WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground takes minutes

  1. Taking minutes of meetings

    CERN Document Server

    Gutmann, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    aking Minutes of Meetings guides you through the entire process behind minute taking: arranging the meeting; writing the agenda; creating the optimum environment; structuring the meeting and writing notes up accurately. The minute-taker is one of the most important and powerful people in a meeting and you can use this opportunity to develop your knowledge, broaden your horizons and build credibility within the organization. Taking Minutes of Meetings is an easy to read 'dip-in, dip-out' guide which shows you how to confidently arrange meetings and produce minutes. It provides hands-on advice about the sections of a meeting as well as tips on how to create an agenda, personal preparation, best practice advice on taking notes and how to improve your accuracy. Brand new chapters of this 4th edition include guidance on using technology to maximize effectiveness and practical help with taking minutes for a variety of different types of meetings. The creating success series of books... With over one million copi...

  2. "Take ten minutes": a dedicated ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, E K

    2010-09-01

    Multiple and inappropriate medications are often the cause for poor health status in the elderly. Medication reviews can improve prescribing. This study aimed to determine if a ten minute medication review by a general practitioner could reduce polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing in elderly patients. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. Patients over the age of 65 (n = 50) underwent a 10-minute medication review. Inappropriate medications, dosage errors, and discrepancies between prescribed versus actual medication being consumed were recorded. A questionnaire to assess satisfaction was completed following review. The mean number of medications taken by patients was reduced (p < 0.001). A medication was stopped in 35 (70%) patients. Inappropriate medications were detected in 27 (54%) patients and reduced (p < 0.001). Dose errors were detected in 16 (32%). A high level of patient satisfaction was reported. A ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy, improves prescribing and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  3. "Take ten minutes": a dedicated ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, E K

    2012-02-01

    Multiple and inappropriate medications are often the cause for poor health status in the elderly. Medication reviews can improve prescribing. This study aimed to determine if a ten minute medication review by a general practitioner could reduce polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing in elderly patients. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. Patients over the age of 65 (n = 50) underwent a 10-minute medication review. Inappropriate medications, dosage errors, and discrepancies between prescribed versus actual medication being consumed were recorded. A questionnaire to assess satisfaction was completed following review. The mean number of medications taken by patients was reduced (p < 0.001). A medication was stopped in 35 (70%) patients. Inappropriate medications were detected in 27 (54%) patients and reduced (p < 0.001). Dose errors were detected in 16 (32%). A high level of patient satisfaction was reported. A ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy, improves prescribing and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  4. The Grounded Nature of Psychological Perspective-Taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erle, Thorsten M; Topolinski, Sascha

    2017-03-02

    Psychological perspective-taking is a powerful social cognition that helps us to understand other people. It creates feelings of closeness and sympathy, motivates us to help others, and is important for positive social relationships. In contrast to the impressive knowledge about its consequences, relatively little is known about how exactly people achieve them. The present paper addresses this question from a grounded cognition perspective, drawing on recent findings on the embodiment of visuospatial perspective-taking. Visuospatial perspective-taking involves a mental transformation of one's body schema into the physical location of another person. We argue that when people psychologically "put themselves in another person's shoes," this simulation of physical proximity happens, too, and is one source of perceived closeness. In five experiments (total N = 1067), participants completed a visuospatial perspective-taking task. During half of the trials, angular disparity between the target person and the participant was high and participants had to adopt the target's visual perspective (which involves an embodied simulation). During the remaining trials, angular disparity was low and participants could solve the task egocentrically. Taking another's perspective led participants to adopt the thoughts of the target person more strongly (Experiments 1-3) and increased the perceived similarity of that person to the self (Experiment 4) and participants' liking of that person (Experiment 5). These effects were independent of task difficulty (Experiment 2), and only present during trials where an embodied transformation happened (i.e., at high angular disparities; Experiment 3). Implications for psychological and visuospatial perspective-taking research and related phenomena are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. The minute brain of the copepod Tigriopus californicus supports a complex ancestral ground pattern of the tetraconate cerebral nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, David R; Brown, Sheena M; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2012-10-15

    Copepods are a diverse and ecologically crucial group of minute crustaceans that are relatively neglected in terms of studies on nervous system organization. Recently, morphological neural characters have helped clarify evolutionary relationships within Arthropoda, particularly among Tetraconata (i.e., crustaceans and hexapods), and indicate that copepods occupy an important phylogenetic position relating to both Malacostraca and Hexapoda. This taxon therefore provides the opportunity to evaluate those neural characters common to these two clades likely to be results of shared ancestry (homology) versus convergence (homoplasy). Here we present an anatomical characterization of the brain and central nervous system of the well-studied harpacticoid copepod species Tigriopus californicus. We show that this species is endowed with a complex brain possessing a central complex comprising a protocerebral bridge and central body. Deutocerebral glomeruli are supplied by the antennular nerves, and a lateral protocerebral olfactory neuropil corresponds to the malacostracan hemiellipsoid body. Glomeruli contain synaptic specializations comparable to the presynaptic "T-bars" typical of dipterous insects, including Drosophila melanogaster. Serotonin-like immunoreactivity pervades the brain and ventral nervous system, with distinctive deutocerebral distributions. The present observations suggest that a suite of morphological characters typifying the Tigriopus brain reflect a ground pattern organization of an ancestral Tetraconata, which possessed an elaborate and structurally differentiated nervous system.

  6. Aging 5 years in 5 minutes: the effect of taking a memory test on older adults' subjective age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Matthew L; Geraci, Lisa; De Forrest, Ross L

    2013-12-01

    How old one feels-one's subjective age-has been shown to predict important psychological and health outcomes. The current studies examined the effect of taking a standard memory test on older adults' subjective age. Study 1 showed that older adults felt older after taking a standard neuropsychological screening test and participating in a free-recall experiment than they felt at baseline. Study 2 showed that the effect was selective to older adults: Younger adults' subjective age was not affected by participating in the memory experiment. Study 3 showed that the subjective-aging effect was specific to memory, as taking a vocabulary test for a similar amount of time did not affect older adults' subjective age. Finally, Study 4 showed that simply expecting to take a memory test subjectively aged older adults. The results indicate that being in a memory-testing context affects older adults' self-perception by making them feel older.

  7. Taking-On: A Grounded Theory of Addressing Barriers in Task Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austinson, Julie Ann

    2011-01-01

    This study of taking-on was conducted using classical grounded theory methodology (Glaser, 1978, 1992, 1998, 2001, 2005; Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Classical grounded theory is inductive, empirical, and naturalistic; it does not utilize manipulation or constrained time frames. Classical grounded theory is a systemic research method used to generate…

  8. Measurement of Required Power with Human-Powered Aircraft in Take-off Ground Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Toshiaki; Sakamoto, Shinsuke; Hori, Kotono; Kusumoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Hattori, Takashi; Sata, Kouta

    In this paper, we propose the method for the measurement of required power and the adjustment of optimum gear ratio in take-off ground running. To get the values of required power and speed, we measured torque of the left side and the right side of pedals, RPM of pedals, and speed of the cockpit frame. In order to improve the take-off speed, some drums were applied, and the optimum gear ratio of the front drum to the rear drum was determined.

  9. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael Simon, E-mail: michael.deleuze@uhasselt.be [Center of Molecular and Materials Modelling, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Takahashi, Masahiko [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-10-07

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b{sub 1}, 6a{sub 1}, 4b{sub 2}, and 1a{sub 2} orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1}, B{sub 1}, and B{sub 2} symmetries, which correspond to C–H stretching and H–C–H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  10. Discontinuous Galerkin Time-Domain Analysis of Power-Ground Planes Taking Into Account Decoupling Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ping

    2017-03-22

    In this paper, a discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method is developed to analyze the power-ground planes taking into account the decoupling capacitors. In the presence of decoupling capacitors, the whole physical system can be split into two subsystems: 1) the field subsystem that is governed by Maxwell\\'s equations that will be solved by the DGTD method, and 2) the circuit subsystem including the capacitor and its parasitic inductor and resistor, which is going to be characterized by the modified nodal analysis algorithm constructed circuit equations. With the aim to couple the two subsystems together, a lumped port is defined over a coaxial surface between the via barrel and the ground plane. To reach the coupling from the field to the circuit subsystem, a lumped voltage source calculated by the integration of electric field along the radial direction is introduced. On the other hand, to facilitate the coupling from the circuit to field subsystem, a lumped port current source calculated from the circuit equation is introduced, which serves as an impressed current source for the field subsystem. With these two auxiliary terms, a hybrid field-circuit matrix equation is established, which enables the field and circuit subsystems are solved in a synchronous scheme. Furthermore, the arbitrarily shaped antipads are considered by enforcing the proper wave port excitation using the magnetic surface current source derived from the antipads supported electric eigenmodes. In this way, the S-parameters corresponding to different modes can be conveniently extracted. To further improve the efficiency of the proposed algorithm in handling multiscale meshes, the local time-stepping marching scheme is applied. The proposed algorithm is verified by several representative examples.

  11. 10 Minutes of Bliss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Olynda

    2014-01-01

    For many of us, it is challenging to find the time to sleep enough each night or to sit down for a meal. So how can this author convince you that taking 10 minutes to do anything every day is actually worth it? The benefits of meditation--increased calm, clarity, compassion, and empathy, to name a few--have been known for centuries. Recently,…

  12. The Postmodern Turn: Shall Classic Grounded Theory Take That Detour? A Review Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian B. Martin, PhD

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Adherents to classic grounded theory have gotten used to spotting the pretenders working under the grounded theory banner. Some of these faux-GT researchers have worked in a fog, misunderstanding fundamentals of the method; these are the studies that leave us shaking our heads and wondering about the doctoral committee and peer reviewers who did not bother to find out more about the method they were evaluating. More infuriating are the authors who are claiming to improve on grounded theory, to reground it, to quote one notable British author who, lack of handson grounded theory experience aside, manages a booklength critique of the method. Two recent books in the“remaking grounded theory” genre are from sociologists with some years of grounded theory projects behind them. Adele E. Clarke, author of Situational Analysis, was a student and colleague of Anselm L. Strauss at the University of California San Francisco. Kathy Charmaz, author of Constructing Grounded Theory, is among the few grounded theorists who studied with Barney G. Glaser and Strauss at UCSF.

  13. The Postmodern Turn: Shall Classic Grounded Theory Take That Detour? A Review Essay

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Adherents to classic grounded theory have gotten used to spotting the pretenders working under the grounded theory banner. Some of these faux-GT researchers have worked in a fog, misunderstanding fundamentals of the method; these are the studies that leave us shaking our heads and wondering about the doctoral committee and peer reviewers who did not bother to find out more about the method they were evaluating. More infuriating are the authors who are claiming to improve on grounded theory, t...

  14. Task analysis of patients' medication-taking practice and the role of making sense: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajcar, Jana

    2006-03-01

    Patients on long-term medications have varied medication-taking practices and complex and often unmet medication information needs. The objective of this qualitative study was to describe from the patient's perspective the medication-taking tasks performed by patients currently receiving long-term medications and then to hypothesize how these tasks relate to patients' medication information needs. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with individuals between the ages of 18 and 65, who had a college or university education, and who were on at least one long-term medication. Grounded theory approach was used for data gathering and data analysis. Maximum variation and theoretical sampling were used and the sample size was determined when theoretical saturation was reached in the core category. Interpretive and theoretical validity were ensured through member checking, through the use of the constant comparative method, and by a review of the results by a panel of pharmacists and physicians. Ten participants aged between 41 and 64 years were included in the study sample. The participants had between one and 7 chronic illnesses, duration of these illnesses to date varied from 1 year to 40 years, and each participant was taking between one and 13 medications. A model was developed that consists of 4 thematic categories: (a) making sense of medication taking, (b) medication-taking acts, (c) mediation-taking self-assessment, and (d) context of medication taking. The main category was making sense of medication taking that consisted of 3 subcategories: (a) nonproblematic mode, (b) problematic mode, and (c) stunned mode. The model explains how and why a patients' need for medication-taking education may vary because their medication-taking practices changes. The model also connects each category to medication information that people may need. Findings contribute to our understanding of medication-taking practice of individuals on long-term medication and have

  15. Stealing minutes: a tri-study of reconstructing self-care for mental health professionals using research as daily practice, case study, and grounded theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppola, John Lafayette Granger

    2016-01-01

    The majority of approaches to self-care in the mental health field revolve around activities that take place outside of the work environment or on supervision and policy level approaches. Using social constructionist and narrative principles, I created, implemented, and studied a series of workshops

  16. Taking Stock of Circumboreal Forest Carbon With Ground Measurements, Airborne and Spaceborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neigh, Christopher S. R.; Nelson, Ross F.; Ranson, K. Jon; Margolis, Hank A.; Montesano, Paul M.; Sun, Guoqing; Kharuk, Viacheslav; Naesset, Erik; Wulder, Michael A.; Andersen, Hans-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The boreal forest accounts for one-third of global forests, but remains largely inaccessible to ground-based measurements and monitoring. It contains large quantities of carbon in its vegetation and soils, and research suggests that it will be subject to increasingly severe climate-driven disturbance. We employ a suite of ground-, airborne- and space-based measurement techniques to derive the first satellite LiDAR-based estimates of aboveground carbon for the entire circumboreal forest biome. Incorporating these inventory techniques with uncertainty analysis, we estimate total aboveground carbon of 38 +/- 3.1 Pg. This boreal forest carbon is mostly concentrated from 50 to 55degN in eastern Canada and from 55 to 60degN in eastern Eurasia. Both of these regions are expected to warm >3 C by 2100, and monitoring the effects of warming on these stocks is important to understanding its future carbon balance. Our maps establish a baseline for future quantification of circumboreal carbon and the described technique should provide a robust method for future monitoring of the spatial and temporal changes of the aboveground carbon content.

  17. Grounding the discipline of business continuity planning: What needs to be done to take it forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, David

    2008-01-01

    Business continuity planning (BCP) is emerging as a profession unto its own. It is separating itself from related fields such as emergency management, IT, disaster recovery and risk management. But can it attain the status of an independent discipline? And if so, what is, and is not, included in this new discipline? What are the core competencies that should be required of its practitioners? This paper offers an approach to founding BCP as a discipline, but with a narrower demarcation than traditionally accepted. It presents three criteria by which to delineate and ground BCP. It discusses the difference between BCP and the more encompassing 'business resilience', and emphasises the need to clearly choose one or the other of these contexts when discussing certifications, standards and other continuity practices. Finally, the paper outlines areas for future research with an eye to proving the efficacy of BCP, especially to executives and stakeholders.

  18. Question No. 5: What Role Can Satellites Take, as a Complement to Ground Based Measurement Systems, to Provide Sustained Observations to Monitor GHG Emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Moustafa; Olsen, Edward

    2011-01-01

    What role can satellites take, as a complement to ground based measurement systems, to provide sustained observations to monitor GHG emissions (e.g., CO2, CH4, O3, N2O, CFC s, NH3, and NF3) that contribute to global warming?

  19. Five minutes of heaven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gárate

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Ganadora del principal premio del festival de cine de Sundance, “Five minutes of Heaven” constituye uno de aquellos filmes que demuestran que la calidad  y un presupuesto limitado pueden ir perfectamente de la mano, y alcanzar momentos de enorme calidad cinematográfica basados en un buen guión y una excelente dirección de actores. El realizador Olivier Hirschbiegel nos demuestra en esta película nuevamente su capacidad para entregarnos una obra de ficción sin dejar de lado su preocupación po...

  20. Five minutes of heaven

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Gárate

    2009-01-01

    Ganadora del principal premio del festival de cine de Sundance, “Five minutes of Heaven” constituye uno de aquellos filmes que demuestran que la calidad  y un presupuesto limitado pueden ir perfectamente de la mano, y alcanzar momentos de enorme calidad cinematográfica basados en un buen guión y una excelente dirección de actores. El realizador Olivier Hirschbiegel nos demuestra en esta película nuevamente su capacidad para entregarnos una obra de ficción sin dejar de lado su preocupación po....

  1. Take a Deep Breath (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-24

    Nearly 16 million Americans have been diagnosed with COPD; however, many may not be aware they have the condition. This podcast discusses the importance of seeing a health care provider if you have trouble breathing.  Created: 11/24/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/24/2016.

  2. Take a Walk (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-07

    Arthritis is among the most common chronic condition in the U.S., affecting more than 52 million adults. This podcast discusses the importance of exercise for those diagnosed with arthritis.  Created: 5/7/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/7/2015.

  3. Take a Breath (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-26

    Inhaling and exhaling is a daily struggle for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This podcast discusses how to manage COPD.  Created: 3/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 3/26/2015.

  4. Ground Stereo Vision-Based Navigation for Autonomous Take-off and Landing of UAVs: A Chan-Vese Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengqing Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at flying target detection and localization of a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV autonomous take-off and landing within Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS-denied environments. A Chan-Vese model–based approach is proposed and developed for ground stereo vision detection. Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is fused into state estimation to reduce the localization inaccuracy caused by measurement errors of object detection and Pan-Tilt unit (PTU attitudes. Furthermore, the region-of-interest (ROI setting up is conducted to improve the real-time capability. The present work contributes to real-time, accurate and robust features, compared with our previous works. Both offline and online experimental results validate the effectiveness and better performances of the proposed method against the traditional triangulation-based localization algorithm.

  5. The DECam Minute Cadence Survey I

    CERN Document Server

    Belardi, Claudia; Munn, Jeffrey A; Gianninas, A; Barber, Sara D; Dey, Arjun; Stetson, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from a minute cadence survey of a three square degree field obtained with the Dark Energy Camera. We imaged part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey area over eight half-nights. We use the stacked images to identify 111 high proper motion white dwarf candidates with g $\\leq24.5$ mag and search for eclipse-like events and other sources of variability. We find a new g = 20.64 mag pulsating ZZ Ceti star with pulsation periods of 11-13 min. However, we do not find any transiting planetary companions in the habitable zone of our target white dwarfs. Given the probability of eclipses of 1% and our observing window from the ground, the non-detection of such companions in this first field is not surprising. Minute cadence DECam observations of additional fields will provide stringent constraints on the frequency of planets in the white dwarf habitable zone.

  6. A potential kidney-bone axis involved in the rapid minute-to-minute regulation of plasma Ca2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm, Anders; Mace, Maria L; Gravesen, Eva;

    2015-01-01

    of plasma-Ca(2+) (p-Ca(2+)) takes place via an exchange mechanism of Ca(2+) between plasma and bone. A labile Ca storage pool exists on bone surfaces storing excess or supplying Ca when blood Ca is lowered. Aim was to examine minute-to-minute regulation of p-Ca(2+) in the very early phase of acute uremia...

  7. Incidence of intracranial hemorrhage and outcomes after ground-level falls in geriatric trauma patients taking preinjury anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Subhash; Sharma, Rohit; Grotts, Jonathan; Ferrigno, Lisa; Kaminski, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Antiplatelet and anticoagulant medication increases the risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) after a fall in geriatric patients. We sought to determine whether there were differences in ICH rates and outcomes based on type of anticoagulant or antiplatelet agent after a ground-level fall (GLF). Our institutional trauma registry was used to identify patients 65 years old or older after a GLF while taking warfarin, clopidogrel, or aspirin over a 2-year period. Rates and types of ICH and patient outcomes were evaluated. Of 562 patients who met inclusion and exclusion criteria, 218 (38.8%) were on warfarin, 95 (16.9%) were on clopidogrel, and 249 (44.3%) were on aspirin. Overall ICH frequency was 15 per cent with no difference in ICH rate, type of ICH, need for craniotomy, mortality, or intensive care unit or hospital length of stay between groups. Patients with ICH were more likely to present with abnormal Glasgow Coma Score, history of hypertension, and/or loss of consciousness.

  8. 10-minute consultation Dry mouth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Taubert; Eleanor M R Davies; Ian Back

    2007-01-01

    @@ A 67 year old man presents with a six week history of dry mouth (xerostomia). He has prostate cancer, which has spread to his spine, and he takes opiates for pain relief. Recently, he started taking an antidepressant.

  9. Last-Minute Travel Application

    OpenAIRE

    Hubner, Andre; Lenz, Mario; Borch, Roman; Posthoff, Michael

    2000-01-01

    In this article, we present a last-minute travel application as part of a complete virtual travel agency. Each year, a significant amount of tour packages are sold as last minute tours in Germany. It is impossible for a travel agent to keep track of all the offered tour packages. Electronic-commerce applications might present the best possible tour package for a specific customer request. Traditional database-driven applications, as used by most of the tour operators, are not sufficient enoug...

  10. BOX: One Minute Volume 3

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Rose

    2009-01-01

    BOX is a digital short originally developed in 2004 documented on a 1920’s box camera. This early moving image work formed the basis of a practice which interrogates our experience of moving image through the remediation of analogue technology with new media. In 2009 it was included in One Minute Volume 3; a programme of artists moving image curated by Kerry Baldry including work by: Tony Hill, Tina Keane, Katherine Meynell, Kayla Parker and Stuart Moore, Dave Griffiths, Marty St Jam...

  11. Discussion on possibilities of taking ground ice in permafrost as water sources on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau during climate warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Large amounts of ground ice are born with permafrost on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.Degradation of permafrost resulted from the climate warming will inevitably lead to melting of ground ice.The water released from the melting ground ice enters hydrologic cycles at various levels,and changes regional hydrologic regimes to various degrees.Due to difficulties in monitoring the perma-frost-degradation-release-water process,direct and reliable evidence is few.The accumulative effect of releasing water,however,is remarkable in the macro-scale hydrologic process.On the basis of the monitoring results of water-levels changes in some lakes on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau,and combined with the previous results of the hydrologic changing trends at the regional scale,the authors preliminarily discussed the possibilities of the degrading permafrost on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau as a potential water source during climate warming.

  12. Making A Last Minute Save?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Khara, Navjote

    Recent academic writings have emphasized that an increasing proportion of world-wide manufacturing is taking place through extensive subcontracting networks that connect consumers in the United States and Europe with workers laboring in the informal economies of developing countries where...... they often lack social protection or legal recognition under national labor laws. In this article, we make a contribution to this literature by exploring how three different forms of workorganization – factory-based, center-based, and home-based football stitching - came into being in the brand sensitive......-establishment as industrial factory-based work in the early parts of the new millennium. We conclude that shifting preferences of the upstream buyers and the global consumers, somewhat ironically, offer a Hobson’s choice to the Jalandhar football manufacturers: either insource football stitching within factory-based settings...

  13. Exercise 30 minutes a day (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    You get the most benefit from exercise if you do it for at least 30 minutes a day for 5 to 6 days a week. But you do not have to do 30 minutes in a row. Studies suggest that you ... for 10 minutes 3 times a day as you do during a longer session.

  14. 78 FR 64179 - Hours of Service of Drivers; Amendment of the 30-Minute Rest Break Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ...; Amendment of the 30-Minute Rest Break Requirement AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA... of Service of Drivers'' to provide an exception from the 30- minute rest break requirement for short...). The final rule included a new provision requiring drivers to take a rest break during the work day...

  15. 48 CFR 9901.312 - Minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minutes. 9901.312 Section 9901.312 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL... maintaining Board files....

  16. U.S. 15 Minute Precipitation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. 15 Minute Precipitation Data is digital data set DSI-3260, archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This is precipitation data. The primary source...

  17. Algebra success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    LearningExpress, LLC

    2014-01-01

    Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with algebra essentials, this handy guide covers vital algebra skills that apply to real-world scenarios. Whether you're new to algebra or just looking for a refresher, Algebra Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. All lessons can be completed in just 20 minutes a day, for a manageable and non-intimidating learning experience.

  18. Taking the Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China’s musical theater market has yet to take shape for a homegrown repertoire to expand The past summer offered an interesting variety of musical performances. While the Chinese version of Mama Mia!,one of the most popular musicals in the world, tours China on a 200-performance run, homegrown musicals are also gaining ground.

  19. 历史人物伦理思想的指认依据--以梁漱溟为例%Identification grounds of historical figures’ ethical thoughts:Taking Liang Shuming as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖济忠; 李建华

    2015-01-01

    堪称伦理思想者,当有指认依据在。以梁漱溟为例,提出伦理思想的三个指认依据:一是基本稳定的形上基础;二是相对系统的伦理主张;三是较为广泛的实际影响。只有坚持论从史出,我们才有可能靠近历史人物伦理思想的历史真实和价值真实。%Whether one can be rated as an ethical thinker or not, there should be some identification grounds. By taking Liang Shuming as an example, this paper proposes three identification grounds of ethical thoughts: basically stable metaphysical foundation, relatively systematic ethical proposition, and comparatively extensive and actual influence. Only by adhering to theory coming from historical materials, can we approach historical truth and value truth of historical figures’ ethical thoughts.

  20. Geometry success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    LLC, LearningExpress

    2014-01-01

    Whether you're new to geometry or just looking for a refresher, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a 20-step lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with geometry essentials, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day: Covers all vital geometry skills, from the basic building blocks of geometry to ratio, proportion, and similarity to trigonometry and beyond Provides hundreds of practice exercises in test format Applies geometr

  1. 10-Minute Consultation Transient ischaemic attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vedamurthy Adhiyaman; Sonja Adhiyaman

    2009-01-01

    @@ A 64 year old man comes to your surgery five days after an episode of visual loss in his left eye, followed by fight sided weakness and speech disturbance lasting 10 minutes. He has made a complete recovery and has driven himself to the surgery to ask whether he can return to work.

  2. Grammar success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    Express, Learning

    2013-01-01

    Thorough and concise, Grammar Success in 20 Minutes a Day, covers all the essentials, including common and proper nouns; personal, reflexive, and demonstrative pronouns; regular and irregular verbs; adjectives, adverbs, misplaced modifiers, prepositions, subordinate and insubordinate clauses; coordinating and correlating conjunctions; compound sentences; and punctuation.

  3. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  4. The elements of grammar in 90 minutes

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Robert

    2011-01-01

    An eminent scholar explains the essentials of English grammar to those who never studied the basics as well as those who need a refresher course. Inspired by Strunk & White's classic The Elements of Style, this user-friendly guide focuses exclusively on grammar, explaining the individual parts of speech and their proper arrangement in sentence form. A modest investment of 90 minutes can provide readers of all ages with simple but important tools that will improve their communication skills. Dover (2011) original publication.

  5. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  6. Taking Turns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Two people take turns selecting from an even number of items. Their relative preferences over the items can be described as a permutation, then tools from algebraic combinatorics can be used to answer various questions. We describe each person's optimal selection strategies including how each could make use of knowing the other's preferences. We…

  7. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    periods around 20 minutes. These periods are longer than those of the Sun, as expected for a star that is larger and heavier than the Sun. The figure accompanying this Press Release shows these oscillations in the form of a "power spectrum", i.e., the amount of temperature change at different values of the period. Most of the highest peaks correspond to the real oscillations in the star. The changes (fluctuations) of the temperature of Eta Bootis vary with the oscillation mode and, at the time of these observations, were mostly between 0.03 and 0.08 degrees. This diagramme provides the first strong evidence ever for solar-type oscillations in a star other than the Sun. An article with the detailed results will soon appear in the "Astronomical Journal". Agreement with Stellar Theory The measured periods of the main oscillation modes give important information about the interior of Eta Bootis. Theoretical models of the star have now been compared with these observations and the astronomers were pleased to find that the agreement is excellent, implying that current stellar theory is remarkably good. This shows that we apparently understand stars quite well, but there is of course still much to be learned. Future observations of this kind, with ground-based telescopes and possibly in a more distant future also from space, promise to open up a new and exciting way of studying stars. From now on, we will be able "to look inside" stars in great detail. Appendix: Spectral Analysis Dark spectral lines were first seen in the solar spectrum by the German physicist Johann Fraunhofer in 1814. Later, in the mid-nineteenth century, such lines were also seen in the spectra of other stars. It is now known that they are due to the upper, cooler layers in the solar and stellar atmospheres, whose atoms and molecules absorb the radiation from the hotter, deeper layers at specific wavelengths. These wavelengths serve as "footprints" of these atoms and molecules and allow astronomers to

  8. Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Ground Vehicle Robotics Jim Parker Associate Director, Ground Vehicle Robotics UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...DATE 20 AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2013 to 15-08-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a...Willing to take Risk on technology -User Evaluated -Contested Environments -Operational Data Applied Robotics for Installation & Base Ops -Low Risk

  9. "Could Cherryl or Irene Just Take a Few Minutes to Explain This Feminist View of Literature?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, Irene; Smith, Cherryl Armstrong

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the role that feminist issues played in a summer institute at the Literature Institute for Teachers and the role of feminist theory in teacher education. Shares thoughts about the role of feminist theory in the classroom. (MG)

  10. Taking Steps to Prevent Falls (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-22

    More than one in four adults U.S. adults over 65 fell at least once in the preceding year. This podcast discusses the importance of preventing falls among older Americans.  Created: 9/22/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 9/22/2016.

  11. Take the Pressure off Your Heart (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-06-02

    Heart disease and stroke are leading causes of death in the U.S. High blood pressure, or hypertension, can lead to both. This podcast discusses the importance of controlling blood pressure.  Created: 6/2/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 6/2/2016.

  12. "Could Cherryl or Irene Just Take a Few Minutes to Explain This Feminist View of Literature?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, Irene; Smith, Cherryl Armstrong

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the role that feminist issues played in a summer institute at the Literature Institute for Teachers and the role of feminist theory in teacher education. Shares thoughts about the role of feminist theory in the classroom. (MG)

  13. The LHC restart in one minute

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    On Friday March 25 2016, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) got its first proton beam of the year. In just over 1 minute this time-lapse provides a quick overview to some of the important milestones that preceded proton beam injection this year, against a background of activities over the last few days in the CERN Control Centre (CCC), the place where the CERN accelerator chain is operated and controlled. Read more: http://cern.ch/go/Z9cz Music From FruityAudio, entitled "New Groove". - Producer - Audiovisual production service Paola Catapano - Director - Julien Ordan - Camera - Julien Ordan Maximilien Brice - Graphics \\ Animations - Arzur Catel Torres - Infography - Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban - Music - FruityAudio - New groove Category Film & Animation License Standard YouTube License

  14. Universal functional form of 1-minute raindrop size distribution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall remains one of the poorly quantified phenomena of the hydrological cycle, despite its fundamental role. No universal laws describing the rainfall behavior are available in literature. This is probably due to the continuous description of rainfall, which is a discrete phenomenon, made by drops. From the statistical point of view, the rainfall variability at particle size scale, is described by the drop size distribution (DSD). With this term, it is generally indicated as the concentration of raindrops per unit volume and diameter, as the probability density function of drop diameter at the ground, according to the specific problem of interest. Raindrops represent the water exchange, under liquid form, between atmosphere and earth surface, and the number of drops and their size have impacts in a wide range of hydrologic, meteorologic, and ecologic phenomena. DSD is used, for example, to measure the multiwavelength rain attenuation for terrestrial and satellite systems, it is an important input for the evaluation of the below cloud scavenging coefficient of the aerosol by precipitation, and is of primary importance to make estimates of rainfall rate through radars. In literature, many distributions have been used to this aim (Gamma and Lognormal above all), without statistical supports and with site-specific studies. Here, we present an extensive investigation of raindrop size distribution based on 18 datasets, consisting in 1-minute disdrometer data, sampled using Joss-Waldvogel or Thies instrument in different locations on Earth's surface. The aim is to understand if an universal functional form of 1-minute drop diameter variability exists. The study consists of three main steps: analysis of the high order moments, selection of the model through the AIC index and test of the model with the use of goodness-of-fit tests.

  15. Simple nanosecond to minutes transient absorption spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhonin, Aleksandr V; Maurer, Marta K; Reese, Chad E; Asher, Sanford A

    2005-12-01

    We built a transient absorption spectrophotometer that can determine transient absorption spectral changes that occur at times as fast as approximately 200 ns and as slow as a minute. The transient absorption can be induced by a temperature-jump (T-jump) or by optical pumping from the deep ultraviolet (UV) to the infrared (IR) by use of single ns Nd:YAG laser pulses. Our use of a fiber-optic spectrometer coupled to a XeF flashlamp makes the collection of transient spectra easy and convenient in the spectral range from the near IR (1700 nm) down to the deep UV (200 nm), with high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios. The spectral resolution is determined by the specific configuration of the fiber-optic spectrometer (grating groove density, fiber diameter, slit width) and varies between 0.3 and 10 nm. The utility of this spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the rate at which a polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanogel particles optically switch light due to a T-jump induced by nanosecond 1.9 microm laser pulses. In addition, we measured the rate of optical switching induced by a 3 ns 355 nm pump pulse in PCCA functionalized with azobenzene.

  16. Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

  17. 10-Minute Consultation Sleep disorder (insomnia)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruce Arroll; Antonio Fernando; Ⅲ; Karen Falloon

    2009-01-01

    @@ A 53 year old man comes to you complaining of not having slept well for many years. He always feels tired the next day. He has tried sleeping pills, which sometimes help, but he is not keen on taking them continually and has found that the benefits they give him don't last. He spends about 9-10 hours in bed each night (going to bed about 9 30 pm or 10 pm and getting up at 7 am) and has trouble getting to sleep. His actual hours of sleep are 5. 5 to 6 each night. He wakes about three times a night and describes the quality of his sleep as poor.

  18. Assessment of exercise capacity in African patients with chronic heart failure using six minutes walk test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufus A Adedoyin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Rufus A Adedoyin1, Samuel A Adeyanju2, Michael O Balogun3, Anthony O Akintomide3, Rasaaq A Adebayo3, Patience O Akinwusi4, Taofeek O Awotidebe11Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; 2Department of Physical and Health Education, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; 3Department of Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; 4Department of Medicine, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Osogbo, NigeriaBackground: The purpose of this study was to assess the functional capacity during a 6-minute corridor walk and a 6-minute bicycle ergometry exercise in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF.Method: Thirty five patients with stable CHF were recruited for the study. Each subject performed six minutes corridor walk and 6-minute bicycle ergometry testing. The 6-minute walk required the subjects to walk at a self selected speed on a 20 meter marked level ground for 6-minute. All the subjects also performed a 6-minute exercise on a stationary bicycle ergometer with initial resistance of 20 watts and increased by 10 watts after 3-minutes. The perceived rate of exertion was assessed using a modified Borg Scale after each exercise mode. The maximum oxygen consumption was derived using American College of Sport Medicine equations.Results: Result showed high positive correlation between distance walked in the 6-minute and the maximum volume of oxygen (VO2 max (r = 0.65, P < 0.01. The average distance walked was 327 m ± 12.03 m. The VO2 max estimated during bicycle ergometry was higher (13.7 ± 1.9 L than during the six minutes walk (8.9 ± 1.2 L.Conclusion: Six minutes walk could be useful to evaluate exercise tolerance in patients with chronic heart failure, while the bicycle ergometer could be more appropriate in the assessment of maximum functional capacity in these patients.Keywords: 6-minute walk, CHF, bicycle ergometer

  19. 5-minute Gridded Global Relief Data (ETOPO5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earth topography five minute grid (ETOPO5) is a gridded data base of worldwide elevations derived from several sources at a resolution of 5 minutes of latitude and...

  20. Summary of after the first three minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Bond, J.

    1991-04-01

    Readers of the New York Times over the past few years have variously learned that: the Big Bang is dead; dark matter isn't cold; the Universe is bubbly, spongy, periodic, replete with Great Voids, Attractors and Walls. And every six months or so obituaries appear for the CDM model of cosmic structure formation. The observational evidence for the Hot Big Bang model, for dark matter, for the large scale structure of the Universe as revealed by galaxy surveys and for the very large scale structure as constrained by microwave background observations was thoroughly explored in After The First Three Minutes. From this meeting we learned that: The Hot Big Bang model is healthier than ever. There is evidence from IRAS surveys that Ω>~0.5, but from Big Bang nucleosynthesis that ΩB>=0.07, suggesting a great deal of nonbaryonic dark matter exists, which cannot be vacuum energy (nonzero Λ). There are fewer viable candidates for cold dark matter (CDM) after the LEP results from CERN, but searches are still promising. Hot dark matter in the form of light massive neutrinos got a boost from the MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem. The standard ``biased'' CDM model, the `minimal' inflation model with adiabatic Gaussian scale invariant fluctuations and cold dark matter, probably should have been `unbiased' in its primordial amplitude all along - although some galaxy types and their relative velocities would be biased. The indications for extra density fluctuation power on large scales over that of the `minimal' CDM model continue to firm up. The emerging dilemma is what can give the observed large scale structure, and yet such CMB isotropy on slightly larger scales. The key clue may reside in cosmological background radiation. All wavebands are being experimentally mined to unearth it. Energy injection models with hot gas or dust are already under pressure in the sub-mm. The recuring invocation of the cosmological constant to solve our cosmological problems causes

  1. Cornavin station to CERN non-stop in 20 minutes

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    Following several years of work, the construction of the Jardin Alpin – CERN tramline is almost complete, and the first tram is due to arrive at CERN on 30 April. Celebrations to mark the occasion will be held in Meyrin-Village and at CERN.   First tests of the overhead lines, signals, and tracks on the stretch between Jardin-Alpin and CERN on 7 April 2011. From 30 April onwards you will be able to travel from Cornavin station to CERN non-stop in 20 minutes using the No. 18 tram. This is great news, especially when you think that, only four years ago, no part of the stretch between Cornavin and CERN was served by a tramline. At present, if you want to travel between CERN and the city centre by public transport, you have to take the No. 14 or the No. 16 tram and the No. 56 bus, changing at Meyrin-Gravière, where you sometimes have quite a long wait. On 30 April all this will be a thing of the past! The construction work for the Geneva-CERN tramline began in January 20...

  2. Grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  3. 265 Wait at Least 60 Minutes After Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Stella; Woodruff, Megan; Halley, Hillary; Patel, Samir; Shah, Summit

    2012-01-01

    Background We will describe 2 unique cases of Food Dependent Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis. Methods Patients underwent a complete history, physical exam, and skin prick testing by classical method. Results Case 1: A 23 year old Asian Male presented with anaphylaxis following cashew ingestion and post prandial exercise. This was the first episode of anaphylaxis despite previous exposure to cashews and exercise independently. Patient ingested cashews and went for a jog 30 minutes later. His symptoms of anaphylaxis included urticaria and ocular swelling. Skin prick testing generated positive results to cashew, with measurements of 10 mm/30 mm (wheal/flare). Controls of histamine and saline measured were 10 mm/30 mm and 0 mm/0 mm, respectively. Case 2: A 42 year old Caucasian Male presented with anaphylaxis following shrimp ingestion and post prandial exertion. This was the first episode of anaphylaxis despite previous exposure to shrimp and exercise independently. Patient ingested shrimp and went for a brisk walk 30 minutes later. His symptoms of anaphylaxis included full body urticaria and shortness of breath. Skin prick testing generated negative results to shrimp and shellfish mix, with measurements of 0 mm/0 mm and 0 mm/0 mm (wheal/flare). Controls of histamine and saline measured were 10mm/30mm and 0mm/0mm, respectively. Conclusions The previous cases describe anaphylactic reactions after food ingestion followed by post prandial exercise. The precise pathophysiology of this rare syndrome is poorly understood, however it is believed that allergen absorption is increased in a post-exercise state. The contrast in our patients’ results of their skin prick tests demonstrate that patients may or may not have food-specific IgE but still can experience food dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis. Mainstay treatment for food dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis is recommending exercising only on an empty stomach. The consideration of food dependent exercise induced

  4. Take-off and landing of aicraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae APOSTOLESCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the take-off and landing segments of an airplane trajectory are studied. The equations of motion for the ground run are derived and solved for distance. Then, specific formulas are obtained for the take-off ground distance and time and the landing ground distance and time. Transitions from take-off to climb and descent to landing are investigated so that take-off distance and landing distance and time can be estimated. The run distances and the run times for take-of and landing dependent of altitude, speed wing, temperature, the coefficient of rolling friction. In conformity with mathematical model, programs of calculation were elaborated. Also interfaces of calculations were elaborated for programs of calculation.

  5. The LOFT Ground Segment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozzo, E.; Antonelli, A.; Argan, A.;

    2014-01-01

    targets per orbit (~90 minutes), providing roughly ~80 GB of proprietary data per day (the proprietary period will be 12 months). The WFM continuously monitors about 1/3 of the sky at a time and provides data for about ~100 sources a day, resulting in a total of ~20 GB of additional telemetry. The LOFT...... we summarize the planned organization of the LOFT ground segment (GS), as established in the mission Yellow Book 1 . We describe the expected GS contributions from ESA and the LOFT consortium. A review is provided of the planned LOFT data products and the details of the data flow, archiving...

  6. Galaxy Group Stephan's Quintet Video File HubbleMinute: Battle Royale in Stephan's Quintet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's closeup view of Stephan's Quintet, a group of five galaxies, reveals a string of brighter star clusters that separate like a diamond necklace. Astronomers studying the compact galaxy group Stephan's Quintet have seen creative destruction in the many collisions taking place among its galaxies. This HubbleMinute discusses what astronomers are learning and hope to learn from exploring the quintet.

  7. The One-Minute Paper: Some Empirical Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizmar, John F.; Ostrosky, Anthony L

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that using the one-minute paper to teach an introductory economics course increases economic knowledge regardless of student ability level and instructor characteristics. The one-minute paper is a form of feedback where the students answer a few basic questions about the lesson at the end of the class. (MJP)

  8. Econometric Assessment of "One Minute" Paper as a Pedagogic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amaresh

    2010-01-01

    This paper makes an econometric testing of one-minute paper used as a tool to manage and assess instruction in my statistics class. One of our findings is that the one minute paper when I have tested it by using an OLS estimate in a controlled Vs experimental design framework is found to statistically significant and effective in enhancing…

  9. 2-minute Gridded Global Relief Data (ETOPO2) v2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Two-minute gridded global relief for both ocean and land areas are available in the ETOPO2v2 (2006) database. ETOPO2v2 replaced ETOPO2 (2001). The historic 2-minute...

  10. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.

  11. Take Five for Customer Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Ax-Fultz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Businesses leverage excellent customer service to improve profitability. Although not profit-driven, libraries should leverage excellent customer service to achieve their unique missions. Evaluating and improving customer service practices will help a library determine if it is successfully serving its customers. The library should review three areas to improve customer service: the physical space of the library, how library employees work with library policies, and the communication skills of the library staff. By using the Take Five model, the library can make immediate, no-cost changes or plan for future improvements by taking just five minutes, every day, to assess specific areas. Over a few weeks or months, these small changes will result in better customer service.

  12. Photospheric Origin of Three-minute Oscillations in a Sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jongchul; Lee, Jeongwoo; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Song, Donguk; Cho, Kyungsuk; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2017-02-01

    The origin of the three-minute oscillations of intensity and velocity observed in the chromosphere of sunspot umbrae is still unclear. We investigated the spatio-spectral properties of the 3 minute oscillations of velocity in the photosphere of a sunspot umbra as well as those in the low chromosphere using the spectral data of the Ni i λ5436, Fe i λ5435, and Na i D2 λ5890 lines taken by the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. As a result, we found a local enhancement of the 3 minute oscillation power in the vicinities of a light bridge (LB) and numerous umbral dots (UDs) in the photosphere. These 3 minute oscillations occurred independently of the 5 minute oscillations. Through wavelet analysis, we determined the amplitudes and phases of the 3 minute oscillations at the formation heights of the spectral lines, and they were found to be consistent with the upwardly propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves in the photosphere with energy flux large enough to explain the chromospheric oscillations. Our results suggest that the 3 minute chromospheric oscillations in this sunspot may have been generated by magnetoconvection occurring in the LB and UDs.

  13. Proportion and factors associated with low fifth minute Apgar score ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proportion and factors associated with low fifth minute Apgar score among ... with low Apgar scores are at an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. ... of meconium stained liquor, induced/ augmented labor and low birth weight.

  14. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Verified, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has verified (quality-controlled), 6-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)....

  15. Jobs within a 30-minute transit ride - Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This mapping service summarizes the total number of jobs that can be reached within 30 minutes by transit. EPA modeled accessibility via transit by calculating total...

  16. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Preliminary, 1-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has recent, preliminary (not quality-controlled), 1-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and...

  17. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Preliminary, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has recent, preliminary (not quality-controlled), 6-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and...

  18. Minutes of September 21, 1993 Meeting [Stapleton outfall systems planning

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Letter including the minutes from the September 21, 1993 meeting on the Stapleton Outfall Systems Planning Study, as well as tentative agenda for the next meeting on...

  19. Six-minute-walk test in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polkey, Michael I; Spruit, Martijn A; Edwards, Lisa D

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes other than spirometry are required to assess nonbronchodilator therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Estimates of the minimal clinically important difference for the 6-minute-walk distance (6MWD) have been derived from narrow cohorts using nonblinded intervention.......Outcomes other than spirometry are required to assess nonbronchodilator therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Estimates of the minimal clinically important difference for the 6-minute-walk distance (6MWD) have been derived from narrow cohorts using nonblinded intervention....

  20. Practical math success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    LearningExpress's 20 Minutes a Day guides make challenging subject areas more accessible by tackling one small part of a larger topic and building upon that knowledge with each passing day. Practical Math Success in 20 Minutes a Day features: A walkthrough of the fundamental concepts of pre-algebra, algebra, and geometry Hundreds of practice exercises for essential practice A posttest, which reveals your progress Access to a free, instantly scored online practice test

  1. Ground Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    Political campaigns today are won or lost in the so-called ground war--the strategic deployment of teams of staffers, volunteers, and paid part-timers who work the phones and canvass block by block, house by house, voter by voter. Ground Wars provides an in-depth ethnographic portrait of two...... infrastructures that utilize large databases with detailed individual-level information for targeting voters, and armies of dedicated volunteers and paid part-timers. Nielsen challenges the notion that political communication in America must be tightly scripted, controlled, and conducted by a select coterie...... of professionals. Yet he also quashes the romantic idea that canvassing is a purer form of grassroots politics. In today's political ground wars, Nielsen demonstrates, even the most ordinary-seeming volunteer knocking at your door is backed up by high-tech targeting technologies and party expertise. Ground Wars...

  2. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Decision Aids > Urinary Incontinence > What is UI? Taking Control: Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in ... 0 Page 2 What is urinary incontinence (UI)? Taking Control (5-minute video) Click on the video above ...

  3. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective. PMID:26900948

  4. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Tan

    Full Text Available A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective.

  5. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective.

  6. Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2011-08-01

    We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

  7. Take Charge. Take the Test. PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  8. Using Minute Papers to Determine Student Cognitive Development Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Can anonymous written feedback collected during classroom assessment activities be used to assess students' cognitive development levels? After library instruction in a first-year engineering design class, students submitted minute papers that included answers to "what they are left wondering." Responses were coded into low, medium and…

  9. Using Minute Papers to Determine Student Cognitive Development Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Can anonymous written feedback collected during classroom assessment activities be used to assess students' cognitive development levels? After library instruction in a first-year engineering design class, students submitted minute papers that included answers to "what they are left wondering." Responses were coded into low, medium and…

  10. Interagency Advanced Power Group -- Steering group meeting minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-18

    This document contains the draft meeting minutes of the Steering Group of the Interagency Advanced Power Group. Included are the discussions resulting from the presentation of working group reports and the results of a discussion of IAPG policies and procedures. In the appendix are the reports of the following working groups: Electrical, Mechanical, Solar, and Systems.

  11. A novel Minute Feedback System for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David T; Leininger, Lisa; Reddy, Rishindra M; Sandhu, Gurjit; Ryszawa, Susan; Englesbe, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Medical students often report a lack of timely, useful feedback during clerkship rotations. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel Minute Feedback System and determine whether it would generate frequent, high quality, documented feedback for students during the third year surgery clerkship. The Minute Feedback System was created using the Qualtrics(©) survey software platform and piloted with surgery clerkship students. These students were surveyed about the frequency and quality of feedback and their overall rating of the surgery clerkship and compared to students who did not use the feedback system. The initial pilot of the Minute Feedback System involved 6/34 M3 surgery clerkship students and generated a total of 70 unique comments from faculty and residents over 3 weeks. When the 6 pilot students were compared to the 28 students without access to the Minute Feedback System, they respectively rated the frequency of feedback 4.50 vs 2.83 (p < 0.01); the quality of feedback 4.70 vs 3.33 (p < 0.01) and the overall rating of the surgery clerkship 4.67 vs 4.05 (p < 0.01) higher. The system was then made available to all students on the M3 surgery clerkship (n = 31) over the subsequent 2 month rotation. 354 unique feedback comments were generated from 399 student requests (89% response rate). Students using the Minute Feedback System (n = 31) compared to students in the previous academic year without (n = 170) rated the quality of feedback (3.76 vs 3.4, p < 0.01), that feedback was provided during clerkship (100% vs 90%, p < 0.01) and the overall quality of the clerkship (3.94 vs 3.87, p = 0.2) higher. The novel Minute Feedback System allows for frequent, timely, useful and documented feedback to medical students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Feed mechanism and method for feeding minute items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Timothy Kent; Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2012-11-06

    A feeding mechanism and method for feeding minute items, such as capacitors, resistors, or solder preforms. The mechanism is adapted to receive a plurality of the randomly-positioned and randomly-oriented extremely small or minute items, and to isolate, orient, and position the items in a specific repeatable pickup location wherefrom they may be removed for use by, for example, a computer-controlled automated assembly machine. The mechanism comprises a sliding shelf adapted to receive and support the items; a wiper arm adapted to achieve a single even layer of the items; and a pushing arm adapted to push the items into the pickup location. The mechanism can be adapted for providing the items with a more exact orientation, and can also be adapted for use in a liquid environment.

  13. The LOFT Ground Segment

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzo, E; Argan, A; Barret, D; Binko, P; Brandt, S; Cavazzuti, E; Courvoisier, T; Herder, J W den; Feroci, M; Ferrigno, C; Giommi, P; Götz, D; Guy, L; Hernanz, M; Zand, J J M in't; Klochkov, D; Kuulkers, E; Motch, C; Lumb, D; Papitto, A; Pittori, C; Rohlfs, R; Santangelo, A; Schmid, C; Schwope, A D; Smith, P J; Webb, N A; Wilms, J; Zane, S

    2014-01-01

    LOFT, the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing, was one of the ESA M3 mission candidates that completed their assessment phase at the end of 2013. LOFT is equipped with two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD performs pointed observations of several targets per orbit (~90 minutes), providing roughly ~80 GB of proprietary data per day (the proprietary period will be 12 months). The WFM continuously monitors about 1/3 of the sky at a time and provides data for about ~100 sources a day, resulting in a total of ~20 GB of additional telemetry. The LOFT Burst alert System additionally identifies on-board bright impulsive events (e.g., Gamma-ray Bursts, GRBs) and broadcasts the corresponding position and trigger time to the ground using a dedicated system of ~15 VHF receivers. All WFM data are planned to be made public immediately. In this contribution we summarize the planned organization of the LOFT ground segment (GS), as established in the mission Yellow Book 1 . We...

  14. The beam has circulated 30 minutes in the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    Last night around 2 a.m. the beam circulated for the first time for about 30 minutes in the clockwise ring of the LHC. This confirms that the accelerating cavities are working well. During the night, the LHC team also increased the intensity of the single bunch to around 1/20th of the nominal LHC bunch intensity. You can follow the beam commissioning daily reports on: https://lhc-commissioning.web.cern.ch/lhc-commissioning/dailynews/index.htm

  15. Superresolution measurement on the minute fluctuation of cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; HUANG Yaoxiong; ZHAO Haiyan; TU Mei; CHEN Wenxin

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for measuring the minute fluctuation of cell membrane is developed by modifying the super-resolution theory, increasing dimension in Fourier space, enhancing brightness gradient and utilizing maximum adaptive weighted averaging filter (MAWA) in obstructing noise. The application of the method in studying aspergillus flavus cell (AFC) and red blood cell and the new findings from the study show that it is a useful tool.

  16. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Clifton M.; Erin C. Holahan; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing i...

  17. 'Grounded' Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2012-01-01

    play within one particular neighbourhood: Nørrebro in the Danish capital, Copenhagen. The article introduces the concept of grounded politics to analyse how groups of Muslim immigrants in Nørrebro use the space, relationships and history of the neighbourhood for identity political statements....... The article further describes how national political debates over the Muslim presence in Denmark affect identity political manifestations within Nørrebro. By using Duncan Bell’s concept of mythscape (Bell, 2003), the article shows how some political actors idealize Nørrebro’s past to contest the present...

  18. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M.; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (rs = −0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (rs = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  19. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macario Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure. Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs=0.60 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0088, apnea-hypopnea index (rs=0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p=0.039, lowest oxygen saturation (rs=-0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p=0.048, and oxygen desaturation index (rs=0.62 [strong positive relationship], p=0.0057. Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  20. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Zaghi, Soroush; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (r s = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (r s = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (r s = -0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (r s = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP.

  1. RESPONSE TO 6 MINUTE WALK TEST IN HEALTHY ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhuti kiran shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: 6Minute walk test (MWT has been used as a performance based measure of functional exercise capacity in all populations including healthy adults. 6MWT is recommended out of other all timed walked tests due to its reproducibility and ease of administration compared to other longer or shorter time duration tests. It detects changes following interventions to improve exercise tolerance in healthy individuals, to assess the fitness level, used as intervention to improve walking endurance and as predictor of objectively measured aerobic fitness in healthy adults. It is essential to know a level of fitness healthy adults possess in our community, thus aim of this study was to evaluate response to 6MWT in young healthy adults. Method: 50 healthy individuals (25 males and 25 females of 18 - 30 years of age were recruited. The 6MWT was performed as per standard guidelines. All subjects were assessed for the outcome measures by principal investigator at baseline i.e. before and post- 6MWT for following parameters. BP, PR, RR, SPO2, RPE. Results: The mean 6 minute walked distance (6MWD was 635.6+59.07, for men it was 675.0+46.88 and for women it was 596.5+41.41. Out of study population 18% of people covered 70%-80%, 54% people covered 80%-90% and 28% people covered 90%-100% of their predicted distance. Oxygen saturation remained unaltered throughout the walk. Mean resting and walking spo2 values were 96.80+13.55% and 96.71+13.55% (p-value: 0.2288. Pulse rate (PR and respiratory rate (RR were affected by the walk. Mean resting and walking PR was 79.82+9.18 and 142.6+19.62 (p-value: 0.0001 and RR was 18.48+2.78 and 30.20+4.35 (p-value: 0.0001 respectively. Mean resting and walking systolic and diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in males as compared to females. Conclusion: The 6 minute walk test is a useful measure of functional capacity in healthy adults. There was a difference between predicted distance covered and actual distance

  2. 积家莲花Master Minute Repeater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    积家莲花Master Minute Repeater三问手表,积家974型手动上弦机芯,动力储存15天,铂金表壳,直径43毫米,动力储存显示位于8点钟位置,四点钟位置为弹簧扭距0到8的数字显示,以辅助动力储存显示,全球限量1枚。

  3. Grounded Theory Methodology: Positivism, Hermeneutics, and Pragmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age, Lars-Johan

    2011-01-01

    Glaserian grounded theory methodology, which has been widely adopted as a scientific methodology in recent decades, has been variously characterised as "hermeneutic" and "positivist." This commentary therefore takes a different approach to characterising grounded theory by undertaking a comprehensive analysis of: (a) the philosophical paradigms of…

  4. Grounded theory methodology--narrativity revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Paul Sebastian; Mey, Günter

    2015-06-01

    This article aims to illuminate the role of narrativity in Grounded Theory Methodology and to explore an approach within Grounded Theory Methodology that is sensitized towards aspects of narrativity. The suggested approach takes into account narrativity as an aspect of the underlying data. It reflects how narrativity could be conceptually integrated and systematically used for shaping the way in which coding, category development and the presentation of results in a Grounded Theory Methodology study proceed.

  5. A 20-minute breath test for helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, B.J.; Plankey, M.W.; Hoffman, S.R.; Boyd, C.L.; Dye, K.R.; Frierson, H.F. Jr.; Guerrant, R.L.; McCallum, R.W. (Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville (USA))

    1991-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated a simplified rapid {sup 14}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. Fasting patients undergoing initial assessment for H. pylori drank 5 microCi of {sup 14}C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath was collected at intervals for 30 min. Samples were counted in a beta-counter, and the results were expressed as counts per minute (cpm). In the same week, patients underwent endoscopy, and a blinded investigator examined biopsy samples of gastric mucosa by culture and histology for H. pylori. There were 49 H. pylori-negative (HP-) and 104 H. pylori-positive (HP+) patients in the study. HP+ patients expired a mean of 4398 cpm (SD 2468) per mmol CO{sub 2} in a sample taken 20 min after ingestion of the isotope. In contrast, HP--patients expired only 340 cpm (SD 196). If the mean +3 SD of HP- patients was used as a cutoff value, the 20-minute sample gave a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% for detecting H. pylori. The radiation exposure from this test is less than 1% of that received from an upper gastrointestinal series, and the short collection time makes it both convenient and cost effective.

  6. Take the (Exercise) Plunge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167533.html Take the (Exercise) Plunge Pool workouts offer a range of health ... the pool. Whether you swim or do aquatic exercises, working out in water improves strength, flexibility and ...

  7. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis.

  8. Electron Crystallographic Study on Structure Determination for Minute Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fanghua; FAN Haifu; WAN Zhenghua; HU Jianjun; TANG Dong

    2007-01-01

    @@ In the 1970s the development of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) provided a new approach to structure determination for minute crystals, which is thoroughly different from the diffraction methods.However, the previous method of trial and error has its own limits, such as some preliminary structural information must be known in advance; the crystals must be sufficient strong under the electron beam irradiation;and not all atoms can be seen in the image. Two ideas were proposed to initiate the present research project:one is to transform an arbitrary image into the crystal structure map, and the other is to enhance the image resolution by combining the information contained in the image and the corresponding electron diffraction pattern. These ideas have been realized via the combination of electron microscopy and diffraction crystallography.

  9. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: Probing the First 20 Minutes

    CERN Document Server

    Steigman, G

    2003-01-01

    Within the first 20 minutes of the evolution of the hot, dense, early Universe, astrophysically interesting abundances of deuterium, helium-3, helium-4, and lithium-7 were synthesized by the cosmic nuclear reactor. The primordial abundances of these light nuclides produced during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) are sensitive to the universal density of baryons and to the early-Universe expansion rate which at early epochs is governed by the energy density in relativistic particles (``radiation'') such as photons and neutrinos. Some 380 kyr later, when the cosmic background radiation (CBR) radiation was freed from the embrace of the ionized plasma of protons and electrons, the spectrum of temperature fluctuations imprinted on the CBR also depended on the baryon and radiation densities. The comparison between the constraints imposed by BBN and those from the CBR reveals a remarkably consistent picture of the Universe at two widely separated epochs in its evolution. Combining these two probes leads to new and tig...

  10. Minutes of the fourth SALE program participants meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    This report is a documentation of the presentations made to the Fourth Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (S.A.L.E.) Program Participants Meeting at Argonne, Illinois, July 8-9, 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and was coordinated by the S.A.L.E. Program of the New Brunswick Laboratory. The objective of the meeting was to provide a forum through which administration of the Program and methods appropriate to the analysis of S.A.L.E. Program samples could be discussed. The Minutes of the Meeting is a collection of presentations by the speakers at the meeting and of the discussions following the presentations. The presentations are included as submitted by the speakers. The discussion sections were transcribed from tape recordings of the meeting and were edited to clarify and emphasize important comments. Seventeen papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  11. Just a minute meditation: Rapid voluntary conscious state shifts in long term meditators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ajay Kumar; Sasidharan, Arun; John, John P; Mehrotra, Seema; Kutty, Bindu M

    2017-08-01

    Meditation induces a modified state of consciousness that remains under voluntary control. Can meditators rapidly and reversibly bring about mental state changes on demand? To check, we carried out 128 channel EEG recordings on Brahma Kumaris Rajayoga meditators (36 long term: median 14240h meditation; 25 short term: 1095h) and controls (25) while they tried to switch every minute between rest and meditation states in different conditions (eyes open and closed; before and after an engaging task). Long term meditators robustly shifted states with enhanced theta power (4-8Hz) during meditation. Short term meditators had limited ability to shift between states and showed increased lower alpha power (8-10Hz) during eyes closed meditation only when pre and post task data were combined. Controls could not shift states. Thus trained beginners can reliably meditate but it takes long term practice to exercise more refined control over meditative states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling and synthesis of strong ground motion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S T G Raghu Kanth

    2008-11-01

    Success of earthquake resistant design practices critically depends on how accurately the future ground motion can be determined at a desired site. But very limited recorded data are available about ground motion in India for engineers to rely upon. To identify the needs of engineers, under such circumstances, in estimating ground motion time histories, this article presents a detailed review of literature on modeling and synthesis of strong ground motion data. In particular, modeling of seismic sources and earth medium, analytical and empirical Green’s functions approaches for ground motion simulation, stochastic models for strong motion and ground motion relations are covered. These models can be used to generate realistic near-field and far-field ground motion in regions lacking strong motion data. Numerical examples are shown for illustration by taking Kutch earthquake-2001 as a case study.

  13. Topical Articles: Attention during Lectures--Beyond Ten Minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karen; Korn, James H.

    2007-01-01

    Many authors claim that students' attention declines approximately 10 to 15 min into lectures. To evaluate this claim, we reviewed several types of studies including studies of student note taking, observations of students during lectures, and self-reports of student attention, as well as studies using physiological measures of attention. We found…

  14. Chill Out (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-08

    The dog days of summer are here and with them come the health risk associated with extended periods of excessive heat. This podcast discusses the importance of taking precautions during times of extreme heat, such as wearing loose-fitting, light-colored clothing and staying indoors in air-conditioned environments as much as possible.  Created: 8/8/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 8/8/2013.

  15. Designing as middle ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt; Binder, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is science and technology studies and actor network theory, enabling investigation of heterogeneity, agency and perfor-mative effects through ‘symmetric’ analysis. The concept of design is defined as being imaginative and mindful to a number of actors...... in a network of humans and non-humans, highlighting that design objects and the designer as an authority are constructed throughout this endeavour. The illustrative case example is drawn from product development in a rubber valve factory in Jutland in Denmark. The key contribution to a general core of design...... research is an articulation of design activity taking place as a middle ground and as an intermixture between a ‘scientific’ regime of knowledge transfer and a capital ‘D’ ‘Designerly’ regime of authoring....

  16. Space shuttle engineering and operations support: Study of the effects of multiple ground updates on the accuracy of the onboard state vector with IMU only navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, R.

    1977-01-01

    There are six cases considered: (1) no updates made during the flight, (2) one ground update in the vertical components only at the first practice separation minus 15 minutes, (3) one ground update in all components at the first practice separation minus 5 minutes, (4) updates 2 and 3 applied successively, (5) Case 4 plus an update in all components at the second separation attempt minus 3 minutes, and (6) one ground update at first separation attempt minus 5 minutes and a second update at second separation minus two minutes. The mission control simulation program, GROPER, was run using as radar input a tape containing radar derived state vectors for the trajectory.

  17. Take Three: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting seasonal flu and spreading it to others by taking these three steps.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  18. Take a Bow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Greg; Ogurek, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Performing-arts centers can provide benefits at the high school and collegiate levels, and administrators can take steps now to get the show started. When a new performing-arts center comes to town, local businesses profit. Events and performances draw visitors to the community. Ideally, a performing-arts center will play many roles: entertainment…

  19. Reformer Takes French Reins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The painful reforms chosen by French voters to rejuvenate their sluggish economy have smoothed the way for Nicolas Sarkozy to take up France’s top political job.The 52-year-old leader of the ruling right-wing Union

  20. Taking the long view

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patrick; Smith, Emma

    2016-10-01

    A new study of the long-term employment prospects of UK science and engineering students suggests that talk of a skills shortage is overblown, with most graduates in these disciplines taking jobs outside science. Researchers Patrick White and Emma Smith discuss their findings and what they mean for current physics students

  1. Minutes of the CAALS Workshop on modularity and communications standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, G.W.

    1991-12-31

    This Workshop was organized similarly to the previous meeting. After a presentation by Scott Tilden on Instrument Interfacing, three of the four Working Groups met individually. The Strategic Planning Committee did not meet at this Workshop, but it held a meeting in April; the minutes of that meeting are included. The Physical link and Transport Committee has defined the requirements for the link connecting modules to their controller, examined a new ASTM standard for low-level communication, and is determining what fits into to the various layers of the ISO model. The Module Requirements Group has proposed a process control model, has defined the core functionality, and has listed the requirements for a Standard Laboratory Module. The Software Engineering Group proposed that a document detailing the CAALS Modularity Architectural Specification be prepared and presented a working outline. The future structure and charters of the committees and the decision making criteria of the Workshop itself were questioned. These items will be examined in greater detail at the next Workshop.

  2. SAVING MOTHERS LIVES-THE GOLDEN FIVE MINUTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : Maternal and neonatal mortality is a subject of universal concern and saving mother's and foetal life is an obligation to the society. Maternal and neonatal overall health is a prime issue of every nation and hence cannot be jeopardized at any cost. In this context when maternal cardiac arrest occur due to any underlying cause, it endanger both the lives, hence a prompt intervention is needed. For this very reason, Perimortem cesarean section has been reported since ancient times; however, greater awareness regarding this procedure within the medical community has only emerged in the past few decades. Recommendations for maternal resuscitation include performance of the procedure within four minutes. If accomplished in a timely manner, perimortem cesarean section can result in fetal salvage and is also critical for maternal resuscitation. Lack of knowledge and sincere guidelines feasible to the health care available about this procedure is not uncommon. We have reviewed publications on perimortem cesarean section and present the most recent evidences on this topic, as well as recommending our “easy-to-follow protocol” adapted for resuscitation following maternal haemodynamic collapse.

  3. VOLUNTEERS REQUESTED !! ONLY 5 MINUTES OF YOUR TIME !! ON MONDAY 27 AUGUST FROM 12H30 TO 16H00

    CERN Multimedia

    Press Office

    2001-01-01

    Louis Saul Film Production is making a film for the Expo 02 (http://www.expo.02.ch/e/home.html), which will take place in Switzerland between May and October 2002. They are filming thousands of people all over the country, expressing their personal wishes, for example: 'I wish I were taller, richer, or I wish for peace around the world etc.' Each interview will be in the person's mother tongue. It will take about 5 minutes. Since there are over 80 nationalities represented at CERN, we are looking for people from all over and of all ages !! The interviews will take place in a bus which will be parked just behind the Users' Office building and you can go straight there. If you need more information, please do not hesitate to contact the Press Office on 74101, 72141 and 78766. THANK YOU!

  4. PROMIS series. Volume 8: Midlatitude ground magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    This is the eighth in a series of volumes pertaining to the Polar Region Outer Magnetosphere International Study (PROMIS). This volume contains 24 hour stack plots of 1-minute average, H and D component, ground magnetograms for the period March 10 through June 16, 1986. Nine midlatitude ground stations were selected from the UCLA magnetogram data base that was constructed from all available digitized magnetogram stations. The primary purpose of this publication is to allow users to define universal times and onset longitudes of magnetospheric substorms.

  5. Detection and classication of resolved multiplet members of the solar 5 minute oscillations through solar diameter-type observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, H. A.

    1985-03-01

    After Hill and Stebbins (1975) provided the first evidence of global oscillations in solar diameter observations, numerous attempts have been made to obtain similar evidence of these modes of oscillation in other types of observations, taking into account Doppler shifts of Fraunhofer lines. Unfortunately, efforts to detect the considered global solar oscillations by other types of observations have so far not been successful. The relative utility of the observational techniques currently in use could be evaluated on the basis of a direct comparison of various results regarding the five minute oscillations. New information obtained on five minute oscillations provides confirmation of the existence and detection of resolved members of multiplets through observed symmetry properties of the eigenfunctions. It is pointed out that the existence of such resolved multiplets is a pivotal issue at this time. The importance of this point is related to the implications for the internal rotation of the sun.

  6. Psychometric properties of 2-minute walk test: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Tamis W

    2014-09-01

    To systematically review the psychometric evidence on the 2-minute walk test (2MWT). Electronic searches of databases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and DARE were done until February 2014 using a combination of subject headings and free texts. Studies were included if psychometric properties of the 2MWT were (1) evaluated; (2) written as full reports; and (3) published in English language peer-reviewed journals. A modified consensus-based standard for the selection of health measurement instruments checklist was used to rate the methodological quality of the included studies. A quality assessment for statistical outcomes was used to assess the measurement properties of the 2MWT. Best-evidence synthesis was collated from 25 studies of 14 patient groups. Only 1 study was found that examined the 2MWT in the pediatric population. The testing procedures of the 2MWT varied across the included studies. Reliability, validity (construct and criterion), and responsiveness of the 2MWT also varied across different patient groups. Moderate to strong evidence was found for reliability, convergent validity, discriminative validity, and responsiveness of the 2MWT in frail elderly patients. Moderate to strong evidence for reliability, convergent validity, and responsiveness was found in adults with lower limb amputations. Moderate to strong evidence for validity (convergent and discriminative) was found in adults who received rehabilitation after hip fractures or cardiac surgery. Limited evidence for the psychometric properties of the 2MWT was found in other population groups because of methodological flaws. There is inadequate breadth and depth of psychometric evidence of the 2MWT for clinical and research purposes-specifically, minimal clinically important changes and responsiveness. More good-quality studies are needed, especially in the pediatric population. Consensus on standardized testing procedures of

  7. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M; Holahan, Erin C; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing is needed. A new filter-paper absorption method to assess the 1-min bioavailable fluoride concentration was developed to meet this need. This method utilizes coiled filter paper that rapidly absorbs the aqueous phase of the dentifrice slurry followed by centrifugation to recover that fluid for fluoride measurement via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The analytical method was used to successfully determine the total fluoride and 1-min bioavailable fluoride in eight dentifrice products containing sodium fluoride (NaF), disodium monofluorophosphate (Na2FPO3, MFP), stannous fluoride (SnF2), or NaF with amorphous calcium phosphate (NaF + ACP). The results showed that some of the dentifrices tested had significantly lower potentially available fluoride than the total fluoride. For a MFP-containing sample, aged seven years past its expiry date, there was significant reduction in the bioavailable fluoride compared to MFP products that were not aged. Other than the aged MFP and the SnF2-containing samples the bioavailable fluoride for all products tested had at least 80 % of the label fluoride concentration. The filter paper absorption method yielded reproducible results for the products tested with MFP samples showing the largest variations. PMID:25821392

  8. Aviation Expo Taking off

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinwen; Bai Yifeng

    2007-01-01

    @@ The 12nd Beijing Aviation Expo(Aviation Expo/China 2007) was held this September 19-22 at the China International Exhibition Center.Beijing Aviation Expo is the ONLY aviation exhibition (Civil & Military,including Airport & Air Traffic Control) organized in Beijing,taking place every two years.It is also the most influential aviation exhibition with the longest history in China.

  9. Taking drugs very seriously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, J Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Neither anti-illegal drug proponents nor their detractors have wholly plausible arguments for their positions, because neither takes responsibility for drug use sufficiently seriously. Instead, only a policy that places users' responsibility at the forefront of the problem is acceptable, one that is sufficiently respectful of actual or potential nonusers' rights not to be wrongfully harmed, directly or indirectly, by drug use, or coerced to support it in any way.

  10. Perspective Taking in Workplaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zappalà Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Workplaces are often described as places in which individuals are motivated by their self-interests and in which negative events like time pressure, anxiety, conflict with co-workers, miscomprehensions, difficulties in solving problems, not-transmitted or not-exchanged information that lead to mistakes, and in some cases to injuries, stress or control, are part of everyday life (Dormann & Zapf, 2002; Schabracq, Winnubst and Cooper, 2003. Such situations are often the result of the limited comprehension of needs, skills, or information available to colleagues, supervisors, subordinates, clients or providers. However, workplaces are also places in which employees take care of clients, support colleagues and subordinates (Rhoades & Eisenberger, 2002, are enthusiastic about their job (Bakker et al., 2008, are motivated by leaders that encourage employees to transcend their own self-interests for the good of the group or the organization and provide them with the confidence to perform beyond expectations (Bass, 1997. Thus positive relationships at work are becoming a new interdisciplinary domain of inquiry (Dutton & Ragins, 2006. Within this positive relationships framework, in this paper we focus on a positive component of workplaces, and particularly on an individual cognitive and emotional process that has an important role in the workplace because it facilitates interpersonal relations and communications: it is the perspective taking process. In order to describe perspective taking, we will refer to some empirical studies and particularly to the review published by Parker, Atkins and Axtell in 2008 on the International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

  11. USGS 1:12000 (Quarter 7 1/2 Minute) Quadrangle Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This is a mathematically generated grid in which each polygon represents one quarter of a standard USGS 7 1/2 minute quadrangle. The result is a 3 3/4 minute...

  12. Modelling 1-minute directional observations of the global irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejll, Peter; Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Direct and diffuse irradiances from the sky has been collected at 1-minute intervals for about a year from the experimental station at the Technical University of Denmark for the IEA project "Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting". These data were gathered by pyrheliometers tracking the Sun, as well as with apertured pyranometers gathering 1/8th and 1/16th of the light from the sky in 45 degree azimuthal ranges pointed around the compass. The data are gathered in order to develop detailed models of the potentially available solar energy and its variations at high temporal resolution in order to gain a more detailed understanding of the solar resource. This is important for a better understanding of the sub-grid scale cloud variation that cannot be resolved with climate and weather models. It is also important for optimizing the operation of active solar energy systems such as photovoltaic plants and thermal solar collector arrays, and for passive solar energy and lighting to buildings. We present regression-based modelling of the observed data, and focus, here, on the statistical properties of the model fits. Using models based on the one hand on what is found in the literature and on physical expectations, and on the other hand on purely statistical models, we find solutions that can explain up to 90% of the variance in global radiation. The models leaning on physical insights include terms for the direct solar radiation, a term for the circum-solar radiation, a diffuse term and a term for the horizon brightening/darkening. The purely statistical model is found using data- and formula-validation approaches picking model expressions from a general catalogue of possible formulae. The method allows nesting of expressions, and the results found are dependent on and heavily constrained by the cross-validation carried out on statistically independent testing and training data-sets. Slightly better fits -- in terms of variance explained -- is found using the purely

  13. The ionospheric response to flux transfer events: the first few minutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rodger

    Full Text Available We utilise high-time resolution measurements from the PACE HF radar at Halley, Antarctica to explore the evolution of the ionospheric response during the first few minutes after enhanced reconnection occurs at the magnetopause. We show that the plasma velocity increases associated with flux transfer events (FTEs occur first ~100–200 km equatorward of the region to which magnetosheath (cusp precipitation maps to the ionosphere. We suggest that these velocity variations start near the ionospheric footprint of the boundary between open and closed magnetic field lines. We show that these velocity variations have rise times ~100 s and fall times of ~10 s. When these velocity transients reach the latitude of the cusp precipitation, sometimes the equatorward boundary of the precipitation begins to move equatorward, the expected and previously reported ionospheric signature of enhanced reconnection. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the velocity variations. It involves the rapid outflow of magnetospheric electrons into the magnetosheath along the most recently reconnected field lines. Several predictions are made arising from the proposed explanation which could be tested with ground-based and space-based observations.

  14. Physics Take-Outs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riendeau, Diane; Hawkins, Stephanie; Beutlich, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Most teachers want students to think about their course content not only during class but also throughout their day. So, how do you get your students to see how what they learn in class applies to their lives outside of class? As physics teachers, we are fortunate that our students are continually surrounded by our content. How can we get them to notice the physics around them? How can we get them to make connections between the classroom content and their everyday lives? We would like to offer a few suggestions, Physics Take-Outs, to solve this problem.

  15. SUSHILANDIA Take Away

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Lozano, María Helena; Amador Torres, Stephania; Silva Manrique, Kelly Johana

    2016-01-01

    Sushilandia take away es un restaurante que ofrece variedad de ingredientes para la selección por parte del cliente, bajo el concepto de “comida para llevar”. El sistema de funcionamiento se basa en la puesta de un menú estándar que le permite al cliente seguir una cadena dentro del sistema de producción de su comida. Inicialmente están dispuestos tres cortes diferentes de sushi, una vez el cliente escoge el que quiere pasa a la zona de proteínas, seguido de vegetales y adiciones. Seguidament...

  16. 47 CFR 69.155 - Per-minute residual interconnection charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Per-minute residual interconnection charge. 69... Per-minute residual interconnection charge. (a) Local exchange carriers may recover a per-minute residual interconnection charge on originating access. The maximum such charge shall be the lower of:...

  17. Ground water and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

  18. Taking Design Games Seriously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Agger; Brandt, Eva; Mattelmäki, Tuuli;

    2014-01-01

    Using design games at Participatory Design (PD) events is well acknowledged as a fruitful way of staging participation. As PD researchers, we have many such experiences, and we have argued that design games connect participants and promote equalizing power relations. However, in this paper, we...... will (self) critically re-connect and reflect on how people (humans) and materials (non-humans) continually participate and intertwine in various power relations in design game situations. The analysis is of detailed situated actions with one of our recent games, UrbanTransition. Core concepts mainly from...... Bruno Latour’s work on Actor-Network-Theory are applied. The aim is to take design games seriously by e.g. exploring how assemblages of humans and non-humans are intertwined in tacitly-but-tactically staging participation, and opening up for or hindering negotiations and decision-making, thus starting...

  19. Risk-taking plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Nir; Gebremedhin, Alem; Moshelion, Menachem

    2012-01-01

    Water scarcity is a critical limitation for agricultural systems. Two different water management strategies have evolved in plants: an isohydric strategy and an anisohydric strategy. Isohydric plants maintain a constant midday leaf water potential (Ψleaf) when water is abundant, as well as under drought conditions, by reducing stomatal conductance as necessary to limit transpiration. Anisohydric plants have more variable Ψleaf and keep their stomata open and photosynthetic rates high for longer periods, even in the presence of decreasing leaf water potential. This risk-taking behavior of anisohydric plants might be beneficial when water is abundant, as well as under moderately stressful conditions. However, under conditions of intense drought, this behavior might endanger the plant. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these two water-usage strategies and their effects on the plant’s ability to tolerate abiotic and biotic stress. The involvement of plant tonoplast AQPs in this process will also be discussed. PMID:22751307

  20. Happy to be taking part?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Kwekkeboom; C.M.C. van Weert

    2008-01-01

    Original title: Meedoen en gelukkig zijn. 'Taking part': that is the central plank of Dutch government policy for people with disabilities. But what exactly does 'taking part' mean, and what is needed to ensure that people are willing or able to take part? Does taking part make people happier?. Doe

  1. When should orthostatic blood pressure changes be evaluated in elderly: 1st, 3rd or 5th minute?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Pinar; Aydin, Ali Ekrem; Koc Okudur, Saadet; Isik, Ahmet Turan

    2016-01-01

    Detection of orthostatic hypotension (OH) is very important in geriatric practice, since OH is associated with mortality, ischemic stroke, falls, cognitive failure and depression. It was aimed to determine the most appropriate time for measuring blood pressure in transition from supine to upright position in order to diagnose OH in elderly. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) including Head up Tilt Table (HUT) test was performed in 407 geriatric patients. Orthostatic changes were assessed separately for the 1st, 3rd and 5th minutes (HUT1, HUT3 and HUT5, respectively) taking the data in supine position as the basis. The mean age, recurrent falls, presence of dementia and Parkinson's disease, number of drugs, alpha-blocker and anti-dementia drug use, and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the patients with versus without OH; whereas, albumin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were significantly lower (pfasting blood glucose level was prominent in HUT1 as compared to HUT3 (p<0.01, p<0.05). Comparison of the patients that had OH only in HUT1, HUT3or HUT5 revealed no difference in terms of CGA parameters. These results suggests that orthostatic blood pressure changes determined at the 1st minute might be more important for geriatric practice. Moreover, 1st minute measurement might be more convenient in the elderly as it requires shorter time in practice.

  2. Building Grounded Theory in Entrepreneurship Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkelä, Markus; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter we describe the process of building of theory from data (Glaser and Strauss 1967; Strauss and Corbin 1998). We discuss current grounded theory in relation to research in entrepreneurship and point out directions and potential improvements for further research in this field...... our approach to grounded theory, we acknowledge the existence of other approaches and try to locate our approach in relation to them. As an important part of this discussion, we take a stand on how to usefully define ‘grounded theory’ and ‘case study research’. Second, we seek to firmly link our....... The chapter has two goals. First, we wish to provide an explicit paradigmatic positioning of the grounded theory methodology, discussing the most relevant views of ontology and epistemology that can be used as alternative starting points for conducting grounded theory research. While the chapter introduces...

  3. Building Grounded Theory in Entrepreneurship Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkelä, Markus; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2007-01-01

    our approach to grounded theory, we acknowledge the existence of other approaches and try to locate our approach in relation to them. As an important part of this discussion, we take a stand on how to usefully define ‘grounded theory’ and ‘case study research’. Second, we seek to firmly link our......In this chapter we describe the process of building of theory from data (Glaser and Strauss 1967; Strauss and Corbin 1998). We discuss current grounded theory in relation to research in entrepreneurship and point out directions and potential improvements for further research in this field...... discussion to the potential value of grounded theory research to the field of entrepreneurship and thus the need in this field of further grounded theory....

  4. Cluster II quartet take the stage together

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    prime contractor Dornier Satellitensysteme. On completion, they were sent to IABG in Ottobrunn, near Munich, for intensive vibration, thermal, vacuum and magnetic testing. The European ground segment for the mission is just as important. A vast amount of data - equivalent to 290 million printed pages - will be returned to Earth over the mission's two-year lifetime. Signals to and from the spacecraft will be sent via a 15 metre antenna at Villafranca in Spain and processed at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) at Darmstadt, Germany. The main control room at ESOC will be used during the launch and early phases of the mission, with teams of operators working round the clock. About two weeks after the second Cluster II pair are placed in their operational orbits, mission operations will switch to a smaller, dedicated control room at ESOC. The Joint Science Operations Centre at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK will co-ordinate the scientific investigations. Its main task will be to combine all requirements from the 11 science instrument teams into an overall plan. The flow of information returned by the 44 instruments will be distributed to eight national data centres, six in Europe, one in the USA and the other in China. Solar Maximum Cluster II is part of an international programme to find out more about how the Sun influences the Earth. The four Cluster II satellites will join an armada of spacecraft from many countries, which are already studying the Sun and high speed wind of charged particles (mainly electrons and protons) which it continually blasts into space. Ulysses and SOHO, both joint ESA-NASA missions, and ESA's Cluster II , when it will be there, are the flagships of this armada. The timing of the mission is ideal, since it will take place during a period of peak activity in the Sun's 11-year cycle, when sunspots and solar radiation reach a maximum. Cluster II will measure the effects of this activity on near-Earth space as incoming energetic

  5. Minute-made and low carbon fingerprint microwave synthesis of high quality templated mesoporous silica

    KAUST Repository

    Chaignon, J.

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Hexagonal mesostructured templated silicas were produced in less than 10 minutes using an ultra-fast microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis. Typically, 10 g can be prepared at once in a commercial microwave device usually devoted to analytical digestion. Undesired alcohol side-products were avoided using inexpensive water colloidal silica instead of silicon alkoxides as the silicon source. In comparison with classical heating activation, the absence of pore expansion and pore wall thickening even for synthesis temperatures as high as 190 °C evidenced that heat transfer and diffusion of matter had no time to take place. Comparison between the chemically extracted and calcined samples shows that the structure was better stabilized for autoclaving above 150 °C. However, a fast temperature ramping and final temperatures above 180 °C were required to sear structures of the highest quality comparable to that of the best conventional methods. This is rationalized by assuming a sequential flake-by-flake assembly of the pore-wall at the micelle palisade. Notably, tosylate counterions yielded better structural characteristics than bromide counterions and allowed better opportunities for surfactant recycling.

  6. The minute virus of mice exploits different endocytic pathways for cellular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcin, Pierre O.; Panté, Nelly, E-mail: pante@zoology.ubc.ca

    2015-08-15

    The minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), is a non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA virus of the family Parvoviridae. Unlike other parvoviruses, the mechanism of cellular uptake of MVMp has not been studied in detail. We analyzed MVMp endocytosis in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a tumor cell line derived from epithelial–mesenchymal transition through polyomavirus middle T antigen transformation in transgenic mice. By a combination of immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that MVMp endocytosis occurs at the leading edge of migrating cells in proximity to focal adhesion sites. By using drug inhibitors of various endocytic pathways together with immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, we discovered that MVMp can use a number of endocytic pathways, depending on the host cell type. At least three different mechanisms were identified: clathrin-, caveolin-, and clathrin-independent carrier-mediated endocytosis, with the latter occurring in transformed cells but not in LA9 fibroblasts. - Highlights: • MVMp uptake takes place at the leading edge of migrating cells. • MVMp exploits a variety of endocytic pathways. • MVMp could use clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis. • MVMp could also use clathrin-independent carriers for cellular uptake.

  7. Ground-water flow and the possible effects of remedial actions at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    J-Field, located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md, has been used since World War II to test and dispose of explosives, chemical warfare agents, and industrial chemicals resulting in ground-water, surface-water, and soil contami- nation. The U.S. Geological Survey finite-difference model was used to better understand ground-water flow at the site and to simulate the effects of remedial actions. A surficial aquifer and a confined aquifer were simulated with the model. A confining unit separates these units and is represented by leakance between the layers. The area modeled is 3.65 mi2; the model was constructed with a variably spaced 40 X 38 grid. The horizontal and lower boundaries of the model are all no-flow boundaries. Steady-state conditions were used. Ground water at the areas under investigation flows from disposal pit areas toward discharge areas in adjacent estuaries or wetlands. Simulations indicate that capping disposal areas with an impermeable cover effectively slows advective ground water flow by 0.7 to 0.5 times. Barriers to lateral ground-water flow were simulated and effectively prevented the movement of ground water toward discharge areas. Extraction wells were simulated as a way to contain ground-water contamination and to extract ground water for treatment. Two wells pumping 5 gallons per minute each at the toxic-materials disposal area and a single well pumping 2.5 gallons per minute at the riot-control-agent disposal area effectively contained contamination at these sites. A combi- nation of barriers to horizontal flow east and south of the toxic-materials disposal area, and a single extraction well pumping at 5 gallons per minute can extract contaminated ground water and prevent pumpage of marsh water.

  8. PCB's take a stroll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castillo Rodríguez

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to bioaccumulable organochlorine compounds is a reality, not only because of the known presence in tissues of the residue of historic contaminants such as DDT and other pesticides, but also because of the risk of current exposure to compounds still in use, such as lindane, endosulphan and polychlorinated biphenyls or PCBs, among others. The case of the PCBs is of particular importance. Although their production was prohibited due to their hazardous nature, persistence and environmental toxicity, a large number of equipments that contain considerable volumes of PCBs continue functioning. These equipments will reach the residual stage in the next few years, if not already, so that their correct disposal is necessary to avoid their release into the environment. A National Plan for the decontamination and elimination of polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs, polychloroterphenyls (PCTs and the equipments that contain them was launched in Spain in 2001. This plan must be implemented taking full account of the possible effects of PBCs on the environment and human health and with the knowledge of those responsible for public health.

  9. Taking the plunge

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On 8 and 15 October, 58 people took the plunge and headed to the Varembé swimming pool in Geneva for their first taste of scuba diving at one of the CERN scuba club’s free trial dives. Club president Alberto Pace, left, taking a new recruit on his first dive. The CERN scuba club was making waves down at the Varembe swimming pool on Wednesday 15 October. Thirty-six people turned up to the club’s second free trial dive. "It was fantastic," said Jörg, one of the new recruits, after his first ever dive. "I’ve always wanted to try diving and this was a free lesson, so I thought I would come and have a go." Fourteen of the club’s fully qualified instructors were there to give one-on-one tuition. After a first dive in the normal pool the new divers moved into the deep pool. Some took to the water like fish, and at one point an impromptu game of aqua-Frisbee broke out, five metres below the surface. Richard Catherall, who organi...

  10. Taking Care of Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortney Davis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available So take good care of time, therefore and how you spend it. -from " The Cloud of Unknowing"Yesterday it was a thousand small coinsringing in your pocket, your hand dipping in, scooping threeat a time, giving them away. Often you'd drop onein the lush grass, unaware it was lost.Spent, tarnished, it is irretrievable.Today time comes to you in a different disguise:a bold of fine silk, vermillion or blue, you measure itlike a woman preparing to sew.Tomorrow, watch out, it comes as something else-thunderstorm, slant rain, February blizzard that drives you inside.Insomniac, you pace and cursethe blue glow of television, computer screen, radio.Soon enough, time will come to you as you were once,newly born and difficult to recognize. You could mistake itfor an elderly coughing man or a woman overrun with disease.Do not stop your ears against its cry.It will ask you to return any small change.It will say, cherish every moment under the leaden sky.

  11. One-Minute Quasi-Periodic Pulsations Seen in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Z.

    2017-01-01

    We study quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the SOL2014-09-10 event that was detected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi satellite. Previous studies have found that this flare displays four-minute QPPs in a broad range of wavelengths. In this article, we find that this event also shows QPPs with a period of around one minute. Using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method, the light curves are decomposed into fast- and slowly varying components with a separation at {≈} 100 seconds. The four-minute QPPs are in the slowly varying component, and the one-minute QPPs are identified with the fast-varying components in the impulsive and maximum phases. Similarly as the four-minute QPPs, the one-minute QPPs are simultaneously found in soft X-rays (SXR), extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and hard X-ray (HXR) emission. High correlations are found between the fast-varying components at the different wavelengths, especially between SXR and HXR. The spatial location of the sources of one-minute QPPs differ from those of the four-minute QPPs. The four-minute QPPs appear in the whole flare region, while the one-minute QPPs tend to originate from the flare loop footpoints. This finding provides an observational constraint for the physical origin of the QPPs.

  12. 基于图形--背景理论的网络广告语认知分析——以淘宝网广告语为例%A Cognitive Analysis of Internet Advertising Language from the Point of Figure-Ground Theory --Taking Advertising Language of Taobao as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李盈

    2012-01-01

    Figure-Ground Theory is tile basic theory of prominence view in cognitive linguistics. Figure is the target of descriplion and ground is the background for figure. Basecl on Fig, re-Ground Theory, this paper it]lends to analyze Internel advertising language to explore, the charm of Internet advertising langHage in commodity markelJng fi'om lhe perspective of cognitive linguislies.%图形--背景理论是认知语言学突显观中的基本理论。图形即所要描写的对象,背景是其环境。本文以图形——背景理论为基础,对网络广告语进行分析。从认知语言学角度来感知网络广告语在商品营销中的巨大魅力。

  13. Taking centre stage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    HAMLET (Highly Automated Multimedia Light Enhanced Theatre) was the star performance at the recent finals of the `Young Engineer for Britain' competition, held at the Commonwealth Institute in London. This state-of-the-art computer-controlled theatre lighting system won the title `Young Engineers for Britain 1998' for David Kelnar, Jonathan Scott, Ramsay Waller and John Wyllie (all aged 16) from Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh. HAMLET replaces conventional manually-operated controls with a special computer program, and should find use in the thousands of small theatres, schools and amateur drama productions that operate with limited resources and without specialist expertise. The four students received a £2500 prize between them, along with £2500 for their school, and in addition they were invited to spend a special day with the Royal Engineers. A project designed to improve car locking systems enabled Ian Robinson of Durham University to take the `Working in industry award' worth £1000. He was also given the opportunity of a day at sea with the Royal Navy. Other prizewinners with their projects included: Jun Baba of Bloxham School, Banbury (a cardboard armchair which converts into a desk and chair); Kobika Sritharan and Gemma Hancock, Bancroft's School, Essex (a rain warning system for a washing line); and Alistair Clarke, Sam James and Ruth Jenkins, Bishop of Llandaff High School, Cardiff (a mechanism to open and close the retractable roof of the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff). The two principal national sponsors of the competition, which is organized by the Engineering Council, are Lloyd's Register and GEC. Industrial companies, professional engineering institutions and educational bodies also provided national and regional prizes and support. During this year's finals, various additional activities took place, allowing the students to surf the Internet and navigate individual engineering websites on a network of computers. They also visited the

  14. Taking Care of Your Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Taking Care of Your Vision KidsHealth > For Teens > Taking Care of Your Vision ... are important parts of keeping your peepers perfect. Vision Basics One of the best things you can ...

  15. Taking a deep breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2012-12-01

    be paid to language revision and reference citation. Together with its authors and readers, IJHDR contributes to the development of a kind of knowledge close to the borders of science. Therefore, to establish a valid scientific background, the articles must be clearly written, and based on sound assumptions. High-visibility for articles is a fundamental aspect desired by all authors. As an open and free access journal, IJHDR meets that condition, and we are planning to make our influence and visibility even wider. Inclusion in the major databases has paramount importance in the academic milieu, however, it should be considered as a consequence, rather than a goal. In 2013, IJHDR will chair a collaborative project with several research institutions aiming to deliver information everywhere, increasing the visibility of the published articles. Thus, now it is the time to take a deep breath, relax, and prepare you for the forthcoming work! See you in 2013!

  16. Ten Minutes Wide: Human Walking Capacities and the Experiential Quality of Campus Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, David

    2011-01-01

    Whether a campus is large or small, the idea of a 10-minute walk is an important human-scaled design standard that affects an institution in significant ways beyond just getting students to class on time. Designing a 10-minute walk seems like a simple exercise. Based on earlier information, all one needs to do is provide a walking surface and make…

  17. 10 CFR 1704.9 - Availability and retention of transcripts, recordings, and minutes, and applicable fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... IMPLEMENTING THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT § 1704.9 Availability and retention of transcripts, recordings... Reading Room the transcript, electronic recording, or minutes of the discussion of any item on the agenda... for withholding a portion of a transcript, electronic recording, or minutes or other item of...

  18. "Fifteen Minutes a Day"--A Method of Improving Reading Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronholm, Maj-Britt

    1990-01-01

    Describes Finland's 15-minute method for improving reading skills. Parents are asked to read aloud to their kindergarteners 15 minutes daily, and children are also encouraged to read. Notes are sent between teachers and parents so teachers can provide support. Older students are encouraged to read and listen to younger ones. (SM)

  19. Reference value for the 6-minute walk test in children and adolescents : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mylius, C F; Paap, D; Takken, T

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The 6-minute walk test is a submaximal exercise test used to quantify the functional exercise capacity in clinical populations. It measures the distance walked within a period of 6-minutes. Obtaining reference values in the pediatric population is especially demanding due to factors as

  20. Minutes of the fifth annual meeting of the panel on reference nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, T.W.; Coyne, J.J.; Brenner, D.S. (eds.)

    1981-04-01

    The minutes include: approval of agenda and minutes of the fourth meeting; elections; reactor physics data needs; fusion data needs; biomedical data needs; status of international and national cooperation; status and availability of data files; status of transfer of responsibilities from NDP to NNDC; status of publications; on-line data base systems; and summary of recommendations and actions. (GHT)

  1. 12 CFR 701.3 - Member inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member inspection of credit union books... inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes. (a) Member inspection rights. A group of members of a...) Accounting books and records; and (2) Minutes of the proceedings of the credit union's members, board of...

  2. Ten Minutes Wide: Human Walking Capacities and the Experiential Quality of Campus Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, David

    2011-01-01

    Whether a campus is large or small, the idea of a 10-minute walk is an important human-scaled design standard that affects an institution in significant ways beyond just getting students to class on time. Designing a 10-minute walk seems like a simple exercise. Based on earlier information, all one needs to do is provide a walking surface and make…

  3. Providing Students with Foundational Field Instruction within a 50 Minute Class Period: A Practical Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, M.

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing recognition among secondary educators and administrators that students need to have a science education that provides connections between familiar classes like biology, chemistry, and physics. Because of this waxing interest in an integrative approach to the sciences, there is a broader push for school districts to offer classes geared towards the earth sciences, a field that incorporates knowledge and skills gleaned from the three core science subjects. Within the contexts of a regular secondary school day on a traditional schedule (45- to 50-minute long classes), it is challenging to engage students in rigorous field-based learning, critical for students to develop a deeper understanding of geosciences content, without requiring extra time outside of the regular schedule. We suggest instruction using common, manmade features like drainage retention ponds to model good field practices and provide students with the opportunity to calculate basic hydrologic budgets, take pH readings, and, if in an area with seasonal rainfall, make observations regarding soils by way of trenching, and near-surface processes, including mass wasting and the effects of vegetation on geomorphology. Gains in student understanding are discussed by analyzing the difference in test scores between exams provided to the students after they had received only in-class instruction, and after they had received field instruction in addition to the in-class lectures. In an advanced setting, students made measurements regarding ion contents and pollution that allowed the classes to practice lab skills while developing a data set that was analyzed after field work was completed. It is posited that similar fieldwork could be an effective approach at an introductory level in post-secondary institutions.

  4. The relevance of syllable per minute measuring at the assessment of reading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Aparecido José Couto; Cárnio, Maria Silvia; Wertzner, Haydée Fiszbein

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To verify whether there are differences in the assessment of reading rate of children at 3rd and 4th grade from elementary school using the measures of words read per minute and syllables read per minute. Methods This research counted on 29 children from 3rd grade and 28 from the 4th grade of elementary school without reading and writing disorders. All children were asked to read aloud a text according to their schooling level. The procedure was recorded and the reading rate was calculated both in words and syllables read per minute. Results Data indicated that syllable read per minute measure was more effective to calculate reading rate of children from different schooling levels since it provides a more reliable profile of reading rate. Conclusion The present study showed evidences that syllable per minute measure is more precise to characterize children's performance since it considers linguistic and textual features.

  5. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  6. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  7. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  8. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Georgieva Yankova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  9. Jammin' Minute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    As awareness of the childhood obesity crisis spreads, schools across the country are recognizing the importance of providing higher-quality, more nutritious food, and of re-integrating physical activity back into students' daily routines. With disparate amounts of resources to accomplish this, some schools may be finding it easier than others to…

  10. Last minute

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2008-01-01

    At its meeting on 12 December, CERN Council decided to follow Finance Committee’s recommendation to adjust our salaries by 2.7% from January 2009. The Staff Association is very pleased about this decision to follow the approved method which shows, even in the current difficult financial situation, the Members States’ full support for the staff of the Organization.

  11. An early influence of common ground during speech planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlangendonck, F.; Willems, R.M.; Menenti, L.M.E.; Hagoort, P.

    2016-01-01

    In order to communicate successfully, speakers have to take into account which information they share with their addressee, i.e. common ground. In the current experiment we investigated how and when common ground affects speech planning by tracking speakers' eye movements while they played a

  12. Management Research and Grounded Theory: A review of grounded theorybuilding approach in organisational and management research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J.J. Kenealy, Ph.D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Grounded theory is a systematic methodology for the collection and analysis of data which was discovered by Glaser and Strauss in the 1960’s. The discovery of this method was first presented to the academic community in their book ‘The Discovery of Grounded Theory’ (1967 which still remains a primary point of reference for those undertaking qualitative research and grounded theory in particular. This powerful research method has become very popular in some research domains; whilst increasing in popularity it is still less prevalent in the field of organisational and management research particularly in its original form. This self reflexive paper sets out to explore the possibilities for this imbalance which takes the discussion onto the areas of methodological adaptation and training. It also enters the debate about access to research subjects and provides a succinct argument supporting the notion that grounded theory should simply be viewed as a method that develops empirically grounded conceptual theory.

  13. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    travels safely and efficiently through the airport. When an aircraft lands, a significant number of tasks must be performed by different groups of ground crew, such as fueling, baggage handling and cleaning. These tasks must be complete before the aircraft is able to depart, as well as check......-in and security services. These tasks are collectively known as ground handling, and are the major source of activity with airports. The business environments of modern airports are becoming increasingly competitive, as both airports themselves and their ground handling operations are changing to private...... ownership. As airports are in competition to attract airline routes, efficient and reliable ground handling operations are imperative for the viability and continued growth of both airports and airlines. The increasing liberalization of the ground handling market prompts ground handling operators...

  14. [Introduction to grounded theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Yu; Windsor, Carol; Yates, Patsy

    2012-02-01

    Grounded theory, first developed by Glaser and Strauss in the 1960s, was introduced into nursing education as a distinct research methodology in the 1970s. The theory is grounded in a critique of the dominant contemporary approach to social inquiry, which imposed "enduring" theoretical propositions onto study data. Rather than starting from a set theoretical framework, grounded theory relies on researchers distinguishing meaningful constructs from generated data and then identifying an appropriate theory. Grounded theory is thus particularly useful in investigating complex issues and behaviours not previously addressed and concepts and relationships in particular populations or places that are still undeveloped or weakly connected. Grounded theory data analysis processes include open, axial and selective coding levels. The purpose of this article was to explore the grounded theory research process and provide an initial understanding of this methodology.

  15. Inequality and Risk-Taking

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Mishra; Son Hing, Leanne S.; Lalumière, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inequality has been associated with risk-taking at the societal level. However, this relationship has not been directly investigated at the individual level. Risk-sensitivity theory predicts that decision makers should increase risk-taking in situations of disparity between one’s present state and desired state. Economic inequality creates such a disparity. In two experiments, we examined whether imposed economic inequality affects risk-taking. In Experiment 1, we examined whether victims of ...

  16. Pudong Takes Six Steps as the World Takes One

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShenHonglei; WuXinyi

    2003-01-01

    The Beijing-based Economic Daily recently carried the headline,“China Takes Three Steps As the World Takes One”——an observation on China's economic growth. Its 16 percent annual GDP growth means that Pudong is advancing at double that speed. This phenomenal growth rate makes Pudong the central focus of this issue.

  17. The hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel as a model organism for potential cold storage of platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Scott T.; Richters, Karl E.; Melin, Travis E.; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hordyk, Peter J.; Benrud, Ryan R.; Geiser, Lauren R.; Cash, Steve E.; Simon Shelley, C.; Howard, David R.; Ereth, Mark H.; Sola-Visner, Martha C.

    2012-01-01

    Hibernating mammals have developed many physiological adaptations to extreme environments. During hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) must suppress hemostasis to survive prolonged body temperatures of 4–8°C and 3–5 heartbeats per minute without forming lethal clots. Upon arousal in the spring, these ground squirrels must be able to quickly restore normal clotting activity to avoid bleeding. Here we show that ground squirrel platelets stored in vivo at 4–8°C wer...

  18. The Grounded Theory Bookshelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian B. Martin, Ph.D.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bookshelf will provide critical reviews and perspectives on books on theory and methodology of interest to grounded theory. This issue includes a review of Heaton’s Reworking Qualitative Data, of special interest for some of its references to grounded theory as a secondary analysis tool; and Goulding’s Grounded Theory: A practical guide for management, business, and market researchers, a book that attempts to explicate the method and presents a grounded theory study that falls a little short of the mark of a fully elaborated theory.Reworking Qualitative Data, Janet Heaton (Sage, 2004. Paperback, 176 pages, $29.95. Hardcover also available.

  19. Reconstructing 3D coastal cliffs from airborne oblique photographs without ground control points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewez, T. J. B.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal cliff collapse hazard assessment requires measuring cliff face topography at regular intervals. Terrestrial laser scanner techniques have proven useful so far but are expensive to use either through purchasing the equipment or through survey subcontracting. In addition, terrestrial laser surveys take time which is sometimes incompatible with the time during with the beach is accessible at low-tide. By comparison, structure from motion techniques (SFM) are much less costly to implement, and if airborne, acquisition of several kilometers of coastline can be done in a matter of minutes. In this paper, the potential of GPS-tagged oblique airborne photographs and SFM techniques is examined to reconstruct chalk cliff dense 3D point clouds without Ground Control Points (GCP). The focus is put on comparing the relative 3D point of views reconstructed by Visual SFM with their synchronous Solmeta Geotagger Pro2 GPS locations using robust estimators. With a set of 568 oblique photos, shot from the open door of an airplane with a triplet of synchronized Nikon D7000, GPS and SFM-determined view point coordinates converge to X: ±31.5 m; Y: ±39.7 m; Z: ±13.0 m (LE66). Uncertainty in GPS position affects the model scale, angular attitude of the reference frame (the shoreline ends up tilted by 2°) and absolute positioning. Ground Control Points cannot be avoided to orient such models.

  20. Sustained aftereffect of α-tACS lasts up to 70 minutes after stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian H Kasten

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS has been repeatedly demonstrated to increase power of endogenous brain oscillations in the range of the stimulated frequency after stimulation. In the alpha band this aftereffect has been shown to persist for at least 30 minutes. However, in most experiments the aftereffect exceeded the duration of the measurement. Thus, it remains unclear how the effect develops beyond these 30 minutes and when it decays. The current study aimed to extend existing findings by monitoring the physiological aftereffect of tACS in the alpha range for an extended period of 90 minutes post-stimulation. To this end participants received either 20 minutes of tACS or sham stimulation with intensities below their individual sensation threshold at the individual alpha frequency. Electroencephalogram was acquired during 3 minutes before and ninety minutes after stimulation. Subjects performed a visual vigilance task during the whole measurement. While the enhanced power in the individual alpha band did not return back to pre-stimulation baseline in the stimulation group, the difference between stimulation and sham diminishes after 70 minutes due to a natural alpha increase of the sham group.

  1. Analysis on Application of Ground Test Remote Management Information System——Taking Xishan Coal Electricity Group for an Example%地测远程管理信息系统应用分析——以西山煤电集团为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铜菊

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,the author briefly introduced features,running environment,realizing function,using methods of ground test remote management information system.Finally,the author introduced application of the system in Xishan Group.%介绍了地测远程管理信息系统的特点、运行环境、实现功能、使用方法,以及其在西山煤电集团公司的应用。

  2. Decision Taking versus Action Determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Decision taking is discussed in the context of the role it may play for various types of agents, and it is contrasted with action determination. Some remarks are made about the role of decision taking and action determination in the ongoing debate concerning the reverse polder development of the

  3. Informatics perspectives on decision taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A decision is an act or event of decision taking. Decision making always includes decision taking, the latter not involving significant exchanges with non-deciding agents. A decision outcome is a piece of storable information constituting the result of a decision. Decision outcomes are typed, for in

  4. Taking Chances in Romantic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lindsey; Knox, David

    2016-01-01

    A 64 item Internet questionnaire was completed by 381 undergraduates at a large southeastern university to assess taking chances in romantic relationships. Almost three fourths (72%) self-identified as being a "person willing to take chances in my love relationship." Engaging in unprotected sex, involvement in a "friends with…

  5. Informatics perspectives on decision taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A decision is an act or event of decision taking. Decision making always includes decision taking, the latter not involving significant exchanges with non-deciding agents. A decision outcome is a piece of storable information constituting the result of a decision. Decision outcomes are typed, for in

  6. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  7. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  8. Communication, concepts and grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Frank

    2015-02-01

    This article discusses the relation between communication and conceptual grounding. In the brain, neurons, circuits and brain areas are involved in the representation of a concept, grounding it in perception and action. In terms of grounding we can distinguish between communication within the brain and communication between humans or between humans and machines. In the first form of communication, a concept is activated by sensory input. Due to grounding, the information provided by this communication is not just determined by the sensory input but also by the outgoing connection structure of the conceptual representation, which is based on previous experiences and actions. The second form of communication, that between humans or between humans and machines, is influenced by the first form. In particular, a more successful interpersonal communication might require forms of situated cognition and interaction in which the entire representations of grounded concepts are involved.

  9. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  10. Ground energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  11. 40 CFR 1603.12 - Availability of transcripts, recordings, and minutes, and applicable fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD RULES IMPLEMENTING THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT § 1603.12... available to the public the transcript, electronic recording, or minutes of the discussion of any item on...

  12. Surficial geology of the Cabot 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG2016-3 Springston, G., 2016, Surficial geology of the Cabot 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report...

  13. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Mount Mansfield 7.5 Minute Quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG2017-2 Thompson, P. J., and Thompson, T. B., 2017, Bedrock Geologic Map of the Mount Mansfield 7.5 Minute Quadrangle, Vermont: VGS Open-File...

  14. Surficial Geologic Map of the Pico Peak, Vermont 7.5 Minute Quadrangle

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — "Digital data from VG12-1 Wright, S., 2012, Surficial Geologic Map of the Pico Peak, Vermont 7.5 Minute Quadrangle: Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report...

  15. Two- and 6-minute walk tests assess walking capability equally in neuromuscular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Kahr; Knak, Kirsten Lykke; Witting, Nanna;

    2016-01-01

    to participate on 2 test days, each consisting of 1 2MWT and 1 6MWT separated by a minimum 30-minute period of rest. The order of the walk tests was randomly assigned via sealed envelopes. A group of 38 healthy controls completed 1 6MWT. RESULTS: The mean walking distance for the 2MWT was 142.8 meters......OBJECTIVE: This methodologic study investigates if the 2-minute walk test (2MWT) can be a valid alternative to the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) to describe walking capability in patients with neuromuscular diseases. METHODS: Patients (n = 115) with different neuromuscular diseases were invited...... and for the 6MWT 405.3 meters. The distance walked in the 2MWT was highly correlated to the distance walked in the 6MWT (r = 0.99, p minute in the 6MWT, both among patients and healthy controls, which was not evident in the 2MWT...

  16. USGS 1:24000 (7 1/2 Minute) Quadrangle Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Mathematically generated grid representing USGS 7 1/2 Minute Quadrangle Map outlines. Quadrangle names and standard identifiers are included with the data set.

  17. Take Charge. Take the Test. "You Know" PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 60 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  18. The Building Blocks of Life Move from Ground to Tree to Animal and Back to Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    I generally use combinations of big words to describe my science, such as biogeochemistry, ecosystem ecology, nutrient cycling, stoichiometry, tropical deforestation, land-use change, agricultural intensification, eutrophication, greenhouse gas emissions, and sustainable development. I didn't expect to use any of these words, but I was surprised that I couldn't use some others that seem simple enough to me, such as farm, plant, soil, and forest. I landed on "building blocks" as my metaphor for the forms of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other elements that I study as they cycle through and among ecosystems. I study what makes trees and other kinds of life grow. We all know that they need the sun and that they take up water from the ground, but what else do trees need from the ground? What do animals that eat leaves and wood get from the trees? Just as we need building blocks to grow our bodies, trees and animals also need building blocks for growing their bodies. Trees get part of their building blocks from the ground and animals get theirs from what they eat. When animals poop and when leaves fall, some of their building blocks return to the ground. When they die, their building blocks also go back to the ground. I also study what happens to the ground, the water, and the air when we cut down trees, kill or shoo away the animals, and make fields to grow our food. Can we grow enough food and still keep the ground, water, and air clean? I think the answer is yes, but it will take better understanding of how all of those building blocks fit together and move around, from ground to tree to animal and back to ground.

  19. A numerical model for ground temperature determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczur, M.; Polepszyc, I.; Biernacka, B.; Sapińska-Śliwa, A.

    2016-09-01

    The ground surface temperature and the temperature with respect to depth are one of the most important issues for geotechnical and environmental applications as well as for plants and other living organisms. In geothermal systems, temperature is directly related to the energy resources in the ground and it influences the efficiency of the ground source system. The ground temperature depends on a very large number of parameters, but it often needs to be evaluated with good accuracy. In the present work, models for the prediction of the ground temperature with a focus on the surface temperature at which all or selected important ground and environmental phenomena are taken into account have been analysed. It has been found that the simplest models and the most complex model may result in a similar temperature variation, yet at a very low depth and for specific cases only. A detailed analysis shows that taking into account different types of pavement or a greater depth requires more complex and advanced models.

  20. The 2.5-minute loaded repeated jump test: evaluating anaerobic capacity in alpine ski racers with loaded countermovement jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Carson; Raschner, Christian; Platzer, Hans-Peter

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to test the reproducibility of the 2.5-minute loaded repeated jump test (LRJT) and to test the effectiveness of general preparation period (GPP) training on anaerobic fitness of elite alpine ski racers with the LRJT. Thirteen male volunteers completed 2 LRJTs to examine reliability. Nine male Austrian elite junior racers were tested in June and October 2009. The LRJT consisted of 60 loaded countermovement jumps (LCMJs) with a loaded barbell equivalent to 40% bodyweight. Before the LRJT, the power (P) of a single LCMJ was determined. Power was calculated from ground reaction forces. The mean P was calculated for the complete test and for each 30-second interval. The interclass correlation coefficients (between 0.88 and 0.99) for main variables of the LRJT demonstrated a high reliability. A repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that anaerobic capacity was significantly higher in October (p ≤ 0.05). The ski racers' single LCMJ P increased from 37.0 ± 1.2 W·kg to 39.0 ± 1.4 W·kg. The mean P of the total test improved from 33.6 ± 1.2 W·kg to 35.8 ± 1.3 W·kg, but relative effect of fatigue did not change. The GPP training improved the athletes' ability to produce and maintain muscular power. The LRJT is a reliable anaerobic test suitable for all alpine ski racing events because the 60 jumps simulate the approximate number of gates in slalom and giant slalom races and the 2.5 minutes is equivalent to the duration of the longest downhill race.

  1. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Emails CDC Features Take Care with Pet Reptiles and Amphibians Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... messages, and helpful resources. Safe Handling Tips for Reptiles and Amphibians Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  2. Opaqueness and Bank Risk Taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Behr

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relationship between opaqueness and bank risk taking. Using a sample of 199 banks from 38 countries over the period January 1996 to December 2006, I analyze whether more opaque banks are riskier than less opaque banks. I find suggestive evidence that commonly used proxies for bank opaqueness are significantly related to bank risk taking as measured by the Merton PD and the bank-individual Z-score, even after accounting for potential simultaneity between risk taking and opaqueness. More opaque banks seem to engage more in risk taking than less opaque banks. This result provides support to the common view that bank opaqueness is problematic and that transparency among financial institutions should be increased.

  3. Taking Action for Healthy Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Jill E.

    2003-01-01

    Summarizes research on relationship between physical activity, good nutrition, and academic performance. Offers several recommendations for how schools can take action to improve the nutrition and fitness of students. (PKP)

  4. Ground State Spin Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, J D; Biamonte, J D

    2012-01-01

    Designing and optimizing cost functions and energy landscapes is a problem encountered in many fields of science and engineering. These landscapes and cost functions can be embedded and annealed in experimentally controllable spin Hamiltonians. Using an approach based on group theory and symmetries, we examine the embedding of Boolean logic gates into the ground state subspace of such spin systems. We describe parameterized families of diagonal Hamiltonians and symmetry operations which preserve the ground state subspace encoding the truth tables of Boolean formulas. The ground state embeddings of adder circuits are used to illustrate how gates are combined and simplified using symmetry. Our work is relevant for experimental demonstrations of ground state embeddings found in both classical optimization as well as adiabatic quantum optimization.

  5. Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Mr. Jim Parker Associate Director Ground Vehicle Robotics Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Report Documentation Page...Briefing 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2012 to 01-08-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT Provide Transition-Ready, Cost-Effective, and Innovative Robotics and Control System Solutions for Manned, Optionally-Manned, and Unmanned

  6. System of gait analysis based on ground reaction force assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Vaverka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biomechanical analysis of gait employs various methods used in kinematic and kinetic analysis, EMG, and others. One of the most frequently used methods is kinetic analysis based on the assessment of the ground reaction forces (GRF recorded on two force plates. Objective: The aim of the study was to present a method of gait analysis based on the assessment of the GRF recorded during the stance phase of two steps. Methods: The GRF recorded with a force plate on one leg during stance phase has three components acting in directions: Fx - mediolateral, Fy - anteroposterior, and Fz - vertical. A custom-written MATLAB script was used for gait analysis in this study. This software displays instantaneous force data for both legs as Fx(t, Fy(t and Fz(t curves, automatically determines the extremes of functions and sets the visual markers defining the individual points of interest. Positions of these markers can be easily adjusted by the rater, which may be necessary if the GRF has an atypical pattern. The analysis is fully automated and analyzing one trial takes only 1-2 minutes. Results: The method allows quantification of temporal variables of the extremes of the Fx(t, Fy(t, Fz(t functions, durations of the braking and propulsive phase, duration of the double support phase, the magnitudes of reaction forces in extremes of measured functions, impulses of force, and indices of symmetry. The analysis results in a standardized set of 78 variables (temporal, force, indices of symmetry which can serve as a basis for further research and diagnostics. Conclusions: The resulting set of variable offers a wide choice for selecting a specific group of variables with consideration to a particular research topic. The advantage of this method is the standardization of the GRF analysis, low time requirements allowing rapid analysis of a large number of trials in a short time, and comparability of the variables obtained during different research measurements.

  7. Elements of Risk Analysis for Collision and Grounding of a RoRo Passenger Ferry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, S.; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Samuelidis, M.

    2002-01-01

    Newly developed software was applied to study the effects of damages due to collision and grounding. The annual risk of collision and grounding was computed for an example RoRo passenger ferry. Collision frequency was evaluated for a specified route taking into account traffic data. Grounding...

  8. Model for forecasting of monthly average insulation at ground level taking into account the radiation absorption losses crossing atmosphere in the thermal solar applications; Modelo de previsao da insolacao media mensal ao nivel do solo levando em conta a perda por absorcao na atmosfera em aplicacoes solares termicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, J.C.; Apolinario, F.R.; Silva, E.P. da [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Hidrogenio]. E-mails: joaoc@fem.unicamp.br; rezende@ifi.unicamp.br; lh2ennio@ifi.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    The use of the solar energy, for thermal or photovoltaic ends, depends basically on the amount of radiation that reaches the ground in the place where desires to carry through this use, defining the necessary area of the collectors, or panels, that in turn are the main components of the final cost of the system and, therefore, of the viability or not on its use. The incident radiation in the terrestrial surface is minor that one reaches the top of the atmosphere due to the absorption and dispersion factors. The objective of this work is to present a model of forecast the monthly average radiation for ends of use in systems of flat solar collectors for heating water, in the city of Campinas - Sao Paulo, Brazil. This work has been developed by the Hydrogen Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the UNICAMP, being also used for other applications with solar energy. Based in the radiation data, taken from a local station, a theoretical study was developed to calculate a parameter of loss of radiation when this cross the atmosphere. This Kt loss factor, has basic importance for the knowledge of the effective available energy for use. With this data it is possible to determine, on the basis of the incident radiation in the top of the atmosphere, the value of the radiation on a surface. (author)

  9. Determinants of 6-minute walk distance in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis undergoing lung transplant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, Mary K; Rivera-Lebron, Belinda N; Kreider, Maryl; Lee, James; Kawut, Steven M

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the physiologic determinants of 6-minute walk distance in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We investigated the demographic, pulmonary function, echocardiographic, and hemodynamic determinants of 6-minute walk distance in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis evaluated for lung transplantation. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 130 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis who completed a lung transplantation evaluation at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania between 2005 and 2010. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to generate an explanatory model for 6-minute walk distance. After adjustment for age, sex, race, height, and weight, the presence of right ventricular dilation was associated with a decrease of 50.9 m (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.4-93.3) in 6-minute walk distance ([Formula: see text]). For each 200-mL reduction in forced vital capacity, the walk distance decreased by 15.0 m (95% CI, 9.0-21.1; [Formula: see text]). For every increase of 1 Wood unit in pulmonary vascular resistance, the walk distance decreased by 17.3 m (95% CI, 5.1-29.5; [Formula: see text]). Six-minute walk distance in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis depends in part on circulatory impairment and the degree of restrictive lung disease. Future trials that target right ventricular morphology, pulmonary vascular resistance, and forced vital capacity may potentially improve exercise capacity in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Seismo-ionospheric effects associated with 'Chelyabinsk' meteorite during the first 25 minutes after its fall

    CERN Document Server

    Berngardt, Oleg I

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the properties of ionospheric irregularities elongated with Earth magnetic field during the first 25 minutes after the fall of the meteorite 'Chelyabinsk' experimentally observed with EKB radar of Russian segment of the SuperDARN. It is shown that 40 minutes before meteor fall the EKB radar started to observe powerful scattering from irregularities elongated with the Earth magnetic field in the F-layer. Scattering was observed for 80 minutes and stopped 40 minutes after the meteorite fall. During 9-15 minutes after the meteorite fall at ranges 400-1200 km from the explosion site a changes were observed in the spectral and amplitude characteristics of the scattered signal. This features were the sharp increase in the Doppler frequency shift of the scattered signal corresponding to the Doppler velocities about 600 m/s and the sharp increase of the scattered signal amplitude. This allows us to conclude that we detected the growth of small-scale ionospheric irregularities elongated with the Ea...

  11. HAWK-I Takes Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    New Wide Field Near-Infrared Imager for ESO's Very Large Telescope Europe's flagship ground-based astronomical facility, the ESO VLT, has been equipped with a new 'eye' to study the Universe. Working in the near-infrared, the new instrument - dubbed HAWK-I - covers about 1/10th the area of the Full Moon in a single exposure. It is uniquely suited to the discovery and study of faint objects, such as distant galaxies or small stars and planets. ESO PR Photo 36a/07 ESO PR Photo 36a/07 HAWK-I on the VLT After three years of hard work, HAWK-I (High Acuity, Wide field K-band Imaging) saw First Light on Yepun, Unit Telescope number 4 of ESO's VLT, on the night of 31 July to 1 August 2007. The first images obtained impressively demonstrate its potential. "HAWK-I is a credit to the instrument team at ESO who designed, built and commissioned it," said Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. "No doubt, HAWK-I will allow rapid progress in very diverse areas of modern astronomy by filling a niche of wide-field, well-sampled near-infrared imagers on 8-m class telescopes." "It's wonderful; the instrument's performance has been terrific," declared Jeff Pirard, the HAWK-I Project Manager. "We could not have hoped for a better start, and look forward to scientifically exciting and beautiful images in the years to come." During this first commissioning period all instrument functions were checked, confirming that the instrument performance is at the level expected. Different astronomical objects were observed to test different characteristics of the instrument. For example, during one period of good atmospheric stability, images were taken towards the central bulge of our Galaxy. Many thousands of stars were visible over the field and allowed the astronomers to obtain stellar images only 3.4 pixels (0.34 arcsecond) wide, uniformly over the whole field of view, confirming the excellent optical quality of HAWK-I. ESO PR Photo 36b/07 ESO PR Photo 36c/07 Nebula in Serpens (HAWK

  12. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water-Quality Investigation 22 - Ground-Water Budget for the Straight Creek Drainage Basin, Red River Valley, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAda, Douglas P.; Naus, Cheryl A.

    2008-01-01

    either surface-water flow or the component of ground-water flow through fractured bedrock. The inflow to the watershed, calculated to be 701 gallons per minute, is from precipitation. The calculated outflow from the watershed at or upstream from seismic-line 5 (the downstream-most line in Straight Creek prior to entering the Red River Valley) is 540 gallons per minute of evapotranspiration in the watershed upstream from line 5 (77.0 percent of precipitation), 5 gallons per minute of surface-water flow (0.7 percent of precipitation), 122 gallons per minute of ground-water flow through the debris-flow deposits and underlying regolith defined by the seismic data (17.4 percent of precipitation), and 34 gallons per minute of ground-water flow through fractured bedrock below the defined seismic line (4.9 percent of precipitation). The ground-water flow through the alluvium and inter-tonguing debris-flow deposits of the Red River Valley was calculated to be 5,227 gallons per minute at seismic-line 7, the first seismic line in the Red River Valley downstream from Straight Creek. The water budget indicates the amount of ground-water flow that enters the Red River alluvium from the debris-flow deposits and regolith in Straight Creek is small (about 2.3 percent; 122 gallons per minute) compared to the volume of flow that moves through the Red River alluvium. The total amount of ground-water flow from Straight Creek (156 gallons per minute; 122 gallons per minute from debris-flow deposits and regolith plus 34 gallons per minute through fractured bedrock) is about 3.0 percent of the ground-water flow calculated at line 7 for the Red River alluvium.

  13. Six-minute walking distance and decrease in oxygen saturation during the six-minute walk test in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douwes, Johannes M; Hegeman, Anneke K; van der Krieke, Merel B; Roofthooft, Marcus T R; Hillege, Hans L; Berger, Rolf M F

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of the 6-minute walking distance (6-MWD), transcutaneous saturation (tcSO2) and heart rate (HR) obtained during the 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This was an observational study with forty-seven pediatric PAH patients, aged ≥7 years, and diagnosed and followed at the national referral center for pediatric PAH in the Netherlands. All patients performed a comprehensive 6-minute walk test (6-MWT), which measures 6-MWD and tcSO2 and HR before ("baseline"), during ("exercise") and 5 min after ("recovery") the walk test. The 6-MWD expressed either in meters or in sex- and age-corrected z-scores, was associated with transplant-free survival, independently from sex, age, and the presence of a shunt-defect. Shorter 6-MWD correlated with higher WHO-FC and increased NT-pro-BNP. Absolute tcSO2 at exercise and tcSO2-decrease during 6-MWT were associated with transplant-free survival, independent from 6-MWD. Combining tcSO2-decrease with 6-MWD provided the strongest prognostic model. Patients with 6-MWD>352 m (the median 6-MWD) had a better outcome than those with smaller 6-MWD. A large tcSO2-decrease during 6-MWT (>19% for patients with and >5% for patients without a shunt defect) identified patients with worse transplant-free survival both in patients with a 6-MWD above and below the median 6-MWD. The 6-MWD is an independent predictor of prognosis in pediatric PAH, that reflects disease severity and clinically relevant exercise-tolerance and therefore qualifies as a treatment goal. The magnitude of tcSO2-decrease during 6-MWT, adjusted for the presence of a shunt, indicates an additional risk factor for prognosis in children with PAH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Informatics Perspectives on Decision Taking

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstra, J A

    2011-01-01

    A decision is an act or event of decision taking. Decision making always includes decision taking, the latter not involving significant exchanges with non-deciding agents. A decision outcome is a piece of storable information constituting the result of a decision. Decision outcomes are typed, for instance: plan, command, assertion, or boolean reply to a question. A decision effect is any consequence of putting a decision outcome into effect. Decision outcomes must be expected by the decider to lead to certain decision effects, by way of their being put into effect. The availability of a model or of a theory of the causal chain leading from a decision outcome to one or more decision effects is assumed for the decision taker, otherwise the decision outcome is merely an utterance. Decision effectiveness measures the decision effects against objectives meant to be served with the decision. Decision taking is positioned amidst many similar notions including: decision making, decision process, decision making proce...

  15. Outdoor validation of the 30 minutes intermittent tracking of 100 x CPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kenji; Ota, Yasuyuki; Lee, Kan-Hua; Nishioka, Kensuke; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2017-09-01

    HCPV uses trackers, but their cost and reliability have raised problems. These problems may be solved by substantially increasing acceptance angle and mechanical tolerance. For a demonstration of the possibility of such substantial improvement, a 30 minutes intermittent tracking in high concentration applications was examined. To allow for 30 minutes intermittent tracking, both advanced optics and an advanced tracking control were investigated. For advanced optics, a 100 x refractive and dielectric concentrator was designed. It had about plus or minus 5° of acceptance angle. For advanced tracking control, a feed-forward control with a linear error correction was investigated. With combining both optimizations, it was shown that 30 minutes intermittent tracking was validated in outdoor experiments even for an as high as 100 x concentration.

  16. How repeated 15-minute assertiveness training sessions reduce wrist cutting in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Masaya

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine a possible treatment for patients with borderline personality disorder who have wrist-cutting syndrome, a condition characterized by repeated, superficial wrist cutting in a non-suicidal fashion. Within the current healthcare system in Japan, the average amount of time a doctor can spend with a psychiatric outpatient is about 8 to 15 minutes. We, therefore, examined whether repeated 15-minute psychotherapy sessions to improve patient assertiveness would be effective for reducing wrist cutting and possibly other forms of self-mutilation. We treated 13 patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and wrist-cutting syndrome with assertiveness training during 15-minute, biweekly therapy sessions over a course of one to four years. At the conclusion of psychotherapeutic treatment, 69% of outpatients showed a statistically significant reduction in wrist-cutting behavior.

  17. Genetic Analysis and Mapping of Dominant Minute Grain Gene Mi3(t) in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-wei; LIU Yong; WANG Shi-quan; DENG Qi-ming; LI Ping

    2005-01-01

    Grain size, determined chiefly by grain Iength, is one of the main factors affecting the grain yield in rice production. To study the trait of rice grain size, F1 and F2 populations were developed from crosses Shuhui 881/Y34 and Shuhui 527/Y34, and genetic analysis for minute grain was performed. The F1 populations showed minute grains, and grain size segregations in the two F2 populations were both in accordance with the ratio of 3:1, indicating that minute grain in Y34 was controlled by a completely dominant gene. By using the F2 population from Shuhui 881/Y34, this dominant gene, tentatively designated as Mi3(t), was mapped based on SSR markers in the interval between RM282 (genetic distance of 5.1 cM) and RM6283 (genetic distance of 0.9 cM) on the short arm of chromosome 3.

  18. Ground Enterprise Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Emergent Space Technologies Inc. proposes to develop the Ground Enterprise Management System (GEMS) for spacecraft ground systems. GEMS will provide situational...

  19. Ground-water resources of Catron County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basabilvazo, G.T.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground-water and related surface-water resources in Catron County, the largest county in New Mexico. The county is located in the Lower Colorado River Basin and the Rio Grande Basin, and the Continental Divide is the boundary between the two river basins. Increases in water used for mining activities (coal, mineral, and geothermal), irrigated agriculture, reservoir construction, or domestic purposes could affect the quantity or quality of ground- water and surface-water resources in the county. Parts of seven major drainage basins are within the two regional river basins in the county--Carrizo Wash, North Plains, Rio Salado, San Agustin, Alamosa Creek, Gila, and San Francisco Basins. The San Francisco, Gila, and Tularosa Rivers typically flow perennially. During periods of low flow, most streamflow is derived from baseflow. The stream channels of the Rio Salado and Carrizo Wash Basins are commonly perennial in their upper reaches and ephemeral in their lower reaches. Largo Creek in the Carrizo Wash Basin is perennial downstream from Quemado Lake and ephemeral in the lower reaches. Aquifers in Catron County include Quaternary alluvium and bolson fill; Quaternary to Tertiary Gila Conglomerate; Tertiary Bearwallow Mountain Andesite, Datil Group, and Baca Formation; Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Crevasse Canyon Formation, Gallup Sandstone, Mancos Shale, and Dakota Sandstone; Triassic Chinle Formation; and undifferentiated rocks of Permian age. Water in the aquifers in the county generally is unconfined; however, confined conditions may exist where the aquifers are overlain by other units of lower permeability. Yields of ground water from the Quaternary alluvium in the county range from 1 to 375 gallons per minute. Yields of ground water from the alluvium in the Carrizo Wash Basin are as much as 250 gallons per minute for short time periods. North of the Plains of San Agustin, ground-water yields from the

  20. Two Parts Reflection, One Part Selfie: A Visual Alternative to the Minute Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie Meehlhause

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For almost 40 years, the Minute Paper has been a quick and easy means of learning assessment, both in the college classroom and library instruction. More recently, the use of social media, particularly selfies, has gained popularity by connecting with students through the technology they are most familiar with. This column makes the case for combining the Minute Paper and selfies in order to gain an insight into students’ skill development and retention after a library session. Adaptable to a variety of classes and learning outcomes, the activity enables students to actively use what they learned rather than passively reflecting on it.

  1. A proposal of a standardised nomenclature for terminal minute sister chromatid exchanges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máximo E. Drets

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We described spontaneous minute sister chromatid exchanges (SCE in telomeric regions of human and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO chromosomes more than 10 years ago. These structures, which we called t-SCE, were detected by means of highly precise quantitative microphotometrical scanning and computer graphic image analysis. Recently, several authors using the CO-FISH method also found small SCEs in telomeric regions and called them T-SCE. The use of different terms for designating the same phenomenon should be avoided. We propose ter SCE as a uniform nomenclature for minute telomeric SCEs.

  2. Thunderstorm-associated cloud motions as computed from 5-minute SMS pictures. [Synchronous Meteorological Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecson, J. J.; Umenhofer, T. A.; Fujita, T. T.

    1977-01-01

    The five-minute rapid-scan imagery from the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite is employed to study cloud motions associated with the Omaha tornado of May 6, 1975. Cloud-motion vectors derived from automated and man-machine interactive systems provide an account of the mesoscale phenomena. In addition to the geostationary satellite data, aerial photography obtained during a cloud-truth mission is used in the severe storm investigation. For tracking overland cumuli with short half-lives, a three-minute scan interval appears necessary for the satellite imagery.

  3. Reinventing Grounded Theory: Some Questions about Theory, Ground and Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gary; James, David

    2006-01-01

    Grounded theory's popularity persists after three decades of broad-ranging critique. In this article three problematic notions are discussed--"theory," "ground" and "discovery"--which linger in the continuing use and development of grounded theory procedures. It is argued that far from providing the epistemic security promised by grounded theory,…

  4. Take-all or nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Restrepo, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Elliott, M.L.; Canning, G.; McMillan, V.E.; Crous, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Take-all disease of Poaceae is caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Magnaporthaceae). Four varieties are recognised in G. graminis based on ascospore size, hyphopodial morphology and host preference. The aim of the present study was to clarify boundaries among species and varieties in Gaeumannomyces b

  5. Take-all or nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Restrepo, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Elliott, M.L.; Canning, G.; McMillan, V.E.; Crous, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Take-all disease of Poaceae is caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Magnaporthaceae). Four varieties are recognised in G. graminis based on ascospore size, hyphopodial morphology and host preference. The aim of the present study was to clarify boundaries among species and varieties in Gaeumannomyce

  6. Influenza Round Table: Take Three

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-11-03

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting the flu and spreading it to others by taking these three steps.  Created: 11/3/2009 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/3/2009.

  7. Take-all or nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Restrepo, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Elliott, M.L.; Canning, G.; McMillan, V.E.; Crous, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Take-all disease of Poaceae is caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Magnaporthaceae). Four varieties are recognised in G. graminis based on ascospore size, hyphopodial morphology and host preference. The aim of the present study was to clarify boundaries among species and varieties in Gaeumannomyces

  8. Take-all or nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Restrepo, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Elliott, M.L.; Canning, G.; McMillan, V.E.; Crous, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Take-all disease of Poaceae is caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Magnaporthaceae). Four varieties are recognised in G. graminis based on ascospore size, hyphopodial morphology and host preference. The aim of the present study was to clarify boundaries among species and varieties in

  9. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausser, J.A.; Leder, J.; Ketturat, C.; Dresler, M.; Faber, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by - more or less qualified - advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We

  10. Computer assisted medical history taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Quaak; A.P.M. Hasman (Arie)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis a study is described which was performed to explore the possibilities of computer-assisted history taking to support patient care. A system was developed by which the patient himself enters his medical data into a computer. The system enables an unexperienced user, i.e.

  11. Taking control of anorexia together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-02-27

    Many people with anorexia receive inadequate treatment for what is a debilitating, relentless and life-threatening illness. In Lincolnshire an innovative nurse-led day programme is helping people stay out of hospital and take back control from the illness. Peer support is crucial to the programme's success.

  12. Macro-Controls Taking Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of China’s economic development is be ginning to improve. Given this trend , what should the government be doing to take advantage of it and maintain steady economic growth? Chen Dongqi, Deputy Director of the Institute of Economic Research of the National Development and Reform Commission, shared his thoughts on this issue with People’s Daily.

  13. Experiencing discrimination increases risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Jeremy P; Koslov, Katrina; Nock, Matthew K; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2013-02-01

    Prior research has revealed racial disparities in health outcomes and health-compromising behaviors, such as smoking and drug abuse. It has been suggested that discrimination contributes to such disparities, but the mechanisms through which this might occur are not well understood. In the research reported here, we examined whether the experience of discrimination affects acute physiological stress responses and increases risk-taking behavior. Black and White participants each received rejecting feedback from partners who were either of their own race (in-group rejection) or of a different race (out-group rejection, which could be interpreted as discrimination). Physiological (cardiovascular and neuroendocrine) changes, cognition (memory and attentional bias), affect, and risk-taking behavior were assessed. Significant participant race × partner race interactions were observed. Cross-race rejection, compared with same-race rejection, was associated with lower levels of cortisol, increased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, greater anger, increased attentional bias, and more risk-taking behavior. These data suggest that perceived discrimination is associated with distinct profiles of physiological reactivity, affect, cognitive processing, and risk taking, implicating direct and indirect pathways to health disparities.

  14. Computer assisted medical history taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Quaak; A.P.M. Hasman (Arie)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis a study is described which was performed to explore the possibilities of computer-assisted history taking to support patient care. A system was developed by which the patient himself enters his medical data into a computer. The system enables an unexperienced user, i.e. a

  15. Taking Care After A Concussion

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-17

    This podcast describes how to take care of yourself after a concussion, including proper recognition and response recommendations.  Created: 3/17/2010 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/17/2010.

  16. Use of Minute-by-Minute Cardiovascular Measurements During Tilt Tests to Strengthen Inference on the Effect of Long-Duration Space Flight on Orthostatic Hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Stein, Sydney P.; Platts, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Typical methodology for evaluating the effects of spaceflight on orthostatic hypotension (OH) has been survival analysis of tolerance times from 80 head-up tilt tests. However when scheduled test durations are short, there may not be enough failures to allow survival analysis to adequately estimate and compare the effects of flight phase (e.g. pre-flight, number of days post-flight), flight duration, and their interaction, as well as interactions with effects of interventions or countermeasures. The problem is exacerbated in the presence of a repeated measures design, in which subjects participate in tilt tests during various flight phases. Here we show how it is possible to dramatically improve the efficiency of statistical inference in this setting by making use of the additional information contained in minute-by-minute observations of cardiovascular parameters thought to be reflective of progression towards presyncope during tilt testing. Methods: We retrospectively examined operational tilt test (OTT; 10 -min 80 head-up tilt) data from 20 International Space Station (ISS) and 66 Shuttle astronauts 10 d before launch (L-10), on landing day (R+0) and during recovery (R+1, R+3, R+6-10) depending on the level of participation. Data from 5 ISS astronauts tested on R+0 or R+1 who used non-standard countermeasures were excluded. In addition to OTT survival time, 8 cardiovascular parameters (CP: heart rate, systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure, pulse pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance) that might be predictive of progression towards presyncope were measured every minute of each OTT. Statistical analysis was predicated on a two ]stage model of causation. In the first stage, flight duration and time from landing affect the astronauts' degree of OH, which is manifested in the time trends and variation of the above CPs during OTTs. In the second stage, the behavior of these parameters directly affects OTT survival

  17. Research on Factors Affecting Dynamic Marketing Capability based on Grounded Theory---Taking the IT Industry as the Example%基于扎根理论的动态营销能力影响因素研究--以IT业为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙淑英; 冯艳; 周江明

    2014-01-01

    当前市场竞争环境日益复杂多变,识别关键影响因素以提升其动态营销能力成为企业应对环境变化的重要途径。文章基于20家IT企业中高层营销经理的访谈数据,利用扎根理论研究方法提出了动态营销能力影响因素模型,认为市场感知、供应链响应、客户关系管理以及研究开发四种能力是企业动态营销能力的重要构件,市场环境动荡性是驱使企业提升动态营销能力的强大外力,而高层管理者认知与决断力、文化与经营理念、资源及其调配、情报与IT应用、组织架构与制度适配以及组织学习平台与氛围则直接影响企业动态营销能力的水平。%The current market environment is increasingly complex, to identify the key factors to enhance their dynamic mark-eting capabilities become an important way for enterprises to cope with environmental change. Based on the survey data of interviewing senior marketing manager from 20 IT enterprises, and using grounded theory method, a theoretical model of the factors affecting dynamic marketing capability is constructed, which indicates that dynamic marketing capability consists of the abilities of market perception, supply chain responsiveness, customer relationship management and R&D, turbulent external environment is the greatest impetus to drive enterprises to enhance their dynamic marketing capability, while senior managers cognition and decision force, corporate culture. Resources and their deployment, intelligence and IT applications, organizational structure and institutional adaptation, organizational learning platform and atmosphere directly determine the level of enterprise dynamic marketing capabilities.

  18. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Ground Test History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold P.

    2014-01-01

    -ups in May-June 1966 with 30.75 minutes accumulative operating time at or above 1GW. The NRX-A6 was tested in December 1969 and ran for 62 minutes at 1100 MW. Each engine had post-test examination and found various structure anomalies which were identified for correction and the fuel element corrosion rate was reduced. The Phoebus series of research reactors began testing at test cell C, in June 1965 with Phoebus 1A. Phoebus 1A operated for 10.5 minutes at 1100 MW before unexpected loss of propellant and leading to an engine breakdown. Phoebus 1B ran for 30 minutes in February of 1967. Phoebus 2A was the highest steady state reactor built at 5GW. Phoebus 2A ran for 12 minutes at 4100 MW demonstrating sufficient power is available. The Peewee test bed reactor was tested November- December 1968 in test cell C for 40 minutes at 500MW with overall performance close to pre-run predictions. The XE' engine was the only engine tested with close to a flight configuration and fired downward into a diffuser at the Engine Test Stand (ETS) in 1969. The XE' was 1100 MW and had 28 start-ups. The nuclear furnace NF-1 was operated at 44 MW with multiple test runs at 90 minutes in the summer of 1972. The NF-1 was the last NTP reactor tested. The Rover/NERVA program was cancelled in 1973. However, before cancellation, a lot of other engineering work was conducted by Aerojet on a 75, 000 lbf prototype flight engine and by Los Alamos on a 16,000 lbf "Small Engine" nuclear rocket design. The ground test history of NTP at the NRDS also offers many lessons learned on how best to setup, operate, emergency shutdown, and post-test examine NTP engines. The reactor and engine maintenance and disassembly facilities were used for assembly and inspection of radioactive engines after testing. Most reactor/ engines were run at test cell A or test cell C with open air exhaust. The Rover/NERVA program became aware of a new environmental regulation that would restrict the amount of radioactive particulates

  19. When perspective taking increases taking: reactive egoism in social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Nicholas; Caruso, Eugene; Bazerman, Max H

    2006-11-01

    Group members often reason egocentrically, believing that they deserve more than their fair share of group resources. Leading people to consider other members' thoughts and perspectives can reduce these egocentric (self-centered) judgments such that people claim that it is fair for them to take less; however, the consideration of others' thoughts and perspectives actually increases egoistic (selfish) behavior such that people actually take more of available resources. A series of experiments demonstrates this pattern in competitive contexts in which considering others' perspectives activates egoistic theories of their likely behavior, leading people to counter by behaving more egoistically themselves. This reactive egoism is attenuated in cooperative contexts. Discussion focuses on the implications of reactive egoism in social interaction and on strategies for alleviating its potentially deleterious effects.

  20. Ground water in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A.R.

    1960-01-01

    One of the first requisites for the intelligent planning of utilization and control of water and for the administration of laws relating to its use is data on the quantity, quality, and mode of occurrence of the available supplies. The collection, evaluation and interpretation, and publication of such data are among the primary functions of the U.S. Geological Survey. Since 1895 the Congress has made appropriations to the Survey for investigation of the water resources of the Nation. In 1929 the Congress adopted the policy of dollar-for-dollar cooperation with the States and local governmental agencies in water-resources investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey. In 1937 a program of ground-water investigations was started in cooperation with the Oklahoma Geological Survey, and in 1949 this program was expanded to include cooperation with the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board. In 1957 the State Legislature created the Oklahoma Water Resources Board as the principal State water agency and it became the principal local cooperator. The Ground Water Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey collects, analyzes, and evaluates basic information on ground-water resources and prepares interpretive reports based on those data. Cooperative ground-water work was first concentrated in the Panhandle counties. During World War II most work was related to problems of water supply for defense requirements. Since 1945 detailed investigations of ground-water availability have been made in 11 areas, chiefly in the western and central parts of the State. In addition, water levels in more than 300 wells are measured periodically, principally in the western half of the State. In Oklahoma current studies are directed toward determining the source, occurrence, and availability of ground water and toward estimating the quantity of water and rate of replenishment to specific areas and water-bearing formations. Ground water plays an important role in the economy of the State. It is

  1. Ground validation of DPR precipitation rate over Italy using H-SAF validation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, Silvia; Petracca, Marco; Sebastianelli, Stefano; Vulpiani, Gianfranco

    2017-04-01

    The H-SAF project (Satellite Application Facility on support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management, funded by EUMETSAT) is aimed at retrieving key hydrological parameters such as precipitation, soil moisture and snow cover. Within the H-SAF consortium, the Product Precipitation Validation Group (PPVG) evaluate the accuracy of instantaneous and accumulated precipitation products with respect to ground radar and rain gauge data adopting the same methodology (using a Unique Common Code) throughout Europe. The adopted validation methodology can be summarized by the following few steps: (1) ground data (radar and rain gauge) quality control; (2) spatial interpolation of rain gauge measurements; (3) up-scaling of radar data to satellite native grid; (4) temporal comparison of satellite and ground-based precipitation products; and (5) production and evaluation of continuous and multi-categorical statistical scores for long time series and case studies. The statistical scores are evaluated taking into account the satellite product native grid. With the recent advent of the GPM era starting in march 2014, more new global precipitation products are available. The validation methodology developed in H-SAF can be easily applicable to different precipitation products. In this work, we have validated instantaneous precipitation data estimated from DPR (Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar) instrument onboard of the GPM-CO (Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory) satellite. In particular, we have analyzed the near surface and estimated precipitation fields collected in the 2A-Level for 3 different scans (NS, MS and HS). The Italian radar mosaic managed by the National Department of Civil Protection available operationally every 10 minutes is used as ground reference data. The results obtained highlight the capability of the DPR to identify properly the precipitation areas with higher accuracy in estimating the stratiform precipitation (especially for the HS). An

  2. Detection of ground ice using ground penetrating radar method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gennady M. Stoyanovich; Viktor V. Pupatenko; Yury A. Sukhobok

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) application for the detection of ground ice. We com-bined a reflection traveltime curves analysis with a frequency spectrogram analysis. We found special anomalies at specific traces in the traveltime curves and ground boundaries analysis, and obtained a ground model for subsurface structure which allows the ground ice layer to be identified and delineated.

  3. Collison and Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, G.; Ji, C.; Kuhala, P.;

    2006-01-01

    COMMITTEE MANDATE Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collision and grounding, with the view towards risk assessment and management. Consideration shall be given to the frequency of occurrence, the proba......COMMITTEE MANDATE Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collision and grounding, with the view towards risk assessment and management. Consideration shall be given to the frequency of occurrence...

  4. The first three minutes - 1990 version. [of early universe after Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    The present state of understanding of what occurred in the universe's first three minutes is reviewed. Emphasis is on the events that lead to potentially observable consequences and that are model-independent or at least generic to broad classes of models. Inflation, phase transitions, dark matter, and nucleosynthesis are summarized.

  5. Integrating management techniques to restore sites invaded by mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen C. Lake; Judith Hough-Goldstein; Vincent. D' Amico

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to suppress an invasive weed are often undertaken with the goal of facilitating the recovery of a diverse native plant community. In some cases, however, reduction in the abundance of the target weed results in an increase in other exotic weeds. Mile-a-minute weed (Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross (Polygonaceae)) is an annual vine from...

  6. MORE MINUTES OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES SUPPORT MOTOR DEVELOPMENT IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Jiménez Díaz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of physical education classes in 12 fundamental motor skills (FMS. Preschool students (M = 6.09±0.5 years old were randomly assigned to a control group (6 boys and 7 girls who performed the regular preschool class (which includes one 30- minutes session per week; experimental group 1 (6 boys and 6 girls who received the regular preschool class plus 1 session of 30 minutes per week of the intervention program; or experimental group 2 (6 boys and 7 girls, who received the regular preschool class plus 1 session of 60 minutes per week of the intervention program; during 8 weeks (n=38. All participants performed the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2 before and after the study. A one-way MANOVA reflected a similar behavior in al FMS in the pre-test. A two-way MANOVA (group x time reflected no interaction in the 12 FMS; also in the 6 object control FMS; but there was an interaction in the 6 locomotor FMS. In conclusion, 90-minutes of physical education classes per week only benefit the FMS of galloping and hopping.

  7. Two Parts Reflection, One Part Selfie: A Visual Alternative to the Minute Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehlhause, Kellie

    2016-01-01

    For almost 40 years, the Minute Paper has been a quick and easy means of learning assessment, both in the college classroom and in library instruction. More recently, the use of social media, particularly selfies, has gained popularity by connecting with students through the technology with which they are most familiar. This article makes the case…

  8. 49 CFR 804.10 - Availability and retention of transcripts, recordings, and minutes, and applicable fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD RULES IMPLEMENTING THE GOVERNMENT... applicable fees. The NTSB shall make promptly available to the public the transcript, electronic recording... complete verbatim copy of the transcript, a complete copy of the minutes, or a complete electronic...

  9. 29 CFR 2203.7 - Transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REVIEW COMMISSION REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT § 2203.7 Transcripts... transcript or electronic recording adequate to record fully the proceedings of each meeting, or portion of a... promptly available to the public, at its national office, the transcript, electronic recording, or minutes...

  10. 10 CFR 1704.8 - Transcripts, recordings, or minutes of closed meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transcripts, recordings, or minutes of closed meetings. 1704.8 Section 1704.8 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD RULES IMPLEMENTING THE GOVERNMENT... shall maintain a complete transcript or electronic recording adequate to record fully the proceedings of...

  11. 40 CFR 1603.11 - Transcripts, recordings, or minutes of closed meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATION BOARD RULES IMPLEMENTING THE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT § 1603.11 Transcripts, recordings, or...), the CSB shall maintain a complete transcript or electronic recording adequate to record fully the... transcript, a complete copy of the minutes, or a complete electronic recording of each meeting, or a portion...

  12. One-Minute Fluency Measures: Mixed Messages in Assessment and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeney, Theresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Although they are valid and reliable, one-minute fluency measures are defining and capturing a reduced view of fluency as simply accuracy and rate in oral reading. Thus, they may lead astray our understanding of struggling readers' reading fluency development and instructional needs. Fluency is a complicated construct. The author discusses a…

  13. Effect of physical culture minutes on the mental performance of students of secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksiy Bulgakov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to find out the impact on the mental performance of students of physical activity used in the process of physical education minutes and the lessons the overall cycle. Materials and Methods: a study was conducted in four secondary schools in Vinnitsa and Kharkov regions. The study involved 673 students grades 5–11. The study was conducted in two stages. In the first stage determines the change in the mental health of students during the school day. We used a technique A. Myunsberga. In the second phase of the study determined the impact of sports on the minutes and indicators of mental health of students. The study was conducted using a sample V. Anfimova proofreading. Results: the study shows the steady decline in indices of mental health of students during the school day. From the second to the sixth lesson mental performance of schoolchildren in the classroom overall cycle is reduced by 13.2%. Conclusions: the study also found that the performance of students in the classroom physical education minutes and the total cycle enhances their mental performance by 8%, compared with the lessons in which minute physical exercise have been conducted.

  14. Fifteen minutes in limbo: On the intricacies of rapport in multi-sited fieldwork on tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, A.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article I discuss a revelatory moment that occurred in arguably the 15 slowest minutes of my ethnographic fieldwork on the cultural meeting between Indigenous people and tourists in Northern Australia. The challenge of doing multi-sited ethnography in tourism is to remain aware of our (tacit

  15. YouTube Fridays: Engaging the Net Generation in 5 Minutes a Week

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2010-01-01

    YouTube Fridays is a teaching tool that devotes the first five minutes of class each Friday to a YouTube video related to the course. Students select the videos, which expand the class's educational content in courses such as thermodynamics and material and energy balances. From assessments of two pilot studies using YouTube Fridays in Chemical…

  16. Predicting outcomes from 6-minute walk distance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruit, Martijn A; Polkey, Michael I; Celli, Bartolome

    2012-01-01

    Exercise tolerance is an important clinical aspect of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that can be easily and reliably measured with the 6-minute walking test (6MWT). To improve the utility of the 6MWT for patient and health care system management, the interpretation of the functional status...

  17. Fifteen minutes in limbo: On the intricacies of rapport in multi-sited fieldwork on tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, A.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article I discuss a revelatory moment that occurred in arguably the 15 slowest minutes of my ethnographic fieldwork on the cultural meeting between Indigenous people and tourists in Northern Australia. The challenge of doing multi-sited ethnography in tourism is to remain aware of our (tacit

  18. Norepinephrine remains increased in the six-minute walking test after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Veiga Guimarães

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the neurohormonal activity in heart transplant recipients and compare it with that in heart failure patients and healthy subjects during rest and just after a 6-minute walking test. INTRODUCTION: Despite the improvements in quality of life and survival provided by heart transplantation, the neurohormonal profile is poorly described. METHODS: Twenty heart transplantation (18 men, 49±11 years and 8.5±3.3 years after transplantation, 11 heart failure (8 men, 43±10 years, and 7 healthy subjects (5 men 39±8 years were included in this study. Blood samples were collected immediately before and during the last minute of the exercise. RESULTS: During rest, patients' norepinephrine plasma level (659±225 pg/mL was higher in heart transplant recipients (463±167 pg/mL and heathy subjects (512±132, p<0.05. Heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level was not different than that of healthy subjects. Just after the 6-minute walking test, the heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level (1248±692 pg/mL was not different from that of heart failure patients (1174±653 pg/mL. Both these groups had a higher level than healthy subjects had (545±95 pg/mL, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neurohormonal activity remains increased after the 6-minute walking test after heart transplantation.

  19. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S. [KNETEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23.

  20. Improved Synthesis of Global Irradiance with One-Minute Resolution for PV System Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hofmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution global irradiance time series are needed for accurate simulations of photovoltaic (PV systems, since the typical volatile PV power output induced by fast irradiance changes cannot be simulated properly with commonly available hourly averages of global irradiance. We present a two-step algorithm that is capable of synthesizing one-minute global irradiance time series based on hourly averaged datasets. The algorithm is initialized by deriving characteristic transition probability matrices (TPM for different weather conditions (cloudless, broken clouds and overcast from a large number of high resolution measurements. Once initialized, the algorithm is location-independent and capable of synthesizing one-minute values based on hourly averaged global irradiance of any desired location. The one-minute time series are derived by discrete-time Markov chains based on a TPM that matches the weather condition of the input dataset. One-minute time series generated with the presented algorithm are compared with measured high resolution data and show a better agreement compared to two existing synthesizing algorithms in terms of temporal variability and characteristic frequency distributions of global irradiance and clearness index values. A comparison based on measurements performed in Lindenberg, Germany, and Carpentras, France, shows a reduction of the frequency distribution root mean square errors of more than 60% compared to the two existing synthesizing algorithms.

  1. Use of the One-Minute Preceptor as a Teaching Tool in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Ki; Wiseman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The one-minute preceptor (OMP) is a time-efficient technique used for teaching in busy clinical settings. It consists of five microskills: (1) get a commitment from the student, (2) probe for supporting evidence, (3) reinforce what was done right, (4) correct errors and fill in omissions, and (5) teach a general rule. It can also be used to…

  2. "60 Minutes" as Pseudo-Event: The Social Deflection of Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryski, Bruce G.

    The formal and substantive traits of the television program, "60 Minutes" reflect characteristics manifest in Daniel Boorstin's conception of the "pseudo-event." Through both the verbal and visual imagery presented in the context of a narrative format, this television news magazine illustrates the significance of mass media…

  3. Comparison of 7.5-minute and 1-degree digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Dennis L.; Ripple, William J.

    1995-01-01

    We compared two digital elevation models (DEM's) for the Echo Mountain SE quadrangle in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Comparisons were made between 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) and 1-degree (1:250,000-scale) images using the variables of elevation, slope aspect, and slope gradient. Both visual and statistical differences are presented.

  4. The assisted 6-minute cycling test to assess endurance in children with a neuromuscular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.; Jong, M. de; Coes, H.M.; Eggermont, F.; Alfen, N. van; Groot, I.J. de

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: For late- or non-ambulant children with a neuromuscular disorder no suitable endurance tests are currently available. We developed the assisted 6-minute cycling test (A6MCT) for the legs and arms and investigated its psychometric properties in healthy boys and boys with Duchenne muscul

  5. "My Mom and Her Boyfriend Fuss": A Five-Minute RAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Erik K.; Whindleton, Kendra

    2012-01-01

    Unresolved issues from home often spill over into behavior problems at school. This article discusses the five-minute RAP techniques: (1) connect; (2) clarify; and (3) restore. The authors present a case study wherein this brief restorative intervention had been a successful alternative to punishment and exclusion.

  6. History by the Minute: A Representative National History or a Common Sense of the Majority?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Michael; Evans, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A number of times over the past century, there have been struggles in the United States over what is and is not included in the history curriculum. These struggles have primarily been over who is represented in the teaching of history. In Canada, however, this debate has not been as prevalent. For example, Historica's Heritage Minutes is a…

  7. The complex photo-rearrangement of a heterocyclic N-oxide : Kinetics from picoseconds to minutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, Thorben; Regner, Nadja; Heinz, Björn; Borysova, Elina; Ryseck, Gerald; Gilch, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The photo-induced rearrangement of 2-benzoyl-3-phenylquinoxaline-1,4-dioxide yielding 1,3-dibenzoylbenzimidazolone (DBBI) is studied by time-resolved fluorescence, UV/vis absorption, and IR spectroscopy. This complex rearrangement occurs on time scales ranging from 0.1 ps up to minutes. Processes wi

  8. Interrater Reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jan; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Holtze, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is widely used as a clinical outcome measure. However, the reliability of the 6MWT is unknown in individuals who have recently experienced a hip fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative and absolute interrater reliability o...

  9. Can the Cardiopulmonary 6-Minute Walk Test Reproduce the Usual Activities of Patients with Heart Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Guilherme Veiga

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The 6-minute walk test is an way of assessing exercise capacity and predicting survival in heart failure. The 6-minute walk test was suggested to be similar to that of daily activities. We investigated the effect of motivation during the 6-minute walk test in heart failure. METHODS: We studied 12 males, age 45±12 years, ejection fraction 23±7%, and functional class III. Patients underwent the following tests: maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on the treadmill (max, cardiopulmonary 6-minute walk test with the walking rhythm maintained between relatively easy and slightly tiring (levels 11 and 13 on the Borg scale (6EB, and cardiopulmonary 6-minute walk test using the usual recommendations (6RU. The 6EB and 6RU tests were performed on a treadmill with zero inclination and control of the velocity by the patient. RESULTS: The values obtained in the max, 6EB, and 6RU tests were, respectively, as follows: O2 consumption (ml.kg-1.min-1 15.4±1.8, 9.8±1.9 (60±10%, and 13.3±2.2 (90±10%; heart rate (bpm 142±12, 110±13 (77±9%, and 126±11 (89±7%; distance walked (m 733±147, 332±66, and 470±48; and respiratory exchange ratio (R 1.13±0.06, 0.9±0.06, and 1.06±0.12. Significant differences were observed in the values of the variables cited between the max and 6EB tests, the max and 6RU tests, and the 6EB and 6RU tests (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Patients, who undergo the cardiopulmonary 6-minute walk test and are motivated to walk as much as they possibly can, usually walk almost to their maximum capacity, which may not correspond to that of their daily activities. The use of the Borg scale during the cardiopulmonary 6-minute walk test seems to better correspond to the metabolic demand of the usual activities in this group of patients.

  10. Coding Issues in Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Alireza

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses grounded theory as one of the qualitative research designs. It describes how grounded theory generates from data. Three phases of grounded theory--open coding, axial coding, and selective coding--are discussed, along with some of the issues which are the source of debate among grounded theorists, especially between its…

  11. Coding Issues in Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Alireza

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses grounded theory as one of the qualitative research designs. It describes how grounded theory generates from data. Three phases of grounded theory--open coding, axial coding, and selective coding--are discussed, along with some of the issues which are the source of debate among grounded theorists, especially between its…

  12. Mechanics of Ship Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    In these notes first a simplified mathematical model is presented for analysis of ship hull loading due to grounding on relatively hard and plane sand, clay or rock sea bottoms. In a second section a more rational calculation model is described for the sea bed soil reaction forces on the sea bottom...

  13. Grounding Anger Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odis E. Simmons, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the things that drew me to grounded theory from the beginning was Glaser and Strauss’ assertion in The Discovery of Grounded Theory that it was useful as a “theoretical foothold” for practical applications (p. 268. From this, when I was a Ph.D student studying under Glaser and Strauss in the early 1970s, I devised a GT based approach to action I later came to call “grounded action.” In this short paper I’ll present a very brief sketch of an anger management program I developed in 1992, using grounded action. I began my research by attending a two-day anger management training workshop designed for training professionals in the most commonly used anger management model. Like other intervention programs I had seen, this model took a psychologizing and pathologizing approach to the issue. Following this, I sat through the full course of an anger management program that used this model, observing the reactions of the participants and the approach of the facilitator. Following each session I conducted open-ended interviews with most of the participants, either individually or in groups of two or three. I had also done previous research in counseling and social work contexts that turned out to be very relevant to an anger management program design.

  14. Grounding in Instant Messaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox Tree, Jean E.; Mayer, Sarah A.; Betts, Teresa E.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated predictions of the "collaborative theory of language use" (Clark, 1996) as applied to instant messaging (IM). This theory describes how the presence and absence of different grounding constraints causes people to interact differently across different communicative media (Clark & Brennan, 1991). In Study 1, we…

  15. Informed Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert

    2012-01-01

    There is a widespread idea that in grounded theory (GT) research, the researcher has to delay the literature review until the end of the analysis to avoid contamination--a dictum that might turn educational researchers away from GT. Nevertheless, in this article the author (a) problematizes the dictum of delaying a literature review in classic…

  16. TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 10 Optionally Manned Vehicles OMV can be driven by a soldier; OMV can drive a soldier; OMV can be remotely operated; OMV can be...all missions for OMV (i.e. shared driving) (i.e. remotely operated) 2 m od al iti es Mission Payloads UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 11 Ground

  17. Take-all or nothing

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Restrepo, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Elliott, M L; Canning, G; McMillan, V.E.; Crous, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Take-all disease of Poaceae is caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Magnaporthaceae). Four varieties are recognised in G. graminis based on ascospore size, hyphopodial morphology and host preference. The aim of the present study was to clarify boundaries among species and varieties in Gaeumannomyces by combining morphology and multi-locus phylogenetic analyses based on partial gene sequences of ITS, LSU, tef1 and rpb1. Two new genera, Falciphoriella and Gaeumannomycella were subsequently introd...

  18. Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menart, James A. [Wright State University

    2013-02-22

    . The price paid for the three-dimensional detail is the large computational times required with GEO3D. The computational times required for GEO2D are reasonable, a few minutes for a 20 year simulation. For a similar simulation, GEO3D takes days of computational time. Because of the small simulation times with GEO2D, a number of attractive features have been added to it. GEO2D has a user friendly interface where inputs and outputs are all handled with GUI (graphical user interface) screens. These GUI screens make the program exceptionally easy to use. To make the program even easier to use a number of standard input options for the most common GSHP situations are provided to the user. For the expert user, the option still exists to enter their own detailed information. To further help designers and GSHP customers make decisions about a GSHP heating and cooling system, cost estimates are made by the program. These cost estimates include a payback period graph to show the user where their GSHP system pays for itself. These GSHP simulation tools should be a benefit to the advancement of GSHP systems.

  19. Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A Menart, Professor

    2013-02-22

    price paid for the three-dimensional detail is the large computational times required with GEO3D. The computational times required for GEO2D are reasonable, a few minutes for a 20 year simulation. For a similar simulation, GEO3D takes days of computational time. Because of the small simulation times with GEO2D, a number of attractive features have been added to it. GEO2D has a user friendly interface where inputs and outputs are all handled with GUI (graphical user interface) screens. These GUI screens make the program exceptionally easy to use. To make the program even easier to use a number of standard input options for the most common GSHP situations are provided to the user. For the expert user, the option still exists to enter their own detailed information. To further help designers and GSHP customers make decisions about a GSHP heating and cooling system, cost estimates are made by the program. These cost estimates include a payback period graph to show the user where their GSHP system pays for itself. These GSHP simulation tools should be a benefit to the advancement of GSHP system

  20. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agnese, Frank A.; O'Brien, G. M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, C.

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this 'second-generation' regional model was to enhance the knowledge an understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-state representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration. The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system is situated within the southern Great Basin, a subprovince of the Basin and Range physiographic province, bounded by latitudes 35 degrees north and 38 degrees 15 minutes north and by longitudes 115 and 118 degrees west. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the arid climatic conditions and the complex geology. Ground-water flow generally can be described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as

  1. Contribution of minute axillary lymph nodes to accurate staging for patients with breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jun; HE Qing-qing; YANG Xin-hua; LIANG Yan; FAN Lin-jun; ZHANG Yi; GUO Mei-qin

    2007-01-01

    Background Axillary lymph node metastasis is a very important metastatic pathway in breast cancer and its accurate detection is important for staging tumour and guiding therapy. However, neither the accuracy of routine detection of lymph node in surgical specimens nor the significance of minute lymph node with metastases in breast cancer is clear. A modified method for conveniently detecting minute lymph node in specimens of axillary dissections in patients with breast cancer was used to analyze their influence on staging breast cancer.Methods Lymph nodes in fresh, unfixed, specimens of axillary dissections from 127 cases of breast cancer were detected routinely. Then the axillary fatty tissues were cut into 1 cm thick pieces, soaked in Carnoy's solution for 6 to 12 hours, taken out and put on a glass plate. Minute lymph nodes were detected by light of bottom lamp and examined by routine pathology.Results Lymph nodes (n= 2483, 19.6±8.0 per case) were found by routine method. A further 879 lymph nodes up to 6 mm (781 < 3 mm, 6.9±5.3 per case, increasing mean to 26.5±9.7) were found from the axillary tissues after soaking in Carnoy's solution. By detection of minute lymph nodes, the stages of lymph node metastasis in 7 cases were changed from pathological node (pN) stage pN0 to pN1 in 4 cases, from pN1 to pN2 in 2 and from pN2 to pN3 in 1.Conclusions The accurate staging of axillary lymph node metastasis can be obtained routinely with number of axillary lymph nodes in most cases of breast cancer. To avoid neglecting minute lymph nodes with metastases, small axillary nodes should be searched carefully in the cases of earlier breast cancer with no swollen axillary nodes. Treatment with Carnoy's solution can expediently detect minute axillary nodes and improve the accurate staging of lymph nodes in breast cancer.

  2. Improving Dental Students' Long-Term Retention of Pharmacy Knowledge with "Medication Minutes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persky, Adam M; Wells, Michael A; Sanders, Kimberly A; Fiordalisi, Jim; Downey, Christine; Anksorus, Heidi N

    2017-09-01

    A major challenge in foundational science courses in dental curricula is the application of information from the classroom to a clinical setting. To bridge this gap, the aim of this study was to increase students' learning in a foundational pharmacology course through increasing clinical relevance and using formative assessment. Second-year dental students in an introductory pharmacology course were presented material in a traditional basic science lecture format and in brief examples of pharmacy-generated clinical content (Medication Minutes). Short-term retention was assessed with a series of five post-class session, non-graded quizzes, each containing four questions: two knowledge-based (one from basic science material and one Medication Minute) and two application-based (one from basic science material and one Medication Minute). Ten knowledge-based (basic science material) questions and ten application-based (Medication Minutes) questions were included on exams throughout the semester. The primary outcome was to measure long-term retention using performance on these questions on an assessment the following semester. Additionally, the impact of student engagement on examination performance was evaluated based on the number of quizzes each student completed. Students who completed three or more quizzes (n=43, 53%) were designated as "highly engaged," while students who completed less than three quizzes (n=36, 44%) were defined as "less engaged." Two students (3%) were excluded for not completing the long-term assessment or not consenting to the study. On short-term retention measures, the students performed better on the Medication Minute (M=0.76) than basic science (M=0.58) (pdifference in performance. On long-term retention measures, the students performed better on Medication Minute material (M=0.64) than basic science material (M=0.33) (p<0.001); this was true for both highly engaged and less-engaged students. These results suggest that teaching pharmacology

  3. Maximizing teaching on the wards: review and application of the One-Minute Preceptor and SNAPPS models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Jennifer M; Nixon, James; Lang, Valerie J

    2015-02-01

    Hospitalist educators face a number of challenges in teaching clinical reasoning to residents and medical students. Helping to develop trainees' clinical acumen is an essential and highly nuanced process, yet complex patients, documentation requirements, and productivity goals compete with teaching time. Workplace-based assessment is particularly important for residents with the institution of the developmental milestones for meeting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. Two frameworks for facilitating the clinical reasoning discussion-the One-Minute Preceptor preceptor and SNAPPS-have been well studied in the outpatient setting with positive results. Both models show promise for use in the inpatient teaching environment with little modification. This narrative review compares and contrasts these 2 teaching frameworks and discusses their application to the inpatient teaching environment. These models can provide opportunities for hospitalist educators to better assess trainees, integrate regular feedback, and encourage self-directed learning. These teaching frameworks can also allow hospitalists to provide more focused education to trainees without taking additional valuable time.

  4. Lightning electromagnetic field generated by grounding electrode considering soil ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rong; HE Jinliang; ZHANG Bo; GAO Yanqing

    2006-01-01

    A circuit model with lumped time-variable parameter is proposed to calculate the transient characteristic of grounding electrode under lightning current, which takes into consideration the dynamic and nonlinear effect of soil ionization around the grounding electrode. The ionization phenomena in the soil are simulated by means of time-variable parameters under appropriate conditions. The generated electromagnetic field in the air is analyzed by using electrical dipole theory and image theory when the lightning current flows into the grounding electrode. The influence of soil ionization on the electromagnetic field is investigated.

  5. Performance and Stability of a Winged Vehicle in Ground Effect

    CERN Document Server

    de Divitiis, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Present work deals with the dynamics of vehicles which intentionally operate in the ground proximity. The dynamics in ground effect is influenced by the vehicle orientation with respect to the ground, since the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, which in turn depend on height and angle of attack, also vary with the Euler angles. This feature, usually neglected in the applications, can be responsible for sizable variations of the aircraft performance and stability. A further effect, caused by the sink rate, determines unsteadiness that modifies the aerodynamic coefficients. In this work, an analytical formulation is proposed for the force and moment calculation in the presence of the ground and taking the aircraft attitude and sink rate into account. The aerodynamic coefficients are firstly calculated for a representative vehicle and its characteristics in ground effect are investigated. Performance and stability characteristics are then discussed with reference to significant equilibrium conditions, w...

  6. Infrasonic induced ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ting-Li

    On January 28, 2004, the CERI seismic network recorded seismic signals generated by an unknown source. Our conclusion is that the acoustic waves were initiated by an explosive source near the ground surface. The meteorological temperature and effective sound speed profiles suggested existence of an efficient near-surface waveguide that allowed the acoustic disturbance to propagate to large distances. An explosion occurring in an area of forest and farms would have limited the number of eyewitnesses. Resolution of the source might be possible by experiment or by detailed analysis of the ground motion data. A seismo-acoustic array was built to investigate thunder-induced ground motions. Two thunder events with similar N-wave waveforms but different horizontal slownesses are chosen to evaluate the credibility of using thunder as a seismic source. These impulsive acoustic waves excited P and S reverberations in the near surface that depend on both the incident wave horizontal slowness and the velocity structure in the upper 30 meters. Nineteen thunder events were chosen to further investigate the seismo-acoustic coupling. The consistent incident slowness differences between acoustic pressure and ground motions suggest that ground reverberations were first initiated somewhat away from the array. Acoustic and seismic signals were used to generate the time-domain transfer function through the deconvolution technique. Possible non-linear interaction for acoustic propagation into the soil at the surface was observed. The reverse radial initial motions suggest a low Poisson's ratio for the near-surface layer. The acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions show a consistent reverberation series of the Rayleigh wave type, which has a systematic dispersion relation to incident slownesses inferred from the seismic ground velocity. Air-coupled Rayleigh wave dispersion was used to quantitatively constrain the near-surface site structure with constraints afforded by near-surface body

  7. "Don't take diabetes for granted."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Don't take diabetes for granted." Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... regularly, and take your medicines on time. Don't take diabetes for granted! Fall 2009 Issue: Volume ...

  8. Periodic sound-based 6-minute walk test forpatients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy:a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Hitomi; Genno, Hirokazu; Shiba, Naoko; Nakamura, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to verify if a periodic sound-based 6-minute walk test with the best periodic sound could be used to evaluate physical endurance more precisely than the conventional 6-minute walk test. [Subjects] The subjects were healthy subjects and 6 ambulant patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. [Methods] The subjects initially walked for 1 minute to a long-interval metronome sound, and the walking distance was measured. The sound interval was then gradually shortened, and the subjects walked for 1 minute for each of the intervals. The best periodic sound was considered to be the periodic sound used when the subject walked the longest distance in 1 minute, and the process of determining it was referred to as the period shortening walk test. This study administered the 6-minute walk test with the best periodic sound to twenty healthy subjects and 6 ambulant patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and compared the walking distance. [Results] The periodic sound-based 6-minute walk test distances in both the healthy subjects and the patients were significantly longer than the conventional 6-minute walk test distances. [Conclusion] The periodic sound-based 6-minute walk test provided a better indication of ambulatory potential in an evaluation of physical endurance than the conventional 6-minute walk test. PMID:26696721

  9. Reducing statistics anxiety and enhancing statistics learning achievement: effectiveness of a one-minute strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chei-Chang; Wang, Yu-Min; Lee, Li-Tze

    2014-08-01

    Statistical knowledge is widely used in academia; however, statistics teachers struggle with the issue of how to reduce students' statistics anxiety and enhance students' statistics learning. This study assesses the effectiveness of a "one-minute paper strategy" in reducing students' statistics-related anxiety and in improving students' statistics-related achievement. Participants were 77 undergraduates from two classes enrolled in applied statistics courses. An experiment was implemented according to a pretest/posttest comparison group design. The quasi-experimental design showed that the one-minute paper strategy significantly reduced students' statistics anxiety and improved students' statistics learning achievement. The strategy was a better instructional tool than the textbook exercise for reducing students' statistics anxiety and improving students' statistics achievement.

  10. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  11. Ibis ground calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, A.J.; Barlow, E.J.; Tikkanen, T. [Southampton Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica - IASF/CNR, Roma (Italy); Blondel, C.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F. [CEA Saclay - Sap, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Di Cocco, G.; Malaguti, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Bologna - IASF/CNR (Italy); Gabriele, M.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica- IASF/CNR, Palermo (Italy); Quadrini, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Cosmica, EASF/CNR, Milano (Italy); Volkmer, R. [Institut fur Astronomie und Astrophysik, Tubingen (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    We present an overview of results obtained from IBIS ground calibrations. The spectral and spatial characteristics of the detector planes and surrounding passive materials have been determined through a series of calibration campaigns. Measurements of pixel gain, energy resolution, detection uniformity, efficiency and imaging capability are presented. The key results obtained from the ground calibration have been: - optimization of the instrument tunable parameters, - determination of energy linearity for all detection modes, - determination of energy resolution as a function of energy through the range 20 keV - 3 MeV, - demonstration of imaging capability in each mode, - measurement of intrinsic detector non-uniformity and understanding of the effects of passive materials surrounding the detector plane, and - discovery (and closure) of various leakage paths through the passive shielding system.

  12. A revised 5 minute gravimetric geoid and associated errors for the North Atlantic calibration area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    A revised 5 minute gravimetric geoid and its errors were computed for the North Atlantic calibration area using GEM-8 potential coefficients and the latest gravity data available from the Defense Mapping Agency. This effort was prompted by a number of inconsistencies and small errors found in previous calculations of this geoid. The computational method and constants used are given in detail to serve as a reference for future work.

  13. Observation of five-minute-period gravity waves in the solar photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, R. T.; Goode, Philip R.; Hill, Henry A.

    1983-01-01

    Vertically propagating traveling waves have been observed in the solar photosphere. These waves have a period of 278 ± 41 seconds and a vertical phase velocity of about 2 km s-1. It is noted that these waves also have approximately the same period as the well-studied five-minute-period acoustic mode, which is evanescent in the photosphere. The only consistent interpretation of the traveling waves implies that they are gravity waves. About half the time the gravity waves are outgoing, while the remainder of the time they are ingoing. The data were collected by Stebbins et al. (1980) to study the vertical structure of the photosphere. They examined velocity pertubations at nine altitudes in the photosphere using a Doppler shift technique. The current work represents a reanalysis of that data which uncovered the five-minute-period traveling waves. The mean velocity amplitude of disturbances at a given altitude, as registered in the observed Doppler shift, was found to be directly proportional to the mean velocity amplitude at the base of the photosphere. This was the expected relationship between the velocity amplitudes. It was not expected that the standard deviation of the velocity amplitude at a particular altitude would be independent of the velocity amplitude at the base of the photosphere. In addition, the phase difference between velocities at different altitudes is, unexpectedly, inversely proportional to the velocity amplitude at any altitude. These two traits of the data are consistent with a five-minute-period nonacoustic traveling wave being superimposed on the five-minute-period acoustic mode. This supposition is borne out by a detailed examination of the data in the complex plane of amplitude and phase and by a calculation of the power spectrum of the traveling waves as a function of their vertical wavenumber (see Hill et al., 1982).

  14. Minutes of the workshop on off-site release criteria for contaminated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.N.

    1989-11-01

    A one and one-half-day workshop was held May 2-3, 1989, at the Pollard Auditorium in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with the objective of formulating a strategy for developing reasonable and uniform criteria for releasing radioactively contaminated materials from the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This report contains the minutes of the workshop. At the conclusion of the workshop, a plan was formulated to facilitate the development of the above-mentioned off-site release criteria.

  15. Inter-individual differences in the initial 80 minutes of motor learning of handrim wheelchair propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegter, Riemer J K; Lamoth, Claudine J; de Groot, Sonja; Veeger, Dirkjan H E J; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2014-01-01

    Handrim wheelchair propulsion is a cyclic skill that needs to be learned during rehabilitation. Yet it is unclear how inter-individual differences in motor learning impact wheelchair propulsion practice. Therefore we studied how early-identified motor learning styles in novice able-bodied participants impact the outcome of a low-intensity wheelchair-practice intervention. Over a 12-minute pre-test, 39 participants were split in two groups based on a relative 10% increase in mechanical efficiency. Following the pretest the participants continued one of four different low-intensity wheelchair practice interventions, yet all performed in the same trial-setup with a total 80-minute dose at 1.11 m/s at 0.20 W/kg. Instead of focusing on the effect of the different interventions, we focused on differences in motor learning between participants over the intervention. Twenty-six participants started the pretest with a lower mechanical efficiency and a less optimal propulsion technique, but showed a fast improvement during the first 12 minutes and this effect continued over the 80 minutes of practice. Eventually these initially fast improvers benefitted more from the given practice indicated by a better propulsion technique (like reduced frequency and increased stroke angle) and a higher mechanical efficiency. The initially fast improvers also had a higher intra-individual variability in the pre and posttest, which possibly relates to the increased motor learning of the initially fast improvers. Further exploration of the common characteristics of different types of learners will help to better tailor rehabilitation to the needs of wheelchair-dependent persons and improve our understanding of cyclic motor learning processes.

  16. Color enhancement of ten-minute far ultraviolet exposure of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    An artifically reproduced color enhancement of a ten-minute far-ultraviolet exposure of the Earth, taken with a filter which blocks the glow cause by atomic hydrogen but which transmits the glow caused by atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen. Note that airglow emission bands are visible on the night side of the Earth, one roughly centered between the two polar auroral zones and one at an angle to this extending northward toward the sunlit side of the Earth.

  17. Applying the one minute preceptor model to pediatric and adolescent gynecology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockspeiser, Tai M; Kaul, Paritosh

    2015-04-01

    There are multiple challenges to teaching in the clinical setting. The One Minute Preceptor is a learner-centered model for effective and efficient teaching in a clinical setting that can help to overcome these challenges. It consists of 5 microskills: get a commitment; probe for supporting evidence; teach general rules; reinforce what was right; correct mistakes. This article illustrates with case vignettes the use of these microskills for the busy Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology clinician.

  18. Mechanics of Ship Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    In these notes first a simplified mathematical model is presented for analysis of ship hull loading due to grounding on relatively hard and plane sand, clay or rock sea bottoms. In a second section a more rational calculation model is described for the sea bed soil reaction forces on the sea bottom....... Finally, overall hull failure is considered first applying a quasistatic analysis model and thereafter a full dynamic model....

  19. Possible space flight-induced catecholamine cardiomyopathy: Neil Armstrong's last 20 lunar minutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe WJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available William J RoweFormer Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, Medical University of Ohio at Toledo, Ohio, USAAbstract: The hypothesis underpinning this paper is that space flight may predispose to catecholamine cardiomyopathy. Catecholamine levels in space are twice those of the supine levels on Earth. Serum magnesium levels are significantly reduced, with potential vicious cycles triggered by elevation of catecholamines. These are conducive to coronary vasospasm with clot formation from oxidative stress and calcium overload, and ultimately, temporary impairment of left ventricular function could occur. Experimental animals in space have shown a significant increase in norepinephrine levels with various microcirculatory disorders and serious myocardial pathology. During extravehicular activity (space walks, astronauts show heart rates of 150–174 beats per minute. Before exposure to the iron-laden dust brought into the habitat on his space suit, Neil Armstrong's heart rates on the lunar surface were 130–160 beats per minute, and accompanied by dyspnea on two occasions during his last 20 minutes on the moon. A stress test done on the day after splashdown was consistent with "ischemic left ventricular dysfunction". To support this hypothesis, echocardiography on the international space station might show left ventricular hypokinesia. Alpha adrenergic blockade, correction of invariable significant magnesium deficits, along with correction of invariable atrial natriuretic peptide deficits, may counteract the vasoconstrictive action of norepinephrine.Keywords: space flight, catecholamines, cardiomyopathy, magnesium, oxidative stress, heat intolerance, calcium

  20. Proteomic analysis of minute amount of colonic biopsies by enteroscopy sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xing [Department of Analytical Chemistry and CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Xu, Yanli [Fuyang People’s Hospital (China); Meng, Qian [Department of Analytical Chemistry and CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Zheng, Qingqing [Digestive Endoscopic Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital (China); Wu, Jianhong [Department of Analytical Chemistry and CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Wang, Chen; Jia, Weiping [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Diabetes Institute, Shanghai Clinical Center for Diabetes, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital (China); Figeys, Daniel [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, and Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Ottawa (Canada); Chang, Ying, E-mail: emulan@163.com [Digestive Endoscopic Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital (China); Zhou, Hu, E-mail: zhouhu@simm.ac.cn [Department of Analytical Chemistry and CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2016-08-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common types of malignant tumor worldwide. Currently, although many researchers have been devoting themselves in CRC studies, the process of locating biomarkers for CRC early diagnosis and prognostic is still very slow. Using a centrifugal proteomic reactor-based proteomic analysis of minute amount of colonic biopsies by enteroscopy sampling, 2620 protein groups were quantified between cancer mucosa and adjacent normal colorectal mucosa. Of which, 403 protein groups were differentially expressed with statistic significance between cancer and normal tissues, including 195 up-regulated and 208 down-regulated proteins in cancer tissues. Three proteins (SOD3, PRELP and NGAL) were selected for further Western blot validation. And the resulting Western blot experimental results were consistent with the quantitative proteomic data. SOD3 and PRELP are down-regulated in CRC mucosa comparing to adjacent normal tissue, while NGAL is up-regulated in CRC mucosa. In conclusion, the centrifugal proteomic reactor-based label-free quantitative proteomic approach provides a highly sensitive and powerful tool for analyzing minute protein sample from tiny colorectal biopsies, which may facilitate CRC biomarkers discovery for diagnoses and prognoses. -- Highlights: •Minute amount of colonic biopsies by endoscopy is suitable for proteomic analysis. •Centrifugal proteomic reactor can be used for processing tiny clinic biopsy sample. •SOD3 and PRELP are down-regulated in CRC, while NGAL is up-regulated in CRC.

  1. A Study of Real-time Peak Oxygen Consumption and Six-minute Walk Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guolin Zhang; Lan Guo; He Li; Jingzhuang Mai; Zhi Liu; Sixian Huang

    2007-01-01

    To assess the relationship between peak oxygen consumption( PVO2 ) and the ambulation distance in six-minute walk test (6MWT)among the healthy subjects.Methods The 51 healthy subjects were recruited for the six-minute walk test.Data of pulmonary gas exchange breath by breath,such as VO2,VCO2 were real-time measured with wireless remote sensing K4B2,so to study the relationship between peak oxygen uptake and the ambulation distance.Results It was noticed that there was a positive linear correlation between the ambulation distance and PVO2 ( r =0.619,P <0.001 ) in six-minute walk test.The regression equation was set up (VO2/kg =0.05D-6.331,P <0.001 ).PVO2 > PVCO2 ,R < 1 were found,which suggested that 6MWT was a test below anaerobic threshold.Conclusions There was a closely positive linear correlation between the ambulation distance and PVO2,which is safety,convenient and valuable for the evaluation of cardiopulmonary function and the treatment of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.

  2. Reliability and feasibility of the six minute walk test in subjects with myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Tollbäck, Anna

    2007-12-01

    The objective was to describe test-retest reliability and feasibility of the six minute walk test in adult subjects with myotonic dystrophy type 1. Twelve subjects (28-68 years, mean 44) performed three six minute walk tests on two occasions, one week apart. Relative reliability was high (ICC(2.1)=0.99) and absolute reliability values were low (standard error of measurement 12 m, repeatability 33 m). Feasibility was investigated in a sample of 64 subjects (19-70 years, mean 43). Fifty-two subjects were able to perform two tests on the same day. Subjects with severe proximal weakness had difficulties performing repeated tests. A practice trial followed by a second test on the same day can be recommended for most subjects, and the best test should be used for evaluations. In conclusion, even though the study sample was small, the present study indicates that the six minute walk test is reliable and feasible in subjects with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

  3. A coherency function model of ground motion at base rock corresponding to strike-slip fault

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁海平; 刘启方; 金星; 袁一凡

    2004-01-01

    At present, the method to study spatial variation of ground motions is statistic analysis based on dense array records such as SMART-1 array, etc. For lacking of information of ground motions, there is no coherency function model of base rock and different style site. Spatial variation of ground motions in elastic media is analyzed by deterministic method in this paper. Taking elastic half-space model with dislocation source of fault, near-field ground motions are simulated. This model takes strike-slip fault and earth media into account. A coherency function is proposed for base rock site.

  4. Outdoor ground impedance models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenborough, Keith; Bashir, Imran; Taherzadeh, Shahram

    2011-05-01

    Many models for the acoustical properties of rigid-porous media require knowledge of parameter values that are not available for outdoor ground surfaces. The relationship used between tortuosity and porosity for stacked spheres results in five characteristic impedance models that require not more than two adjustable parameters. These models and hard-backed-layer versions are considered further through numerical fitting of 42 short range level difference spectra measured over various ground surfaces. For all but eight sites, slit-pore, phenomenological and variable porosity models yield lower fitting errors than those given by the widely used one-parameter semi-empirical model. Data for 12 of 26 grassland sites and for three beech wood sites are fitted better by hard-backed-layer models. Parameter values obtained by fitting slit-pore and phenomenological models to data for relatively low flow resistivity grounds, such as forest floors, porous asphalt, and gravel, are consistent with values that have been obtained non-acoustically. Three impedance models yield reasonable fits to a narrow band excess attenuation spectrum measured at short range over railway ballast but, if extended reaction is taken into account, the hard-backed-layer version of the slit-pore model gives the most reasonable parameter values.

  5. On the Reduction of Grounding to Essence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Carnino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a recent article, Fabrice Correia explores the project of reducing the notion of grounding to that of essence. He then goes on to provide several candidate definitions and test each of them against a number of objections. His final take on the situation is, roughly, that two of the definitions can handle all of the considered objections. The aim of this paper is to re-evaluate Correia's conclusions in the light of two sources of insights: Firstly, I will argue that one of the objections treated by Correia has been somewhat underestimated, and that it still constitutes a threat against definitions of grounding in terms of essence. Secondly, there are at least two further objections that should be considered by the advocate of such definitions. As I will show, one of them can be neutralized; but the other one is more serious and suggests a clear dialectical edge to an operationalist definition.

  6. A history of the 2014 Minute 319 environmental pulse flow asdocumented by field measurements and satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Steven M.; Ramirez-Hernandez, Jorge; Rodriguez-Burgeueno, J. Eliana; Milliken, Jeff; Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco; Schlatter, Karen; Santiago-Serrano, Edith; Carrera-Villa, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    As provided in Minute 319 of the U.S.-Mexico Water Treaty of 1944, a pulse flow of approximately 132 million cubic meters (mcm) was released to the riparian corridor of the Colorado River Delta over an eight-week period that began March 23, 2014 and ended May 18, 2014. Peak flows were released in the early part of the pulse to simulate a spring flood, with approximately 101.7 mcm released at Morelos Dam on the U.S.-Mexico border. The remainder of the pulse flow water was released to the riparian corridor via Mexicali Valley irrigation spillway canals, with 20.9 mcm released at Km 27 Spillway (41 km below Morelos Dam) and 9.3 mcm released at Km 18 Spillway (78 km below Morelos Dam). We used sequential satellite images, overflights, ground observations, water discharge measurements, and automated temperature, river stage and water quality loggers to document and describe the progression of pulse flow water through the study area. The rate of advance of the wetted front was slowed by infiltration and high channel roughness as the pulse flow crossed more than 40 km of dry channel which was disconnected from underlying groundwater and partially overgrown with salt cedar. High lag time and significant attenuation of flow resulted in a changing hydrograph as the pulse flow progressed to the downstream delivery points; two peak flows occurred in some lower reaches. The pulse flow advanced more than 120 km downstream from Morelos Dam to reach the Colorado River estuary at the northern end of the Gulf of California.

  7. Multiwavelength Variability Study of the Classical BL Lac Object PKS 0735+178 on Timescales Ranging from Decades to Minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Arti; Stawarz, Łukasz; Ostrowski, Michał; Larionov, Valeri; Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J.; Joshi, Santosh; Soida, Marian; Agudo, Iván

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of our power spectral analysis for the BL Lac object PKS 0735+178, utilizing the Fermi-LAT survey at high-energy γ-rays, several ground-based optical telescopes, and single-dish radio telescopes operating at GHz frequencies. The novelty of our approach is that, by combining long-term and densely sampled intra-night light curves in the optical regime, we were able to construct for the first time the optical power spectrum of the blazar for a time domain extending from 23 years down to minutes. Our analysis reveals that: (1) the optical variability is consistent with a pure red noise, for which the power spectral density can be well approximated by a single power law throughout the entire time domain probed; (2) the slope of power spectral density at high-energy γ-rays (∼1) is significantly flatter than that found at radio and optical frequencies (∼2) within the corresponding time variability range; (3) for the derived power spectra, we did not detect any low-frequency flattening, nor do we see any evidence for cutoffs at the highest frequencies down to the noise floor levels due to measurement uncertainties. We interpret our findings in terms of a model where the blazar variability is generated by the underlying single stochastic process (at radio and optical frequencies), or a linear superposition of such processes (in the γ-ray regime). Along with the detailed PSD analysis, we also present the results of our extended (1998–2015) intra-night optical monitoring program and newly acquired optical photo-polarimetric data for the source.

  8. ELECTRON AND PROTON ACCELERATION DURING THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.; Sun, L. P. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Firoz, Kazi A. [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Miroshnichenko, L. I., E-mail: lic@nju.edu.cn [N. V. Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN), Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, 142190 Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-10

    High-energy particles were recorded by near-Earth spacecraft and ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) on 2012 May 17. This event was the first ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 24. In this study, we try to identify the acceleration source(s) of solar energetic particles by combining in situ particle measurements from the WIND/3DP, GOES 13, and solar cosmic rays registered by several NMs, as well as remote-sensing solar observations from SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, and RHESSI. We derive the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) path length (1.25 {+-} 0.05 AU) and solar particle release time (01:29 {+-} 00:01 UT) of the first arriving electrons by using their velocity dispersion and taking into account contamination effects. We found that the electron impulsive injection phase, indicated by the dramatic change in the spectral index, is consistent with flare non-thermal emission and type III radio bursts. Based on the potential field source surface concept, modeling of the open-field lines rooted in the active region has been performed to provide escape channels for flare-accelerated electrons. Meanwhile, relativistic protons are found to be released {approx}10 minutes later than the electrons, assuming their scatter-free travel along the same IMF path length. Combining multi-wavelength imaging data of the prominence eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME), we obtain evidence that GLE protons, with an estimated kinetic energy of {approx}1.12 GeV, are probably accelerated by the CME-driven shock when it travels to {approx}3.07 solar radii. The time-of-maximum spectrum of protons is typical for shock wave acceleration.

  9. Taking Care of You: Support for Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helps clear the mind, boost energy levels, and improve sleep. Even 20 minutes can do the trick, so save a bit of time every day to get moving. continue More Tips Stay organized. Keep all the information you' ...

  10. Take Control of PDFpen 5

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    After a whirlwind history and overview of PDF, you'll take a tour through PDFpen's tools and navigation. With those basics taken care of, you'll learn how to: Scan a document to PDF and make the text editable with OCRCombine pages from multiple files into a single PDFTurn a Web site into a multi-page PDFAdd or remove pages from a PDFAdd a hand-written signature to a PDFAdd page and URL links to a PDFMake a clickable table of contents for a PDFUse professional editing marks on a PDFEdit text within a PDF that was received in emailLeave comments on a PDF documentRemove sensitive or confidential

  11. Taking the Copenhagen Process apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cort, Pia

    The aim of this thesis is to analyse the EU vocational education and training policy process (The Copenhagen Process) from a critical perspective based on the policy analysis methodology, “What’s the Problem Represented to Be?” (WPR) developed by Professor Carol Bacchi. The main research question...... “How can the European vocational education and training policy process - the Copenhagen Process - be understood from a WPR perspective? “ is addressed in six articles which take apart the Copenhagen Process and deal with specific WPR questions and specific aspects of the Copenhagen Process......: the construction of vocational education and training; changes in governmentality; the genealogy of EC vocational education and training policy; the technologies of Europeanization; and finally the discursive and institutional effects of the policy process in the Danish context. The thesis argues...

  12. Data Glove For Note Taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Mahajan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We aim at creating a note-taking device typically to be used in a classroom environment. Traditional methods of writing have limited speed and cannot keep up with speech. Writing with pen on paper requires us to look at the paper, which can reduce concentration on the ongoing discussion. Laptops are costly, power consuming and heavy for such a trivial task. Voice to text programs dont have the freedom of choosing the text to be included, and noise in the room can affect performance of such a program. Smart phones have a small keypad, which demands more user concentration. We have created a glove that one can wear and touch-type on any flat surface with minimal costs and power consumption. With ergonomics in mind, the glove has been designed to yield ten self fabricated switch button sensors to finally create a complete utility for simple and an inexpensive typing tool.

  13. Common Ground and Delegation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobrajska, Magdalena; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lyngsie, Jacob

    Much recent research suggests that firms need to increase their level of delegation to better cope with, for example, the challenges introduced by dynamic rapid environments and the need to engage more with external knowledge sources. However, there is less insight into the organizational...... preconditions of increasing delegation. We argue that key HR practices?namely, hiring, training and job-rotation?are associated with delegation of decision-making authority. These practices assist in the creation of shared knowledge conditions between managers and employees. In turn, such a ?common ground...

  14. Ground penetrating radar

    CERN Document Server

    Daniels, David J

    2004-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar has come to public attention in recent criminal investigations, but has actually been a developing and maturing remote sensing field for some time. In the light of recent expansion of the technique to a wide range of applications, the need for an up-to-date reference has become pressing. This fully revised and expanded edition of the best-selling Surface-Penetrating Radar (IEE, 1996) presents, for the non-specialist user or engineer, all the key elements of this technique, which span several disciplines including electromagnetics, geophysics and signal processing. The

  15. Singlet Ground State Magnetism:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loidl, A.; Knorr, K.; Kjems, Jørgen;

    1979-01-01

    The magneticGamma 1 –Gamma 4 exciton of the singlet ground state system TbP has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering above the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature. Considerable dispersion and a pronounced splitting was found in the [100] and [110] directions. Both the band width...... and the splitting increased rapidly as the transition temperature was approached in accordance with the predictions of the RPA-theory. The dispersion is analysed in terms of a phenomenological model using interactions up to the fourth nearest neighbour....

  16. Embodied perspective-taking indicated by selective disruption from aberrant self motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Mark R; Stent, Chloé; Mohr, Christine; Golding, John F

    2017-03-01

    Spatial perspective-taking that involves imagined changes in one's spatial orientation is facilitated by vestibular stimulation inducing a congruent sensation of self-motion. We examined further the role of vestibular resources in perspective-taking by evaluating whether aberrant and conflicting vestibular stimulation impaired perspective-taking performance. Participants (N = 39) undertook either an "own body transformation" (OBT) task, requiring speeded spatial judgments made from the perspective of a schematic figure, or a control task requiring reconfiguration of spatial mappings from one's own visuo-spatial perspective. These tasks were performed both without and with vestibular stimulation by whole-body Coriolis motion, according to a repeated measures design, balanced for order. Vestibular stimulation was found to impair performance during the first minute post stimulus relative to the stationary condition. This disruption was task-specific, affecting only the OBT task and not the control task, and dissipated by the second minute post-stimulus. Our experiment thus demonstrates selective temporary impairment of perspective-taking from aberrant vestibular stimulation, implying that uncompromised vestibular resources are necessary for efficient perspective-taking. This finding provides evidence for an embodied mechanism for perspective-taking whereby vestibular input contributes to multisensory processing underlying bodily and social cognition. Ultimately, this knowledge may contribute to the design of interventions that help patients suffering sudden vertigo adapt to the cognitive difficulties caused by aberrant vestibular stimulation.

  17. Grounding Bottom Damage and Ship Motion over a Rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    1996-01-01

    A model for prediction of damage to tankers during grounding is presented. The model takes into account the coupling between the external ship dynamics and the local damage process of the hull girder. The model for the local damage is based on a least upper bound solution with kinematic compatibi...

  18. 48 CFR 252.228-7001 - Ground and flight risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ground and flight risk. 252.228-7001 Section 252.228-7001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION...) Conventional winged aircraft, as well as helicopters, vertical take-off or landing aircraft,...

  19. Grounding Bottom Damage and Ship Motion over a Rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    1996-01-01

    A model for prediction of damage to tankers during grounding is presented. The model takes into account the coupling between the external ship dynamics and the local damage process of the hull girder. The model for the local damage is based on a least upper bound solution with kinematic compatibi...

  20. LF airport ground noise mitigation using scattering sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosschaart, C.; Eisses A.R.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    Ground noise due to aircraft starting from the Amsterdam airport runway ‘Polderbaan’ has been an issue since its construction in 2003. Take off operation in headwind conditions causes downwind sound propagation towards a residential area situated 2,5 km Southwest of the runway. Due to the large

  1. LF airport ground noise mitigation using scattering sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosschaart, C.; Eisses A.R.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    Ground noise due to aircraft starting from the Amsterdam airport runway ‘Polderbaan’ has been an issue since its construction in 2003. Take off operation in headwind conditions causes downwind sound propagation towards a residential area situated 2,5 km Southwest of the runway. Due to the large prop

  2. Improvised double-embedding technique of minute biopsies: A mega boon to histopathology laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokendra Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Optimal orientation of minute mucosal biopsies is essential for a definite diagnosis in gastrointestinal pathology or to visualize neural plexuses in Hirschsprung disease. The problem of minute size of the biopsy and its orientation gets compounded when they are from neonates and mandates exhaustive strip cuts, thus delaying reporting. Aim: A modified agar-paraffin technique is aimed to make tissue embedding efficient and user-friendly by inking mapping biopsies (one or more either fresh or fixed with surgical coloring inks followed by embedding first in agar after orientation and followed thereafter by processing, re-embedding in paraffin wax, sectioning and staining. Results: The tissues in agar paraffin block were found to be well processed, firm, held secure and well preserved. The blocks were easy to cut, with serial sections of thickness 2-3 μ and easy to spread. The colored inks remained permanently on the tissues both in the block as well as on the sections which helped in easy identification of tissues. Agar did not interfere with any stain such as Hematoxylin and Eosin or with histochemical stains, enzyme histochemistry or immunohistochemistry. Inking biopsies and pooling them in a block when obtained from the same patient reduced the number of tissue blocks. Conclusion: The modified agar-paraffin embedding technique is a simple reliable user friendly method that can greatly improve the quality of diagnostic information from minute biopsies by optimal orientation, better quality of sections, faster turnaround time and cost-effectiveness by economizing on the number of paraffin blocks, manpower, chemical reagents and laboratory infrastructure.

  3. The College Audition: Coaching Your Students on How To Tell a Two-Minute Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Offer a strategy that can help make the work acting instructors do with their students as they prepare for college auditions as effective as possible. Looks at the process of finding an appropriate monologue. Established some ground rules for preparation and apply them to the monologue's development. Reviews suggestions to help students present…

  4. Habits of Spiritually Grounded Leaders: It Takes Discipline and Persistence to Exercise These Practices of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Superintendents work in environments that can become politically charged and psychically dangerous. Staying open-hearted and steadily focused on a higher purpose in such circumstances requires the inner strength that results from spiritual practice. Engaging in such practices is not likely to eliminate all stress or prevent political turmoil. But…

  5. Taking the High Ground: A Case for Department of Defense Application of Public Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    IT cannot be sustained in a declining budget environment with users demanding better services. Wyld captures the essence of much of the problem for...the DoD laboratory data centers into model versions of public providers. An open source project, called Eucalyptus (http://www.eucalyptus.com), would...be an excellent starting point for such a project. Eucalyptus is a software plat- form for implementing private cloud computing solutions on top of

  6. Technology transfer: taking science from the books to the ground at Bent Creek Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia Kirschman

    2014-01-01

    Technology transfer has been an important part of the research program at Bent Creek Experimental Forest (Bent Creek) since its establishment in 1925. Our stated mission is to develop and disseminate knowledge and strategies for restoring, managing, sustaining, and enhancing the vegetation and wildlife of upland hardwood-dominated forest ecosystems of the Southern...

  7. Realization of minute-long steady-state H-mode discharges on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianzu, GONG; Baonian, WAN; Jiangang, LI; Jinping, QIAN; Erzhong, LI; Fukun, LIU; Yanping, ZHAO; Mao, WANG; Handong, XU; A, M. GAROFALO; Annika, EKEDAH; Siye, DING; Juan, HUANG; Ling, ZHANG; Qing, ZANG; Haiqing, LIU; Long, ZENG; Shiyao, LIN; Biao, SHEN; Bin, ZHANG; Linming, SHAO; Bingjia, XIAO; Jiansheng, HU; Chundong, HU; Liqun, HU; Liang, WANG; Youwen, SUN; Guosheng, XU; Yunfeng, LIANG; Nong, XIANG; EAST Team

    2017-03-01

    In the 2016 EAST experimental campaign, a steady-state long-pulse H-mode discharge with an ITER-like tungsten divertor lasting longer than one minute has been obtained using only RF heating and current drive, through an integrated control of the wall conditioning, plasma configuration, divertor heat flux, particle exhaust, impurity management, and effective coupling of multiple RF heating and current drive sources at high injected power. The plasma current (I p ∼ 0.45 MA) was fully-noninductively driven (V loop technology studies on EAST, and will benefit the physics basis for steady state operation of ITER and CFETR.

  8. Measurement of the linear electro-optic coefficient of a minute cBN sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU; Qingping; MA; Haitao; JIA; Gang; CHEN; Zhanguo; ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (Cbn) is a kind of artificial (synthetic) crystal. Transverse electro-optic modulation in a minute Cbn sample was carried out. Basing on the practical form of the crystal, we established the theoretical and experimental method according to the sample. For the first time, the linear electro-optic effect was observed in Cbn, and half-wave voltage of the Cbn sample was measured successfully. Furthermore, its linear electro-optic coefficient was calculated at 1.17×10-14 m/V.

  9. Effect of physical culture minutes on the mental performance of students of secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksiy Bulgakov; Alfiya Deyneko; Mikhailo Marchenkov

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: to find out the impact on the mental performance of students of physical activity used in the process of physical education minutes and the lessons the overall cycle. Materials and Methods: a study was conducted in four secondary schools in Vinnitsa and Kharkov regions. The study involved 673 students grades 5–11. The study was conducted in two stages. In the first stage determines the change in the mental health of students during the school day. We used a technique A. Myunsberga. I...

  10. Bragg grating writing in PMMA microstructured polymer optical fibers in less than 7 minutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar; Nielsen, Kristian; Markos, Christos;

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate fiber Bragg grating (FBG) writing in PMMA microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers (mPOFs) using UV Phase Mask technique with writing times shorter than 10 min. The shortest writing time was 6 minutes and 50 seconds and the longest writing time was 8 min and 50 sec. The FBGs were...... written in a 125 x00B5;m PMMA mPOF having 3-rings of holes, the reflection peaks were centred at 632.6 nm and have a reflectivity as high as 26 dB. We also demonstrate how the writing dynamics depends on the intensity of the writing beam....

  11. A simple semipaced 3-minute chair rise test for routine exercise tolerance testing in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilaniu B

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Aguilaniu,1,2 Hubert Roth,3 Jesus Gonzalez-Bermejo,4 Marie Jondot,5 Jocelyne Maitre,5 François Denis,6 Thomas Similowski4,7 1Medicine Faculty, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, France; 2McGill University, Montreal, Canada; 3Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Rhône-Alpes, CHU Grenoble, France; 4Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Respiratory and Intensive Care Medicine, Paris, France; 5Clinique Universitaire de Pneumologie, CHU Grenoble, France, Grenoble, France; 6Boehringer Ingelheim, 7Université Paris, Paris, France Abstract: The functional work capacity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients is usually assessed with walk tests such as the 6-minute walk test (6MWT or the shuttle test. Because these exercise modalities require a controlled environment which limits their use by pulmonologists and severely restricts their use among general practitioners, different modalities of a short (1 minute or less sit-to-stand test were recently proposed. In this study, we evaluated a new modality of a semipaced 3-minute chair rise test (3CRT in 40 patients with COPD, and compared the reproducibility of physiological responses and symptoms during the 3CRT and their interchangeability with the 6MWT. The results demonstrate that physiological variables, heart rate, pulse oxygen saturation, work done, and symptoms (Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores, during the 3CRT were highly reproducible, and that the physiological responses and symptoms obtained during the 3CRT and the 6MWT were interchangeable for most patients. Moreover, these preliminary data suggest that patients able to perform more than 50 rises during 3 minutes had no significant disability. The simplicity and ease of execution of the 3CRT will facilitate the assessment of exercise symptoms and disability in COPD patients during routine consultations with pulmonologists and general practitioners, and will thus contribute

  12. Building on solid ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlfing, Ingo; Starke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The social sciences are currently witnessing a trend toward multi-method research (MMR). However, many important issues have not been sufficiently addressed so far. The focus of this paper is case selection for process tracing on the basis of regression results, which is the main point of interse...... choices and faulty inferences. We develop a novel selection procedure that takes these issues into account and improves causal inference in MMR....

  13. Take-all or nothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Restrepo, M; Groenewald, J Z; Elliott, M L; Canning, G; McMillan, V E; Crous, P W

    2016-01-01

    Take-all disease of Poaceae is caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis (Magnaporthaceae). Four varieties are recognised in G. graminis based on ascospore size, hyphopodial morphology and host preference. The aim of the present study was to clarify boundaries among species and varieties in Gaeumannomyces by combining morphology and multi-locus phylogenetic analyses based on partial gene sequences of ITS, LSU, tef1 and rpb1. Two new genera, Falciphoriella and Gaeumannomycella were subsequently introduced in Magnaporthaceae. The resulting phylogeny revealed several cryptic species previously overlooked within Gaeumannomyces. Isolates of Gaeumannomyces were distributed in four main clades, from which 19 species could be delimited, 12 of which were new to science. Our results show that the former varieties Gaeumannomyces graminis var. avenae and Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici represent species phylogenetically distinct from G. graminis, for which the new combinations G. avenae and G. tritici are introduced. Based on molecular data, morphology and host preferences, Gaeumannomyces graminis var. maydis is proposed as a synonym of G. radicicola. Furthermore, an epitype for Gaeumannomyces graminis var. avenae was designated to help stabilise the application of that name.

  14. Take care of your mouse!

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2011-01-01

    “Stop --- Think --- Click" is the basic recommendation for securely browsing the Internet and for securely reading e-mails. Users who have followed this recommendation in the past were less likely to have their computer infected or their computing account compromised. We would like to thank all those who donated their mouse to the CERN Animal Shelter for Computer Mice (http://cern.ch/c-a-s). For those who still use a mouse, please stay vigilant and  alert: do not click on links whose origin you do not trust or which look like gibberish. Do not install untrusted software or plug-ins, since software from untrusted sources may infect or compromise your computer, or violate copyrights. Finally, take particular care with e-mails: Do not open unexpected or suspicious e-mails or attachments. Delete them if they do not concern you or if they appear strange. If in doubt, or if you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact Computer.Security@cern.ch

  15. Taking SESAME to the classroom

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 High School Teacher Programme (HST) is well under way, and this year it has a distinct Middle Eastern flavour, with eight teachers from the region among the 54 taking part.   Established in the late 1990s, HST is a three-week residential programme in English designed to give teachers a taste of frontier research and promote the teaching of modern physics in high schools. Along with the more than 30 other teacher schools given in the native language of the participants, HST aims to help teachers bring modern physics to the classroom and motivate their students to study science at upper secondary school and university. As part of the HST programme, teachers form working groups to develop lessons based on CERN science. This year, however, with eight teachers coming from Israel, Palestine, Iran and Jordan, all of which are members of SESAME, the international laboratory for Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science Applications in the Middle East, one group is working on a dif...

  16. Marine no-take zone rapidly benefits endangered penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichegru, L; Grémillet, D; Crawford, R J M; Ryan, P G

    2010-08-23

    No-take zones may protect populations of targeted marine species and restore the integrity of marine ecosystems, but it is unclear whether they benefit top predators that rely on mobile pelagic fishes. In South Africa, foraging effort of breeding African penguins decreased by 30 per cent within three months of closing a 20 km zone to the competing purse-seine fisheries around their largest colony. After the fishing ban, most of the penguins from this island had shifted their feeding effort inside the closed area. Birds breeding at another colony situated 50 km away, whose fishing grounds remained open to fishing, increased their foraging effort during the same period. This demonstrates the immediate benefit of a relatively small no-take zone for a marine top predator relying on pelagic prey. Selecting such small protected areas may be an important first conservation step, minimizing stakeholder conflicts and easing compliance, while ensuring benefit for the ecosystems within these habitats.

  17. Ground-water resources in the Hood Basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Stephen J.

    1983-01-01

    The Hood Basin, an area of 1,035 square miles in north-central Oregon, includes the drainage basins of all tributaries of the Columbia River between Eagle Creek and Fifteenmile Creek. The physical characteristics and climate of the basin are diverse. The Wasco subarea, in the eastern half of the basin, has moderate relief, mostly intermittent streams, and semiarid climate. The Hood subarea, in the western half, has rugged topography, numerous perennial streams, and a humid climate.Water-bearing geologic units that underlie the basin include volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks of Miocene to Holocene age, and unconsolidated surficial deposits of Pleistocene and Holocene age. The most important water-bearing unit, the Columbia River Basalt Group, underlies almost the entire basin. Total thickness probably exceeds 2,000 feet, but by 1980 only the upper 1,000 feet or less had been developed by wells. Wells in this unit generally yield from 15 to 1,000 gallons per minute and a few yield as much as 3,300 gallons per minute.The most productive aquifer in the Columbia River Basalt Group is The Dalles Ground Water Reservoir, a permeable zone of fractured basalt about 25 to 30 square miles in extent that underlies the city of The Dalles. During the late 1950's and mid-1960's, withdrawals of 15,000 acre-feet per year or more caused water levels in the aquifer to decline sharply. Pumpage had diminished to about 5,000 acre-feet per year in 1979 and water levels have stabilized, indicating that ground water recharge and discharge, including the pumping, are in balance.The other principal geologic units in the basin have more limited areal distribution and less saturated thickness than the Columbia River Basalt Group. Generally, these units are capable of yielding from a few to a hundred gallons per minute to wells.Most of the ground water in the basin is chemically suitable for domestic, irrigation, or other uses. Some ground water has objectionable concentrations of

  18. Five-minute grid shapefile with marine bird density data off central California, CDAS data (1980-2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A shapefile of five minute grids that contains marine bird density data at-sea from the CDAS Central CA data set (1980-2001). It is a shapefile representing 5 minute...

  19. Amount of Minutes Played Does Not Contribute to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in National Basketball Association Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroha, Kelechi R; Marfo, Kojo; Meta, Fabien; Matar, Robert; Shehab, Ramsy; Thompson, Terry; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Makhni, Eric C

    2017-07-01

    There is limited information on the potential risk factors for sustaining an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear in National Basketball Association (NBA) athletes. This study evaluated 83 NBA players who sustained an ACL injury between 1984 and 2015 to determine the influence of minutes played on injury risk. Minutes played in the injury game, during the season, and over their career were assessed, along with the ability to return to play, player efficiency rating, and playing time after return. Athletes in the NBA played significantly fewer minutes before sustaining an ACL injury (17.1 minutes) than their average minutes per game that season (23.5 minutes; PNBA competition the season following ACL injury. Players who were drafted as lottery picks (draft pick 1 to 15) or those who were starters played significantly more minutes the season following injury than those who were not (both PNBA game did not contribute to the risk of sustaining an ACL injury. Although there was a high rate of return to NBA competition the season following injury, those who were elite athletes played more minutes per game than those who were not. Athletes who returned to play sustained a decrease in player efficiency ratings compared with similar athletes without ACL injury. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(4):e658-e662.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Mucking about : robot takes the risk out of sample collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, L.

    2010-05-15

    According to Directive 74 of the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, oilsands mine operators must take regular samples of tailings to monitor the reduction of fluid tailings. The tailings are a mixture of water, clay, sand and residual bitumen. Soft tailings tend to have the consistency of toothpaste, often with a surface crust. Most of the sampling is currently performed by people in boats or in vehicles. However, a group of mechanical engineering students at the University of Alberta have developed a robot that can perform the risky task of taking soil samples from partially dried oil sands tailings ponds to help determine their degree of stability. The all-tailings rover can navigate on soft tailings and take measurements to characterize the deposits. The robot measures soil strength using a penetrometer, a cone-tipped probe that is pushed about a metre into the ground. The force used indicates strength of soil up to about 20 kilopascals. The all-tailings rover looks like a small dune buggy, about one metre long. It has a gas motor with a hydraulic system that actuates the drive wheels. It also has onboard microprocessor control, a navigation unit including a global positioning satellite system and other sensors to navigate on soft ground. An onboard computer plans the trajectory or takes trajectory commands that have been sent by radio. Status information can be sent by radio to a separate computer. The robot can be hooked up to a satellite phone and operated remotely. A future model will do a dynamic penetrometer test that can mimic the vibrations of heavy equipment so that operators can determine if the deposit can support a bulldozer. Another prototype might penetrate as far down as 5 metres. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  1. Do muscle strengthening exercises improve performance in the 6-minute walk test in postmenopausal women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia G. Reis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Walking speed seems to be related to aerobic capacity, lower limb strength, and functional mobility, however it is not clear whether there is a direct relationship between improvement in muscle strength and gait performance in early postmenopausal women. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of muscle strengthening exercises on the performance of the 6-minute walk test in women within 5 years of menopause. METHODS: The women were randomized into control group (n=31, which performed no exercise, and exercise group (n=27, which performed muscle strengthening exercises. The exercises were performed twice a week for 3 months. The exercise protocol consisted of warm-up, stretching, and strengthening of the quadriceps, hamstring, calf, tibialis anterior, gluteus maximus, and abdominal muscles, followed by relaxation. Muscular strength training started with 60% of 1MR (2 series of 10-15 repetitions, reaching 85% until the end of the 3-month period (4 series of 6 repetitions each. RESULTS: The between-group comparisons pre- and post-intervention did not show any difference in distance walked, heart rate or blood pressure (p>0.05, but showed differences in muscle strength post-intervention, with the exercise group showing greater strength (p CONCLUSION: The results suggest that muscle strengthening of the lower limbs did not improve performance in the 6-minute walk test in this population of postmenopausal women.

  2. Regression equations to predict 6-minute walk distance in Chinese adults aged 55–85 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley P.C. Ngai, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The 6-minute walk distance (6MWD is used as a measure of functional exercise capacity in clinical populations and research. Reference equations to predict 6MWD in different populations have been established, however, available equations for Chinese population are scarce. This study aimed to develop regression equations to predict the 6MWD for a Hong Kong Chinese population. Fifty-three healthy individuals (25 men, 28 women; mean age = 69.3 ± 6.5 years participated in this cross-sectional study. Each participant performed two 6-minute walk tests (6MWTs in accordance with a standard protocol. Heart rate (HR was continuously monitored throughout the 6MWTs and the maximum HR was recorded. Measurements from the 6MWT that resulted in the highest 6MWD were used for regression analysis. The mean 6MWD was 563 ± 62 m and was significantly correlated with age (r = −0.62, height (r = 0.39, and percentage of predicted maximal HR (%predHRmax; r = 0.50. A regression equation derived from the data showed that age, sex, and %predHRmax were independent contributors and together explained 65% of the variance in 6MWD. When HR was excluded, the equation explained 52% of the variance. Application of these equations to a Chinese population living in different parts of China warrants further investigation.

  3. 5-minute Solar Oscillations and Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Guglielmi, Anatol; Dovbnya, Boris

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we study impact of the photospheric 5-minute oscillations on the ion cyclotron waves in the solar wind. We proceed from the assumption that the ion cyclotron waves in solar wind are experiencing modulation with a characteristic period of 5 minutes under the influence of Alfven waves driven by photospheric motions. The theory presented in our paper predicts a deep frequency modulation of the ion cyclotron waves. The frequency modulation is expected mainly from variations in orientation of the IMF lines. In turn, the variations in orientation are caused by the Alfven waves, propagating from the Sun. To test the theoretical predictions we have analyzed records of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF) geoelectromagnetic waves in order to find the permanent quasi-monochromatic oscillations of natural origin in the Pc1-2 frequency band (0.1-5 Hz), the carrier frequency of which varies with time in a wide range. As a result we found the so-called "serpentine emission" (SE), which was observed in Antarct...

  4. Application of Six-minute Walk Test in Heart Transplantation Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guolin Zhang; Wenhui Huang; Lan Guo; Zhi Liu; Guilan Wu

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and gas exchange of 5 heart transplantation patients and to approach the variation tendency of exercise tolerance,oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate chronotropic response.Methods 5 cases of heart transplantation patients (age 25~52 years) were undertaken 6MWT 6~30 months after operation,synchronizing gas exchanging parameters were measured by wireless portable remote sensing K4B2 gas analyzer,51 normal controls were compared.Results The six-minute walk distance (6MWD) of 5 patients were (592.61±26.7)m (558~625)m,the ascending tendency during exercise was slower,the maximum heart rates were 80%±6% of age-predicting maximal heart rate,lower than normal control (86%);the end point VO2/kg were (21.8±1.4)mL/min·kg(19.94~23.60)mL/min·kg.Conclusions The 6WMD and VO2 of 5 patients reached normal range,but the heart rate chronotropic response and VO2 ascending tendency were slower than those of normal controls.

  5. Prueba de caminata de seis minutos Guidelines for the six-minute walk test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONICA GUTIERREZ-CLAVERÍA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La prueba de caminata de 6 minutos ha demostrado ser una herramienta muy útil en la evaluación funcional de los pacientes con enfermedades respiratorias crónicas, incluyendo pacientes con hipertensión pulmonar. Para su correcta interpretación y uso clínico en el seguimiento de pacientes, es fundamental estandarizar la técnica. El propósito de este instructivo es justamente difundir a nivel nacional, la manera de efectuar esta técnica en forma correcta. En este contexto, este instructivo describe las indicaciones, contraindicaciones, limitaciones, medidas de seguridad y entrega detalles sobre la ejecución, informe e interpretación de la prueba de caminata de 6 minutos.The six-minute walk test has been shown as a very useful tool in the functional assessment of patients with chronic respiratory diseases enclosing patients with pulmonary hypertension. Methodological standardization ofthis test is fundamental for interpreting its results, as well as for using it in the short and long-term clinical follow up of our patients. The purpose of these guidelines is justly to spread out in our country the proper way to perform this useful test. In this context, indications, contraindications, limitations, security measures and detailed instructions about how to carry out, how to report and how to interpret the 6 minute walk test are described in these guidelines.

  6. Cardiorespiratory Mechanical Simulator for In Vitro Testing of Impedance Minute Ventilation Sensors in Cardiac Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, Emanuela; Cercenelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cardiorespiratory mechanical simulator (CRMS), a system able to reproduce both the cardiac and respiratory movements, intended to be used for in vitro testing of impedance minute ventilation (iMV) sensors in cardiac pacemakers. The simulator consists of two actuators anchored to a human thorax model and a software interface to control the actuators and to acquire/process impedance signals. The actuators can be driven separately or simultaneously to reproduce the cardiac longitudinal shortening at a programmable heart rate and the diaphragm displacement at a programmable respiratory rate (RR). A standard bipolar pacing lead moving with the actuators and a pacemaker case fixed to the thorax model have been used to measure impedance (Z) variations during the simulated cardiorespiratory movements. The software is able to discriminate the low-frequency component because of respiration (Z(R)) from the high-frequency ripple because of cardiac effect (Z(C)). Impedance minute ventilation is continuously calculated from Z(R) and RR. From preliminary tests, the CRMS proved to be a reliable simulator for in vitro evaluation of iMV sensors. Respiration impedance recordings collected during cardiorespiratory movements reproduced by the CRMS were comparable in morphology and amplitude with in vivo assessments of transthoracic impedance variations.

  7. Two-minute training for improving neonatal bag and mask ventilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen J van Vonderen

    Full Text Available To test effectivity of a two-minute training consisting of a few key-points in ventilation using the self-inflating bag (SIB.Experienced and inexperienced caregivers were asked to mask ventilate a leak free manikin using the SIB before and after the training. Mask leak and pressures were measured using respiratory function monitoring. Pressures above 35 cm H2O were considered excessive. Parameters were compared using a Wilcoxon non-parametric test.Before and after the short training, experienced caregivers had minimal median (IQR mask leak (14 (3-75 vs. 3 (0-53%; p<0.01. Inexperienced users had large leak which reduced from 51 (7-91% before to 11 (2-71% after training (p<0.01. Pressures above 35 cm H2O hardly occurred in experienced caregivers (0 (0-5 vs. 0 (0-0%; ns. In inexperienced caregivers this frequently occurred but decreased considerably after training (94 (46-100 vs. 2 (0-70%; p<0.01.A two-minute training of bag and mask ventilation was effective. This training could be incorporated into any training program.

  8. Minute ampullary carcinoid tumor with lymph node metastases: a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakano Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoid tumors are usually considered to have a low degree of malignancy and show slow progression. One of the factors indicating the malignancy of these tumors is their size, and small ampullary carcinoid tumors have been sometimes treated by endoscopic resection. Case presentation We report a case of a 63-year-old woman with a minute ampullary carcinoid tumor that was 7 mm in diameter, but was associated with 2 peripancreatic lymph node metastases. Mild elevation of liver enzymes was found at her regular medical check-up. Computed tomography (CT revealed a markedly dilated common bile duct (CBD and two enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopy showed that the ampulla was slightly enlarged by a submucosal tumor. The biopsy specimen revealed tumor cells that showed monotonous proliferation suggestive of a carcinoid tumor. She underwent a pylorus-preserving whipple resection with lymph node dissection. The resected lesion was a small submucosal tumor (7 mm in diameter at the ampulla, with metastasis to 2 peripancreatic lymph nodes, and it was diagnosed as a malignant carcinoid tumor. Conclusion Recently there have been some reports of endoscopic ampullectomy for small carcinoid tumors. However, this case suggests that attention should be paid to the possibility of lymph node metastases as well as that of regional infiltration of the tumor even for minute ampullary carcinoid tumors to provide the best chance for cure.

  9. Prototyping chips in minutes: Direct Laser Plotting (DLP) of functional microfluidic structures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Limu

    2013-10-10

    We report a fast and simple prototyping method to fabricate polymer-based microfluidic chips using Direct Laser Plotting (DLP) technique, by which various functional micro-structures can be realized within minutes, in a mask-free and out-of-cleanroom fashion. A 2D Computer-Aid-Design (CAD) software was employed to layout the required micro-structures and micro-channels, a CO2 laser plotter was then used to construct the microstructures. The desired patterns can be plotted directly on PDMS substrates and bio-compatible polymer films by manipulating the strength and density of laser pulses. With the DLP technique, chip-embedded micro-electrodes, micro-mixers and 3D microfluidic chips with 5 layers, which normally require several days of work in a cleanroom facility, can be fabricated in minutes in common laboratory. This novel method can produce microfluidic channels with average feature size of 100 μm, while feature size of 50 μm or smaller is achievable by making use of the interference effect from laser impulsion. In this report, we present the optimized parameters for successful fabrication of 3D microchannels, micro-mixers and microfluidic chips for protein concentration measurements (Bovine Serum Albumine (BSA) test), and a novel procedure to pattern flexible embedding electrodes on PDMS-based microfluidic chips. DLP offers a convenient and low cost alternative to conventional microfluidic channel fabrication technique which relies on complicated and hazardous soft lithography process.

  10. Skin cancer margin analysis within minutes with full-field OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Ogrich, Lauren; Morales, Diego; Cusack, Carrie Ann; Abdelmalek, Mark; Boccara, Claude; Durkin, John

    2017-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer. Treatment consists of surgical removal of the skin cancer. Traditional excision involves the removal of the visible skin cancer with a significant margin of normal skin. On cosmetically sensitive areas, Mohs micrographic tissue is the standard of care. Mohs uses intraoperative microscopic margin assessment which minimizes the surgical defect and can help reduce the recurrence rate by a factor of 3. The current Mohs technique relies on frozen section tissue slide preparation which significantly lengthens operative time and requires on-site trained histotechnicians. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FFOCT) is a novel optical imaging technique which provides a quick and efficient method to visualize cancerous areas in minutes, without any preparation or destruction of the tissue. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of FFOCT for the analysis of skin cancer margins during Mohs surgery. Over 150 images of Mohs specimens were acquired intraoperatively with FFOCT before frozen section analysis. The imaging procedure took less than 5 minutes for each specimen. No artifacts on histological preparation were found arising from FFOCT manipulation; however frozen section artifact was readily seen on FFOCT. An atlas was established with FFOCT images and corresponding histological slides to reveal FFOCT reading criteria of normal and cancerous structures. Blind analysis showed high concordance between FFOCT and histology. FFOCT can potentially reduce recurrence rates while maintaining short surgery times, optimize clinical workflow, and decrease healthcare costs. For the patient, this translates into smaller infection risk, decreased stress, and better comfort.

  11. Healthy adults maximum oxygen uptake prediction from a six minute walking test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nury Nusdwinuringtyas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A parameter is needed in medical activities or services to determine functional capacity. This study is aimed to produce functional capacity parameter for Indonesian adult as maximum O2.Methods: This study used 123 Indonesian healthy adult subjects (58 males and 65 females with a sedentary lifestyle, using a cross-sectional method.Results: Designed by using the followings: distance, body height, body weight, sex, age, maximum heart rate of six minute walking test and lung capacity (FEV and FVC, the study revealed a good correlation (except body weight with maximum O2. Three new formulas were proposed, which consisted of eight, six, and five variable respectively. Test of the new formula gave result of maximum O2 that is relevant to the golden standard maximum O2 using Cosmed® C-Pex.Conclusion: The Nury formula is the appropriate predictor of maximum oxygen uptake for healthy Indonesians adult as it is designed using Indonesian subjects (Mongoloid compared to the Cahalin’s formula (Caucasian. The Nury formula which consists of five variables is more applicable because it does not require any measurement tools neither specific competency. (Med J Indones 2011;20:195-200Keywords: maximum O2, Nury’s formula, six minute walking test

  12. Neuronal apoptosis and inflammatory reaction in rat models of focal cerebral ischemia following 40-minute suspended moxibustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rixin Chen; Zhimai Lv; Mingren Chen; Xin An; Dingyi Xie; Jing Yi

    2011-01-01

    The treatment duration of heat-sensitive moxibustion (approximately 40 minutes on average) is longer than that of traditional suspended moxibustion.The present study investigated expression changes of three inflammatory and apoptosis-associated proteins (inducible nitric oxide synthase,cyclooxygenase-2 and caspase-3) in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model rats following suspended moxibustion for 40 minutes,to explore the mechanisms underlying neuroprotective action of suspended moxibustion.The results indicated that suspended moxibustion at acupoint Dazhui (DU 14) for 40 minutes reduced the cortical expression of caspase-3,cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase proteins of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model rats,as well as decreasing infarct volume and ameliorating the neurological deficit score.Outcomes with 40 minutes of moxibustion were superior to the outcomes after suspended moxibustion for 15 minutes.

  13. Identification of the origin of chromosomal aberrations by laser microdissection: Double minutes observed in two cases derive from different chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajcan-Separovic, E. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada); Wang, H.S.; Janes, L. [Children`s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Single copies of tiny chromosome fragments appearing as double minutes were observed in high frequency in amniotic fluid cultures of two mothers who underwent prenatal testing because of advanced age. In case 1, the minutes were C band and NOR negative, while in case 2 they were C band positive, NOR negative. In both cases centromeric DNA sequences were detected on double minutes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using all human centromeric probe (ONCOR). We applied the laser microdissection method to diagnose the origin of double minutes. The diagnostic procedures consisted of microdissection of double minutes from single cells, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the dissected DNA and subsequent FISH using PCR products as a probe pool on metaphase chromosomes from the patient`s amniocytes and fibroblasts from a karyotypically normal newborn. Using this strategy we observed strong FISH signals on double minutes and centromeres of a D and G group chromosome in case 1 amniocyytes, while in case 2 the signal was present on double minutes and a C group chromosome centromere. Hybridization of amniocyte chromosome spreads with centromeric {alpha}-satellite probes for the candidate chromosomes 13/21 and 14/22 (ONCOR) in case 1 revealed FISH signals on double minutes only with the 13/21 probe. In case 2, {alpha}-satellite probes for candidate chromosomes 10 and 12 (ONCOR) were used, and only the probe for chromosome 12 hybridized to double minutes. With the laser microdissection method we were thus able to diagnose and confirm that the double minutes observed in human amniocytes derived from centromeres of chromosomes 13/21 in case 1, and from centomeres of chromosome 12 in case 2. This demonstrates the utility of laser microdissection for identification of chromosomal abnormalities of unknown origin.

  14. A thermal design tool for buildings in ground contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, P.G.; Mathews, E.H. (Pretoria Univ. (South Africa). Centre for Experimental and Numerical Thermoflow)

    1994-01-01

    Simulation of the heat flow into the ground underneath a building is usually performed by means of procedures which do not take into account other heat flow paths. An efficient design tool for buildings in ground contact is lacking. This paper consequently describes how heat flow into the ground can be simplified and incorporated in an efficient design tool. The design tool is based on a first order thermal model calculated by means of straightforward equations. Other features of the design tool include the simulation of multizone behaviour, comfort temperatures, time dependent thermal parameters such as variable ventilation as well as alternative air-conditioning systems such as evaporative and structural cooling. The proposed simulation of ground contact is validated in 53 existing buildings comprising a wide range of thermal characteristics. (Author)

  15. Contamination of Ground Water Due To Landfill Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. S. Raju

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present site under investigation at Ajitsingh Nagar in Vijayawada of Andhra Pradesh is initially a low lying area and used for disposing the urban solid waste for the last few years, through open dumping with out taking any measures to protect the Ground water against pollution. The present study has been taken up to measure the degree of pollution of ground water due to leachate produced in the landfill site. Bore holes were made at eight random locations to measure the depth and characteristics of solid waste. Four sampling wells were made for the collection of ground water samples and they were analyzed for various parameters. All parameters were measured based on Standard methods. It is found that the ground water is contaminated due leachates of Landfill to the large extent and is not suitable for Drinking, Domestic and Irrigation purposes.

  16. Wind-induced ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderyan, Vahid; Hickey, Craig J.; Raspet, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Wind noise is a problem in seismic surveys and can mask the seismic signals at low frequency. This research investigates ground motions caused by wind pressure and shear stress perturbations on the ground surface. A prediction of the ground displacement spectra using the measured ground properties and predicted pressure and shear stress at the ground surface is developed. Field measurements are conducted at a site having a flat terrain and low ambient seismic noise. Triaxial geophones are deployed at different depths to study the wind-induced ground vibrations as a function of depth and wind velocity. Comparison of the predicted to the measured wind-induced ground displacement spectra shows good agreement for the vertical component but significant underprediction for the horizontal components. To validate the theoretical model, a test experiment is designed to exert controlled normal pressure and shear stress on the ground using a vertical and a horizontal mass-spring apparatus. This experiment verifies the linear elastic rheology and the quasi-static displacements assumptions of the model. The results indicate that the existing surface shear stress models significantly underestimate the wind shear stress at the ground surface and the amplitude of the fluctuation shear stress must be of the same order of magnitude as the normal pressure. Measurement results show that mounting the geophones flush with the ground provides a significant reduction in wind noise on all three components of the geophone. Further reduction in wind noise with depth of burial is small for depths up to 40 cm.

  17. Spoken Spanish: turn taking, interventing and simultaneous speech in spontaneus conversation

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Conversation is a very important human activity through which people connect to the outer world. In this article, we try to understand the dynamics of spontaneous speech (taking turns, interventions, simultaneous speech) and the reasons why the participants do not participate equally in a conversation. The work is based on a recorded ten minute long spontaneous conversation among Spanish students and on the analysis of its tran scription. The corpus has got all the characteristics of spoken l...

  18. Temperature and Humidity Independent Control Research on Ground Source Heat Pump Air Conditioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Wang, L. L.

    Taking green demonstration center building air conditioning system as an example, this paper presents the temperature and humidity independent control system combined with ground source heat pump system, emphasis on the design of dry terminal device system, fresh air system and ground source heat pump system.

  19. Three-minute constant rate step test for detecting exertional dyspnea relief after bronchodilation in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borel B

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Benoit Borel,1,2 Courtney A Wilkinson-Maitland,3 Alan Hamilton,4 Jean Bourbeau,5 Hélène Perrault,6 Dennis Jensen,3,5,7 François Maltais2 1Laboratoire HAVAE, Université de Limoges, Limoges, France; 2Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, 3Clinical Exercise and Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, McGill University, Montréal, QC, 4Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada Limited, Burlington, ON, 5Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, 6Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 7Translational Research in Respiratory Diseases Program, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of the 3-minute constant rate step test (3-MST to detect the relief of exertional dyspnea (respiratory discomfort after acute bronchodilation in COPD patients. Patients and methods: A total of 40 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 45.7 (±14.7, % predicted performed four 3-MSTs at randomly assigned stepping rates of 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min after inhalation of nebulized ipratropium bromide (500 µg/salbutamol (2.5 mg and saline placebo, which were randomized to order. Patients rated their intensity of perceived dyspnea at the end of each 3-MST using Borg 0–10 category ratio scale. Results: A total of 37 (92.5%, 36 (90%, 34 (85% and 27 (67.5% patients completed all 3 minutes of exercise at 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min under both treatment conditions, respectively. Compared with placebo, ipratropium bromide/salbutamol significantly decreased dyspnea at the end of the third minute of exercise at 14 steps/min (by 0.6±1.0 Borg 0–10 scale units, P<0.01 and 16 steps/min (by 0.7±1.3 Borg 0–10 scale

  20. A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE REFERENCE VALUES FOR TWO MINUTE WALK DISTANCE IN HEALTHY INDIAN ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Krishna Priya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of functional scales to assess the prognosis of the individuals is widely being encouraged by the International classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Two, six and twelve minute walk tests are the existing functional walk tests, among which 6MWT is being considered as the gold standard. Patients in acute stages of illnesses and early stages of recovery, it is difficult and tiring to accomplish a 6MWT. 2MWT is presently being used as a pre and post-test. To comment on the status of the patient and the test results in the first attempt, it is necessary to look at the reference values of 2MWT. Purpose of the study: This study aims to establish reference values for 2MWT in healthy Indian adults. Objective of the study: To establish reference values for 2 minute walk distance in healthy Indian adults of 20-80 years age. Methods: Three hundred subjects met the inclusion criteria through convenience sampling. Two trials of 2MWT were administered. Instructions for the test were adopted from American Thoracic Society guidelines for 6MWT. Out of the two trials, the one in which more distance was covered by the subject was taken for the analysis. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results: The mean 2MWD was 182.69 + 32.40 meters. 2MWD had shown moderate significant negative correlation with age (r = -0.58 and weak but significant positive correlation with height (r = 0.35. The correlations with weight (r= 0.1 and BMI (r= -0.13 were found to be negligible. It was also found that males walked 21.55 + 3.5 meters more than females and aye2MWD during the second trial was found to be 3.011 + 1.44 meters greater than the first trial. Conclusion: The average distance covered by a healthy Indian individual is approximately 182.69 + 32.40 meters in 2 minutes duration. Implication: Patients in early stages of rehabilitation, early post-operative period and patients with severe disability, found 6MWT difficult

  1. Prescribing cycle training intensity from the six-minute walk test for patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luxton Nia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cycle training intensity for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is normally based on an incremental cycle test. Such tests are expensive and not readily available to clinicians. The six-minute walk test (6MWT has been proposed as an alternative to an incremental cycle test for this purpose, based on the findings of previous research that the peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak for the incremental cycle test and the 6MWT was equivalent in participants with COPD. A regression equation relating distance walked on the 6MWT and peak work rate (Wpeak on the incremental cycle test has been described. The aim of this study is to measure the physiological responses to constant load cycle exercise performed at an intensity of 60% Wpeak determined from the 6MWT in participants with stable COPD. Methods/Design This study is a prospective, repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants with stable COPD and mild to severe lung disease will be recruited from referrals to pulmonary rehabilitation. Subjects with co-morbidities limiting exercise performance will be excluded. Two 6MWTs will be performed. The better 6MWT will be used to calculate Wpeak for cycle exercise from a regression equation. After 30 minutes rest, subjects will perform ten minutes of constant-load cycle exercise at 60% of the calculated Wpeak. During all exercise, cardiorespiratory and metabolic data (Cosmed K4b2, dyspnoea and rate of perceived exertion (RPE will be recorded. The VO2 measured at the end of cycle exercise will be compared to VO2peak of the 6MWT (VO2bike/VO2walk. Pearson's correlation coefficient will be calculated for the relationship between VO2bike and VO2walk. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, with Bonferroni correction, will be performed to determine whether the ratio of VO2bike/VO2walk is affected by disease severity. Discussion This novel study will measure the physiological responses to cycle exercise, in terms of VO2

  2. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us General Background: When & How to take Antibiotics When should you take antibiotics? What is the proper dosage? How safe are antibiotics? How does a physician decide which antibiotic to ...

  3. Subsidiary Initiative Taking in Multinational Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dörrenbacher, Christoph; Gammelgaard, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the political maneuvering that accompanies subsidiary initiative taking in multinational corporations. On the basis of an explorative empirical investigation of subsidiary initiative taking in the French subsidiaries of six German MNCs, the paper explores the activities...

  4. Are You Taking Medication as Prescribed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Are You Taking Medication as Prescribed? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... another time. back to top Taking HIV/AIDS Medications People with HIV/AIDS can have a particularly ...

  5. Take Care of Your Child's Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Previous section Use Fluoride 5 of 7 sections Take Action: Foods and Drinks Give your child healthy foods. Healthy foods include vegetables, ... to tooth decay. To help prevent tooth decay: Give your kids only tap water to drink between meals. Serve milk or juice with a meal instead of between ... 6 of 7 sections Take Action: Dental Checkups Take your child to the ...

  6. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  7. Localizing Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    ing Ground-Penetrating Radar (LGPR) uses very high frequency (VHF) radar reflections of underground features to generate base- line maps and then...Innovative ground- penetrating radar that maps underground geological features provides autonomous vehicles with real-time localization. Localizing...NOV 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Localizing Ground-Penetrating Radar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  8. Hematological and hemorheological determinants of the six-minute walk test performance in children with sickle cell anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Waltz

    Full Text Available The six-minute walk test is a well-established submaximal exercise reflecting the functional status and the clinical severity of sickle cell patients. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate the biological determinants of the six-minute walk test performance in children with sickle cell anemia. Hematological and hemorheological parameters, pulmonary function and the six-minute walk test performance were determined in 42 children with sickle cell anemia at steady state. The performance during the six-minute walk test was normalized for age, sex and height and expressed as percentage of the predicted six-minute walk distance. We showed that a high level of anemia, a low fetal hemoglobin expression and low red blood cell deformability were independent predictors of a low six-minute walk test performance. This study describes for the first time the impact of blood rheology in the six-minute walk test performance in children with sickle cell anemia.

  9. Rapid fabrication of hierarchically structured supramolecular nanocomposite thin films in one minute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Kao, Joseph

    2016-11-08

    Functional nanocomposites containing nanoparticles of different chemical compositions may exhibit new properties to meet demands for advanced technology. It is imperative to simultaneously achieve hierarchical structural control and to develop rapid, scalable fabrication to minimize degradation of nanoparticle properties and for compatibility with nanomanufacturing. The assembly kinetics of supramolecular nanocomposite in thin films is governed by the energetic cost arising from defects, the chain mobility, and the activation energy for inter-domain diffusion. By optimizing only one parameter, the solvent fraction in the film, the assembly kinetics can be precisely tailored to produce hierarchically structured thin films of supramolecular nanocomposites in approximately one minute. Moreover, the strong wavelength dependent optical anisotropy in the nanocomposite highlights their potential applications for light manipulation and information transmission. The present invention opens a new avenue in designing manufacture-friendly continuous processing for the fabrication of functional nanocomposite thin films.

  10. [Near-drowning in an adult: favorable course after a 20-minute submersion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, L; Domenighetti, G

    1982-06-12

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was successful in a healthy 29-year-old woman who had been submerged for 20 minutes in water at 10 degrees C. The evolution was characterized by the development of a multifactorial ARDS (secondary drowning) and sepsis caused by Aeromonas hydrophila and Acinetobacter anitratum. Fibrosing alveolitis caused a restrictive syndrome with severe mechanical impairment and transitory therapy-resistant hypoxemia. It is suggested that prolonged submersion in cold water is also a treatable and completely reversible condition in adults. In our patient without neurological sequelae the pulmonary function studies after 3 months show complete recovery from the mechanical impairment. After a follow-up period of 11 months only mild abnormalities of gas exchange persist.

  11. One minute papers : rendimiento y satisfacción del alumnado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Vivel Búa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de mejora de enseñanza-aprendizaje en el contexto universitario ha generado la aplicación de nuevas o mejoradas técnicas docentes, las cuales fomenten una participación activa del alumno y una mayor interacción con el profesor. El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido analizar el grado de satisfacción del alumnado universitario con una de las innovaciones docentes más populares, sobre todo, por su bajo coste y sencillez, que es el one minute paper, la cual registró una alta tasa de participación en el contexto analizado. En particular, esta experiencia docente se hizo en una asignatura de contabilidad en el Grado de Administración y Dirección de Empresas de la Universidad de Santiago de Compostela.

  12. The Single Minute Exchange of Die Methodology in a High-Mix Processing Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filla Jan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of turbulence in the economic environment, enterprises must react flexibly to the changing demands of their customers. Thus, a changeover process is required. If an enterprise has a large product portfolio, there are basically only two process options; to integrate production into large batches or to change the production programme frequently. Frequent changes associated with the changeover process of machinery are optimized by using the SMED method. The main goal of this paper is to apply SMED (Single Minute Exchange of Die to a High-Mix processing line. The case study is undertaken in a flat glass processing company which manufactures hundreds of types of products. The results of the case study demonstrate that it is possible to save up to 30% annually of the time currently spent on changeovers.

  13. An easy, green and ultra-fast synthesis of dicationic ionic liquids: From days to minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, J.-M.; Aminuddin, N. F.; Kermanioryani, M.; Mutalib, M. I. Abdul; Lethesh, K. C.; Mazlan, F. Afzal

    2016-11-01

    Ionic liquids are no longer a curiosity since they have shown tremendous potential in several key sectors of chemical sciences proven by the exponential number of publications in recent years. However, due to its toxicity and time-consuming synthesis route, these have become a technical hurdle of their use in pilot or industrial scales. Notably their syntheses not only time and energy consuming but also rather of dirty nature with the use of molecular solvents for synthesis and purification steps, leading to high production cost and impeding the possible further industrial outcome. In this preliminary work, we have developed a neat and quick synthesis pathway of di-cationic ionic liquids, reducing not only the necessary time from days to minutes but also the overall energy consumption resulted in high purity, increasing their potential as green alternative to common molecular organic solvents.

  14. L’art du cameo onirique dans Les minutes noires de Martín Solares

    OpenAIRE

    Benmiloud, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Comme auteur de romans policiers, l'écrivain mexicain Martín Solares s'inscrit à la fois dans le désir de restituer une image de la vie mexicaine contemporaine et dans la continuité de ce sous-genre littéraire. Son roman Les minutes noires se donne un cadre imaginaire mais le lecteur a beau jeu d'y retrouver des données propres à la biographie de l'auteur. Le crime qui constitue le nœud de l'intrigue, assassinats en série de petites filles dans une région du Mexique, est lui-même dérivé d'un ...

  15. Geologic map of the Morena Reservoir 7.5-minute quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Victoria R.

    2016-06-01

    IntroductionMapping in the Morena Reservoir 7.5-minute quadrangle began in 1980, when the Hauser Wilderness Area, which straddles the Morena Reservoir and Barrett Lake quadrangles, was mapped for the U.S. Forest Service. Mapping was completed in 1993–1994. The Morena Reservoir quadrangle contains part of a regional-scale Late Jurassic(?) to Early Cretaceous tectonic suture that coincides with the western limit of Jurassic metagranites in this part of the Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB). This suture, and a nearly coincident map unit consisting of metamorphosed Cretaceous and Jurassic back-arc basinal volcanic and sedimentary rocks (unit KJvs), mark the boundary between western, predominantly metavolcanic rocks, and eastern, mainly metasedimentary, rocks. The suture is intruded and truncated by the western margin of middle to Late Cretaceous Granite Mountain and La Posta plutons of the eastern zone of the batholith.

  16. Selective detection of 1000 B. anthracis spores within 15 minutes using a peptide functionalized SERS assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Huang, Hermes; Inscore, Frank; Sengupta, Atanu; Sperry, Jay; Sickler, Todd; Prugh, Amber; Guicheteau, Jason

    2014-12-21

    A surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) assay has been designed to detect Bacillus anthracis spores. The assay consists of silver nanoparticles embedded in a porous glass structure that have been functionalized with ATYPLPIR, a peptide developed to discriminately bind B. anthracis versus other species of Bacillus. Once bound, acetic acid was used to release the biomarker dipicolinic acid from the spores, which was detected by SERS through the addition of silver colloids. This SERS assay was used to selectively bind B. anthracis with a 100-fold selectivity versus B. cereus, and to detect B. anthracis Ames at concentrations of 1000 spores per mL within 15 minutes. The SERS assay measurements provide a basis for the development of systems that can detect spores collected from the air or from water supplies.

  17. Six-minute stepper test: a valid clinical exercise tolerance test for COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosbois JM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available JM Grosbois,1,2 C Riquier,3 B Chehere,4 J Coquart,5 H Béhal,6 F Bart,2 B Wallaert,2,3 C Chenivesse3 1FormAction Santé, Pérenchies, France; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Germon et Gauthier, Béthune, France; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine Immunology and Allergy, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Competence Center for rare lung diseases, University Lille 2, Lille, France; 4EA 7369, URePSSS, Multidisciplinary Research Unit in Sport Health Society, University Lille 2, Lille, France; 5Faculty of Sport Sciences, Sports and Physical Activity, Center for Ecology and Transformation, University of Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan, France; 6Department of Statistical Methods and Biostatistics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, University of Lille Nord, Lille, France Introduction: Exercise tolerance testing is an integral part of the pulmonary rehabilitation (PR management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The 6-minute stepper test (6MST is a new, well-tolerated, reproducible exercise test, which can be performed without any spatial constraints.Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the results of the 6MST to those obtained during a 6-minute walk test (6MWT and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET in a cohort of COPD patients.Methods: Ninety-one COPD patients managed by outpatient PR and assessed by 6MST, 6MWT, and CPET were retrospectively included in this study. Correlations between the number of steps on the 6MST, the distance covered on the 6MWT, oxygen consumption, and power at the ventilatory threshold and at maximum effort during CPET were analyzed before starting PR, and the improvement on the 6MST and 6MWT was compared after PR.Results: The number of steps on the 6MST was significantly correlated with the distance covered on the 6MWT (r=0.56; P<0.0001, the power at maximum effort (r=0.46; P<0.0001, and oxygen consumption at maximum effort (r=0.39; P<0

  18. Preventing seclusion in psychiatry: a care ethics perspective on the first five minutes at admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskes, Yolande; Kemper, Martijn; Landeweer, Elleke G M; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2014-11-01

    In this article, an intervention aimed at improving quality of care to prevent seclusion in psychiatry by focusing on the first five minutes at admission is analyzed from a care ethics perspective. Two cases are presented from an evaluation study in a psychiatric hospital. In both cases, the nurses follow the intervention protocol, but the outcome is different. In the first case, the patient ends up in the seclusion room. In the second case, this does not happen. Analyzing the cases from a care ethics perspective, we conclude that applying the intervention in the right way implies more than following the steps laid down in the protocol. It requires a new way of thinking and acting, resulting in new relationships between nurses and patients. Care ethics theory can help clarify what good care is actually about and keep in mind what is needed to apply the intervention. Thus, care ethics theory can be highly practical and helpful in changing and improving healthcare practice.

  19. The 15-Minute Family Interview as a learning strategy for senior undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtslander, Lorraine; Solar, Jessica; Smith, Nicole R

    2013-05-01

    Nursing care of families continues to be a challenge within complex and demanding health-care systems. Educational strategies to bridge the theory-practice gap, connecting classroom learning with clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing education, enable students to develop the skills required to form meaningful partnerships with families. This article describes how undergraduate nursing students complete a 15-Minute Family Interview in a clinical practice setting, and document the interview process in a reflective major paper. Students integrate research and theory and identify ways to improve the care of families in the clinical setting while building communication skills and confidence in interacting with families in everyday practice. The implementation of the assignment and the evaluation of the process, including quotes from 10 student papers and 2 clinical faculty members, are discussed. Implications for education and ongoing research are offered.

  20. Rapid fabrication of hierarchically structured supramolecular nanocomposite thin films in one minute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ting; Kao, Joseph

    2016-11-08

    Functional nanocomposites containing nanoparticles of different chemical compositions may exhibit new properties to meet demands for advanced technology. It is imperative to simultaneously achieve hierarchical structural control and to develop rapid, scalable fabrication to minimize degradation of nanoparticle properties and for compatibility with nanomanufacturing. The assembly kinetics of supramolecular nanocomposite in thin films is governed by the energetic cost arising from defects, the chain mobility, and the activation energy for inter-domain diffusion. By optimizing only one parameter, the solvent fraction in the film, the assembly kinetics can be precisely tailored to produce hierarchically structured thin films of supramolecular nanocomposites in approximately one minute. Moreover, the strong wavelength dependent optical anisotropy in the nanocomposite highlights their potential applications for light manipulation and information transmission. The present invention opens a new avenue in designing manufacture-friendly continuous processing for the fabrication of functional nanocomposite thin films.

  1. Operational Solar Forecasting System for DNI and GHI for Horizons Covering 5 Minutes to 72 Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coimbra, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    I will describe the methodology used to develop and deploy operationally a comprehensive solar forecasting system for both concentrated and non-concentrated solar technologies. This operational forecasting system ingests data from local telemetry, remote sensing and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, processes all the diferent types of data (time series, sky images, satellite images, gridded data, etc.) to produce concatenated solar forecasts from 5 minutes out to 72 hours into the future. Each forecast is optimized with stochastic learning techniques that include input selection, model topology optimization, model output statistics, metric fitness optimization and machine learning. These forecasts are used by solar generators (plant managers), utilities and independent system operators for operations, scheduling, dispatching and market participation.

  2. Two-minute training for improving neonatal bag and mask ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Jeroen J; Witlox, Ruben S; Kraaij, Sascha; te Pas, Arjan B

    2014-01-01

    To test effectivity of a two-minute training consisting of a few key-points in ventilation using the self-inflating bag (SIB). Experienced and inexperienced caregivers were asked to mask ventilate a leak free manikin using the SIB before and after the training. Mask leak and pressures were measured using respiratory function monitoring. Pressures above 35 cm H2O were considered excessive. Parameters were compared using a Wilcoxon non-parametric test. Before and after the short training, experienced caregivers had minimal median (IQR) mask leak (14 (3-75) vs. 3 (0-53)%; ptraining (ptraining (94 (46-100) vs. 2 (0-70)%; ptraining of bag and mask ventilation was effective. This training could be incorporated into any training program.

  3. A six-minute video-clip to ponder the values fostered by health technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Pascale; Williams-Jones, Bryn; Hivon, Myriam; Daudelin, Genevieve; Alice Miller, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    As part of our research team's knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) initiatives, we developed a six-minute video-clip to enable productive deliberations among technology developers, clinicians and patient representatives. This video-clip summarises in plain language the valuable goals and features that are embedded in health technology and raises questions regarding the direction that should be taken by health care innovations. The use of such video-clips creates unique opportunities for face-to-face deliberations by enabling participants to interact and debate policy issues that are pivotal to the sustainability of health care systems. In our experience, we found that audiovisual-elicitation-based KTE initiatives can fill an important communication gap among key stakeholders: pondering, from a health care system perspective, why and how certain kinds of medical technologies bring a more valuable response to health care needs when compared to others.

  4. Transcription of minute virus of mice, an autonomous parvovirus, may be regulated by attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Asher, E.; Aloni, Y.

    1984-10-01

    To characterize the transcriptional organization and regulation of minute virus of mice, an autonomous parvovirus, viral transcriptional complexes were isolated and cleaved with restriction enzymes. The in vivo preinitiated nascent RNA was elongated in vitro in the presence of (alpha-/sup 32/P)UTP to generate runoff transcripts. The lengths of the runoff transcripts were analyzed by gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. On the basis of the map locations of the restriction sites and the lengths of the runoff transcripts, the in vivo initiation sites were determined. Two major initiation sites having similar activities were thus identified at residues 201 +/- 5 and 2005 +/- 5; both of them were preceded by a TATAA sequence. When uncleaved viral transcriptional complexes or isolated nuclei were incubated in vitro in the presence of (alpha-/sup 32/P)UTP or (alpha-/sup 32/P)CTP, they synthesized labeled RNA that, as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, contained a major band of 142 nucleotides. The RNA of the major band was mapped between the initiation site at residue 201 +/- 5 and residue 342. We noticed the potential of forming two mutually exclusive stem-and-loop structures in the 142-nucleotide RNA; one of them is followed by a string of uridylic acid residues typical of a procaryotic transcription termination signal. We propose that, as in the transcription of simian virus 40, RNA transcription in minute virus of mice may be regulated by attenuation and may involve eucaryotic polymerase B, which can respond to a transcription termination signal similar to that of the procaryotic polymerase.

  5. EMAG2 Version 3 - Update of a two arc-minute global magnetic anomaly grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Brian; Saltus, Richard; Chulliat, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic minerals in rocks of the shallow portions of the lithosphere (the crust and upper mantle above the depth of the Curie isotherm) induce complex distortions, or anomalies, of the otherwise smooth magnetic field from the Earth's core. The NOAA/CIRES geomagnetism team published a global compilation of magnetic anomaly data, at 2-arc minute resolution (EMAG2_V2) in 2009. Since 2009 NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI, formerly NGDC) has added over 51 million points of magnetic data (over 2.5 million miles of marine and airborne surveys) to its data holdings. Using these new data, updated satellite-based geomagnetic models, pre-compiled regional anomaly grids, and magnetic observatory data, we produced the third version of EMAG2. Among other improvements, EMAG2_V3 uses no a priori information about ocean age/structure in order to more accurately reflect the complexity of the oceanic anomalies, including 'magnetic stripes', and provides more accurate mapping of anomalies in regions of new data. This also eliminates false confidence in the accuracy or geographic data availability of marine magnetic anomalies. The primary grid models magnetic anomalies at 4km (approximately 2 arc-minute) above ellipsoid; a secondary product is also available that reports anomalies at sea level above oceanic regions, and 4km above the continents. Also, each grid value comes with an error estimate and each data point is fully traceable to the source data that were used to derive it. The compilation will be updated regularly as new data are available. This presentation will detail the latest version available.

  6. Controlled Study of Correlation of Biomechanical Profile of Hemiparetic Patients with Distance Travelled in Six Minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Laís Moreira; Quintão, Mônica Maria Pena; de Carvalho, Karen Santos R; Carrapatoso, Beatriz Cantanhede; Malfacini, Sabrina Lindenberg L; da Silva, André Custódio; Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Chermont, Sergio S M C

    2015-09-24

    The six-minute walking test (6MWT) is used to assess exercise tolerance that is associated with motor function of the lower limbs in hemiparetic patients. It is suggested that, for post-stroke subjects, performance in the 6MWT may be limited by biomechanical and cardiovascular factors. Our aim is to determine the correlation between the six-minute walk distance (6MWD) and the biomechanical profile of hemiparetic patients. During this cross-sectional controlled study, 10 hemiparetic patients with heart failure underwent 6MWT (ATS protocol). Tonus (Ashworth Scale) and goniometry of the lower limbs were measured. The average of 6MWD in two tests was 279±8 m. There was a negative correlation between the degree of spasticity for both the sural triceps (r=-0.57, P<0.05), quadriceps (r=-0.58, P<0.05) and the limitation in ankle dorsiflexion and the 6MWD (r=-0.76, P<0.05). Also, there was correlation between hip extension and ankle dorsiflexion limitations with 6MWD (r=0.66, P<0.05), (r=0.77, P<0.05). The negative correlation between the highest spasticity in paretic limb and the 6MWD and the correlation between the lower movement range of paretic hip and ankle suggest association with these factors and gait velocity in 6MWT. Loss percentage represents the percentage calculation between distance traveled and the distance predicted achieved by patients. In this study, the negative correlation between the percentage of loss of 6MWD and the limitation in the ankle dorsiflexion movement suggests that for a minor motion arch of the ankle, there is a higher percentage of walking distance loss foretold.

  7. Echocardiographic Predictors for Worsening of Six-Minute Walk Distances in Patients With Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Kenya; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Nishio, Susumu; Hirata, Yukina; Seno, Hiromitsu; Saijo, Yoshihito; Ise, Takayuki; Tobiume, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Koji; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Sata, Masataka

    2017-07-15

    Change in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) has been used as a clinical marker in pulmonary hypertension. Determinants and worsening of 6MWD remain a matter of debate because nonpulmonary factors have an impact on the 6MWD. We hypothesized that future reduction of 6MWD in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) was more closely associated with cardiac dysfunction. We prospectively performed standard clinical and echocardiographic evaluations in SSc patients with the 6-minute walk test at enrollment. Features associated with the 6MWD were sought in a multiple linear regression analysis and compared using standardized β. Worsening of the 6MWD was defined as a 15% reduction and served as the primary outcome. Eighty-one patients were included. In the multivariate analysis, baseline 6MWD was related to SSc severity score (β = -0.250, p = 0.024), left atrial volume index (β = -0.222, p = 0.046), right ventricular fractional area change (β = 0.252, p = 0.025), and the ratio of mean pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac output (β = -0.31, p = 0.002). During follow-up, 20 patients reached the primary outcome. In sequential Cox models, a model based on right ventricular fractional area change at baseline (chi-square 4.8) was improved by left atrial volume index (chi-square 10.3, p = 0.007). In conclusion, determinants and worsening of 6MWD are explained by cardiac factors. When using the 6MWD as a clinical marker in pulmonary hypertension patients, their left ventricular diastolic function and right ventricular systolic function should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reference equations for the six-minute walk distance based on a Brazilian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Raquel R; Probst, Vanessa S; de Andrade, Armele F Dornelas; Samora, Giane A R; Hernandes, Nidia A; Marinho, Patrícia E M; Karsten, Marlus; Pitta, Fabio; Parreira, Veronica F

    2013-01-01

    It is important to include large sample sizes and different factors that influence the six-minute walking distance (6MWD) in order to propose reference equations for the six-minute walking test (6 MWT). To evaluate the influence of anthropometric, demographic, and physiologic variables on the 6 MWD of healthy subjects from different regions of Brazil to establish a reference equation for the Brazilian population. In a multicenter study, 617 healthy subjects performed two 6 MWTs and had their weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) measured, as well as their physiologic responses to the test. Delta heart rate (∆HR), perceived effort, and peripheral oxygen saturation were calculated by the difference between the respective values at the end of the test minus the baseline value. Walking distance averaged 586 ± 106 m, 54 m greater in male compared to female subjects (p<0.001). No differences were observed among the 6 MWD from different regions. The quadratic regression analysis considering only anthropometric and demographic data explained 46% of the variability in the 6 MWT (p<0.001) and derived the equation: 6 MWD(pred)=890.46-(6.11 × age)+(0.0345 × age(2))+(48.87 × gender)-(4.87 × BMI). A second model of stepwise multiple regression including ∆HR explained 62% of the variability (p<0.0001) and derived the equation: 6 MWD(pred)=356.658-(2.303 × age)+(36.648 × gender)+(1.704 × height)+(1.365×∆HR). The equations proposed in this study, especially the second one, seem adequate to accurately predict the 6 MWD for Brazilians.

  9. Use of the six-minute walk test to characterize golden retriever muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Austin R; Van Wie, Emiko; Stoughton, William B; Bettis, Amanda K; Barnett, Heather H; LaBrie, Nicholas R; Balog-Alvarez, Cynthia J; Nghiem, Peter P; Cummings, Kevin J; Kornegay, Joe N

    2016-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder in which loss of the dystrophin protein causes progressive skeletal/cardiac muscle degeneration and death within the third decade. For clinical trials and supportive animal studies, DMD disease progression and response to treatment must be established using outcome parameters (biomarkers). The 6-minute walk test (6MWT), defined as the distance an individual can walk in 6 minutes, is commonly used in DMD clinical trials and has been employed in dogs to characterize cardiac and respiratory disease severity. Building on methods established in DMD and canine clinical studies, we assessed the 6MWT in dogs with the DMD genetic homolog, golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD). Twenty-one cross-bred golden retrievers were categorized as affected (DMD mutation and GRMD phenotype), carrier (female heterozygous for DMD mutation and no phenotype), and normal (wild type DMD gene and normal phenotype). When compared to grouped normal/carrier dogs, GRMD dogs walked shorter height-adjusted distances at 6 and 12 months of age and their distances walked declined with age. Percent change in creatine kinase after 6MWT was greater in GRMD versus normal/carrier dogs at 6 months, providing another potential biomarker. While these data generally support use of the 6MWT as a biomarker for preclinical GRMD treatment trials, there were certain limitations. Results of the 6MWT did not correlate with other outcome parameters for GRMD dogs when considered alone and an 80% increase in mean distance walked would be necessary to achieve satisfactory power. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronotropic incompetence in Chagas disease: effectiveness of blended sensor (volume/minute and accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio da Silva Menezes Junior

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction:Technological progress of pacemakers has allowed the association of two or more sensors in one heart rate system response. The accelerometer sensor measures the intensity of the activity; it has a relatively rapid response to the beginning of it, however, it may present insufficient response to less strenuous or of less impact exercise. The minute ventilation sensor changes the pacing rate in response to changes in respiratory frequency in relation to tidal volume, allowing responses to situations of emotional stress and low impact exercises.Objective:To evaluate the cardiorespiratory response of the accelerometer with respect to the blended sensor (BS=accelerometer sensor+minute ventilation sensor to exercise in chagasic patients undergoing cardiopulmonary exercise test.Methods:This was a prospective, observational, randomized, cross-sectional study. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected. The maximum heart rate of the sensor was programmed by age (220-age. The results were analyzed through t test with paired samples (P<0.05.Results:Sample was comprised of 44 patients, with a mean age of 66±10.4 years, 58% were female, 54% as first implant, in 74% were functional class I and 26% were functional class II, left ventricular ejection fraction was 58±7. As for the cardiopulmonary test, maximum expected heart rate and VO2 were not achieved in both the accelerometer sensor and the blended sensor, however, metabolic equivalent in the blended sensor was higher than the expected, all data with P<0.001.Conclusion:Even though the maximal heart rate was not reached, the blended sensor provided a physiological electrical sequence when compared to the accelerometer sensor, providing better physical fitness test in cardiopulmonary hemodynamics and greater efficiency.

  11. Six minute walk test in respiratory diseases: A university hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Ameri Hatem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Six minutes walk test (6MWT, is a sub-maximal exercise test, used as a clinical indicator of the functional capacity, in patients with cardiopulmonary diseases. Its safety, validity, reliability and its correlation with several physiological instruments, are well studied. However, there are no published data on 6MWT, in the Saudi population. We are reviewing our experience with 6MWT and assessing its safety and its correlation with pulmonary function variables, in patients with pulmonary diseases, in our local population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We consecutively studied patients with pulmonary diseases, who underwent 6MWT and pulmonary function test in King Khalid University Hospital, from June 2003 to December 2004. The 6MWTs were conducted according to the American Thoracic Society guidelines. Spirometry, lung volumes and diffusion capacity measurements were correlated with the absolute walked distance. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty nine tests were performed. All patients were of the Saudi community (59% female, with mean age of 43±15 years. Out of 129 patients, 65 patients had proven respiratory diagnosis. In all patients, the test were performed with no serious complications. The six minute walk distance (6MWD had correlation with patient′s height (r=+0.40, P < 0.001, but not with patients′ weight, BMI, borg scale, or oxygen saturation. The 6MWD correlated significantly with Dlco (r=+0.52, P < 0.01, FVC (r=+0.46, r< 0.001 and had a weaker relation with FEV1 (r=+0.31, P < 0.05. The test had no significant correlation with lung volumetric parameters (TLC, FRC and RV. CONCLUSION: 6MWT is simple and safe test in evaluating patients with chronic pulmonary diseases in the Saudi population. In our study, 6MWD showed correlation with spirometric parameters and diffusion capacity. Further studies are needed to evaluate 6MWT in a more homogenous patients′ population.

  12. Effectiveness of a 40-minute Ophthalmologic Examination Teaching Session on Medical Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency physicians are among the few specialists besides ophthalmologists who commonly perform ophthalmologic examinations using the slit lamp and other instruments. However, most medical schools in the United States do not require an ophthalmology rotation upon completion. Teaching procedural skills to medical students can be challenging due to limited resources and instructor availability. Our study assesses the effectiveness of a 40-minute hands-on teaching session on ophthalmologic examination for medical students using only two instructors and low-cost equipment. Methods: We performed an interventional study using a convenience sample of subjects. Pre- and post-workshop questionnaires on students’ confidence in performing ophthalmologic examination were administered. We used a paired t-test and Wilcoxon rank test to analyze the data. Results: Of the 30 participants in the study, the mean age was 25 and the majority were first-year medical students. The students’ confidence in performing every portion of the ophthalmologic exam increased significantly after the teaching session. We found that the average confidence level before the teaching session were below 2 on a 1-5 Likert scale (1 being the least confident. Confidence levels in using the slit lamp had the highest improvement among the skills taught (2.17 95% CI [1.84-2.49]. Students reported the least improvement in their confidence in assessing extraocular movements (0.73, 95% CI [0.30-1.71] and examining pupillary function (0.73, 95% CI [0.42-1.04]. We observed the biggest difference in median confidence level in the use of the tonometer (4 with a p-value of <0.05. Conclusion: A 40-minute structured hands-on training session can significantly improve students’ confidence levels in ophthalmologic skills.

  13. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  14. Patient comfort following thirty minutes of lens wear: piggy-back versus conventional rigid-lens wear

    OpenAIRE

    W.D.H. Gillan

    2014-01-01

    Discomfort when wearing contact lenses, especially rigid contact lenses, is a common complaint amongst neophyte as well as experienced contact lens wearers. Wearing a piggy-back system of contact lenses has been shown to improve comfort and wearing time, especially in keratoconic subjects. Twenty two normal subjects wore a rigid lens or a piggy-back system of lenses for thirty minutes and after a thirty minute break swopped the mode of lens wear and wore the second modality for a thirty minut...

  15. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 120.376 Grounded distribution systems... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must...

  16. Getting grounded: using Glaserian grounded theory to conduct nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cheri Ann

    2010-03-01

    Glaserian grounded theory is a powerful research methodology for understanding client behaviour in a particular area. It is therefore especially relevant for nurse researchers. Nurse researchers use grounded theory more frequently than other qualitative analysis research methods because of its ability to provide insight into clients' experiences and to make a positive impact. However, there is much confusion about the use of grounded theory.The author delineates key components of grounded theory methodology, areas of concern, and the resulting implications for nursing knowledge development. Knowledge gained from Glaserian grounded theory research can be used to institute measures for enhancing client-nurse relationships, improving quality of care, and ultimately improving client quality of life. In addition, it can serve to expand disciplinary knowledge in nursing because the resulting substantive theory is a middle-range theory that can be subjected to later quantitative testing.

  17. Spacelab Ground Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Edward J.; Gaskins, Roger B.

    1982-02-01

    Spacelab (SL) ground processing is active at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The palletized payload for the second Shuttle launch is staged and integrated with interface verification active. The SL Engineering Model is being assembled for subsequent test and checkout activities. After delivery of SL flight elements from Europe, prelaunch operations for the first SL flight start with receipt of the flight experiment packages and staging of the SL hardware. Experiment operations consist of integrating the various experiment elements into the SL racks, floors and pallets. Rack and floor assemblies with the experiments installed, are integrated into the flight module. Aft end-cone installation, pallet connections, and SL subsystems interface verifications are accomplished, and SL-Orbiter interfaces verified. The Spacelab cargo is then transferred to the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) in a controlled environment using a canister/transporter. After the SL is installed into the Orbiter payload bay, physical and functional integrity of all payload-to-Orbiter interfaces are verified and final close-out operations conducted. Spacelab payload activities at the launch pad are minimal with the payload bay doors remaining closed. Limited access is available to the module through the Spacelab Transfer Tunnel. After mission completion, the SL is removed from the Orbiter in the OPF and returned to the SL processing facility for experiment equipment removal and reconfiguration for the subsequent mission.

  18. PALSAR ground data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Heinrich; Palsetia, Marzban; Carande, Richard; Curlander, James C.

    2002-02-01

    The upcoming launches of new satellites like ALOS, Envisat, Radarsat2 and ECHO will pose a significant challenge for many ground stations, namely to integrate new SAR processing software into their existing systems. Vexcel Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has built a SAR processing system, named APEX -Suite, for spaceborne SAR satellites that can easily be expanded for the next generation of SAR satellites. APEX-Suite includes an auto-satellite-detecting Level 0 Processor that includes bit-error correction, data quality characterization, and as a unique feature, a sophisticated and very accurate Doppler centroid estimator. The Level 1 processing is divided into the strip mode processor FOCUST, based on the well-proven range-Doppler algorithm, and the SWATHT ScanSAR processor that uses the Chirp Z Trans-form algorithm. A high-accuracy ortho-rectification processor produces systematic and precision corrected Level 2 SAR image pro ducts. The PALSAR instrument is an L-band SAR with multiple fine and standard resolution beams in strip mode, and several wide-swath ScanSAR modes. We will address the adaptation process of Vexcel's APEX-Suite processing system for the PALSAR sensor and discuss image quality characteristics based on processed simulated point target phase history data.

  19. BIODYNAMICAL PROFIL OF THE TAKE-OFF ACTION IN HIGH JUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Čoh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the key dynamic and kinematic parameters of the take-off action in the high jump. The authors studied a single elite athlete (personal record 2.31m using a direct measurement method, i.e. a force plate, to measure the dynamic parameters and a synchronised 3D video system to measure the kinematic parameters. They were able to collect and calculate data on 49 variables. Given that the study was focused on just one athlete, generalisation of the results can only be limited. However, this was a very specific experiment where the results clearly have theoretical and practical value for biomechanical research of high jump technique modelling. Their findings include that the jumper studied developed the highest ground reaction force in the eccentric phase of the take-off. The ground reaction force in the vertical direction exceeded his body weight by 5.6 times. In the concentric phase, the maximum ground reaction force was 9% lower than in the eccentric phase. They were also able to identify large ground reaction forces in the horizontal and lateral directions, which are manifested in extreme loading on the ankle joint of the jumper’s take-off leg during the take-off action.

  20. Diurnal freeze/thaw cycles of the ground surface on the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG MeiXue; YAO TanDong; GOU XiaoHua; HIROSE Nozomu; FUJII Hide Yuki; HAO LiSheng; D.F.LEVIA

    2007-01-01

    The exchange of energy and water between the lithosphere and atmosphere mainly takes place at the ground surface. Therefore, freeze/thaw condition at the ground surface is an important factor in examining the interactions between the land surface and atmosphere. Based on the observation data obtained by CEOP/CAMP-Tibet, the diurnal freeze/thaw cycles of the ground surface near Naqu, central Tibetan Plateau was preliminarily analyzed. The results show that the surface layer was completely frozen for approximately one month. However, the time that the ground surface experienced diurnal freeze/thaw cycles was about 6 months. The high frequency of freeze/thaw cycles at the ground surface significantly influences water and energy exchanges between ground and atmosphere over half a year. The interaction processes between the ground and atmosphere under different soil conditions (such as complete thaw, complete freeze and diurnal freeze/thaw cycles) are issues worthy of further examination.

  1. Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Townshend 7.5 x 15 minute quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG98-335A Armstrong, T.R., and Ratcliffe, N.M., 1998, Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Townshend 7.5 x 15 minute quadrangle,...

  2. Massachusetts Bay - Internal Wave Packets Extracted from SAR Imagery Binned in 1x1 minute grid cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This feature class contains internal wave packets extracted from SAR imagery that were binned in 1x1 minute latitude/longitude polygon grid cells. Statistics were...

  3. Epstein on Anchors and Grounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guala Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between anchors and grounds is one of the most innovative contributions of The Ant Trap. In this commentary I will argue that the distinction suffers from an ambiguity between tokens and types. This leads Epstein to endorse pluralism about anchors and grounds, a position that is not justified in the book and to which there are plausible alternatives.

  4. Ground water and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, R.G.; Scanlon, B.; Döll, P.; Rodell, M.; Beek, R. van; Wada, Y.; Longuevergne, L.; Leblanc, M.; Famiglietti, J.S.; Edmunds, M.; Konikow, L.; Green, T.R.; Chen, J.; Taniguchi, M.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; MacDonald, A.; Fan, Y.; Maxwell, R.M.; Yechieli, Y.; Gurdak, J.J.; Allen, D.M.; Shamsudduha, M.; Hiscock, K.; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    As the world’s largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate chang

  5. Ground Attenuation of Railroad Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarewicz, R.; Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Kokowski, P.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of ground effect on railroad noise is described using the concept of the peak A-weighted sound exposure level, and A-weighted sound exposure level. The train is modelled by a continuous line of incoherent point sources that have a cosine directivity. The ground effect is included by...

  6. Ground water and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, R.G.; Scanlon, B.; Döll, P.; Rodell, M.; Beek, R. van; Wada, Y.; Longuevergne, L.; Leblanc, M.; Famiglietti, J.S.; Edmunds, M.; Konikow, L.; Green, T.R.; Chen, J.; Taniguchi, M.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; MacDonald, A.; Fan, Y.; Maxwell, R.M.; Yechieli, Y.; Gurdak, J.J.; Allen, D.M.; Shamsudduha, M.; Hiscock, K.; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    As the world’s largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate

  7. Grounding Damage to Conventional Vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Marie; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2003-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with rational design of conventional vessels with regard to bottom damage generated in grounding accidents. The aim of the work described here is to improve the design basis, primarily through analysis of new statistical data for grounding damage. The current...

  8. The making of a grounded theory: after death communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devers, Edie; Robinson, Katherine Morton

    2002-04-01

    Qualitative research provides understanding of phenomena with a depth and richness that cannot be generated through quantitative approaches. Qualitative methods, however, can often appear difficult, if not confusing. In this article, the authors take the reader through the grounded theory process using Devers's research, Experiencing the Deceased: Reconciling the Extraordinary (1994), a study of after death communication (ADC), to illustrate the use of this particular qualitative method. The authors hope that this article will leave the reader with a better understanding of grounded theory method and stimulate an interest in using it for studying other death-related topics.

  9. Grounded action: Achieving optimal and sustainable change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odis E. Simmons, Ph.D.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Grounded action is the application and extension of grounded theory for the purpose of designing and implementing practical actions such as interventions, program designs, action models, social and organizational policies, and change initiatives. Grounded action is grounded theory with an added action component in which actions are systematically derived from a systematically derived explanatory grounded theory. Actions are grounded in the grounded theory in the same way that grounded theories are grounded in data. Grounded actionwas designed by the authors to address complex, multi-dimensionalorganizational and social problems and issues.

  10. Neonatal facial movements in the first minutes of life--eye opening and tongue thrust: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Juliane; Ruff, Ruth; Juette, Frauke; von Gontard, Alexander; Gortner, Ludwig

    2007-11-01

    Infants born by caesarean section (CS) near or at term were observed to display spontaneous facial movements in their first minutes. We hypothesized that those are reproducible. Up to now, nothing was known about the significance, frequency, and determinants of such facial activity. Repetitive eye opening (EO) and tongue thrust (TT) actions were documented during 1 to 5 minutes, 5 to 10 minutes, and 1 to 15 minutes in 102 infants. In addition, 32 infants were recorded on video from minute 2 to minute 10. Infant- and maternal- influencing factors were noted and videos analyzed using Interact (Version 7.1, Mangold International, Arnstorf, Germany). According to our results, 99 of 102 newborns (gestational age, 33 to 42 weeks) performed EO or TT during the first 15 minutes. Preterm and infants with lower Apgar scores and infants born under general anesthesia showed less EO. Infants of smoking mothers, newborns admitted to special care, and infants with lower umbilical artery pH had significantly fewer TT episodes. Within a "normal" population of newborns of > 37 weeks at delivery (n = 57), 97% showed EO and 95% showed TT. In the filmed 32 newborns, infants began EO at 2:40 and TT at 2:34 minutes of life on average. Crying had no influence, but suctioning/intervention reduced EO frequency. In conclusion, EO and TT are occurring regularly during neonatal adaptation. TT seems to be an inborn automatic behavior; numerous occurrences of EO argue for neurological well-being. Both facial actions may initiate maternal-infant attachment.

  11. Determination of maximum aerobic velocity by a five minute test with reference to running world records. A theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, A; Berthon, P; Laubignat, J F

    1996-01-01

    Field measurement of the maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) is closely linked to effort-duration then to the used protocol. We construct the relationship between running speed and running-duration logarithm from running world records. It appears a noteworthy point at 4.97 minutes, to be suggested as MAV duration point. By agreement, MAV could be measured on field by a five minute test whatever the sport may be.

  12. Clinicopathological features of minute pharyngeal lesions diagnosed by narrow-band imaging endoscopy and biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takashi Kumamoto; Kazuhiro Sentani; Shiro Oka; Shinji Tanaka; Wataru Yasui

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the utility of magnified narrow-band imaging (NBI) endoscopy for diagnosing and treating minute pharyngeal neoplasia.METHODS:Magnified NBI gastrointestinal examinations were performed by the first author.A magnification hood was attached to the tip of the endoscope for quick focusing.Most of the examinations were performed under sedation.Magnified NBI examinations were performed for all of the pharyngeal lesions that had noticeable brownish areas under unmagnified NBI observation,and an intrapapillary capillary loop (IPCL)classification was made.A total of 93 consecutive pharyngeal lesions were diagnosed as IPCL type ⅣV and were suspected to represent dysplasia.Sixty-two lesions of approximately 1 mm in diameter were biopsied in the clinic,and 17 lesions with larger diameters were resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD)at the Hiroshima University Hospital.In addition to the histological diagnoses,the lesion diameters were microscopically measured in 45 of the 62 biopsies.Thirtyfour of the 62 biopsied patients received endoscopic follow up.RESULTS:Minute pharyngeal lesions were diagnosed in 93 of approximately 3000 patients receiving magnified NBI examinations at the clinic.Of the 93 patients with IPCL type Ⅳ lesions,80 were men,and 13 were women.Fifty-six were drinkers,and 57 were smokers.Two had esophageal cancer.Twenty-one lesions were located on the posterior hypopharyngeal wall,and 72lesions were located on the posterior oropharyngeal wall.All 93 lesions were fiat and showed similar findings in the magnified and unmagnified NBI examinations.Although almost all of the IPCL type Ⅳ lesions showed faint redness when examined under white light,it was difficult to diagnose the lesions using only this technique because the contrast was weaker than that achieved in the NBI examinations.Of the 93 lesions,only 3 had diameters greater than 2.1 mm.Sixty-two lesions of approximately 1 mm were biopsied in the clinic,whereas 17 larger lesions

  13. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  14. Typical savings from each minute reduction in tardy first case of the day starts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2009-04-01

    Analysts and clinicians sitting in operating room (OR) committee meetings cannot evaluate rapidly whether a suggested idea to reduce delays in first case of the day starts can be beneficial economically. Three years of data were used from a six OR outpatient surgery facility. The cost reduction from reducing the tardiness of start of first cases of the day was calculated using the method of McIntosh et al. (Anesth Analg 2006;103:1499-516), limited to ORs with at least 8 h of cases and turnovers. Results were then reported per minute reduction in tardy first case of the day starts as an approximation for rapid use in meetings. Each 1.0 min reduction in the tardy starts of first cases of the day in ORs with more than 8 h of cases and turnovers resulted overall in 1.1 +/- 0.1 min reduction in regularly scheduled labor costs (mean +/- se). This result was close to the 1.2 min obtained using an entirely different (simulation) method performed previously for OR time reductions. Secondary analyses confirmed that assumptions were satisfied at the facility, thereby reducing the chance that results are biased. For example, the proportions of the variance in tardiness attributable to anesthesiologists and specialties were only 1% and 3%, respectively, and there were no significant differences in tardiness among the 85 anesthesiologists or 14 specialties. Typical savings for reducing tardiness of first case of the day starts at a surgical suite equal the product of four values: i) 1.1 min reduction in staffed OR time per 1 min reduction in tardiness, ii) estimate for reductions in tardiness (min) per OR, iii) number of ORs at the suite with more than 8 h of cases, and iv) sum of the average compensations per regularly scheduled minute for personnel in each OR. If small, the analyst and/or clinician can promptly speak up and refocus group conversation toward other potential interventions. If large, the full return on investment analysis would be performed.

  15. Near ground gamma radiation associated with lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, K.; Greenfield, M. B.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    Increases in the atmospheric gamma radiation of 22 to 82above normal background have been observed after the onset of lightning fifteen times since March 2001[1]. Gamma rays have been observed with up to four 12.9 cm3 NaI detectors and recently with a high resolution Ge detector positioned 6-21 m and 15 m above ground, respectively. The tail of the observed background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR were fitted with exponential decay curves yielding typical correlation coefficients of 0.95 to 0.99 and half-lives of 52.7 +/-4.81 min and 52.8+/-10.95 min, without and with precipitation, respectively. The GRR above 300 KeV from radon progeny due to precipitation were subtracted [2]. The 3x3 Ge detector with 2 KeV resolution positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors observed increases in GRR minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay which was concurrently observed in the NaI detector. [1] M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-1844. [2] M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 9 (2003) pp 5733-5741.

  16. Hitting the ground running

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KEENEN,MARTHA JANE; NUSBAUM,ANNA W.

    2000-05-18

    Very few of us get to start clean: getting a new organization, new space, and hiring new people for a new information management program. In over 20 years in some aspect of this profession, the author has never faced that particular challenge. By far the majority of information management opportunities involve taking over from someone else. Sometimes, a predecessor has gone on to better things on his/her initiative; that is not always the case. Sometimes the group is one you were a part of yesterday. If the function functions, time moves on and changes may be needed to accommodate new technology, additional and/or changed tasks, and alterations in corporate missions. If the function does not, it is a good bet that you were hired or promoted as an agent of change. Each of these situations poses challenges. This presentation is about that first few months and first year in a new assignment. In other words, you have the job, now what?

  17. Ground-water flow and the potential effects of remediation at Graces Quarters, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbus, F.J.; Fleck, W.B.

    1996-01-01

    Ground water in the east-central part of Graces Quarters, a former open-air chemical-agent test facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds. The U.S. Geological Survey's finite- difference model was used to help understand ground-water flow and simulate the effects of alternative remedial actions to clean up the ground water. Scenarios to simulate unstressed conditions and three extraction well con- figurations were used to compare alternative remedial actions on the contaminant plume. The scenarios indicate that contaminants could migrate from their present location to wetland areas within 10 years under unstressed conditions. Pumping 7 gal/min (gallons per minute) from one well upgradient of the plume will not result in containment or removal of the highest contaminant concentrations. Pumping 7 gal/min from three wells along the central axis of the plume should result in containment and removal of dissolved contami- nants, as should pumping 7 gal/min from three wells at the leading edge of the plume while injecting 7 gal/min back into an upgradient well.

  18. Faint arc-minute extended radio emission around Cygnus X-3

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Sutil, J R; Combi, J A; Luque-Escamilla, P; Munoz-Arjonilla, A J; Paredes, J M; Pooley, G

    2008-01-01

    Aims. We revisit the vicinity of the microquasar Cygnus X-3 at radio wavelengths. We aim to improve our previous search for possible associated extended radio features/hot spots in the position angle of the Cygnus X-3 relativistic jets focusing on shorter angular scales than previously explored. Methods. Our work is mostly based on analyzing modern survey and archive radio data, mainly including observations carried out with the Very Large Array and the Ryle Telescopes. We also used deep near-infrared images that we obtained in 2005. Results. We present new radio maps of the Cygnus X-3 field computed after combining multi-configuration Very Large Array archive data at 6 cm and different observing runs at 2 cm with the Ryle Telescope. These are probably among the deepest radio images of Cygnus X-3 reported to date at cm wavelengths. Both interferometers reveal an extended radio feature within a few arc-minutes of the microquasar position, thus making our detection more credible. Moreover, this extended emissio...

  19. Data Streaming for Metabolomics: Accelerating Data Processing and Analysis from Days to Minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Burke, J Rafael; Aisporna, Aries E; Benton, H Paul; Rinehart, Duane; Fang, Mingliang; Huan, Tao; Warth, Benedikt; Forsberg, Erica; Abe, Brian T; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Wolan, Dennis W; Teyton, Luc; Lairson, Luke; Siuzdak, Gary

    2017-01-17

    The speed and throughput of analytical platforms has been a driving force in recent years in the "omics" technologies and while great strides have been accomplished in both chromatography and mass spectrometry, data analysis times have not benefited at the same pace. Even though personal computers have become more powerful, data transfer times still represent a bottleneck in data processing because of the increasingly complex data files and studies with a greater number of samples. To meet the demand of analyzing hundreds to thousands of samples within a given experiment, we have developed a data streaming platform, XCMS Stream, which capitalizes on the acquisition time to compress and stream recently acquired data files to data processing servers, mimicking just-in-time production strategies from the manufacturing industry. The utility of this XCMS Online-based technology is demonstrated here in the analysis of T cell metabolism and other large-scale metabolomic studies. A large scale example on a 1000 sample data set demonstrated a 10 000-fold time savings, reducing data analysis time from days to minutes. Further, XCMS Stream has the capability to increase the efficiency of downstream biochemical dependent data acquisition (BDDA) analysis by initiating data conversion and data processing on subsets of data acquired, expanding its application beyond data transfer to smart preliminary data decision-making prior to full acquisition.

  20. Impaired Economy of Gait and Decreased Six-Minute Walk Distance in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie I. Katzel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the biomechanics of gait may alter the energy requirements of walking in Parkinson's Disease (PD. This study investigated economy of gait during submaximal treadmill walking in 79 subjects with mild to moderate PD and the relationship between gait economy and 6-minute walk distance (6 MW. Oxygen consumption (VO2 at the self-selected treadmill walking speed averaged 64% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak. Submaximal VO2 levels exceeded 70% of VO2 peak in 30% of the subjects. Overall the mean submaximal VO2 was 51% higher than VO2 levels expected for the speed and grade consistent with severe impairment in economy of gait. There was an inverse relationship between economy of gait and 6MW (r=−0.31, P<0.01 and with the self-selected walking speed (r=−0.35, P<0.01. Thus, the impairment in economy of gait and decreased physiologic reserve result in routine walking being performed at a high percentage of VO2 peak.

  1. Cell migration is another player of the minute virus of mice infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcin, Pierre O.; Panté, Nelly, E-mail: pante@zoology.ubc.ca

    2014-11-15

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), preferentially infects and kills cancer cells. This intrinsic MVMp oncotropism may depend in part on the early stages of MVMp infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early events of MVMp infection in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a highly invasive mouse mammary tumor cell line derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen-mediated transformation. Using a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that various parameters of the cell migration process affect MVMp infection. We show that, after binding to the plasma membrane, MVMp particles rapidly cluster at the leading edge of migrating cells, which exhibit higher levels of MVMp uptake than non-motile cells. Moreover, promoting cell migration on a fibronectin matrix increased MVMp infection, and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition allowed MVMp replication in non-permissive epithelial cells. Hence, we propose that cell migration influences the early stages of MVMp infection. - Highlights: • We document early steps of MVMp infection. • We report that a fibronectin matrix promotes MVMp infection. • We show that cellular migration plays a role in MVMp uptake. • We show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition allows MVMp replication.

  2. [Comparative analysis of the six-minute walk test in healthy children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Evanirso S; Mourão, Flávio A G; Souza, Roberta K V; Glicério, Bráulio M; Coelho, Cristiane C

    2010-01-01

    To perform a comparative analysis of the six-minute walk test in healthy children and adolescents in corridors of 30.5m (100 feet) 20m (65.6 feet) in length. We evaluated 67 participants (36 boys and 31 girls), aged 7 to 14 years old, from public schools of a city in a metropolitan area. All were submitted to four walking tests, two in each of the corridors. The variables analyzed were: walked distance, work rate, mean blood pressure, heart rate and oxygen saturation. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA for repeated measures and significance level at ppressure, heart rate and oxygen saturation. The walked distance was not statistically different in the two tests on each corridor. However, the participants covered greater distances on the 30.5m corridor (p<0.05) compared to the best test between corridors. However, this increase was less than 10%. Regarding the cardiac overload and the work rate, there were no significant differences between the corridors. There were differences in walked distance between the corridors, however they were less than 10% with no significant changes in the other measured parameters. Therefore, the 20m corridor had a good reproducibility for the population of this study.

  3. Minute virus of canines (MVC, canine parvovirus type-1): pathogenicity for pups and seroprevalence estimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, L E; Schlafer, D H; Hashimoto, A

    1994-04-01

    Minute virus of canines (MVC, canine parvovirus type-1) caused inapparent to severe illness in neonatal specific-pathogen-free pups exposed by the oronasal route. The experimental disease was generally mild. Four of 21 infected pups had clinical signs of respiratory illness, but only 2 pups, not euthanized during the early postinoculation period, developed severe illness or died. Principal pathologic changes included bronchitis and interstitial pneumonia with various degrees of lymphadenitis. In contrast to the reported field cases, enteric signs were absent in the experimentally infected animals. Histopathologic changes in the small intestine were mild or absent. Bronchial, bronchiolar, and alveolar epithelial cells appeared to be the sites of initial and most extensive viral growth, reflecting the pattern of histopathologic changes. The disease caused by MVC was mild in comparison to that caused by canine parvovirus-type 2. MVC now appears to be established as a cause of illness in young pups and of transplacental infections with embryo resorption. The prevalence of MVC hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies was high (approximately 50%) in adult dog sera from widely separated geographic areas of the United States.

  4. The Last Minutes of Oxygen Shell Burning in a Massive Star

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Bernhard; Heger, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We present the first 3D simulation of the last minutes of oxygen shell burning in an 18 solar mass supernova progenitor up to the onset of core collapse. A moving inner boundary is used to accurately model the contraction of the silicon and iron core according to a 1D stellar evolution model with a self-consistent treatment of core deleptonization and nuclear quasi-equilibrium. The simulation covers the full solid angle to allow the emergence of large-scale convective modes. Due to core contraction and the concomitant acceleration of nuclear burning, the convective Mach number increases to ~0.1 at collapse, and an l=2 mode emerges shortly before the end of the simulation. Aside from a growth of the oxygen shell from 0.51 to 0.56 solar masses due to entrainment from the carbon shell, the convective flow is reasonably well described by mixing length theory, and the dominant scales are compatible with estimates from linear stability analysis. We deduce that artificial changes in the physics, such as accelerated ...

  5. Biology of tiny animals: three new species of minute salamanders (Plethodontidae: Thorius) from Oaxaca, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovito, Sean M.; García-París, Mario; Maisano, Jessica A.; Wake, David B.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three new species of minute salamanders, genus Thorius, from the Sierra Madre del Sur of Oaxaca, Mexico. Until now only a single species, T. minutissimus, has been reported from this region, although molecular data have long shown extensive genetic differentiation among geographically disjunct populations. Adult Thorius pinicola sp. nov., T. longicaudus sp. nov., and T. tlaxiacus sp. nov. are larger than T. minutissimus and possess elliptical rather than oval nostrils; T. pinicola and T. longicaudus also have longer tails. All three new species occur west of the range of T. minutissimus, which has the easternmost distribution of any member of the genus. The new species are distinguished from each other and from other named Thorius in Oaxaca by a combination of adult body size, external morphology and osteology, and by protein characters (allozymes) and differences in DNA sequences. In addition, we redescribe T. minutissimus and a related species, T. narisovalis, to further clarify the taxonomic status of Oaxacan populations and to facilitate future studies of the remaining genetically differentiated Thorius that cannot be satisfactorily assigned to any named species. Populations of all five species considered here appear to have declined dramatically over the last one or two decades and live specimens are difficult to find in nature. Thorius may be the most endangered genus of amphibians in the world. All species may go extinct before the end of this century. PMID:27896029

  6. Biology of tiny animals: three new species of minute salamanders (Plethodontidae: Thorius from Oaxaca, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Parra-Olea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe three new species of minute salamanders, genus Thorius, from the Sierra Madre del Sur of Oaxaca, Mexico. Until now only a single species, T. minutissimus, has been reported from this region, although molecular data have long shown extensive genetic differentiation among geographically disjunct populations. Adult Thorius pinicola sp. nov., T. longicaudus sp. nov., and T. tlaxiacus sp. nov. are larger than T. minutissimus and possess elliptical rather than oval nostrils; T. pinicola and T. longicaudus also have longer tails. All three new species occur west of the range of T. minutissimus, which has the easternmost distribution of any member of the genus. The new species are distinguished from each other and from other named Thorius in Oaxaca by a combination of adult body size, external morphology and osteology, and by protein characters (allozymes and differences in DNA sequences. In addition, we redescribe T. minutissimus and a related species, T. narisovalis, to further clarify the taxonomic status of Oaxacan populations and to facilitate future studies of the remaining genetically differentiated Thorius that cannot be satisfactorily assigned to any named species. Populations of all five species considered here appear to have declined dramatically over the last one or two decades and live specimens are difficult to find in nature. Thorius may be the most endangered genus of amphibians in the world. All species may go extinct before the end of this century.

  7. Cytogenetic aberrations in osteosarcomas. Nonrandom deletions, rings, and double-minute chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J A; Gebhardt, M C; Kozakewich, H P

    1994-10-01

    Relatively few karyotypes have been reported from short-term cultures and/or direct harvests of osteosarcomas. We describe clonal aberrations in 17 high-grade osteosarcoma specimens and in one low-grade osteosarcoma. The high-grade osteosarcomas were karyotyped after direct harvest (four cases) or after short-term culture periods of osteosarcoma and two lung metastases, were from the same patient and shared a number of clonal aberrations. No consistent chromosome translocations were identified in the overall group of high-grade osteosarcomas, but potential nonrandom deletions involved 6q21-->qter, 9p21-->pter, chromosome 10, chromosome 13, 17p12-pter, and chromosome 20. Ring chromosomes were detected in three cases, and double-minute (dmin) chromosomes were detected in six. All high-grade osteosarcomas had numerous nonclonal chromosome aberrations superimposed on complex clonal events. The single low-grade osteosarcoma was characterized by a balanced, nonconstitutional, t(5;10) (p13;p14-15), together with an addition to the short arm of chromosome X. This is the first translocation reported in low-grade osteosarcoma, and the simplicity of the karyotype contrasts strikingly with those in the high-grade osteosarcomas.

  8. RAPID ORBITAL DECAY IN THE 12.75-MINUTE BINARY WHITE DWARF J0651+2844

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Kenyon, Scott J. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Mukadam, Anjum S., E-mail: jjhermes@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We report the detection of orbital decay in the 12.75-minute, detached binary white dwarf (WD) SDSS J065133.338+284423.37 (hereafter J0651). Our photometric observations over a 13 month baseline constrain the orbital period to 765.206543(55) s and indicate that the orbit is decreasing at a rate of (- 9.8 {+-} 2.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1} (or -0.31 {+-} 0.09 ms yr{sup -1}). We revise the system parameters based on our new photometric and spectroscopic observations: J0651 contains two WDs with M{sub 1} = 0.26 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 2} = 0.50 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }. General relativity predicts orbital decay due to gravitational wave radiation of (- 8.2 {+-} 1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1} (or -0.26 {+-} 0.05 ms yr{sup -1}). Our observed rate of orbital decay is consistent with this expectation. J0651 is currently the second-loudest gravitational wave source known in the milli-Hertz range and the loudest non-interacting binary, which makes it an excellent verification source for future missions aimed at directly detecting gravitational waves. Our work establishes the feasibility of monitoring this system's orbital period decay at optical wavelengths.

  9. Case Report: Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by a Minute Meningioma with Hyperostosed Suprameatal Tubercle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitomo Ishi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellopontine angle tumors might occasionally provoke trigeminal neuralgia but are usually large enough to be diagnosed radiographically. We present a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by a very small meningioma covering the suprameatal tubercle that displayed hyperostosis at the entrance of Meckel's cave and was not obvious on routine magnetic resonance (MR images. A 72-year-old woman with intractable trigeminal neuralgia in the left V3 territory was referred to our institution. Preoperative imaging studies revealed that the left trigeminal nerve was medially distorted at the entrance of Meckel's cave by a laterally seated bone bulge covered by a minute enhanced lesion. Trigeminal nerve decompression surgery was performed via a retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach. We found a small meningioma that had compressed and flattened the trigeminal nerve root at the entrance of Meckel's cave, which was grossly and totally removed by suprameatal tubercle resection. There was no vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root. The trigeminal neuralgia ceased completely after the operation. Accurate preoperative determination of the causative pathologies is essential to achieve adequate surgical results after microvascular decompression for neurovascular compression syndrome. Because conventional MR sequences are inadequate for the precise interpretation of complex neurovascular anatomy in the cerebellopontine angle and such small tumors can be overlooked on routine MR studies, high-resolution thin-slice MR examinations and careful radiological interpretations are required for correct diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Data Streaming for Metabolomics: Accelerating Data Processing and Analysis from Days to Minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The speed and throughput of analytical platforms has been a driving force in recent years in the “omics” technologies and while great strides have been accomplished in both chromatography and mass spectrometry, data analysis times have not benefited at the same pace. Even though personal computers have become more powerful, data transfer times still represent a bottleneck in data processing because of the increasingly complex data files and studies with a greater number of samples. To meet the demand of analyzing hundreds to thousands of samples within a given experiment, we have developed a data streaming platform, XCMS Stream, which capitalizes on the acquisition time to compress and stream recently acquired data files to data processing servers, mimicking just-in-time production strategies from the manufacturing industry. The utility of this XCMS Online-based technology is demonstrated here in the analysis of T cell metabolism and other large-scale metabolomic studies. A large scale example on a 1000 sample data set demonstrated a 10 000-fold time savings, reducing data analysis time from days to minutes. Further, XCMS Stream has the capability to increase the efficiency of downstream biochemical dependent data acquisition (BDDA) analysis by initiating data conversion and data processing on subsets of data acquired, expanding its application beyond data transfer to smart preliminary data decision-making prior to full acquisition. PMID:27983788

  11. Structure of Enhanced Cued Recall Task in the 7 Minute Screen Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Simon, Sara; Ladera-Fernandez, Valentina; Garcia-Garcia, Ricardo; Patino-Alonso, María C; Perea-Bartolome, M Victoria; Unzueta-Arce, Jaime; Perez-Arechaederra, Diana; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    Episodic memory in the 7 Minute Screen is assessed by the Enhanced Cued Recall (ECR) test. The ECR test is composed of three phases, Identification, Immediate Recall, and Free and Cued Recall. However, just the last phase is considered for the total score. We believe that collecting the performance data of the Identification and Immediate Recall phases could provide information regarding possible difficulties or impairments in the different aspects involved in the temporal mnesic process of acquisition of new information, such as in working memory or visual identification. The objective was to assess the goodness of fit for the three phases of the ECR test using a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to show if each phase is separated from each other as a different aspect that participates in the mnesic process. A total of 311 participants greater than 65 years were included in this study. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted for each individual phase. The analyses show that the ECR test consists of three separate phases that identify different steps of the mnesic process. Individual scores for each phase could allow for investigation of patient performance in different aspects of the memory process and could help in further neuropsychological assessment.

  12. Effects of 6-minute walk test on the QT dispersion in patients with congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠海鹏; 许顶立; 李琦

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of QT dispersion (QTd) and the effects of 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) mimicking the patients' daily activities on QTd in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF).Methods: Twenty-eight CHF patients and 22 normal subjects participated these study, who all completed 6-MWT without developing severe arrhythmias.Before and after 6-MWT, standardized 12-lead surface ECGs were obtained to measure QTd and corrected QTd (QTcd).Results: Both before and after 6-MWT, the QTd and QTcd in CHF patients were longer than those in the controls (P<0.001), and QTd and QTcd after 6-MWT were significantly shorter than those before 6-MWT in CHF patients (P=0.007, and 0.018).There was no significant difference in the measurement in the control group.Conclusion: QTd and QTcd are longer in CHF patients than in normal subjects.Moderate exercise may improve the inhomogeneity of ventricular repolarization dispersion in CHF patients.

  13. Terminal Continuation (TC RNA Amplification Enables Expression Profiling Using Minute RNA Input Obtained from Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Ginsberg

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel methodology named terminal continuation (TC RNA amplification has been developed to amplify RNA from minute amounts of starting material. Utility of the TC RNA amplification method is demonstrated with two new modifications including obviating the need for second strand synthesis, and purifying the amplification template using column filtration prior to in vitro transcription (IVT. Using four low concentrations of RNA extracted from mouse brain (1, 10, 25 and 50 ng, one round TC RNA amplification was compared to one round amplified antisense RNA (aRNA in conjunction with column filtration and drop dialysis purification. The TC RNA amplification without second strand synthesis performed extremely well on customdesigned cDNA array platforms, and column filtration was found to provide higher positive detection of individual clones when hybridization signal intensity was subtracted from corresponding negative control hybridization signal levels. Results indicate that TC RNA amplification without second strand synthesis, in conjunction with column filtration, is an excellent method for RNA amplification from extremely small amounts of input RNA from mouse brain and postmortem human brain, and is compatible with microaspiration strategies and subsequent microarray analysis.

  14. Detection of Bacillus spores within 15 minutes by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Chetan; Inscore, Frank; Huang, Hermes; Farquharson, Stuart; Sengupta, Atanu

    2012-06-01

    Since the distribution of Bacillus anthracis causing spores through the US Postal System, there has been a persistent fear that biological warfare agents (BWAs) will be used by terrorists against our military abroad and our civilians at home. Despite the substantial effort to develop BWA analyzers, they remain either too slow, produce high falsealarm rates, lack sensitivity, or cannot be fielded. Consequently there remains a need for a portable analyzer that can overcome these limitations as expressed at the 2011 Biological Weapons Convention. To meet this need we have been developing a sample system that selectively binds BWAs and produce surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra using portable Raman spectrometers. Here we describe the use of a short peptide ligand functionalized on silver nanoparticles to selectively capture Bacillus cereus spores (a surrogate of B. anthracis) and their subsequent detection by SER spectroscopy. This technique was used to specifically detect B. cereus spores over closely related species like B. subtilis belonging to the same genus within 15 minutes. Sensitivity of the method was demonstrated by detecting 104 B. cereus spores/mL of water. The technology, once developed should prove invaluable for rapid monitoring of BWAs, which will immensely help first responders and emergency personnel in implementing appropriate counter measures.

  15. The First Five Minutes of a Core Collapse Supernova Multidimensional Hydrodynamic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kifonidis, K; Janka, H T; Müller, E

    1999-01-01

    We present results of high-resolution two-dimensional simulations which follow the first five minutes of a core collapse supernova explosion in a 15 solar mass blue supergiant progenitor. The computations start shortly after core bounce and include neutrino-matter interactions by using a light-bulb approximation for the neutrinos, and a treatment of the nucleosynthesis due to explosive silicon and oxygen burning. We find that newly formed iron-group elements are distributed throughout a significant fraction of the stellar helium core by the concerted action of convective and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Fast moving nickel mushrooms with velocities up to 4000 km/s are observed. A continuation of the calculations to later times, however, indicates, that the iron velocities observed in SN 1987 A cannot be reproduced due to a strong deceleration of the clumps during their interaction with the dense shell left behind by the shock at the He/H interface. Therefore, we cannot confirm the claim that convective "prem...

  16. Case Report: Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by a Minute Meningioma with Hyperostosed Suprameatal Tubercle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishi, Yukitomo; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Sugiyama, Taku; Yokoyama, Yuka; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Echizenya, Sumire; Itamoto, Koji; Echizenya, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellopontine angle tumors might occasionally provoke trigeminal neuralgia but are usually large enough to be diagnosed radiographically. We present a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by a very small meningioma covering the suprameatal tubercle that displayed hyperostosis at the entrance of Meckel's cave and was not obvious on routine magnetic resonance (MR) images. A 72-year-old woman with intractable trigeminal neuralgia in the left V3 territory was referred to our institution. Preoperative imaging studies revealed that the left trigeminal nerve was medially distorted at the entrance of Meckel's cave by a laterally seated bone bulge covered by a minute enhanced lesion. Trigeminal nerve decompression surgery was performed via a retrosigmoid intradural suprameatal approach. We found a small meningioma that had compressed and flattened the trigeminal nerve root at the entrance of Meckel's cave, which was grossly and totally removed by suprameatal tubercle resection. There was no vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root. The trigeminal neuralgia ceased completely after the operation. Accurate preoperative determination of the causative pathologies is essential to achieve adequate surgical results after microvascular decompression for neurovascular compression syndrome. Because conventional MR sequences are inadequate for the precise interpretation of complex neurovascular anatomy in the cerebellopontine angle and such small tumors can be overlooked on routine MR studies, high-resolution thin-slice MR examinations and careful radiological interpretations are required for correct diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Monolith disk chromatography separates PEGylated protein positional isoforms within minutes at low pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakari, Yu; Podgornik, Ales; Yoshimoto, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Although PEGylation makes proteins drugs more effective, the PEGylation reaction must be controlled carefully in order to obtain a desired PEGylated protein form since various different PEGylated forms may be produced during the reaction. For monitoring the PEGylation reaction, a method with monolith disk ion exchange chromatography, which can separate positional isomers as well as PEGmers, has been developed as a process analytical tool (PAT). The method was optimized for separation of randomly PEGylated protein (lysozyme) isoforms based on the number of resolved peaks, peak resolution, analysis time and pressure drop. In order to increase the retention of mono- and di-PEGylated protein isomers the mobile phase was decreased to pH 4.5, where a large number of mono- and di-PEGylated isomers were resolved within a few minutes. Based on the linear gradient elution optimization model, the following values were determined: gradient slope 0.016 M/mL, disk thickness 3 mm (single disk) and flow rate 10 mL/min. Under these optimal conditions, the analysis was completed within ca. 4 min while the pressure drop was below 1 MPa. As the method was successfully applied to monitoring mono and di-PEGylated positional isoforms in the reaction mixture of random PEGylation of lysozyme, it is expected to be an efficient PAT tool.

  18. Evaluation of Electromyographic Frequency Domain Changes during a Three-Minute Maximal Effort Cycling Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Wang, David H. Fukuda, Jeffrey R. Stout, Edward H. Robinson, Amelia A. Miramonti, Maren S. Fragala, Jay R. Hoffman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the time course of EMG frequency changes during a three-minute maximal effort cycling test (3MT session and to examine which parameter between mean (MNF and median (MDF frequency is more suitable for evaluation of changes in neuromuscular function throughout a 3MT. Eighteen recreationally-active men volunteered to participate in this study. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC was measured using a dynamometer to determine maximal EMG frequency of the vastus lateralis (VL of the kicking leg during isometric knee extension. A maximal oxygen consumption test (VO2peak on a cycle ergometer was performed to establish the appropriate load profile for the 3MT which was completed after a period of at least 48 hours. MNF, MDF and power output (PO values were measured at 10-second epochs throughout the duration of the 3MT. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the changes in EMG frequency, relative to maximal values from the MVC, and change in PO during the testing procedure. MNF, Root Mean Square (RMS, and PO significantly decreased during the 3MT, while MDF did not change significantly. Statistically, EMG frequency and PO decreased at first and remained constant in response to the 3MT, which may be reflective of differing patterns of muscle fiber type fatigue throughout the testing session. Due to decreased variability, changes in neuromuscular function during this protocol may be better evaluated using MNF than MDF.

  19. Most human proteins made in both nucleus and cytoplasm turn over within minutes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Baboo

    Full Text Available In bacteria, protein synthesis can be coupled to transcription, but in eukaryotes it is believed to occur solely in the cytoplasm. Using pulses as short as 5 s, we find that three analogues--L-azidohomoalanine, puromycin (detected after attaching fluors using 'click' chemistry or immuno-labeling, and amino acids tagged with 'heavy' 15N and 13C (detected using secondary ion mass spectrometry--are incorporated into the nucleus and cytoplasm in a process sensitive to translational inhibitors. The nuclear incorporation represents a significant fraction of the total, and labels in both compartments have half-lives of less than a minute; results are consistent with most newly-made peptides being destroyed soon after they are made. As nascent RNA bearing a premature termination codon (detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization is also eliminated by a mechanism sensitive to a translational inhibitor, the nuclear turnover of peptides is probably a by-product of proof-reading the RNA for stop codons (a process known as nonsense-mediated decay. We speculate that the apparently-wasteful turnover of this previously-hidden ('dark-matter' world of peptide is involved in regulating protein production.

  20. Step-count guidelines referenced on 60-minutes of moderate/vigorous physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Eduardo Fontana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish step-count guidelines for sixth-grade students and assess the ability of step-counts to discriminate between students achieving and not achieving 60-minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily. 201 sixth-grade students completed the study. They wore a pedometer and an accelerometer at the waist level for one full day. ROC curves were used to establish step-count guidelines and determine the diagnostic accuracy of step-counts. Sixth grade students need 12,118 steps/day to reach adequate daily levels of physical activity. The AUC indicated good diagnostic accuracy of step-counts. Suggested step-count guidelines can be a useful tool for identifying children who need to increase their daily levels of physical activity. The step-count cutoff proposed in this study is adequate for discriminating between sixth grade students reaching and not reaching recommended levels of physical activity.

  1. Chylomicron metabolism in rats: kinetic modeling indicates that the particles remain at endothelial sites for minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultin, Magnus; Savonen, Roger; Chevreuil, Olivier; Olivecrona, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Chylomicrons labeled in vivo with (14)C-oleic acid (primarily in triglycerides, providing a tracer for lipolysis) and (3)H-retinol (primarily in ester form, providing a tracer for the core lipids) were injected into rats. Radioactivity in tissues was followed at a series of times up to 40 min and the data were analyzed by compartmental modeling. For heart-like tissues it was necessary to allow the chylomicrons to enter into a compartment where lipolysis is rapid and then transfer to a second compartment where lipolysis is slower. The particles remained in these compartments for minutes and when they returned to blood they had reduced affinity for binding in the tissue. In contrast, the data for liver could readily be fitted with a single compartment for native and lipolyzed chylomicrons in blood, and there was no need for a pathway back to blood. A composite model was built from the individual tissue models. This whole-body model could simultaneously fit all data for both fed and fasted rats and allowed estimation of fluxes and residence times in the four compartments; native and lipolyzed chylomicrons ("remnants") in blood, and particles in the tissue compartments where lipolysis is rapid and slow, respectively.

  2. Oxygen saturation/minute heart rate index: Simple lung function test for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ali; Dogruel, Dilek; Yilmaz, Ozlem

    2017-02-01

    The severity of airway obstruction can be accurately determined on spirometry in children with asthma. Other assessments may include peak expiratory flow and pulse oximetry. In the present study, we evaluated the validity and reliability of oxygen saturation/minute heart rate (SpO2 /MHR) index in the prediction of degree of severe airway obstruction in children with asthma. This was a retrospective study of children aged 7-17 followed for asthma at Mersin Women and Children's Hospital. The study compared SpO2 /MHR ratio with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) measured on spirometry, an important indicator of small airway obstruction. A total of 296 patients were included in the study, and classified either as having normal FEV1 (FEV1 > 80% of predicted, n = 178) or severely reduced FEV1 (FEV1 MHR index in predicting low FEV1 were calculated on receiver operating characteristics analysis. An SpO2 /MHR ratio cut-off MHR ratio appears to be a highly useful index to assess airway obstruction in older children with asthma. Thus, it can be used as a marker of airway obstruction severity when spirometry is not available. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Evaluation of exercise tolerance patients in cardiac rehabilitation D model based on 6 Minute Walk Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielawa Lukasz.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the results of 6-minute walk test depending on gender, age, left ventricular ejection fraction, the primary disease and BMI. Patients underwent assessment of Cardiac Rehabilitation Department in Szymbark in 2012 (80 people. Duration of rehabilitation for all patients was 21 days. The test was performed at the beginning and end of the cycle. Following the 3-week cardiac rehabilitation in the model D in a group of 80 patients with a mean age of 72 years achieved a statistically significant improvement in exercise capacity, expressed in the increase in test 6MWT distance by an average of 52 meters. In the study, men received final results statistically superior to women. The largest increase in the distance gained to patients after aortic valve prosthesis. People who are obese with a body mass index BMI over 30 have an average trip distance underperform both at baseline, final, and in the resulting increase of the distance than those with a BMI under 30. Prevention of obesity, one of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease should be the goal of training during cardiac rehabilitation patient education.

  4. Learn something new in 20 minutes: Bite Size sessions to support research and teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Andy; Beecroft, Claire; Freeman, Jenny

    2013-09-01

    The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at The University of Sheffield run an innovative series of informal 20-minute Bite Size sessions to help staff and students teach, research, collaborate and communicate more effectively. The sessions have two clear strands: one focused on teaching and the other on research. The remit is not to teach people how to use something in their work or study, but to let them know why they should use it and how they can employ it. By introducing participants to the possibilities and how they can apply ideas and technologies in their work and study in an enthusiastic manner, it is possible to send them away with at least the intention to explore and experiment. The evidence shows that this organic approach is working--staff and students are starting to use many of the tools that Bite Size has covered. Any kind of widespread change within organisations can be hard to deliver, but by bringing champions on your side and delivering sessions in a convenient, informal and timely manner; good practice and ideas can spread naturally.

  5. Biology of tiny animals: three new species of minute salamanders (Plethodontidae: Thorius) from Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Olea, Gabriela; Rovito, Sean M; García-París, Mario; Maisano, Jessica A; Wake, David B; Hanken, James

    2016-01-01

    We describe three new species of minute salamanders, genus Thorius, from the Sierra Madre del Sur of Oaxaca, Mexico. Until now only a single species, T. minutissimus, has been reported from this region, although molecular data have long shown extensive genetic differentiation among geographically disjunct populations. Adult Thorius pinicola sp. nov., T. longicaudus sp. nov., and T. tlaxiacus sp. nov. are larger than T. minutissimus and possess elliptical rather than oval nostrils; T. pinicola and T. longicaudus also have longer tails. All three new species occur west of the range of T. minutissimus, which has the easternmost distribution of any member of the genus. The new species are distinguished from each other and from other named Thorius in Oaxaca by a combination of adult body size, external morphology and osteology, and by protein characters (allozymes) and differences in DNA sequences. In addition, we redescribe T. minutissimus and a related species, T. narisovalis, to further clarify the taxonomic status of Oaxacan populations and to facilitate future studies of the remaining genetically differentiated Thorius that cannot be satisfactorily assigned to any named species. Populations of all five species considered here appear to have declined dramatically over the last one or two decades and live specimens are difficult to find in nature. Thorius may be the most endangered genus of amphibians in the world. All species may go extinct before the end of this century.

  6. 77 FR 23547 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Columbia River Crossing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Columbia River originates on the west slope of the Rocky Mountains in Canada and flows approximately 1,200... Part 217 Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Columbia River... Administration 50 CFR Part 217 RIN 0648-BB16 Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine...

  7. Chinese Military Reforms: A Pessimistic Take

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    JFQ 83, 4th Quarter 2016 Cliff 53 Chinese Military Reforms A Pessimistic Take By Roger Cliff O n the evening of May 21, 1941, the German battleship...behind, May 11, 2015 (U.S. Navy/Conor Minto) 54 Commentary / Chinese Military Reforms: A Pessimistic Take JFQ 83, 4th Quarter 2016 headquarters of...area of responsibility, February 10, 2015 (U.S. Navy/Matthew Dickinson) 56 Commentary / Chinese Military Reforms: A Pessimistic Take JFQ 83, 4th

  8. Taking a Bath In Tibetan Medicinal Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Lighting incense in a room and planting oneself into the environment scented by the smoke is one of the ways Tibetans keep fit. And they say they are taking a bath when doing so.According to the Tibetan medical code, the Tibetans had long produced many ways for "taking baths" to cleanse themselves, build up their physique and prolong life. Most popular ones include taking baths in

  9. Revised data taking schedule with ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Aduszkiewicz, A; Andrieu, B; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Argyriades, J; Asryan, A G; Baatar, B; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Boldizsar, L; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bubak, A; Bunyatov, S A; Choi, K U; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Cleymans, J; Derkach, D A; Diakonos, F; Dominik, W; Dumarchez, J; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Ferrero, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Hasegawa, T; Haungs, A; Igolkin, S; Ivanov, A S; Ivashkin, A; Kadija, K; Katrynska, N; Kielczewska, D; Kikola, D; Kisiel, J; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kolevatov, R S; Kondratiev, V P; Kowalski, S; Kurepin, A; Lacey, R; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Majka, Z; I Malakhov, A; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Maris, I; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mijakowski, P; Mitrovski, M; Montaruli, T; Mrówczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Naumenko, P A; Nikolic, V; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Peryt, W; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Przewlocki, P; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Renfordt, R; Röhrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovskii, A; Sakashita, K; Schuster, T; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Shibata, M; Sissakian, A N; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Sorin, A S; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Taranenko, A; Tsenov, R; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek, A; Zipper, W; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the revised data taking schedule of NA61 with ion beams. The revision takes into account limitations due to the new LHC schedule as well as final results concerning the physics performance with secondary ion beams. It is proposed to take data with primary Ar and Xe beams in 2012 and 2014, respectively, and to test and use for physics a secondary B beam from primary Pb beam fragmentation in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

  10. From Darwin to constructivism: the evolution of grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Helen; Griffiths, Debra; McKenna, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    To explore the evolution of grounded theory and equip the reader with a greater understanding of the diverse conceptual positioning that is evident in the methodology. Grounded theory was developed during the modernist phase of research to develop theories that are derived from data and explain human interaction. Its philosophical foundations derive from symbolic interactionism and were influenced by a range of scholars including Charles Darwin and George Mead. Rather than a rigid set of rules and procedures, grounded theory is a way of conceptualising data. Researchers demonstrate a range of perspectives and there is significant variation in the way the methodology is interpreted and executed. Some grounded theorists continue to align closely with the original post-positivist view, while others take a more constructivist approach. Although the diverse interpretations accommodate flexibility, they may also result in confusion. The grounded theory approach enables researchers to align to their own particular world view and use methods that are flexible and practical. With an appreciation of the diverse philosophical approaches to grounded theory, researchers are enabled to use and appraise the methodology more effectively.

  11. take off用法举隅

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗成勇

    2011-01-01

    1.take off有"起飞"之意,如:This plane will soon take off.这架飞机不久就要起飞。2.take off有"拿走"之意,如:Who has taken my book off the table?谁把我的书从桌上拿走了?3.take off有"脱掉(大衣、帽、鞋、裤子、裙子等)"之意,如:He took off his shoes and sat on the chair.他

  12. Ocean and climate sciences taking grand challenges and extraordinary opportunities: introduction to COAA 2007 special sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Quanan; QIAO Fangli; YANG Shi-Keng

    2008-01-01

    @@ In this universe, the earth is a unique breeding ground for living beings. It bares the evolutions, sustains the survival and enriches the development of human species. The studies of history have indicated that minute changes of the earth's environment mayhave caused great impacts on the vulnerable balanced ecological systems, endanger the living conditions for human beings and associated cultures.Thus, understanding the nature's governing rules of the earth, and clarifying its fundamental laws of sciences are everlasting research topics for the human pursuits.

  13. Unsteady propulsion in ground effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    Many animals in nature experience hydrodynamic benefits by swimming or flying near the ground, and this phenomenon is commonly called 'ground effect'. A flexible fin flapping near the ground was modelled, inspired by animals swimming. A transverse heaving motion was prescribed at the leading edge, and the posterior parts of the fin were passively fluttering by the fin-fluid interaction. The fin moved freely horizontally in a quiescent flow, by which the swimming speed was dynamically determined. The fin-fluid interaction was considered by using the penalty immersed boundary method. The kinematics of the flexible fin was altered by flapping near the ground, and the vortex structures generated in the wake were deflected upward, which was qualitatively analyzed by using the vortex dipole model. The swimming speed and the thrust force of the fin increased by the ground effects. The hydrodynamic changes from flapping near the ground affected the required power input in two opposite ways; the increased and decreased hydrodynamic pressures beneath the fin hindered the flapping motion, increasing the power input, while the transversely reduced flapping motion induced the decreased power input. The Froude propulsive efficiency was increased by swimming in the ground effects Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  14. Ground Control System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Ground Control System contributes to the safe construction and operation of the subsurface facility, including accesses and waste emplacement drifts, by maintaining the configuration and stability of the openings during construction, development, emplacement, and caretaker modes for the duration of preclosure repository life. The Ground Control System consists of ground support structures installed within the subsurface excavated openings, any reinforcement made to the rock surrounding the opening, and inverts if designed as an integral part of the system. The Ground Control System maintains stability for the range of geologic conditions expected at the repository and for all expected loading conditions, including in situ rock, construction, operation, thermal, and seismic loads. The system maintains the size and geometry of operating envelopes for all openings, including alcoves, accesses, and emplacement drifts. The system provides for the installation and operation of sensors and equipment for any required inspection and monitoring. In addition, the Ground Control System provides protection against rockfall for all subsurface personnel, equipment, and the engineered barrier system, including the waste package during the preclosure period. The Ground Control System uses materials that are sufficiently maintainable and that retain the necessary engineering properties for the anticipated conditions of the preclosure service life. These materials are also compatible with postclosure waste isolation performance requirements of the repository. The Ground Control System interfaces with the Subsurface Facility System for operating envelopes, drift orientation, and excavated opening dimensions, Emplacement Drift System for material compatibility, Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for ground control instrument readings, Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System to support waste emplacement operations, and the Subsurface Excavation System

  15. Ground-based Transit Observation of the Habitable-zone Super-Earth K2-3d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Akihiko; Livingston, John; Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Ryu, Tsuguru; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2016-12-01

    We report the first ground-based transit observation of K2-3d, a 1.5 R ⊕ planet supposedly within the habitable zone around a bright M-dwarf host star, using the Okayama 188 cm telescope and the multi(grz)-band imager MuSCAT. Although the depth of the transit (0.7 mmag) is smaller than the photometric precisions (1.2, 0.9, and 1.2 mmag per 60 s for the g, r, and z bands, respectively), we marginally but consistently identify the transit signal in all three bands, by taking advantage of the transit parameters from K2, and by introducing a novel technique that leverages multi-band information to reduce the systematics caused by second-order extinction. We also revisit previously analyzed Spitzer transit observations of K2-3d to investigate the possibility of systematic offsets in transit timing, and find that all the timing data can be explained well by a linear ephemeris. We revise the orbital period of K2-3d to be 44.55612 ± 0.00021 days, which corrects the predicted transit times for 2019, i.e., the era of the James Webb Space Telescope, by ∼80 minutes. Our observation demonstrates that (1) even ground-based, 2 m class telescopes can play an important role in refining the transit ephemeris of small-sized, long-period planets, and (2) a multi-band imager is useful to reduce the systematics of atmospheric origin, in particular for bluer bands and for observations conducted at low-altitude observatories.

  16. Acute effects of deep breathing for a short duration (2-10 minutes) on pulmonary functions in healthy young volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, G; Prabhu, Krishnamoorthi; Baliga, Rekha; Pai, M Kirtana; Manjunatha, S

    2011-01-01

    Breathing is the most vital function for maintenance of life. Slow and deep breathing is an integral part of Pranayama and it reduces dead space ventilation and renews air throughout the lungs. The reported beneficial effects of deep breathing as a part of either long term or short term practice of Pranayama are well documented. However our knowledge about the effects of a few minutes' of deep breathing on human ventilatory parameters is poor. In the present study, we examined the relationship between exposure to short duration of deep breathing and performance on pulmonary function tests before and after the deep breathing. The study was conducted in a homogenous group of 12 volunteers containing 4 females and 8 males who were well trained in pulmonary function testing (PFT) before the start of the study. The volunteers performed deep breathing (DB) exercise for 2, 5 and 10 minutes at the rate of 6 breaths per minute under guidance, and the duration of DB exercise for that day was randomly selected for each group. PFT was done before and after the DB exercise. There was a significant (P vital capacity (VC) after 2 and 5 minutes' DB exercise and a consistent improvement in tidal volume (TV) and minute ventilation (MV) after the DB exercise in all the three groups, though it wasn't statistically significant. There was a significant (P vital capacity (FVC) after 2 minutes' of DB exercise and a consistent increase in all the three groups in forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC) and peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR), though this increase was not statistically significant. This shows that deep breathing exercise, even for a few minutes' duration is beneficial for the lung functions.

  17. Evidence for the different physiological significance of the 6- and 2-minute walk tests in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motl Robert W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers have recently advocated for the 2-minute walk (2MW as an alternative for the 6-minute walk (6MW to assess long distance ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS. This recommendation has not been based on physiological considerations such as the rate of oxygen consumption (V·O2 over the 6MW range. Objective This study examined the pattern of change in V·O2 over the range of the 6MW in a large sample of persons with MS who varied as a function of disability status. Method Ninety-five persons with clinically-definite MS underwent a neurological examination for generating an Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score, and then completion of the 6MW protocol while wearing a portable metabolic unit and an accelerometer. Results There was a time main effect on V·O2 during the 6MW (p = .0001 such that V·O2 increased significantly every 30 seconds over the first 3 minutes of the 6MW, and then remained stable over the second 3 minutes of the 6MW. This occurred despite no change in cadence across the 6MW (p = .84. Conclusions The pattern of change in V·O2 indicates that there are different metabolic systems providing energy for ambulation during the 6MW in MS subjects and steady state aerobic metabolism is reached during the last 3 minutes of the 6MW. By extension, the first 3 minutes would represent a test of mixed aerobic and anaerobic work, whereas the second 3 minutes would represent a test of aerobic work during walking.

  18. Design and application of the pre-processing system on Shenzhen minute precipitation data%深圳分钟降水数据预处理系统设计与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许沛华; 陈正洪; 李磊; 郑慧

    2012-01-01

    The running of"Shenzhen partition storm intensity formula projection software"needs to get more types of maximum precipitation samples in the direfrent duration year by year from all the automatic weather stations in Shenzhen.As calculated volume and timeliness demanding,the pre-processing system on Shenzhen minute precipitation data was designed and developed,which has a "seamless connection" with the software.In this paper the system is introduced in detail about partition principle,the quality control on minute rainfall data,different duration sliding precipitation calculation,automatic determination of the different precipitation processes,sample selection,as well as function,process and design technique.Meanwhile,taking daily minute precipitation data at Shenzhen local station from 1961 to 2010 for example,the software was employed to calculate 8 maximum rainfall sequences including 9 durations for 5 minutes,10 minutes,15 minutes,20 minutes,30 minutes,45 minutes,60 minutes,90 minutes,120 minutes for every year.The results show that the system can meet the demands of Shenzhen partition storm intensity formula projections software.%"深圳分区暴雨强度公式推算软件"运行,需要获取其境内所有自动气象站逐年不同历时多个样本最大降水量资料,基于其计算量大、时效性要求高,设计开发了与之配套的"深圳分钟降水数据预处理系统",并实现与该软件的"无缝衔接"。从分区原则确定、分钟资料质量控制、不同历时滑动雨量(强)计算、不同降水过程自动判断、样本挑选,以及功能、流程、设计技术等方面,对该系统作详细介绍。同时,以深圳本站1961—2010年共50年逐日分钟降水资料为例,采用该软件计算出5、10、15、20、30、45、60、90、120 min共9个历时每年8个最大降水量序列,结果表明,该系统能满足"深圳分区暴雨强度公式推算软件"的要求。

  19. Ethics takes time, but not that long

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Leif A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time and communication are important aspects of the medical consultation. Physician behavior in real-life pediatric consultations in relation to ethical practice, such as informed consent (provision of information, understanding, respect for integrity and patient autonomy (decision-making, has not been subjected to thorough empirical investigation. Such investigations are important tools in developing sound ethical praxis. Methods 21 consultations for inguinal hernia were video recorded and observers independently assessed global impressions of provision of information, understanding, respect for integrity, and participation in decision making. The consultations were analyzed for the occurrence of specific physician verbal and nonverbal behaviors and length of time in minutes. Results All of the consultations took less than 20 minutes, the majority consisting of 10 minutes or less. Despite this narrow time frame, we found strong and consistent association between increasing time and higher ratings on all components of ethical practice: information, (β = .43, understanding (β = .52, respect for integrity (β = .60, and decision making (β = .43. Positive nonverbal behaviors by physicians during the consultation were associated particularly with respect for integrity (β =.36. Positive behaviors by physicians during the physical examination were related to respect for children's integrity. Conclusion Time was of essence for the ethical encounter. Further, verbal and nonverbal positive behaviors by the physicians also contributed to higher ratings of ethical aspects. These results can help to improve quality of ethical practice in pediatric settings and are of relevance for teaching and policy makers.

  20. Minute Concentration Measurements of Simple Hydrocarbon Species Using Supercontinuum Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jihyung; Traina, Nicholas; Halloran, Michael; Lee, Tonghun

    2016-06-01

    Minute concentration measurements of simple hydrocarbon gases are demonstrated using near-infrared supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy. Absorption-based gas sensors, particularly when combined with optical fiber components, can significantly enhance diagnostic capabilities to unprecedented levels. However, these diagnostic techniques are subject to limitations under certain gas sensing applications where interference and harsh conditions dominate. Supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy is a novel laser-based diagnostic technique that can exceed the above-mentioned limitations and provide accurate and quantitative concentration measurement of simple hydrocarbon species while maintaining compatibility with telecommunications-grade optical fiber components. Supercontinuum radiation generated using a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber is used to probe rovibrational absorption bands of four hydrocarbon species using full-spectral absorption diagnostics. Absorption spectra of methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), and ethylene (C2H4) were measured in the near-infrared spectrum at various pressures and concentrations to determine the accuracy and feasibility of the diagnostic strategy. Absorption spectra of propane (C3H8) were subsequently probed between 1650 nm and 1700 nm, to demonstrate the applicability of the strategy. Measurements agreed very well with simulated spectra generated using the HITRAN database as well as with previous experimental results. Absorption spectra of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 were then analyzed to determine their respective measurement accuracy and detection limit. Concentration measurements integrated from experimental results were in very good agreement with independent concentration measurements. Calculated detection limits of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure are 0.1%, 0.09%, and 0.17%, respectively.

  1. The absence of sub-minute periodicity in classical T Tauri stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, H. M.; Lewandowska, N.; Hundertmark, M. P. G.; Steinle, H.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Buckley, D.; Crawford, S.; O'Donoghue, D.; Vaisanen, P.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) are young, late-type objects, that still accrete matter from a circumstellar disk. Analytical treatments and numerical simulations predict instabilities of the accretion shock on the stellar surface. Aims: We search for variability on timescales below a few minutes in the CTTS TW Hya and AA Tau. Methods: TW Hya was observed with SALTICAM on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) in narrow-band filters around the Balmer jump. The observations were performed in slit mode, which provides a time resolution of about 0.1 s. For AA Tau we obtained observations with OPTIMA, a single photon-counting device with even better time resolution. Results: Small-scale variability typically lasts a few seconds, however, no significant periodicity is detected. We place a 99% confidence upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the lightcurves. The relative amplitude is below 0.001 for TW Hya in the frequency range 0.02-3 Hz in the 340 nm filter and 0.1-3 Hz in the 380 nm filter. The corresponding value for AA Tau is an amplitude of 0.005 for 0.02-50 Hz. Conclusions: The relevant timescales indicate that shock instabilites should not be seen directly in our optical and UV observations, but the predicted oscialltions would induce observable variations in the reddening. We discuss how the magnetic field could stabilise the accretion shock. Based on observations obtained at the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and Skinakas observatory, Greece. unknown author type, collab unknown author type, collab unknown author type, collab unknown author type, collab unknown author type, collab unknown author type, collab

  2. Are the 10 meter and 6 minute walk tests redundant in patients with spinal cord injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail F Forrest

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship and redundancy between gait speeds measured by the 10 Meter Walk Test (10MWT and 6 Minute Walk Test (6MWT after motor incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI. To identify gait speed thresholds supporting functional ambulation as measured with the Spinal Cord Injury Functional Ambulation Inventory (SCI-FAI. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort. SETTING: Seven outpatient rehabilitation centers from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation NeuroRecovery Network (NRN. PARTICIPANTS: 249 NRN patients with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS level C (n = 20, D (n = 179 and (n = 50 iSCI not AIS evaluated, from February 2008 through April 2011. INTERVENTIONS: Locomotor training using body weight support and walking on a treadmill, overground and home/community practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S: 10MWT and 6MWT collected at enrollment, approximately every 20 sessions, and upon discharge. RESULTS: The 10MWT and 6MWT speeds were highly correlated and the 10MWT speeds were generally faster. However, the predicted 6MWT gait speed from the 10MWT, revealed increasing error with increased gait speed. Regression lines remained significantly different from lines of agreement, when the group was divided into fast (≥0.44 m/s and slow walkers (<0.44 m/s. Significant differences between 6MWT and 10MWT gait speeds were observed across SCI-FAI walking mobility categories (Wilcoxon sign rank test p<.001, and mean speed thresholds for limited community ambulation differed for each measure. The smallest real difference for the 6MWT and 10MWT, as well as the minimally clinically important difference (MCID values, were also distinct for the two tests. CONCLUSIONS: While the speeds were correlated between the 6MWT and 10MWT, redundancy in the tests using predictive modeling was not observed. Different speed thresholds and separate MCIDs were defined for community ambulation for each test.

  3. The Last Minutes of Oxygen Shell Burning in a Massive Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bernhard; Viallet, Maxime; Heger, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We present the first 4π-three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the last minutes of oxygen shell burning in an 18 M ⊙ supernova progenitor up to the onset of core collapse. A moving inner boundary is used to accurately model the contraction of the silicon and iron core according to a one-dimensional stellar evolution model with a self-consistent treatment of core deleptonization and nuclear quasi-equilibrium. The simulation covers the full solid angle to allow the emergence of large-scale convective modes. Due to core contraction and the concomitant acceleration of nuclear burning, the convective Mach number increases to ˜0.1 at collapse, and an ℓ = 2 mode emerges shortly before the end of the simulation. Aside from a growth of the oxygen shell from 0.51 M ⊙ to 0.56 M ⊙ due to entrainment from the carbon shell, the convective flow is reasonably well described by mixing-length theory, and the dominant scales are compatible with estimates from linear stability analysis. We deduce that artificial changes in the physics, such as accelerated core contraction, can have precarious consequences for the state of convection at collapse. We argue that scaling laws for the convective velocities and eddy sizes furnish good estimates for the state of shell convection at collapse and develop a simple analytic theory for the impact of convective seed perturbations on shock revival in the ensuing supernova. We predict a reduction of the critical luminosity for explosion by 12%-24% due to seed asphericities for our 3D progenitor model relative to the case without large seed perturbations.

  4. Overweight-mortality paradox and impact of six-minute walk distance in lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongkiat Chaikriangkrai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight-mortality paradox and impact of six-minute walk distance (SMWD in lung transplantation Background: The objective of this study was to examine combined prognostic influence of body mass index (BMI and SMWD on mortality in lung transplant recipients. Methods: Consecutive isolated lung transplant recipients were identified. Preoperative BMI and SMWD data were collected. The cohort was followed for all-cause mortality. Results: The study included 324 lung transplant recipients with mean age of 57 ± 13 years and 58% were male (27% obstructive, 3% vascular, 6% cystic fibrosis, and 64% with restrictive lung diseases. In the total cohort; 37% had normal BMI, 10% were underweight, 33% were overweight, and 20% were obese. The median SMWD was 700 feet. The lower SMWDgroup was defined as the patients who had SMWD <237 feet as determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC. Based on this definition, 66 patients (20% had lower SMWD. There were 71 deaths during a median follow-up of 2.3 years. In multivariate analysis, both BMI and SMWD were independently associated with death. Being overweight was associated with reduced mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR 0.50, P = 0.042 compared to the normal BMI group, and this was primarily driven by early mortality posttransplant. This paradoxical overweight-mortality relationship remained significant in the lower SMWD group (HR 0.075, P = 0.018, but not in the higher SMWD group (P = 0.552. Conclusion: In lung transplant recipients under lung allocation score (LAS era, pretransplant BMI and SMWD were independent predictors for mortality after the transplant. The lowest mortality risk was noted in a group of transplant recipients identified as overweight; whereas, being underweight or obese was associated with increased mortality.

  5. Assessment of Cardiovascular Fitness of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Using Six Minute Walk Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taofeek Oluwole Awotidebe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB tends to have limited exercise tolerance and a significant disability affecting their activities of daily living. The importance of exercise in the management of these patients has not been well investigated. This study was designed to assess the cardiovascular fitness of patients with pulmonary TB using the six-minute walk test (6-MWT. METHOD: Sixty five consented patients with Pulmonary TB were consecutively recruited into the study. The patients performed 6-MWT over a 30 meter course on a level walkway at a speed as fast as they could. Data were obtained on participants’ physical characteristics, pre and post exercise blood pressure and heart rate, and maximum oxygen consumption. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics of mean and standard deviation and paired t-test. RESULTS: The post walk test cardiovascular parameters were significantly higher than the resting cardiovascular parameters. The mean VO2 max and MET of the participants were 11.7±0.97 (ml O2kg -1min-1 and 3.35±0.28 (mL/Kg respectively. The means 6-MWT distance for male and female participants were 502.0±43.0m 481.7±68.3m respectively. CONCLUSION: The result implies that the 6-MWT is capable of evoking a significant cardiovascular change among patients with pulmonary TB. The 6-MWT may be useful in the assessment of functional capacity of patients with pulmonary TB. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(2.000: 99-106

  6. [Memory, fluency, and orientation: a five-minute screening test for cognitive decline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Derio, C; Guerrero Bonnet, S; Troncoso Ponce, M; Araneda Yañez, A; Slachevsky Chonchol, A; Behrens Pellegrino, M I

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment (CI) will double in the next 20 years, making early detection a key priority. Validation of a 5-minute CI screening test. Adults aged 60 and older were recruited from memory clinics and the community at large in the Santiago, Chile metropolitan area. Based on clinical examination they were categorised as No CI (NCI), Mild CI (MCI) and dementia sufferers (DS). We measured the validity of a new test, MEFO, evaluating memory (5 points), phonetic verbal fluency (2 points) and orientation (6 points) by comparing its results with those from the MMSE. We evaluated 214 subjects, comprising 49 with dementia, 47 with MCI, and 118 with no CI. The MEFO differentiated between all 3 groups whereas the MMSE did not discriminate between the MCI and NCI groups. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for the MEFO distinguishing NCI subjects from dementia sufferers was 0.97; for NCI vs CI (dementia+MCI), 0.89; and for NCI vs MCI, 0.80. On the MMSE these values were 0.95, 0.84, and 0.73, respectively. A cut-off score of 6/7 on the MEFO identified dementia sufferers with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 96%. A cut-off score of 8/9 distinguished CI from NCI subjects with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 75%. The MEFO is a valid and reliable test for discriminating between dementia and CI sufferers and subjects with no CI. Its validity is similar to that the MMSE under these conditions, but it is more effective for identifying subjects with MCI and its administration time is shorter. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Renal tissue thawed for 30 minutes is still suitable for gene expression analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ma

    Full Text Available Some biosamples obtained from biobanks may go through thawing before processing. We aim to evaluate the effects of thawing at room temperature for different time periods on gene expression analysis. A time course study with four time points was conducted to investigate the expression profiling on 10 thawed normal mice renal tissue samples through Affymetrix GeneChip mouse gene 2.0 st array. Microarray results were validated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR on 6 candidate reference genes and 11 target genes. Additionally, we used geNorm plus and NormFinder to identify the most stably expressed reference genes over time. The results showed RNA degraded more after longer incubation at room temperature. However, microarray results showed only 240 genes (0.91% altered significantly in response to thawing at room temperature. The signal of majority altered probe sets decreased with thawing time, and the crossing point (Cp values of all candidate reference genes correlated positively with the thawing time (p<0.05. The combination of B2M, ACTB and PPIA was identified as the best choice for qPCR normalization. We found most target genes were stable by using this normalization method. However, serious gene quantification errors were resulted from improper reference genes. In conclusion, thirty minutes of thawing at room temperature has a limited impact on microarray and qPCR analysis, gene expression variations due to RNA degradation in early period after thawing can be largely reduced by proper normalization.

  8. Six-Minute Walk Test in Evaluation of Children with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Malgorzata; Migdal, Anna; Jagiellowicz-Kowalska, Dorota; Mazurkiewicz, Katarzyna; Sadel-Wieczorek, Anna; Brzezinska-Rajszys, Grazyna

    2017-04-01

    Six-minute walk test (6MWT) is a submaximal exercise test applied for evaluation of adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It was widely used as an endpoint in the clinical trials. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of 6MWT in management of children with PAH and to establish correlations with other clinical features. 164 6MWT were performed in 15 children between 5 and 18 years with PAH confirmed by right heart catheterization (102 in patients with shunt, 62 without shunt). Distance in 6MWT (6MWD)-% of predicted for age and gender, desaturation at the maximum effort, peak heart rate (HR)-% of maximal HR, were compared to the level of NTproBNP, WHO-FC, echocardiography parameters, and events of PAH treatment intensification. 6MWD had low negative correlation with peak HR (τ -0.1 p = 0,03), negative correlation with NTproBNP (τ -0.17 p = 0.002), and no dependence on echocardiography parameters. The presence of shunt was associated with lower 6MWD, lower blood saturation at rest, and higher desaturation after effort. Patients in III/IV WHO-FC achieved higher rest HR and maximal HR in comparison to patients in I/II WHO-FC (63.1 vs. 55.2% p intensification, increase of distance was observed. The results of 6MWT were consistent with clinical status (WHO-FC, NTproBNP) but not with echocardiography parameters. 6MWT may be the source of additional information in management of children with PAH.

  9. Take Home Tests: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Larry J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Data gathered on three kinds of tests (closed-book, open-book, and take-home) covered possible differential achievement on knowledge and cognitive-skill items, student attitudes, and cheating. On take-home tests, scores on knowledge items were found to higher, anxiety level was lower, and cheating was not a problem. (MSE)

  10. Paediatric environmental health history taking: Why bother?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. ten Tusscher; M.M. Leijs; J.G. Koppe

    2006-01-01

    Environmental health history taking is often not part of standard medical history taking for clinical physicians. During recent years attention has been placed on home environments and asthma and allergies, high caloric intake and obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, yet environmental health histor

  11. Supervisory powers and bank risk taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shehzad, Choudry Tanveer; De Haan, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    We examine the effect of different types of bank supervisory powers in place before the crisis on bank risk-taking during the crisis. We employ data of more than 8000 banks from high-income OECD countries for the 2007-2011 period and impaired loans to gross loans ratio as proxy for bank risk-taking.

  12. Supervisory powers and bank risk taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shehzad, Choudry Tanveer; De Haan, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    We examine the effect of different types of bank supervisory powers in place before the crisis on bank risk-taking during the crisis. We employ data of more than 8000 banks from high-income OECD countries for the 2007-2011 period and impaired loans to gross loans ratio as proxy for bank risk-taking.

  13. The Interim : until you achieve an operationally responsive ground system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, Bob; Clarke, Kelly; Lei, Jordan; Miyamoto, Charles; Owen-Mankovich, Kyran

    2008-01-01

    Everyone wants to achieve a 'Responsive' Ground Data System (GDS), but that takes time. What do you do in the interim? Our group, called the Integration, Test and Deployment Team (ITD), is a group of responsive engineers whose primary focus is to assist JPL projects to successfully adapt, test, integrate and deploy their ground data system. The team configures and adapts the GDS for a project, so that analysts, engineers and scientist do not need to be experts in the GDS to operate it. The team has developed a human interface to accommodate all types of users. It provides Graphical User Interfaces (GUI's) for those that want GUI's, command line interfaces for those that want control, and selection button interfaces for other users. The cornerstone of a responsive Ground Data System is responsive people. Without individuals who can be aware of a project's changing needs and requirements, how can the GDS become responsive

  14. Test-Retest Reliability of Physiological and Performance Responses to 120 Minutes of Simulated Soccer Match Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Liam D; Hunter, Robert; Parker, Paul; Goodall, Stuart; Thomas, Kevin; Howatson, Glyn; West, Daniel J; Stevenson, Emma; Russell, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Harper, LD, Hunter, R, Parker, P, Goodall, S, Thomas, K, Howatson, G, West, DJ, Stevenson, E, and Russell, M. Test-retest reliability of physiological and performance responses to 120 minutes of simulated soccer match play. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3178-3186, 2016-This study investigated the test-retest reliability of physiological and performance responses to 120 minutes (90 minutes plus 30 minutes extra-time [ET]) of the soccer match simulation (SMS). Ten university-standard soccer players completed the SMS on 2 occasions under standardized conditions. Capillary and venous blood was taken pre-exercise, at half-time, and at 90 and 120 minutes, with further capillary samples taken every 15 minutes throughout the exercise. Core temperature (Tcore), physical (20- and 15-m sprint speeds and countermovement jump height), and technical (soccer dribbling) performance was also assessed during each trial. All variables except blood lactate demonstrated no systematic bias between trials (p > 0.05). During the last 15 minutes of ET, test-rest reliability (coefficient of variation %, Pearson's r, respectively) was moderate to strong for 20-m sprint speed (3.5%, 0.71), countermovement jump height (4.9%, 0.90), dribble speed (2.8%, 0.90), and blood glucose (7.1%, 0.93), and very strong for Tcore (1.2%, 0.99). Moderate reliability was demonstrated for 15-m sprint speed (4.6%, 0.36), dribble precision (11.5%, 0.30), plasma insulin (10.3%, 0.96), creatine kinase ([CK] 28.1%, 0.38), interleukin-6 (24%, 0.99), nonesterified fatty acids ([NEFA] 13.2%, 0.73), glycerol (12.5%, 0.86), and blood lactate (18.6%, 0.79). In the last 15 minutes of ET, concentrations of blood glucose and lactate and sprint and jump performances were reduced, whereas Tcore, NEFA, glycerol, and CK concentrations were elevated (p ≤ 0.05). The SMS is a reliable protocol for measuring responses across the full 120 minutes of soccer-specific exercise. Deleterious effects on performance and physiological

  15. Ground Beef and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... torn. If possible, place the package in a plastic bag so leaking juices won't drip on other ... duty plastic wrap, aluminum foil, freezer paper, or plastic bags made for freezing. Ground beef is safe indefinitely ...

  16. Ground Enterprise Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft ground systems are on the cusp of achieving "plug-and-play" capability, i.e., they are approaching the state in which the various components can be...

  17. On Grounding of Fast Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1997-01-01

    numerical examples also indicate that, even with impact speeds of 40 knots against a 1:10 sloping bottom, the global strength of the hull girder is not exceeded by the grounding induced loads.For the local deformation of high-speed ship hulls at the point of contact with the ground, the paper presents...... experimental results from crushing tests of aluminium hull girder components with realistic full-scale scantlings. A comparison with existing simplified calculation procedures for ductile metallic structures show that these procedures cannot be used to predict the crushing behaviour of the fore body of high......The paper deals with analysis of grounding of high-speed crafts. It is the purpose to present a comprehensive mathematical model for calculation of the overall dynamic ship response during grounding. This procedure is applied to derive the motions, the time varying sectional forces and the local...

  18. Ground water and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Döll, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F.P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  19. Ground water and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Döll, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  20. Ground Water and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Doell, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J. -F; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2013-01-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  1. Microphysical Properties of Warm Clouds During The Aircraft Take-Off and Landing Over Bucharest, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Sabina; Nicolae Vajaiac, Sorin; Boscornea, Andreea

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on airborne measurements of microphysical parameters into warm clouds when the aircraft penetrates the cloud, both during take-off and landing. The experiment was conducted during the aircraft flight between Bucharest and Craiova, in the southern part of Romania. The duration of the experimental flight was 2 hours and 35 minutes in October 7th, 2014, but the present study is dealing solely with the analysis of cloud microphysical properties at the beginning of the experiment (during the aircraft take-off) and at the end, when it got finalized by the aircraft landing procedure. The processing and interpretation of the measurements showed the differences between microphysical parameters, emphasizing that the type of cloud over Bucharest changed, as it was expected. In addition, the results showed that it is important to take into account both the synoptic context and the cloud perturbation due to the velocity of the aircraft, in such cases.

  2. The 5-minute Apgar score: survival and short-term outcomes in extremely low-birth-weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, Ann Gibbons; Kirkby, Sharon; Dysart, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The Apgar score is a standardized tool for evaluating newborns in the delivery room. Despite its long history and widespread use, debate remains over its reliability of predicting neonatal outcomes, especially in extremely low-birth-weight premature infants. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between the 5-minute Apgar score of extremely low-birth-weight infants, as it relates to survival and morbidities associated with prematurity and length of hospital stay. A retrospective query of the Alere neonatal database from 2001 to 2011 examined all infants less than 32 weeks' gestation and less than 1000-g birth weight. The 5-minute Apgar score was divided into 2 groups, score of 4 or greater or less than 4. The study compared results of the 5-minute Apgar score and associated morbidities in surviving infants. Statistical analyses included chi-square, Fisher exact test, t test, and multivariate regression. The sample consisted of 3898 infants with an 86.4% (n = 3366) survival rate. Controlling for gestational age and birth weight, surviving infants with a 5-minute Apgar score of less than 4 were more likely to demonstrate nonintact survival. Infants with a low 5-minute Apgar score have greater risk for mortality and morbidities associated with prematurity.

  3. Evaluation of multimodal ground cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Lecuyer, Anatole; Serafin, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents an array of results on the perception of ground surfaces via multiple sensory modalities,with special attention to non visual perceptual cues, notably those arising from audition and haptics, as well as interactions between them. It also reviews approaches to combining synth...... synthetic multimodal cues, from vision, haptics, and audition, in order to realize virtual experiences of walking on simulated ground surfaces or other features....

  4. Ground Wood Fiber Length Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Lauri Ilmari Salminen; Sari Liukkonen; Alava, Mikko J.

    2014-01-01

    This study considers ground wood fiber length distributions arising from pilot grindings. The empirical fiber length distributions appear to be independent of wood fiber length as well as feeding velocity. In terms of mathematics the fiber fragment distributions of ground wood pulp combine an exponential distribution for high-length fragments and a power-law distribution for smaller lengths. This implies that the fiber length distribution is influenced by the stone surface. A fragmentation-ba...

  5. Availability and quality of ground water, southern Ute Indian Reservation, southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Robert E.; Hutchinson, E. Carter; Hillier, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    Population growth and the potential development of subsurface mineral resources have increased the need for information on the availability and quality of ground water on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Southern Ute Tribal Council, the Four Corners Regional Planning Commission, and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, conducted a study during 1974-76 to assess the ground-water resources of the reservation. Water occurs in aquifers in the Dakota Sandstone, Mancos Shale, Mesaverde Group, Lewis Shale, Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, Fruitland Formation, Kirtland Shale, Animas and San Jose Formations, and terrace and flood-plain deposits. Well yields from sandstone and shale aquifers are small, generally in the range from 1 to 10 gallons per minute with maximum reported yields of 75 gallons per minute. Well yields from terrace deposits generally range from 5 to 10 gallons per minute with maximum yields of 50 gallons per minute. Well yields from flood-plain deposits are as much as 25 gallons per minute but average 10 gallons per minute. Water quality in aquifers depends in part on rock type. Water from sandstone, terrace, and flood-plain aquifers is predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type, whereas water from shale aquifers is predominantly a sodium bicarbonate type. Water from rocks containing interbeds of coal or carbonaceous shales may be either a calcium or sodium sulfate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water ranged from 115 to 7,130 milligrams per liter. Water from bedrock aquifers is the most mineralized, while water from terrace and flood-plain aquifers is the least mineralized. In many water samples collected from bedrock, terrace, and flood-plain aquifers, the concentrations of arsenic, chloride, dissolved solids, fluoride, iron, manganese, nitrate, selenium, and sulfate exceeded U.S. Public Health Service (1962) recommended limits for drinking water. Selenium in the ground water in excess of U

  6. Students' Resources for Stance-Taking in the Literature Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabel, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Making aspects of privileged ways of participating visible is central to support students’ literacy development within different educational disciplines (Hasan, 1996, 2011). In my doctoral work I focus on the discipline of literature in lower secondary school in the school subject of Danish......, exploring students’ resources for stance-taking in their written literary response texts. In my presentation on Friday I will outline the theoretical grounding of the study and the preliminary findings. Drawing on the appraisal system within SFL (Hood, 2011; Martin & White, 2005) and the dimension...... of specialization within LCT (Maton, 2007, 2010), my analyses show a variation in students’ interpersonal meaning-making choices, linking their literary response texts within the same task to either primarily a knower or a knowledge code. This variation suggests a tension in the literature education at this time...

  7. Large Payload Ground Transportation and Test Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Many spacecraft concepts under consideration by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Evolvable Mars Campaign take advantage of a Space Launch System payload shroud that may be 8 to 10 meters in diameter. Large payloads can theoretically save cost by reducing the number of launches needed--but only if it is possible to build, test, and transport a large payload to the launch site in the first place. Analysis performed previously for the Altair project identified several transportation and test issues with an 8.973 meters diameter payload. Although the entire Constellation Program—including Altair—has since been canceled, these issues serve as important lessons learned for spacecraft designers and program managers considering large payloads for future programs. A transportation feasibility study found that, even broken up into an Ascent and Descent Module, the Altair spacecraft would not fit inside available aircraft. Ground transportation of such large payloads over extended distances is not generally permitted, so overland transportation alone would not be an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be possible, but water transportation could take as long as 67 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA’s Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary, which could increase cost, schedule, and technical risk. Once at the launch site, there are no facilities currently capable of accommodating the combination of large payload size and hazardous processing such as hypergolic fuels

  8. Patient comfort following thirty minutes of lens wear: piggy-back versus conventional rigid-lens wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D.H. Gillan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Discomfort when wearing contact lenses, especially rigid contact lenses, is a common complaint amongst neophyte as well as experienced contact lens wearers. Wearing a piggy-back system of contact lenses has been shown to improve comfort and wearing time, especially in keratoconic subjects. Twenty two normal subjects wore a rigid lens or a piggy-back system of lenses for thirty minutes and after a thirty minute break swopped the mode of lens wear and wore the second modality for a thirty minute period. This study suggests that a piggy-back lens system provides improved comfort compared to wearing a rigid lens on its own. The order of lens wear might, however, influence the perceived comfort.

  9. Two minutes of the Great Council of the Commune of Verona in the Scaligeri age (June and September 1367

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Varanini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We publish here the minutes of two meetings of the Great Council of the city of Verona, held in June and September 1367. Each minute includes a list of the names of the members of the Council (867 in the first minute and 742 in the second. The first part of the essay provides the required archival and diplomatistic information. These same documents are studied from the point of view of the social and political history in the essay by the same author The Great Council of the town of Verona in 1367, in Venice and the Veneto during the Renaissance: the Legacy of Benjamin Kohl, edited by M. Knapton, J.E. Law and A. Smith (.

  10. Ground water for public water supply at Windigo, Isle Royale National Park, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannemann, N.G.; Twenter, F.R.

    1982-01-01

    Three test holes drilled at Windigo in Isle Royale National Park in 1981 indicate that the ophitic basaltic lava flows underlying the area contain little water and cannot be considered a source for public water supply. The holes were 135, 175, and 71 feet deep. One hole yielded about 1 gallon of water perminute; the other two yielded less. Glacial deposits seem to offer the best opportunity for developing a ground-water supply of 5 to 10 gallons per minute.

  11. IN MY OPINION: Taking part matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Christine

    2000-09-01

    demanding syllabuses for pre-university exams. In years gone by, some of our most gifted students happened to be taught by some of our most able teachers, and together they tackled the old Scholarship-level papers. The old O-level work gave students a solid grounding in classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, with lots of sums on which to anchor the concepts. Those who enjoyed this aspect of the science could launch into A-level studies of Maths, Physics, Chemistry and/or Further Maths, and relish the challenges hidden in the syllabuses. Advanced level aims have changed. Mathematical elements have been played down; traditional proofs and applications may be referred to but are no longer required learning for the candidates. The modular system allows less repetitive revision and consolidation of ideas so that students are not required to immerse themselves in the subject in the same way as a generation ago. Does this matter? The `new way' hopes to attract some students into Physics and Engineering who would have been intimidated by the rigour and commitment required to do well in the old system. The single-minded student has a wealth of information available to further his or her studies and will not be limited by the dictates of any syllabus. However, without the need to meet exam requirements, many of our most able students have been deprived of the pleasure of advancing their knowledge so far at school, and must wait for a degree course to take up the story. (We should worry if many of these potential scientists get deflected from Physics.) The change in A-level targets inevitably means that the UK is slipping down the IPhO medal table, but in the Olympic tradition it is the taking part that matters. The 31st Olympiad was won by the People's Republic of China, with five gold medals out of five. Heartiest congratulations to them and to Russia, who came second with two gold, two silver and a bronze. The other gold medals went to Hungary (2), India (2), Taiwan (2

  12. Reference Values for the Six-Minute Walk Test in Healthy Children and Adolescents: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas de Assis Pereira Cacau

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of the study is to compare the available reference values and the six-minute walk test equations in healthy children/adolescents. Our systematic review was planned and performed in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. We included all studies that established reference values for the six-minute walk test in healthy children/adolescents. Methods: To perform this review, a research was performed in PubMed, EMBASE (via SCOPUS and Cochrane (LILACS, Bibliographic Index Spanish in Health Sciences, Organization Collection Pan-American Health Organization, Publications of the World Health Organization and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO via Virtual Health Library until June 2015 without language restriction. Results: The initial research identified 276 abstracts. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and were fully reviewed and approved by both reviewers. None of the selected studies presented sample size calculation. Most of the studies recruited children and adolescents from school. Six studies reported the use of random samples. Most studies used a corridor of 30 meters. All studies followed the American Thoracic Society guidelines to perform the six-minute walk test. The walked distance ranged 159 meters among the studies. Of the 12 included studies, 7 (58% reported descriptive data and 6 (50% established reference equation for the walked distance in the six-minute walk test. Conclusion: The reference value for the six-minute walk test in children and adolescents ranged substantially from studies in different countries. A reference equation was not provided in all studies, but the ones available took into account well established variables in the context of exercise performance, such as height, heart rate, age and weight. Countries that did not established reference values for the six-minute walk test should be encouraged to do because it would help their clinicians and researchers have a more precise

  13. Reference Values for the Six-Minute Walk Test in Healthy Children and Adolescents: a Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacau, Lucas de Assis Pereira; de Santana-Filho, Valter Joviniano; Maynard, Luana G.; Gomes Neto, Mansueto; Fernandes, Marcelo; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to compare the available reference values and the six-minute walk test equations in healthy children/adolescents. Our systematic review was planned and performed in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. We included all studies that established reference values for the six-minute walk test in healthy children/adolescents. Methods To perform this review, a research was performed in PubMed, EMBASE (via SCOPUS) and Cochrane (LILACS), Bibliographic Index Spanish in Health Sciences, Organization Collection Pan-American Health Organization, Publications of the World Health Organization and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) via Virtual Health Library until June 2015 without language restriction. Results The initial research identified 276 abstracts. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and were fully reviewed and approved by both reviewers. None of the selected studies presented sample size calculation. Most of the studies recruited children and adolescents from school. Six studies reported the use of random samples. Most studies used a corridor of 30 meters. All studies followed the American Thoracic Society guidelines to perform the six-minute walk test. The walked distance ranged 159 meters among the studies. Of the 12 included studies, 7 (58%) reported descriptive data and 6 (50%) established reference equation for the walked distance in the six-minute walk test. Conclusion The reference value for the six-minute walk test in children and adolescents ranged substantially from studies in different countries. A reference equation was not provided in all studies, but the ones available took into account well established variables in the context of exercise performance, such as height, heart rate, age and weight. Countries that did not established reference values for the six-minute walk test should be encouraged to do because it would help their clinicians and researchers have a more precise interpretation of the test

  14. Psychomotor and cognitive effects of 15-minute inhalation of methoxyflurane in healthy volunteers: implication for post-colonoscopy care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam Q.; Burgess, Jenna; Debreceni, Tamara L.; Toscano, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colonoscopy with portal inhaled methoxyflurane (Penthrox) is highly feasible with low sedation risk and allows earlier discharge. It is unclear if subjects can return to highly skilled psychomotor skill task shortly after Penthrox assisted colonoscopy. We evaluated the psychomotor and cognitive effects of 15-minute inhalation of Penthrox in adults. Patients and methods: Sixty healthy volunteers (18 to 80 years) were studied on 2 occasions with either Penthrox or placebo in a randomized, double-blind fashion. On each occasion, the subject’s psychomotor function was examined before, immediately, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 min after a 15-minute inhalation of studied drug, using validated psychomotor tests (Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), auditory reaction time (ART), eye-hand coordination (EHC) test, trail making test (TMT) and logical reasoning test (LRT). Results: Compared to placebo, a 15-minute Penthrox inhalation led to an immediate but small impairment of DSST (P < 0.001), ART (P < 0.001), EHC (P < 0.01), TMT (P = 0.02) and LRT (P = 0.04). In all subjects, the performance of all 5 tests normalized by 30 minutes after inhalation, and was comparable to that with placebo. Although increasing age was associated with a small deterioration in psychomotor testing performance, the magnitude of Penthrox effects remained comparable among all age groups. Conclusions: In all age groups, a 15-minute Penthrox inhalation induces acute but short-lasting impairment of psychomotor and cognitive performance, which returns to normal within 30 minutes , indicating that subjects who have colonoscopy with Penthrox can return to highly skilled psychomotor skills tasks such as driving and daily work the same day. PMID:27853742

  15. Effect of time to operation on mortality for hypotensive patients with gunshot wounds to the torso: The golden 10 minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meizoso, Jonathan P; Ray, Juliet J; Karcutskie, Charles A; Allen, Casey J; Zakrison, Tanya L; Pust, Gerd D; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Ginzburg, Enrique; Pizano, Louis R; Schulman, Carl I; Livingstone, Alan S; Proctor, Kenneth G; Namias, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Timely hemorrhage control is paramount in trauma; however, a critical time interval from emergency department arrival to operation for hypotensive gunshot wound (GSW) victims is not established. We hypothesize that delaying surgery for more than 10 minutes from arrival increases all-cause mortality in hypotensive patients with GSW. Data of adults (n = 309) with hypotension and GSW to the torso requiring immediate operation from January 2004 to September 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with resuscitative thoracotomies, traumatic brain injury, transfer from outside institutions, and operations occurring more than 1 hour after arrival were excluded. Survival analysis using multivariate Cox regression models was used for comparison. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are reported. Statistical significance was considered at p ≤ 0.05. The study population was aged 32 ± 12 years, 92% were male, Injury Severity Score was 24 ± 15, systolic blood pressure was 81 ± 29 mm Hg, Glasgow Coma Scale score was 13 ± 4. Overall mortality was 27%. Mean time to operation was 19 ± 13 minutes. After controlling for organ injury, patients who arrived to the operating room after 10 minutes had a higher likelihood of mortality compared with those who arrived in 10 minutes or less (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.10-3.26; p = 0.02); this was also true in the severely hypotensive patients with systolic blood pressure of 70 mm Hg or less (HR, 2.67; 95% CI, 0.97-7.34; p = 0.05). The time associated with a 50% cumulative mortality was 16 minutes. Delay to the operating room of more than 10 minutes increases the risk of mortality by almost threefold in hypotensive patients with GSW. Protocols should be designed to shorten time in the emergency department. Further prospective observational studies are required to validate these findings. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  16. Five-minute grid of marine bird density off central California - Oceanic season, 1980-2001 (CDAS data set Oc0_dens.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oc0_dens is a polygon shapefile representing 5 minute x 5 minute latitude x longitude cells that contain the overall, combined densities (birds/sq km), of 76 species...

  17. Five-minute grid of marine bird biomass density surveyed off central California - all seasons, 1980-2001 (CDAS data set AL0_MASS.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — AL0_MASS is a polygon shapefile representing 5 minute x 5 minute latitude x longitude cells that house the overall total biomass densities (kg/sq.km.) of 76 species...

  18. Five-minute grid of marine bird density off central California - Davidson Current seasons, 1980-2001 (CDAS data set Da0_dens.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Da0_dens is a polygon shapefile representing 5 minute x 5 minute latitude x longitude cells that contain the overall, combined densities (birds/sq km), of 76 species...

  19. Five-minute grid of marine bird biomass density surveyed off central California - Upwelling season, 1980-2001 (CDAS data set Up0_mass.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Up0_mass is a polygon shapefile representing 5 minute x 5 minute latitude x longitude cells that house the overall total biomass densities (kg/sq km) of 76 species...

  20. Five-minute grid of marine bird density off central California - all seasons, 1980-2001 (CDAS data set AL0_DENS.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — AL0_DENS is a polygon shapefile representing 5 minute x 5 minute latitude x longitude cells that contain the overall, combined densities (birds/sq.km.), of 76...