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Elizabeth A; Frederick, Richard I

    2013-12-01

    We entered item scores for the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS; Rogers, Bagby, & Dickens, 1991) into a spreadsheet and compared computed scores with those hand-tallied by examiners. We found that about 35% of the tests had at least 1 scoring error. Of SIRS scale scores tallied by examiners, about 8% were incorrectly summed. When the errors were corrected, only 1 SIRS classification was reclassified in the fourfold scheme used by the SIRS. We note that mistallied scores on psychological tests are common, and we review some strategies for reducing scale score errors on the SIRS. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. The Contributions of Memory and Vocabulary to Non-Verbal Ability Scores in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungkhetklang, Chantanee; Bavin, Edith L.; Crewther, Sheila G.; Goharpey, Nahal; Parsons, Carl

    2016-01-01

    It is usually assumed that performance on non-verbal intelligence tests reflects visual cognitive processing and that aspects of working memory (WM) will be involved. However, the unique contribution of memory to non-verbal scores is not clear, nor is the unique contribution of vocabulary. Thus, we aimed to investigate these contributions. Non-verbal test scores for 17 individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and 39 children with typical development (TD) of similar mental age were compared to determine the unique contribution of visual and verbal short-term memory (STM) and WM and the additional variance contributed by vocabulary scores. No significant group differences were found in the non-verbal test scores or receptive vocabulary scores, but there was a significant difference in expressive vocabulary. Regression analyses indicate that for the TD group STM and WM (both visual and verbal) contributed similar variance to the non-verbal scores. For the ID group, visual STM and verbal WM contributed most of the variance to the non-verbal test scores. The addition of vocabulary scores to the model contributed greater variance for both groups. More unique variance was contributed by vocabulary than memory for the TD group, whereas for the ID group memory contributed more than vocabulary. Visual and auditory memory and vocabulary contributed significantly to solving visual non-verbal problems for both the TD group and the ID group. However, for each group, there were different weightings of these variables. Our findings indicate that for individuals with TD, vocabulary is the major factor in solving non-verbal problems, not memory, whereas for adolescents with ID, visual STM, and verbal WM are more influential than vocabulary, suggesting different pathways to achieve solutions to non-verbal problems. PMID:28082922

  2. Joint awareness in different types of knee arthroplasty evaluated with the Forgotten Joint score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienpont, Emmanuel; Opsomer, Gaetan; Koninckx, Angelique; Houssiau, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the 'Forgotten Joint' score (FJS-12), a 12-item questionnaire designed to analyze the patient's ability to forget the joint in everyday life, in French and to compare the results of this Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) score in patients who had other than total joint arthroplasties. The score was compared in 122 patients that had either medial unicompartmental (N=51), patellofemoral (N=21) or total knee arthroplasty (N=50). After having validated the FJS-12 in French, a similar PRO was observed in unicompartmental and postero-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. Patellofemoral resurfacing had a significantly lower score than the two other types of arthroplasty, which can be explained by a significantly younger and smaller patient group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of three prenatal risk scores in a series of low-risk pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R B; Acheson, L S; Zyzanski, S J

    1988-01-01

    Three prepartum obstetrical risk-scoring methods (Goodwin, Halliday, Hobel) were retrospectively applied to a consecutive series of 795 singleton pregnancies. The study population was low risk overall, with a perinatal mortality rate of 11 per 1000 and a primary cesarean section rate of 9.7%. The predictive ability of the scores was tested for individual outcomes as well as for a "combined measure" designed to group outcomes of clinical interest. Outcome variables examined included labor arrests, need for augmentation of labor, fetal heartrate abnormalities during labor, selection of or transfer to a more intensive level of care, indicated forceps delivery, cesarean section, resuscitation, Apgar scores, permanent injury, and perinatal deaths. Along with expected differences in sensitivity and specificity, there were differences among the three scores in performance as measured by positive and negative predictive value. Goodwin's system performed somewhat better overall. All three systems performed better in multiparous than in primiparous patients, but primiparas experienced more adverse outcomes.

  4. Highlighting ethical decisions underlying the scoring of animal welfare in the Welfare Quality® scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veissier, I.; Jensen, Karsten Klint; Botreau, R.

    2011-01-01

    All systems of scoring animal units (groups, farms, slaughter plants, etc.) according to the level of the animals’ welfare are based inevitably on normative decisions. Similarly, all methods of labelling, in terms of acceptability, are based on choices reflecting ethical values. The evaluative...... dimension of scoring and labelling does not mean that we should reject them, but it does mean that we need to make the normative and ethical background explicit. The Welfare Quality® scoring system is used as a case study in order to highlight the role of underlying value-based decisions. In this scoring...... of welfare or be based on what can be achieved in practice – in other words, an absolute assessment or a relative one may be proposed. Welfare Quality® adopted an intermediate strategy: absolute limits between welfare categories (Not classified, Acceptable, Enhanced, or Excellent level of welfare) were set...

  5. Diet Quality Scores of Australian Adults Who Have Completed the Healthy Eating Quiz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rebecca L; Rollo, Megan E; Schumacher, Tracy; Collins, Clare E

    2017-08-15

    Higher scores obtained using diet quality and variety indices are indicators of more optimal food and nutrient intakes and lower chronic disease risk. The aim of this paper is to describe the overall diet quality and variety in a sample of Australian adults who completed an online diet quality self-assessment tool, the Healthy Eating Quiz. The Healthy Eating Quiz takes approximately five minutes to complete online and computes user responses into a total diet quality score (out of a maximum of 73 points) and then categorizes them into the following groups: 'needs work' (Healthy eating quiz scores were higher in those aged 45-75 years compared to 16-44 years (p Healthy Eating Quiz data indicates that individuals receiving feedback on how to improve their score can improve their diet quality, there is a need for further nutrition promotion interventions in Australian adults.

  6. Highlighting ethical decisions underlying the scoring of animal welfare in the Welfare Quality® scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veissier, I.; Jensen, Karsten Klint; Botreau, R.

    2011-01-01

    of criteria to which the unit complies vs does not comply). Welfare Quality® opted for the second alternative to facilitate the provision of advice to farmers on solving the welfare problems associated with their farms. Third, one has to decide whether the overall welfare assessment should reflect the average...... for bad scores on others. In the opinion of most people, welfare scores do not compensate each other. This was taken into account in the Welfare Quality® scoring system by using a specific operator instead of mere weighted sums. Finally, a scoring system may either reflect societal demands for high levels......, but the rules governing the assignment of an animal unit to a category take into account what had been observed on European farms. The scientists behind Welfare Quality® are keen to make the value-based choices underlying assessments of animal welfare transparent. This is essential to allow stakeholder groups...

  7. ITC Guidelines on Quality Control in Scoring, Test Analysis, and Reporting of Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allalouf, Avi

    2014-01-01

    The Quality Control (QC) Guidelines are intended to increase the efficiency, precision, and accuracy of the scoring, analysis, and reporting process of testing. The QC Guidelines focus on large-scale testing operations where multiple forms of tests are created for use on set dates. However, they may also be used for a wide variety of other testing…

  8. ITC Guidelines on Quality Control in Scoring, Test Analysis, and Reporting of Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allalouf, Avi

    2014-01-01

    The Quality Control (QC) Guidelines are intended to increase the efficiency, precision, and accuracy of the scoring, analysis, and reporting process of testing. The QC Guidelines focus on large-scale testing operations where multiple forms of tests are created for use on set dates. However, they may also be used for a wide variety of other testing…

  9. Symptom scoring systems to diagnose distal polyneuropathy in diabetes : the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.G.; Smit, A.J.; van Sonderen, E.; Groothoff, J.W.; Eisma, W.H.; Links, T.P.

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To provide one of the diagnostic categories for distal diabetic polyneuro-pathy,several symptom scoring systems are available, which are often extensive andlack in validation. We validated a new four-item Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS) scorefor diagnosing distal diabetic polyneuropathy. MET

  10. Braden Scale cumulative score versus subscale scores: are we missing opportunities for pressure ulcer prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Molly M

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer incidence rates continue to rise in the United States in the acute care setting despite efforts to extinguish them, and pressure ulcers are a nursing-sensitive quality indicator. The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk instrument has been shown to be a valid and reliable instrument for assessing pressure ulcer risk. This case study represented 1 patient out of a chart audit that reviewed 20 patients with confirmed hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The goal of the audit was to determine whether these ulcers might be avoided if preventive interventions based on Braden subscale scores versus the cumulative score were implemented. This case study describes a patient who, deemed at low risk for pressure ulcer development based on cumulative Braden Scale, may have benefited from interventions based on the subscale scores of sensory perception, activity, and mobility. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions based on subscales may be effective for preventing pressure ulcers when compared to a protocol based exclusively on the cumulative score.

  11. Discrepancy between coronary artery calcium score and HeartScore in middle-aged Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Sand, Niels Peter; Nørgaard, Bjarne;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is an independent and incremental risk marker. This marker has previously not been compared to the HeartScore risk model. Design: A random sample of 1825 citizens (men and women, 50 or 60 years of age) was invited for screening. Methods: Using...

  12. Geriatric Fever Score: a new decision rule for geriatric care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hsien Chung

    Full Text Available Evaluating geriatric patients with fever is time-consuming and challenging. We investigated independent mortality predictors of geriatric patients with fever and developed a prediction rule for emergency care, critical care, and geriatric care physicians to classify patients into mortality risk and disposition groups.Consecutive geriatric patients (≥65 years old visiting the emergency department (ED of a university-affiliated medical center between June 1 and July 21, 2010, were enrolled when they met the criteria of fever: a tympanic temperature ≥37.2°C or a baseline temperature elevated ≥1.3°C. Thirty-day mortality was the primary endpoint. Internal validation with bootstrap re-sampling was done.Three hundred thirty geriatric patients were enrolled. We found three independent mortality predictors: Leukocytosis (WBC >12,000 cells/mm3, Severe coma (GCS ≤ 8, and Thrombocytopenia (platelets <150 10(3/mm3 (LST. After assigning weights to each predictor, we developed a Geriatric Fever Score that stratifies patients into two mortality-risk and disposition groups: low (4.0% (95% CI: 2.3-6.9%: a general ward or treatment in the ED then discharge and high (30.3% (95% CI: 17.4-47.3%: consider the intensive care unit. The area under the curve for the rule was 0.73.We found that the Geriatric Fever Score is a simple and rapid rule for predicting 30-day mortality and classifying mortality risk and disposition in geriatric patients with fever, although external validation should be performed to confirm its usefulness in other clinical settings. It might help preserve medical resources for patients in greater need.

  13. High Framingham risk score decreases quality of life in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Yosaputra

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and obesity tend to occur together in the general population. Increasing prevalence of multiple CVD risk factors has been related to increased risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Studies have suggested that people with several risk factors of CVD may have impaired health-related quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess the association of CVD risk factors with quality of life (QOL among adults aged 40 to 65 years. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 220 subjects 40 - 65 years of age at a health center. The CVD risk factors were assessed using the Framingham risk score that is the standard instrument for assessment of the risk of a first cardiac event. The risk factors assessed were age, smoking, blood pressure, total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. QOL was assessed by means of the WHOQOL-BREF instrument that had been prevalidated. The results of the study showed that 28.2% of subjects were smokers, 56.4% had stage 1 hypertension, 42.8% high total cholesterol and 13.6% low HDL cholesterol. The high risk group amounted to 45.5% and 42.3% constitued an intermediate risk group. High CVD risk scores were significantly associated with a low QOL for all domains (physical, psychological, social and environment (p=0.000. Preventing or reducing the multiple CVD risk factors to improve QOL is necessary among adults.

  14. Reliability and sensitivity to change of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score in a multireader, longitudinal setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, ea; Østergaard, Mikkel; Kvan, NP;

    2005-01-01

    acquired and scored according to the recommendations from the OMERACT MRI group. The intra- and interreader agreement (evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs]) and the sensitivity to change (evaluated by the smallest detectable difference [SDD]) were determined for scores of synovitis.......96 for erosion, and 0.97 for edema). The SDDs were generally low, suggesting a high potential to detect changes. Interreader single-measure ICCs were high for status scores (mean baseline and followup 0.69 and 0.78 for synovitis, 0.83 and 0.73 for erosion, and 0.79 and 0.95 for edema) and for change scores (mean...

  15. Usefulness of Serum Albumin Concentration to Predict High Coronary SYNTAX Score and In-Hospital Mortality in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtul, Alparslan; Murat, Sani Namik; Yarlioglues, Mikail; Duran, Mustafa; Ocek, Adil Hakan; Koseoglu, Cemal; Celık, Ibrahim Etem; Kilic, Alparslan; Aksoy, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    High SYNTAX score is a predictor of adverse cardiovascular events, including mortality, in acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). Decreased serum albumin (SA) concentration is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. We aimed to investigate whether SA levels at admission are associated with high SYNTAX score and in-hospital mortality in patients with ACS. The study included 1303 patients with ACS who underwent coronary angiography (CA). The patients were divided into 2 groups as high SYNTAX score (≥33) and lower SYNTAX score (≤32). Baseline SA levels were significantly lower in patients with high SYNTAX score than with lower SYNTAX score (3.46 ± 0.42 mg/dL vs 3.97±0.37 mg/dL, respectively; P SYNTAX score (odds ratio 4.329, 95% confidence interval 2.028-8.264; P SYNTAX score, and SA (SYNTAX score and in-hospital mortality in ACS.

  16. Evaluation of a risk factor scoring model in screening for undiagnosed diabetes in China population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-jun DONG; Neng-jun LOU; Jia-jun ZHAO; Zhong-wen ZHANG; Lu-lu QIU; Ying ZHOU; Lin LIAO

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To develop a risk scoring model for screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in Chinese population.Methods:A total of 5348 subjects from two districts of Jinan City,Shandong Province,China were enrolled.Group A (2985) included individuals from east of the city and Group B (2363) from west of the city.Screening questionnaires and a standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTr) were completed by all subjects.Based on the stepwise logistic regression analysis of Group A,variables were selected to establish the risk scoring model.The validity and effectiveness of this model were evaluated in Group B.Results:Based on stepwise logistic regression analysis performed with data of Group A,variables including age,body mass index (BMI),waist-to-hip ratio (WHR),systolic pressure,diastolic pressure,heart rate,family history of diabetes,and history of high glucose were accepted into the risk scoring model.The risk for having diabetes increased along with aggregate scores.When Youden index was closest to 1,the optimal cutoff value was set up at 51.At this point,the diabetes risk scoring model could identify diabetes patients with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 66.5%,making the positive predictive value 12.83%and negative predictive value 98.53%.We compared our model with the Finnish and Danish model and concluded that our model has superior validity in Chinese population.Conclusions:Our diabetes risk scoring model has satisfactory sensitivity and specificity for identifying undiagnosed diabetes in our population,which might be a simple and practical tool suitable for massive diabetes screening.

  17. A comparison of three scoring systems for predicting complications after major lung resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Mark K; Durkin, Amy E

    2003-01-01

    Although complications occur frequently after major lung resection, current predictive models are not entirely satisfactory. We devised a new predictive scoring system and compared it to two existing systems. We performed an initial retrospective review of 400 patients who underwent major resection for lung cancer from 1980 to 1995. Predictive covariates (age, spirometry, diffusing capacity) associated with three or more complication groups were used to develop a scoring system. This system (EVAD) was then evaluated against the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) and Cardiopulmonary Risk Index (CPRI) systems for patients operated between 1996 and 2001. Major resection for lung cancer included lobectomy (188) and pneumonectomy (30). Complication categories were: pulmonary (23; 10.5%); cardiovascular (24; 11.0%); infectious (8; 3.6%); other (29; 13.2%); nonfatal (45; 20.6%); and any (53; 24.2%). Death occurred in ten patients (4.6%). Mean EVAD scores were significantly different between groups with and without complications in all categories except infectious complications and death, whereas mean CPRI scores differed only for pulmonary complications, nonfatal complications, and death, and mean POSSUM scores did not appropriately differ for any complications. EVAD predicted incremental risk in all complication categories except cardiovascular, infectious, and death, whereas CPRI predicted incremental risk only for nonfatal and possibly any complications, and POSSUM did not predict incremental risk for any complication category. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated the EVAD system to be equivalent to or better than CPRI and POSSUM for all complication categories. A simple scoring system (EVAD) that utilizes pulmonary function test data and patient age predicts the likelihood of complications after major lung resection. It is easier to use and at least as accurate as other scoring systems

  18. Risk Score Model for Predicting Sonographic Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinaz Poursafa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to develop and test the validity of a risk score to be used as a simple tool to identify those children at high risk of sonographic non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Methods:This cross-sectional study was conducted among 962 participants aged 6-18 years in Isfahan, Iran. They consisted of three groups of nearly equal number of normal-weight, overweight and obese individuals. Coefficients of the logistic regression models were used to assign a score value for each variable and the composite sonographic NAFLD risk score was calculated as the sum of those scores. Performance of model was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve procedure. Findings:Data of 931 participants was included in the analysis. The sonographic findings of 16.8% of participants were compatible with NAFLD. Age, sex, body mass index, waist circumference and serum triglycerides level were diagnosed as factors associated with NAFLD. The risk score was calculated as 50 for sonographic NAFLD. Conclusion:This study, to the best of our knowledge is the first of its kind in the pediatric age group, focuses on predicting sonographic NAFLD from easily-measured factors. It may suggest an association of hypertriglyceridemic-waist phenotype with NAFLD in the pediatric age group.

  19. Evaluation of nosocomial infection risk using APACHE II scores in the neurological intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Ying; Li, Shu-Juan; Yang, Nan; Hu, Wen-Li

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of using the Acute Physiology, Age and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring system for predicting the risk of nosocomial infection in the neurological intensive care unit (NICU), 216 patients transferred to NICU within 24hours of admission were retrospectively evaluated. Based on admission APACHE II scores, they were classified into three groups, with higher APACHE II scores representing higher infectious risk. The device utilization ratios and device-associated infection ratios of NICU patients were analyzed and compared with published reports on patient outcome. Statistical analysis of nosocomial infection ratios showed obvious differences between the high-risk, middle-risk and low-risk groups (pAPACHE II model in predicting the risk of nosocomial infection was 0.81, which proved to be reliable and consistent with the expectation. In addition, we found statistical differences in the duration of hospital stay (patient-days) and device utilization (device-days) between different risk groups (pAPACHE II scoring system was validated in predicting the risk of nosocomial infection, duration of patient-days and device-days, and providing accurate assessment of patients' condition, so that appropriate prevention strategies can be implemented based on admission APACHE II scores.

  20. Comparison of the unstructured clinician gestalt, the wells score, and the revised Geneva score to estimate pretest probability for suspected pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza, Andrea; Verschuren, Franck; Meyer, Guy; Quentin-Georget, Sybille; Soulie, Caroline; Thys, Frédéric; Roy, Pierre-Marie

    2013-08-01

    The assessment of clinical probability (as low, moderate, or high) with clinical decision rules has become a cornerstone of diagnostic strategy for patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, but little is known about the use of physician gestalt assessment of clinical probability. We evaluate the performance of gestalt assessment for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective observational cohort of consecutive suspected pulmonary embolism patients in emergency departments. Accuracy of gestalt assessment was compared with the Wells score and the revised Geneva score by the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic curves. Agreement between the 3 methods was determined by κ test. The study population was 1,038 patients, with a pulmonary embolism prevalence of 31.3%. AUC differed significantly between the 3 methods and was 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78 to 0.84) for gestalt assessment, 0.71 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.75) for Wells, and 0.66 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.70) for the revised Geneva score. The proportion of patients categorized as having low clinical probability was statistically higher with gestalt than with revised Geneva score (43% versus 26%; 95% CI for the difference of 17%=13% to 21%). Proportion of patients categorized as having high clinical probability was higher with gestalt than with Wells (24% versus 7%; 95% CI for the difference of 17%=14% to 20%) or revised Geneva score (24% versus 10%; 95% CI for the difference of 15%=13% to 21%). Pulmonary embolism prevalence was significantly lower with gestalt versus clinical decision rules in low clinical probability (7.6% for gestalt versus 13.0% for revised Geneva score and 12.6% for Wells score) and non-high clinical probability groups (18.3% for gestalt versus 29.3% for Wells and 27.4% for revised Geneva score) and was significantly higher with gestalt versus Wells score in high clinical probability groups (72.1% versus 58.1%). Agreement