WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground response spectra

  1. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  2. Analytical approach to calculation of response spectra from seismological models of ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Erdal

    1988-01-01

    An analytical approach to calculate response spectra from seismological models of ground motion is presented. Seismological models have three major advantages over empirical models: (1) they help in an understanding of the physics of earthquake mechanisms, (2) they can be used to predict ground motions for future earthquakes and (3) they can be extrapolated to cases where there are no data available. As shown with this study, these models also present a convenient form for the calculation of response spectra, by using the methods of random vibration theory, for a given magnitude and site conditions. The first part of the paper reviews the past models for ground motion description, and introduces the available seismological models. Then, the random vibration equations for the spectral response are presented. The nonstationarity, spectral bandwidth and the correlation of the peaks are considered in the calculation of the peak response.

  3. Long-Period Ground Motion Prediction Equations for Relative, Pseudo-Relative and Absolute Velocity Response Spectra in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Y. P.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Aoi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPE) also known as attenuation relations have been developed for absolute acceleration or pseudo relative velocity response spectra. For a small damping, pseudo and absolute acceleration response spectra are nearly identical and hence interchangeable. It is generally known that the relative and pseudo relative velocity response spectra differ considerably at very short or very long periods, and the two are often considered similar at intermediate periods. However, observations show that the period range at which the two spectra become comparable is different from site to site. Also, the relationship of the above two types of velocity response spectra with absolute velocity response spectra are not discussed well in literature. The absolute velocity response spectra are the peak values of time histories obtained by adding the ground velocities to relative velocity response time histories at individual natural periods. There exists many tall buildings on huge and deep sedimentary basins such as the Kanto basin, and the number of such buildings is growing. Recently, Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) has proposed four classes of long-period ground motion intensity (http://www.data.jma.go.jp/svd/eew/data/ltpgm/) based on absolute velocity response spectra, which correlate to the difficulty of movement of people in tall buildings. As the researchers are using various types of response spectra for long-period ground motions, it is important to understand the relationships between them to take appropriate measures for disaster prevention applications. In this paper, we, therefore, obtain and discuss the empirical attenuation relationships using the same functional forms for the three types of velocity response spectra computed from observed strong motion records from moderate to large earthquakes in relation to JMA magnitude, hypocentral distance, sediment depths, and AVS30 as predictor variables at periods between

  4. Depth-dependent Vertical-to-Horizontal (V/H) Ratios of Free-Field Ground Motion Response Spectra for Deeply Embedded Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei X.; Braverman J.; Miranda, M.; Rosario, M.E.; Costantino, C.J.

    2015-02-25

    This report documents the results of a study to determine the depth-dependent V/H ratios of ground motion response spectra in the free field. The V/H ratios reported herein were developed from a worldwide database of surface and downhole acceleration recordings obtained from 45 vertical array stations. This database was specifically compiled for this project, and includes information from a diversity of active tectonic regions (California, Alaska, Taiwan, Japan), site conditions (rock to soft soil), ground motion intensity levels (PGAs between 0.01 g and 0.50 g), magnitudes (between ML 2.78 and JMA 8.1), epicentral distances (between 3.2 km and 812 km), and source depths (between 1.2 km and 112 km), as well as sensors at surface and at a wide range of depths relevant to the project. To study the significance of the depth effect, V/H ratios from all the records were sorted into a number of depth bins relevant to the project, and statistics (average, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, 16th, 50th, and 84th percentiles) of the V/H ratios within each bin were computed. Similar analyses were repeated, controlling for different site conditions, ground motion intensity levels, array locations, and source depths, to study their relative effect on the V/H ratios. Our findings confirm the importance of the depth effect on the V/H ratios. The research findings in this report can be used to provide guidance on the significance of the depth effect, and the extent to which this effect should be considered in the seismic design of deeply embedded SMR structures and NPP structures in general.

  5. Depth-dependent Vertical-to-Horizontal (V/H) Ratios of Free-Field Ground Motion Response Spectra for Deeply Embedded Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Braverman, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miranda, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rosario, M. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Costantino, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report documents the results of a study to determine the depth-dependent V/H ratios of ground motion response spectra in the free field. The V/H ratios reported herein were developed from a worldwide database of surface and downhole acceleration recordings obtained from 45 vertical array stations. This database was specifically compiled for this project, and includes information from a diversity of active tectonic regions (California, Alaska, Taiwan, Japan), site conditions (rock to soft soil), ground motion intensity levels (PGAs between 0.01 g and 0.50 g), magnitudes (between ML 2.78 and JMA 8.1), epicentral distances (between 3.2 km and 812 km), and source depths (between 1.2 km and 112 km), as well as sensors at surface and at a wide range of depths relevant to the project. To study the significance of the depth effect, V/H ratios from all the records were sorted into a number of depth bins relevant to the project, and statistics (average, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, 16th, 50th, and 84th percentiles) of the V/H ratios within each bin were computed. Similar analyses were repeated, controlling for different site conditions, ground motion intensity levels, array locations, and source depths, to study their relative effect on the V/H ratios. Our findings confirm the importance of the depth effect on the V/H ratios. The research findings in this report can be used to provide guidance on the significance of the depth effect, and the extent to which this effect should be considered in the seismic design of deeply embedded SMR structures and NPP structures in general.

  6. A Spatial Correlation Model of Peak Ground Acceleration and Response Spectra Based on Data of the Istanbul Earthquake Rapid Response and Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Thomas; Goda, Katsuichiro; Erdik, Mustafa; Daniell, James; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    Ground motion intensity measures such as the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and the pseudo spectral acceleration (PSA) at two sites due to the same seismic event are correlated. The spatial correlation needs to be considered when modelling ground-motion fields for seismic loss assessments, since it can have a significant influence on the statistical moments and probability distribution of aggregated seismic loss of a building portfolio. Empirical models of spatial correlation of ground motion intensity measures exist only for a few seismic regions in the world such as Japan, Taiwan and California, since for this purpose a dense observation network of earthquake ground motion is required. The Istanbul Earthquake Rapid Response and Early Warning System (IERREWS) provides one such dense array with station spacing of typically 2 km in the urban area of Istanbul. Based on the records of eight small to moderate (Mw3.5 - Mw5.1) events, which occurred since 2003 in the Marmara region, we establish a model of intra-event spatial correlation for PGA and PSA up to the natural period of 1.0 s. The results indicate that the correlation coefficients of PGA and short-period PSA decay rapidly with increasing interstation distance, resulting in correlation lengths of approximately 2-3 km, while correlation lengths at longer natural periods (above 0.5 s) exceed 5 km. Finally, we implement the correlation model in a Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate economic loss in Istanbul's district Zeytinburnu due to an Mw7.2 scenario earthquake.

  7. Hysteresis and Soil Site Dependent Input and Hysteretic Energy Spectra for Far-Source Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrahtom Gebrekirstos Mezgebo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake input energy spectra for four soil site classes, four hysteresis models, and five ductility levels are developed for far-source ground motion effect. These energy spectra are normalized by a quantity called velocity index (VI. The use of VI allows for the creation of dimensionless spectra and results in smaller coefficients of variation. Hysteretic energy spectra are then developed to address the demand aspect of an energy-based seismic design of structures with 5% critical damping and ductility that ranges from 2 to 5. The proposed input and hysteretic energy spectra are then compared with response spectra generated using nonlinear time history analyses of real ground motions and are found to produce reasonably good results over a relatively large period range.

  8. Calculation of ground vibration spectra from heavy military vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V. V.; Pickup, S.; McNuff, J.

    2010-07-01

    The demand for reliable autonomous systems capable to detect and identify heavy military vehicles becomes an important issue for UN peacekeeping forces in the current delicate political climate. A promising method of detection and identification is the one using the information extracted from ground vibration spectra generated by heavy military vehicles, often termed as their seismic signatures. This paper presents the results of the theoretical investigation of ground vibration spectra generated by heavy military vehicles, such as tanks and armed personnel carriers. A simple quarter car model is considered to identify the resulting dynamic forces applied from a vehicle to the ground. Then the obtained analytical expressions for vehicle dynamic forces are used for calculations of generated ground vibrations, predominantly Rayleigh surface waves, using Green's function method. A comparison of the obtained theoretical results with the published experimental data shows that analytical techniques based on the simplified quarter car vehicle model are capable of producing ground vibration spectra of heavy military vehicles that reproduce basic properties of experimental spectra.

  9. A study of ice response spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chunguang; JIA Lingling

    2009-01-01

    Some problems concerning the ice forces and ice response spectra are studied from both theoretical and practical points of view. On the basis of structural analysis,the analysis method of ice response spectra is proposed, since it plays an important role in the prediction of maximum structural response in cold regions. And it is illustrated that it is easy to study the structural response to ice using the ice response spectra.

  10. Representation of bidirectional ground motions for design spectra in building codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jonathan P.; Abrahamson, Norman A.; Atkinson, Gail M.; Beker, Jack W.; Boore, David M.; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Campbell, Kenneth W.; Comartin, Craig D.; Idriss, I.M.; Lew, Marshall; Mehrain, Michael; Moehle, Jack P.; Naeim, Farzad; Sabol, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 NEHRP Provisions modified the definition of horizontal ground motion from the geometric mean of spectral accelerations for two components to the peak response of a single lumped mass oscillator regardless of direction. These maximum-direction (MD) ground motions operate under the assumption that the dynamic properties of the structure (e.g., stiffness, strength) are identical in all directions. This assumption may be true for some in-plan symmetric structures, however, the response of most structures is dominated by modes of vibration along specific axes (e.g., longitudinal and transverse axes in a building), and often the dynamic properties (especially stiffness) along those axes are distinct. In order to achieve structural designs consistent with the collapse risk level given in the NEHRP documents, we argue that design spectra should be compatible with expected levels of ground motion along those principal response axes. The use of MD ground motions effectively assumes that the azimuth of maximum ground motion coincides with the directions of principal structural response. Because this is unlikely, design ground motions have lower probability of occurrence than intended, with significant societal costs. We recommend adjustments to make design ground motions compatible with target risk levels.

  11. Prediction of Inelastic Response Spectra Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edén Bojórquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have been oriented to develop methodologies for estimating inelastic response of structures; however, the estimation of inelastic seismic response spectra requires complex analyses, in such a way that traditional methods can hardly get an acceptable error. In this paper, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model is presented as an alternative to estimate inelastic response spectra for earthquake ground motion records. The moment magnitude (MW, fault mechanism (FM, Joyner-Boore distance (dJB, shear-wave velocity (Vs30, fundamental period of the structure (T1, and the maximum ductility (μu were selected as inputs of the ANN model. Fifty earthquake ground motions taken from the NGA database and recorded at sites with different types of soils are used during the training phase of the Feedforward Multilayer Perceptron model. The Backpropagation algorithm was selected to train the network. The ANN results present an acceptable concordance with the real seismic response spectra preserving the spectral shape between the actual and the estimated spectra.

  12. Real-Time Continuous Response Spectra Exceedance Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Frank; Harvey, Danny; Lindquist, Kent; Franke, Mathias

    2017-04-01

    A novel approach is presented for near real-time earthquake alarms for critical structures at distributed locations using real-time estimation of response spectra obtained from near free-field motions. Influential studies dating back to the 1980s identified spectral response acceleration as a key ground motion characteristic that correlates well with observed damage in structures. Thus, monitoring and reporting on exceedance of spectra-based thresholds are useful tools for assessing the potential for damage to facilities or multi-structure campuses based on input ground motions only. With as little as one strong-motion station per site, this scalable approach can provide rapid alarms on the damage status of remote towns, critical infrastructure (e.g., hospitals, schools) and points of interests (e.g., bridges) for a very large number of locations enabling better rapid decision making during critical and difficult immediate post-earthquake response actions. Real-time calculation of PSA exceedance and alarm dissemination are enabled with Bighorn, a module included in the Antelope software package that combines real-time spectral monitoring and alarm capabilities with a robust built-in web display server. Examples of response spectra from several M 5 events recorded by the ANZA seismic network in southern California will be presented.

  13. Proposed Site-Specific Response Spectra for Surabaya-Madura Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Kusumastuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a site-specific seismic hazard study to determine the recommended seismic design criteria for Suramadu Bridge. The study is performed using probabilistic seismic hazard approach to determine maximum acceleration and response spectra at bedrock and followed by local site effect analysis to determine maximum acceleration and response spectra at ground surface. The probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA is carried out using 3-dimension (3-D seismic source models (fault source model. Two hazard levels are analysed to represent 150 and 3,300 years return period of ground motion around site location. The local site effect analysis is performed using 1-dimension (1-D shear wave propagation theory to obtain peak ground acceleration and response spectra at ground surface. Finally, the site-specific surface response spectra with 5 percent damping are developed based on the mean plus one standard deviation concept from the result of local site effect analysis.

  14. A simple method for conversion of airborne gamma-ray spectra to ground level doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    A new and simple method for conversion of airborne NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectra to dose rates at ground level has been developed. By weighting the channel count rates with the channel numbers a spectrum dose index (SDI) is calculated for each spectrum. Ground level dose rates then are determined...

  15. Conversion of Airborne Gamma ray Spectra to Ground Level Air Kerma Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1997-01-01

    A new method for relating airborne gamma-ray spectra to dose rates and kerma rates at ground level is presented. Dependent on flying altitude 50 m to 125 m the method gives correct results for gamma energies above 250 keV respective 350 keV. At lower energies the method underestimate the dose...... or kerma rates; by having a large fraction of the ground level gamma-rays at energies below 350 keV special care should be taken at an interpretation of the results....

  16. [Observation and Analysis of Ground Daylight Spectra of China's Different Light Climate Partitions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shu-ying; Yang, Chun-yu

    2015-12-01

    The territory of China is vast, so the daylight climates of different regions are not the same. In order to expand theutilization scope and improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy and daylight resources, this article observed and analyzed the ground daylight spectra of China's different light climate partitions. Using a portable spectrum scanner, this article did a tracking observation of ground direct daylight spectra in the period of 380-780 nm visible spectrum of different solar elevation angles during one day in seven representative cities of china's different light climate partitions. The seven representative cities included Kunming, Xining, Beijing, Shenzhen, Nanjing, Nanchang and Chongqing. According to the observation results, this article analyzed the daylight spectrum changing law, compared the daylight spectrum curves of different light climate partitions cities, and summarized the influence factors of daylight spectral radiation intensity. The Analysis of the ground direct daylight spectra showed that the daylight spectral radiation intensity of different solar elevation angles during one day of china's different light climate partitions cities was different, but the distribution and trend of daylight power spectra were basically the same which generally was first increased and then decreased. The maximum peak of spectral power distribution curve appeared at about 475 nm, and there were a steep rise between 380-475 nm and a smooth decline between 475-700 nm while repeatedly big ups and downs appearing after 700 nm. The distribution and trend of daylight power spectra of china's different light climate partitions cities were basically the same, and there was no obvious difference between the daylight spectral power distribution curves and the different light climate partitions. The daylight spectral radiation intensity was closely related to the solar elevation angle and solar surface condition.

  17. Analysis of K-net and Kik-net data: implications for ground motion prediction - acceleration time histories, response spectra and nonlinear site response; Analyse des donnees accelerometriques de K-net et Kik-net: implications pour la prediction du mouvement sismique - accelerogrammes et spectres de reponse - et la prise en compte des effets de site non-lineaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pousse, G

    2005-10-15

    This thesis intends to characterize ground motion during earthquake. This work is based on two Japanese networks. It deals with databases of shallow events, depth less than 25 km, with magnitude between 4.0 and 7.3. The analysis of K-net allows to compute a spectral ground motion prediction equation and to review the shape of the Eurocode 8 design spectra. We show the larger amplification at short period for Japanese data and bring in light the soil amplification that takes place at large period. In addition, we develop a new empirical model for simulating synthetic stochastic nonstationary acceleration time histories. By specifying magnitude, distance and site effect, this model allows to produce many time histories, that a seismic event is liable to produce at the place of interest. Furthermore, the study of near-field borehole records of the Kik-net allows to explore the validity domain of predictive equations and to explain what occurs by extrapolating ground motion predictions. Finally, we show that nonlinearity reduces the dispersion of ground motion at the surface. (author)

  18. An improved algorithm for numerical calculation of seismic response spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengwang Liao; Wei Ding; Fei Li

    2016-01-01

    The information of seismic response spectra is key to many problems concerned with aseismic structure and is also helpful for earthquake disaster relief if it is generated in time when earthquake happens. While current numerical calculation methods suffer from poor precision, especially in frequency band near Nyquist frequency, we present a set of improved parameters for precision improvement. It is shown that precision of displace-ment and velocity response spectra are both further improved compared to current nu-merical algorithms. A uniform fitting formula is given for computing these parameters for damping ratio range of 0.01e0.9, quite convenient for practical application.

  19. Ozone vertical distribution retrieval from ground-based high resolution infrared solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougatchev, N. S.; Connor, B. J.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    A practical procedure for the retrieval of ozone vertical profiles from ground-based high resolution Fourier transform infrared solar spectra has been developed. The analysis is based on a multilayer line-by-line forward model and a semi-empirical version of the optimal estimation inversion method of Rodgers. The 1002.6-1003.2 cm(exp -1) spectral interval has been selected for the analysis on the basis of synthetic spectrum calculations. This interval contains numerous ozone lines covering a range of intensities and providing retrieval sensitivity from ground level to about 35 km. Characterization of the method and an error analysis have been performed. For a spectral resolution of 0.05-0.01 cm(exp -1) and a signal-to-noise ratio greater than or equal to 100 the retrieval is stable with a vertical resolution of approximately 5 km attainable near the surface degrading to approximately 10 km in the stratosphere. Synthetic spectra studies show that the a priori profile and weak constraints selected for the retrievals introduce no significant biases for a wide range of ozone profiles.

  20. SENSITIVITY OF STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO GROUND MOTION SOURCE AND SITE PARAMETERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Erdal; Brebbia, C.A.; Cakmak, A.S.; Abdel Ghaffar, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Designing structures to withstand earthquakes requires an accurate estimation of the expected ground motion. While engineers use the peak ground acceleration (PGA) to model the strong ground motion, seismologists use physical characteristics of the source and the rupture mechanism, such as fault length, stress drop, shear wave velocity, seismic moment, distance, and attenuation. This study presents a method for calculating response spectra from seismological models using random vibration theory. It then investigates the effect of various source and site parameters on peak response. Calculations are based on a nonstationary stochastic ground motion model, which can incorporate all the parameters both in frequency and time domains. The estimation of the peak response accounts for the effects of the non-stationarity, bandwidth and peak correlations of the response.

  1. Spectroscopic study on deuterated benzenes. I. Microwave spectra and molecular structure in the ground state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunishige, Sachi; Katori, Toshiharu; Baba, Masaaki, E-mail: baba@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki [Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    We observed microwave absorption spectra of some deuterated benzenes and accurately determined the rotational constants of all H/D isotopomers in the ground vibrational state. Using synthetic analysis assuming that all bond angles are 120°, the mean bond lengths were obtained to be r{sub 0}(C–C) = 1.3971 Å and r{sub 0}(C–H) = r{sub 0}(C–D) = 1.0805 Å. It has been concluded that the effect of deuterium substitution on the molecular structure is negligibly small and that the mean bond lengths of C–H and C–D are identical unlike small aliphatic hydrocarbons, in which r{sub 0}(C–D) is about 5 mÅ shorter than r{sub 0}(C–H). It is considered that anharmonicity is very small in the C–H stretching vibration of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  2. Energy Spectra, Composition, and Other Properties of Ground-Level Events During Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; COhen, C. M. S.; Labrador, A. W.; Leske, R. A.; Looper, M. D.; Haggerty, D. K.; Mason, G. M.; Mazur, J. E.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2012-01-01

    We report spacecraft measurements of the energy spectra of solar protons and other solar energetic particle properties during the 16 Ground Level Events (GLEs) of Solar Cycle 23. The measurements were made by eight instruments on the ACE, GOES, SAMPBX, and STEREO spacecraft and extend from approximately 0.1 to approximately 500-700 MeV. All of the proton spectra exhibit spectral breaks at energies ranging from approximately 2 to approximately 46 MeV and all are well fit by a double power-law shape. A comparison of GLE events with a larger sample of other solar energetic particle (SEP) events shows that the typical spectral indices are harder in GLE events, with a mean slope of -3.18 at greater than 40 MeV/nuc. In the energy range 45 to 80 MeV/nucleon about approximately 50% of GLE events have properties in common with impulsive He-3-rich SEP events, including enrichments in Ne/O, Fe/O, Ne-22/Ne-20, and elevated mean charge states of Fe. These He-3 rich events contribute to the seed population accelerated by CME-driven shocks. An analysis is presented of whether highly-ionized Fe ions observed in five events could be due to electron stripping during shock acceleration in the low corona. Making use of stripping calculations by others and a coronal density model, we can account for events with mean Fe charge states of (Q(sub Fe) is approximately equal to +20 if the acceleration starts at approximately 1.24-1.6 solar radii, consistent with recent comparisons of CME trajectories and type-II radio bursts. In addition, we suggest that gradual stripping of remnant ions from earlier large SEP events may also contribute a highly-ionized suprathermal seed population. We also discuss how observed SEP spectral slopes relate to the energetics of particle acceleration in GLE and other large SEP events.

  3. PROPOSAL OF "GROUND RESPONSE SPECTRUM" AND PRESENTATION OF THEIR EXAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Yukio

    "Ground response spectrum" is proposed in this paper. "Ground response spectrum" is the graph which is so drawn as to read the maximum values of dynamic responses of subsurface ground to a seismic accelerograph, such as particle acceleration, velocity, displacement on the surface and shear strain caused in the ground. The calculation method of the spectrum is the same as the ordinary response spectrum except the use of simple one-dimensional continuum of linear viscoelastic medium; instead a single-degree-of-freedom oscillation system is used in the calculation of ordinary response spectrum. A few examples of the "ground response spectrum" are presented and special feature and usefulness of the spectrum is discussed in this paper.

  4. Between-event and between-station variability observed in the Fourier and response spectra domains: comparison with seismological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, D.; Spallarossa, D.; Pacor, F.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we analyse a regional data set composed by about 9000 waveforms from 231 earthquakes in the magnitude range from 3 to 6 and recorded in central Italy in the time period 2008-2013. We derive a seismological model whose source, attenuation and site parameters are used to explain the ground motion variability associated with a set of ground motion prediction equation (GMPE) calibrated ad hoc for both Fourier and acceleration response spectra. The main results are the following: (1) the between-event residuals δΒe show a clear dependence on the stress drop for frequencies above 2 Hz; (2) the standard deviation τ of δΒe is strongly reduced (up to 80 per cent) by introducing in the functional form the stress drop values estimated from each source spectrum; (3) the standard deviation τ depends on the magnitude scale used to calibrate the GMPE: while the moment magnitude better describes the source variability at low frequency, the local magnitude better capture the source-related ground motion variability at frequencies larger than 2 Hz; (4) for frequencies higher than 10 Hz, the observed increase of τ with frequency correlate well with the attenuation parameter ksource, computed from the high-frequency slope of the source spectra. Regarding the station-to-station residuals δS2S, their frequency dependency is in good agreement with the site amplifications extracted from the S-wave spectra. Finally, while the overall dependences of the ground motion variability on seismological parameters are similar when observed either in the Fourier or in the response spectra domains (e.g. the dependency of the between event on stress drop), differences in the results suggest that the response spectra do not allow to fully capture the ground motion variability, as well as the site amplifications, at high frequencies.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Ground Response during Diaphragm Wall Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yong-chun; WANG Jian-hua

    2008-01-01

    Construction of diaphragm wall panels may cause considerable stress changes in heavily overconsolidated soil deposits and can induce substantial ground movement. The 3D Lagrangian method was adopted to model the mechanical response of ground, including horizontal normal stress and shear stress, lateral ground displacement and vertical ground surface settlement, during the slurry trenching and concreting of diaphragm wall panels. Numerical results show that slurry trenching leads to horizontal stress relief of ground, reducing the horizontal stress of the ground from initial K0 pressure to hydrostatic betonite pressure. Wet concrete pressure lies between the hydrostatic bentonite pressure and the initial K0 pressure, so it can compensate partially the horizontal stress loss of the ground adjacent to the trench and thus reduce the lateral movement of the trench face as well as the vertical settlement of the ground surface.

  6. Mass spectra of ground and excited states of scalar and axial vector charmonium and bottomonium

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatnagar, Shashank

    2016-01-01

    In this work we calculate the mass spectrum of ground ($1P$), and excited ($2P, 3P$) states of scalar $(0^{++})$ and axial vector $(1^{++})$ charmonium and bottomonium such as $\\chi_{c0}$, $\\chi_{b0}$ and $\\chi_{c1}$, $\\chi_{b1}$ in the framework of a QCD motivated Bethe-Salpeter Equation. Our results are in good agreement with data (where ever available) and other models. In this framework, from the beginning, we employ a $4\\times 4$ representation for two-body quark-anti quark BS amplitude for calculating the mass spectra. However, the price we have to pay in this approach is to solve a coupled set of Salpeter equations for scalar and axial vector quarkonia. We have explicitly shown that these equations get decoupled in the heavy-quark approximation leading to the mass spectral equations dependent on the principal quantum number, $N$ in an approximate harmonic oscillator basis, giving a much deeper insight into the problem. In the above treatment, while the confining part of the BSE kernel has been treated ...

  7. Enhancement of Vibronic and Ground-State Vibrational Coherences in 2D Spectra of Photosynthetic Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Chenu, Aurélia; Kauffmann, Harald F; Mančal, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    A vibronic-exciton model is applied to investigate the mechanism of enhancement of coherent oscillations due to mixing of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom recently proposed as the origin of the long-lived oscillations in 2D spectra of the FMO complex [Christensson et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 116 (2012) 7449]. We reduce the problem to a model BChl dimer to elucidate the role of resonance coupling, site energies, nuclear mode and energy disorder in the enhancement of vibronic-exciton and ground-state vibrational coherences, and to identify regimes where this enhancement is significant. For a heterodimer representing the two coupled BChls 3 and 4 of the FMO complex, the initial amplitude of the vibronic-exciton and vibrational coherences are enhanced by up to 15 and 5 times, respectively, compared to the vibrational coherences in the isolated monomer. This maximum initial amplitude enhancement occurs when there is a resonance between the electronic energy gap and the frequency of the vibrational mode. The b...

  8. Site response zones and short-period earthquake ground motion projections for the Las Vegas Basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Barbara Luke; Ying Liu

    2008-11-01

    A deterministic seismic hazard analysis was conducted to address the effect of local soil conditions on earthquake-induced strong ground motion in the Las Vegas Basin, Nevada (US). Using a large geological and geotechnical database, two response units were defined: a fine-grained unit, predominantly clay; and a coarse-grained unit, predominantly gravel. A moderate number of high-quality shallow shear wave velocity measurements were collected from which characteristic shear wave velocity profiles were developed for each response unit. An equivalent-linear one-dimensional site response model was used. The model was calibrated using a basin-wide, small-strain ground motion database. Calibration tests showed that ground motion projections become increasingly conservative with increasing ground-motion amplitude. Projections were overconservative for the coarsegrained response unit, likely due to the sparseness of the velocity database. For the earthquake response analyses, historical ground motions were used to model characteristic ‘bedrock’ motion for earthquakes on 10 faults judged to be critical. Response spectral envelopes were generated for each unit through Monte-Carlo simulations. For the fine-grained response unit, 95th percentile peak ground acceleration, peak spectral acceleration and predominant period were 310 cm/s2, 1100cm/s2, and 0.29 s, respectively. With respect to codified design spectra, projections are lower at short periods and higher at long periods. Projections of peak spectral accelerations for the coarsegrained response unit, were more than double that of codified spectra; however, they are believed to be overconservative. Near-fault effects and basin-edge effects, though potentially important, were not considered in these analyses.

  9. Overview of Ground-Motion Issues for Cascadia Megathrust Events: Simulation of Ground-Motions and Earthquake Site Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghofrani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ground motions for earthquakes of M7.5 to 9.0 on the Cascadia subduction interface are simulated based on a stochastic finite-fault model and used to estimate average response spectra for reference firm soil conditions. The simulations are first validated by modeling the wealth of ground-motion data from the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku earthquake of Japan. Adjustments to the calibrated model are then made to consider average source, attenuation and site parameters for the Cascadia region. This includes an evaluation of the likely variability in stress drop for large interface earthquakes and an assessment of regional attenuation and site effects. We perform best-estimate simulations for a preferred set of input parameters. Typical results suggest mean values of 5%-damped pseudoacceleration in the range from about 100 to 200 cm/s2, at frequencies from 1 to 4 Hz, for firm-ground conditions in Vancouver. Uncertainty in most-likely value of the parameter representing stress drop causes variability in simulated response spectra of about ±50%. Uncertainties in the attenuation model produce even larger variability in response spectral amplitudes—a factor of about two at a closest distance to the rupture plane (Rcd of 100 km, becoming even larger at greater distances. It is thus important to establish the regional attenuation model for ground-motion simulations and to bound the source properties controlling radiation of ground motion. We calculate theoretical one-dimensional spectral amplification estimates for four selected Fraser River Delta sites to show how the presence of softer sediments in the region may alter the predicted ground motions. The amplification functions are largely consistent with observed spectral amplification at Fraser River delta sites, suggesting amplification by factors of 2.5–5 at the peak frequency of the site; we note that deep sites in the delta have a low peak frequency, ∼0.3 Hz. This work will aid in seismic hazard

  10. Retrieval of ethane from ground-based FTIR solar spectra using improved spectroscopy: Recent burden increase above Jungfraujoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, B.; Bader, W.; Toon, G. C.; Bray, C.; Perrin, A.; Fischer, E. V.; Sudo, K.; Boone, C. D.; Bovy, B.; Lejeune, B.; Servais, C.; Mahieu, E.

    2015-07-01

    An improved spectroscopy is used to implement and optimize the retrieval strategy of ethane (C2H6) from ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar spectra recorded at the high-altitude station of Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps, 46.5°N, 8.0°E, 3580 m a.s.l.). The improved spectroscopic parameters include C2H6 pseudo-lines in the 2720-3100 cm-1 range and updated line parameters for methyl chloride and ozone. These improved spectroscopic parameters allow for substantial reduction of the fitting residuals as well as enhanced information content. They also contribute to limiting oscillations responsible for ungeophysical negative mixing ratio profiles. This strategy has been successfully applied to the Jungfraujoch solar spectra available from 1994 onwards. The resulting time series is compared with C2H6 total columns simulated by the state-of-the-art chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. Despite very consistent seasonal cycles between both data sets, a negative systematic bias relative to the FTIR observations suggests that C2H6 emissions are underestimated in the current inventories implemented in GEOS-Chem. Finally, C2H6 trends are derived from the FTIR time series, revealing a statistically-significant sharp increase of the C2H6 burden in the remote atmosphere above Jungfraujoch since 2009. Evaluating cause of this change in the C2H6 burden, which may be related to the recent massive growth of shale gas exploitation in North America, is of primary importance for atmospheric composition and air quality in the Northern Hemisphere.

  11. Response spectra for differential motion of structures supports during earthquakes in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I.S. Elmasry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Differential motions of ground supports of stiff structures with large plan dimensions and separate foundations under earthquakes were studied by researchers during the last few decades. Such a type of structural response was previously underestimated. The importance of studying such a response comes up from the fact that usually the structures affected are of strategic importance such as bridges. During their expected life, structures may experience vibrations excited by ground waves of short wavelengths during near-source earthquakes, or during amplified earthquake signals, during explosions, or during vibrations induced from nearby strong vibration sources. This is the case when the differential motion of supports becomes considerable. This paper aims to review the effects of seismic signal variations along the structures dimensions with emphasis on Egypt as a case study. The paper shows some patterns of the damage imposed by such differential motion. A replication of the differential motion in the longitudinal direction is applied on a frame bridge model. The resulting straining actions show the necessity for considering the differential motion of supports in the design of special structures in Egypt. Finally, response spectra for the differential motion of supports, based on the available data from previous earthquakes in Egypt, is derived and proposed for designers to include in the design procedure when accounting for such type of structural response, and especially in long-span bridges.

  12. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Emma C.; Withington, Stafford; Newnham, David A.; Wadhams, Peter; Jones, Anna E.; Clancy, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0°) clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz) to 150 µm (2000 GHz) at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate retrievals and guide the

  13. Engineering characterization of ground motion. Task I. Effects of characteristics of free-field motion on structural response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Short, S.A.; Merz, K.L.; Tokarz, F.J.; Idriss, I.M.; Power, M.S.; Sadigh, K.

    1984-05-01

    This report presents the results of the first task of a two-task study on the engineering characterization of earthquake ground motion for nuclear power plant design. The overall objective of this study is to develop recommendations for methods for selecting design response spectra or acceleration time histories to be used to characterize motion at the foundation level of nuclear power plants. Task I of the study develops a basis for selecting design response spectra, taking into account the characteristics of free-field ground motion found to be significant in causing structural damage.

  14. Vibrational Spectra and Potential Energy Surface for Electronic Ground State of Jet-Cooled Molecule S2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Yan; DING Shi-Liang

    2004-01-01

    The vibration states of transition molecule S2O, including both bending and stretching vibrations, are studied in the framework of dynamical symmetry groups U1(4) U2(4). We get all the vibration spectra of S2O by fitting 22 spectra data with 10 parameters. The fitting rms of the Hamiltonian is 2.12 cm-1. With the parameters and Lie algebraic theory, we give the analytical expression of the potential energy surface, which helps us to calculate the dissociation energy and force constants of S2O in the electronic ground state.

  15. Spectroscopic analysis of asymmetric top free radicals --Application to pure rotational spectra of NO2 in the ground vibronic state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Several key problems involved in the analyses of spectra ofasymmetric top molecules, i.e., the effective Hamiltonian, the representation and basis vector, identification of energy levels, the selection rules, the relative intensity, and Zeeman tuning rate, were elucidated systematically. Introducing the high-order centrifugal distortion terms into the effective Hamiltonian, the precision for calculation has been improved substantially, which allows us to analyze the high-lying rotational transitions. A global analysis of all available spectra of 14N16O2 in the ground vibronic state has been made to obtain a set of molecular constants of 14N16O2 in the ground vibronic state which is the most precise and extensive so far. Using the improved parameters, some FIR LMR lines left unassigned hitherto have been identified successfully.

  16. The Interim : until you achieve an operationally responsive ground system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, Bob; Clarke, Kelly; Lei, Jordan; Miyamoto, Charles; Owen-Mankovich, Kyran

    2008-01-01

    Everyone wants to achieve a 'Responsive' Ground Data System (GDS), but that takes time. What do you do in the interim? Our group, called the Integration, Test and Deployment Team (ITD), is a group of responsive engineers whose primary focus is to assist JPL projects to successfully adapt, test, integrate and deploy their ground data system. The team configures and adapts the GDS for a project, so that analysts, engineers and scientist do not need to be experts in the GDS to operate it. The team has developed a human interface to accommodate all types of users. It provides Graphical User Interfaces (GUI's) for those that want GUI's, command line interfaces for those that want control, and selection button interfaces for other users. The cornerstone of a responsive Ground Data System is responsive people. Without individuals who can be aware of a project's changing needs and requirements, how can the GDS become responsive

  17. A Study of the Elements Copper through Uranium in Sirius A: Contributions from STIS and Ground-Based Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ayres, T. R.; Castelli, F.; Gulliver, A. F.; Monier, R.; Wahlgren, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    We determine abundances or upper limits for all of the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The purpose of the study is to assemble the most complete picture of elemental abundances with the hope of revealing the chemical history of the brightest star in the sky, apart from the Sun. We also explore the relationship of this hot metallic-line (Am) star to its cooler congeners, as well as the hotter, weakly- or non-magnetic Mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars. Our primary observational material consists of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in the ASTRAL project. We have also used archival material from the COPERNICUS satellite, and from the HST Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph, as well as ground-based spectra from Furenlid, Westin, Kurucz, Wahlgren, and their coworkers, ESO spectra from the UVESPOP project, and NARVAL spectra retrieved from PolarBase. Our analysis has been primarily by spectral synthesis, and in this work we have had the great advantage of extensive atomic data unavailable to earlier workers. We find most abundances as well as upper limits range from 10 to 100 times above solar values. We see no indication of the huge abundance excesses of 1000 or more that occur among many chemically peculiar stars of the upper main sequence. The picture of Sirius as a hot Am star is reinforced.

  18. A study of the elements copper through uranium in Sirius A: Contributions from STIS and ground-based spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Cowley, Charles R; Castelli, Fiorella; Gulliver, Austin F; Monier, Richard; Wahlgren, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    We determine abundances or upper limits for all of the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The purpose of the study is to assemble the most complete picture of elemental abundances with the hope of revealing the chemical history of the brightest star in the sky, apart from the Sun. We also explore the relationship of this hot metallic-line (Am) star to its cooler congeners, as well as the hotter, weakly- or non-magnetic mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars. Our primary observational material consists of {\\em Hubble Space Telescope} ($HST$) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in the ASTRAL project. We have also used archival material from the %\\citep/{ayr10}. $COPERNICUS$ satellite, and from the $HST$ Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), as well as ground-based spectra from Furenlid, Westin, Kurucz, Wahlgren, and their coworkers, ESO spectra from the UVESPOP project, and NARVAL spectra retrieved from PolarBase. Our analysis has been primarily by...

  19. Ground state charmed meson spectra for N_f=2+1+1

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, T D

    2015-01-01

    We present a preliminary study of the charmed meson spectra using the electrically neutral subset of the new Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal N_f=2+1+1 gauge configurations that utilise the 3-HEX smeared clover action. The analysis is performed with a focus on the hyperfine splitting.

  20. Computation of Raman Spectra from Density Matrix Linear Response Theory in Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders; Coe, Joshua; Cawkwell, Marc

    2011-06-01

    Linear response calculations based on density matrix perturbation theory [A. M. N. Niklasson and M. Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] have been developed within a self-consistent tight-binding method for extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 123004 (2008)]. Besides the nuclear coordinates, extended auxiliary electronic degrees of freedom are added to the regular Born-Oppenheimer Lagrangian, both for the electronic ground state and response densities. This formalism enables highly efficient, on-the-fly, analytic computations of the polarizability autocorrelation functions and the Raman spectra during energy conserving Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories. We will illustrate these capabilities via time-resolved Raman spectra computed during explicit, reactive molecular dynamics simulations of the shock compression of methane, benzene, tert-butylacetylene. Comparisons will be made with experimental results where possible.

  1. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  2. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  3. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  4. A study of design spectra based on attenuation relationship of ground motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@In recent years, more and more studies are focused on the performance in seismic design instead of the strength of structures. People have realized that the structure deformation (displacement) can describe the damage more properly and directly than the strength (force). The displacement design spectra need to be constructed within more wide range of the period and the damping for the displacement-based seismic design.

  5. Analysis of ground-based and VIRTIS-M/ROSETTA reflectance spectra of asteroid 2687 Šteins: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, K.; Arnold, G.; Hiesinger, H.; Capaccioni, F.

    2012-04-01

    The asteroid 2687 Šteins was encountered by Rosetta in 2008. Prior to the fly-by, ground-based observations of Šteins were performed [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. We present a summary of ground-based VIS and NIR reflectance spectra of Šteins and compare them with VIRTIS-M-spectra obtained during the fly-by. On the basis of these spectral data we discuss the relationship to meteorite materials, and the classification of Šteins. The ground-based spectra cover a wavelength range from 0.4-2.5 µm. All spectra show a clear absorption feature at ~0.5 µm and a steep spectral slope between ~0.6-0.8 µm. At wavelengths >1 µm the spectra show a neutral to slightly reddish trend. The absorption band at ~0.5 µm is commonly linked to the feature at that wavelength in the oldhamite spectrum [7]. The oldhamite spectrum shows another weaker feature at 0.96 µm. This weaker feature at ~0.96 µm is visible in two of the ground-based spectra. Spectral slopes of most Earth-based spectra are comparable within arrow bars. The uniform spectral characteristics indicate a homogenous surface of Šteins. The VIRTIS-M-spectra of Šteins cover the wavelength range from 0.25-1 µm (VIS) and 1-5 µm (IR). The spectra show an overall flat behavior with a steep red slope at wavelengths 3.5 µm thermal emission contributes significantly to the detected radiation. The thermal properties derived from VIRTIS-M long wavelength measurements suggest a thin regolith layer and a low porosity. The shape of the asteroid is consistent with the hypothesis that Šteins is a rubble-pile. Ground-based and fly-by spectra of Šteins are in good agreement with each other considering the overall spectral characteristics and the occurrence of the absorption feature at 0.5 µm. Prior to the Rosetta fly-by Šteins has been classified (by e.g. [1, 5]) as an E[II]-type asteroid (after [8, 9], also Xe after [10]). VIRTIS data suggest that Šteins can be classified as an igneous E-type asteroid, being a member of the E

  6. Nonlinear Site Response Due to Large Ground Acceleration: Observation and Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, S.; Furumura, T.; Sasatani, T.

    2009-12-01

    nonlinear site response, we conducted FDM simulations of nonlinear seismic wavefield using finite strain formulation and Murnaghan constants that describe the nonlinear properties of surface soil. The nonlinear FDM simulation of ground motion is based on the work of Xu et al. (2000). Our present simulation model is in 2D, but it can be extended to 3D very easy. The Murnaghan constants for this simulation can be determined from a relationship between these constants and S-H/V deformation, which is derived from comparison of the observed S-H/V and that from FDM simulation with different values of these constants. The results of this simulation indicated a dramatic change occurring in the frequency-dependent amplification properties as the strain level near the surface increases. The predominant peak in the Fourier spectra of the S-wave gradually moved to the lower frequency band as the strain level increased from 10^-8 to 10^-6, and high frequency components showed a significant drop. These results correspond well with the observed data mentioned above. This demonstrates the effectiveness of nonlinear FDM simulation for an estimation of actual ground motion and frequency contents in an expected large earthquake.

  7. Floor response spectra for seismic qualification of Kozloduy VVER 440-230 NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostov, M.K. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (BG). Central Lab. for Seismic Mechanics and Earthquake Engineering; Ma, D.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Prato, C.A. [Univ. of Cordoba (AR); Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (US)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the floor response spectra generation methodology for Kozloduy NPP, Unit 1-2 of VVER 440-230 is presented. The 2D coupled soil-structure interaction models are used combined with a simplified correction of the final results for accounting of torsional effects. Both time history and direct approach for in-structure spectra generation are used and discussion of results is made.

  8. Seismic Response of RC Framed Buildings with Open Ground Storey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somani Kishangopal J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available RC framed buildings are generally designed without considering the structural action of masonry infill walls. These masonry infill walls are widely used as partitions and considered as non-structural elements. But they affect both the structural and non-structural performance of RC buildings during earthquake. RC framed building with open ground storey is known as soft storey, which performs poorly during earthquake. In order to study this total 144 RC framed buildings having bare frame, full infill frame and open ground storey frame were analyzed by seismic coefficient method and response spectrum method for various seismic hazards. The present study deals with the comparison of base shear for medium rise RC framed buildings having P+5, P+7, P+9 and P+11 storeys for various seismic zones (III, IV & V and for various soil conditions (Hard & Medium as per IS 1893(part 1: 2002. This work helps in understanding the effect of earthquake with increase in height of RC framed buildings on base shear for various seismic zones and soil conditions. The result shows that the effect of infill stiffness on structural response is significant under lateral loads. It is found that the presence infill walls increases the base shear by 60-65% more than bare frame by both seismic coefficient method and response spectrum method.

  9. 0.94-2.42 μm ground-based transmission spectra of the hot Jupiter HD-189733b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielski, C.; Waldmann, I. P.; Hollis, M. D. J.; Tinetti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Deroo, P.; Swain, M. R., E-mail: camilla@star.ucl.ac.uk [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We present here new transmission spectra of the hot Jupiter HD-189733b using the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We obtained two nights of observations where we recorded the primary transit of the planet in the J, H, and K bands simultaneously, covering a spectral range from 0.94 to 2.42 μm. We used Fourier analysis and other detrending techniques validated previously on other data sets to clean the data. We tested the statistical significance of our results by calculating the autocorrelation function, and we found that, after the detrending, autocorrelative noise is diminished at most frequencies. Additionally, we repeated our analysis on the out-of-transit data only, showing that the residual telluric contamination is well within the error bars. While these techniques are very efficient when multiple nights of observations are combined together, our results prove that even one good night of observations is enough to provide statistically meaningful data. Our observed spectra are consistent with space-based data recorded in the same wavelength interval by multiple instruments, indicating that ground-based facilities are becoming a viable and complementary option to spaceborne observatories. The best fit to the features in our data was obtained with water vapor. Our error bars are not small enough to address the presence of additional molecules; however, by combining the information contained in other data sets with our results, it is possible to explain all the available observations with a modeled atmospheric spectrum containing water vapor, methane, carbon monoxide, and hazes/clouds.

  10. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  11. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  12. Damping scaling factors for elastic response spectra for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions: "average" horizontal component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Abrahamson, Norman; Campbell, Kenneth; Silva, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and nonstructural systems can have other damping ratios. This paper develops a new model for a damping scaling factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE for damping ratios between 0.5% to 30%. The model is developed based on empirical data from worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions. Dependencies of the DSF on potential predictor variables, such as the damping ratio, spectral period, ground motion duration, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, and site conditions, are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by the inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions show weak influence on the DSF. The proposed damping scaling model provides functional forms for the median and logarithmic standard deviation of DSF, and is developed for both RotD50 and GMRotI50 horizontal components. A follow-up paper develops a DSF model for vertical ground motion.

  13. Closed-form critical earthquake response of elastic-plastic structures on compliant ground under near-fault ground motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro eKojima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The double impulse is introduced as a substitute of the fling-step near-fault ground motion. A closed-form solution of the elastic-plastic response of a structure on compliant (flexible ground by the ‘critical double impulse’ is derived for the first time based on the solution for the corresponding structure with fixed base. As in the case of fixed-base model, only the free-vibration appears under such double impulse and the energy approach plays an important role in the derivation of the closed-form solution of a complicated elastic-plastic response on compliant ground. It is remarkable that no iteration is needed in the derivation of the critical elastic-plastic response. It is shown via the closed-form expression that, in the case of a smaller input level of double impulse to the structural strength, as the ground stiffness becomes larger, the maximum plastic deformation becomes larger. On the other hand, in the case of a larger input level of double impulse to the structural strength, as the ground stiffness becomes smaller, the maximum plastic deformation becomes larger. The criticality and validity of the proposed theory are investigated through the comparison with the response analysis to the corresponding one-cycle sinusoidal input as a representative of the fling-step near-fault ground motion. The applicability of the proposed theory to actual recorded pulse-type ground motions is also discussed.

  14. Seismic Safety Program: Ground motion and structural response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    In 1964, John A. Blume & Associates Research Division (Blume) began a broad-range structural response program to assist the Nevada Operations Office of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in ensuring the continued safe conduct of underground nuclear detonation testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Blume`s long experience in earthquake engineering provided a general basis for the program, but much more specialized knowledge was required for the AEC`s purposes. Over the next 24 years Blume conducted a major research program to provide essential understanding of the detailed nature of the response of structures to dynamic loads such as those imposed by seismic wave propagation. The program`s results have been embodied in a prediction technology which has served to provide reliable advanced knowledge of the probable effects of seismic ground motion on all kinds of structures, for use in earthquake engineering and in building codes as well as for the continuing needs of the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). This report is primarily an accounting of the Blume work, beginning with the setting in 1964 and the perception of the program needs as envisioned by Dr. John A. Blume. Subsequent chapters describe the structural response program in detail and the structural prediction procedures which resulted; the intensive data acquisition program which, as is discussed at some length, relied heavily on the contributions of other consultant-contractors in the DOE/NV Seismic Safety Support Program; laboratory and field studies to provide data on building elements and structures subjected to dynamic loads from sources ranging from testing machines to earthquakes; structural response activities undertaken for testing at the NTS and for off-NTS underground nuclear detonations; and concluding with an account of corollary studies including effects of natural forces and of related studies on building response.

  15. A STUDY ON APPLICABILITY OF GROUND RESPONSE ACCELERATION METHOD TO DEEP VERTICAL UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mai; Shiba, Yukio; Watanabe, Kazuaki

    This paper discusses the applicability of ground response acceleration method to seismic analysis for deep vertical underground structures. To examine the applicability, an analysis of relationships between response of ground and the shaft was conducted. It was found from the analysis that vertical axial stress of the shaft was not correspond with shear stress of ground. Accordingly, it was concluded that the axial stress was not evaluated correctly by the existing method. Therefore, to extend the applicability of the method, ground responses correlated with the axial stress were analyzed and a new method using these ground responses was proposed.

  16. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  17. Response of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and spectra to concentrated wall suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewola, O.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The response of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and spectra to concentrated suction applied through a porous wall strip has been quantified. Both suction and no suction data of the spectra collapsed reasonably well for Kolmogorov normalised wavenumber k {1/*} > 0.2. Similar results were also observed for second-order structure functions (not shown) for Kolmogorov normalised radius r* suction results shows a significant departure from the no suction case of the Kolmogorov normalised spectra and second-order structure functions for k {1/*} 20, respectively. The departure at the larger scales with collapse at the small scales suggests that suction induce a change in the small-scale motion. This is also reflected in the alteration of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and Taylor microscale Reynolds number. This change is a result of the weakening of the large-scale structures. The effect is increased as the suction rate is increased.

  18. A database of neutron spectra, instrument response functions, and dosimetric conversion factors for radiation protection applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naismith, O.F. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Siebert, B.R.L. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    One of the major problems encountered in dose assessment for neutron radiation protection derives from the imperfect dose equivalent response of the devices used for monitoring. To investigate the performance of such devices in realistic neutron fields and to optimise calibration procedures, knowledge of both the prevalent spectral fluences and the energy response of the dosemeters is required. To facilitate this and similar studies, a database has been developed comprising a catalogue of neutron spectra and energy-dependent response functions together with a software package to manipulate the data in the catalogue. The range of data, features of the programs, and examples for radiation protection applications are described. (author).

  19. Earthquake Ground Motion Measures for Seismic Response Evaluation of Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, In-Kil; Ahn, Seong-Moon; Choun, Young-Sun; Seo, Jeong-Moon

    2007-03-15

    This study used the assessment results of failure criteria - base shear, story drift, top acceleration and top displacement - for a PSC containment building subjected to 30 sets of near-fault ground motions to evaluate the earthquake ground motion intensity measures. Seven intensity measures, peak ground acceleration(PGA), peak ground velocity(PGV), spectral acceleration(Sa), velocity(Sv), spectrum intensity for acceleration(SIa), velocity(SIv) and displacement(SId), were used to represent alternative ground motion. The regression analyses of the failure criteria for a PSC containment building were carried out to evaluate a proper intensity measure by using two regression models and seven ground motion parameters. The regression analysis results demonstrate the correlation coefficients of the failure criteria in terms of the candidate IM. From the results, spectral acceleration(Sa) is estimated as the best parameter for a evaluation of the structural safety for a seismic PSA.

  20. Parallel finite element modeling of earthquake ground response and liquefaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinchi Lu(陆金池); Jun Peng(彭军); Ahmed Elgamal; Zhaohui Yang(杨朝晖); Kincho H. Law

    2004-01-01

    Parallel computing is a promising approach to alleviate the computational demand in conducting large-scale finite element analyses. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for earthquake ground response and liquefaction using the parallel nonlinear finite element program, ParCYCLIC, designed for distributed-memory message-passing parallel computer systems. In ParCYCLIC, finite elements are employed within an incremental plasticity, coupled solid-fluid formulation. A constitutive model calibrated by physical tests represents the salient characteristics of sand liquefaction and associated accumulation of shear deformations. Key elements of the computational strategy employed in ParCYCLIC include the development of a parallel sparse direct solver, the deployment of an automatic domain decomposer, and the use of the Multilevel Nested Dissection algorithm for ordering of the finite element nodes. Simulation results of centrifuge test models using ParCYCLIC are presented. Performance results from grid models and geotechnical simulations show that ParCYCLIC is efficiently scalable to a large number of processors.

  1. General Method for Calculating the Response and Noise Spectra of Active Fabry-Perot Semiconductor Waveguides With External Optical Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaaberg, Søren; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    of the input field can be calculated. Both responses and noise spectra are given through semianalytical expressions taking into account the longitudinal extent and finite end-facet reflectivities of the active device. Different examples of responses and spectra are presented for semiconductor optical...

  2. Understanding vegetation response to climate variability from space: the scientific objectives, the approach and the concept of the SPECTRA Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.

    2002-06-01

    The response of vegetation to climate variability is a major scientific question. The monitoring of the carbon stock in terrestrial environments, as well as the improved understanding of the surface-atmosphere interactions controlling the exchange of matter, energy and momentum, is of immediate interest for an improved assessment of the various components of the global carbon cycle. Studies of the Earth System processes at the global scale rely on models that require an advanced understanding and proper characterization of processes at smaller scales. The goal of the SPECTRA mission is to improve the description of those processes by means of better constraints on and parameterizations of the associated models. Many vegetation properties are related to features of reflectance spectra in the region 400 nm - 2500 nm. Detailed observations of spectral reflectance reveal subtle features related to biochemical components of leaves such as chlorophyll and water. The architecture of vegetation canopies determines complex changes of observed reflectance spectra with view and illumination angle. Quantitative analysis of reflectance spectra requires, therefore, an accurate characterization of the anisotropy of reflected radiance. This can be achieved with nearly simultaneous observations at different view angles. Exchange of energy between the biosphere and the atmosphere is an important mechanism determining the response of vegetation to climate variability. This requires measurements of the component temperature of foliage and soil. The prime objective of SPECTRA is to determine the amount, assess the conditions and understand the response of terrestrial vegetation to climate variability and its role in the coupled cycles of energy, water and carbon. The amount and state of vegetation will be determined by the combination of observed vegetation properties and data assimilation. Specifically, the mission will characterize the amount and state of vegetation with observations

  3. Understanding vegetation response to climate variability from space the scientific objectives, the approach and the concept of the Spectra Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.; Rast, M.; Baret, F.; Hurk, B.; Knorr, W.; Mauser, W.; Miller, J.; Schaepman, M.; Schimel, D.; Verstraete, M.

    The response of vegetation to climate variability is a major scientific question. The monitoring of the carbon stock in terrestrial environments, as well as the improved understanding of the surface-atmosphere interactions controlling the exchange of matter, energy and momentum, is of immediate interest for an improved assessment of the various components of the global carbon cycle. Studies of the Earth System processes at the global scale rely on models that require an advanced understanding and proper characterization of processes at smaller scales. The goal of the SPECTRA mission is to improve the description of those processes by means of better constraints on and parameterizations of the associated models. Many vegetation properties are related to features of reflectance spectra in the region 400 nm - 2500 nm. Detailed observations of spectral reflectance reveal subtle features related to biochemical components of leaves such as chlorophyll and water. The architecture of vegetation canopies determines complex changes of observed reflectance spectra with view and illumination angle. Quantitative analysis of reflectance spectra requires, therefore, an accurate characterization of the anisotropy of reflected radiance. This can be achieved with nearly - simultaneous observations at different view angles. Exchange of energy between the biosphere and the atmosphere is an important mechanism determining the response of vegetation to climate variability. This requires measurements of the component t mperature ofe foliage and soil. The prime objective of SPECTRA is to determine the amount, assess the conditions and understand the response of terrestrial vegetation to climate variability and its role in the coupled cycles of energy, water and carbon. The amount and state of vegetation will be determined by the combination of observed vegetation properties and data assimilation. Specifically, the mission will characterize the amount and state of vegetation with

  4. Understanding Vegetation Response To Climate Variability From Space: The Scientific Objectives< The Approach and The Concept of The Spectra Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.; Rast, M.; Baret, F.; Mauser, W.; Miller, J.; Schaepman, M.; Schimel, D.; Verstraete, M.

    The response of vegetation to climate variability is a major scientific question. The monitoring of the carbon stock in terrestrial environments, as well as the improved understanding of the surface-atmosphere interactions controlling the exchange of mat- ter, energy and momentum, is of immediate interest for an improved assessment of the various components of the global carbon cycle. Studies of the Earth System processes at the global scale rely on models that require an advanced understanding and proper characterization of processes at smaller scales. The goal of the SPECTRA mission is to improve the description of those processes by means of better constraints on and parameterizations of the associated models. Many vegetation properties are related to features of reflectance spectra in the region 400 nm U 2500 nm. Detailed observa- tions of spectral reflectance reveal subtle features related to biochemical components of leaves such as chlorophyll and water. The architecture of vegetation canopies de- termines complex changes of observed reflectance spectra with view and illumination angle. Quantitative analysis of reflectance spectra requires, therefore, an accurate char- acterization of the anisotropy of reflected radiance. This can be achieved with nearly U simultaneous observations at different view angles. Exchange of energy between the biosphere and the atmosphere is an important mechanism determining the response of vegetation to climate variability. This requires measurements of the component tem- perature of foliage and soil. The prime objective of SPECTRA is to determine the amount, assess the conditions and understand the response of terrestrial vegetation to climate variability and its role in the coupled cycles of energy, water and carbon. The amount and state of vegetation will be determined by the combination of observed vegetation properties and data assimilation. Specifically, the mission will character- ize the amount and state of vegetation

  5. Determination of floor response spectra for the Brookhaven HFBR reactor building structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subudhi, M.; Goradia, H.

    1978-11-01

    In order to perform the dynamic analysis of various structural components of the HFBR reactor building at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) subjected to seismic disturbances, it is necessary to obtain the floor response spectra of the primary structure. The mathematical model includes the four floor levels of the internal structure, the dome, and soil spring effects. The standard time history analysis is adopted to obtain the response spectrum for each floor of the internal structure. This report summarizes the results both in tabular and graphical form for various damping values.

  6. Effects on the Floor Response Spectra by the Nonlinear Behavior of a Seismic Base Isolation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyungkui; Kim, Jung Han; Choi, Inkil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    An evaluation of safety being carried out for various risk factors of prevents for nuclear power plant accident. In general, an evaluation of the structural integrity was performed about seismic risk. In recent years, an assessment of integrity of internal equipment being carried out for earthquake loads owing to the possibility of severe accidents caused by the destruction of internal equipment or a blackout. Floor response spectra of the structure should be sought for evaluating of the integrity of internal equipment. The floor response spectra depends on the characteristics of seismic base isolation system such as the natural frequency, damping ratio, and height of the floor of the structure. An evaluation of the structural integrity using the equivalent stiffness of the seismic base isolation system was satisfactory. In this study, the effect of the non-linearity of isolated system in the floor response spectrum of the structure is analyzed. In this study, the floor response spectrum of the seismic base isolation system by the non-linear effect of the rubber isolator was analyzed. As a result, the influence of the non-linear isolated system was increased in hi-frequency domain. In addition, each floor exhibited a more different of responses compared with the equivalent linear model of the isolated structure. The non-linearity of the isolation system of the structure was considered, because of a more reliable assessment of integrity of equipment at each floor of seismic base the isolation system.

  7. Solvent effects on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of quinine sulphate: Estimation of ground and excited-state dipole moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D.

    2012-06-01

    Ground and excited state dipole moments of probe quinine sulphate (QS) was obtained using Solvatochromic shift method. Higher dipole moment is observed for excited state as compared to the ground state which is attributed to the higher polarity of excited state.

  8. Response of base isolation system excited by spectrum compatible ground motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In Kil [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Structures in a nuclear power system are designed to be elastic even under an earthquake excitation. However a structural component such as an isolator shows inelastic behavior inherently. For the seismic assessment of nonlinear structures, the response history analysis should be performed. Especially for the performance based design, where the failure probability of a system needs to be evaluated, the variation of response should be evaluated. In this study, the spectrum compatible ground motions, the artificial ground motion and the modified ground motion, were generated. Using these ground motions, the variations of seismic responses of a simplified isolation system were evaluated.

  9. One dimensional equivalent linear ground response analysis - A case study of collapsed Margalla Tower in Islamabad during 2005 Muzaffarabad Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Rehman, Zia-ur-; Farooq, Khalid; Memon, Shazim Ali

    2016-07-01

    One dimensional equivalent linear ground response analysis was conducted in the Margalla Tower building in Islamabad, which collapsed during 2005 Muzaffarabad Earthquake. The analyses were conducted in DEEPSOIL software, without considering the effect of ground water table. The input subsoil data were selected from laboratory and field tests conducted for the site with bedrock at a depth of 21 m as per site condition. The field and laboratory testing data showed that the subsoil beneath the Tower site was silty clay to lean clay according to the unified soil classification system. Four different accelerograms with PGA values of 0.17 g, 0.15 g, 0.22 g and 0.21 g, compatible with the earthquake in the target area were applied at the bedrock. The surface response spectra showed that, except the Accelerogram-1 all other three were amplified near the fundamental period of the site. The analyses showed that different PGA values (0.26 g, 0.21 g, 0.36 g and 0.21 g) were produced at the surface which can be explained due to the difference in the Fourier amplitude of input accelerograms. Furthermore, the different input accelerograms produced a different shear strain and thus mobilized different shear strengths along the soil profile depth. Finally, the calculated response spectra of accelerograms were compared with the response spectra of Islamabad. The calculated spectral acceleration values were found to be higher than reported by the Building Code of Pakistan (0.16 g to 0.24 g).

  10. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraja, Jana; Kumar, H M Suresh; Inamdar, S R; Wari, M N

    2016-02-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π→π⁎ transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μ(e)). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μ(e)) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state.

  11. A Preliminary Analysis on Empirical Attenuation of Absolute Velocity Response Spectra (1 to 10s) in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Y. P.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Aoi, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Mw 9.1 Tohoku-oki earthquake caused strong shakings of super high rise and high rise buildings constructed on deep sedimentary basins in Japan. Many people felt difficulty in moving inside the high rise buildings even on the Osaka basin located at distances as far as 800 km from the epicentral area. Several empirical equations are proposed to estimate the peak ground motions and absolute acceleration response spectra applicable mainly within 300 to 500km from the source area. On the other hand, Japan Meteorological Agency has recently proposed four classes of absolute velocity response spectra as suitable indices to qualitatively describe the intensity of long-period ground motions based on the observed earthquake records, human experiences, and actual damages that occurred in the high rise and super high rise buildings. The empirical prediction equations have been used in disaster mitigation planning as well as earthquake early warning. In this study, we discuss the results of our preliminary analysis on attenuation relation of absolute velocity response spectra calculated from the observed strong motion records including those from the Mw 9.1 Tohoku-oki earthquake using simple regression models with various model parameters. We used earthquakes, having Mw 6.5 or greater, and focal depths shallower than 50km, which occurred in and around Japanese archipelago. We selected those earthquakes for which the good quality records are available over 50 observation sites combined from K-NET and KiK-net. After a visual inspection on approximately 21,000 three component records from 36 earthquakes, we used about 15,000 good quality records in the period range of 1 to 10s within the hypocentral distance (R) of 800km. We performed regression analyses assuming the following five regression models. (1) log10Y (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR (2) log10Y (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR +gS (3) log10Y (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR + hD (4) log10Y (T) = c+ aMw - log10R - bR +gS +hD (5) log10Y

  12. Detector-Response Correction of Two-Dimensional γ-Ray Spectra from Neutron Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusev G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron-capture reaction produces a large variety of γ-ray cascades with different γ-ray multiplicities. A measured spectral distribution of these cascades for each γ-ray multiplicity is of importance to applications and studies of γ-ray statistical properties. The DANCE array, a 4π ball of 160 BaF2 detectors, is an ideal tool for measurement of neutron-capture γ-rays. The high granularity of DANCE enables measurements of high-multiplicity γ-ray cascades. The measured two-dimensional spectra (γ-ray energy, γ-ray multiplicity have to be corrected for the DANCE detector response in order to compare them with predictions of the statistical model or use them in applications. The detector-response correction problem becomes more difficult for a 4π detection system than for a single detector. A trial and error approach and an iterative decomposition of γ-ray multiplets, have been successfully applied to the detector-response correction. Applications of the decomposition methods are discussed for two-dimensional γ-ray spectra measured at DANCE from γ-ray sources and from the 10B(n, γ and 113Cd(n, γ reactions.

  13. Monitoring the intensity of locust damage to vegetation using hyper-spectra data obtained at ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Shaoxiang; Wu, Tong

    2007-09-01

    Since 1980s of the last century, outbreak of Oriental Migratory Locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis Meyen) has rampantly emerged again in some regions of China. It is extremely important to monitor efficiently the locust damage to vegetation in order to control this kind of insect pest. In this paper, taking Huanghua County of Hebei province, China as the study area and based on the in situ hyper-spectral data, the differences in canopy reflectance spectra and the characteristic parameters of hyper-spectra were analyzed and compared for the reeds at normal growing and for those under encroaching from locusts. In addition, five models were developed to simulate the relations between the characteristic parameters of hyper-spectra and Leaf Area Index (LAI) of reeds. The result showed that among those indices the locust damage spectra index (LDSI) is mostly applicable to reflect the intensity of locust damage in the study area. Finally, a scheme for the intensity distinction of locust damage to reeds was suggested based on LDSI data, i.e., no damage if LDSI is over 62.856, slightly damage if LDSI is between 41.254 and 59.496, and seriously damage if LDSI is less than 41.254.

  14. Breast Cancer Spatial Heterogeneity in Near-Infrared Spectra and the Prediction of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ylenia

    Breast cancer accounts for more than 20% of all female cancers. Many of these patients receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) to reduce the size of the tumor before surgery and to anticipate the efficacy of treatments for after the procedure. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that comes in several clinical and histological forms. The prediction of the efficacy of chemotherapy would potentially select good candidates who would respond while excluding poor candidates who would not benefit from treatment. In this work we investigate the possibility of noninvasively predicting chemotherapy response prior to treatment based on optical biomarkers obtained from tumor spatial heterogeneities of spectral features measured using Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy. We describe an algorithm to calculate an index that characterizes spatial differences in broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of tumor-containing breast tissue. Patient-specific tumor spatial heterogeneities are visualized through a Heterogeneity Spectrum (HS). HS is a biomarker that can be attributed to different molecular distributions within the tumor. To classify lesion heterogeneities, we built a Heterogeneity Index (HI) from the HS by weighing specific absorption bands. It has been shown that NAC response is potentially related to tumor heterogeneity. Therefore, we correlate the HI obtained prior to treatment with the final response to NAC. In this thesis we also present a novel digital parallel frequency domain system for tissue imaging. The systems employs a supercontinuum laser with high brightness, and a photomultiplier with a large detection area, both allowing a deep penetration with extremely low power on the sample. The digital parallel acquisition is performed through the use of the Flimbox and it decreases the time required for standard serial systems that need to scan through all modulation frequencies. The all-digital acquisition removes analog noise, avoids the analog mixer and it does not

  15. Exciton Absorption Spectra by Linear Response Methods: Application to Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Martín A; Jackson, Nicholas E; Fauvell, Thomas J; Kelley, Matthew S; Chen, Lin X; Schatz, George C; Ratner, Mark A

    2017-03-15

    The theoretical description of the time-evolution of excitons requires, as an initial step, the calculation of their spectra, which has been inaccessible to most users due to the high computational scaling of conventional algorithms and accuracy issues caused by common density functionals. Previously (J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 144, 204105), we developed a simple method that resolves these issues. Our scheme is based on a two-step calculation in which a linear-response TDDFT calculation is used to generate orbitals perturbed by the excitonic state, and then a second linear-response TDDFT calculation is used to determine the spectrum of excitations relative to the excitonic state. Herein, we apply this theory to study near-infrared absorption spectra of excitons in oligomers of the ubiquitous conjugated polymers poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV), and poly(benzodithiophene-thieno[3,4-b]thiophene) (PTB7). For P3HT and MEH-PPV oligomers, the calculated intense absorption bands converge at the longest wavelengths for 10 monomer units, and show strong consistency with experimental measurements. The calculations confirm that the exciton spectral features in MEH-PPV overlap with those of the bipolaron formation. In addition, our calculations identify the exciton absorption bands in transient absorption spectra measured by our group for oligomers (1, 2, and 3 units) of PTB7. For all of the cases studied, we report the dominant orbital excitations contributing to the optically active excited state-excited state transitions, and suggest a simple rule to identify absorption peaks at the longest wavelengths. We suggest our methodology could be considered for further developments in theoretical transient spectroscopy to include nonadiabatic effects, coherences, and to describe the formation of species such as charge-transfer states and polaron pairs.

  16. Structural Design and Response in Collision and Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Alan; Tikka, Kirsi; Daidola, John C.

    2000-01-01

    The results summarized in this paper represent the work of SNAME Ad Hoc Panel #6 convened under the SNAME Technical and Research Program. This is a summary and overview paper. Topics discussed will be addressed individually and in more detail in later publications. The 2nd International Conference...... on Collision and Grounding of Ships, to be held in Copenhagen, July 1-3,2001, will also present and discuss many of the results of this panel and other related research. The paper discusses four primary areas of panel work: collision and grounding models, data, accident scenarios and design applications...... striking-ship bow models and their application are described. Potential design applications and alternatives for improving crashworthiness are discussed....

  17. Thermomechanical modelling of ground response under environmental actions.

    OpenAIRE

    Samat, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters, such as landslides triggered by heavy rains, rock deformations and soil cracking in presence of temperature changes and other phenomena related to climatic actions, show the relevance of investigating the effects of the interactions between the atmosphere and the earth ground surface where main human activities develop. The prediction of such hazard requires an adequate knowledge of the changes in hydro-geological conditions under climatic actions. Having advanced constitut...

  18. Response of a pipeline to ground movements caused by trenching in compressible alluvium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, D. R.; Taylor, M. E.; Pocock, R. G.

    Disturbance of the ground due to work on buried services, such as the renewal, replacement or construction of deep sewers, is likely to cause differential ground movements in the vicinity. This may be a factor contributing to failure in nearby service pipelines such as drainage, gas and water mains. The response of an instrumented shallow buried pipeline to ground movements caused by adjacent deep trenching in a compressible alluvium is described.

  19. Seismic Responses of Asymmetric Base-Isolated Structures under Near-Fault Ground Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Kun; LI Li; FANG Qin-han

    2008-01-01

    An inter-story shear model of asymmetric base-isolated structures incorporating deformation of each isolation bearing was built, and a method to simultaneously simulate bi-directional near-fault and far-field ground motions was proposed. A comparative study on the dynamic responses of asymmetric base-isolated structures under near-fault and far-field ground motions were conducted to investigate the effects of eccentricity in the isolation system and in the superstructures, the ratio of the uncoupled torsional to lateral frequency of the superstructure and the pulse period of near-fault ground motions on the nonlinear seismic response of asymmetric base-isolated structures. Numerical results show that eccentricity in the isolation system makes asymmetric base-isolated structure more sensitive to near-fault ground motions, and the pulse period of near-fault ground motions plays an import role in governing the seismic responses of asymmetric base-isolated structures.

  20. Legume ground covers alter defoliation response of black walnut saplings to drought and anthracnose

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Van Sambeek

    2003-01-01

    Growth and premature defoliation of black walnut saplings underplanted 5 or 6 years earlier with six different ground covers were quantified in response to a summer drought or anthracnose. Walnut saplings growing with ground covers of hairy vetch, crownvetch, and to a lesser extent sericea lespedeza continued to have more rapid height and diameter growth than saplings...

  1. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancements in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. Two Distinct Testing Environments: a) GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage - GODU LH2; b) GODU Autonomous Control - GODU LO2. Scope: I. GODU LH2: a) Investigate alternative storage and distribution architecture for future cryogenic propellant operations. b) Demonstrate advanced cryogenic propellant handling operations (liquefaction, storage and distribution) of normal boiling point and sub-cooled cryogenic propellants. II. GODU L02: a) Develop and demonstrate advanced control and health management technologies and techniques to autonomously control cryogenic propellant servicing operations. b) Investigate modern COTS hardware and control systems in an effort to reduce the "standing army" of engineers associated with maintaining and operating ground systems through the use of health management and autonomous control technologies. Goals: a) Raise Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and Integration Readiness Levels (IRL) of several key technology development areas. b) Reduce operations lifecycle costs of future test programs and launch complexes. c) Demonstrate technologies for future exploration beyond low earth orbit. d) Serve as test environments for extraterrestrial surface operations.

  2. Kalman filtering for neural prediction of response spectra from mining tremors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krok, A.; Waszczyszyn, Z. [Cracow University of Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2007-08-15

    Acceleration response spectra (ARS) for mining tremors in the Upper Silesian Coalfield, Poland are generated using neural networks trained by means of Kalman filtering. The target ARS were computed on the base of measured accelerograms. It was proved that the standard feed-forward, layered neural network, trained by the DEFK (decoupled extended Kalman filter) algorithm is numerically much less efficient than the standard recurrent NN learnt by Recurrent DEKF, cf. (Haykin S, (editor). Kalman filtering and neural networks. New York: John Wiley & Sons; 2001). It is also shown that the studied KF algorithms are better than the traditional Resilient-Propagation learning method. The improvement of the training process and neural prediction due to introduction of an autoregressive input is also discussed in the paper.

  3. Diagrammatic expansion for positive density-response spectra: Application to the electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uimonen, A.-M.; Stefanucci, G.; Pavlyukh, Y.; van Leeuwen, R.

    2015-03-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. B 90, 115134 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.115134] we put forward a diagrammatic expansion for the self-energy which guarantees the positivity of the spectral function. In this work we extend the theory to the density-response function. We write the generic diagram for the density-response spectrum as the sum of "partitions." In a partition the original diagram is evaluated using time-ordered Green's functions on the left half of the diagram, antitime-ordered Green's functions on the right half of the diagram, and lesser or greater Green's function gluing the two halves. As there exists more than one way to cut a diagram in two halves, to every diagram corresponds more than one partition. We recognize that the most convenient diagrammatic objects for constructing a theory of positive spectra are the half-diagrams. Diagrammatic approximations obtained by summing the squares of half-diagrams do indeed correspond to a combination of partitions which, by construction, yield a positive spectrum. We develop the theory using bare Green's functions and subsequently extend it to dressed Green's functions. We further prove a connection between the positivity of the spectral function and the analytic properties of the polarizability. The general theory is illustrated with several examples and then applied to solve the long-standing problem of including vertex corrections without altering the positivity of the spectrum. In fact already the first-order vertex diagram, relevant to the study of gradient expansion, Friedel oscillations, etc., leads to spectra which are negative in certain frequency domain. We find that the simplest approximation to cure this deficiency is given by the sum of the zeroth-order bubble diagram, the first-order vertex diagram, and a partition of the second-order ladder diagram. We evaluate this approximation in the three-dimensional homogeneous electron gas and show the positivity of the spectrum for all frequencies and

  4. Spectroscopic analysis of asymmetric top free radicals --Application to pure rotational spectra of NO2 in the ground vibronic state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yuyan

    2001-01-01

    [1]Sears, T. J., The calculation of the energy levels of an asymmetric top free radical in a magnetic field, Comput. Phys. Rep., 1984, 2: 1..[2]Davies, P. B., Liu, Y., Liu, Z., Far infrared LMR spectra of monobromomethyl radicals, Chem. Phys. Lett., 1993, 214: 305.[3]Nolte, J., Wagner, H. G., Sears, T. J. et al., The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of CH2F, J. Mol. Spec-trosc., 1999, 195: 43.[4]Sears, T. J., ASYTOP--A program for detailed analysis of gas phase magnetic resonance spectra of asymmetric top molecules, Comput. Phys. Commun., 1984, 34: 123.[5]Papousek, D., Aliev, M. R., Molecular Vibrational Rotational Spectra, Prague: Academia, 1982, 72.[6]Matsushima, F., Nagase, H., Nakauchi, T. et al., Frequency measurement of pure rotational transitions of H2O, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 1999, 193: 217.[7]Bowater, I. C., Brown, J. M., Carrington, A., Microwave spectroscopy of nonlinear free radicals, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, 1973, 333: 265.[8]Castellano, S., Bothner-by, A. A., Analysis of NMR spectra by least squares, J. Chem. Phys., 1964, 41: 3863.[9]Bird, G. R., Microwave spectrum of NO2, J. Chem. Phys., 1956, 25: 1040.[10]Bird, G. R., Baird, J. C., Jache, A. W. et al., Microwave spectrum of NO2: fine structure and magnetic coupling, J. Chem. Phys., 1964, 40: 3378.[11]Lees, R. M., Curl, R. F., Baker, J. G., Millimeter-wavelength microwave spectrum of nitrogen dioxide, J. Chem. Phys., 1966, 45: 2037.[12]Baron, P. A., Godfrey, P. D., Harris, D. O., Microwave spectrum of NO2 at 70 GHz, J. Chem. Phys., 1974, 60: 3723.[13]Bowman, W. C., De Lucia, F. C., The millimeter and submillimeter spectrum of NO2, J. Chem. Phys., 1982, 77: 92.[14]Semmoud-Monnanteuil, N., Colmont, J. M., Perrin, A. et al., New measurements in the millimeter-wave spectrum of NO2, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 1989, 134: 176.[15]Baskakov, O. I., Moskienko, M. V., Dyubko, S. F., Submillimeter rotational spectrum of nitrogen dioxide, Opt

  5. Breast cancer spatial heterogeneity in near-infrared spectra and the prediction of neoadjuvant chemotherapy response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ylenia; Leproux, Anaïs; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Gratton, Enrico

    2011-09-01

    We describe an algorithm to calculate an index that characterizes spatial differences in broadband near-infrared [(NIR), 650-1000 nm] absorption spectra of tumor-containing breast tissue. Patient-specific tumor spatial heterogeneities are visualized through a heterogeneity spectrum function (HS). HS is a biomarker that can be attributed to different molecular distributions within the tumor. To classify lesion heterogeneities, we built a heterogeneity index (HI) derived from the HS by weighing the HS in specific NIR absorption bands. It is shown that neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) response is potentially related to the tumor heterogeneity. Therefore, we correlate the heterogeneity index obtained prior to treatment with the final response to NAC. From a pilot study of 15 cancer patients treated with NAC, pathological complete responders (pCR) were separated from non-pCR according to their HI (-44 +/- 12 and 43 +/- 17, p = 3 × 10-8, respectively). We conclude that the HS function is a biomarker that can be used to visualize spatial heterogeneities in lesions, and the baseline HI prior to therapy correlates with chemotherapy pathological response.

  6. Electromagnetic modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar responses to complex targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonis

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the electromagnetic modelling of composite structures for Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) applications. It was developed within the Short-Term Scientific Mission ECOST-STSM-TU1208-211013-035660, funded by COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar". The Authors define a set of test concrete structures, hereinafter called cells. The size of each cell is 60 x 100 x 18 cm and the content varies with growing complexity, from a simple cell with few rebars of different diameters embedded in concrete at increasing depths, to a final cell with a quite complicated pattern, including a layer of tendons between two overlying meshes of rebars. Other cells, of intermediate complexity, contain pvc ducts (air filled or hosting rebars), steel objects commonly used in civil engineering (as a pipe, an angle bar, a box section and an u-channel), as well as void and honeycombing defects. One of the cells has a steel mesh embedded in it, overlying two rebars placed diagonally across the comers of the structure. Two cells include a couple of rebars bent into a right angle and placed on top of each other, with a square/round circle lying at the base of the concrete slab. Inspiration for some of these cells is taken from the very interesting experimental work presented in Ref. [1]. For each cell, a subset of models with growing complexity is defined, starting from a simple representation of the cell and ending with a more realistic one. In particular, the model's complexity increases from the geometrical point of view, as well as in terms of how the constitutive parameters of involved media and GPR antennas are described. Some cells can be simulated in both two and three dimensions; the concrete slab can be approximated as a finite-thickness layer having infinite extension on the transverse plane, thus neglecting how edges affect radargrams, or else its finite size can be fully taken into account. The permittivity of concrete can be

  7. Site specific seismic hazard analysis and determination of response spectra of Kolkata for maximum considered earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiuly, Amit; Sahu, R. B.; Mandal, Saroj

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents site specific seismic hazard analysis of Kolkata city, former capital of India and present capital of state West Bengal, situated on the world’s largest delta island, Bengal basin. For this purpose, peak ground acceleration (PGA) for a maximum considered earthquake (MCE) at bedrock level has been estimated using an artificial neural network (ANN) based attenuation relationship developed on the basis of synthetic ground motion data for the region. Using the PGA corresponding to the MCE, a spectrum compatible acceleration time history at bedrock level has been generated by using a wavelet based computer program, WAVEGEN. This spectrum compatible time history at bedrock level has been converted to the same at surface level using SHAKE2000 for 144 borehole locations in the study region. Using the predicted values of PGA and PGV at the surface, corresponding contours for the region have been drawn. For the MCE, the PGA at bedrock level of Kolkata city has been obtained as 0.184 g, while that at the surface level varies from 0.22 g to 0.37 g. Finally, Kolkata has been subdivided into eight seismic subzones, and for each subzone a response spectrum equation has been derived using polynomial regression analysis. This will be very helpful for structural and geotechnical engineers to design safe and economical earthquake resistant structures.

  8. The rotational spectra of the ground and first excited bending states of deuterium isocyanide, DNC, up to 2 THz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brünken, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Thorwirth, S.; Lewen, F.; Winnewisser, G.

    2006-01-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of deuterium isocyanide (DNC) was recorded in the frequency range from approximately 680 to 1985 GHz. Twenty-one new transitions in the vibrational ground and first excited bending states (01e,f 0) have been assigned, namely R-branch transitions from J=9-8 to 25-24. In a least squares analysis of these new transition frequencies together with previously reported millimeter-wave data, spectroscopic parameters up to sextic order could be derived with high precision for both states. Furthermore, the l-type doubling constant q and its centrifugal distortion terms qJ and qJJ were obtained for the first excited bending state.

  9. 0.94 - 2.42 micron ground-based transmission spectra of the hot-Jupiter HD-189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Danielski, C; Waldmann, I P; Hollis, M D J; Tinetti, G; Swain, M R

    2012-01-01

    We present here new transmission spectra of the hot Jupiter HD-189733b using the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We obtained two nights of observations where we recorded the primary transit of the planet in the J-, H- and K-bands simultaneously, covering a total spectral range from 0.94 to 2.4 micron. We used Fourier analysis and other de-trending techniques validated previously on other datasets to clean the data. We tested the statistical significance of our results by calculating the auto-correlation function, and we found that, after the detrending, white noise dominates at most frequencies. Additionally, we repeated our analysis on the out-of-transit data only, showing that the residual telluric contamination is well within the error bars. While these techniques are very efficient when multiple nights of observations are combined together, our results prove that even one good night of observations is enough to provide statistically meaningful data, which might appear counterintui...

  10. Hazard consistent structural demands and in-structure design response spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Thomas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costantino, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costantino, Carl J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Current analysis methodology for the Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear facilities is specified in ASCE Standard 4. This methodology is based on the use of deterministic procedures with the intention that enough conservatism is included in the specified procedures to achieve an 80% probability of non-exceedance in the computed response of a Structure, System. or Component for given a mean seismic design input. Recently developed standards are aimed at achieving performance-based, risk consistent seismic designs that meet specified target performance goals. These design approaches rely upon accurately characterizing the probability (hazard) level of system demands due to seismic loads consistent with Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analyses. This paper examines the adequacy of the deterministic SSI procedures described in ASCE 4-98 to achieve an 80th percentile of Non-Exceedance Probability (NEP) in structural demand, given a mean seismic input motion. The study demonstrates that the deterministic procedures provide computed in-structure response spectra that are near or greater than the target 80th percentile NEP for site profiles other than those resulting in high levels of radiation damping. The deterministic procedures do not appear to be as robust in predicting peak accelerations, which correlate to structural demands within the structure.

  11. An explicit time domain solution for ground stratum response to harmonic moving loan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuecheng Bian; Yunmin Chen

    2006-01-01

    Based on the thin 1ayer method originally proposed in frequency domain, an explicit time domain semi-analytical solution has been developed for simulating three-dimensional layered ground responses to harmonic moving loads. The Fourier-Laplace transforms were applied to derive the transformed solution that satisfied the boundary conditions of horizontal infinities. The eigenvalue decomposition was performed with respect to Laplace parameter to express the ground motion corresponding to the eigenmodes. The formulation for each eigenmode incorporating the moving load expression was transformed back into time domain analytically, and the global system responses were given by means of the general mode superposition method. The proposed explicit time domain solution is suitable for studying various types of moving load acting on or inside the ground. In this paper a moving harmonic load with rectangular distribution was adopted to demonstrate the ground response simulation. Two illustrative examples for moving load with speeds below or above the ground Rayleigh wave velocity were presented to test the computational accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach. A parametric study was also performed to investigate the influences of soil properties on the ground responses.

  12. Development of a seismic design method based on response spectra for building structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiyuan; YU Ruifang

    2007-01-01

    The assumption and problem of the mode-superposition response spectrum method in seismic design code is discussed based on a brief review of the development of the seismic design method for building structures. The scope of application for the classical damping theory is ana- lyzed and the necessity of the research on mode-superposition method for non-classical damping is presented. The pro- gresses on the mode superposition response spectrum theory are discussed. This includes: 1) the complex mode superposi- tion method (in real form) for the non-classically damped linear system and the general calculation formula for the application of code; 2) the complex complete quadratic com- bination (CCQC) method for the non-classically damped linear system, which is based on the same assumptions as in deducing the complete quadratic combination (CQC) method which is popularly used in seismic design codes of many countries; 3) the complex complete quadratic combination with three components (CCQC3) method, which is a general- ization of the CCQC method to the case of multi-components and multiple-support seismic excitations and deducing cor- responding method; 4) the approach for calculation of seismic response of the non-classically damped system with over- critical damping and the calculation method of seismic response for the linear system with multiple eigenvalues; 5) the time-dependent CCQC(t) algorithm considering non- stationary earthquake ground motion; 6) an applied and effec- tive method to solve the low order complex vector basis for the large linear non-classically damped system, which can be expediently used in practice to avoid the unknown errors coming from the forced uncoupling method; 7) bringing for- ward the concept of partial quadratic combination in order to reduce the calculation amount of CQC and CCQC methods, and studying the primary estimation-criterion. The reason- ability and applicable scope of these methods are also briefly discussed in this

  13. A FORTRAN program for calculating nonlinear seismic ground response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, William B.

    1977-01-01

    The program described here was designed for calculating the nonlinear seismic response of a system of horizontal soil layers underlain by a semi-infinite elastic medium representing bedrock. Excitation is a vertically incident shear wave in the underlying medium. The nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the soil is represented by a model consisting of simple linear springs and Coulomb friction elements arranged as shown. A boundary condition is used which takes account of finite rigidity in the elastic substratum. The computations are performed by an explicit finite-difference scheme that proceeds step by step in space and time. A brief program description is provided here with instructions for preparing the input and a source listing. A more detailed discussion of the method is presented elsewhere as is the description of a different program employing implicit integration.

  14. Seismoelectric ground response to local and regional earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieran, Laura; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Thorwart, Martin; Ritter, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    During earthquakes magnetotelluric stations occasionally record electric and magnetic signals similar to seismograms. The major part of these magnetic signals is induced by the seismic movement of the magnetometers (induction coils) in the static magnetic field. In contrast, the electric field signals are caused by the seismoelectric effect. Based on more than 600 earthquakes from Chile, Costa Rica and Europe we established a logarithmic magnitude-distance-relationship describing the magnitude threshold to be exceeded for observing seismoelectric (SE) signals with standard magnetotelluric (MT) recording units at given hypocentral distance r and for noise levels less than 3 μV/m. The log(r) term results from the geometric spreading of the radiated seismic waves. A comparison of SE signals at different hypocentral distances shows that observability is not only influenced by the amplitude of the incoming seismic wave. It also depends on the geological structure underneath the station which causes a unique frequency dependent SE response. To quantify these site effects we computed spectral seismoelectric transfer functions representing the ratios of the spectral amplitudes of SE records and acceleration seismograms (SESRs). Some stations show constant SESRs in the major frequency range, while others show a decrease with increasing frequencies. Based on the current Biot-type seismoelectric theory constant SESRs can be explained by coseismic SE waves alone. The observed SESR amplitudes at some sites are indeed consistent with theoretical expectations for electrically highly resistive soils or rocks, in agreement with the local geology of the investigated areas. The frequency dependence of SESRs observed at other locations can be explained if the incident SE waves consist not only of coseismic arrivals but also of a significant contribution from SE interface response waves which are generated at electrical or mechanical boundaries. Therefore, frequency-dependent SESRs

  15. Infrared, Raman, and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations and structure of 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoropyridine in its ground and excited electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, Hong-Li; Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3255 (United States); Kim, Sunghwan [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 (United States); Laane, Jaan, E-mail: laane@chem.tamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3255 (United States)

    2015-07-29

    Highlights: • The structures of 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoropyridine for its S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(π, π{sup ∗}) states have been calculated. • TFPy is rigidly planar in its ground electronic state, but is quasi-planar and floppy in S{sub 1}. • The barrier to planarity is 30 cm{sup −1} in the excited state. • The observed vibrational frequencies for both states agree well with the computations. • A ring-bending potential energy function for the S{sub 1}(π, π{sup ∗}) state was proposed. - Abstract: Infrared and Raman spectra of 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoropyridine (TFPy) were recorded and vibrational frequencies were assigned for its S{sub 0} electronic ground states. Ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to complement the experimental work. The lowest electronic excited state of this molecule was investigated with ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and theoretical CASSCF calculations. The band origin was found to be at 35,704.6 cm{sup −1} in the ultraviolet absorption spectrum. A slightly puckered structure with a barrier to planarity of 30 cm{sup −1} was predicted by CASSCF calculations for the S{sub 1}(π, π{sup ∗}) state. Lower frequencies for the out-of-plane ring bending vibrations for the electronic excited state result from the weaker π bonding within the pyridine ring.

  16. Study on the effect of ground motion direction on the response of engineering structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Menghan; Fan, Feng; Sun, Baitao; Zhi, Xudong

    2016-12-01

    Due to the randomness of earthquake wave magnitude and direction, and the uncertain direction of strong axis and weak axis in the construction of engineering structures, the effect of the direction of ground motion on a structure are studied herein. Ground motion records usually contain three vertical ground motion data, which are obtained by sensors arranged in accordance with the EW (East -West) direction, NS (South- North) direction and perpendicular to the surface ( z) direction, referring to the construction standard of seismic stations. The seismic records in the EW and NS directions are converted to Cartesian coordinates in accordance with the rotation of θ = 0°-180°, and consequently, a countless group of new ground motion time histories are obtained. Then, the characteristics of the ground motion time history and response spectrum of each group were studied, resulting in the following observations: (1) the peak and phase of ground motion are changed with the rotation of direction θ, so that the direction θ of the maximum peak ground motion can be determined; (2) response spectrum values of each group of ground motions change along with the direction θ, and their peak, predominant period and declining curve are also different as the changes occur; then, the angle θ in the direction of the maximum peak value or the widest predominant period can be determined; and (3) the seismic response of structures with different directions of ground motion inputs has been analyzed under the same earthquake record, and the results show the difference. For some ground motion records, such as the Taft seismic wave, these differences are significant. Next, the Lushan middle school gymnasium structure was analyzed and the calculation was checked using the proposed method, where the internal force of the upper space truss varied from 25% to 28%. The research results presented herein can be used for reference in choosing the ground motion when checking the actual damage

  17. Absorption line indices from high resolution spectra. I. New Response Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Tantalo, R; Munari, U; Piovan, L; Sordo, R

    2004-01-01

    Basing on the huge library of 1A resolution spectra calculated by Munari et al. (2004) over a large range of atmospheric parameters (log Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) and both for solar and alpha-enhanced abundance ratios, we present theoretical absorption line indices on the Lick system. Firstly we derive the so-called Response Functions (RFs) of Tripicco & Bell (1995, TB95) for a wide range of atmospheric parameters, and [a/Fe]=+0.4. The RFs are commonly used to correct indices with solar [a/Fe] ratios to indices with [a/Fe]>0. Not only the RFs vary with the type of star but also with the metallicity. Secondly, with the aid of this and the Fitting Functions (FFs) of Worthey et al. (1994), we derive the indices for SSPs and compare them with those obtained by previous authors. The new RFs not only supersede the old ones by TB95, but also confirm that method adopted by Tantalo & Chiosi (2004a) to include the effect of alpha-enhancement was correct, and clearly show that also Hb increases with the degree of enh...

  18. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  19. Ground Response to Tunnel Re-profiling Under Heavily Squeezing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrakas, Apostolos; Anagnostou, Georgios

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a finite strain theoretical analysis of the ground response around highly deformed circular tunnel cross sections that are subjected to (repeated) re-profiling in order to re-establish the desired clearance. Plane strain axially symmetric conditions are considered, with linearly elastic, perfectly or brittle plastic rock behaviour according to the non-associated Mohr-Coulomb model. On the basis of this theoretical analysis, some practical questions are addressed with respect to the ground response curve, the maximum rock pressure (as carried by a practically rigid new temporary support) and the maximum wall convergence (as expected in the presence of a light new support) after re-profiling. Finally, the paper revisits the question of the effectiveness of a pilot tunnel with respect to the ground response during enlargement of the tunnel cross section.

  20. Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 1. Special topics in earthquake ground motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This report is divided into twelve chapters: seismic hazard analysis procedures, statistical and probabilistic considerations, vertical ground motion characteristics, vertical ground response spectrum shapes, effects of inclined rock strata on site response, correlation of ground response spectra with intensity, intensity attenuation relationships, peak ground acceleration in the very mean field, statistical analysis of response spectral amplitudes, contributions of body and surface waves, evaluation of ground motion characteristics, and design earthquake motions. (DLC)

  1. A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, W. Wallace; Strow, L. Larrabee; Revercomb, H.; Knuteson, R.; Thompson, A.

    2003-01-01

    This final report summarizes all research activities and publications undertaken as part of NASA Atmospheric Chemistry and Modeling Analysis Program (ACMAP) Grant NAG-1-2022, 'A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra'. Major project accomplishments include: (1) analysis of more than 300,000 AERI spectra from the ARM SGP site yielding a 5-year (1998-2002) timeseries of CO retrievals from the Lamont, OK AERI; (2) development of a prototype CO profile retrieval algorithm for AERI spectra; (3) validation and publication of the first CO retrievals from the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (SHIS); and (4) development of a prototype AERI tropospheric O3 retrieval algorithm. Compilation and publication of the 5-year Lamont, OK timeseries is underway including a new collaboration with scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Public access to this data will be provided upon article submission. A comprehensive CO analysis of the archive of HIS spectra of remains as the only originally proposed activity with little progress. The greatest challenge faced in this project was motivating the University of Wisconsin Co-Investigators to deliver their archived HIS and AERIOO data along with the requisite temperature and water vapor profiles in a timely manner. Part of the supplied HIS dataset from ASHOE may be analyzed as part of a Master s Thesis under a separate project. Our success with the SAFARI 2000 SHIS CO analysis demonstrates the utility of such aircraft remote sensing data given the proper support from the instrument investigators. In addition to the PI and Co-I s, personnel involved in this CO climatology project include one Post Doctoral Fellow, one Research Scientist, two graduate students, and two undergraduate students. A total of fifteen presentations regarding research related to this

  2. Accuracy of three-dimensional seismic ground response analysis in time domain using nonlinear numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fayun; Chen, Haibing; Huang, Maosong

    2017-07-01

    To provide appropriate uses of nonlinear ground response analysis for engineering practice, a three-dimensional soil column with a distributed mass system and a time domain numerical analysis were implemented on the OpenSees simulation platform. The standard mesh of a three-dimensional soil column was suggested to be satisfied with the specified maximum frequency. The layered soil column was divided into multiple sub-soils with a different viscous damping matrix according to the shear velocities as the soil properties were significantly different. It was necessary to use a combination of other one-dimensional or three-dimensional nonlinear seismic ground analysis programs to confirm the applicability of nonlinear seismic ground motion response analysis procedures in soft soil or for strong earthquakes. The accuracy of the three-dimensional soil column finite element method was verified by dynamic centrifuge model testing under different peak accelerations of the earthquake. As a result, nonlinear seismic ground motion response analysis procedures were improved in this study. The accuracy and efficiency of the three-dimensional seismic ground response analysis can be adapted to the requirements of engineering practice.

  3. Computational Simulation of Dynamic Response of Vehicle Tatra T815 and the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlček, Jozef; Valašková, Veronika

    2016-10-01

    The effect of a moving load represents the actual problem which is analysed in engineering practice. The response of the vehicle and its dynamic effect on the pavement can be analysed by experimental or computational ways. The aim of this paper was to perform computer simulations of a vehicle-ground interaction. For this purpose, a half-part model of heavy lorry Tatra 815 and ground was modelled in computational programmes ADINA and PLAXIS based on FEM methods, utilizing analytical approaches. Two procedures were then selected for further calculations. The first one is based on the simplification of the stiffer pavement layers to the beam element supported by the springs simulating the subgrade layers using Winkler-Pasternak theory of elastic half-space. Modulus of subgrade reaction was determined in the standard programme trough the simulation of a plate load test. Second approach considers a multi-layered ground system with layers of different thicknesses and material properties. For comparison of outputs of both approaches, the same input values were used for every calculation procedure. Crucial parameter for the simulations was the velocity of the passing vehicle with regard to the ground response to the impulse of the pass. Lower velocities result in almost static response of the pavement, but higher velocities induce response that can be better described by the dynamic theory. For small deformations, an elastic material model seems to be sufficient to define the ground response to the moving load, but for larger deformations advanced material models for the ground environment would be more reliable.

  4. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations...... with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene...

  5. Measuring the response of canopy emissivity spectra to leaf area index variation using thermal hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neinavaz, Elnaz; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Groen, Thomas A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the plant biophysical factors affecting the canopy spectral reflectance of plants in the optical domain to receive research attention in recent decades is leaf area index (LAI). Although it is expected that the value of LAI affects the emission of radiation, it not known how. To our knowledge, the effect of LAI on plant canopy emissivity spectra has not yet been investigated in the thermal infrared region (TIR 8-14 μm). The overall aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of LAI on canopy emissivity spectra of different species at the nadir position. The 279 spectral wavebands in the TIR domain were measured under controlled laboratory condition using a MIDAC spectrometer for four plant species. The corresponding LAI of each measurement was destructively calculated. We found a positive correlation between canopy emissivity spectra at various LAI values, indicating that emissivity increases concomitantly with LAI value. The canopy emissivity spectra of the four species were found to be statistically different at various wavebands even when the LAI values of the species were similar. It seems that other biophysical or biochemical factors also contribute to canopy emissivity spectra: this merits further investigation. We not only quantify the role of LAI on canopy emissivity spectra for the first time, but also demonstrate the potential of using hyperspectral thermal data to estimate LAI of plant species.

  6. Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Context of Mathematics: A Grounded Theory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Emily P.; Adams, Thomasenia L.

    2012-01-01

    In this grounded theory case study, four interconnected, foundational cornerstones of culturally responsive mathematics teaching (CRMT), communication, knowledge, trust/relationships, and constant reflection/revision, were systematically unearthed to develop an initial working theory of CRMT that directly informs classroom practice. These…

  7. Seismic Response of Base-Isolated Structures under Multi-component Ground Motion Excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of a base-isolated structure for multi-component random ground motion is presented. The mean square response of the system is obtained under different parametric variations. The effectiveness of main parameters and the torsional component during an earthquake is quantified with the help of the response ratio and the root mean square response with and without base isolation. It is observed that the base isolation has considerable influence on the response and the effect of the torsional component is not ignored.

  8. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations....... The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations...... in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made...

  9. Infrared, Raman, and Ultraviolet Absorption Spectra and Theoretical Calculations and Structure of 2,6-Difluoropyridine in its Ground and Excited Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Hong-Li; Kim, Sunghwan; Laane, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of 2,6-difluoropyridine (26DFPy) along with ab initio and DFT computations have been used to assign the vibrations of the molecule in its S0 electronic ground state and to calculate its structure. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum showed the electronic transition to the S1(π,π*) state to be at 37,820.2 cm−1. With the aid of ab initio computations the vibrational frequencies for this excited state were also determined. TD-B3LYP and CASSCF computations for the excited states were carried out to calculate the structures for the S1(π,π*) and S2(n,π*) excited states. The CASSCF results predict that the S1(π,π*) state is planar and the S2(n,π*) state has a barrier to planarity of 256 cm−1. The TD-B3LYP computations predict a barrier of 124 cm−1 for the S1(π,π*) states, but the experimental results support the planar structure. Hypothetical models for the ring-puckering potential energy function were calculated for both electronic excited states to show the predicted quantum states. The changes in the vibrational frequencies in the two excited states reflect the weaker π bonding within the pyridine ring. PMID:24070189

  10. Effect of Passive Pile on 3D Ground Deformation and on Active Pile Response

    OpenAIRE

    Bingxiang Yuan; Rui Chen; Jun Teng; Tao Peng; Zhongwen Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using a series of model tests, this study investigated the effect of a passive pile on 3D ground deformation around a laterally loaded pile and on that laterally loaded pile’s response in sand. The active pile head was subjected to lateral loads, and the passive pile was arranged in front of the active pile. In the model tests, the distance between the two pile centers was set to zero (i.e., a single pile test), 2.5, 4, and 6 times the pile width (B). The 3D ground surface deformations around...

  11. Attenuation relations for horizontal peak ground acceleration and response spectrum in northeastern Tibetan Plateau region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞言祥; 汪素云

    2004-01-01

    The seismic intensity attenuation relations in northeastern Tibetan Plateau region are established by a regression analysis on isoseismal data. Then the attenuation relations for horizontal peak ground acceleration and short-period response spectrum for western North America are derived based on the database of HUO Jun-rong and strong motion data from recent earthquakes. The attenuation relations of long-period response spectrum for western North America are developed by analyzing the broadband digital seismic recordings of southern California. By integrating the short-period and long-period attenuation relationships, the attenuation relations for horizontal acceleration response spectrum in the period range of 0.04~6 s for western North America are established. The attenuation equation that accounts for the magnitude saturation and near-field saturation of high frequency ground motion is used. Finally the attenuation relations for horizontal peak ground acceleration and response spectrum for the region of northeastern Tibetan Plateau are developed by using the transforming method.

  12. Dynamic Responses Analysis of a Building Structure Subjected to Ground Shock from a Tunnel Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Li; LI Zhongxian; HAO Hong

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic responses of a multi-storey building without or with a sliding base-isolation device for ground shock induced by an in-tunnel explosion are numerically analyzed.The effect of an adjacent tunnel in between the building and the explosion tunnel,which affects ground shock propagation,is considered in the analysis.Different modeling methods,such as the eight-node equal-parametric finite element and mass-lumped system,are used to establish the coupling model consisting of the two adjacent tunnels,the surrounding soil medium with the Lysmer viscous boundary condition,and the multi-storey building with or without the sliding base-isolation device.In numerical calculations,a continuous friction model,which is different from the traditional Coulomb friction model,is adopted to improve the computational efficiency and reduce the accumulated errors.Some example analyses are subsequently performed to study the response characteristics of the building and the sliding base-isolation device to ground shock.The effect of the adjacent tunnel in between the building and the explosion tunnel on the ground shock wave propagation is also investigated.The final conclusions based on the numerical results will provide some guidance in engineering practice.

  13. Seismic Response of Power Transmission Tower-Line System Subjected to Spatially Varying Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of power transmission tower-line system subjected to spatially varying base excitations is studied in this paper. The transmission towers are modeled by beam elements while the transmission lines are modeled by cable elements that account for the nonlinear geometry of the cables. The real multistation data from SMART-1 are used to analyze the system response subjected to spatially varying ground motions. The seismic input waves for vertical and horizontal ground motions are also generated based on the Code for Design of Seismic of Electrical Installations. Both the incoherency of seismic waves and wave travel effects are accounted for. The nonlinear time history analytical method is used in the analysis. The effects of boundary conditions, ground motion spatial variations, the incident angle of the seismic wave, coherency loss, and wave travel on the system are investigated. The results show that the uniform ground motion at all supports of system does not provide the most critical case for the response calculations.

  14. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Cundill

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition. Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI, Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI, Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI, Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2 and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI, which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997. Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important.

  15. Structural responses of secondary lining of high-speed railway tunnel excavated in loess ground

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dingli; Fang, Qian; Li, Pengfei; Wong, Louis

    2013-01-01

    To systematically study the mechanical properties and structural responses of the secondary lining for high-speed railway tunnels excavated in loess ground, on-site monitoring was performed to measure the contact pressure between the primary lining and secondary lining. It is found that the contact pressure reaches its first peak value when the tunnel formwork carriage is removed. The load acting on secondary lining is in the form of deformation pressure, which is different from the loose pre...

  16. 结构瞬时输入能量反应持时谱的研究%STUDY ON THE DURATION SPECTRA OF STRUCTURAL MOMENTARY INPUT ENERGY RESPONSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈逵; 刘哲锋; 沈蒲生

    2011-01-01

    Most of current methods in the aseismic design of structures require the provision of sufficient strength against anticipated seismic effects. The corresponding design response spectra can not reflectthe effect of the time duration of an earthquake. The energy based aseismie design is known as an alternative design methodology. A parameter study is carried out on input the duration of the structural energy response based on the momentary input energy and statistical theory, which can reflect the effects of the duration on structures. By establishing the duration of momenary input energy spectra of a linear single degree of freedom (SDOF) system, the effects of the structural dynamic parameters and the characteristics of seismic on the duration were observed.It is found that peak value of the duration of momentary input energy spectrum decreases obviously with damping ratio increase and the changing of peak ground acceleration do not have effects on the duration of momentary input energy spectrum. Based on a total of 100 ground motion records from many significant earthquakes with different peak ground velocities to acceleration (V/A), two parts simple function is suggested according to the shapes of spectra. A simplified model is developed for calculating the duration of momentary input energy spectra to the linear SDOF system with 5% damping. This research conclusion provided a theoretical foundation for more research of the quantization to the cumulative damage in time process based on input energy time histories.%现有抗震设计理论大多是基于承载力或强度的设计方法,与其相应的反应谱理论的最大缺陷是无法反映地震持时的影响,以地震能量作为设计参数的抗震设计理论则有望弥补这一不足.该文在地震瞬时输入能量概念的基础上,利用统计学原理对结构的反应持时提出一种新的定义,用以描述地震波对结构的持时效应,并通过建立相应的持时谱来研究结构

  17. Image segmentation techniques for improved processing of landmine responses in ground-penetrating radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2007-04-01

    As ground penetrating radar sensor phenomenology improves, more advanced statistical processing approaches become applicable to the problem of landmine detection in GPR data. Most previous studies on landmine detection in GPR data have focused on the application of statistics and physics based prescreening algorithms, new feature extraction approaches, and improved feature classification techniques. In the typical framework, prescreening algorithms provide spatial location information of anomalous responses in down-track / cross-track coordinates, and feature extraction algorithms are then tasked with generating low-dimensional information-bearing feature sets from these spatial locations. However in time-domain GPR, a significant portion of the data collected at prescreener flagged locations may be unrelated to the true anomaly responses - e.g. ground bounce response, responses either temporally "before" or "after" the anomalous response, etc. The ability to segment the information-bearing region of the GPR image from the background of the image may thus provide improved performance for feature-based processing of anomaly responses. In this work we will explore the application of Markov random fields (MRFs) to the problem of anomaly/background segmentation in GPR data. Preliminary results suggest the potential for improved feature extraction and overall performance gains via application of image segmentation approaches prior to feature extraction.

  18. Design response spectra-compliant real and synthetic GMS for seismic analysis of seismically isolated nuclear reactor containment building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmer [ENVICO Consultants Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Abu-Hayah, Nadin; Kim, Doo Kie [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung Gook [Innose Tech Co., Ltd., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Due to the severe impacts of recent earthquakes, the use of seismic isolation is paramount for the safety of nuclear structures. The diversity observed in seismic events demands ongoing research to analyze the devastating attributes involved, and hence to enhance the sustainability of base-isolated nuclear power plants. This study reports the seismic performance of a seismically-isolated nuclear reactor containment building (NRCB) under strong short-period ground motions (SPGMs) and long-period ground motions (LPGMs). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission-based design response spectrum for the seismic design of nuclear power plants is stipulated as the reference spectrum for ground motion selection. Within the period range(s) of interest, the spectral matching of selected records with the target spectrum is ensured using the spectral-compatibility approach. NRC-compliant SPGMs and LPGMs from the mega-thrust Tohoku earthquake are used to obtain the structural response of the base-isolated NRCB. To account for the lack of earthquakes in low-to-moderate seismicity zones and the gap in the artificial synthesis of long-period records, wavelet-decomposition based autoregressive moving average modeling for artificial generation of real ground motions is performed. Based on analysis results from real and simulated SPGMs versus LPGMs, the performance of NRCBs is discussed with suggestions for future research and seismic provisions.

  19. Orthogonal expansion of ground motion and PDEM-based seismic response analysis of nonlinear structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jie; Liu Zhangjun; Chen Jianbing

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces an orthogonal expansion method for general stochastic processes. In the method, a normalized orthogonal function of time variable t is first introduced to carry out the decomposition of a stochastic process and then a correlated matrix decomposition technique, which transforms a correlated random vector into a vector of standard uncorrelated random variables, is used to complete a double orthogonal decomposition of the stochastic processes. Considering the relationship between the Hartley transform and Fourier transform of a real-valued function, it is suggested that the first orthogonal expansion in the above process is carried out using the Hartley basis function instead of the trigonometric basis function in practical applications. The seismic ground motion is investigated using the above method. In order to capture the main probabilistic characteristics of the seismic ground motion, it is proposed to directly carry out the orthogonal expansion of the seismic displacements. The case study shows that the proposed method is feasible to represent the seismic ground motion with only a few random variables. In the second part of the paper, the probability density evolution method (PDEM) is employed to study the stochastic response of nonlinear structures subjected to earthquake excitations. In the PDEM, a completely uncoupled one-dimensional partial differential equation, the generalized density evolution equation, plays a central role in governing the stochastic seismic responses of the nonlinear structure. The solution to this equation will yield the instantaneous probability density function of the responses. Computational algorithms to solve the probability density evolution equation are described, An example, which deals with a nonlinear frame structure subjected to stochastic ground motions, is illustrated to validate the above approach.

  20. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

  1. Detecting plant metabolic responses induced by ground shock using hyperspectral remote sensing and physiological contact measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickles, W.L.; Cater, G.A.

    1996-12-03

    A series of field experiments were done to determine if ground shock could have induced physiological responses in plants and if the level of the response could be observed. The observation techniques were remote sensing techniques and direct contact physiological measurements developed by Carter for detecting pre-visual plant stress. The remote sensing technique was similar to that used by Pickles to detect what appeared to be ground shock induced plant stress above the 1993 Non Proliferation Experiment`s underground chemical explosion. The experiment was designed to provide direct plant physiological measurements and remote sensing ratio images and from the same plants at the same time. The simultaneous direct and remote sensing measurements were done to establish a ground truth dataset to compare to the results of the hyperspectral remote sensing measurements. In addition, the experiment was designed to include data on what was thought to be the most probable interfering effect, dehydration. The experimental design included investigating the relative magnitude of the shock induced stress effects compared to dehydration effects.

  2. Displacement response analysis of base-isolated buildings subjected to near-fault ground motions with velocity pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiumei; Li, Xiaojun; Yang, Yu; Liu, Aiwen; Li, Yaqi

    2016-04-01

    In order to study the influence of the velocity pulse to seismic displacement response of base-isolated buildings and the differences of the influent of the two types of near-fault ground motions with velocity pulse to seismic response of base-isolated buildings, the seismic responses are analyzed by three dimensional finite element models for three base-isolated buildings, 4 stories, 9 stories and 14 stories. In this study, comparative analyses were done for the seismic displacement responses of the base-isolated structures under 6 near-fault ground motion records with velocity pulse and no velocity pulse, in which, 6 artificial ground motion time histories with same elastic response spectrum as the 6 near-fault ground motion records are used as the ground motion with no velocity pulse. This study indicates that under the ground motions with velocity pulse the seismic displacement response of base-isolated buildings is significantly increased than the ground motions with no velocity pulse. To the median-low base-isolated buildings, the impact of forward directivity pulses is bigger than fling-step pulses. To the high base-isolated buildings, the impact of fling-step pulses is bigger than forward directivity pulses. The fling-step pulses lead to large displacement response in the lower stories. This work has been supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.51408560)

  3. Combining optimization methods with response spectra curve-fitting toward improved damping ratio estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewick, Patrick T.; Smyth, Andrew W.

    2016-12-01

    The authors have previously shown that many traditional approaches to operational modal analysis (OMA) struggle to properly identify the modal damping ratios for bridges under traffic loading due to the interference caused by the driving frequencies of the traffic loads. This paper presents a novel methodology for modal parameter estimation in OMA that overcomes the problems presented by driving frequencies and significantly improves the damping estimates. This methodology is based on finding the power spectral density (PSD) of a given modal coordinate, and then dividing the modal PSD into separate regions, left- and right-side spectra. The modal coordinates were found using a blind source separation (BSS) algorithm and a curve-fitting technique was developed that uses optimization to find the modal parameters that best fit each side spectra of the PSD. Specifically, a pattern-search optimization method was combined with a clustering analysis algorithm and together they were employed in a series of stages in order to improve the estimates of the modal damping ratios. This method was used to estimate the damping ratios from a simulated bridge model subjected to moving traffic loads. The results of this method were compared to other established OMA methods, such as Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) and BSS methods, and they were found to be more accurate and more reliable, even for modes that had their PSDs distorted or altered by driving frequencies.

  4. First retrievals of HCFC-142b from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations: application to high-altitude Jungfraujoch spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Emmanuel; O'Doherty, Simon; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin; Bader, Whitney; Bovy, Benoît; Lejeune, Bernard; Demoulin, Philippe; Roland, Ginette; Servais, Christian; Zander, Rodolphe

    2013-04-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are the first substitutes to the long-lived ozone depleting halocarbons, in particular the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Given the complete ban of the CFCs by the Montreal Protocol, its Amendments and Adjustments, HCFCs are on the rise, with current rates of increase substantially larger than at the beginning of the 21st century. HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) is presently the second most abundant HCFCs, after HCFC-22 (CHClF2). It is used in a wide range of applications, including as a blowing foam agent, in refrigeration and air-conditioning. Its concentration will soon reach 25 ppt in the northern hemisphere, with mixing ratios increasing at about 1.1 ppt/yr [Montzka et al., 2011]. The HCFC-142b lifetime is estimated at 18 years. With a global warming potential of 2310 on a 100-yr horizon, this species is also a potent greenhouse gas [Forster et al., 2007]. First space-based retrievals of HCFC-142b have been reported by Dufour et al. [2005]. 17 occultations recorded in 2004 by the Canadian ACE-FTS instrument (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer, onboard SCISAT-1) were analyzed, using two microwindows (1132.5-1135.5 and 1191.5-1195.5 cm-1). In 2009, Rinsland et al. determined the HCFC-142b trend near the tropopause, from the analysis of ACE-FTS observations recorded over the 2004-2008 time period. The spectral region used in this study extended from 903 to 905.5 cm-1. In this contribution, we will present the first HCFC-142b measurements from ground-based high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar spectra. We use observations recorded at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5°N, 8°E, 3580 m asl), with a Bruker 120HR instrument, in the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, visit http://www.ndacc.org). The retrieval of HCFC-142b is very challenging, with simulations indicating only weak absorptions, lower than 1% for low sun spectra and current

  5. The contrasting responses of soil microorganisms in two rice cultivars to elevated ground-level ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youzhi; Yu, Yongjie; Tang, Haoye; Zu, Qianhui; Zhu, Jianguo; Lin, Xiangui

    2015-02-01

    Although elevated ground-level O₃ has a species-specific impact on plant growth, the differences in soil biota responses to O₃ pollution among rice cultivars are rarely reported. Using O₃ Free-Air Concentration Enrichment, the responses of the rhizospheric bacterial communities in the O₃-tolerant (YD6) and the O₃-sensitive (IIY084) rice cultivars to O₃ pollution and their differences were assessed by pyrosequencing at rice tillering and anthesis stages. Elevated ground-level O₃ negatively influenced the bacterial community in cultivar YD6 at both rice growth stages by decreasing the bacterial phylogenetic diversities and response ratios. In contrast, in cultivar IIY084, the bacterial community responded positively at the rice tillering stage under O₃ pollution. However, several keystone bacterial guilds were consistently negatively affected by O₃ pollution in two rice cultivars. These findings indicate that continuously O₃ pollution would negatively influence rice agroecosystem and the crop cultivar is important in determining the soil biota responses to elevated O₃. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Line parameter study of ozone at 5 and 10 μm using atmospheric FTIR spectra from the ground: A spectroscopic database and wavelength region comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Christof; Boursier, Corinne; Jeseck, Pascal; Té, Yao

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric ozone concentration measurements mostly depend on spectroscopic methods that cover different spectral regions. Despite long years of measurement efforts, the uncertainty goal of 1% in absolute line intensities has not yet been reached. Multispectral inter-comparisons using both laboratory and atmospheric studies reveal that important discrepancies exist when ozone columns are retrieved from different spectral regions. Here, we use ground based FTIR to study the sensitivity of ozone columns on different spectroscopic parameters as a function of individual bands for identifying necessary improvements of the spectroscopic databases. In particular, we examine the degree of consistency that can be reached in ozone retrievals using spectral windows in the 5 and 10 μm bands of ozone. Based on the atmospheric spectra, a detailed database inter-comparison between HITRAN (version 2012), GEISA (version 2011) and S&MPO (as retrieved from the website at the end of 2015) is made. Data from the 10 μm window are consistent to better than 1%, but there are larger differences when the windows at 5 μm are included. The 5 μm results agree with the results from 10 μm within ±2% for all databases. Recent S&MPO data are even more consistent with the desired level of 1%, but spectroscopic data from HITRAN give about 4% higher ozone columns than those from GEISA. If four sub-windows in the 5 μm band are checked for consistency, retrievals using GEISA or S&MPO parameters show less dispersion than those using HITRAN, where one window in the P-branch of the ν1 + ν3 band gives about 2% lower results than the other three. The atmospheric observations are corroborated by a direct comparison of the spectroscopic databases, using a simple statistical analysis based on intensity weighted spectroscopic parameters. The bias introduced by the weighted average approach is investigated and it is negligible if relative differences between databases do not correlate with line

  7. Seismic analysis of the large 70-meter antenna, part 1: Earthquake response spectra versus full transient analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedron, K.; Chian, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    As a check on structure safety aspects, two approaches in seismic analysis for the large 70-m antennas are presented. The first approach, commonly used by civil engineers, utilizes known recommended design response spectra. The second approach, which is the full transient analysis, is versatile and applicable not only to earthquake loading but also to other dynamic forcing functions. The results obtained at the fundamental structural frequency show that the two approaches are in good agreement with each other and both approaches show a safe design. The results also confirm past 64-m antenna seismic studies done by the Caltech Seismology Staff.

  8. Study of a sealed high gas pressure THGEM detector and response of Alpha particle spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yu-Ning; Liu, Hong-Bang; Xie, Yi-Gang; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Chen, Shi; Huang, Wen-Qian; Hong, Dao-Jin; Zheng, Yang-Heng

    2016-01-01

    A sealed high gas pressure detector working in pure argon is assembled. It consists of a 5 cm $\\times$ 5 cm PCB THGEM (THick Gaseous Electron Multipliers). The detector structure and experimental setup are described. The performances under high pressure of 2 atm mainly consist in selecting optimal voltages for ionization region and induction region. The dependence of the shape of Alpha particle spectra measured with relative gas gain on gas pressure (1.3 $\\sim$ 2.0 atm) has been studied. The 8 groups of relative gas gain versus working voltage of THGEM expressed by weighting filed $E/P$ are normalized, being consistent with theory. The results show that the air tightness of the chamber is good measured by a sensitive barometer and checked with gas gain. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulation on energy deposition without gas gain involved.

  9. Preliminary results of ground-motion characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bozzoni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary results are presented herein for the engineering applications of the characteristics of the ground motion induced by the May 20, 2012, Emilia earthquake. Shake maps are computed to provide estimates of the spatial distribution of the induced ground motion. The signals recorded at the Mirandola (MRN station, the closest to the epicenter, have been processed to obtain acceleration, velocity and displacement response spectra. Ground-motion parameters from the MRN recordings are compared with the corresponding estimates from recent ground-motion prediction equations, and with the spectra prescribed by the current Italian Building Code for different return periods. The records from the MRN station are used to plot the particle orbit (hodogram described by the waveform. The availability of results from geotechnical field tests that were performed at a few sites in the Municipality of Mirandola prior to this earthquake of May 2012 has allowed preliminary assessment of the ground response. The amplification effects at Mirandola are estimated using fully stochastic site-response analyses. The seismic input comprises seven actual records that are compatible with the Italian code-based spectrum that refers to a 475-year return period. The computed acceleration response spectrum and the associated dispersion are compared to the spectra calculated from the recordings of the MRN station. Good agreement is obtained for periods up to 1 s, especially for the peak ground acceleration. For the other periods, the spectral acceleration of the MRN recordings exceeds that of the computed spectra.

  10. On the Design and Response of Domestic Ground-Source Heat Pumps in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Underwood

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The design and response of ground source heat pumps coupled to vertical closed loop arrays in UK domestic applications are investigated in this article. Two typical UK house types are selected as the vehicle for the study and a detailed dynamic thermal modelling method is used to arrive at time-series heating demands for the two houses. A new empirical heat pump model is derived using experimental data taking into account the deteriorating performance of the heat pump during periods of light load. The heat pump model is incorporated into an existing numerical ground model and completed with a classical effectiveness type heat exchange model of the closed loop array. The model is used to analyse array sizing and performance over an extended time period, as well as sensitivity of the design to soil conductivity and borehole heat exchanger resistance and sensitivity to over-sizing and part-load behavior of the heat pump. Results show that the UK’s standard for ground source design (the Microgeneration Certification Scheme may lead to under-estimated array sizes and that heating system over-sizing and deleterious part-load heat pump performance can add up to 20% to the electrical consumption of these systems.

  11. Response of a proportional counter to $^{37}$Ar and $^{71}$Ge: real spectra versus GEANT4 simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdurashitov, D; Matushko, V; Suerfu, B

    2015-01-01

    The energy deposition spectra of $^{37}$Ar and $^{71}$Ge in a miniature proportional counter are measured and compared in detail to the model response simulated with Geant4. The spectrum of $^{71}$Ge is measured with total statistics of 1.7$\\cdot$10$^8$ events and is presented for the first time. A certain modification of the Geant4 code, making it possible to trace the deexcitation of atomic shells properly, is suggested. After the modification Geant4 is able to reproduce a response of particle detectors in detail in a keV energy range. This feature is very important in the laboratory experiments that search for massive sterile neutrinos as well as for dark matter directly by detection of recoil nuclei. We expect this work to convince physicists to trust Geant4 simulations at low energies.

  12. Response of a transmission tower-line system at a canyon site to spatially varying ground motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-nan LI; Feng-long BAI; Li TIAN; Hong HAO

    2011-01-01

    Collapses of transmission towers were often observed in previous large earthquakes such as the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan and Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan, China. These collapses were partially caused by the pulling forces from the transmission lines generated from out-of-phase responses of the adjacent towers owing to spatially varying earthquake ground motions. In this paper, a 3D finite element model of the transmission tower-line system is established considering the geometric nonlinearity of transmission lines. The nonlinear responses of the structural system at a canyon site are analyzed subjected to spatially varying ground motions. The spatial variations of ground motion associated with the wave passage, coherency loss, and local site effects are given. The spatially varying ground motions are simulated stochastically based on an empirical coherency loss function and a filtered Tajimi-Kanai power spectral density function. The site effect is considered by a transfer function derived from ID wave propagation theory. Compared with structural responses calculated using the uniform ground motion and delayed excitations, numerical results indicate that seismic responses of transmission towers and power lines are amplified when considering spatially varying ground motions including site effects. Each factor of ground motion spatial variations has a significant effect on the seismic response of the structure, especially for the local site effect. Therefore, neglecting the earthquake ground motion spatial variations may lead to a substantial underestimation of the response of transmission tower-line system during strong earthquakes. Each effect of ground motion spatial variations should be incorporated in seismic analysis of the structural system.

  13. Approximate method in estimation sensitivity responses to variations in delayed neutron energy spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Shin, H. S.; Song, T. Y.; Park, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Previous our numerical results in computing point kinetics equations show a possibility in developing approximations to estimate sensitivity responses of nuclear reactor. We recalculate sensitivity responses by maintaining the corrections with first order of sensitivity parameter. We present a method for computing sensitivity responses of nuclear reactor based on an approximation derived from point kinetics equations. Exploiting this approximation, we found that the first order approximation works to estimate variations in the time to reach peak power because of their linear dependence on a sensitivity parameter, and that there are errors in estimating the peak power in the first order approximation for larger sensitivity parameters. To confirm legitimacy of out approximation, these approximate results are compared with exact results obtained from out previous numerical study. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  14. Seismic Response of Long-Span Triple-Tower Suspension Bridge under Random Ground Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-ke Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multitower suspension bridge is of different style compared to the traditional suspension bridge with two towers, and consequently the dissimilarity of static and dynamic behaviors is distinct. As a special case of multitower suspension bridge, two long-span triple-tower suspension bridges have been constructed in China and the seismic random response of triple-tower suspension bridges is studied in this paper. A nonlinear dynamic analysis finite element model is established in ABAQUS and the Python language is utilized to facilitate the preprocess and postprocess during the finite element analysis. The procedure for random response calculation of structures based on the pseudoexcitation method is presented, with the initial equilibrium state of structure considered, which may be ignored for long-span bridges during calculating of stochastic response. The stationary seismic random responses of triple-tower suspension bridge under uniform excitation in firm, medium, and soft soil conditions and under spatially varying excitation in soft soil are investigated. The distribution of RMS of random responses of displacements and internal forces of the stiffening girder and towers is presented and discussed in detail. Results show that spatially variable ground motions should be considered in the stochastic analysis of triple-tower suspension bridge.

  15. Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intense and long-standing problems in burn centers in Tehran have led nurses to burnout. This phenomenon has provoked serious responses and has put the nurses, patients and the organization under pressure. The challenge for managers and nurse executives is to understand the factors which would reduce or increase the nurses' responses to burnout and develop delivery systems that promote positive adaptation and facilitate quality care. This study, as a part of more extensive research, aims to explore and describe the nurses' perceptions of the factors affecting their responses to burnout. Methods Grounded theory was used as the method. Thirty- eight participants were recruited. Data were generated by unstructured interviews and 21 sessions of participant observations. Constant comparison was used for data analysis. Results Nurses' and patients' personal characteristics and social support influenced nurses' responses to burnout. Personal characteristics of the nurses and patients, especially when interacting, had a more powerful effect. They altered emotional, attitudinal, behavioral and organizational responses to burnout and determined the kind of caring behavior. Social support had a palliative effect and altered emotional responses and some aspects of attitudinal responses. Conclusions The powerful effect of positive personal characteristics and its sensitivity to long standing and intense organizational pressures suggests approaches to executing stress reduction programs and refreshing the nurses' morale by giving more importance to ethical aspects of caring. Moreover, regarding palliative effect of social support and its importance for the nurses' wellbeing, nurse executives are responsible for promoting a work environment that supports nurses and motivates them.

  16. Dynamic Response and Ground-Motion Effects of Building Clusters During Large Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbiliroglu, Y. D.; Taborda, R.; Bielak, J.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the response of building clusters during earthquakes, the effect that they have on the ground motion, and how individual buildings interact with the surrounding soil and with each other. We conduct a series of large-scale, physics-based simulations that synthesize the earthquake source and the response of entire building inventories. The configuration of the clusters, defined by the total number of buildings, their number of stories, dynamic properties, and spatial distribution and separation, is varied for each simulation. In order to perform these simulations efficiently while recurrently modifying these characteristics without redoing the entire "source to building structure" simulation every time, we use the Domain Reduction Method (DRM). The DRM is a modular two-step finite-element methodology for modeling wave propagation problems in regions with localized features. It allows one to store and reuse the background motion excitation of subdomains without loss of information. Buildings are included in the second step of the DRM. Each building is represented by a block model composed of additional finite-elements in full contact with the ground. These models are adjusted to emulate the general geometric and dynamic properties of real buildings. We conduct our study in the greater Los Angeles basin, using the main shock of the 1994 Northridge earthquake for frequencies up to 5Hz. In the first step of the DRM we use a domain of 82 km x 82 km x 41 km. Then, for the second step, we use a smaller sub-domain of 5.12 km x 5.12 km x 1.28 km, with the buildings. The results suggest that site-city interaction effects are more prominent for building clusters in soft-soil areas. These effects consist in changes in the amplitude of the ground motion and dynamic response of the buildings. The simulations are done using Hercules, the parallel octree-based finite-element earthquake simulator developed by the Quake Group at Carnegie

  17. Martian Surface Temperature and Spectral Response from the MSL REMS Ground Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Torres, Javier; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Zorzano, María-Paz; Serrano, María; Mendaza, Teresa; Hamilton, Vicky; Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; REMS Team

    2013-04-01

    The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) offers the opportunity to explore the near surface atmospheric conditions and, in particular will shed new light into the heat budget of the Martian surface. This is important for studies of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), as the ground and air temperatures measured directly by REMS control the coupling of the atmosphere with the surface [Zurek et al., 1992]. This coupling is driven by solar insolation. The ABL plays an important role in the general circulation and the local atmospheric dynamics of Mars. One of the REMS sensors, the ground temperature sensor (GTS), provides the data needed to study the thermal inertia properties of the regolith and rocks beneath the MSL rover. The GTS includes thermopile detectors, with infrared bands of 8-14 µm and 16-20 µm [Gómez-Elvira et al., 2012]. These sensors are clustered in a single location on the MSL mast and the 8-14 µm thermopile sounds the surface temperature. The infrared radiation reaching the thermopile is proportional to the emissivity of the surface minerals across these thermal wavelengths. We have developed a radiative transfer retrieval method for the REMS GTS using a database of thermal infrared laboratory spectra of analogue minerals and their mixtures. [Martín Redondo et al. 2009, Martínez-Frías et al. 2012 - FRISER-IRMIX database]. This method will be used to assess the perfomance of the REMS GTS as well as determine, through the error analysis, the surface temperature and emissivity values where MSL is operating. Comparisons with orbiter data will be performed. References Gómez-Elvira et al. [2012], REMS: The Environmental Sensor Suite for the Mars Science Laboratory Rover, Space Science Reviews, Volume 170, Issue 1-4, pp. 583-640. Martín-Redondo et al. [2009] Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11:, pp. 1428-1432. Martínez-Frías et al. [2012] FRISER-IRMIX database http

  18. Laser Doppler Vibrometer: Application of DOE/Taguchi Methodologies to Pyroshock Response Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Litz

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical methodologies were employed for measuring and analyzing the explosively induced transient responses of a flat steel plate excited with shock. The application of design of experiment methodology was made to structure and test a Taguchi L9(32 full factorial experimental matrix (which uses nine tests to study two factors, with each factor examined at three levels in which a helium-neon laser Doppler vibrometer and two piezocrystal accelerometers were used to monitor explosively induced vibrations ranging from 10 to 105 Hz on a 96 × 48 × 0.25 in. flat steel plate. Resulting conclusions were drawn indicating how these techniques aid in understanding the pyroshock phenomenon with respect to the effects and interrelationships of explosive-charge weight and location on the laser Doppler and contract accelerometer recording systems.

  19. Solution of two-dimensional, two-region electromagnetic ground response. Final report, March-August 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlberg, I.

    1989-03-01

    A solution for the two-dimensional, two-region electromagnetic ground response was developed that relates the surface components of the electric field to the surface components of the magnetic field. This has been accomplished by deriving a universal functional form for a dimensionless Green's function. The Green's function provides increasingly more accurate approximations to the response for each successive reflection from the second layer. This result would appear to provide simplification and reduced computer running time in the numerical modelling of the HABEMP when the ground response is coupled to finite-difference methods for solving the atmospheric part of the problem.

  20. The Response of Long-Span Bridges to Low Frequency, Near-Fault Earthquake Ground Motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, David; Astaneh-Asl, A.; Larsen, S.C.; Hutchings, Larry

    2009-02-27

    Historical seismic hazard characterizations did not include earthquake ground motion waveforms at frequencies below approximately 0.2 Hz (5 seconds period). This resulted from limitations in early strong motion instrumentation and signal processing techniques, a lack of measurements in the near-field of major earthquakes and therefore no observational awareness, and a delayed understanding in the engineering community of the potential significance of these types of motions. In recent years, there is a growing recognition of the relevance of near-fault, low frequency motions, particularly for long-period structures such as large bridges. This paper describes a computationally based study of the effects of low frequency (long-period) near-fault motions on long-span bridge response. The importance of inclusion of these types of motions for long span cable supported bridges is demonstrated using actual measured broad-band, near-fault motions from large earthquakes.

  1. Engineering characteristics of near-fault vertical ground motions and their effect on the seismic response of bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xinle; Dou Huijuan; Zhu Xi

    2007-01-01

    A wide variety of near-fault strong ground motion records were collected from various tectonic environments worldwide and were used to study the peak value ratio and response spectrum ratio of the vertical to horizontal component of ground motion,focusing on the effect of earthquake magnitude,site conditions,pulse duration,and statistical component.The results show that both the peak value ratio and response spectrum ratio are larger than the 2/3 value prescribed in existing seismic codes,and the relationship between the vertical and horizontal ground motions is comparatively intricate.In addition,the effect of the near-fault ground motions on bridge performance is analyzed,considering both the material nonlinear characteristics and the P~△ effect.

  2. How Iranian Medical Trainees Approach their Responsibilities in Clinical Settings; A Grounded Theory Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Asemani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: It seems we are now experiencing “responsibility problems” among medical trainees (MTs and some of those recently graduated from medical schools in Iran. Training responsible professionals have always been one of the main concerns of medical educators. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of research in the literature on “responsibility” especially from the medical education point of view. Therefore, the present study was carried out with the aim of presenting a theoretical based framework for understanding how MTs approach their responsibilities in educational settings. Method: This qualitative study was conducted at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS using the grounded theory methodology. 15 MTs and 10 clinical experts and professional nurses were purposefully chosen as participants. Data was analyzed using the methodology suggested by Corbin and Strauss, 1998. Results: “Try to find acceptance toward expectations”, “try to be committed to meet the expectations” and “try to cope with unacceptable expectations” were three main categories extracted based on the research data. Abstractly, the main objective for using these processes was “to preserve the integrity of student identity” which was the core category of this research too. Moreover, it was also found that practically, “responsibility” is considerably influenced by lots of positive and negative contextual and intervening conditions. Conclusion: “Acceptance” was the most decisive variable highly effective in MTs’ responsibility. Therefore, investigating the “process of acceptance” regarding the involved contextual and intervening conditions might help medical educators correctly identify and effectively control negative factors and reinforce the constructive ones that affect the concept of responsibility in MTs.

  3. Short communication: Lactational responses to palmitic acid supplementation when replacing soyhulls or dry ground corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, J; Preseault, C L; Lock, A L

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of mid-lactation dairy cows to a palmitic acid (C16:0)-enriched fatty acid supplement when replacing soyhulls or dry ground corn in the diet. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows (182 ± 60 d in milk; mean ± SD) were blocked by preliminary 3.5% fat-corrected milk and randomly assigned to treatment sequence in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Treatments consisted of a control diet containing no supplemental fat (CON), and 2 C16:0-enriched fatty acid-supplemented treatments (PA; BergaFat F100, Berg & Schmidt, Hanover, Germany) as a replacement for either soyhulls (PA-SH) or dry ground corn (PA-CG). The C16:0-enriched supplement was fed at 1.5% of diet dry matter. The PA treatments did not affect dry matter intake, but PA-SH increased dry matter intake by 1.4 kg/d compared with PA-CG. The PA treatments did not affect milk yield; however, PA-SH increased milk yield by 2.4 kg/d compared with PA-CG. The PA treatments tended to decrease milk protein content (3.12 vs. 3.15%). In contrast, PA-SH increased milk protein content (3.14 vs. 3.10%) and milk protein yield (1.27 vs. 1.19 kg/d) compared with PA-CG. The PA treatments increased milk fat concentration (3.68 vs. 3.55%) and milk fat yield (1.46 vs. 1.38 kg/d). The increase in milk fat yield with PA treatments was due to the increase in the yield of 16-carbon fatty acid in milk fat. Furthermore, PA-SH tended to increase yield of de novo fatty acids and yield of 16-carbon fatty acids compared with PA-CG. The PA treatments tended to increase feed efficiency (3.5% fat-corrected milk/dry matter intake) compared with CON (1.51 vs. 1.46). The PA-SH treatment tended to increase insulin concentration compared with PA-CG (1.58 vs. 1.49 μg/L) and PA treatments increased nonesterified fatty acids compared with CON (110 vs. 99 μEq/L). Overall, PA treatments improved feed efficiency and increased milk fat yield and the response to the C16:0-enriched

  4. Prediction of Pseudo relative velocity response spectra at Yucca Mountain for underground nuclear explosions conducted in the Pahute Mesa testing area at the Nevada testing site; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP), managed by the Office of Geologic Disposal of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for commercial, high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This work, intended to extend our understanding of the ground motion at Yucca Mountain resulting from testing of nuclear weapons on the NTS, was funded by the Yucca Mountain project and the Military Applications Weapons Test Program. This report summarizes one aspect of the weapons test seismic investigations conducted in FY88. Pseudo relative velocity response spectra (PSRV) have been calculated for a large body of surface ground motions generated by underground nuclear explosions. These spectra have been analyzed and fit using multiple linear regression techniques to develop a credible prediction technique for surface PSRVs. In addition, a technique for estimating downhole PSRVs at specific stations is included. A data summary, data analysis, prediction development, prediction evaluation, software summary and FORTRAN listing of the prediction technique are included in this report.

  5. Retrieval of xCO2 from ground-based mid-infrared (NDACC solar absorption spectra and comparison to TCCON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Buschmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available High resolution solar absorption spectra, taken within the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC in the mid-infrared spectral region are used to infer partial or total column abundances of many gases. In this paper we present the retrieval of a column averaged mole fraction of carbon dioxide from NDACC-IRWG spectra taken with a Fourier-Transform-Infra-Red (FTIR spectrometer at the site in Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen. The retrieved time series is compared to co-located standard TCCON measurements of total column CO2. Comparing the NDACC and TCCON retrievals we find that the sensitivity of the NDACC retrieval is lower in the troposphere (by a factor of two and higher in the stratosphere, compared to TCCON. Thus, the NDACC retrieval is less sensitive to tropospheric changes (e.g. the seasonal cycle in the column average.

  6. Application of bounding spectra to seismic design of piping based on the performance of above ground piping in power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This report extends the potential application of Bounding Spectra evaluation procedures, developed as part of the A-46 Unresolved Safety Issue applicable to seismic verification of in-situ electrical and mechanical equipment, to in-situ safety related piping in nuclear power plants. The report presents a summary of earthquake experience data which define the behavior of typical U.S. power plant piping subject to strong motion earthquakes. The report defines those piping system caveats which would assure the seismic adequacy of the piping systems which meet those caveats and whose seismic demand are within the bounding spectra input. Based on the observed behavior of piping in strong motion earthquakes, the report describes the capabilities of the piping system to carry seismic loads as a function of the type of connection (i.e. threaded versus welded). This report also discusses in some detail the basic causes and mechanisms for earthquake damages and failures to power plant piping systems.

  7. Database for estimating tree responses of walnut and other hardwoods to ground cover management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.W. Van Sambeek

    2010-01-01

    The ground cover in plantings of walnut and other hardwoods can substantially affect tree growth and seed production. The number of alternative ground covers that have been suggested for establishment in tree plantings far exceeds the number that have already been tested with walnut and other temperate hardwoods. Knowing how other hardwood species respond to ground...

  8. Millimeter Wave and Terahertz Spectra and Global Fit of Torsion-Rotation Transitions in the Ground, First and Second Excited Torsional States of 13CH3OH Methanol

    CERN Document Server

    Xua, Li-Hong; Hao, Yun; Mueller, H S P; Endres, C P; Lewen, F; Schlemmer, S; Menten, K M

    2014-01-01

    Methanol is observed in a wide range of astrophysical sources throughout the universe, and comprehensive databases of the millimeter and THz spectra of CH3OH and its principal isotopologues represent important tools for the astronomical community. A previous combined analysis of microwave and millimeter wave spectra of 13CH3OH together with Fourier transform far-infrared spectra was limited to the first two torsional states, v_t = 0 and 1, for J values up to 20. The limits on frequency and quantum number coverage have recently been extended by new millimeter and THz measurements on several different spectrometers in the Cologne laboratory in the frequency windows 34-70 GHz, 75-120 GHz, 240-340 GHz, 360-450 GHz and 1.12-1.50 THz. With the new data, the global treatment has now been expanded to include the first three torsional states for J values up to 30. The current 13CH3OH data set contains about 2,300 microwave, millimeter-wave, sub-millimeter and THz lines and about 17,100 Fourier-transform far-infrared l...

  9. Simulation of spatially varying ground motions including incoherence, wave‐passage and differential site‐response effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konakli, Katerina; Der Kiureghian, Armen

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for simulating arrays of spatially varying ground motions, incorporating the effects of incoherence, wave passage, and differential site response. Non‐stationarity is accounted for by considering the motions as consisting of stationary segments. Two approaches are developed....... In the first, simulated motions are consistent with the power spectral densities of a segmented recorded motion and are characterized by uniform variability at all locations. Uniform variability in the array of ground motions is essential when synthetic motions are used for statistical analysis of the response...

  10. The Nonrelativistic Ground State Energy Spectra of Potential Counting Coulomb and Quad-ratic Terms in Non-commutative Two Dimensional Real Spaces and Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmadjid Maireche

    2016-01-01

    A novel theoretical study for the exact solvability of nonrelativistic quantum spectrum systems for potential containing coulomb and quadratic terms is discussed used both Boopp’s shift method and standard perturbation theory in both noncommutativity two dimensional real space and phase (NC-2D: RSP), it has been observed that the exact corrections for the ground states spectrum of studied potential was depended on two infinitesimals parameters and which plays an opposite rolls, and we ha...

  11. Switching dynamics and linear response spectra of a driven one-dimensional nonlinear lattice containing an intrinsic localized mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Imai, S; Fujita, N; Shi, W; Takao, Y; Sada, Y; Hubbard, B E; Ilic, B; Sievers, A J

    2013-01-01

    An intrinsic localized mode (ILM) represents a localized vibrational excitation in a nonlinear lattice. Such a mode will stay in resonance as the driver frequency is changed adiabatically until a bifurcation point is reached, at which point the ILM switches and disappears. The dynamics behind switching in such a many body system is examined here through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Linear response spectra of a driven micromechanical array containing an ILM were measured in the frequency region between two fundamentally different kinds of bifurcation points that separate the large amplitude ILM state from the two low amplitude vibrational states. Just as a natural frequency can be associated with a driven harmonic oscillator, a similar natural frequency has been found for a driven ILM via the beat frequency between it and a weak, tunable probe. This finding has been confirmed using numerical simulations. The behavior of this nonlinear natural frequency plays important but different roles as the two bifurcation points are approached. At the upper transition its frequency coalesces with the driver and the resulting bifurcation is very similar to the saddle-node bifurcation of a single driven Duffing oscillator, which is treated in an Appendix. The lower transition occurs when the four-wave mixing partner of the natural frequency of the ILM intersects the topmost extended band mode of the same symmetry. The properties of linear local modes associated with the driven ILM are also identified experimentally for the first time and numerically but play no role in these transitions.

  12. Switching dynamics and linear response spectra of a driven one-dimensional nonlinear lattice containing an intrinsic localized mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Imai, S.; Fujita, N.; Shi, W.; Takao, Y.; Sada, Y.; Hubbard, B. E.; Ilic, B.; Sievers, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    An intrinsic localized mode (ILM) represents a localized vibrational excitation in a nonlinear lattice. Such a mode will stay in resonance as the driver frequency is changed adiabatically until a bifurcation point is reached, at which point the ILM switches and disappears. The dynamics behind switching in such a many body system is examined here through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Linear response spectra of a driven micromechanical array containing an ILM were measured in the frequency region between two fundamentally different kinds of bifurcation points that separate the large amplitude ILM state from the two low amplitude vibrational states. Just as a natural frequency can be associated with a driven harmonic oscillator, a similar natural frequency has been found for a driven ILM via the beat frequency between it and a weak, tunable probe. This finding has been confirmed using numerical simulations. The behavior of this nonlinear natural frequency plays important but different roles as the two bifurcation points are approached. At the upper transition its frequency coalesces with the driver and the resulting bifurcation is very similar to the saddle-node bifurcation of a single driven Duffing oscillator, which is treated in an Appendix. The lower transition occurs when the four-wave mixing partner of the natural frequency of the ILM intersects the topmost extended band mode of the same symmetry. The properties of linear local modes associated with the driven ILM are also identified experimentally for the first time and numerically but play no role in these transitions.

  13. Deconvolution effect of near-fault earthquake ground motions on stochastic dynamic response of tunnel-soil deposit interaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hacıefendioğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The deconvolution effect of the near-fault earthquake ground motions on the stochastic dynamic response of tunnel-soil deposit interaction systems are investigated by using the finite element method. Two different earthquake input mechanisms are used to consider the deconvolution effects in the analyses: the standard rigid-base input and the deconvolved-base-rock input model. The Bolu tunnel in Turkey is chosen as a numerical example. As near-fault ground motions, 1999 Kocaeli earthquake ground motion is selected. The interface finite elements are used between tunnel and soil deposit. The mean of maximum values of quasi-static, dynamic and total responses obtained from the two input models are compared with each other.

  14. Solvent effect on absorption and fluorescence spectra of three biologically active carboxamides (C1, C2 and C3). Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment from solvatochromic method using solvent polarity parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, N R; Melavanki, R M; Kapatkar, S B; Ayachit, N H; Saravanan, J

    2011-05-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of three Carboxamides namely (E)-2-(4-Chlorobenzylideneamino)-N-(2-chlorophenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (C(1)), (E)-N-(3-Chlorophenyl)-2-(3, 4-dimethoxybenzylideneamino)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (C(2)) and (E)-N-(3-Chlorophenyl)-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylideneamino)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (C(3)) have been recorded at room temperature in solvents of different polarities using dielectric constant (ε) and refractive index (n). Experimental ground (μ(g)) and excited (μ(e)) state dipole moments are estimated by means of solvatochromic shift method and also the excited dipole moments are estimated in combination with ground state dipole moments. It was estimated that dipole moments of the excited state were higher than those of the ground state of all three molecules. Further, the changes in dipole moment (Δμ) were calculated both from solvatochromic shift method and on the basis of microscopic empirical solvent polarity parameter (E(N)(T)) and the values are compared.

  15. Balancing intertwined responsibilities: A grounded theory study of teamwork in everyday intensive care unit practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjurling-Sjöberg, Petronella; Wadensten, Barbro; Pöder, Ulrika; Jansson, Inger; Nordgren, Lena

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to describe and explain teamwork and factors that influence team processes in everyday practice in an intensive care unit (ICU) from a staff perspective. The setting was a Swedish ICU. Data were collected from 38 ICU staff in focus groups with registered nurses, assistant nurses, and anaesthetists, and in one individual interview with a physiotherapist. Constant comparative analysis according to grounded theory was conducted, and to identify the relations between the emerged categories, the paradigm model was applied. The core category to emerge from the data was "balancing intertwined responsibilities." In addition, eleven categories that related to the core category emerged. These categories described and explained the phenomenon's contextual conditions, causal conditions, and intervening conditions, as well as the staff actions/interactions and the consequences that arose. The findings indicated that the type of teamwork fluctuated due to circumstantial factors. Based on the findings and on current literature, strategies that can optimise interprofessional teamwork are presented. The analysis generated a conceptual model, which aims to contribute to existing frameworks by adding new dimensions about perceptions of team processes within an ICU related to staff actions/interactions. This model may be utilised to enhance the understanding of existing contexts and processes when designing and implementing interventions to facilitate teamwork in the pursuit of improving healthcare quality and patient safety.

  16. Root proliferation and seed yield in response to spatial heterogeneity of below-ground competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Erin E; Gersani, Mordechai; Brown, Joel S

    2005-11-01

    Here, we tested the predictions of a 'tragedy of the commons' model of below-ground plant competition in annual plants that experience spatial heterogeneity in their competitive environment. Under interplant competition, the model predicts that a plant should over-proliferate roots relative to what would maximize the collective yield of the plants. We predict that a plant will tailor its root proliferation to local patch conditions, restraining root production when alone and over-proliferating in the presence of other plants. A series of experiments were conducted using pairs of pea (Pisum sativum) plants occupying two or three pots in which the presence or absence of interplant root competition was varied while nutrient availability per plant was held constant. In two-pot experiments, competing plants produced more root mass and less pod mass per individual than plants grown in isolation. In three-pot experiments, peas modulated this response to conditions at the scale of individual pots. Root proliferation in the shared pot was higher compared with the exclusively occupied pot. Plants appear to display sophisticated nutrient foraging with outcomes that permit insights into interplant competition.

  17. Responses of woody species to spatial and temporal ground water changes in coastal sand dune systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Máguas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the relative importance of groundwater in costal dune systems, studies concerning the responses of vegetation to ground water (GW availability variations, particularly in Mediterranean regions, are scarce. Thus, the main purpose of this study is to compare the responses of co-occurring species possessing different functional traits, to changes in GW levels (i.e. the lowering of GW levels in a sand dune ecosystem. For that, five sites were established within a 1 km2 area in a meso-mediterranean sand dune ecosystem dominated by a Pinus pinaster forest. Due to natural topographic variability and anthropogenic GW exploitation, substantial variability in depth to GW between sites was found. Under these conditions it was possible to identify the degree of usage and dependence on GW of different plant species (two deep-rooted trees, a drought adapted shrub, a phreatophyte and a non-native woody invader and how GW dependence varied seasonally and between the heterogeneous sites. Results indicated that the plant species had differential responses to changes in GW depth according to specific functional traits (i.e. rooting depth, leaf morphology, and water use strategy. Species comparison revealed that variability in pre-dawn water potential (Ψpre and bulk leaf δ13C was related to site differences in GW use in the deep-rooted (Pinus pinaster, Myrica faya and phreatophyte (Salix repens species. However, such variation was more evident during spring than during summer drought. The exotic invader, Acacia longifolia, which does not possess a very deep root system, presented the largest seasonal variability in Ψpre and bulk leaf δ13C. In contrast, the response of Corema album, an endemic understory drought-adapted shrub, seemed to be independent of water availability across seasons and sites. Thus, the susceptibility to lowering of GW due to anthropogenic

  18. Getting around the Impasse: A Grounded Approach to Teaching Ethics and Social Responsibility in International Business Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marc T.; Lok, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Considers the dilemma of teaching ethics and social responsibility in international business courses with either an ethnocentric absolutist or an unengaged relativistic approach. Suggests a strategy that focuses on a grounded understanding of the elements, processes, and properties of capitalism that would serve as a common understanding upon…

  19. Below-ground carbon flux and partitioning: global patterns and response to temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.M. Litton; C.P. Giardina

    2008-01-01

    1. The fraction of gross primary production (GPP) that is total below-ground carbon flux (TBCF) and the fraction of TBCF that is below-ground net primary production (BNPP) represent globally significant C fluxes that are fundamental in regulating ecosystem C balance. However, global estimates of the partitioning of GPP to TBCF and of TBCF to BNPP, as well as the...

  20. Well-response model of the confined area, Bunker Hill ground-water basin, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Timothy J.; Morgan, Charles O.

    1978-01-01

    The Bunker Hill ground-water basin, in the vicinity of San Bernardino, Calif., is being artificially recharged with imported water. Current and future artificial recharge of the basin may cause the potentiometric surface in an area of confined ground water to rise above land surface and water to flow from uncapped and unplugged wells. This could cause damage to structures where the soil becomes waterlogged and where buried wells begin to flow beneath the structures. A well-response model was used to generate a series of water-level hydrographs representing the response of the ground-water basin to six possible combinations of conditions for each well; one pumping rate, two artificial-recharge rate, and three natural-recharge rates. Inflow to the ground-water basin exceeds outflow for all tested combinations. According to model predictions, the accumulation of stored ground water resulting from the excess of inflow is sufficient to cause the water level in the selected wells to rise above land surface for all but one of the combinations of conditions tested. Water levels in wells are predicted to rise above the land surface as early as 1981 for the combination with the greatest excess of inflow. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Communication and general concern criterion prior to activation of the rapid response team: a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martland, Jarrad; Chamberlain, Diane; Hutton, Alison; Smigielski, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Objective Patients commonly show signs and symptoms of deterioration for hours or days before cardiorespiratory arrest. Rapid response teams (RRT) were created to improve recognition and response to patient deterioration in these situations. Activation criteria include vital signs or 'general concern' by a clinician or family member. The general concern criterion for RRT activation accounts for nearly one-third of all RRT activity, and although it is well established that communication deficits between staff can contribute to poorer outcomes for patients, there is little evidence pertaining to communication and its effects on the general concern RRT activation. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a substantive grounded theory related to the communication process between clinicians that preceded the activation of an RRT when general concern criterion was used.Methods Qualitative grounded theory involved collection of three types of data details namely personal notes from participants in focus groups with white board notes from discussions and audio recordings of the focus groups sessions. Focus groups were conducted with participants exploring issues associated with clinician communication and how it related to the activation of an RRT using the general concern criterion.Results The three main phases of coding (i.e. open, axial and selective coding) analysis identified 322 separate open codes. The strongest theme contributed to a theory of ineffective communication and decreased psychological safety, namely that 'In the absence of effective communication there is a subsequent increase in anxiety, fear or concern that can be directly attributed to the activation of an RRT using the 'general concern' criterion'. The RRT filled cultural and process deficiencies in the compliance with an escalation protocol. Issues such as 'not for resuscitation documentation' and 'inability to establish communication with and between medical or nursing personnel' rated

  2. Ground water/surface water responses to global climate simulations, Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Climate variations can play an important, if not always crucial, role in successful conjunctive management of ground water and surface water resources. This will require accurate accounting of the links between variations in climate, recharge, and withdrawal from the resource systems, accurate projection or predictions of the climate variations, and accurate simulation of the responses of the resource systems. To assess linkages and predictability of climate influences on conjunctive management, global climate model (GCM) simulated precipitation rates were used to estimate inflows and outflows from a regional ground water model (RGWM) of the coastal aquifers of the Santa ClaraCalleguas Basin at Ventura, California, for 1950 to 1993. Interannual to interdecadal time scales of the El Nin??o Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) climate variations are imparted to simulated precipitation variations in the Southern California area and are realistically imparted to the simulated ground water level variations through the climate-driven recharge (and discharge) variations. For example, the simulated average ground water level response at a key observation well in the basin to ENSO variations of tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures is 1.2 m/??C, compared to 0.9 m/??C in observations. This close agreement shows that the GCM-RGWM combination can translate global scale climate variations into realistic local ground water responses. Probability distributions of simulated ground water level excursions above a local water level threshold for potential seawater intrusion compare well to the corresponding distributions from observations and historical RGWM simulations, demonstrating the combination's potential usefulness for water management and planning. Thus the GCM-RGWM combination could be used for planning purposes and - when the GCM forecast skills are adequate - for near term predictions.

  3. Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Spectra of the HCOO^{13}CH_{3} Isotopolog of Methylformate in the Ground State and in the First Excited Torsional State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykal, I.; Margules, L.; Huet, T. R.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Carvajal, M.; Kleiner, I.; Guillemin, J. C.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-06-01

    The detection of nineteen new rotational transitions of the parent molecule of methylformate (HCOOCH_{3}) in the second lowest excited torsional mode (ν_{t} =2) was recently reported in Orion-KL, as well as the detection of eighty new lines corresponding to the two ^{18}O isotopologs of methylformate in their ground states. The laboratory work on HCOO^{13}CH_{3} was continued. A wide spectral range from 50 to 940 GHz was recorded in Lille with the submillimeter-wave spectrometer based on harmonic generation of a microwave synthesizer source, using a multiplication chain of solid state sources (50-100 and 150-940 GHz) and a backward wave oscillator (100-150 GHz), and coupled to a 2.2 m cell. The absolute accuracy of the line positions is better than 30 kHz up to 630 GHz and 50 kHz above. The two states (ν_{t} = 0 and 1) were fitted together using the RAM Hamiltonian of the BELGI program and a new set of 45 parameters was accurately determined. The fit contains 7050 lines corresponding to the ground state up to J = 78 and K_{a} = 34 and 1907 lines related to ν_{t} =1 up to J = 59 and K_{a} = 24. The detection of new ν_{t} =1 lines in Orion KL will be reported and discussed. This work is supported by the French Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (CNRS), by CNES, and by the Spanish Government through the grants FIS2011-28738-C02-02 and CONSOLIDER 2009-00038. S. Takano, Y. Sakai, S. Kakimoto, M. Sasaki, and K. Kobayashi PASJ. {64}, 89, 2012. B. Tercero, et al. A& A. {538}, A199, 2012. M. Carvajal, et al. A& A. {500}, 1109, 2009.

  4. Influence of dynamic soil-structure interaction on building response to ground vibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2014-01-01

    Vibration from traffic and pile driving are an increasing problem in densely populated areas. To assess vibration levels in new or existing buildings near construction sites, roads or railways in the design phase, valid models for prediction of wave transmission via the ground and into a building...... must be used. In this regard it is often assumed that a no significant back coupling from the building to the ground exists. Thus, a model with free-field vibrations from the ground provides input at the base of the building model. The aim of the present paper is to examine whether—and to which extent...

  5. Traveling wave effect on the seismic response of a steel arch bridge subjected to near fault ground motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yan; George C Lee

    2007-01-01

    In the 1990s, several major earthquakes occurred throughout the world, with a common observation that near fault ground motion (NFGM) characteristics had a distinct impact on causing damage to civil engineering structures that could not be predicted by using far field ground motions. Since then, seismic responses of structures under NFGMs have been extensively examined, with most of the studies focusing on structures with relatively short fundamental periods, where the traveling wave effect does not need to be considered. However, for long span bridges, especially arch bridges, the traveling wave (only time delay considered) effect may be very distinct and is therefore important. In this paper, the results from a case study on the seismic response of a steel arch bridge under selected NFGMs is presented by considering the traveling wave effect with variable apparent velocities. The effects of fling step and long period pulses of NFGMs on the seismic responses of the arch bridge are also discussed.

  6. Dissecting the Power Sources of Low-Luminosity Emission-Line Galaxy Nuclei via Comparison of HST-STIS and Ground-Based Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Constantin, Anca; Ho, Luis C; Barth, Aaron J; Filippenko, Alexei V; Castillo, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of ~100 nearby line-emitting galaxy nuclei, we have built the currently definitive atlas of spectroscopic measurements of H_alpha and neighboring emission lines at subarcsecond scales. We employ these data in a quantitative comparison of the nebular emission in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based apertures, which offer an order-of-magnitude difference in contrast, and provide new statistical constraints on the degree to which Transition Objects and low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are powered by an accreting black hole at <10 pc. We show that while the small-aperture observations clearly resolve the nebular emission, the aperture dependence in the line ratios is generally weak, and this can be explained by gradients in the density of the line-emitting gas: the higher densities in the more nuclear regions potentially flatten the excitation gradients, suppressing the forbidden emission. The Transition Objects show a threefold increase in the incidence of broad H_...

  7. IMF By effects on ground magnetometer response to increased solar wind dynamic pressure derived from global MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Dogacan Su; Zou, Shasha; Slavin, James A.

    2017-05-01

    During sudden solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements, the magnetosphere undergoes rapid compression resulting in a reconfiguration of the global current systems, most notably the field-aligned currents (FACs). Ground-based magnetometers are traditionally used to study such compression events. However, factors affecting the polarity and magnitude of the ground-based magnetic perturbations are still not well understood. In particular, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By is known to create significant asymmetries in the FAC patterns. We use the University of Michigan Block Adaptive Tree Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS'R'US) magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the effects of IMF By on the global variations of ground magnetic perturbations during solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements. Using virtual magnetometers in three idealized simulations with varying IMF By, we find asymmetries in the peak amplitude and magnetic local time of the ground magnetic perturbations during the preliminary impulse (PI) and the main impulse (MI) phases. These asymmetries are especially evident at high-latitude ground magnetometer responses where the peak amplitudes differ by 50 nT at different locations. We show that the FACs related with the PI are due to magnetopause deformation, and the FACs related with the MI are generated by vortical flows within the magnetosphere, consistent with other simulation results. The perturbation FACs due to pressure enhancements and their magnetospheric sources do not differ much under different IMF By polarities. However, the conductance profile affected by the superposition of the preexisting FACs and the perturbation FACs including their closure currents is responsible for the magnitude and location asymmetries in the ground magnetic perturbations.

  8. Analysis of the spectral response of flourishing-withering vegetation changes based on ground spectral measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guli·Japper; CHEN Xi; ZHAO Jin; MA ZhongGuo; CHANG Cun; ZHANG XueRen

    2007-01-01

    A structural mode was used to characterize vegetation composition at the plant leaf level and a flourishing-withering ratio was developed. The spectral responses of vegetation with different flourishing-withering ratios were analyzed, the change rates of the chlorophyll and moisture content indices of vegetation with different flourishing-withering ratios were compared, and correlations between the chlorophyll and moisture content indices were analyzed. The results reveal that leaves with an intermediate flourishing-withering ratio can increase the absorption signatures of vegetation and that band ranges of 570-700 nm and 1300-1540 nm can play a role in indicating changes in the flourishing-withering ratios of vegetation; NPQI, NPCI, R695/R420, R695/R760, R750/R700, the peak-value area of red selvedge, the red selvedge amplitude, the ratio between the red selvedge amplitude and the minimum amplitude, and the NDVl of vegetation change regularly with the change in flourishing-withering ratios,and these nine vegetation indices are highly related to the chlorophyll content. Vegetation indexes of NDWI and PRI are very sensitive to the flourishing-withering change in vegetation and are closely related to the moisture content, and the correlation coefficient is higher than 0.9. The derivative of the spectra is more effective in describing changes in the structural mode of vegetation with different flourishing-withering ratios, especially at band ranges of 552-628 nm and 630-686 nm, and it is more sensitive to the mixed flourishing-withering ratios of leaves rather than to the vegetation indices. The red selvedge position in the spectrum is highly related to the chlorophyll content and is not sensitive to changes in the structural mode of mixed flourishing-withering leaves. The red selvedge parameters are sensitive to changes in the flourishing-withering ratio at the peak-value area of the red selvedge amplitude and the ratio between the red selvedge amplitude and the

  9. Diverse Responses of Remotely Sensed Grassland Phenology to Interannual Climate Variability over Frozen Ground Regions in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Frozen ground may regulate the phenological shifts of dry and cold grasslands at the southern edge of the Eurasian cryosphere. In this study, an investigation based on the MODIS Collection 5 phenology product and climatic data collected from 2001 to 2009 reveals the diverse responses of grassland phenology to interannual climate variability over various frozen ground regions in Mongolia. Compared with middle and southern typical steppe and desert steppe, the spring (start of season; SOS and autumn (end of season; EOS phenological events of northern forest steppe with lower air temperature tend to be earlier and later, respectively. Both the SOS and EOS are less sensitive to climate variability in permafrost regions than in other regions, whereas the SOS of typical steppe is more sensitive to both air temperature and precipitation over sporadic permafrost and seasonal frozen ground regions. Over various frozen ground regions in Mongolia; the SOS is mainly dominated by the prior autumn precipitation, and frozen ground plays a vital role in storing the precipitation of the previous autumn for the subsequent grass green-up. The EOS is mainly dominated by autumn air temperature. These findings could help to improve phenological models of grasslands in extremely dry and cold regions.

  10. Dissecting the Power Sources of Low-Luminosity Emission-Line Galaxy Nuclei via Comparison of HST-STIS and Ground-Based Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Anca; Shields, Joseph C.; Ho, Luis C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Castillo, Christopher A.

    2015-12-01

    Using a sample of ∼100 nearby line-emitting galaxy nuclei, we have built the currently definitive atlas of spectroscopic measurements of Hα and neighboring emission lines at subarcsecond scales. We employ these data in a quantitative comparison of the nebular emission in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based apertures, which offer an order-of-magnitude difference in contrast, and provide new statistical constraints on the degree to which transition objects and low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are powered by an accreting black hole at ≲10 pc. We show that while the small-aperture observations clearly resolve the nebular emission, the aperture dependence in the line ratios is generally weak, and this can be explained by gradients in the density of the line-emitting gas: the higher densities in the more nuclear regions potentially flatten the excitation gradients, suppressing the forbidden emission. The transition objects show a threefold increase in the incidence of broad Hα emission in the high-resolution data, as well as the strongest density gradients, supporting the composite model for these systems as accreting sources surrounded by star-forming activity. The narrow-line LINERs appear to be the weaker counterparts of the Type 1 LINERs, where the low accretion rates cause the disappearance of the broad-line component. The enhanced sensitivity of the HST observations reveals a 30% increase in the incidence of accretion-powered systems at z ≈ 0. A comparison of the strength of the broad-line emission detected at different epochs implies potential broad-line variability on a decade-long timescale, with at least a factor of three in amplitude. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  11. DISSECTING THE POWER SOURCES OF LOW-LUMINOSITY EMISSION-LINE GALAXY NUCLEI VIA COMPARISON OF HST-STIS AND GROUND-BASED SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, Anca; Castillo, Christopher A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807 (United States); Shields, Joseph C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Using a sample of ∼100 nearby line-emitting galaxy nuclei, we have built the currently definitive atlas of spectroscopic measurements of Hα and neighboring emission lines at subarcsecond scales. We employ these data in a quantitative comparison of the nebular emission in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based apertures, which offer an order-of-magnitude difference in contrast, and provide new statistical constraints on the degree to which transition objects and low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are powered by an accreting black hole at ≲10 pc. We show that while the small-aperture observations clearly resolve the nebular emission, the aperture dependence in the line ratios is generally weak, and this can be explained by gradients in the density of the line-emitting gas: the higher densities in the more nuclear regions potentially flatten the excitation gradients, suppressing the forbidden emission. The transition objects show a threefold increase in the incidence of broad Hα emission in the high-resolution data, as well as the strongest density gradients, supporting the composite model for these systems as accreting sources surrounded by star-forming activity. The narrow-line LINERs appear to be the weaker counterparts of the Type 1 LINERs, where the low accretion rates cause the disappearance of the broad-line component. The enhanced sensitivity of the HST observations reveals a 30% increase in the incidence of accretion-powered systems at z ≈ 0. A comparison of the strength of the broad-line emission detected at different epochs implies potential broad-line variability on a decade-long timescale, with at least a factor of three in amplitude.

  12. Modeling the high-latitude ground response to the excitation of the ionospheric MHD modes by atmospheric electric discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, E.; Mazur, N.; Pilipenko, V.; Baddeley, L.

    2016-11-01

    The ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) and fast magnetosonic (FMS) waveguide, which can trap the electromagnetic wave energy in the range from fractions of Hz to several Hz, are characteristic features of the upper ionosphere. Their role in the electromagnetic impulsive coupling between atmospheric discharge processes and the ionosphere can be elucidated with a proper model. The presented model is based on numerical solution of coupled wave equations for electromagnetic modes in the ionosphere and atmosphere in a realistic ionosphere modeled with the use of IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) vertical profiles. The geomagnetic field is supposed to be nearly vertical, so the model can be formally applied to high latitudes, though the main features of ground ULF structure will be qualitatively similar at middle latitudes as well. The modeling shows that during the lightning discharge a coupled wave system comprising IAR and MHD waveguide is excited. Using the model, the spatial structure, frequency spectra, and polarization parameters have been calculated at various distances from a vertical dipole. In the lightning proximity (about several hundred kilometer) only the lowest IAR harmonics are revealed in the radial magnetic component spectra. At distances >800 km the multiband spectral structure is formed predominantly by harmonics of FMS waveguide modes. The model predictions do not contradict the results of search coil magnetometer observations on Svalbard; however, the model validation demands more dedicated experimental studies.

  13. Forest Watch: Using Student Data to Monitor Forest Response to Ground-Level Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, S.; Rock, B. N.

    2006-12-01

    Forest Watch, a k-12 science outreach program begun at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) in 1991, has engaged pre-college students in providing UNH researchers with data on the annual response of white pine (Pinus strobus; a bio-indicator species for ozone exposure) to ground-level ozone across the New England region. Each year, student-collected growth and foliar symptomology data for 5 pine trees adjacent to their schools, along with first-year foliar samples, are submitted to UNH. Key foliar symptoms and student data are compared with summer monthly (JJA) maximum ozone concentrations collected by state and federal ozone monitoring stations across the region. To date, tree health indicators are inversely correlated (r2=0.83;p=0.10) with ozone concentrations: low ozone levels correlate with symptoms of good health (spectral indices diagnostic of high foliar chlorophyll levels and moisture content, normal incremental growth, low number of foliar symptoms), while summers characterized by high ozone concentrations correlate with symptoms of reduced health (low chlorophyll indices and moisture content, reduced incremental growth, increased number of foliar symptoms). In drought years (1999, 2001, 2002, 2003) few foliar symptoms of ozone damage are seen even though ozone levels were high, likely due to drought-induced stomatal closure. Based on student data since 1998, either low ozone summers, or drought summers have resulted in improved health in the sampled trees (n=30). Based on the success of Forest Watch in New England, we are exploring the extension of the program to Colorado as Front Range Forest Watch, operated from Colorado State University (CSU). The primary objective is to develop a student-scientist-local agency project that addresses real ecological issues in northern Colorado, including ozone pollution, and to provide pre-college students and teachers authentic science experiences. CSU runs a GK-12 program with Poudre School District in northern

  14. Seismic Response and Evaluation of SDOF Self-Centering Friction Damping Braces Subjected to Several Earthquake Ground Motions

    OpenAIRE

    Jong Wan Hu; Myung-Hyun Noh

    2015-01-01

    This paper mainly deals with seismic response and performance for self-centering friction damping braces (SFDBs) subjected to several maximum- or design-leveled earthquake ground motions. The self-centering friction damping brace members consist of core recentering components fabricated with superelastic shape memory alloy wires and energy dissipation devices achieved through shear friction mechanism. As compared to the conventional brace members for use in the steel concentrically braced fra...

  15. Random seismic response and sensitivity analysis of uncertain multi-span continuous beams subjected to spatially varying ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2016-09-01

    An analytical method is formulated for the seismic analysis of multi-span continuous beams with random structural parameters subjected to spatially varying ground motions. An earthquake-induced ground motion is modelled as a stationary random process defined by power spectral density function, and the spatial variation is considered. The physical parameters of the multi-span beams are random and modelled as continuous random Gaussian variables. The stationary random responses are determined as approximate explicit functions of the structural parameters. Direct differentiation of these functions with respect to the structural parameters provides analytical expressions of the sensitivities of the stationary responses. On the basis of Taylor expansion, the statistic moments of the random responses are obtained. Taking the four-span beam as an illustrative example, the mean value and standard deviation of the random responses are computed and compared with those from Monte Carlo simulation to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method. Results are illustrated for the influence of different structural parameters on the statistic moments of the random responses. It is found that randomness in Young's modulus and the mass per unit length has approximate equivalent and significant influence on the random responses, while that of damping is negligible.

  16. Action spectra again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  17. 关于不同阻尼比反应谱的研究%Researches about the response spectra with different damping ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗开海; 王亚勇

    2011-01-01

    The related provisions in the seismic design codes of China,America and Europe about the design response spectra with different damping ratio,and the unreasonable respects about these provisions were reviewed.Through the theory analysis,it was pointed out that for the long period and large damping structures,the damping force shall not be neglected,and the response spectra applied in the engineering design should be determined by the elastic force of SDOF.According to the analytical results of the comprehensive damping modification factors of the response spectra of a number of earthquake records,two modification proposals for the design response spectra in Code for seismic design og buildings(GB 50011—2001) are presented.%回顾了中、美、欧抗震设计规范关于不同阻尼比反应谱的相关规定及其存在的问题。通过理论分析指出,长周期、大阻尼的结构,阻尼力的影响不可忽略,工程设计反应谱应以弹性力为依据进行标定。根据实际地震记录反应谱的综合阻尼调整系数的分析,给出了规范(GB 50011—2001)的反应谱修正方案。

  18. A Theory-Grounded Measure of Adolescents' Response to a Media Literacy Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn; Yanovitzky, Itzhak; Carpenter, Amanda; Banerjee, Smita C.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Hecht, Michael L.; Elek, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Media literacy interventions offer promising avenues for the prevention of risky health behaviors among children and adolescents, but current literature remains largely equivocal about their efficacy. The primary objective of this study was to develop and test theoretically-grounded measures of audiences' degree of engagement with the content of…

  19. A Theory-Grounded Measure of Adolescents' Response to a Media Literacy Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn; Yanovitzky, Itzhak; Carpenter, Amanda; Banerjee, Smita C.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Hecht, Michael L.; Elek, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Media literacy interventions offer promising avenues for the prevention of risky health behaviors among children and adolescents, but current literature remains largely equivocal about their efficacy. The primary objective of this study was to develop and test theoretically-grounded measures of audiences' degree of engagement with the content of…

  20. Parochial Dissonance: A Grounded Theory of Wisconsin's New North Response to the Employability Skills Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneck, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate a theory that explained the beliefs and behaviors of participants from business, not-for-profit business, education, and government sectors when resolving the employability skills gap. Classical grounded theory was the inductive methodology applied to this study. The New North, an 18 county region located…

  1. Study of Ground Treatment on Improvement of Pile Foundation Response in Liquefiable Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Yulong, Chen

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In light of the disastrous the 2011 Tohoku Pacific Earthquake, the government of Japan has conducted studies to revise the seismic design code, and elevated peak ground accelerations have been adopted. Consequently, revisions on existing design to comply with the updated code are required for public projects that are still undergoing. The design safety needs to be reassessed, and implementation of strengthening measures is required if deemed necessary. For liquefaction...

  2. Estimation of the ground shaking from the response of rigid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena de Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper illustrates and compares simplified approaches to interpret the mechanisms of damage observed on rigid bodies in the cemetery of Amatrice, after the main shock (August 24, 2016, MW=6.0 of the Central Italy earthquake. The final goal of the work is to link the observed movements of the fallen objects to specific characteristics of the ground motion occurred at the specific site.

  3. Retrieval of HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) from ground-based high-resolution infrared solar spectra: Atmospheric increase since 1989 and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Emmanuel; Lejeune, Bernard; Bovy, Benoît; Servais, Christian; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Christopher D.; Walker, Kaley A.; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K.; O'Doherty, Simon

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an approach for retrieving HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) from ground-based high-resolution infrared solar spectra, using its ν7 band Q branch in the 900-906 cm-1 interval. Interferences by HNO3, CO2 and H2O have to be accounted for. Application of this approach to observations recorded within the framework of long-term monitoring activities carried out at the northern mid-latitude, high-altitude Jungfraujoch station in Switzerland (46.5°N, 8.0°E, 3580 m above sea level) has provided a total column times series spanning the 1989 to mid-2015 time period. A fit to the HCFC-142b daily mean total column time series shows a statistically-significant long-term trend of (1.23±0.08×1013 molec cm-2) per year from 2000 to 2010, at the 2-σ confidence level. This corresponds to a significant atmospheric accumulation of (0.94±0.06) ppt (1 ppt=1/1012) per year for the mean tropospheric mixing ratio, at the 2-σ confidence level. Over the subsequent time period (2010-2014), we note a significant slowing down in the HCFC-142b buildup. Our ground-based FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) results are compared with relevant data sets derived from surface in situ measurements at the Mace Head and Jungfraujoch sites of the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) network and from occultation measurements by the ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer) instrument on-board the SCISAT satellite.

  4. Inequality spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  5. Electronic and vibrational spectra of protonated benzaldehyde-water clusters, [BZ-(H2O)n≤5]H+: evidence for ground-state proton transfer to solvent for n ≥ 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopfer, Otto; Patzer, Alexander; Chakraborty, Shamik; Alata, Ivan; Omidyan, Reza; Broquier, Michel; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2014-03-28

    Vibrational and electronic photodissociation spectra of mass-selected protonated benzaldehyde-(water)n clusters, [BZ-(H2O)n]H(+) with n ≤ 5, are analyzed by quantum chemical calculations to determine the protonation site in the ground electronic state (S0) and ππ(*) excited state (S1) as a function of microhydration. IR spectra of [BZ-(H2O)n]H(+) with n ≤ 2 are consistent with BZH(+)-(H2O)n type structures, in which the excess proton is localized on benzaldehyde. IR spectra of clusters with n ≥ 3 are assigned to structures, in which the excess proton is located on the (H2O)n solvent moiety, BZ-(H2O)nH(+). Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP, MP2, and ri-CC2 levels support the conclusion of proton transfer from BZH(+) to the solvent moiety in the S0 state for hydration sizes larger than the critical value nc = 3. The vibronic spectrum of the S1 ← S0 transition (ππ(*)) of the n = 1 cluster is consistent with a cis-BZH(+)-H2O structure in both electronic states. The large blueshift of the S1 origin by 2106 cm(-1) upon hydration with a single H2O ligand indicates that the proton affinity of BZ is substantially increased upon S1 excitation, thus strongly destabilizing the hydrogen bond to the solvent. The adiabatic S1 excitation energy and vibronic structure calculated at the ri-CC2/aug-cc-pVDZ level agrees well with the measured spectrum, supporting the notion of a cis-BZH(+)-H2O geometry. The doubly hydrated species, cis-BZH(+)-(H2O)2, does not absorb in the spectral range of 23 000-27 400 cm(-1), because of the additional large blueshift of the ππ(*) transition upon attachment of the second H2O molecule. Calculations predict roughly linear and large incremental blueshifts for the ππ(*) transition in [BZ-(H2O)n]H(+) as a function of n. In the size range n ≥ 3, the calculations predict a proton transfer from the (H2O)nH(+) solvent back to the BZ solute upon electronic ππ(*) excitation.

  6. Electronic and vibrational spectra of protonated benzaldehyde-water clusters, [BZ-(H2O)n≤5]H+: Evidence for ground-state proton transfer to solvent for n ≥ 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopfer, Otto; Patzer, Alexander; Chakraborty, Shamik; Alata, Ivan; Omidyan, Reza; Broquier, Michel; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    Vibrational and electronic photodissociation spectra of mass-selected protonated benzaldehyde-(water)n clusters, [BZ-(H2O)n]H+ with n ≤ 5, are analyzed by quantum chemical calculations to determine the protonation site in the ground electronic state (S0) and ππ* excited state (S1) as a function of microhydration. IR spectra of [BZ-(H2O)n]H+ with n ≤ 2 are consistent with BZH+-(H2O)n type structures, in which the excess proton is localized on benzaldehyde. IR spectra of clusters with n ≥ 3 are assigned to structures, in which the excess proton is located on the (H2O)n solvent moiety, BZ-(H2O)nH+. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP, MP2, and ri-CC2 levels support the conclusion of proton transfer from BZH+ to the solvent moiety in the S0 state for hydration sizes larger than the critical value nc = 3. The vibronic spectrum of the S1 ← S0 transition (ππ*) of the n = 1 cluster is consistent with a cis-BZH+-H2O structure in both electronic states. The large blueshift of the S1 origin by 2106 cm-1 upon hydration with a single H2O ligand indicates that the proton affinity of BZ is substantially increased upon S1 excitation, thus strongly destabilizing the hydrogen bond to the solvent. The adiabatic S1 excitation energy and vibronic structure calculated at the ri-CC2/aug-cc-pVDZ level agrees well with the measured spectrum, supporting the notion of a cis-BZH+-H2O geometry. The doubly hydrated species, cis-BZH+-(H2O)2, does not absorb in the spectral range of 23 000-27 400 cm-1, because of the additional large blueshift of the ππ* transition upon attachment of the second H2O molecule. Calculations predict roughly linear and large incremental blueshifts for the ππ* transition in [BZ-(H2O)n]H+ as a function of n. In the size range n ≥ 3, the calculations predict a proton transfer from the (H2O)nH+ solvent back to the BZ solute upon electronic ππ* excitation.

  7. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-07

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  8. Spectral response of the intrinsic region of a GaAs-InAs quantum dot solar cell considering the absorption spectra of ideal cubic dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayantan; Chatterjee, Avigyan; Biswas, Ashim Kumar; Sinha, Amitabha

    2016-10-01

    Recently, attempts have been made by some researchers to improve the efficiency of quantum dot solar cells by incorporating different types of quantum dots. In this paper, the photocurrent density has been obtained considering the absorption spectra of ideal cubic dots. The effects of quantum dot size dispersion on the spectral response of the intrinsic region of a GaAs-InAs quantum dot solar cell have been studied. The dependence of the spectral response of this region on the size of quantum dots of such solar cell has also been investigated. The investigation shows that for smaller quantum dot size dispersion, the spectral response of the intrinsic region of the cell increases significantly. It is further observed that by enlarging the quantum dot size it is possible to enhance the spectral response of such solar cells as it causes better match between absorption spectra of the quantum dots and the solar spectrum. These facts indicate the significant role of quantum dot size and size dispersion on the performance of such devices. Also, the power conversion efficiency of such solar cell has been studied under 1 sun, AM 1.5 condition.

  9. Observation and Analysis of Ground Daylight Spectra of China ’s Different Light Climate Partitions%中国不同光气候分区地面日光光谱的观测与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁树英; 杨春宇

    2015-01-01

    我国地域辽阔,各地光气候有很大区别,为了扩大和提高太阳能与天然光的利用范围及利用效率,采用一种便携式的光谱扫描仪,对我国不同光气候分区的7个代表性城市(昆明、西宁、北京、深圳、南京、南昌和重庆)一天中不同太阳高度角对应时刻的地面直射日光光谱在380~780 nm可见光谱段进行了跟踪观测,分析了不同光气候分区城市一天中不同太阳高度角对应时刻的日光光谱变化规律,比较了不同光气候分区城市的日光光谱曲线,总结了日光光谱辐射强度的影响因素。分析表明:不同光气候分区城市一天中不同太阳高度角对应时刻的日光光谱辐射强度不同,但日光光谱功率的分布和走向基本一致,总体呈先上升后下降的趋势,最大峰值出现在475 nm附近,380~475 nm之间光谱功率分布曲线出现陡升,475~700 nm之间曲线有下降趋势但基本平稳,>700 nm曲线出现了反复的较大起伏;不同光气候分区城市的日光光谱功率分布曲线的分布和走向也基本一致,没有明显的与不同光气候分区直接相关的日光光谱功率分布差异性规律;日光光谱辐射强度与太阳高度角和日面状况密切相关。%The territory of China is vast ,so the daylight climates of different regions are not the same. In order to expand the utilization scope and improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy and daylight resources ,this article observed and analyzed the ground daylight spectra of China’s different light climate partitions. Using a portable spectrum scanner ,this article did a tracking observation of ground direct daylight spectra in the period of 380~780 nm visible spectrum of different solar elevation angles during one day in seven representative cities of china’s different light climate partitions. The seven representative cities in-cluded Ku nming ,Xining ,Beijing ,Shenzhen

  10. Testing of ground fault relay response during the energisation of megawatt range electric boilers in thermal power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth; Davidsen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    , during the energisation of a boiler. A special case for concern was the presence of an electric arc between the electrodes of the boiler and the water in the boiler during approximately 2s at the energisation, which can in theory be seen as a ground fault by the relay. The voltage and current transient......Large controllable loads may support power systems with an increased penetration of fluctuating renewable energy, by providing a rapid response to a change in the power production. Megawatt range electric boilers are an example of such controllable loads, capable of change rapidly...

  11. A Constructive/ist Response to Glaser. About Barney G. Glaser: Constructivist Grounded Theory? Published in FQS 3(3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Bryant

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent articles on the Grounded Theory Method (GTM have started to analyze its conceptual and philosophical foundations. In particular it has been argued that the early characterizations by GLASER and STRAUSS exhibit a scientistic and positivist orientation that is no longer tenable. In her recent contribution to the GTM literature, CHARMAZ distinguished between objectivist GTM and constructivist GTM. This drew a response from Barney GLASER in an earlier issue of FQS. What follows is a rejoinder to GLASER, offering some clarification of developments in people's understanding of this important and widely-used qualitative approach. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0301155

  12. Development of methodology and computer programs for the ground response spectrum and the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joon Kyoung [Semyung Univ., Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technol , Jecheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    Objective of this study is to investigate and develop the methodologies and corresponding computer codes, compatible to the domestic seismological and geological environments, for estimating ground response spectrum and probabilistic seismic hazard. Using the PSHA computer program, the Cumulative Probability Functions(CPDF) and Probability Functions (PDF) of the annual exceedence have been investigated for the analysis of the uncertainty space of the annual probability at ten interested seismic hazard levels (0.1 g to 0.99 g). The cumulative provability functions and provability functions of the annual exceedence have been also compared to those results from the different input parameter spaces.

  13. Atmospheric Response to Fukushima Daiichi NPP (Japan) Accident Reviled by Satellite and Ground observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ouzounov, D; Hattori, K; Kafatos, M; Taylor, P

    2011-01-01

    Immediately after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan we started to continuously survey the Outgoing Long-wavelength Radiation (OLR, 10-13 microns) from NOAA/AVHRR. Our preliminary results show the presence of hot spots on the top of the atmosphere over the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) and due to their persistence over the same region they are most likely not of meteorological origin. On March 14 and 21 we detected a significant increase in radiation (14 W/m2) at the top of the atmosphere which also coincides with a reported radioactivity gas leaks from the FDNPP. After March 21 the intensity of OLR started to decline, which has been confirmed by ground radiometer network. We hypothesize that this increase in OLR was a result of the radioactive leaks released in atmosphere from the FDNPP. This energy triggers ionization of the air near the ground and lead to release of latent heat energy due to change of air humidity and temperature. Our early results demonstrate the potential ...

  14. 'Veiling sexualities': a grounded theory of mental health nurses responses to issues of sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Agnes; Barker, Phil; Begley, Cecily M

    2008-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study to develop a grounded theory explaining how mental health nurses respond to issues of sexuality in clinical practice. The history of sexuality and people with mental health problems has largely been a history shrouded in misunderstanding, stigma, myth and negativity. However, individuals with mental health problems may experience sexuality and relationship difficulties related to their life experiences, mental illness, or its treatment. Grounded theory was the methodology used for the study. Interviews were conducted in 2005-2006 with 27 mental health nurses working an urban area in the Republic of Ireland. Data were analysed using the concurrent processes of constant comparative analysis, data collection, theoretical sampling and memo writing. The core category to emerge from the data was 'veiling sexualities'. This refers to participants' accounts of how they responded to the sexuality dimension of clients' lives. Participants' main concerns about sexuality were related to feelings of personal and professional vulnerability, due to a lack of competence, comfort and confidence in this area. The theory highlights the manner in which nurses perpetuate practices that marginalize, discriminate and socially exclude clients as 'sexual citizens'. The theory of Veiled Sexualities may facilitate acknowledgement of the presence of sexuality in all nurse-client encounters, and promote a discourse on the sexual rights of people experiencing mental distress among mental health nurses and all involved in the delivery of mental health services.

  15. Can Dynamics Be Responsible for the Complex Multipeak Infrared Spectra of NO Adsorbed to Copper(II) Sites in Zeolites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göltl, Florian; Sautet, Philippe; Hermans, Ive

    2015-06-26

    Copper-exchanged SSZ-13 is a very efficient material in the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) using ammonia (deNO(x)-SCR) and characterizing the underlying distribution of copper sites in the material is of prime importance to understand its activity. The IR spectrum of NO adsorbed to divalent copper sites are modeled using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. For most sites, complex multi-peak spectra induced by the thermal motion of the cation as well as the adsorbate are found. A finite temperature spectrum for a specific catalyst was constructed, which shows excellent agreement with previously reported data. Additionally these findings allow active and inactive species in deNO(x)-SCR to be identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such complex spectra for single molecules adsorbed to single active centers have been reported in heterogeneous catalysis, and we expect similar effects to be important in a large number of systems with mobile active centers.

  16. Individual responsibility as ground for priority setting in shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Lars; Gustavsson, Erik; Munthe, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Given healthcare resource constraints, voices are being raised to hold patients responsible for their health choices. In parallel, there is a growing trend towards shared decision-making, aiming to empower patients and give them more control over healthcare decisions. More power and control over decisions is usually taken to mean more responsibility for them. The trend of shared decision-making would therefore seem to strengthen the case for invoking individual responsibility in the healthcare priority setting. To analyse whether the implementation of shared decision-making would strengthen the argument for invoking individual responsibility in the healthcare priority setting using normative analysis. Shared decision-making does not constitute an independent argument in favour of employing individual responsibility since these notions rest on different underlying values. However, if a health system employs shared decision-making, individual responsibility may be used to limit resource implications of accommodating patient preferences outside professional standards and goals. If a healthcare system employs individual responsibility, high level dynamic shared decision-making implying a joint deliberation resulting in a decision where both parties are willing to revise initial standpoints may disarm common objections to the applicability of individual responsibility by virtue of making patients more likely to exercise adequate control of their own actions. However, if communication strategies applied in the shared decision-making are misaligned to the patient's initial capacities, arguments against individual responsibility might, on the other hand, gain strength. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. A Theory-Grounded Measure of Adolescents’ Response to a Media Literacy Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn; Yanovitzky, Itzhak; Carpenter, Amanda; Banerjee, Smita C.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Hecht, Michael L.; Elek, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Media literacy interventions offer promising avenues for the prevention of risky health behaviors among children and adolescents, but current literature remains largely equivocal about their efficacy. The primary objective of this study was to develop and test theoretically-grounded measures of audiences’ degree of engagement with the content of media literacy programs based on the recognition that engagement (and not participation per se) can better explain and predict individual variations in the effects of these programs. We tested the validity and reliability of a measure of engagement with two different samples of 10th grade high school students who participated in a pilot and actual test of a brief media literacy curriculum. Four message evaluation factors (involvement, perceived novelty, critical thinking, personal reflection) emerged and demonstrate acceptable reliability. PMID:28042522

  18. Analytical investigations of seismic responses for reinforced concrete bridge columns subjected to strong near-fault ground motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Kuo Su; Yu-Chi Sung; Shuenn-Yih Chang; Chao-Hsun Huang

    2007-01-01

    Strong near-fault ground motion, usually caused by the fault-rupture and characterized by a pulse-like velocitywave form, often causes dramatic instantaneous seismic energy (Jadhav and Jangid 2006). Some reinforced concrete (RC)bridge columns, even those built according to ductile design principles, were damaged in the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake.Thus, it is very important to evaluate the seismic response of a RC bridge column to improve its seismic design and prevent future damage. Nonlinear time history analysis using step-by-step integration is capable of tracing the dynamic response of a structure during the entire vibration period and is able to accommodate the pulsing wave form. However; the accuracy of the numerical results is very sensitive to the modeling of the nonlinear load-deformation relationship of the structural member.FEMA 273 and ATC-40 provide the modeling parameters for structural nonlinear analyses of RC beams and RC columns.They use three parameters to define the plastic rotation angles and a residual strength ratio to describe the nonlinear loaddeformation relationship of an RC member. Structural nonlinear analyses are performed based on these parameters. This method provides a convenient way to obtain the nonlinear seismic responses of RC structures. However, the accuracy of the numerical solutions might be further improved. For this purpose, results from a previous study on modeling of the static pushover analyses for RC bridge columns (Sung et al. 2005) is adopted for the nonlinear time history analysis presented herein to evaluate the structural responses excited by a near-fault ground motion. To ensure the reliability of this approach,the numerical results were compared to experimental results. The results confirm that the proposed approach is valid.

  19. Inverse modelling of Köhler theory - Part 1: A response surface analysis of CCN spectra with respect to surface-active organic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Samuel; Partridge, Daniel; Topping, David; Stier, Philip

    2016-04-01

    In this study an inverse modelling framework for the calculation of CCN spectra is developed to facilitate a more robust treatment of evaluation of Köhler models against observations. To achieve this, we define an objective function that provides a diagnostic metric of the deviation of modelled CCN spectra from observations as a function of input parameters. This allows for the assessment of model accuracy while simultaneously examining global parameter sensitivities and identifying parameter interactions across all atmospherically relevant supersaturations, corresponding to a broad range of cloud types and updraft velocities. The focus of this study is two-fold. Firstly, we assess the feasibility of inverse modelling as a new methodology for aerosol-CCN spectra closure. To achieve this goal, responses in the objective function to parameter perturbations in 2D cross-sections of the complete parameter space, response surfaces, are used to examine the likelihood of our chosen objective function containing enough information to constrain the model input parameters considered using automatic search algorithms. Secondly, these response surfaces are employed to conduct an extensive parametric sensitivity analysis and subsequently rank the relative importance of aerosol physiochemical parameters in determining CCN spectra. Using Köhler theory to model CCN concentrations requires knowledge of many physiochemical parameters, some of which are difficult to measure in-situ at the scale of interest. Therefore, novel methodologies, such as the one developed here, are required to probe the entire parameter space of aerosol-cloud interaction problems and provide global sensitivity analyses to constrain parametric uncertainties. Partitioning of surface-active species from the bulk to the surface phase can alter the point of CCN activation. Therefore, the analysis conducted here is carried out for a standard Köhler model as well as more complex Köhler models accounting for the

  20. Managing United States public lands in response to climate change: a view from the ground up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenwood, Mikaela S; Dilling, Lisa; Milford, Jana B

    2012-05-01

    Federal land managers are faced with the task of balancing multiple uses and goals when making decisions about land use and the activities that occur on public lands. Though climate change is now well recognized by federal agencies and their local land and resource managers, it is not yet clear how issues related to climate change will be incorporated into on-the-ground decision making within the framework of multiple use objectives. We conducted a case study of a federal land management agency field office, the San Juan Public Lands Center in Durango, CO, U.S.A., to understand from their perspective how decisions are currently made, and how climate change and carbon management are being factored into decision making. We evaluated three major management sectors in which climate change or carbon management may intersect other use goals: forests, biofuels, and grazing. While land managers are aware of climate change and eager to understand more about how it might affect land resources, the incorporation of climate change considerations into everyday decision making is currently quite limited. Climate change is therefore on the radar screen, but remains a lower priority than other issues. To assist the office in making decisions that are based on sound scientific information, further research is needed into how management activities influence carbon storage and resilience of the landscape under climate change.

  1. Hepatic and branchial xenobiotic biomarker responses in Solea spp. from several NW Mediterranean fishing grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siscar, R; Varó, I; Solé, M

    2015-12-01

    The common sole, Solea solea and the Senegalese sole, Solea senegalensis are two important commercial benthic species that coexist in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Several common biomarkers of chemical exposure were measured in two organs (liver and gills) involved in a different degree in biotransformation and detoxification processes. These parameters were: phase I cytochrome P450 CYP1A-dependent ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and carboxylesterase activities, phase II glutathione S-transferase activity and the enzymatic antioxidants: catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) considering biometric variables (size and weight) and all liver and gill biomarkers discriminated at a certain extent individuals of both species collected at the different fishing grounds. Esterase inhibition by the organophosphorus pesticides dichlorvos and diazinon was also compared in vitro in muscle, liver and gill of the two species revealing a differential sensitivity. The use of benthic sole in pollution monitoring of Southern Europe is discussed as local sentinel in respect to other benthic fish from more Northern latitudes.

  2. Optical absorption spectra of Ag-11 isomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Fernandez, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of the three most; stable structural isomers of the Ag-11 cluster were calculated using the time-dependent, density functional theory within the Casida formalism. The slightly different, spectra, of the isomers may permit the identification of the ground-stale confi......The optical absorption spectra of the three most; stable structural isomers of the Ag-11 cluster were calculated using the time-dependent, density functional theory within the Casida formalism. The slightly different, spectra, of the isomers may permit the identification of the ground...

  3. Research on the attribution evaluating methods of dynamic effects of various parameter uncertainties on the in-structure floor response spectra of nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianbo; Lin, Gao; Liu, Jun; Li, Zhiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Consideration of the dynamic effects of the site and structural parameter uncertainty is required by the standards for nuclear power plants (NPPs) in most countries. The anti-seismic standards provide two basic methods to analyze parameter uncertainty. Directly manually dealing with the calculated floor response spectra (FRS) values of deterministic approaches is the first method. The second method is to perform probability statistical analysis of the FRS results on the basis of the Monte Carlo method. The two methods can only reflect the overall effects of the uncertain parameters, and the results cannot be screened for a certain parameter's influence and contribution. In this study, based on the dynamic analyses of the floor response spectra of NPPs, a comprehensive index of the assessed impact for various uncertain parameters is presented and recommended, including the correlation coefficient, the regression slope coefficient and Tornado swing. To compensate for the lack of guidance in the NPP seismic standards, the proposed method can effectively be used to evaluate the contributions of various parameters from the aspects of sensitivity, acuity and statistical swing correlations. Finally, examples are provided to verify the set of indicators from systematic and intuitive perspectives, such as the uncertainty of the impact of the structure parameters and the contribution to the FRS of NPPs. The index is sensitive to different types of parameters, which provides a new technique for evaluating the anti-seismic parameters required for NPPs.

  4. Calculations of nonlinear response properties using the intermediate state representation and the algebraic-diagrammatic construction polarization propagator approach: two-photon absorption spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippenberg, S; Rehn, D R; Wormit, M; Starcke, J H; Rusakova, I L; Trofimov, A B; Dreuw, A

    2012-02-14

    An earlier proposed approach to molecular response functions based on the intermediate state representation (ISR) of polarization propagator and algebraic-diagrammatic construction (ADC) approximations is for the first time employed for calculations of nonlinear response properties. The two-photon absorption (TPA) spectra are considered. The hierarchy of the first- and second-order ADC∕ISR computational schemes, ADC(1), ADC(2), ADC(2)-x, and ADC(3/2), is tested in applications to H(2)O, HF, and C(2)H(4) (ethylene). The calculated TPA spectra are compared with the results of coupled cluster (CC) models and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) calculations, using the results of the CC3 model as benchmarks. As a more realistic example, the TPA spectrum of C(8)H(10) (octatetraene) is calculated using the ADC(2)-x and ADC(2) methods. The results are compared with the results of TDDFT method and earlier calculations, as well as to the available experimental data. A prominent feature of octatetraene and other polyene molecules is the existence of low-lying excited states with increased double excitation character. We demonstrate that the two-photon absorption involving such states can be adequately studied using the ADC(2)-x scheme, explicitly accounting for interaction of doubly excited configurations. Observed peaks in the experimental TPA spectrum of octatetraene are assigned based on our calculations.

  5. Effects of low temperature on breathing pattern and ventilatory responses during hibernation in the golden-mantled ground squirrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Cheryl L; Milsom, William K

    2017-07-01

    During entrance into hibernation in golden-mantled ground squirrels (Callospermophilus lateralis), ventilation decreases as metabolic rate and body temperature fall. Two patterns of respiration occur during deep hibernation. At 7 °C body temperature (T b ), a breathing pattern characterized by episodes of multiple breaths (20.6 ± 1.9 breaths/episode) separated by long apneas or nonventilatory periods (T nvp ) (mean = 11.1 ± 1.2 min) occurs, while at 4 °C T b , a pattern in which breaths are evenly distributed and separated by a relatively short T nvp (0.5 ± 0.05 min) occurs. Squirrels exhibiting each pattern have similar metabolic rates and levels of total ventilation (0.2 and 0.23 ml O2/hr/kg and 0.11 and 0.16 ml air/min/kg, respectively). Squirrels at 7 °C T b exhibit a significant hypoxic ventilatory response, while squirrels at 4 °C T b do not respond to hypoxia at any level of O2 tested. Squirrels at both temperatures exhibit a significant hypercapnic ventilatory response, but the response is significantly reduced in the 4 °C T b squirrels. Carotid body denervation has little effect on the breathing patterns or on the hypercapnic ventilatory responses. It does reduce the magnitude and threshold for the hypoxic ventilatory response. Taken together the data suggest that (1) the fundamental rhythm generator remains functional at low temperatures; (2) the hypercapnic ventilatory response arises from central chemoreceptors that remain functional at very low temperatures; (3) the hypoxic ventilatory response arises from both carotid body and aortic chemoreceptors that are silenced at lower temperatures; and (4) there is a strong correlation between breathing pattern and chemosensitivity.

  6. Four-Component Damped Density Functional Response Theory Study of UV/Vis Absorption Spectra and Phosphorescence Parameters of Group 12 Metal-Substituted Porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Thomas; Saue, Trond; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    The influences of group 12 (Zn, Cd, Hg) metal-substitution on the valence spectra and phosphorescence parameters of porphyrins (P) have been investigated in a relativistic setting. In order to obtain valence spectra, this study reports the first application of the damped linear response function, or complex polarization propagator, in the four-component density functional theory framework [as formulated in Villaume et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2010 , 133 , 064105 ]. It is shown that the steep increase in the density of states as due to the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling yields only minor changes in overall computational costs involved with the solution of the set of linear response equations. Comparing single-frequency to multifrequency spectral calculations, it is noted that the number of iterations in the iterative linear equation solver per frequency grid-point decreases monotonously from 30 to 0.74 as the number of frequency points goes from one to 19. The main heavy-atom effect on the UV/vis-absorption spectra is indirect and attributed to the change of point group symmetry due to metal-substitution, and it is noted that substitutions using heavier atoms yield small red-shifts of the intense Soret-band. Concerning phosphorescence parameters, the adoption of a four-component relativistic setting enables the calculation of such properties at a linear order of response theory, and any higher-order response functions do not need to be considered-a real, conventional, form of linear response theory has been used for the calculation of these parameters. For the substituted porphyrins, electronic coupling between the lowest triplet states is strong and results in theoretical estimates of lifetimes that are sensitive to the wave function and electron density parametrization. With this in mind, we report our best estimates of the phosphorescence lifetimes to be 460, 13.8, 11.2, and 0.00155 s for H2P, ZnP, CdP, and HgP, respectively, with the corresponding transition

  7. Electronic and vibrational spectra of protonated benzaldehyde-water clusters, [BZ-(H{sub 2}O){sub n≤5}]H{sup +}: Evidence for ground-state proton transfer to solvent for n ≥ 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopfer, Otto, E-mail: dopfer@physik.tu-berlin.de; Patzer, Alexander; Chakraborty, Shamik [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Alata, Ivan; Omidyan, Reza; Broquier, Michel [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d’Orsay, UMR-CNRS 8214, and Centre Laser de l’Université Paris Sud/LUMAT FR 2764, Batiment 106, l’Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, UMR-CNRS 7345 Aix Marseille Université, Avenue Escadrille Normandie-Niémen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2014-03-28

    Vibrational and electronic photodissociation spectra of mass-selected protonated benzaldehyde-(water){sub n} clusters, [BZ-(H{sub 2}O){sub n}]H{sup +} with n ≤ 5, are analyzed by quantum chemical calculations to determine the protonation site in the ground electronic state (S{sub 0}) and ππ{sup *} excited state (S{sub 1}) as a function of microhydration. IR spectra of [BZ-(H{sub 2}O){sub n}]H{sup +} with n ≤ 2 are consistent with BZH{sup +}-(H{sub 2}O){sub n} type structures, in which the excess proton is localized on benzaldehyde. IR spectra of clusters with n ≥ 3 are assigned to structures, in which the excess proton is located on the (H{sub 2}O){sub n} solvent moiety, BZ-(H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +}. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP, MP2, and ri-CC2 levels support the conclusion of proton transfer from BZH{sup +} to the solvent moiety in the S{sub 0} state for hydration sizes larger than the critical value n{sub c} = 3. The vibronic spectrum of the S{sub 1} ← S{sub 0} transition (ππ{sup *}) of the n = 1 cluster is consistent with a cis-BZH{sup +}-H{sub 2}O structure in both electronic states. The large blueshift of the S{sub 1} origin by 2106 cm{sup −1} upon hydration with a single H{sub 2}O ligand indicates that the proton affinity of BZ is substantially increased upon S{sub 1} excitation, thus strongly destabilizing the hydrogen bond to the solvent. The adiabatic S{sub 1} excitation energy and vibronic structure calculated at the ri-CC2/aug-cc-pVDZ level agrees well with the measured spectrum, supporting the notion of a cis-BZH{sup +}-H{sub 2}O geometry. The doubly hydrated species, cis-BZH{sup +}-(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, does not absorb in the spectral range of 23 000–27 400 cm{sup −1}, because of the additional large blueshift of the ππ{sup *} transition upon attachment of the second H{sub 2}O molecule. Calculations predict roughly linear and large incremental blueshifts for the ππ{sup *} transition in [BZ-(H{sub 2}O){sub n

  8. Nonparametric Bayesian time-series modeling and clustering of time-domain ground penetrating radar landmine responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kenneth D., Jr.; Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2010-04-01

    Time domain ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been shown to be a powerful sensing phenomenology for detecting buried objects such as landmines. Landmine detection with GPR data typically utilizes a feature-based pattern classification algorithm to discriminate buried landmines from other sub-surface objects. In high-fidelity GPR, the time-frequency characteristics of a landmine response should be indicative of the physical construction and material composition of the landmine and could therefore be useful for discrimination from other non-threatening sub-surface objects. In this research we propose modeling landmine time-domain responses with a nonparametric Bayesian time-series model and we perform clustering of these time-series models with a hierarchical nonparametric Bayesian model. Each time-series is modeled as a hidden Markov model (HMM) with autoregressive (AR) state densities. The proposed nonparametric Bayesian prior allows for automated learning of the number of states in the HMM as well as the AR order within each state density. This creates a flexible time-series model with complexity determined by the data. Furthermore, a hierarchical non-parametric Bayesian prior is used to group landmine responses with similar HMM model parameters, thus learning the number of distinct landmine response models within a data set. Model inference is accomplished using a fast variational mean field approximation that can be implemented for on-line learning.

  9. Alouatta trichromatic color vision: cone spectra and physiological responses studied with microspectrophotometry and single unit retinal electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Luiz Carlos L; Saito, Cézar A; da Silva Filho, Manoel; Kremers, Jan; Bowmaker, James K; Lee, Barry B

    2014-01-01

    The howler monkeys (Alouatta sp.) are the only New World primates to exhibit routine trichromacy. Both males and females have three cone photopigments. However, in contrast to Old World monkeys, Alouatta has a locus control region upstream of each opsin gene on the X-chromosome and this might influence the retinal organization underlying its color vision. Post-mortem microspectrophotometry (MSP) was performed on the retinae of two male Alouatta to obtain rod and cone spectral sensitivities. The MSP data were consistent with only a single opsin being expressed in each cone and electrophysiological data were consistent with this primate expressing full trichromacy. To study the physiological organization of the retina underlying Alouatta trichromacy, we recorded from retinal ganglion cells of the same animals used for MSP measurements with a variety of achromatic and chromatic stimulus protocols. We found MC cells and PC cells in the Alouatta retina with similar properties to those previously found in the retina of other trichromatic primates. MC cells showed strong phasic responses to luminance changes and little response to chromatic pulses. PC cells showed strong tonic response to chromatic changes and small tonic response to luminance changes. Responses to other stimulus protocols (flicker photometry; changing the relative phase of red and green modulated lights; temporal modulation transfer functions) were also similar to those recorded in other trichromatic primates. MC cells also showed a pronounced frequency double response to chromatic modulation, and with luminance modulation response saturation accompanied by a phase advance between 10-20 Hz, characteristic of a contrast gain mechanism. This indicates a very similar retinal organization to Old-World monkeys. Cone-specific opsin expression in the presence of a locus control region for each opsin may call into question the hypothesis that this region exclusively controls opsin expression.

  10. Alouatta trichromatic color vision: cone spectra and physiological responses studied with microspectrophotometry and single unit retinal electrophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos L Silveira

    Full Text Available The howler monkeys (Alouatta sp. are the only New World primates to exhibit routine trichromacy. Both males and females have three cone photopigments. However, in contrast to Old World monkeys, Alouatta has a locus control region upstream of each opsin gene on the X-chromosome and this might influence the retinal organization underlying its color vision. Post-mortem microspectrophotometry (MSP was performed on the retinae of two male Alouatta to obtain rod and cone spectral sensitivities. The MSP data were consistent with only a single opsin being expressed in each cone and electrophysiological data were consistent with this primate expressing full trichromacy. To study the physiological organization of the retina underlying Alouatta trichromacy, we recorded from retinal ganglion cells of the same animals used for MSP measurements with a variety of achromatic and chromatic stimulus protocols. We found MC cells and PC cells in the Alouatta retina with similar properties to those previously found in the retina of other trichromatic primates. MC cells showed strong phasic responses to luminance changes and little response to chromatic pulses. PC cells showed strong tonic response to chromatic changes and small tonic response to luminance changes. Responses to other stimulus protocols (flicker photometry; changing the relative phase of red and green modulated lights; temporal modulation transfer functions were also similar to those recorded in other trichromatic primates. MC cells also showed a pronounced frequency double response to chromatic modulation, and with luminance modulation response saturation accompanied by a phase advance between 10-20 Hz, characteristic of a contrast gain mechanism. This indicates a very similar retinal organization to Old-World monkeys. Cone-specific opsin expression in the presence of a locus control region for each opsin may call into question the hypothesis that this region exclusively controls opsin expression.

  11. Influence of ground tire rubber on the transient loading response of a peat biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Hornos, F J; Izquierdo, M; Martínez-Soria, V; Penya-Roja, J M; Sempere, F; Gabaldón, C

    2011-08-01

    The effect of using ground tire rubber (GTR) as an adsorptive material in the removal of a 2:1:1 weight mixture of n-butyl acetate, toluene and m-xylene by using a peat biofilter under different intermittent conditions was investigated. The performance of two identical size biofilters, one packed with fibrous peat alone and the other with a 3:1 (vol) fibrous peat and GTR mixture, was examined for a period of four months. Partition coefficients of both materials were measured. Values of 53, 118 and 402 L kg(-1) were determined for n-butyl acetate, toluene and m-xylene in peat, respectively; and values of 40, 609 and 3035 L kg(-1) were measured for the same compounds in GTR. Intermittent load feeding of 16 h per day, 5 days per week working at an EBRT of 60 s and an inlet VOC concentration of 0.3 g C m(-1), resulted in removal efficiencies higher than 90% for both biofilters, indicating that the addition of GTR did not adversely affect the behavior of the bioreactor. Full removal of n-butyl acetate was obtained for both biofilters. GTR improved the removal of the aromatics in the first part of the biofilter, facilitating lower penetration of the toluene and m-xylene into the bed. A 31-day starvation period was applied and intermittent operation subsequently restarted. In both biofilters, high removal efficiencies after a re-acclimation period of two days were achieved. A shock loading test related to 1-h peaks of three- and four-fold increases in its baseline concentration (0.30 g C m(-3)) was applied in both biofilters. For the biofilter packed with the peat and GTR mixture, attenuation greater than 60% was observed in the maximum outlet concentration when compared to the biofilter packed with peat alone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A band Lanczos approach for calculation of vibrational coupled cluster response functions: simultaneous calculation of IR and Raman anharmonic spectra for the complex of pyridine and a silver cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2013-07-07

    We describe new methods for the calculation of IR and Raman spectra using vibrational response theory. Using damped linear response functions that incorporate a Lorentzian line-shape function from the outset, it is shown how the calculation of Raman spectra can be carried out through the calculation of a set of vibrational response functions in the same manner as described previously for IR spectra. The necessary set of response functions can be calculated for both vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) anharmonic vibrational wave-functions. For the efficient and simultaneous calculation of the full set of necessary response functions, a non-hermitian band Lanczos algorithm is implemented for VCC, and a hermitian band Lanczos algorithm is implemented for VCI. It is shown that the simultaneous calculation of several response functions is often advantageous. Sample calculations are presented for pyridine and the complex between pyridine and the silver cation.

  13. Interaction response of maglev masses moving on a suspended beam shaken by horizontal ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    As a maglev transport route has to cross a region with occasional earthquakes, the train/guideway interaction is an issue of great concern in dominating safety of the maglev system. This paper intends to present a computational framework of interaction analysis for a maglev train traveling over a suspension bridge shaken by horizontal earthquakes. The suspended guideway girder is modeled as a single-span suspended beam and the maglev train traveling over it as a series of maglev masses. Due to motion- dependent nature of magnetic forces in a maglev suspension system, appropriate adjustments of the magnetic forces between magnets and guide-rail require the air gaps be continuously monitored. Thus an on-board hybrid LQR+PID controller with constraint rule base is designed to control the dynamic response of a running maglev mass. Then the governing equations of motion for the suspended beam associated with all the controlled maglev masses are transformed into a set of generalized equations by Galerkin's method, and solved using an incremental-iterative procedure. Numerical investigations demonstrate that when a controlled maglev train travels over a suspended guideway shaken by horizontal earthquakes, the proposed hybrid controller has the ability to adjust the levitation gaps in a prescribed stable region for safety reasons and to reduce the vehicle's acceleration response for ride quality.

  14. Ten-year responses of ground-dwelling spiders to retention harvest in the boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Jaime; Spence, John R; Langor, David W; Shorthouse, David P

    2016-12-01

    The Ecosystem Management Emulating Natural Disturbances (EMEND) project tests the hypothesis that varying levels of green tree retention maintain and retain forest biodiversity better than conventional clear-cutting. We studied epigaeic spiders to assess biodiversity changes 2, 5, and 10 yr following a range of partial retention harvests (clear-cut, 10-75% retention) and unharvested controls in four boreal mixedwood cover types. A total of 56 371 adult spiders representing 220 species was collected using pitfall traps. Lasting effects on forest structure were proportional to harvest intensity. These changes strongly influenced spider richness, abundance, and species composition, as well as assemblage recovery. Distinctive assemblages were associated with disturbance level, especially with partial harvests (≤50% retention), and these were dominated by open-habitat species even 10 yr after harvest. Assemblages were more similar to those of controls in the highest (75%) retention treatment, but significant recovery toward the structure of pre-disturbance assemblages was not detected for any prescription in any cover type. Although early responses to retention harvest suggested positive effects on spider assemblages, these are better explained as lag effects after harvest because assemblages were less similar to those of unharvested controls 5 yr post-harvest, and only minor recovery was observed 10 yr following harvest. Retention of forest biodiversity decreased over time, especially in conifer stands and the lower (10-50%) retention treatments. Overall, retention harvests retained biodiversity and promoted landscape heterogeneity somewhat better than clear-cutting; however, there was a clear gradient of response and no retention "threshold" for conservation can be recommended on the basis of our data. Furthermore, results suggest that retention harvest prescriptions should be adjusted for cover type. We show that low retention ameliorated impacts in broadleaved

  15. Steel Moment-Resisting Frame Responses in Simulated Strong Ground Motions: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Big One

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This thesis studies the response of steel moment-resisting frame buildings in simulated strong ground motions. I collect 37 simulations of crustal earthquakes in California. These ground motions are applied to nonlinear finite element models of four types of steel moment frame buildings: six- or twenty-stories with either a stiffer, higherstrength design or a more flexible, lower-strength design. I also consider the presence of fracture-prone welds in each design. Since these b...

  16. You can hide but you can't run: apparent competition, predator responses and the decline of Arctic ground squirrels in boreal forests of the southwest Yukon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jeffery R; Gillis, Elizabeth A; Boonstra, Rudy; Krebs, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    Throughout much of North America's boreal forest, the cyclical fluctuations of snowshoe hare populations (Lepus americanus) may cause other herbivores to become entrained in similar cycles. Alternating apparent competition via prey switching followed by positive indirect effects are the mechanisms behind this interaction. Our purpose is to document a change in the role of indirect interactions between sympatric populations of hares and arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii plesius), and to emphasize the influence of predation for controlling ground squirrel numbers. We used mark-recapture to estimate the population densities of both species over a 25-year period that covered two snowshoe hare cycles. We analysed the strength of association between snowshoe hare and ground squirrel numbers, and the changes to the seasonal and annual population growth rates of ground squirrels over time. A hyperbolic curve best describes the per capita rate of increase of ground squirrels relative to their population size, with a single stable equilibrium and a lower critical threshold below which populations drift to extinction. The crossing of this unstable boundary resulted in the subsequent uncoupling of ground squirrel and hare populations following the decline phase of their cycles in 1998. The implications are that this sustained Type II predator response led to the local extinction of ground squirrels. When few individuals are left in a colony, arctic ground squirrels may also have exhibited an Allee effect caused by the disruption of social signalling of approaching predators.

  17. You can hide but you can’t run: apparent competition, predator responses and the decline of Arctic ground squirrels in boreal forests of the southwest Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Elizabeth A.; Boonstra, Rudy; Krebs, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout much of North America’s boreal forest, the cyclical fluctuations of snowshoe hare populations (Lepus americanus) may cause other herbivores to become entrained in similar cycles. Alternating apparent competition via prey switching followed by positive indirect effects are the mechanisms behind this interaction. Our purpose is to document a change in the role of indirect interactions between sympatric populations of hares and arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii plesius), and to emphasize the influence of predation for controlling ground squirrel numbers. We used mark-recapture to estimate the population densities of both species over a 25-year period that covered two snowshoe hare cycles. We analysed the strength of association between snowshoe hare and ground squirrel numbers, and the changes to the seasonal and annual population growth rates of ground squirrels over time. A hyperbolic curve best describes the per capita rate of increase of ground squirrels relative to their population size, with a single stable equilibrium and a lower critical threshold below which populations drift to extinction. The crossing of this unstable boundary resulted in the subsequent uncoupling of ground squirrel and hare populations following the decline phase of their cycles in 1998. The implications are that this sustained Type II predator response led to the local extinction of ground squirrels. When few individuals are left in a colony, arctic ground squirrels may also have exhibited an Allee effect caused by the disruption of social signalling of approaching predators. PMID:27635312

  18. You can hide but you can’t run: apparent competition, predator responses and the decline of Arctic ground squirrels in boreal forests of the southwest Yukon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery R. Werner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Throughout much of North America’s boreal forest, the cyclical fluctuations of snowshoe hare populations (Lepus americanus may cause other herbivores to become entrained in similar cycles. Alternating apparent competition via prey switching followed by positive indirect effects are the mechanisms behind this interaction. Our purpose is to document a change in the role of indirect interactions between sympatric populations of hares and arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii plesius, and to emphasize the influence of predation for controlling ground squirrel numbers. We used mark-recapture to estimate the population densities of both species over a 25-year period that covered two snowshoe hare cycles. We analysed the strength of association between snowshoe hare and ground squirrel numbers, and the changes to the seasonal and annual population growth rates of ground squirrels over time. A hyperbolic curve best describes the per capita rate of increase of ground squirrels relative to their population size, with a single stable equilibrium and a lower critical threshold below which populations drift to extinction. The crossing of this unstable boundary resulted in the subsequent uncoupling of ground squirrel and hare populations following the decline phase of their cycles in 1998. The implications are that this sustained Type II predator response led to the local extinction of ground squirrels. When few individuals are left in a colony, arctic ground squirrels may also have exhibited an Allee effect caused by the disruption of social signalling of approaching predators.

  19. Regionally Adaptable Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) from Empirical Models of Fourier and Duration of Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Sanjay; Scherbaum, Frank; Kuehn, Nicolas; Stafford, Peter; Edwards, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The current practice of deriving empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) involves using ground motions recorded at multiple sites. However, in applications like site-specific (e.g., critical facility) hazard ground motions obtained from the GMPEs are need to be adjusted/corrected to a particular site/site-condition under investigation. This study presents a complete framework for developing a response spectral GMPE, within which the issue of adjustment of ground motions is addressed in a manner consistent with the linear system framework. The present approach is a two-step process in which the first step consists of deriving two separate empirical models, one for Fourier amplitude spectra (FAS) and the other for a random vibration theory (RVT) optimized duration (Drvto) of ground motion. In the second step the two models are combined within the RVT framework to obtain full response spectral amplitudes. Additionally, the framework also involves a stochastic model based extrapolation of individual Fourier spectra to extend the useable frequency limit of the empirically derived FAS model. The stochastic model parameters were determined by inverting the Fourier spectral data using an approach similar to the one as described in Edwards and Faeh (2013). Comparison of median predicted response spectra from present approach with those from other regional GMPEs indicates that the present approach can also be used as a stand-alone model. The dataset used for the presented analysis is a subset of the recently compiled database RESORCE-2012 across Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean region.

  20. Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred J. Molz, III

    2010-05-28

    to Pu uptake by corn roots and xylem transport. Plants were started in wet paper wrapped around each corn seed. When the tap roots were sufficiently long, the seedlings were transplanted to a soil container with the tap root extending out the container bottom. The soil container was then placed over a nutrient solution container, and the solution served as an additional medium for root growth. To conduct an uptake study, a radioactive substance, such as Pu complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB, was added to the nutrient solution. After a suitable elapsed time, the corn plant was sacrificed, cut into 10 cm lengths, and the activity distribution measured. Experimental results clarified the basic nature of Pu uptake and transport in corn plants, and resulting simulations suggested that each growing season Pu in the SRS lysimeters would move into the plant shoots and be deposited on the soil surface during the Fall dieback. Subsequent isotope ratio analyses showed that this did happen. OVERALL RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS - (1) Pu transport downward from the source is controlled by advection, dispersion and adsorption, along with surface-mediated REDOX reactions. (2) Hysteresis, extreme root distribution functions, air-content dependent oxidation rate constants, and large evaporation rates from the soil surface were not able to explain the observed upward migration of Pu. (3) Small amounts of Pu uptake by plant roots and translocation in the transpiration stream creates a realistic mechanism for upward Pu migration (4) Realistic xylem cross-sectional areas imply high flow velocities under hot, wet conditions. Such flow velocities produce the correct shape for the observed activity distributions in the top 20 cm of the lysimeter soil. (5) Simulations imply that Pu should have moved into the above-ground grass tissue each year during the duration of the experiments, resulting in an activity residual accumulating on the soil surface. An isotope ratio analysis showed that

  1. Condition-dependent dispersal of a patchily distributed riparian ground beetle in response to disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Adam J; Sadler, Jon P; Fowles, Adrian P

    2006-11-01

    In common with many habitat elements of riverine landscapes, exposed riverine sediments (ERS) are highly disturbed, naturally patchy and regularly distributed, whose specialists are strongly adapted to flood disturbance and loss of habitat due to succession. Investigations of dispersal in ERS habitats therefore provide an important contrast to the unnaturally fragmented, stable systems usually studied. The present investigation analysed the three interdependent stages of dispersal: (1) emigration, (2) inter-patch movement and (3) immigration of a common ERS specialised beetle, Bembidion atrocaeruleum (Stephens 1828) (Coleoptera, Carabidae), in a relatively unmodified section of river, using mark-resight methods. Dispersal was correlated with estimates of local population size and density, water level and patch quality in order to test for condition-dependent dispersal cues. Flood inundation of habitat was found to increase strongly the overall rate of dispersal, and the rate of emigration was significantly higher from patches that were heavily trampled by cattle. Strongly declining numbers of dispersers with distance suggested low dispersal rates during periods of low water level. Dispersal in response to habitat degradation by cattle trampling would likely lead to a higher overall population fitness than a random dispersal strategy. Dispersal distances were probably adapted to the underlying habitat landscape distribution, high-flow dispersal cues and ready means of long-distance dispersal through hydrochory. Species whose dispersal is adapted to the natural habitat distribution of riverine landscapes are likely to be strongly negatively affected by reduced flood frequency and intensity and habitat fragmentation through flow regulation or channelisation.

  2. Entrepreneurism from the ground up: Entrepreneurism, innovation, and responsiveness in a start-up university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael Paul Anthony

    Colleges and universities are under increased pressure from internal and external constituencies for increased innovation and responsiveness. Entrepreneurial private industry models such as start-up businesses, corporate ventures and spin-off organizations have been recognized for their ability to quickly adapt to changing business environments and rapidly innovate to take advantage of new opportunities. This case study investigates these claims with regard to a start-up university founded with the identity of an entrepreneurial, interdisciplinary institution that prepares graduate level students for leadership careers as entrepreneurs in the bio-tech industry. By interviewing twenty-four administrators, faculty, and members of the Board of Trustees, including all but one of the founding full-time faculty, I present an "insider's" depiction of the lived experience of those most closely associated with the founding and subsequent institution building of this unique higher education organization. Initial chapters present a theory of higher education organizations, derived from Birnbaum (1988) and Bolman and Deal (1991), as driven by two primary tasks: resolving identity and establishing power and resources in relation to that identity. I also present Russell and Russell's (1992) theory of "entrepreneurial posture" in relation to a higher education organization. Subsequent chapters analyze the start-up university's environment, strategy, culture, and structure within the framework of the two primary organizational tasks and Russell and Russell's (1992) definition of an entrepreneurial organization.

  3. Study of timing response and charge spectra of glass based Resistive Plate Chamber detectors for INO-ICAL experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, A.; Kumar, A.; Naimuddin, Md.

    2017-03-01

    Resistive Plate chambers (RPCs) are robust and affordable gaseous detectors that combine low cost with excellent timing, good spatial resolution and fast response to the incoming particles. The India Based Neutrino Observatory is an approved project aimed at building a magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector to study Neutrino physics and related issues. The ICAL experiment will utilize about 29000 RPC's as active detector elements, sandwiched between alternate plates of thick iron. The RPC detectors will be used to detect muons produced from the atmospheric neutrinos interaction with an iron target. The spatial information of the muons will be extracted from the two dimensional readout and the hit position in the respective layers. The up going and down going directionality will be obtained using the time stamp of hits in the active detectors. The charge induced by the particle and its behaviour with respect to the applied voltage play a significant role in designing the readout electronics for the detector. In this paper, we present the timing and charge measurement of single gap glass based RPC detectors. We will also report about studies on the dependence of the timing and charge response of these RPC detectors as a function of the gas composition.

  4. Spectroscopic Parameters for Ozone and its Isotopes: Current Status, Prospects for Improvement, and the Identification of 16O16O17O and O-16O-16O-17 and O-16O-17O-16 Lines in Infrared Ground-Based and Stratospheric Solar Absorption Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Flaud, J.-M.; Goldman, A.; Perrin, A.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Smith, M. A. H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. C.; Barbe, A.; Stephens, T. M.; hide

    1998-01-01

    We describe the updates to the spectroscopic parameters of ozone and its isotopes in the 1996 HITRAN compilation. Recent published studies not included in HITRAN are also summarized. Finally, we report the identification of infrared lines of the v(sub 3) bands of O-16O-16O-17 and O-16O-17O-16 in high-resolution solar spectra recorded by stratospheric balloon-borne and ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers.

  5. FORTRAN programs for calculating nonlinear seismic ground response in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    The programs described here were designed for calculating the nonlinear seismic response of a two-dimensional configuration of soil underlain by a semi-infinite elastic medium representing bedrock. There are two programs. One is for plane strain motions, that is, motions in the plane perpendicular to the long axis of the structure, and the other is for antiplane strain motions, that is motions parallel to the axis. The seismic input is provided by specifying what the motion of the rock-soil boundary would be if the soil were absent and the boundary were a free surface. This may be done by supplying a magnetic tape containing the values of particle velocity for every boundary point at every instant of time. Alternatively, a punch card deck may be supplied giving acceleration values at every instant of time. In the plane strain program it is assumed that the acceleration values apply simultaneously to every point on the boundary; in the antiplane strain program it is assumed that the acceleration values characterize a plane shear wave propagating upward in the underlying elastic medium at a specified angle with the vertical. The nonlinear hysteretic behavior of the soil is represented by a three-dimensional rheological model. A boundary condition is used which takes account of finite rigidity in the elastic substratum. The computations are performed by an explicit finite-difference scheme that proceeds step by step in space and time. Computations are done in terms of stress departures from an unspecified initial state. Source listings are provided here along with instructions for preparing the input. A more detailed discussion of the method is presented elsewhere.

  6. Response of bats to light with different spectra: light-shy and agile bat presence is affected by white and green, but not red light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; van Grunsven, Roy H A; Ramakers, Jip J C; Ferguson, Kim B; Raap, Thomas; Donners, Maurice; Veenendaal, Elmar M; Visser, Marcel E

    2017-05-31

    Artificial light at night has shown a remarkable increase over the past decades. Effects are reported for many species groups, and include changes in presence, behaviour, physiology and life-history traits. Among these, bats are strongly affected, and how bat species react to light is likely to vary with light colour. Different spectra may therefore be applied to reduce negative impacts. We used a unique set-up of eight field sites to study the response of bats to three different experimental light spectra in an otherwise dark and undisturbed natural habitat. We measured activity of three bat species groups around transects with light posts emitting white, green and red light with an intensity commonly used to illuminate countryside roads. The results reveal a strong and spectrum-dependent response for the slow-flying Myotis and Plecotus and more agile Pipistrellus species, but not for Nyctalus and Eptesicus species. Plecotus and Myotis species avoided white and green light, but were equally abundant in red light and darkness. The agile, opportunistically feeding Pipistrellus species were significantly more abundant around white and green light, most likely because of accumulation of insects, but equally abundant in red illuminated transects compared to dark control. Forest-dwelling Myotis and Plecotus species and more synanthropic Pipistrellus species are thus least disturbed by red light. Hence, in order to limit the negative impact of light at night on bats, white and green light should be avoided in or close to natural habitat, but red lights may be used if illumination is needed. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION FOR MODELING THE EFFECT OF GROUND SEGMENT LOCATION ON IN-ORBIT RESPONSIVENESS OF LEO SUNSYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Navabi; Hossein Bonyan Khamseh

    2011-01-01

    Responsiveness is a challenge for space systems to sustain competitive advantage over alternate non-spaceborne technologies.For a satellite in its operational orbit,in-orbit responsiveness is defined as the capability of the satellite to respond to a given demand in a timely manner.In this paper,it is shown that Average Wait Time (AWT) to pick up user demand from ground segment is the appropriate metric to evaluate the effect of ground segment location on in-orbit responsiveness of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) sunsynchronous satellites.This metric depends on pattern of ground segment access to satellite and distribution of user demands in time domain.A mathematical model is presented to determine pattern of ground segment access to satellite and concept of cumulative distribution function is used to simulate distribution of user demands for markets with different total demand scenarios.Monte Carlo simulations are employed to take account of uncertainty in distribution and total volume of user demands.Sampling error and standard deviation are used to ensure validity of AWT metric obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.Incorporation of the proposed metric in the ground segment site location process results in more responsive satellite systems which,in turn,lead to greater customer satisfaction levels and attractiveness of spaceborne systems for different applications.Finally,simulation results for a case study are presented.

  8. Seismic Response and Evaluation of SDOF Self-Centering Friction Damping Braces Subjected to Several Earthquake Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wan Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly deals with seismic response and performance for self-centering friction damping braces (SFDBs subjected to several maximum- or design-leveled earthquake ground motions. The self-centering friction damping brace members consist of core recentering components fabricated with superelastic shape memory alloy wires and energy dissipation devices achieved through shear friction mechanism. As compared to the conventional brace members for use in the steel concentrically braced frame structure, these self-centering friction damping brace members make the best use of their representative characteristics to minimize residual deformations and to withstand earthquake loads without member replacement. The configuration and response mechanism of self-centering friction damping brace systems are firstly described in this study, and then parametric investigations are conducted through nonlinear time-history analyses performed on numerical single degree-of-freedom spring models. After observing analysis results, adequate design methodologies that optimally account for recentering capability and energy dissipation according to their comparative parameters are intended to be suggested in order to take advantage of energy capacity and to minimize residual deformation simultaneously.

  9. Slow-rise and fast-drop current feature of ultraviolet response spectra for ZnO-nanowire film modulated by water molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Shou-Tian; Wang Qiang; Zhao Feng; Qu Shi-Liang

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the fabrication of ZnO-nanowire films by electro-chemical anodization of Zn foil.The ZnO films are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy,X-ray diffraction patterns,and transmission electron microscopy,respectively.The ultraviolet (UV) photo-response properties of the surface-contacted ZnO film are studied through the current evolution processes under different relative humidities.Unlike the usually observed current spectra of the ZnO films,the drop time is shorter than the rise time.The photo-conductivity gain G and the response time γ are both increased with the increase of the applied bias.The photo-conductivity gain G is lowered with the increase of the environmental humidity,while the response time γ is increased.These results can be explained by considering three different surface processes:1) the electron-hole (e-p) pair generation by the UV light illumination,2)the following surface (O-2) species desorption,and 3) the photo-catalytic hydrolysis of water molecules adsorbed on the ZnO surface.The slow-rise and fast-drop current feature is suggested to originate from the sponge-like structure of the ZnO nanowires.

  10. Physiological responses to hypersalinity correspond to nursery ground usage in two inshore shark species (Mustelus antarcticus and Galeorhinus galeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnah, Louise; MacKellar, Sara R C; Barnett, David A; MacCormack, Tyson J; Stehfest, Kilian M; Morash, Andrea J; Semmens, Jayson M; Currie, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    Shark nurseries are susceptible to environmental fluctuations in salinity because of their shallow, coastal nature; however, the physiological impacts on resident elasmobranchs are largely unknown. Gummy sharks (Mustelus antarcticus) and school sharks (Galeorhinus galeus) use the same Tasmanian estuary as a nursery ground; however, each species has distinct distribution patterns that are coincident with changes in local environmental conditions, such as increases in salinity. We hypothesized that these differences were directly related to differential physiological tolerances to high salinity. To test this hypothesis, we exposed wild, juvenile school and gummy sharks to an environmentally relevant hypersaline (120% SW) event for 48 h. Metabolic rate decreased 20-35% in both species, and gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was maintained in gummy sharks but decreased 37% in school sharks. We measured plasma ions (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)) and osmolytes [urea and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO)], and observed a 33% increase in plasma Na(+) in gummy sharks with hyperosmotic exposure, while school sharks displayed a typical ureosmotic increase in plasma urea (∼20%). With elevated salinity, gill TMAO concentration increased by 42% in school sharks and by 30% in gummy sharks. Indicators of cellular stress (heat shock proteins HSP70, 90 and 110, and ubiquitin) significantly increased in gill and white muscle in both a species- and a tissue-specific manner. Overall, gummy sharks exhibited greater osmotic perturbation and ionic dysregulation and a larger cellular stress response compared with school sharks. Our findings provide physiological correlates to the observed distribution and movement of these shark species in their critical nursery grounds.

  11. Correlation of horizontal and vertical components of strong ground motion for response-history analysis of safety-related nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yin-Nan, E-mail: ynhuang@ntu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yen, Wen-Yi, E-mail: b01501059@ntu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Whittaker, Andrew S., E-mail: awhittak@buffalo.edu [Dept. of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, MCEER, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The correlation of components of ground motion is studied using 1689 sets of records. • The data support an upper bound of 0.3 on the correlation coefficient. • The data support the related requirement in the upcoming edition of ASCE Standard 4. - Abstract: Design standards for safety-related nuclear facilities such as ASCE Standard 4-98 and ASCE Standard 43-05 require the correlation coefficient for two orthogonal components of ground motions for response-history analysis to be less than 0.3. The technical basis of this requirement was developed by Hadjian three decades ago using 50 pairs of recorded ground motions that were available at that time. In this study, correlation coefficients for (1) two horizontal components, and (2) the vertical component and one horizontal component, of a set of ground motions are computed using records from a ground-motion database compiled recently for large-magnitude shallow crustal earthquakes. The impact of the orientation of the orthogonal horizontal components on the correlation coefficient of ground motions is discussed. The rules in the forthcoming edition of ASCE Standard 4 for the correlation of components in a set of ground motions are shown to be reasonable.

  12. Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  13. Analysis and design for inelastic structural response of extended pile shaft foundations in laterally spreading ground during earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravifar, Arash

    Experiences from past earthquakes have shown that lateral spreading associated with liquefaction of cohesionless soils can be a cause of severe damage to bridge foundations. Large diameter extended pile shafts can be an effective bridge foundation choice for areas subjected to lateral spreading because they offer greater stiffness and strength relative to the magnitude of lateral spreading loads that can develop against them. A limited degree of plastic hinging below the ground surface may be allowable in design of extended pile shafts. Issues for design for extended pile shafts include: (a) how to estimate the demands due to superstructure inertia and lateral spreading in liquefied soils, and (b) how to combine these two loads in estimating the local and global inelastic demands on the structure. Studies of the response of pile foundations and pile-supported structures in liquefiable soils using physical models, numerical models, and case studies have provided the basis for a number of design recommendations. The guidance is, however, quite varied regarding how lateral spreading and superstructure inertial loads should be combined in design. To answer the above questions a series of Nonlinear Dynamic Finite Element Analyses (NDA) have been performed to investigate inelastic response of extended pile shafts subjected to liquefaction-induced lateral spreading, covering a range of soil, pile, and ground motion conditions. The results of NDA were first used to show that combined effects of lateral spreading and superstructure inertia produce larger demands than are produced by either loading case alone, such that the combined demand cannot be enveloped by analyzing the two load cases separately. The results were then used to evaluate current equivalent static analysis (ESA) method (Caltrans, 2008), with the relatively poor agreement illustrating the limitations of methods that do not combine the two loads. The results of NDA parametric study were then used to develop

  14. The Las Vegas Valley Seismic Response Project: Ground Motions in Las Vegas Valley from Nuclear Explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; McCallen, D

    2005-03-18

    Between 2001-2004 the Las Vegas Seismic Response Project has sought to understand the response of Las Vegas Valley (LVV) to seismic excitation. In this study, the author report the findings of this project with an emphasis on ground motions in LVV from nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These ground motions are used to understand building structural response and damage as well as human perception. Historical nuclear explosion observations are augmented with earthquake recordings from a temporary deployment of seismometers to improve spatial coverage of LVV. The nuclear explosions were conducted between 1968 and 1989 and were recorded at various sites within Las Vegas. The data from past nuclear tests were used to constrain ground motions in LVV and to gain a predictive capability of ground motions for possible future nuclear tests at NTS. Analysis of ground motion data includes peak ground motions (accelerations and velocities) and amplification of basin sites relative to hard rock sites (site response). Site response was measured with the Standard Spectral Ratios (SSR) technique relative to hard rock reference sites on the periphery of LVV. The site response curves indicate a strong basin amplification of up to a factor of ten at frequencies between 0.5-2 Hz. Amplifications are strongest in the central and northern portions of LVV, where the basin is deeper than 1 km based on the reported basin depths of Langenheim et al (2001a). They found a strong correlation between amplification and basin depth and shallow shear wave velocities. Amplification below 1 Hz is strongly controlled by slowness-averaged shear velocities to depths of 30 and 100 meters. Depth averaged shear velocities to 10 meters has modest control of amplifications between 1-3 Hz. Modeling reveals that low velocity material in the shallow layers (< 200 m) effectively controls amplification. They developed a method to scale nuclear explosion ground motion time series to sites around LVV

  15. Retrieval of Earthshine Spectra Using Evolutionary Computational Methods as Analogs for Extra-Solar Planetary Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrile, R. J.; Tinetti, G.; Lee, S.; Fink, W.; Huntsberger, T.; von Allmen, P.; Tisdale, E. R.

    2006-05-01

    The spectral information provided by the next generation of extra-solar planet exploration missions will be averaged over the visible disk and the exposure time. Most probably, the interpretation of the observed spectra will not be unique, but families of solutions will provide equally good explanations of the spectral features (degeneracy). Traditional retrieval techniques developed to study the environments of planets in our solar system are inadequate to analyze disk/time-averaged spectra because they assume homogeneous environments, short observational time scales and search only for solutions belonging to the local domain of the initial conditions. We developed an innovative technique that couples evolutionary computational methods to a 3D model that simulates the spectral response of the planet rotating (Tinetti et al., 2005). We have performed a set of preliminary experiments in retrieving the earthshine spectrum recorded by Woolf et al. (2002): nine weighting parameters were retrieved, corresponding to different surface/cloud types (ocean, forest, grass, ground, tundra, ice, high/medium/low clouds) uniformly distributed over 48 planetary pixels. Two distinct retrieval experiments were run: i) evolution of one large solution population with 1000 individuals and ii) evolution of multiple solution islands with 100 individuals in each island. These two experiments returned over 2700 automatically generated retrievals satisfying the error criterion (fitness) of 10% least squares match to the observed spectra. The spectral retrieval procedure with this reduced set of parameters already resulted in a high quality fit of the earthshine spectrum, in agreement with ground truth. The retrieved solutions were divided into classes of spectral fit using clustering tools, which helped visualize the degeneracy in the set of solutions. We have also repeated the experiment using non-uniformly distributed 3 cloud types over ground- truth surface types in 22 illuminated pixels

  16. Study on Site Specific Design Earthquake Ground Motion of Nuclear Power Plants in China1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Bochang; Li Xiaojun; Li Yaqi

    2008-01-01

    The main technical backgrounds and requirements are introduced with regard to earthquake ground motion design parameters in several domestic and American standards,codes and guides involved in the seismic analysis and design activities of nuclear power plants in China.Based on the research results from site seismic safety evaluation of domestic nuclear power plant projects in the last years,characteristics and differences of site specific design spectra are analyzed in comparison with standard response spectra,and the suitability of standard response spectra for domestic nuclear power plant projects is discussed.

  17. Inverse modelling of Köhler theory - Part 1: A response surface analysis of CCN spectra with respect to surface-active organic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Samuel; Partridge, Daniel G.; Topping, David; Stier, Philip

    2016-09-01

    In this study a novel framework for inverse modelling of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra is developed using Köhler theory. The framework is established by using model-generated synthetic measurements as calibration data for a parametric sensitivity analysis. Assessment of the relative importance of aerosol physicochemical parameters, while accounting for bulk-surface partitioning of surface-active organic species, is carried out over a range of atmospherically relevant supersaturations. By introducing an objective function that provides a scalar metric for diagnosing the deviation of modelled CCN concentrations from synthetic observations, objective function response surfaces are presented as a function of model input parameters. Crucially, for the chosen calibration data, aerosol-CCN spectrum closure is confirmed as a well-posed inverse modelling exercise for a subset of the parameters explored herein. The response surface analysis indicates that the appointment of appropriate calibration data is particularly important. To perform an inverse aerosol-CCN closure analysis and constrain parametric uncertainties, it is shown that a high-resolution CCN spectrum definition of the calibration data is required where single-valued definitions may be expected to fail. Using Köhler theory to model CCN concentrations requires knowledge of many physicochemical parameters, some of which are difficult to measure in situ on the scale of interest and introduce a considerable amount of parametric uncertainty to model predictions. For all partitioning schemes and environments modelled, model output showed significant sensitivity to perturbations in aerosol log-normal parameters describing the accumulation mode, surface tension, organic : inorganic mass ratio, insoluble fraction, and solution ideality. Many response surfaces pertaining to these parameters contain well-defined minima and are therefore good candidates for calibration using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC

  18. Ground motions recorded in Rome during the April 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence: site response and comparison with ground‐motion predictions based on a global dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Arrigo; Boore, David; Rovelli, Antonio; Govoni, Aladino; Marra, Fabrizio; Monica, Gieseppe Della; Boschi, Enzo

    2013-01-01

    The mainshock and moderate‐magnitude aftershocks of the 6 April 2009 M 6.3 L’Aquila seismic sequence, about 90 km northeast of Rome, provided the first earthquake ground‐motion recordings in the urban area of Rome. Before those recordings were obtained, the assessments of the seismic hazard in Rome were based on intensity observations and theoretical considerations. The L’Aquila recordings offer an unprecedented opportunity to calibrate the city response to central Apennine earthquakes—earthquakes that have been responsible for the largest damage to Rome in historical times. Using the data recorded in Rome in April 2009, we show that (1) published theoretical predictions of a 1 s resonance in the Tiber valley are confirmed by observations showing a significant amplitude increase in response spectra at that period, (2) the empirical soil‐transfer functions inferred from spectral ratios are satisfactorily fit through 1D models using the available geological, geophysical, and laboratory data, but local variability can be large for individual events, (3) response spectra for the motions recorded in Rome from the L’Aquila earthquakes are significantly amplified in the radial component at periods near 1 s, even at a firm site on volcanic rocks, and (4) short‐period response spectra are smaller than expected when compared to ground‐motion predictions from equations based on a global dataset, whereas the observed response spectra are higher than expected for periods near 1 s.

  19. Strong ground movement induced by mining activities and its effect on power transmission structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Kao-shan; CHEN Shen-en

    2009-01-01

    Surface mining activities may introduce damages to nearby infrastructure. Concerns are put forward by the power company about structural integrity of electric power transmission structures in areas where coal mining activities cause strong ground vibrations. Common practice in the power industry is to limit ground motion by specifying maximum Peak Particle Velocity. So far, there is a lack of industry-wide recognized guidelines on how ground vibration limits should be set for the transmission structures. In order to develop a defense strategy to protect power transmission lines against strong ground motions in mining areas, a systematic research work was conducted to establish strong ground vibration characteristics and to study impacts of ground excitations on transmission pole structures. Ground movements were recorded using geophones and wireless tri-axial sensing units. The process of generating ground motion response spectra via analyzing actual ground motion measurements is described in the paper. These spectra developed based on peak particle velocities were used as a basis for spectral analysis performed using validated Finite Element models to obtain structural displacements, reactions and stress states of the transmission pole structures in the mining sites. A quantitative ground motion limit was established by comparing structural responses with the corresponding design requirements.

  20. Generate tri-directional spectra-compatible time histories using HHT method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bo; Xie, Wei-Chau, E-mail: xie@uwaterloo.ca; Pandey, Mahesh D.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Hilbert–Huang Transform are applied to modify real earthquake records. • Generate tri-directional time histories compatible with target spectra. • Both GRS and FRS are considered as target spectra. • Target spectra with multiple damping ratios are considered. - Abstract: This paper proposes two algorithms to generate spectrum-compatible time histories based on two approaches recommended by USNRC Standard Review Plan 3.7.1. Hilbert–Huang Transform technique is used to analyze frequency contents and amplitudes of seed motions. Through adjusting the frequency contents and amplitudes of seed motions, spectrum-compatible time histories are obtained. The first algorithm is to generate tri-directional time histories compatible with multi-damping target design spectra (ground response spectra or floor response spectra). The second algorithm is to generate tri-directional time histories compatible with single-damping target design spectra. Examples are presented to demonstrate versatility of these two proposed algorithms to generate spectra-compatible time histories.

  1. The response of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) to selection cutting in a South Carolina bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael, D.; Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott; Kilgo, John, C.; Moorman, Christopher, E.

    2005-04-01

    We compared the response of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) to the creation of canopy gaps of different size (0.13, 0.26, and 0.50 ha) and age (1 and 7 years) in a bottomland hardwood forest (South Carolina, USA). Samples were collected four times in 2001 by malaise and pitfall traps placed at the center and edge of each gap, and 50 m into the surrounding forest. Species richness was higher at the center of young gaps than in old gaps or in the forest, but there was no statistical difference in species richness between old gaps and the forests surrounding them. Carabid abundance followed the same trend, but only with the exclusion of Semiardistomis viridis (Say), a very abundant species that differed in its response to gap age compared to most other species. The carabid assemblage at the gap edge was very similar to that of the forest, and there appeared to be no distinct edge community. Species known to occur in open or disturbed habitats were more abundant at the center of young gaps than at any other location. Generalist species were relatively unaffected by the disturbance, but one species (Dicaelus dilatatus Say) was significantly less abundant at the centers of young gaps. Forest inhabiting species were less abundant at the centers of old gaps than in the forest, but not in the centers of young gaps. Comparison of community similarity at various trapping locations showed that communities at the centers of old and young gaps had the lowest similarity (46.5%). The community similarity between young gap centers and nearby forest (49.1%) and old gap centers and nearby forest (50.0%) was similarly low. These results show that while the abundance and richness of carabids in old gaps was similar to that of the surrounding forest, the species composition between the two sites differed greatly.

  2. DNA Master File of Ground-Shock, Air-Blast, and Structure-Response Data. Volume 1. Archive Description and User’s Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    Representative (COR) during the early part of the program. Lt Col. D. Burgess was the COR for the remainder of the work. The initial effort was...were conducted near Pueblo, Colorado, to investigate ground response in clay-over- shale geologies. Event I was a 20-ton half-buried shot to be

  3. The effects of grounding (earthing on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oschman JL

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available James L Oschman,1 Gaétan Chevalier,2 Richard Brown3 1Nature’s Own Research Association, Dover, NH, USA; 2Developmental and Cell Biology Department, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Human Physiology Department, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA Abstract: Multi-disciplinary research has revealed that electrically conductive contact of the human body with the surface of the Earth (grounding or earthing produces intriguing effects on physiology and health. Such effects relate to inflammation, immune responses, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this report is two-fold: to 1 inform researchers about what appears to be a new perspective to the study of inflammation, and 2 alert researchers that the length of time and degree (resistance to ground of grounding of experimental animals is an important but usually overlooked factor that can influence outcomes of studies of inflammation, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Specifically, grounding an organism produces measurable differences in the concentrations of white blood cells, cytokines, and other molecules involved in the inflammatory response. We present several hypotheses to explain observed effects, based on current research results and our understanding of the electronic aspects of cell and tissue physiology, cell biology, biophysics, and biochemistry. An experimental injury to muscles, known as delayed onset muscle soreness, has been used to monitor the immune response under grounded versus ungrounded conditions. Grounding reduces pain and alters the numbers of circulating neutrophils and lymphocytes, and also affects various circulating chemical factors related to inflammation. Keywords: chronic inflammation, immune system, wound repair, white blood cells, macrophages, autoimmune disorders

  4. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) responses for sub-surface salt contamination and solid waste: modeling and controlled lysimeter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewardana, Y N S; Shilpadi, A T; Mowjood, M I M; Kawamoto, K; Galagedara, L W

    2017-02-01

    The assessment of polluted areas and municipal solid waste (MSW) sites using non-destructive geophysical methods is timely and much needed in the field of environmental monitoring and management. The objectives of this study are (i) to evaluate the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) wave responses as a result of different electrical conductivity (EC) in groundwater and (ii) to conduct MSW stratification using a controlled lysimeter and modeling approach. A GPR wave simulation was carried out using GprMax2D software, and the field test was done on two lysimeters that were filled with sand (Lysimeter-1) and MSW (Lysimeter-2). A Pulse EKKO-Pro GPR system with 200- and 500-MHz center frequency antennae was used to collect GPR field data. Amplitudes of GPR-reflected waves (sub-surface reflectors and water table) were studied under different EC levels injected to the water table. Modeling results revealed that the signal strength of the reflected wave decreases with increasing EC levels and the disappearance of the subsurface reflection and wave amplitude reaching zero at higher EC levels (when EC >0.28 S/m). Further, when the EC level was high, the plume thickness did not have a significant effect on the amplitude of the reflected wave. However, it was also found that reflected signal strength decreases with increasing plume thickness at a given EC level. 2D GPR profile images under wet conditions showed stratification of the waste layers and relative thickness, but it was difficult to resolve the waste layers under dry conditions. These results show that the GPR as a non-destructive method with a relatively larger sample volume can be used to identify highly polluted areas with inorganic contaminants in groundwater and waste stratification. The current methods of MSW dumpsite investigation are tedious, destructive, time consuming, costly, and provide only point-scale measurements. However, further research is needed to verify the results under heterogeneous aquifer

  5. The Seismic Response of High-Speed Railway Bridges Subjected to Near-Fault Forward Directivity Ground Motions Using a Vehicle-Track-Bridge Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ling-kun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA project ground motion library, the finite element model of the high-speed railway vehicle-bridge system is established. The model was specifically developed for such system that is subjected to near-fault ground motions. In addition, it accounted for the influence of the rail irregularities. The vehicle-track-bridge (VTB element is presented to simulate the interaction between train and bridge, in which a train can be modeled as a series of sprung masses concentrated at the axle positions. For the short period railway bridge, the results from the case study demonstrate that directivity pulse effect tends to increase the seismic responses of the bridge compared with far-fault ground motions or nonpulse-like motions and the directivity pulse effect and high values of the vertical acceleration component can notably influence the hysteretic behaviour of piers.

  6. Should ground-motion records be rotated to fault-normal/parallel or maximum direction for response history analysis of buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Juan C.; Kalkan, Erol

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, regulatory seismic codes (for example, California Building Code) require at least two sets of horizontal ground-motion components for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of building structures. For sites within 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal and fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHAs should be performed separately—when FN and then FP direction are aligned with transverse direction of the building axes. This approach is assumed to lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. The validity of this assumption is examined here using 3D computer models of single-story structures having symmetric (torsionally stiff) and asymmetric (torsionally flexible) layouts subjected to an ensemble of near-fault ground motions with and without apparent velocity pulses. In this parametric study, the elastic vibration period is varied from 0.2 to 5 seconds, and yield-strength reduction factors, R, are varied from a value that leads to linear-elastic design to 3 and 5. Further validations are performed using 3D computer models of 9-story structures having symmetric and asymmetric layouts subjected to the same ground-motion set. The influence of the ground-motion rotation angle on several engineering demand parameters (EDPs) is examined in both linear-elastic and nonlinear-inelastic domains to form benchmarks for evaluating the use of the FN/FP directions and also the maximum direction (MD). The MD ground motion is a new definition for horizontal ground motions for use in site-specific ground-motion procedures for seismic design according to provisions of the American Society of Civil Engineers/Seismic Engineering Institute (ASCE/SEI) 7-10. The results of this study have important implications for current practice, suggesting that ground motions rotated to MD or FN/FP directions do not necessarily provide

  7. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, A. C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we ...

  8. Time-dependent renormalized natural orbital theory applied to the two-electron spin-singlet case: ground state, linear response, and autoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Brics, M

    2013-01-01

    Favorably scaling numerical time-dependent many-electron techniques such as time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with adiabatic exchange-correlation potentials typically fail in capturing highly correlated electron dynamics. We propose a method based on natural orbitals, i.e., the eigenfunctions of the one-body reduced density matrix, that is almost as inexpensive numerically as adiabatic TDDFT, but which is capable of describing correlated phenomena such as doubly excited states, autoionization, Fano profiles in the photoelectron spectra, and strong-field ionization in general. Equations of motion (EOM) for natural orbitals and their occupation numbers have been derived earlier. We show that by using renormalized natural orbitals (RNO) both can be combined into one equation governed by a hermitian effective Hamiltonian. We specialize on the two-electron spin-singlet system, known as being a "worst case" testing ground for TDDFT, and employ the widely used, numerically exactly solvable, one-dimens...

  9. Excitation spectra and ground-state properties from density functional theory for the inverted band-structure systems $\\beta$-HgS, HgSe, and HgTe

    CERN Document Server

    Delin, A

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a systematic density-functional study of the mercury chalcogenide compounds $\\beta$-HgS, HgSe, and HgTe using an all-electron full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method. We find that, in the zinc-blende structure, both HgSe and HgTe are semimetals whereas $\\beta$-HgS has a small spin-orbit induced band gap. Our calculated relativistic photoemission and inverse photoemission spectra (PES and IPES, respectively) reproduce very well the most recently measured spectra, as do also our theoretical optical spectra. In contrast to the normal situation, we find that the local density approximation (LDA) to the density functional gives calculated equilibrium volumes in much better agreement with experiment than does the generalized gradient corrected functional (GGA). We also address the problem of treating relativistic $p$ electrons with methods based on a scalar-relativistic basis set, and show that the effect is rather small for the present systems.

  10. V S30, slope, H 800 and f 0: performance of various site-condition proxies in reducing ground-motion aleatory variability and predicting nonlinear site response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derras, Boumédiène; Bard, Pierre-Yves; Cotton, Fabrice

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the ability of various site-condition proxies (SCPs) to reduce ground-motion aleatory variability and evaluate how SCPs capture nonlinearity site effects. The SCPs used here are time-averaged shear-wave velocity in the top 30 m ( V S30), the topographical slope (slope), the fundamental resonance frequency ( f 0) and the depth beyond which V s exceeds 800 m/s ( H 800). We considered first the performance of each SCP taken alone and then the combined performance of the 6 SCP pairs [ V S30- f 0], [ V S30- H 800], [ f 0-slope], [ H 800-slope], [ V S30-slope] and [ f 0- H 800]. This analysis is performed using a neural network approach including a random effect applied on a KiK-net subset for derivation of ground-motion prediction equations setting the relationship between various ground-motion parameters such as peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity and pseudo-spectral acceleration PSA ( T), and M w, R JB, focal depth and SCPs. While the choice of SCP is found to have almost no impact on the median ground-motion prediction, it does impact the level of aleatory uncertainty. V S30 is found to perform the best of single proxies at short periods ( T < 0.6 s), while f 0 and H 800 perform better at longer periods; considering SCP pairs leads to significant improvements, with particular emphasis on [ V S30- H 800] and [ f 0-slope] pairs. The results also indicate significant nonlinearity on the site terms for soft sites and that the most relevant loading parameter for characterising nonlinear site response is the "stiff" spectral ordinate at the considered period.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Earthquake Response Analysis of Buildings at The Union Territory of Chandigarh, India, by using Building Vibration Observations due to Weak Earthquake Ground Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, K.; Ito, T.; Masuda, T.; Koketsu, K.; Ramancharla, P. K.; Sangam, R.; Bodige, N.; Dasari, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the vulnerability of built environment in highly seismic areas is an important component of earthquake risk mitigation. As part of Indo-Japan collaborative research project (DISANET) sponsored by JST and JICA, six sets of building vibration sensors have been installed in the Union Territory of Chandigarh, India. The Union Territory of Chandigarh, India is located at South of the Himalayan Frontal Belt (HFT) is in zone IV of the seismic zone map of India (BIS, 2007). In past few decades, this area has experienced several minor earthquakes and a few moderate earthquakes. In spite of being in high seismic zone, most of the buildings in Chandigarh are designed and constructed for gravity loads only disregarding seismic forces. Such kind of buildings may deteriorate in strength even when they are subjected to minor earthquakes. To understand the response of buildings to micro-tremors, vibration sensors were installed in the building of Department of Geology of Panjab University in July 2012. Subsequently 5 more buildings were instrumented by January 2014. For each building, in order to capture the overall vibration of building during earthquake, vibration sensors of 8 or 10 units are installed to the ground floor, top floor and middle floor of the building. These sensors are continuously monitoring the building vibration and recording all data which include the weak ground motion occurring from near to far earthquakes. Through these sensors, over 20 minor ground motions have been recorded during last two years. Even in these weak ground motions, it was possible to confirm the state of the building response caused by earthquakes. In this presentation, we will introduce some building vibration records caused by the weak ground motion of the earthquakes and discuss the important insights drawn from analysis of recorded data.

  12. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  13. Below-ground process responses to elevated CO2 and temperature: a discussion of observations, measurement methods, and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elise Pendall; Scott Bridgham; Paul J. Hanson; Bruce Hungate; David W. Kicklighter; Dale W. Johnson; Beverly E. Law; Yiqi Luo; J. Patrick Megonigal; Maria Olsrud; Michael G. Ryan; Shiqiang Wan

    2004-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 and temperatures are probably altering ecosystem carbon cycling, causing both positive and negative feedbacks to climate. Below-ground processes play a key role in the global carbon (C) cycle because they regulate storage of large quantities of C, and are potentially very sensitive to direct and indirect effects of elevated...

  14. Above- and below-ground competition in high and low irradiance: tree seedling responses to a competing liana Byttneria grandifolia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.Y.; Bongers, F.; Cao, K.F.; Cai, Z.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: In tropical forests, trees compete not only with other trees, but also with lianas, which may limit tree growth and regeneration. Liana effects may depend on the availability of above- and below-ground resources and differ between tree species. We conducted a shade house experiment to test

  15. Translational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions Using CorpsWallSlip (CWSlip)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    For some analyses, it is appropriate to use acceleration values of khg and kvg smaller than the horizontal and vertical peak accelerations...ground acceleration time-histories, ah (= khg ) and av (= kvg), respectively. Recall that g is the universal gravitational constant while kh and kv

  16. Parochial Dissonance: A Grounded Theory of Wisconsin's New North Response to the Employability Skills Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneck, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate a theory that explained the beliefs and behaviors of participants from business, not-for-profit business, education, and government sectors when resolving the employability skills gap. Classical grounded theory was the inductive methodology applied to this study. The New North, an 18 county region located…

  17. Wind-induced ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderyan, Vahid; Hickey, Craig J.; Raspet, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Wind noise is a problem in seismic surveys and can mask the seismic signals at low frequency. This research investigates ground motions caused by wind pressure and shear stress perturbations on the ground surface. A prediction of the ground displacement spectra using the measured ground properties and predicted pressure and shear stress at the ground surface is developed. Field measurements are conducted at a site having a flat terrain and low ambient seismic noise. Triaxial geophones are deployed at different depths to study the wind-induced ground vibrations as a function of depth and wind velocity. Comparison of the predicted to the measured wind-induced ground displacement spectra shows good agreement for the vertical component but significant underprediction for the horizontal components. To validate the theoretical model, a test experiment is designed to exert controlled normal pressure and shear stress on the ground using a vertical and a horizontal mass-spring apparatus. This experiment verifies the linear elastic rheology and the quasi-static displacements assumptions of the model. The results indicate that the existing surface shear stress models significantly underestimate the wind shear stress at the ground surface and the amplitude of the fluctuation shear stress must be of the same order of magnitude as the normal pressure. Measurement results show that mounting the geophones flush with the ground provides a significant reduction in wind noise on all three components of the geophone. Further reduction in wind noise with depth of burial is small for depths up to 40 cm.

  18. Characteristics of near-fault ground motion containing velocity pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Tao; ZHAO Feng-xin; ZHANG Yu-shan

    2006-01-01

    There are many reports about the research on near-fault velocity pulses, which focus on the generation of velocity pulse and simplify the velocity pulse so as to be used in the seismic design of structure. However few researches have put emphasis on the characteristics of near-fault ground motions containing velocity pulses, especially the characteristics relevant with the design response spectrum prescribed by the code. Through collection of a large number of near-fault records containing velocity pulses, the response spectra and the characteristic periods of records containing no pulses are compared with those of records containing pulses. Response spectra of near-fault records are compared with standard spectra given by code; furthermore, the response spectra and the characteristic periods of each earthquake are compared with that given by code. The result shows that at long periods (longer than 1.5 s), the response spectrum of pulse-containing records is bigger than the response spectrum of no-pulse-containing records; when the characteristic period of near-fault records is calculated, the method that does not fix frequency is more reasonable because the T1 and T2 have a lagging tendency; regardless of the site Ⅰ and site Ⅱ, the characteristic period of pulse-containing records is over twice bigger than the characteristic period given by the code.

  19. First High Resolution IR Spectra of 2-^{13}C-PROPANE. the νb{9} B-Type Band Near 366.767 \\wn and the νb{26} C-Type Band Near 746.615 \\wn. Determination of Ground and Upper State Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunt, S. J.; Grzywacz, Robert; Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Billinghurst, Brant E.

    2017-06-01

    This is the first report in a project to record high resolution IR data of the ^{13}C and D substituted isotopologues of propane. In this talk we will give details on the first high resolution (Δν = 0.0009 \\wn) IR investigation of 2-^{13}C-propane. Spectra of the CCC skeletal bending mode near 336.767 \\wn (B-type) and the wagging mode near 746.615 \\wn (C-type) were recorded using the FTS on the Far-IR beamline of the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The spectra were assigned both traditionally and with the aid of the PGOPHER program of Colin Western. The only available MW data on this molecule are the six K =0 J lines from Lide. We therefore had to use the present data to determine a new set of ground state constants that included centrifugal distortion terms for this molecule. We compare these experimentally determined values with the recent ab initio values of Villa, Senent & Carvajal. Upper state constants for both bands have been found that provide a good simulation of the spectra. The hope is that this data will be useful in identifying isotopic propane lines in Titan and other astrophysical objects. C. Western, J. Quant. Spectrosc. & Rad. Transf. 186, 221 ff. (2017). Lide, J.Chem. Phys. 33, p.1514ff. (1960). Villa, Senent & Carvajal, PCCP 15, 10258 (2013).

  20. Improved ground-based remote-sensing systems help monitor plant response to climate and other changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Dennis G.; Bogle, Rian C.

    2016-05-26

    Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are improving and developing new ground-based remote-sensing instruments and techniques to study how Earth’s vegetation responds to changing climates. Do seasonal grasslands and forests “green up” early (or late) and grow more (or less) during unusually warm years? How do changes in temperature and precipitation affect these patterns? Innovations in ground-based remote-sensing instrumentation can help us understand, assess, and mitigate the effects of climate change on vegetation and related land resources.

  1. Seismic Response and Performance Evaluation of Self-Centering LRB Isolators Installed on the CBF Building under NF Ground Motions

    OpenAIRE

    Junwon Seo; Jong Wan Hu

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly treats the seismic behavior of lead-rubber bearing (LRB) isolation systems with superealstic shape memory alloy (SMA) bending bars functioning as damper and self-centering devices. The conventional LRB isolators that are usually installed at the column bases supply extra flexibility to the centrically braced frame (CBF) building with a view to elongate its vibration period, and thus make a contribution to mitigating seismic acceleration transferred from ground to structure. ...

  2. Control spectra for Quito

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Roberto; Rivas-Medina, Alicia; Caiza, Pablo; Quizanga, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The Metropolitan District of Quito is located on or very close to segments of reverse blind faults, Puengasí, Ilumbisí-La Bota, Carcelen-El Inca, Bellavista-Catequilla and Tangahuilla, making it one of the most seismically dangerous cities in the world. The city is divided into five areas: south, south-central, central, north-central and north. For each of the urban areas, elastic response spectra are presented in this paper, which are determined by utilizing some of the new models of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) NGA-West2 program. These spectra are calculated considering the maximum magnitude that could be generated by the rupture of each fault segment, and taking into account the soil type that exists at different points of the city according to the Norma Ecuatoriana de la Construcción (2015). Subsequently, the recurrence period of earthquakes of high magnitude in each fault segment is determined from the physical parameters of the fault segments (size of the fault plane and slip rate) and the pattern of recurrence of type Gutenberg-Richter earthquakes with double truncation magnitude (Mmin and Mmax) is used.

  3. NuSTAR calibration facility and multilayer reference database: Optic response model comparison to NuSTAR on-ground calibration data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brejnholt, Nicolai

    the optic response for both on- and off-axis NuSTAR observations, detailed knowledge of the as-coated multilayer is required. The purpose of this thesis is to establish a multilayer reference database. As an integral part of this effort, a hard X-ray calibration facility was designed and constructed. Each......-ground calibration data. The on-ground calibration and flight witness sample investigations were carried out at a hard X-ray facility constructed for the same purpose. This thesis established the NuSTAR multilayer reference database and found that it provides a good description of the as-coated multilayers of the Nu......STAR optics. A thorough quantitative study of the NuSTAR effective area requires the utilized ray tracing tool to mature further. Currently, the effective area estimated from the multilayer reference database represents an optimistic upper limit. Along with a conservative estimate derived from on...

  4. Action spectra of zebrafish cone photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duco Endeman

    Full Text Available Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly popular model in the field of visual neuroscience. Although the absorption spectra of its cone photopigments have been described, the cone action spectra were still unknown. In this study we report the action spectra of the four types of zebrafish cone photoreceptors, determined by measuring voltage responses upon light stimulation using whole cell patch clamp recordings. A generic template of photopigment absorption spectra was fit to the resulting action spectra in order to establish the maximum absorption wavelength, the A2-based photopigment contribution and the size of the β-wave of each cone-type. Although in general there is close correspondence between zebrafish cone action- and absorbance spectra, our data suggest that in the case of MWS- and LWS-cones there is appreciable contribution of A2-based photopigments and that the β-wave for these cones is smaller than expected based on the absorption spectra.

  5. Evaluation of ground grain versus pre- and post-pellet whole grain additions to poultry diets via a response surface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Amy F; Chrystal, Peter V; Truong, Ha H; Selle, Peter H; Liu, Sonia Yun

    2017-09-12

    1. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of pre- and post-pellet whole grain wheat additions to diets on growth performance, gizzard and pancreas development, nutrient utilisation and starch and protein (N) digestibility coefficients in broiler chickens via an equilateral triangle response surface design. 2. The three apical treatments of the equilateral triangle comprised (1A) a standard diet containing 600 g/kg ground wheat, (2B) the same diet containing 600 g/kg pre-pellet whole wheat and (3C) the same diet containing 300 g/kg ground wheat and 300 g/kg post-pellet whole wheat. Seven blends of the three apical diets were located within the triangle to complete the design and a total of 360 male Ross 308 chicks were offered the ten experimental diets from 7 to 28 d post-hatch. Model prediction and response surface plots were generated with R 3.0.3 software. 3. The most efficient FCR of 1.466 was observed in birds offered an almost equal mixture of the pre- and post-pellet whole grain apical dietary treatments, which corresponded to 172 g/kg ground grain, 256 g/kg pre-pellet whole grain, 172 g/kg post-pellet whole grain in a diet containing 600 g/kg wheat. 4. The most efficient energy utilisation (ME:GE ratio of 0.766) was observed in birds offered a blend of the ground grain and pre-pellet whole grain apical dietary treatments which corresponded to a mixture of 384 g/kg pre-pellet whole grain and 216 g/kg ground grain. 5. Pre-pellet whole grain feeding generated the most pronounced responses in increased relative gizzard contents, reduced gizzard pH and increased relative pancreas weights. Consideration is given to the likely differences between pre- and post-pellet whole grain feeding.

  6. Grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  7. Bi-objective approach for placing ground and air ambulance base and helipad locations in order to optimize EMS response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Milad; Bozorgi-Amiri, Ali; Tavakoli, Shayan; Yousefi-Babadi, Abolghasem

    2017-06-15

    Shortening the travel time of patient transfer has clinical implications for many conditions such as cardiac arrest, trauma, stroke and STEMI. As resources are often limited precise calculations are needed. In this paper we consider the location problem for both ground and aerial emergency medical services. Given the uncertainty of when patients are in need of prompt medical attention we consider these demand points to be uncertain. We consider various ways in which ground and helicopter ambulances can work together to make the whole process go faster. We develop a mathematical model that minimizes travel time and maximizes service level. We use a compromising programming method to solve this bi-objective mathematical model. For numerical experiments we apply our model to a case study in Lorestan, Iran, using geographical and population data, and the location of the actual hospital based in the capital of the province. Results show that low-accessibility locations are the main focus of the proposed problem and with mathematical modeling access to a hospital is vastly improved. We also found out that once the budget reaches a certain point which suffices for building certain ambulance bases more investments does not necessarily result in less travel time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Calculating time-resolved differential absorbance spectra for ultrafast pump-probe experiments with surface hopping trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, Andrew S.; Subotnik, Joseph E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 231 S. 34th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2014-10-21

    We report a surface hopping approach for modeling the full time- and frequency-resolved differential absorbance spectra (beyond the inhomogenous limit) obtained in ultrafast pump-probe experiments. In our approach, we combine dynamical information obtained from ensembles of classical trajectories propagated on the ground and on the excited potential energy surfaces to directly calculate optical response functions and hence spectral lineshapes. We demonstrate that our method is exact for the model problem of two shifted harmonic potentials with identical harmonic frequencies in the absence of electronic relaxation. We then consider a model three state system with electronic relaxation and show that our method is able to capture the effects of nonadiabatic excited state dynamics on the time-dependent differential absorbance spectra. Furthermore, by comparing our spectra against those spectra calculated with either an (1) inhomogenous expression, (2) ground-state Kubo theory, or (3) excited-state Kubo theory, we show that including dynamical information from both the ground and excited potential energy surfaces significantly improves the reliability of the semiclassical approximations. As such, our surface hopping method should find immediate use in modeling the time-dependent differential abosrbance spectra of ultrafast pump-probe experiments.

  9. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  10. Newmark design spectra considering earthquake magnitudes and site categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Xie, Wei-Chau; Pandey, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Newmark design spectra have been implemented in many building codes, especially in building codes for critical structures. Previous studies show that Newmark design spectra exhibit lower amplitudes at high frequencies and larger amplitudes at low frequencies in comparison with spectra developed by statistical methods. To resolve this problem, this study considers three suites of ground motions recorded at three types of sites. Using these ground motions, influences of the shear-wave velocity, earthquake magnitudes, source-to-site distances on the ratios of ground motion parameters are studied, and spectrum amplification factors are statistically calculated. Spectral bounds for combinations of three site categories and two cases of earthquake magnitudes are estimated. Site design spectrum coefficients for the three site categories considering earthquake magnitudes are established. The problems of Newmark design spectra could be resolved by using the site design spectrum coefficients to modify the spectral values of Newmark design spectra in the acceleration sensitive, velocity sensitive, and displacement sensitive regions.

  11. Seismic Response and Performance Evaluation of Self-Centering LRB Isolators Installed on the CBF Building under NF Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwon Seo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly treats the seismic behavior of lead-rubber bearing (LRB isolation systems with superealstic shape memory alloy (SMA bending bars functioning as damper and self-centering devices. The conventional LRB isolators that are usually installed at the column bases supply extra flexibility to the centrically braced frame (CBF building with a view to elongate its vibration period, and thus make a contribution to mitigating seismic acceleration transferred from ground to structure. However, these base isolation systems are somehow susceptible to shear failure due to the lack of lateral resistance. In the construction site, they have been used to be integrated with displacement control dampers additionally withstanding lateral seismic forces. For this motivation, LRB isolation systems equipped with superelastic SMA bending bars, which possess not only excellent energy dissipation but also outstanding recentering capability, are proposed in this study. These reinforced and recentering LRB base isolators are modeled as nonlinear component springs, and then assigned into the bases of 2D frame models used for numerical simulation. Their seismic performance and capacity in the base-isolated frame building can be evaluated through nonlinear dynamic analyses conducted with historic ground motion data. After comparative study with analyses results, it is clearly shown that 2D frame models with proposed LRB isolators generally have smaller maximum displacements than those with conventional LRB isolators. Furthermore, the LRB isolation systems with superelastic SMA bending bars effectively reduce residual displacement as compared to those with steel bending bars because they provide more flexibility and recentering force to the entire building structure.

  12. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.

  13. Drought and root herbivory interact to alter the response of above-ground parasitoids to aphid infested plants and associated plant volatile signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq

    Full Text Available Multitrophic interactions are likely to be altered by climate change but there is little empirical evidence relating the responses of herbivores and parasitoids to abiotic factors. Here we investigated the effects of drought on an above/below-ground system comprising a generalist and a specialist aphid species (foliar herbivores, their parasitoids, and a dipteran species (root herbivore.We tested the hypotheses that: (1 high levels of drought stress and below-ground herbivory interact to reduce the performance of parasitoids developing in aphids; (2 drought stress and root herbivory change the profile of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs emitted by the host plant; (3 parasitoids avoid ovipositing in aphids feeding on plants under drought stress and root herbivory. We examined the effect of drought, with and without root herbivory, on the olfactory response of parasitoids (preference, plant volatile emissions, parasitism success (performance, and the effect of drought on root herbivory. Under drought, percentage parasitism of aphids was reduced by about 40-55% compared with well watered plants. There was a significant interaction between drought and root herbivory on the efficacy of the two parasitoid species, drought stress partially reversing the negative effect of root herbivory on percent parasitism. In the absence of drought, root herbivory significantly reduced the performance (e.g. fecundity of both parasitoid species developing in foliar herbivores. Plant emissions of VOCs were reduced by drought and root herbivores, and in olfactometer experiments parasitoids preferred the odour from well-watered plants compared with other treatments. The present work demonstrates that drought stress can change the outcome of interactions between herbivores feeding above- and below-ground and their parasitoids, mediated by changes in the chemical signals from plants to parasitoids. This provides a new insight into how the structure of terrestrial

  14. Analysis of strong ground motions to evaluate regional attenuation relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Montaldo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Italian attenuation relationships at regional scale have been refined using a data set of 322 horizontal components of strong ground motions recorded mainly during the 1997-1998 Umbria-Marche, Central Italy, earthquake sequence. The data set includes records generated by events with local magnitude (M L ranging between 4.5 and 5.9, recorded at rock or soil sites and epicentral distance smaller than 100 km. Through a multiple step regression analysis, we calculated empirical equations for the peak ground acceleration and velocity, the Arias Intensity and for the horizontal components of the 5% damped velocity pseudo response spectra, corresponding to 14 frequencies ranging from 0.25 to 25 Hz. We compared our results with well known predictive equations, widely used on the national territory for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis. The results obtained in this study show smaller values for all the analyzed ground motion indicators compared to other predictive equations.

  15. Efficient evaluation of dielectric response functions and calculations of ground and excited state properties beyond local Density Functional approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Deyu; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Viet Nguyen, H.; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-01

    A recently developed technique to diagonalize iteratively dielectric matrices [1], is used to carry out efficient, ab-initio calculations of dispersion interactions, and excited state properties of nanostructures. In particular, we present results for the binding energies of weakly bonded molecular crystals [2], obtained at the EXX/RPA level of theory, and for absorption spectra of semiconducting clusters, obtained by an iterative solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equations [3]. We show that the ability to obtain the eigenmodes of dielectric matrices from Density Functional perturbation theory, without computing single particle excited states, greatly improves the efficiency of both EXX/RPA and many body perturbation theory [3,4] calculations and opens the way to large scale computations. [1] H. Wilson, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B , 78, 113303, 2008; and H. Wilson, D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B, 79, 245106, 2009. [2] D. Lu, Y. Li, D. Rocca and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett, 102, 206411, 2009; and Y. Li, D. Lu, V. Nguyen and G. Galli, J. Phys. Chem. C (submitted) [3] D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, submitted. [4] D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 147601, 2008. Work was funded by DOE/Scidac DE-FC02-06ER25794 and DOE/BES DE-FG02-06ER46262.

  16. Integrated plant phenotypic responses to contrasting above- and below-ground resources: key roles of specific leaf area and root mass fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Swart, Elferra M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-06-01

    Plants adapt phenotypically to different conditions of light and nutrient supply, supposedly in order to achieve colimitation of these resources. Their key variable of adjustment is the ratio of leaf area to root length, which relies on plant biomass allocation and organ morphology. We recorded phenotypic differences in leaf and root mass fractions (LMF, RMF), specific leaf area (SLA) and specific root length (SRL) of 12 herbaceous species grown in factorial combinations of high/low irradiance and fertilization treatments. Leaf area and root length ratios, and their components, were influenced by nonadditive effects between light and nutrient supply, and differences in the strength of plant responses were partly explained by Ellenberg's species values representing ecological optima. Changes in allocation were critical in plant responses to nutrient availability, as the RMF contribution to changes in root length was 2.5× that of the SRL. Contrastingly, morphological adjustments (SLA rather than LMF) made up the bulk of plant response to light availability. Our results suggest largely predictable differences in responses of species and groups of species to environmental change. Nevertheless, they stress the critical need to account for adjustments in below-ground mass allocation to understand the assembly and responses of communities in changing environments.

  17. ECHAM5-wiso water vapour isotopologues simulation and its comparison with WS-CRDS measurements and retrievals from GOSAT and ground-based FTIR spectra in the atmosphere of Western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gribanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water stable isotopes provide integrated tracers of the atmospheric water cycle, affected by changes in air mass origin, non-convective and convective processes and continental recycling. Novel remote sensing and in situ measuring techniques have recently offered opportunities for monitoring atmospheric water vapour isotopic composition. Recently developed infrared laser spectrometers allow for continuous in situ measurements of surface water vapour δDv and δ18Ov. So far, very few intercomparison of measurements conducted using different techniques have been achieved at a given location, due to difficulties intrinsic to the comparison of integrated with local measurements. Nudged simulations conducted with high resolution isotopically enabled GCMs provide a consistent framework for comparison with the different types of observations. Here, we compare simulations conducted with the ECHAM5-wiso model with three types of water vapour isotopic data obtained during summer 2012 at the forest site of Kourovka, Western Siberia: daily mean GOSAT δDv soundings, hourly ground-based FTIR total atmospheric columnar δDv amounts, and in situ hourly Picarro δDv measurements. There is an excellent correlation between observed and predicted δDv at surface while the comparison between water column values derived from the model compares well with FTIR and GOSAT estimates.

    This research was supported by the grant of Russian government under the contract 11.G34.31.0064.

  18. Vibrational spectra of corticosteroid hormones in the terahertz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkasova, O. P.; Nazarov, M. M.; Sapozhnikov, D. A.; Man'kova, A. A.; Fedulova, E. V.; Volodin, V. A.; Minaeva, V. A.; Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.

    2010-11-01

    The terahertz time-domain and Raman spectra of corticosteroid hormones in the region of low-frequency infrared vibrations have been measured. On the ground of quantum chemical calculations of the frequencies and normal modes the assignments of vibrational bands in the THz-spectra are performed.

  19. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Romanov, Alexey; Romanov, Alexander; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positiv...

  20. Vertical ground reaction force responses to different head-out aquatic exercises performed in water and on dry land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberton, Cristine Lima; Finatto, Paula; Pinto, Stephanie Santana; Antunes, Amanda Haberland; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Tartaruga, Marcus Peikriszwili; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to analyse the vertical ground reaction forces (Fz) of head-out aquatic exercises [stationary running (SR), frontal kick (FK), cross-country skiing (CCS), jumping jacks (JJ), adductor hop (ADH) and abductor hop (ABH)] at two cadences in both aquatic and dry land environments. Twelve young women completed two sessions in each environment, each consisting of three exercises performed at two cadences (first and second ventilatory thresholds - C1 and C2, respectively). Two-way and three-way repeated measures analysis of variance were used to the statistical analysis. The results showed that the peak Fz and impulse were significantly lower in the aquatic environment, resulting in values from 28.2% to 58.5% and 60.4% to 72.8% from those obtained on dry land, respectively. In the aquatic environment, the peak Fz was lower and the impulse was higher at the C1 than at the C2. Furthermore, it was observed that SR and FK (0.9-1.1 BW) elicited a significantly higher peak Fz values compared to the ADH and JJ exercises (0.5-0.8 BW). It can be concluded that the aquatic environment reduces the Fz during head-out aquatic exercises. It should be noted that its magnitude is also dependent on the intensity and the identity of the exercise performed.

  1. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  2. Response of ground-dwelling spider assemblages to prescribed fire following stand structure manipulation in the southern Cascade Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy E. Gillette; Richard S. Vetter; Sylvia R. Mori; Carline R. Rudolph; Dessa R. Welty

    2008-01-01

    We assessed spider (Arachnida: Araneae) responses to prescribed fire following stand s tructure treatments in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex P. & C. Laws.) stands in the Cascade Range of California. Stands were logged or left untreated to create three levels of structural diversity. We logged one treatment to minimize old-growth...

  3. Soil water repellency and ground cover effects on infiltration in response to prescribed burning of steeply-sloped sagebrush hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangeland managers and scientists are in need of predictive tools to accurately simulate post-fire hydrologic responses and provide hydrologic risk assessment. Rangeland hydrologic modeling has advanced in recent years; however, model advancements have largely been associated with data from gently ...

  4. A Promising Partnership: Uncovering the Middle Ground between Social Innovation and Social Work: Response to Dr. Marilyn L. Flynn's Remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensoy Bahar, Ozge

    2017-01-01

    This response article discusses opportunities to bridge social work and social innovation as a promising partnership to address the issues impacting vulnerable populations across the global context. It starts by revisiting the conceptualization of innovation in social work and continues by considering factors that contribute to the growing…

  5. Hibernation is associated with depression of T-cell independent humoral immune responses in the 13-lined ground squirrel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Henning, Robert H.; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Carey, Hannah V.

    Mammalian hibernation consists of periods of low metabolism and body temperature (torpor), interspersed by euthermic arousal periods. The function of both the innate and adaptive immune system is suppressed during hibernation. In this study, we analyzed the humoral adaptive immune response to a

  6. A Promising Partnership: Uncovering the Middle Ground between Social Innovation and Social Work: Response to Dr. Marilyn L. Flynn's Remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensoy Bahar, Ozge

    2017-01-01

    This response article discusses opportunities to bridge social work and social innovation as a promising partnership to address the issues impacting vulnerable populations across the global context. It starts by revisiting the conceptualization of innovation in social work and continues by considering factors that contribute to the growing…

  7. 武汉一次短时暴雪过程的地面雨滴谱特征分析%Characteristic analysis of a short-range snowstorm event in Wuhan based on ground raindrop spectra data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德俊; 熊守权; 柳草; 韩琦; 袁正腾; 王慧娟; 徐桂荣

    2013-01-01

      利用Thies Clima激光雨滴谱仪(TCLPM)和站点加密观测资料,对2011年2月12日发生在武汉的一次短时暴雪天气过程的演变特征进行了初步分析。结果表明:人工观测与激光雨滴谱仪自动探测的累积降雪量较为一致,均为5.6 mm。该短时暴雪过程,先后经历降雨、雨夹雪和纯雪三个阶段,且激光雨滴谱仪监测到了这三种降水相态对应的不同滴谱特征,即:降雨阶段,粒子下落速度大而粒径小;纯雪阶段,粒子下落速度小而粒径大。同时,监测到三个阶段雨滴谱型的变化较明显,其经历了单峰、波动再多峰的演变过程,谱宽与数浓度呈明显增加趋势。降雨强度与反射率因子和粒子质量加权平均直径呈正相关:雨强大对应反射率因子和雨滴平均直径值大,雨强小对应反射率因子和雨滴平均直径也小。%Data from Thies Clima laser precipitation monitor (TCLMP) and observations from intensive artificial weather stations were used to preliminarily analyze evolution characteristics of a short-range snowstorm event occurred on 12 February 2011 in Wuhan. The results show that cumulative snowfall of 5.6 mm by artificial observation is consistent with detecting one by TCLPM. This short-range snowstorm event has experienced three different periods such as rainfall, sleet and snowfall, and the different droplet spectra characteristics corresponding with three precipitation types have been monitored by TCLMP. During rainfall period, particle falling velocity is faster but particle diameter is smaller, while during snowfall period, particle falling velocity is slower but particle diameter is bigger. At the same time, the remarkable change of raindrop size distribution patterns in three periods have been monitored, and the patterns experience a process from unimodal spec-trum to undulation and then multimodal spectrum. Furthermore, both spectrum width and number

  8. Edge responses are different in edges under natural versus anthropogenic influence: a meta-analysis using ground beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magura, Tibor; Lövei, Gábor L; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2017-02-01

    Most edges are anthropogenic in origin, but are distinguishable by their maintaining processes (natural vs. continued anthropogenic interventions: forestry, agriculture, urbanization). We hypothesized that the dissimilar edge histories will be reflected in the diversity and assemblage composition of inhabitants. Testing this "history-based edge effect" hypothesis, we evaluated published information on a common insect group, ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in forest edges. A meta-analysis showed that the diversity-enhancing properties of edges significantly differed according to their history. Forest edges maintained by natural processes had significantly higher species richness than their interiors, while edges with continued anthropogenic influence did not. The filter function of edges was also essentially different depending on their history. For forest specialist species, edges maintained by natural processes were penetrable, allowing these species to move right through the edges, while edges still under anthropogenic interventions were impenetrable, preventing the dispersal of forest specialists out of the forest. For species inhabiting the surrounding matrix (open-habitat and generalist species), edges created by forestry activities were penetrable, and such species also invaded the forest interior. However, natural forest edges constituted a barrier and prevented the invasion of matrix species into the forest interior. Preserving and protecting all edges maintained by natural processes, and preventing anthropogenic changes to their structure, composition, and characteristics are key factors to sustain biodiversity in forests. Moreover, the increasing presence of anthropogenic edges in a landscape is to be avoided, as they contribute to the loss of biodiversity. Simultaneously, edges under continued anthropogenic disturbance should be restored by increasing habitat heterogeneity.

  9. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. I. The normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandi, G. L.; Chiofalo, M. L.; Toncelli, R.; Bramanti, D.; Polacco, E.; Nobili, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the equivalence principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration η between two test bodies—of different compositions, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass—if the measurement is made to the level of η ≃10-13 or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in a low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following articles (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation—in particular, its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)—can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining a quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus.

  10. 2D ground motion at a soft viscoelastic layer/hard substratum site in response to SH cylindrical seismic waves radiated by deep and shallow line sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wirgin, A; Wirgin, Armand

    2004-01-01

    We show, essentially by theoretical means, that for a site with the chosen simple geometry and mechanical properties (horizontal, homogeneous, soft viscoelastic layer of infinite lateral extent overlying, and in welded contact with, a homogeneous, hard elastic substratum of half-infinite radial extent, shear-horizontal motion): 1) coupling to Love modes is all the weaker the farther the seismic source (modeled as a line, assumed to lie in the substratum) is from the lower boundary of the soft layer, 2) for a line source close to the lower boundary of the soft layer, the ground response is characterized by possible beating phenomena, and is of significantly-longer duration than for excitation by cylindrical waves radiated by deep sources. Numerical applications of the theory show, for instance, that a line source, located 40m below the lower boundary of a 60m thick soft layer in a hypothetical Mexico City-like site, radiating a SH pulse of 4s duration, produces substantial ground motion during 200s, with marke...

  11. Ground Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    Political campaigns today are won or lost in the so-called ground war--the strategic deployment of teams of staffers, volunteers, and paid part-timers who work the phones and canvass block by block, house by house, voter by voter. Ground Wars provides an in-depth ethnographic portrait of two...... infrastructures that utilize large databases with detailed individual-level information for targeting voters, and armies of dedicated volunteers and paid part-timers. Nielsen challenges the notion that political communication in America must be tightly scripted, controlled, and conducted by a select coterie...... of professionals. Yet he also quashes the romantic idea that canvassing is a purer form of grassroots politics. In today's political ground wars, Nielsen demonstrates, even the most ordinary-seeming volunteer knocking at your door is backed up by high-tech targeting technologies and party expertise. Ground Wars...

  12. Technical Work Plan For: Calculation of Waste Packave and Drip Shield Response to Vibratory Ground Motion and Revision of the Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Gross

    2006-12-08

    The overall objective of the work scope covered by this technical work plan (TWP) is to develop new damage abstractions for the seismic scenario class in total system performance assessment (TSPA). The new abstractions will be based on a new set of waste package and drip shield damage calculations in response to vibratory ground motion and fault displacement. The new damage calculations, which are collectively referred to as damage models in this TWP, are required to represent recent changes in waste form packaging and in the regulatory time frame. The new damage models also respond to comments from the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT) postvalidation review of the draft TSPA model regarding performance of the drip shield and to an Additional Information Need (AIN) from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  13. Assessment of the stress response in Columbian ground squirrels: laboratory and field validation of an enzyme immunoassay for fecal cortisol metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Curtis O; Palme, Rupert; Boonstra, Rudy

    2009-01-01

    Stress responses play a critical role in the ecology and demography of wild animals, and the analysis of fecal hormone metabolites is a powerful noninvasive method to assess the role of stress. We characterized the metabolites of injected radiolabeled cortisol in the urine and feces of Columbian ground squirrels and validated an enzyme immunoassay for measuring fecal cortisol metabolites (FCM) with a 5 alpha-3beta,11 beta-diol structure by stimulation and suppression of adrenocortical activity and by evaluation of the circadian pattern of FCM excretion. In addition, we also evaluated the impact of capture, handling, and acclimation to the laboratory on FCM. Cortisol is highly metabolized, with virtually none being excreted, and of the radiolabeled cortisol injected, 31% was recovered in urine and 6.5% in feces. The lag time between cortisol injection and its appearance in urine and feces was 4.5 +/- 0.82 (SE) h and 7.0 +/- 0.53 (SE) h, respectively. FCM levels varied over the day, reflecting circadian variation in endogenous cortisol. Dexamethasone decreased FCM levels by 33%, and ACTH increased them by 255%. Trapping and housing initially increased FCM levels and decreased body mass, but these reversed within 3-7 d, indicating acclimation. Finally, FCM levels were modestly repeatable over time (r=0.57) in wild, live trapped, nonbreeding animals, indicating that FCMs provide a measure of the squirrel's stress-axis state. This assay provides a robust noninvasive assessment of the stress response of the Columbian ground squirrel and will facilitate an integration of its life history and physiology.

  14. Responses of epidermal phenolic compounds to light acclimation: in vivo qualitative and quantitative assessment using chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in leaves of three woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidel, L P R; Meyer, S; Goulas, Y; Cadot, Y; Cerovic, Z G

    2007-09-25

    Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) excitation spectra were measured to assess the UV-sunscreen compounds accumulated in fully expanded leaves of three woody species belonging to different chemotaxons, (i.e. Morus nigra L., Prunus mahaleb L. and Lagerstroemia indica L.), grown in different light microclimates. The logarithm of the ratio of ChlF excitation spectra (logFER) between two leaves acclimated to different light microclimates was used to assess the difference in epidermal absorbance (EAbs). EAbs increased with increasing solar irradiance intercepted for the three species. This epidermal localisation of UV-absorbers was confirmed by the removal of the epidermis. It was possible to simulate EAbs as a linear combination of major phenolic compounds (Phen) identified in leaf methanol extracts by HPLC-DAD. Under UV-free radiation conditions, shaded leaves of M. nigra accumulated chlorogenic acid. Hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) derivatives and hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) derivatives greatly increased with increasing PAR irradiance under the low UV-B conditions found in the greenhouse. These traits were also observed for the HCA of the two other species. Flavonoid (FLAV) accumulation started under low UV-A irradiance, and became maximal in the adaxial epidermis of sun-exposed leaves outdoors. A decrease in the amount of HCA was observed concomitantly to the intense accumulation of FLAV for both leaf sides of the three species. Judging from the logFER, under low UV-B conditions, larger amounts of HCA are present in the epidermis in comparison to FLAV for the three species. Upon transition from the greenhouse to full sunlight outdoors, there was a decrease in leaf-soluble HCA that paralleled FLAV accumulation in reaction to increasing solar UV-B radiation in the three species. In M. nigra, that contains large amounts of HCA, the logFER analysis showed that this decrease occurred in the adaxial epidermis, whereas the abaxial epidermis, which is protected from direct UV

  15. Study on ground temperature change and characteristic response of engineering geology of permafrost along Qinghai-Tibet Railway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Weidong; WANG Quancai; YU Shaoshui; ZHANG Xiaoyan

    2003-01-01

    Along with the global warming in the recent scores of years, comparatively big changes have taken place in the weather and other environmental conditions of the permafrost area in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and very big changes have also occurred in the engineering geological conditions of the permafrost area. Based on a large volume of field survey data, this paper discusses the regularities of horizontal and vertical distribution of permafrost, with its focus of analysis on the temperature change characteristics of the soil in different frozen-soil zones, as well as presents simulation analysis and research for the engineering geologic characteristic response changes that would occur in the future when the temperature of the frozen soil in different zones rises by 1 and 2.6℃ respectively, which will have a tremendous impact on the stability of constructional work.

  16. 接地线缆HEMP电流响应规律研究%Study on Current Response of Grounding Cable in HEMP Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴焱杰; 张春光; 许凯; 赵煜

    2014-01-01

    The cable connecting the information systems may be coupled by the electromagnetic pulse energy to the internal cir-cuit,resulting in system performance degradation,damage and even burned,and bringing great harm. Therefore,the work to research cables’ effects under electromagnetic pulse is the precondition to take electromagnetic protective measures. The finite-difference time-domain ( FDTD) method and Noda thin models are used to establish the space and computational model with high-altitude nuclear elec-tromagnetic pulse (HEMP) as the incident source,the grounding cable HEMP current response in the different states is analyzed and calculated. The results show that the response current of grounding cable attenuates rapidly in the oscillation process with a large peak at a position higher;the incident direction changes of the wave source can produce different results in response,and the response current mainly appears from the cable laid in the same direction with the electric field excitation component. The conclusions can provide useful guidance for the cable electromagnetic protection.%连接电子系统的线缆能够将电磁脉冲能量耦合至系统的内部电路,造成系统性能降级、损伤甚至烧毁,带来极大的危害,因此开展线缆的电磁脉冲效应研究工作是采取针对性电磁防护措施的必要前提。以高空核爆电磁脉冲(HEMP)为入射源,基于时域有限差分(FDTD)方法和Noda细线模型建立仿真空间和计算模型,分析计算了不同状态下接地线缆的HEMP电流响应。结果表明,接地线缆的响应电流在振荡过程中迅速衰减,且在较高位置处峰值较大;波源入射方向的改变会产生不同的响应结果,线缆响应电流主要来自与其布设方向一致的电场分量的激励。所得结论能够为线缆的电磁防护提供有益指导。

  17. First High Resolution IR Spectra of 1-^{13}C-PROPANE. the νb{9} B-Type Band Near 366.404 \\wn and the νb{26} C-Type Band Near 748.470 \\wn. Determination of Ground and Upper State Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunt, S. J.; Grzywacz, Robert; Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Billinghurst, Brant E.

    2017-06-01

    We report in this talk on the first high resolution IR spectra (Δν = 0.0009 \\wn) of the 1-^{13}C-Propane isotopologue. Spectra were taken on the Bruker FTS instrument on the Far-IR beamline at the Canadian National Synchrotron (CLS) located at the University of Saskatchewan. The νb{9} B-type band centered near 366.404 \\wn appears unperturbed and lines were assigned up to K = 17 and J = 50. Since the 1960 MW study of Lide only used 6 J lines of K = 0 we had to use GSCD analyses to determine a fuller set of molecular constants for this molecule. Since normal propane has been detected using the νb{26} C-type band in Titan and other astrophysical objects our main focus was on the analagous bands for the both the 1-^{13}C and 2-^{13}C isotopologues. Assigned lines up to K = 17, J = 50 in νb{26} were analyzed with GSCD to independently obtain ground state rotational constants. These were consistent with those obtained from the νb{9} analysis. Upper state constants were also determined that reproduce the vast majority of this band. As in the normal and 2-^{13}C species a Coriolis resonance with the 2νb{9} state causes lines of most K levels above 15 to be shifted. We did not have enough sample available at the time of these experiments to be able to record the 2νb{9} - νb{9} hot band transitions in the low frequency study of νb{9}. Lide, J. Chem. Phys. 33, p. 1514 ff. (1960) Flaud, Kwabia Tchana, Lafferty & Nixon, Mol. Phys. 108, p. 699 ff. (2010)

  18. Representation of near-fault pulse-type ground motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Lili; Xu Longjun; Adrian Rodriguez-Marek

    2005-01-01

    Near-fault ground motions with long-period pulses have been identified as critical in the design of structures.To aid in the representation of this special type of motion, eight simple pulses that characterize the effects of either the flingstep or forward-directivity are considered. Relationships between pulse amplitudes and velocity pulse period for different pulses are discussed. Representative ratios and peak acceleration amplification can exhibit distinctive features depending on variations in pulse duration, amplitude and the selected acceleration pulse shape. Additionally, response spectral characteristics for the equivalent pulses are identified and compared in terms of fixed PGA and PGV, respectively. Response spectra are strongly affected by the duration of pulses and the shape of the basic pulses. Finally, dynamic time history response features of a damped SDOF system subjected to pulse excitations are examined. These special aspects of pulse waveforms and their response spectra should be taken into account in the estimation of ground motions for a project site close to a fault.

  19. Ground-based observations of the auroral zone and polar cap ionospheric responses to dayside transient reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Davies

    Full Text Available Observations from the EISCAT VHF incoherent scatter radar system in northern Norway, during a run of the common programme CP-4, reveal a series of poleward-propagating F-region electron density enhancements in the pre-noon sector on 23 November 1999. These plasma density features, which are observed under conditions of a strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field, exhibit a recurrence rate of under 10 min and appear to emanate from the vicinity of the open/closed field-line boundary from where they travel into the polar cap; this is suggestive of their being an ionospheric response to transient reconnection at the day-side magnetopause (flux transfer events. Simultaneous with the density structures detected by the VHF radar, poleward-moving radar auroral forms (PMRAFs are observed by the Finland HF coherent scatter radar. It is thought that PM-RAFs, which are commonly observed near local noon by HF radars, are also related to flux transfer events, although the specific mechanism for the generation of the field-aligned irregularities within such features is not well understood. The HF observations suggest, that for much of their existence, the PMRAFs trace fossil signatures of transient reconnection rather than revealing the footprint of active reconnection itself; this is evidenced not least by the fact that the PMRAFs become narrower in spectral width as they evolve away from the region of more classical, broad cusp scatter in which they originate. Interpretation of the HF observations with reference to the plasma parameters diagnosed by the incoherent scatter radar suggests that as the PMRAFs migrate away from the reconnection site and across the polar cap, entrained in the ambient antisunward flow, the irregularities therein are generated by the presence of gradients in the electron density, with these gradients having been formed through structuring of the ionosphere in the cusp region in response to transient reconnection

  20. An Analysis of Spectra in the Red Rectangle Nebula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Frédéric Zagury

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a series of spectra in the Red Rectangle nebula. Only the reddest part of the spectra can safely be attributed to light from the nebula, and indicates Rayleigh scattering by the gas, in conformity with the large angles of scattering involved and the proximity of the star. In the blue, light from HD 44179, refracted or scattered in the atmosphere, dominates the spectra. This paper questions the reliability of ground-based broad-band spectra of extended objects in the blue.

  1. Analysis of afferent responses from isolated semicircular canal of the guitarfish using rotational acceleration white-noise inputs. II. Estimation of linear system parameters and gain and phase spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, D P; Honrubia, V

    1976-05-01

    Quantitative estimates were computed for exponential coefficients and rate constants contributing to afferent unit impulse responses obtained from bundles innervating specific regions of the semicircular canal. The grouping of these estimates into specific response classes provided quantitative correlations with specific anatomical regions of innervation of the crista. Linear system gain and phase spectra were computed also, by applying Fourier transformations to unit impulse responses, for purposes of comparison with previous studies employing frequency domain analyses. Responses fitted by third-order linear system equations were specific to afferents innervating the crest and transition regions of the crista; whereas those fitted by overdamped, second-order equations were specific to afferents innervating the slopes and transition crista regions. It was concluded that strictly mechanical models of the transduction process are inadequate to account for the diverse and spatially distributed classes of observed responses and, moreover, structural features such as different hair cell types or efferent innervation effects could be excluded as inoperative in this preparation. The alternative hypothesis was suggested that certain of the observed subcomponents could be direct reflections of the initial mechanical stimulus, but that other subcomponents were reflections of more complex filtering mechanisms operating at the cellular or synaptic levels.

  2. Raman Spectra of Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-30

    17), Raman spectra, plus a , . theoretical treatment of the data, f complex fluorozirconate 14 I anions in ZBLAN glasses and melts (16), and...based ZBLAN glasses ) 17. ICORS (International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy) Proceedings, London, England. Conferencf 5-9 Sep 88. (Molten silica...RESEARCH FINAL REPORT DTIC CONTRACT N00014-81-K-0501 &JELECTE 1 MAY 81 -- 30 NOV 86 EJJAN041989 V "RAMAN SPECTRA OF GLASSES " 0 During the five years of the

  3. Initial responses of rove and ground beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Carabidae to removal of logging residues following clearcut harvesting in the boreal forest of Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Work

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased interest in biomass harvesting for bioenergetic applications has raised questions regarding the potential ecological consequences on forest biodiversity. Here we evaluate the initial changes in the abundance, species richness and community composition of rove (Staphylinidae and ground beetles (Carabidae, immediately following 1 stem-only harvesting (SOH, in which logging debris (i.e., tree tops and branches are retained on site, and 2 whole-tree harvesting (WTH, in which stems, tops and branches are removed in mature balsam fir stands in Quebec, Canada. Beetles were collected throughout the summer of 2011, one year following harvesting, using pitfall traps. Overall catch rates were greater in uncut forest (Control than either stem-only or whole-tree harvested sites. Catch rates in WTH were greater than SOH sites. Uncut stands were characterized primarily by five species: Atheta capsularis, A. klagesi, A. strigosula, Tachinus fumipennis/frigidus complex (Staphylinidae and to a lesser extent to Pterostichus punctatissimus (Carabidae. Increased catch rates in WTH sites, where post-harvest biomass was less, were attributable to increased catches of rove beetles Pseudopsis subulata, Quedius labradorensis and to a lesser extent Gabrius brevipennis. We were able to characterize differences in beetle assemblages between harvested and non-harvested plots as well as differences between whole tree (WTH and stem only (SOH harvested sites where logging residues had been removed or left following harvest. However, the overall assemblage response was largely a recapitulation of the responses of several abundant species.

  4. Automatic apparatus and data transmission for field response tests of the ground; Automatisation et teletransmission des donnees pour les tests de reponse du terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laloui, L.; Steinmann, G.

    2004-07-01

    This is the report on the third part of a development started 1998 at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland. Energy piles are becoming increasingly used as a heat exchanger and heat storage device, as are geothermal probes. Their design and sizing is subject to some uncertainty due to the fact that the planner has to estimate the thermal and mechanical properties of the ground surrounding the piles or probes. The aim of the project was to develop an apparatus for field measurements of thermal and mechanical properties of an energy pile or a geothermal probe (thermal response tests). In the reported third phase of the project the portable apparatus was equipped with a data transmission device using the Internet. Real-time data acquisition and supervision is now implemented and data processing has been improved. Another goal of the project was to obtain the official accreditation of such response tests according to the European standard EN 45,000. First operation experience from a test in Lyon, France is reported.

  5. Mesozooplankton size structure in response to environmental conditions in the East China Sea: How much does size spectra theory fit empirical data of a dynamic coastal area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Comas, Carmen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Ye, Lin; Sastri, Akash R.; Lee, Yu-Ching; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Hsieh, Chih-hao

    2014-02-01

    A fundamental ecological trait of marine organisms is body size. Various theoretical models have used the size distribution of plankton communities to explain their trophic structure and functioning. Recent studies indicate that changes associated with global warming, eutrophication, and fisheries might have dramatically shifted the size structure of marine organisms and thus changed ecosystem functioning. Accordingly, size structure has been suggested as a useful indicator for monitoring ecosystem status. Here, we used three size metrics to represent mesozooplankton size structure: the slope of normalized biomass spectra (NB-SS), NB-SS linear fit, and size diversity. We analyzed the relationship between zooplankton size structure and environmental conditions in the very dynamic East China Sea (ECS). We tested four hypotheses predicted by theoretical studies: (1) a coastal-offshore gradient for NB-SS, (2) a negative relationship between temperature and NB-SS steepness, (3) a positive relationship between trophic status (i.e., chlorophyll a and inorganic-nutrient concentrations as a proxy) and NB-SS steepness, and (4) a positive relationship between oligotrophy and NB-SS linearity. Hypotheses 1-3 did not stand up to our analyses of the empirical data, while hypothesis 4 was supported. In the ECS, we found no clear spatial gradient for each of the three size metrics, where (i) size diversity was not correlated to temperature and significantly decreased with chl a and phosphate concentrations, (ii) the NB-SS slope showed no relationship with the environment, and (iii) NB-SS linearity tended to be higher in more oligotrophic offshore waters. Trophic status exerted a stronger effect than temperature on size distribution, but its effect was opposite to model prediction. Our results suggest that population dynamics (i.e., pulses of reproduction due to increased food availability) override metabolic scaling effects on mesozooplankton NB-SS at the mesoscale. In addition

  6. Outdoor ground impedance models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenborough, Keith; Bashir, Imran; Taherzadeh, Shahram

    2011-05-01

    Many models for the acoustical properties of rigid-porous media require knowledge of parameter values that are not available for outdoor ground surfaces. The relationship used between tortuosity and porosity for stacked spheres results in five characteristic impedance models that require not more than two adjustable parameters. These models and hard-backed-layer versions are considered further through numerical fitting of 42 short range level difference spectra measured over various ground surfaces. For all but eight sites, slit-pore, phenomenological and variable porosity models yield lower fitting errors than those given by the widely used one-parameter semi-empirical model. Data for 12 of 26 grassland sites and for three beech wood sites are fitted better by hard-backed-layer models. Parameter values obtained by fitting slit-pore and phenomenological models to data for relatively low flow resistivity grounds, such as forest floors, porous asphalt, and gravel, are consistent with values that have been obtained non-acoustically. Three impedance models yield reasonable fits to a narrow band excess attenuation spectrum measured at short range over railway ballast but, if extended reaction is taken into account, the hard-backed-layer version of the slit-pore model gives the most reasonable parameter values.

  7. Rock mass response to strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events and blasting observed at the surface of the excavations in deep level gold mines in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Alexander; Durrheim, Ray; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to extreme ground motion and derive the attenuation factors in near field. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of the ground motion was found to be proportional to the distance from the source following R^-1.1 & R^-1.7 for compact rock and R^-3.1 & R^-3.4 for more fractured rock close to the surface of the tunnel. In addition the ground motion was compared to the quasi-static deformations taking place around the underground excavations. The quasi-static deformations were measured by means of strain, tilt and closure. A good correspondence

  8. Spectra and strains

    CERN Document Server

    Golyshev, V

    2008-01-01

    This is a blend of two informal reports on the activities of the seminar on Galois representations and mirror symmetry given at the Conference on classification problems and mirror duality at the Steklov Institute, in March 2006, and at the Seminar on Algebra, Geometry and Physics at MPI, in November 2007. We assess where we are on the issue of the spectra of Fano varieties, and state problems. We introduce higher dimensional irreducible analogues of dessins, the low ramified sheaves, and hypothesize that Fano spectra relate to their geometric conductors. We give a recipe to a physicist.

  9. Current induced magnetic flux response in frustrated three-band superconductors as a bulk probe of broken time reversal symmetry (BTRS) ground states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yerin, Yuriy; Omelyanchouk, Alexander [Verkin Inst. for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering. 61103 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Brink, Jeroen van den; Efremov, Dmitriy [Inst. for Theorretical Solid State Physics at the Leibniz Inst. for Solid State an Materials Research, IFW-Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Within the Ginzburg-Landau formalism we provide a classification of all possible ground states (GS) of a three-band superconductor (3BSC) where either frustrated states with BTRS or a single non-BTRS GS with unconventional/conventional s-wave symmetry, respectively, exist. The necessary condition for a BTRS GS in general cannot be reduced to a ''-''sign of the product of all interband couplings (IBC) valid in the case of 3 equivalent bands with repulsive equal IBC, only. It corresponds to a maximal IBC frustration. We show that with increasing diversity of the parameter space this frustration is reduced and the regions of possible BTRS GS start to shrink. We track possible evolutions of a BTRS GS of a 3BSC based doubly-connected system in an external magnetic field. Depending on its parameters, a magnetic flux can induce various current density leaps, connected with adiabatic or non-adiabatic transitions from BTRS to non-BTRS states and vice versa. The current induced magnetic flux response of samples with a doubly-connected geometry e.g. as a thin tube provides a suitable experimental tool for the detection of BTRS GS.

  10. Comparability of red/near-infrared reflectance and NDVI based on the spectral response function between MODIS and 30 other satellite sensors using rice canopy spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-11-26

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from -12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, -8.52% to -0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and -9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7-17 showed

  11. Combined linear response quantum mechanics and classical electrodynamics (QM/ED) method for the calculation of surface-enhanced Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Jonathan; Schatz, George C

    2012-03-01

    A multiscale method is presented that allows for evaluation of plasmon-enhanced optical properties of nanoparticle/molecule complexes with no additional cost compared to standard electrodynamics (ED) and linear response quantum mechanics (QM) calculations for the particle and molecule, respectively, but with polarization and orientation effects automatically described. The approach first calculates the total field of the nanoparticle by ED using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The field intensity in the frequency domain as a function of distance from the nanoparticle is calculated via a Fourier transform. The molecular optical properties are then calculated with QM in the frequency domain in the presence of the total field of the nanoparticle. Back-coupling due to dipolar reradiation effects is included in the single-molecule plane wave approximation. The effects of polarization and partial orientation averaging are considered. The QM/ED method is evaluated for the well-characterized test case of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of pyridine bound to silver, as well as for the resonant Raman chromophore rhodamine 6G. The electromagnetic contribution to the enhancement factor is 10(4) for pyridine and 10(2) for rhodamine 6G. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  12. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  13. Leaf traits and photosynthetic responses of Betula pendula saplings to a range of ground-level ozone concentrations at a range of nitrogen loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmens, Harry; Hayes, Felicity; Sharps, Katrina; Mills, Gina; Calatayud, Vicent

    2017-04-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition rates have increased strongly since the 1950s. Rising ground-level O3 concentrations and atmospheric N deposition both affect plant physiology and growth, however, impacts have often been studied in isolation rather than in combination. In addition, studies are often limited to a control treatment and one or two elevated levels of ozone and/or nitrogen supply. In the current study, three-year old Betula pendula saplings were exposed to seven different O3 profiles (24h mean O3 concentration of 36-68ppb in 2013, with peaks up to an average of 105ppb) in precision-controlled hemispherical glasshouses (solardomes) and four different N loads (10, 30, 50 or 70kgNha(-1)y(-1)) in 2012 and 2013. Here we report on the effects of enhanced O3 concentrations and N load on leaf traits and gas exchange in leaves of varying age and developmental stage in 2013. The response of leaf traits to O3 (but not N) vary with leaf developmental stage. For example, elevated O3 did not affect the chlorophyll content of the youngest fully expanded leaf, but it reduced the chlorophyll content and photosynthetic parameters in aging leaves, relatively more so later than earlier in the growing season. Elevated O3 enhanced the N content of senesced leaves prior to leaf fall, potentially affecting subsequent N cycling in the soil. Enhanced N generally stimulated the chlorophyll content and photosynthetic capacity. Whilst elevated O3 reduced the light-saturated rate of photosynthesis (Asat) in aging leaves, it did not affect stomatal conductance (gs). This suggests that photosynthesis and gs are not closely coupled at elevated O3 under-light saturating conditions. We did not observe any interactions between O3 and N regarding photosynthetic parameters (Vc,max, Jmax, Asat), chlorophyll content, gs, N content in senesced leaves and leaf number. Hence, the sensitivity of these leaf traits to O3 in young silver birch trees is

  14. Hazard-consistent ground motions generated with a stochastic fault-rupture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Akemi, E-mail: nishida.akemi@jaea.go.jp [Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 178-4-4, Wakashiba, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0871 (Japan); Igarashi, Sayaka, E-mail: igrsyk00@pub.taisei.co.jp [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, 344-1 Nase-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0051 (Japan); Sakamoto, Shigehiro, E-mail: shigehiro.sakamoto@sakura.taisei.co.jp [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, 344-1 Nase-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0051 (Japan); Uchiyama, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo.uchiyama@sakura.taisei.co.jp [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, 344-1 Nase-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0051 (Japan); Yamamoto, Yu, E-mail: ymmyu-00@pub.taisei.co.jp [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, 344-1 Nase-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0051 (Japan); Muramatsu, Ken, E-mail: kmuramat@tcu.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering, Tokyo City University, 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Takada, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: takada@load.arch.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Architecture, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Conventional seismic probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of nuclear power plants consist of probabilistic seismic hazard and fragility curves. Even when earthquake ground-motion time histories are required, they are generated to fit specified response spectra, such as uniform hazard spectra at a specified exceedance probability. These ground motions, however, are not directly linked with seismic-source characteristics. In this context, the authors propose a method based on Monte Carlo simulations to generate a set of input ground-motion time histories to develop an advanced PRA scheme that can explain exceedance probability and the sequence of safety-functional loss in a nuclear power plant. These generated ground motions are consistent with seismic hazard at a reference site, and their seismic-source characteristics can be identified in detail. Ground-motion generation is conducted for a reference site, Oarai in Japan, the location of a hypothetical nuclear power plant. A total of 200 ground motions are generated, ranging from 700 to 1100 cm/s{sup 2} peak acceleration, which corresponds to a 10{sup −4} to 10{sup −5} annual exceedance frequency. In the ground-motion generation, seismic sources are selected according to their hazard contribution at the site, and Monte Carlo simulations with stochastic parameters for the seismic-source characteristics are then conducted until ground motions with the target peak acceleration are obtained. These ground motions are selected so that they are consistent with the hazard. Approximately 110,000 simulations were required to generate 200 ground motions with these peak accelerations. Deviations of peak ground motion acceleration generated for 1000–1100 cm/s{sup 2} range from 1.5 to 3.0, where the deviation is evaluated with peak ground motion accelerations generated from the same seismic source. Deviations of 1.0 to 3.0 for stress drops, one of the stochastic parameters of seismic-source characteristics, are required to

  15. Assessment of potential strong ground motions in the city of Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Malagnini

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available A methodology is used which combines stochastic generation of random series with a finite-difference technique to estimate the expected horizontal ground motion for the city of Rome as induced by a large earthquake in the Central Apennines. In this approach, source properties and long-path propagation are modelled through observed spectra of ground motion in the region, while the effects of the near-surface geology in the city are simulated by means of a finite-difference technique applied to 2-D models including elastic and anelastic properties of geologic materials and topographic variations. The parameters commonly used for earthquake engineering purposes are estimated from the simulated time histories of horizontal ground motion. We focus our attention on peak ground acceleration and velocity, and on the integral of the squared acceleration and velocity (that are proportional to the Arias intensity and seismic energy flux, respectively. Response spectra are analyzed as well. Parameter variations along 2-D profiles visualize the effects of the small-scale geological heterogeneities and topography irregularities on ground motion in the case of a strong earthquake. Interestingly, the largest amplification of peak ground acceleration and Arias intensity does not necessarily occur at the same sites where peak ground velocity and flux of seismic energy reach their highest values, depending on the frequency band of amplification. A magnitude 7 earthquake at a distance of 100 km results in peak ground accelerations ranging from 30 to 70 gals while peak ground velocities are estimated to vary from 5 to 7 cm/s; moreover, simulated time histories of horizontal ground motion yield amplitudes of 5% damped pseudovelocity response spectra as large as 15-20 cm/s for frequencies from 1to 3 Hz. In this frequency band, the mean value is 7 cm/s for firm sites and ranges from 10 to 13 cm/s for soil sites. All these results are in good agreement with predictions

  16. 'Grounded' Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2012-01-01

    play within one particular neighbourhood: Nørrebro in the Danish capital, Copenhagen. The article introduces the concept of grounded politics to analyse how groups of Muslim immigrants in Nørrebro use the space, relationships and history of the neighbourhood for identity political statements....... The article further describes how national political debates over the Muslim presence in Denmark affect identity political manifestations within Nørrebro. By using Duncan Bell’s concept of mythscape (Bell, 2003), the article shows how some political actors idealize Nørrebro’s past to contest the present...

  17. SEISMIC RESPONSE OF LARGE CROSSING TRANSMISSION TOWER-LINE SYSTEM SUBJECTED TO NEAR-FAULT GROUND MOTIONS%大跨越输电塔-线体系的近场脉冲型地震反应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武钢; 翟长海; 李爽; 谢礼立

    2013-01-01

    分析了大跨越输电塔-线体系的动力特性,对比了大跨越输电塔-线体系的近-远场地震反应,研究了大跨越塔-线体系的近场脉冲地震反应规律.结果表明在同幅值的近场脉冲型地震动作用下,大跨越输电塔-线体系的动力反应远大于其在一般地震动下的反应,大跨越输电塔-线体系的近场脉冲型地震反应幅值随地震动脉冲周期增大而增大.将等效脉冲模型引入大跨越输电塔-线体系近场响应分析,结果表明:塔-线体系在等效脉冲作用下的响应与实际地震动相近,将等效脉冲用于分析大跨越输电塔-线体系的地震响应能够弥补实际近场脉冲型地震动数目过少的不足.%Dynamic characteristics of a large crossing transmission tower-line system (LCTTL) are analyzed.The seismic responses of a large crossing transmission tower-line system subjected to near-fault pulse-like ground motions and ordinary ground motions are compared.The characteristics of responses caused by near-fault pulse-like ground motions are presented.It is shown that the seismic responses of LCTL induced by near-fault pulse-like ground motions are severer than the responses subjected to ordinary ground motions.The amplitude of seismic responses increases with the pulse period of near-fault pulse-like ground motions.An equivalent pulse model is introduced to seismic response evaluation of LCTL.The results demonstrate that the equivalent pulse model can capture the important response characteristics of the near-fault records.The application of equivalent pulse model in seismic responses analysis of LCTL can augment the number of near-fault record set.

  18. Study of Ground Response Curve (GRC) Based on a Damage Model / Badanie Krzywej Odpowiedzi Gruntu (Grc) W Oparciu O Model Pękania Skał

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molladavoodi, H.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of stresses and displacements around underground openings is necessary in a wide variety of civil, petroleum and mining engineering problems. In addition, an excavation damaged zone (EDZ) is generally formed around underground openings as a result of high stress magnitudes even in the absence of blasting effects. The rock materials surrounding the underground excavations typically demonstrate nonlinear and irreversible mechanical response in particular under high in situ stress states. The dominant cause of irreversible deformations in brittle rocks is damage process. One of the most widely used methods in tunnel design is the convergence-confinement method (CCM) for its practical application. The elastic-plastic models are usually used in the convergence-confinement method as a constitutive model for rock behavior. The plastic models used to simulate the rock behavior, do not consider the important issues such as stiffness degradation and softening. Therefore, the use of damage constitutive models in the convergence-confinement method is essential in the design process of rock structures. In this paper, the basic concepts of continuum damage mechanics are outlined. Then a numerical stepwise procedure for a circular tunnel under hydrostatic stress field, with consideration of a damage model for rock mass has been implemented. The ground response curve and radius of excavation damage zone were calculated based on an isotropic damage model. The convergence-confinement method based on damage model can consider the effects of post-peak rock behavior on the ground response curve and excavation damage zone. The analysis of results show the important effect of brittleness parameter on the tunnel wall convergence, ground response curve and excavation damage radius. Analiza naprężeń i przemieszczeń powstałych wokół otworu podziemnego wymagana jest przy szerokiej gamie projektów z zakresu budownictwa lądowego, inżynierii górniczej oraz naftowej. Ponadto

  19. Direct recovery of fluctuation spectra from tomographic shear spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzetti, Marino; Bonometto, Silvio A.; Casarini, Luciano; Murante, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Forthcoming experiments will enable us to determine high precision tomographic shear spectra. Matter density fluctuation spectra, at various z, should then be recovered from them, in order to constrain the model and determine the DE state equation. Available analytical expressions, however, do the opposite, enabling us to derive shear spectra from fluctuation spectra. Here we find the inverse expression, yielding density fluctuation spectra from observational tomographic shear spectra. The procedure involves SVD techniques for matrix inversion. We show in detail how the approach works and provide a few examples.

  20. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  1. Ground-based experiments complement microgravity flight opportunities in the investigation of the effects of space flight on the immune response: is protein kinase C gravity sensitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapes, S. K.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews ground-based and flight experiments, discusses how those experiments complement each other, and details how those experiments lead us to speculate about the gravity-sensitive nature of protein kinase C.

  2. UC Berkeley Seismic Guidelines, Appendix II: Ground Motion Time Histories for the UC Berkeley Campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    2003-06-03

    Three sets of ten time histories each were developed to represent the ground motions for each of the three return periods. All of the time histories are provided as pairs of fault-normal and fault-parallel components. The ground motion time histories are provided in two forms: unmodified, and spectrally modified to match the probabilistic response spectra. The unmodified time histories can be scaled to match the probabilistic response spectra at a specified period, such as the first mode period of the structure being analyzed, while leaving the shape of the response spectrum unmodified. This approach preserves the particular characteristics of the individual time history, together with the peaks and troughs of its response spectrum. These individual characteristics are modified in the spectrally matched time histories, resulting in a suite of ten time histories (for a given return period) that all have the same response spectrum for a given component (fault normal or fault parallel) that follows the smooth shape of the probabilistic response spectrum.

  3. UC Berkeley Seismic Guidelines, Appendix II: Ground Motion TimeHistories for the UC Berkeley Campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    2003-06-03

    Three sets of ten time histories each were developed to represent the ground motions for each of the three return periods. All of the time histories are provided as pairs of fault-normal and fault-parallel components. The ground motion time histories are provided in two forms: unmodified, and spectrally modified to match the probabilistic response spectra. The unmodified time histories can be scaled to match the probabilistic response spectra at a specified period, such as the first mode period of the structure being analyzed, while leaving the shape of the response spectrum unmodified. This approach preserves the particular characteristics of the individual time history, together with the peaks and troughs of its response spectrum. These individual characteristics are modified in the spectrally matched time histories, resulting in a suite of ten time histories (for a given return period) that all have the same response spectrum for a given component (fault normal or fault parallel) that follows the smooth shape of the probabilistic response spectrum.

  4. [Population dynamics of ground carabid beetles and spiders in a wheat field along the wheat-alfalfa interface and their response to alfalfa mowing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Hui; Hu, Yi-Jun; Hu, Wen-Chao; Hong, Bo; Guan, Xiao-Qing; Ma, Shi-Yu; He, Da-Han

    2014-09-01

    Taking the wheat-alfalfa and wheat-wheat interfaces as model systems, sampling points were set by the method of pitfall trapping in the wheat field at the distances of 3 m, 6 m, 9 m, 12 m, 15 m, 18 m, 21 m, 24 m, and 27 m from the interface. The species composition and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders captured in pitfalls were investigated. The results showed that, to some extent there was an edge effect on species diversity and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders along the two interfaces. A marked edge effect was observed between 15 m and 18 m along the alfalfa-wheat interface, while no edge effect was found at a distance over 20 m. The edge effect along the wheat-wheat interface was weaker in comparison to the alfalfa-wheat interface. Alfalfa mowing resulted in the migration of a large number of ground carabid beetles and spiders to the adjacent wheat filed. During ten days since mowing, both species and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders increased in wheat filed within the distance of 20 m along the alfalfa-wheat interface. The spatial distribution of species diversity of ground beetles and spiders, together with the population abundance of the dominant Chlaenius pallipes and Pardosa astrigera, were depicted, which could directly indicate the migrating process of natural enemy from alfalfa to wheat field.

  5. Strong ground-motion prediction from Stochastic-dynamic source models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guatteri, Mariagiovanna; Mai, P.M.; Beroza, G.C.; Boatwright, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the absence of sufficient data in the very near source, predictions of the intensity and variability of ground motions from future large earthquakes depend strongly on our ability to develop realistic models of the earthquake source. In this article we simulate near-fault strong ground motion using dynamic source models. We use a boundary integral method to simulate dynamic rupture of earthquakes by specifying dynamic source parameters (fracture energy and stress drop) as spatial random fields. We choose these quantities such that they are consistent with the statistical properties of slip heterogeneity found in finite-source models of past earthquakes. From these rupture models we compute theoretical strong-motion seismograms up to a frequency of 2 Hz for several realizations of a scenario strike-slip Mw 7.0 earthquake and compare empirical response spectra, spectra obtained from our dynamic models, and spectra determined from corresponding kinematic simulations. We find that spatial and temporal variations in slip, slip rise time, and rupture propagation consistent with dynamic rupture models exert a strong influence on near-source ground motion. Our results lead to a feasible approach to specify the variability in the rupture time distribution in kinematic models through a generalization of Andrews' (1976) result relating rupture speed to apparent fracture energy, stress drop, and crack length to 3D dynamic models. This suggests that a simplified representation of dynamic rupture may be obtained to approximate the effects of dynamic rupture without having to do full dynamic simulations.

  6. Meteors and meteorites spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.; Lenža, L.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; Knížek, A.; Kubelík, P.; Kaiserová, T.; Váňa, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of our meteor spectroscopy project is to better understand the physical and chemical properties of meteoroids. Astrometric and spectral observations of real meteors are obtained via spectroscopic CCD video systems. Processed meteor data are inserted to the EDMOND database (European viDeo MeteOr Network Database) together with spectral information. The fully analyzed atmospheric trajectory, orbit and also spectra of a Leonid meteor/meteoroid captured in November 2015 are presented as an example. At the same time, our target is the systematization of spectroscopic emission lines for the comparative analysis of meteor spectra. Meteoroid plasma was simulated in a laboratory by laser ablation of meteorites samples using an (ArF) excimer laser and the LIDB (Laser Induced Dielectric Breakdown) in a low pressure atmosphere and various gases. The induced plasma emissions were simultaneously observed with the Echelle Spectrograph and the same CCD video spectral camera as used for real meteor registration. Measurements and analysis results for few selected meteorite samples are presented and discussed.

  7. The spectra and temperature of cloud lightning discharge channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Spectra of seven cloud lightning discharges are reported for the first time after captured with a Slit-less Spectrograph on Chinese Tibet Plateau. The structural characters are analyzed and compared with the spectra of cloud-to-ground lightning, and the results indicate that the spectra of cloud lightning show two different kinds of structure characteristics. One has the similar structure as those of cloud-to-ground lightning discharge, and the other is absolutely different. Meanwhile, more lines of OII with high excited energy are recorded in the spectra of cloud lightning discharge in comparison with that of cloud-to-ground lighting happening in the same region. Temperatures at different positions are calculated and temperature characteristics of these two sorts are analyzed, based to the wavelength, relative intensities and other transition parameters. We suggest that the physical process in the cloud discharge channels changes with much more rapid velocity and wider range compared to cloud-to-ground lightning. The differences between the two types of cloud discharge also reflect some discrepancies between the discharge characteristics.

  8. Field Spectra of Suaeda salsa in Response to Soil Chemical Properties%翅碱蓬野外光谱对土壤化学性质的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆生; 刘高焕; 张敏; 黄种; 宁吉才; 谢传节

    2011-01-01

    Suaeda salsa is familiar in soil salinization area. Through studying Suaeda salsa community characteristics, soil chemical properties can be inferred. Suaeda salsa spectra and soil chemical property data were gotten through measuring seventeen paired-samples, which were used to study field spectra of Suaeda salsa in response to changes of soil chemical properties. The results showed that second derivative spectrum of 1 121 nm could be used to indicate changes of soil organic matter and soil total nitrogen, and second derivative spectrum of 1 208 nm could be used to commendably indicate changes of soil total phosphorus, and first derivative spectrum of 353 nm could be used to indicate changes of soil available potassium, and second derivative spectrum of 724 nm could be used to indicate changes of soil pH, and first derivative spectrum of 950 nm could be used to commendably indicate changes of soil salt content, which were the useful information for monitoring soil salinization using remote sensing technology in area covered with Suaeda salsa.%翅碱蓬(Suaeda salsa)是土壤盐渍化较为严重的地区常见的植被类型,研究翅碱蓬群落特征可以间接反映下方土壤的化学性质.通过野外采集的17个翅碱蓬野外光谱数据和相应土壤样品的理化分析数据,探讨了土壤化学性质和翅碱蓬野外光谱之间的关系.结果表明,翅碱蓬二阶导数光谱1 121 nm波段可用来反映土壤有机质和全氮的含量变化,二阶导数光谱1 208 nm波段可以很好地反映土壤全磷的含量变化,一阶导数光谱353 nm波段可以很好地反映土壤速效钾的含量变化最好,二阶导数光谱724 nm波段可以很好地反映土壤pH值的变化,而反映土壤盐分含量变化最好的为一阶导数光谱950 nm,这为翅碱蓬覆盖的区域利用遥感技术进行土壤化学性质监测奠定了基础.

  9. Initial response of small ground-dwelling mammals to forest alternative buffers along headwater streams in the Washington Coast Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall J. Wilk; Martin G. Raphael; Christopher S. Nations; Jeffrey D. Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the short-term effects of alternative designs of forested buffer treatments along headwater streams on small ground-dwelling mammals in managed forests in western Washington, USA. Over three summers (one pretreatment and two posttreatment), we trapped 19 mammalian species along 23 streams in the northern Coast Range. We compared faunal communities in...

  10. Sequencing BPS Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, Sergei; Saberi, Ingmar; Stosic, Marko; Sulkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar\\'e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular $S$-matrix. This leads to the identifi...

  11. Spectral characteristics of vertical ground motion in the Northridge and other earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozorgnia, Y. [ATS Engineering, Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Niazi, M. [Berkeley Geophysical Consultants, CA (United States); Campbell, K.W. [EQE International, Evergreen, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Spectral characteristics of vertical ground motion recorded during the Northridge earthquake are evaluated and compared to those of other earthquakes. Relationship between vertical and horizontal spectra is examined through development of attenuation of vertical and horizontal response spectra. Vertical-to-horizontal response spectral relationship is then compared to that of 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, and several other earthquakes recorded over SMART-1 array in Taiwan. This preliminary analysis shows that the main characteristics of vertical-to-horizontal spectral ratio are similar to those of other earthquakes. One main characteristic is that in the near-field region and in short period range, the ratio is much higher than commonly assumed ratio of 2/3.

  12. Analysis of ground-motion simulation big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, T.; Fujiwara, H.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a parallel distributed processing system which applies a big data analysis to the large-scale ground motion simulation data. The system uses ground-motion index values and earthquake scenario parameters as input. We used peak ground velocity value and velocity response spectra as the ground-motion index. The ground-motion index values are calculated from our simulation data. We used simulated long-period ground motion waveforms at about 80,000 meshes calculated by a three dimensional finite difference method based on 369 earthquake scenarios of a great earthquake in the Nankai Trough. These scenarios were constructed by considering the uncertainty of source model parameters such as source area, rupture starting point, asperity location, rupture velocity, fmax and slip function. We used these parameters as the earthquake scenario parameter. The system firstly carries out the clustering of the earthquake scenario in each mesh by the k-means method. The number of clusters is determined in advance using a hierarchical clustering by the Ward's method. The scenario clustering results are converted to the 1-D feature vector. The dimension of the feature vector is the number of scenario combination. If two scenarios belong to the same cluster the component of the feature vector is 1, and otherwise the component is 0. The feature vector shows a `response' of mesh to the assumed earthquake scenario group. Next, the system performs the clustering of the mesh by k-means method using the feature vector of each mesh previously obtained. Here the number of clusters is arbitrarily given. The clustering of scenarios and meshes are performed by parallel distributed processing with Hadoop and Spark, respectively. In this study, we divided the meshes into 20 clusters. The meshes in each cluster are geometrically concentrated. Thus this system can extract regions, in which the meshes have similar `response', as clusters. For each cluster, it is possible to determine

  13. 地震动功率谱与反应谱的转换关系%Relationship between power spectral-density functions and response spectra of earthquake ground motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵凤新; 刘爱文

    2001-01-01

    本文详细评述了现今常用的几种加速度反应谱与功率谱的转换关系.对于小阻尼单质点体系而言,考虑到输入地震动是一非平稳的随机过程,又由于其传递函数的窄频带滤波特性,它的加速度反应将是一窄频带的非平稳随机过程.对于峰值系数水平的超越不是独立的,而是成群超越.据此本文考虑非平稳效应和对峰值系数水平的成群效应,对前人的转换关系进行了修正,并基于随机振动理论,给出了对工程上常用的频率平稳、强度非平稳的地震动模型的功率谱和反应谱的转换关系.此转换关系对于长、短持时的地震动记录和反应谱长、短周期部分以及不同阻尼比的反应谱都能给出精度较高的结果.

  14. Site dependence of far-source ground motions during the Wenchuan earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longjun Xu; Haiying Yu; Wenhai Cao; Lili Xie

    2009-01-01

    This paper aimed to examine the site dependence and evaluate the methods for site analysis of far-source ground motions. This was achieved through the examination of frequency content estimated by different methods based on strong ground motions recorded at twelve far-source stations in Shandong province during the Wenchuan earthquake. The stations were located in sites with soil profiles ranging from code classes 1 to III. Approaches used included the Fourier amplitude spectrum (FAS), the earthquake response spectrum (ERS), the spectral ratio between the horizontal and the vertical components (H/V), the spectral ratio between the spectra at the site and at a reference site (SRRS), and coda wave analysis (CWA). Results showed that major periods of these ground motions obtained by FAS, ERS and H/V ratio methods were all evidently larger than site dominant periods; the periods were also different from each other and mainly reflected the frequency content of long period components. Prominent periods obtained by the SRRS approach neither illuminated the long period aspect nor efficiently determined site features of the motions. The CWA resulted in a period close to site period for stations with good quality recordings. The results obtained in this study will be useful for the evaluation of far-source effect in constructing seismic design spectra and in selecting methods for ground motion site analysis.

  15. The Transit Spectra of Earth and Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G J; Bowles, Neil E; Fletcher, Leigh N; Aigrain, Suzanne; Lee, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a number of observations have been made of the transits of 'Hot Jupiters', such as HD 189733b, which have been modelled to derive atmospheric structure and composition. As measurement techniques improve, the transit spectra of 'Super-Earths' such as GJ 1214b are becoming better constrained, allowing model atmospheres to be fitted for this class of planet also. While it is not yet possible to constrain the atmospheric states of small planets such as the Earth or cold planets like Jupiter, this may become practical in the coming decades and if so, it is of interest to determine what we might infer from such measurements. Here we have constructed atmospheric models of the Solar System planets from 0.4 - 15.5 microns that are consistent with ground-based and satellite observations and from these calculate the primary transit and secondary eclipse spectra (with respect to the Sun and typical M-dwarfs) that would be observed by a 'remote observer', many light years away. From these spectra we test ...

  16. Optical spectra analysis for breast cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkov, S. A.; Kochemasov, G. G.; Lyubynskaya, T. E.; Maslov, N. V.; Nuzhny, A. S.; da Silva, L. B.; Rubenchik, A.

    2011-11-01

    Minimally invasive probe and optical biopsy system based on optical spectra recording and analysis seem to be a promising tool for early diagnostics of breast cancer. Light scattering and absorption spectra are generated continuously as far as the needle-like probe with one emitting and several collecting optical fibers penetrates through the tissues toward to the suspicious area. That allows analyzing not only the state of local site, but also the structure of tissues along the needle trace. The suggested method has the advantages of automated on-line diagnosing and minimal tissue destruction and in parallel with the conventional diagnostic procedures provides the ground for decision-making. 165 medical trials were completed in Nizhny Novgorod Regional Oncology Centre, Russia. Independent diagnoses were the results of fine biopsy and histology. Application of wavelet expansion and clasterization techniques for spectra analysis revealed several main spectral types for malignant and benign tumors. Automatic classification algorithm demonstrated specificity ˜90% and sensitivity ˜91%. Large amount of information, fuzziness in criteria and data noisiness make neural networks to be an attractive analytic tool. The model based on three-layer perceptron was tested over the sample of 29 `cancer' and 29 `non-cancer' cases and demonstrated total separation.

  17. Review of seismicity and ground motion studies related to development of seismic design at SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Acree, J.R. [Westinghouse Environmental and Geotechnical Services, Inc., Columbia, SC (United States)

    1992-08-01

    The NRC response spectra developed in Reg. Guide 1.60 is being used in the studies related to restarting of the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. Because it envelopes all the other site specific spectra which have been developed for SRS, it provides significant conservatism in the design and analysis of the reactor systems for ground motions of this value or with these probability levels. This spectral shape is also the shape used for the design of the recently licensed Vogtle Nuclear Station, located south of the Savannah River from the SRS. This report provides a summary of the data base used to develop the design basis earthquake. This includes the seismicity, rates of occurrence, magnitudes, and attenuation relationships. A summary is provided for the studies performed and methodologies used to establish the design basis earthquake for SRS. The ground motion response spectra developed from the various studies are also summarized. The seismic hazard and PGA`s developed for other critical facilities in the region are discussed, and the SRS seismic instrumentation is presented. The programs for resolving outstanding issues are discussed and conclusions are presented.

  18. Topographic gradient based site characterization in India complemented by strong ground-motion spectral attributes

    KAUST Repository

    Nath, Sankar Kumar

    2013-12-01

    We appraise topographic-gradient approach for site classification that employs correlations between 30. m column averaged shear-wave velocity and topographic gradients. Assessments based on site classifications reported from cities across India indicate that the approach is reasonably viable at regional level. Additionally, we experiment three techniques for site classification based on strong ground-motion recordings, namely Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR), Response Spectra Shape (RSS), and Horizontal-to-Vertical Response Spectral Ratio (HVRSR) at the strong motion stations located across the Himalayas and northeast India. Statistical tests on the results indicate that these three techniques broadly differentiate soil and rock sites while RSS and HVRSR yield better signatures. The results also support the implemented site classification in the light of strong ground-motion spectral attributes observed in different parts of the globe. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  20. Sequencing BPS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  1. Non-Gaussian Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P G; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Magueijo, Joao

    1997-01-01

    Gaussian cosmic microwave background skies are fully specified by the power spectrum. The conventional method of characterizing non-Gaussian skies is to evaluate higher order moments, the n-point functions and their Fourier transforms. We argue that this method is inefficient, due to the redundancy of information existing in the complete set of moments. In this paper we propose a set of new statistics or non-Gaussian spectra to be extracted out of the angular distribution of the Fourier transform of the temperature anisotropies in the small field limit. These statistics complement the power spectrum and act as localization, shape, and connectedness statistics. They quantify generic non-Gaussian structure, and may be used in more general image processing tasks. We concentrate on a subset of these statistics and argue that while they carry no information in Gaussian theories they may be the best arena for making predictions in some non-Gaussian theories. As examples of applications we consider superposed Gaussi...

  2. Sequencing BPS spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gukov, Sergei [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik,Vivatsgasse 7, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Nawata, Satoshi [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Centre for Quantum Geometry of Moduli Spaces, University of Aarhus,Nordre Ringgade 1, DK-8000 (Denmark); Saberi, Ingmar [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stošić, Marko [CAMGSD, Departamento de Matemática, Instituto Superior Técnico,Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Mathematical Institute SANU,Knez Mihajlova 36, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sułkowski, Piotr [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-03-02

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel “sliding” property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  3. Characterization of Freshwater EM Sub Bottom Sediment Properties and Target Responses for Detection of UXO with Ground-Penetrating RADAR (GPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    in the Results as they are important factors that contributed to the quality of the surveys. We towed the antennas over the water surface in a...such that n*= √ε*. We computed phase velocity vph = c/Real(n*). We computed the one-way attenuation rate β (dB m−1) from the imaginary part of the...in our spectra) because they could have been an important factor . We dispersed with ultrasound in a 0.005-M sodium metaphosphate solution. We then

  4. Observing Muostakh Island disappear: erosion of a ground-ice-rich coast in response to summer warming and sea ice reduction on the East Siberian shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Günther

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations of coastline retreat using contemporary very high resolution satellite and historical aerial imagery were compared to measurements of open water fractions and summer air temperatures. We analyzed seasonal and interannual variations of thawing-induced cliff top retreat (thermo-denudation and marine abrasion (thermo-abrasion on Muostakh Island in the southern central Laptev Sea. The island is composed of ground-ice-rich permafrost deposits of Ice Complex type that render it particularly susceptible to erosion along the coast, resulting in land loss. Based on topographic reference measurements during field campaigns, we generated digital elevation models using stereophotogrammetry, in order to block adjust and ortho-rectify aerial photographies from 1951 and GeoEye, QuickBird, WorldView-1, and WorldView-2 imagery from 2010 to 2012 for change detection. Coastline retreat for erosive segments ranged from −13 to −585 m and was −109 ± 81 m (–1.8 ± 1.3 m a−1 on average during the historical period. Current seasonal dynamics of cliff top retreat revealed rapid thermo-denudation rates of –10.2 ± 4.5 m a−1 in mid summer and –4.1 ± 2.0 m a−1 on average during the 2010–2012 observation period. Using sea ice concentration data from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I and air temperature time series from Tiksi, we calculated seasonal duration available for thermo-abrasion, expressed as open water days, and for thermo-denudation, based on thawing degree days. Geomorphometric analysis revealed that total ground ice content on Muostakh is made up of equal amounts of intrasedimentary and macro ground ice, while its vertical hourglass distribution provides favorable local preconditions for subsidence and the acceleration of coastal thermo-erosion under intensifying environmental forcings. Our results showed a~close relationship between mean summer air temperature and coastal thermo-erosion rates, in agreement with

  5. Engineering applications of strong ground motion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Paul

    1993-02-01

    design response spectra for crustal earthquakes at a power plant site in California and for subduction earthquakes in the Seattle-Portland region. We also demonstrate the use of simulation methods for modeling the attenuation of strong ground motion, and show evidence of the effect of critical reflections from the lower crust in causing the observed flattening of the attenuation of strong ground motion from the 1988 Saguenay, Quebec, and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes.

  6. Hydrogeology, water quality, water budgets, and simulated responses to hydrologic changes in Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creek ground-water basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Eugene B.; Van Konyenburg, Kathryn M.

    1998-01-01

    Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creeks are underlain by thin, narrow ground-water basins that supply nearly all water used for local agricultural and municipal purposes. The creeks discharge to the Pacific Ocean near the northwestern corner of San Luis Obispo County, California. The basins contain heterogeneous, unconsolidated alluvial deposits and are underlain by relatively impermeable bedrock. Both creeks usually stop flowing during the summer dry season, and most of the pumpage during that time is derived from ground-water storage. Annual pumpage increased substantially during 1956?88 and is now a large fraction of basin storage capacity. Consequently, dry-season water levels are lower and the water supply is more vulnerable to drought. The creeks are the largest source of ground-water recharge, and complete basin recharge can occur within the first few weeks of winter streamflow. Agricultural and municipal pumpages are the largest outflows and cause dry-season water-level declines throughout the San Simeon Basin. Pumping effects are more localized in the Santa Rosa Basin because of subsurface flow obstructions. Even without pumpage, a large quantity of water naturally drains out of storage at the upper ends of the basins during the dry season. Ground water is more saline in areas close to the coast than in inland areas. Although seawater intrusion has occurred in the past, it probably was not the cause of high salinity in 1988?89. Ground water is very hard, and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some locations. Probability distributions of streamflow were estimated indirectly from a 120-year rainfall record because the periods of record for local stream-gaging stations were wetter than average. Dry-season durations with recurrence intervals between 5 and 43 years are likely to dry up some wells but not cause seawater intrusion. A winter with no streamflow is likely to occur about every 32 years and to

  7. On Grounding of Fast Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1997-01-01

    numerical examples also indicate that, even with impact speeds of 40 knots against a 1:10 sloping bottom, the global strength of the hull girder is not exceeded by the grounding induced loads.For the local deformation of high-speed ship hulls at the point of contact with the ground, the paper presents...... experimental results from crushing tests of aluminium hull girder components with realistic full-scale scantlings. A comparison with existing simplified calculation procedures for ductile metallic structures show that these procedures cannot be used to predict the crushing behaviour of the fore body of high......The paper deals with analysis of grounding of high-speed crafts. It is the purpose to present a comprehensive mathematical model for calculation of the overall dynamic ship response during grounding. This procedure is applied to derive the motions, the time varying sectional forces and the local...

  8. Simulation of strong ground motion for the 25 April 2015 Nepal (Gorkha) Mw 7.8 earthquake using the SCEC broadband platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. C., Raghucharan; Somala, Surendra Nadh

    2017-02-01

    The 25th April 2015 Nepal (Gorkha) earthquake has been introduced into the SCEC BBP v15.3, and validation simulations are run using EXSIM methodology with the strong ground motion data of the earthquake. Synthetic seismograms are generated along with the response spectra for engineering applications. Goodness-of-fit metrics have been computed from response spectra for 14 stations located in the Central Indo-Gangetic Plains (CIGP). Plots of residuals are made as a function of hypocentral distance for various time periods. Spatial distribution of residuals as well as average residuals for all stations for the horizontal components are computed. The results demonstrate that there was a good match between the actual data and synthetics generated by the broadband platform. Finally, four of the widely used ground motion prediction equations around the world are chosen to compare how they predict the synthetics for Gorkha earthquake in CIGP.

  9. Response Features of Red Edge Parameters for Lettuce Leaf Spectra under Different Nitrogen Levels%生菜叶片光谱红边参数对氮营养的响应特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱咏莉; 李萍萍; 毛罕平; 吴沿友

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain the optimum red edge parameters for using rapid detection of the lettuce leaf nitrogen content, the response feature of red edge parameters for leaf spectra under different nitrogen levels and the relationship between red edge parameters and leaf nitrogen contents were investigated. Visible and near infrared ( Vis - NIR) spectroradiometer was used to collect the leaves' spectral data of water culture lettuce, and the chlorophyll meter ( SPAD 502 ) was used to measure the leaf chlorophyll content. Red edge parameters, which included red edge position (λred) , red edge area (Sred) , red edge differential ( Dλred) , the minimum of red edge differential ( Dλmin) and the ratio of Dλred to Dλmin ( Dλred/ Dλmin) , were calculated based on the first derivative reflectance spectra in the red edge region. The results showed that the dynamic characteristics of red edge parameters changed with different nitrogen nutrition levels in water culture. It was concluded that λred Dλmin, Sred and Dλred/Dλmin had significant relationship with the leaf chlorophyll content, respectively. In all red edge parameters, the correlation degree of λred was the highest with correlation coefficient 0. 942 0. And the root mean squared error was the lowest with 1. 803. Therefore, it was demonstrated that λred could be a predictor for lettuce leaf nitrogen content.%以不同氮素供应水平下的水培生菜为研究对象,采用光谱仪和叶绿素仪分别获得生菜叶片的漫反射光谱信息和叶绿素含量,通过提取生菜叶片光谱的红边参数,分析不同氮素供应水平下红边参数的变化规律,以及各个红边参数与生菜叶片叶绿素含量间的关系.结果表明,随氮营养供应水平的提高,生菜叶片各红边参数呈现不同的响应趋势.红边位置、最小振幅、红边面积以及红边振幅和最小振幅比值与生菜叶片SPAD值间均具有极显著的相关关系,其中以红边位置的相关程

  10. 脉冲地震动缩放水平对结构非线性位移反应影响的分析%Effects of scaled pulse-like ground motion records on nonlinear structural displacement response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周靖; 陈凯亮; 黄靓

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear displacement biases in response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems were studied,they were induced by scaled pulse-like ground motion velocity records. Based on response time-history analysis of a SDOF system subjected to 30 pulse-like ground motions, the variation laws of the nonlinear displacement biases versus the structural vibration period (T) and the strength reduction factor (R) with scaling the earthquake records to the levels of target spectral acceleration ( Sa ), peak ground acceleration ( PGA ), peak ground velocity ( PGV ), and peak ground displacement (PGD) were studied. The variation trends of the displacement biases were determined with log-linear regression of scattered points, and the stability of the biases under the condition of scaling different ground motion intensities was comparatively analyzed. The results demonstrated that the amount of the displacement biases greatly depends on the scaling factor, the first modal period of the vibration, and the overall strength of the structure; reasonably selecting the scaling factor and the ground motion intensity presenting parameter of the pulse-like ground motion velocity records can reduce the displacement bias in structural seismic responses.%研究缩放速度脉冲型地震动强度水平引起的单自由度(SDOF)体系非线性位移反应的偏差.采用30条速度脉冲地震记录,通过SDOF的体系动力时程分析,分析了速度脉冲型地震动分别缩放到不同目标谱加速度(Sα)、峰值加速度(PGA)、峰值速度(PGV)、峰值位移(PGD)水平时,SDOF体系非线性位移反应偏差随系统自振周期和强度折减系数变化的规律;通过对散点数据的对数线性回归确定了位移反应偏差的变化趋势,并比较了不同地面运动强度表征参数下位移偏差的稳定性.分析结果表明:位移偏差对地震动缩放系数、系统的基阶自振周期和系统的强度有一定的依赖性,合理选

  11. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. II. The rejection of common mode forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandi, G. L.; Toncelli, R.; Chiofalo, M. L.; Bramanti, D.; Nobili, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    "Galileo Galilei on the ground" (GGG) is a fast rotating differential accelerometer designed to test the equivalence principle (EP). Its sensitivity to differential effects, such as the effect of an EP violation, depends crucially on the capability of the accelerometer to reject all effects acting in common mode. By applying the theoretical and simulation methods reported in Part I of this work, and tested therein against experimental data, we predict the occurrence of an enhanced common mode rejection of the GGG accelerometer. We demonstrate that the best rejection of common mode disturbances can be tuned in a controlled way by varying the spin frequency of the GGG rotor.

  12. Functional Regression for Quasar Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ciollaro, Mattia; Freeman, Peter; Genovese, Christopher; Lei, Jing; O'Connell, Ross; Wasserman, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha forest is a portion of the observed light spectrum of distant galactic nuclei which allows us to probe remote regions of the Universe that are otherwise inaccessible. The observed Lyman-alpha forest of a quasar light spectrum can be modeled as a noisy realization of a smooth curve that is affected by a `damping effect' which occurs whenever the light emitted by the quasar travels through regions of the Universe with higher matter concentration. To decode the information conveyed by the Lyman-alpha forest about the matter distribution, we must be able to separate the smooth `continuum' from the noise and the contribution of the damping effect in the quasar light spectra. To predict the continuum in the Lyman-alpha forest, we use a nonparametric functional regression model in which both the response and the predictor variable (the smooth part of the damping-free portion of the spectrum) are function-valued random variables. We demonstrate that the proposed method accurately predicts the unobserv...

  13. Electronic Spectra of Chevreul's Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luciana A. da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The isomorphic series of double sulfites with empirical formula Cu2SO3.MSO3.2H 2O (where M is Cu, Fe, Mn, or Cd have been prepared from the Cu(II replacement by transition metal ions such as Mn(II, Fe(II and Cd(II ions in Chevreul's salt, Cu2SO3.CuSO3.2H 2O. As a consequence, the isomorphic species present distinct colors. Molecular modeling calculations were carried out for the dimeric [CuI2(SO3 2(SO32]6- center. The electronic spectra of the Chevreul's salt consist of a charge-transfer band around 425 nm associated with the [CuI2(SO3 2(SO32]6- chromophore and two ligand field transitions at 785 and 1000 nm involving the Jahn-Teller splitting of the Cu(II levels. An additional intervalence-transfer band, responsible for its characteristic red color, can be found at 500 nm. The replacement of the Cu(II ions for Fe(II, Mn(II and Cd(II does not eliminate the absorption band at 425 nm, supporting its assignment as a charge-transfer transition centered on the Cu(I sites; while the original band at 500 nm disappears, in agreement with its intervalence transfer nature.

  14. Unified description of light- and strange-baryon spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Glozman, L Ya; Varga, K; Wagenbrunn, R F

    1998-01-01

    We present a chiral constituent quark model for light and strange baryons providing a unified description of their ground states and excitation spectra. The model relies on constituent quarks and Goldstone bosons arising as effective degrees of freedom of low-energy QCD from the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. The spectra of the three-quark systems are obtained from a precise variational solution of the Schrödinger equation with a semirelativistic Hamiltonian. The theoretical predictions are found in close agreement with experiment.

  15. A study of National Lightning Detection Network responses to natural lightning based on ground truth data acquired at LOG with emphasis on cloud discharge activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y.; Rakov, V. A.; Tran, M. D.; Nag, A.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) detection efficiency (DE) and classification accuracy (CA) for cloud discharge (IC) activity (identified here by a sequence of non-return-stroke-type electric field pulses not accompanied by channels to ground) were evaluated using optical and electric field data acquired at the LOG (Lightning Observatory in Gainesville), Florida. Our ground truth "IC events" include 26 "isolated IC events" (complete IC flashes), 58 "IC events before first return stroke," and 69 "IC events after first return stroke." For the total of 153 IC events, 33% were detected by the NLDN, and the classification accuracy was 86%. For complete IC flashes, the detection efficiency and classification accuracy were 73% and 95%, respectively, and the average number of NLDN-reported cloud pulses was 2.9 per detected event. For 24 preliminary breakdown pulse trains in CG flashes, the detection efficiency and classification accuracy were 46% and 82%, respectively. We have additionally estimated the DE and CA for return strokes in CG flashes. Irrespective of stroke order and polarity, the DE was 92% (339/367), and the CA was also 92% (312/339). The DEs for negative first and subsequent strokes were 98% and 90%, respectively.

  16. Retrieval of Extra-Solar Planetary Spectra Using Evolutionary Computational Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrile, R. J.; Fink, W.; Huntsberger, T.; Lee, S.; Tisdale, E. R.; Tinetti, G.; von Allmen, P.

    2005-12-01

    The spectral information provided by the next generation of extra-solar planet exploration missions will be averaged over the visible disk and the exposure time. Most probably, the interpretation of the observed spectra will not be unique, but families of solutions will provide equally good explanations of the spectral features (degeneracy). Traditional retrieval techniques developed to study the environments of planets in our solar system are inadequate to analyze disk/time-averaged spectra because they assume homogeneous environments, short observational time scales and search only for solutions belonging to the local domain of the initial conditions. We developed an innovative technique that couples evolutionary computational methods to a 3D model that simulates the spectral response of the planet rotating (Tinetti et al., 2005). We have performed a set of preliminary experiments in retrieving the earthshine spectrum recorded by Woolf et al. (2002): nine weighting parameters were retrieved, corresponding to different surface/cloud types (ocean, forest, grass, ground, tundra, ice, high/medium/low clouds) uniformly distributed over 48 planetary pixels. Two distinct retrieval experiments were run: i) evolution of one large solution population with 1000 individuals and ii) evolution of multiple solution islands with 100 individuals in each island. These two experiments returned over 2700 automatically generated retrievals satisfying the error criterion (fitness) of 10% least squares match to the observed spectra. The spectral retrieval procedure with this reduced set of parameters already resulted in a high quality fit of the earthshine spectrum, in agreement with ground truth. The retrieved solutions were divided into classes of spectral fit using clustering tools, which helped visualize the degeneracy in the set of solutions. As a next step we are repeating the experiment using non-uniformly distributed 9 surface/cloud types in 12 planetary pixels (108 retrieved

  17. Grounding experiments on soft bottoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sterndorff, M.J.; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To verify a theoretical analysis procedure for calculation of the hull girder response of ships running aground, a series of large-scale ship grounding experiments was performed on an artificial island made of engineered fill. The tests were conducted by running a condemned fishing vessel up...

  18. Ground water and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

  19. LSD-based analysis of high-resolution stellar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsymbal, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Van, Reeth T.

    2014-11-01

    We present a generalization of the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), a powerful tool for extracting high S/N average line profiles from stellar spectra. The generalization of the method is effected by extending it towards the multiprofile LSD and by introducing the possibility to correct the line strengths from the initial mask. We illustrate the new approach by two examples: (a) the detection of astroseismic signatures from low S/N spectra of single stars, and (b) disentangling spectra of multiple stellar objects. The analysis is applied to spectra obtained with 2-m class telescopes in the course of spectroscopic ground-based support for space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler. Usually, rather high S/N is required, so smaller telescopes can only compete successfully with more advanced ones when one can apply a technique that enables a remarkable increase in the S/N of the spectra which they observe. Since the LSD profiles have a potential for reconstruction what is common in all the spectral profiles, it should have a particular practical application to faint stars observed with 2-m class telescopes and whose spectra show remarkable LPVs.

  20. Seismic hazard analyses for Taipei city including deaggregation, design spectra, and time history with excel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jui-Pin; Huang, Duruo; Cheng, Chin-Tung; Shao, Kuo-Shin; Wu, Yuan-Chieh; Chang, Chih-Wei

    2013-03-01

    Given the difficulty of earthquake forecast, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) has been a method to best estimate site-specific ground motion or response spectra in earthquake engineering and engineering seismology. In this paper, the first in-depth PSHA study for Taipei, the economic center of Taiwan with a six-million population, was carried out. Unlike the very recent PSHA study for Taiwan, this study includes the follow-up hazard deaggregation, response spectra, and the earthquake motion recommendations. Hazard deaggregation results show that moderate-size and near-source earthquakes are the most probable scenario for this city. Moreover, similar to the findings in a few recent studies, the earthquake risk for Taipei should be relatively high and considering this city's importance, the high risk should not be overlooked and a potential revision of the local technical reference would be needed. In addition to the case study, some innovative Excel applications to PSHA are introduced in this paper. Such spreadsheet applications are applicable to geosciences research as those developed for data reduction or quantitative analysis with Excel's user-friendly nature and wide accessibility.

  1. Identification of acceleration pulses in near-fault ground motion using the EMD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yushan; Hu Yuxian; Zhao Fengxin; Liang Jianwen; Yang Caihong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, response spectral characteristics of one-, two-, and three-lobe sinusoidal acceleration pulses are investigated, and some of their basic properties are derived. Furthermore, the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method is utilized as an adaptive filter to decompose the near-fault pulse-like ground motions, which were recorded during the September 20, 1999, Chi-Chi earthquake. These ground motions contain distinct velocity pulses, and were decomposed into high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) components, from which the corresponding HF acceleration pulse (if existing)and LF acceleration pulse could be easily identified and detected. Finally, the identified acceleration pulses are modeled by simplified sinusoidal approximations, whose dynamic behaviors are compared to those of the original acceleration pulses as well as to those of the original HF and LF acceleration components in the context of elastic response spectra. It was demonstrated that it is just the acceleration pulses contained in the near-fault pulse-like ground motion that fundamentally dominate the special impulsive dynamic behaviors of such motion in an engineering sense. The motion thus has a greater potential to cause severe damage than the far-field ground motions, i.e. they impose high base shear demands on engineering structures as well as placing very high deformation demands on long-period structures.

  2. Pileup correction of microdosimetric spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Langen, K M; Lennox, A J; Kroc, T K; De Luca, P M

    2002-01-01

    Microdosimetric spectra were measured at the Fermilab neutron therapy facility using low pressure proportional counters operated in pulse mode. The neutron beam has a very low duty cycle (<0.1%) and consequently a high instantaneous dose rate which causes distortions of the microdosimetric spectra due to pulse pileup. The determination of undistorted spectra at this facility necessitated (i) the modified operation of the proton accelerator to reduce the instantaneous dose rate and (ii) the establishment of a computational procedure to correct the measured spectra for remaining pileup distortions. In support of the latter effort, two different pileup simulation algorithms using analytical and Monte-Carlo-based approaches were developed. While the analytical algorithm allows a detailed analysis of pileup processes it only treats two-pulse and three-pulse pileup and its validity is hence restricted. A Monte-Carlo-based pileup algorithm was developed that inherently treats all degrees of pileup. This algorithm...

  3. Correlation Functions and Power Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The present lecture note is a supplement to the textbook Digital Signal Processing by J. Proakis and D.G. Manolakis used in the IMM/DTU course 02451 Digital Signal Processing and provides an extended discussion of correlation functions and power spectra. The definitions of correlation functions...... and spectra for discrete-time and continuous-time (analog) signals are pretty similar. Consequently, we confine the discussion mainly to real discrete-time signals. The Appendix contains detailed definitions and properties of correlation functions and spectra for analog as well as discrete-time signals....... It is possible to define correlation functions and associated spectra for aperiodic, periodic and random signals although the interpretation is different. Moreover, we will discuss correlation functions when mixing these basic signal types. In addition, the note include several examples for the purpose...

  4. Absorption Spectra of Astaxanthin Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Olsina, Jan; Minofar, Babak; Polivka, Tomas; Mancal, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids in hydrated polar solvents form aggregates characterized by dramatic changes in their absorption spectra with respect to monomers. Here we analyze absorption spectra of aggregates of the carotenoid astaxanthin in hydrated dimethylsulfoxide. Depending on water content, two types of aggregates were produced: H-aggregates with absorption maximum around 390 nm, and J-aggregates with red-shifted absorption band peaking at wavelengths >550 nm. The large shifts with respect to absorption maximum of monomeric astaxanthin (470-495 nm depending on solvent) are caused by excitonic interaction between aggregated molecules. We applied molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate structure of astaxanthin dimer in water, and the resulting structure was used as a basis for calculations of absorption spectra. Absorption spectra of astaxanthin aggregates in hydrated dimethylsulfoxide were calculated using molecular exciton model with the resonance interaction energy between astaxanthin monomers constrained by semi-e...

  5. Infrared spectra of mineral species

    CERN Document Server

    Chukanov, Nikita V

    2014-01-01

    This book details more than 3,000 IR spectra of more than 2,000 mineral species collected during last 30 years. It features full descriptions and analytical data of each sample for which IR spectrum was obtained.

  6. A Theoretical Study on the Vibrational Spectra of PAH Molecules with Aliphatic Sidegroups

    CERN Document Server

    Sadjadi, SeyedAbdolreza; Kwok, Sun

    2015-01-01

    The role of aliphatic side groups on the formation of astronomical unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features is investigated by applying the density functional theory (DFT) to a series of molecules with mixed aliphatic-aromatic structures. The effects of introducing various aliphatic groups to a fixed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) core (ovalene) are studied. Simulated spectra for each molecule are produced by applying a Drude profile at $T$=500 K while the molecule is kept at its electronic ground state. The vibrational normal modes are classified using a semi-quantitative method. This allows us to separate the aromatic and aliphatic vibrations and therefore provide clues to what types of vibrations are responsible for the emissions bands at different wavelengths. We find that many of the UIE bands are not pure aromatic vibrational bands but may represent coupled vibrational modes. The effects of aliphatic groups on the formation of the 8 $\\mu$m plateau are qua ntitatively determined. The vibratio...

  7. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  8. Doubly heavy baryon spectra guided by lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Garcilazo, H; Vijande, J

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides results for the ground state and excited spectra of three-flavored doubly heavy baryons, $bcn$ and $bcs$. We take advantage of the spin-independent interaction recently obtained to reconcile the lattice SU(3) QCD static potential and the results of nonperturbative lattice QCD for the triply heavy baryon spectra. We show that the spin-dependent potential might be constrained on the basis of nonperturbative lattice QCD results for the spin splittings of three-flavored doubly heavy baryons. Our results may also represent a challenge for future lattice QCD work, because a smaller lattice error could help in distinguishing between different prescriptions for the spin-dependent part of the interaction. Thus, by comparing with the reported baryon spectra obtained with parameters estimated from lattice QCD, one can challenge the precision of lattice calculations. The present work supports a coherent description of singly, doubly and triply heavy baryons with the same Cornell-like interacting poten...

  9. Validation of Broadband Ground Motion Simulations for Japanese Crustal Earthquakes by the Recipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, A.; Maeda, T.; Morikawa, N.; Miyake, H.; Fujiwara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion (HERP) of Japan has organized the broadband ground motion simulation method into a standard procedure called the "recipe" (HERP, 2009). In the recipe, the source rupture is represented by the characterized source model (Irikura and Miyake, 2011). The broadband ground motion time histories are computed by a hybrid approach: the 3-D finite-difference method (Aoi et al. 2004) and the stochastic Green's function method (Dan and Sato, 1998; Dan et al. 2000) for the long- (> 1 s) and short-period (structure model. As the engineering significance of scenario earthquake ground motion prediction is increasing, thorough verification and validation are required for the simulation methods. This study presents the self-validation of the recipe for two MW6.6 crustal events in Japan, the 2000 Tottori and 2004 Chuetsu (Niigata) earthquakes. We first compare the simulated velocity time series with the observation. Main features of the velocity waveforms, such as the near-fault pulses and the large later phases on deep sediment sites are well reproduced by the simulations. Then we evaluate 5% damped pseudo acceleration spectra (PSA) in the framework of the SCEC Broadband Platform (BBP) validation (Dreger et al. 2015). The validation results are generally acceptable in the period range 0.1 - 10 s, whereas those in the shortest period range (0.01-0.1 s) are less satisfactory. We also evaluate the simulations with the 1-D velocity structure models used in the SCEC BBP validation exercise. Although the goodness-of-fit parameters for PSA do not significantly differ from those for the 3-D velocity structure model, noticeable differences in velocity waveforms are observed. Our results suggest the importance of 1) well-constrained 3-D velocity structure model for broadband ground motion simulations and 2) evaluation of time series of ground motion as well as response spectra.

  10. Assessing ecosystem response to multiple disturbances and climate change in South Africa using ground- and satellite-based measurements and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsch, W. L.; Falge, E. M.; Brümmer, C.; Mukwashi, K.; Schmullius, C.; Hüttich, C.; Odipo, V.; Scholes, R. J.; Mudau, A.; Midgley, G.; Stevens, N.; Hickler, T.; Scheiter, S.; Martens, C.; Twine, W.; Iiyambo, T.; Bradshaw, K.; Lück, W.; Lenfers, U.; Thiel-Clemen, T.; du Toit, J.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa currently experiences rapidly growing human population, intrinsically tied to substantial changes in land use on shrubland, savanna and mixed woodland ecosystems due to over-exploitation. Significant conversions driving degradation, affecting fire frequency and water availability, and fueling climate change are expected to increase in the immediate future. However, measured data of greenhouse gas emissions as affected by land use change are scarce to entirely lacking from this region. The project 'Adaptive Resilience of Southern African Ecosystems' (ARS AfricaE) conducts research and develops scenarios of ecosystem development under climate change, for management support in conservation or for planning rural area development. This will be achieved by (1) creation of a network of research clusters (paired sites with natural and altered vegetation) along an aridity gradient in South Africa for ground-based micrometeorological in-situ measurements of energy and matter fluxes, (2) linking biogeochemical functions with ecosystem structure, and eco-physiological properties, (3) description of ecosystem disturbance (and recovery) in terms of ecosystem function such as carbon balance components and water use efficiency, (4) set-up of individual-based models to predict ecosystem dynamics under (post) disturbance managements, (5) combination with long-term landscape dynamic information derived from remote sensing and aerial photography, and (6) development of sustainable management strategies for disturbed ecosystems and land use change. Emphasis is given on validation (by a suite of field measurements) of estimates obtained from eddy covariance, model approaches and satellite derivations.

  11. Attenuation of ground-borne vibration affecting residents near railway. Lines Deliverable 2.1: Exposure response relationships and factors influencing these relationships (Work Package WP1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.A.; Vos, H.; Koopman, A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present deliverable is to describe and assess reported health impacts of vibration among residents living near railway lines, in particular the response to freight trains. To this end, first a state of the art overview is given of the results from all field studies reported so f

  12. Communication: Nonadditive dielectric susceptibility spectra of associating liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierwirth, S. P.; Münzner, P.; Knapp, T. A.; Gainaru, C.; Böhmer, R.

    2017-03-01

    Highly unusual linear-response spectra involving contributions from hydrogen-bonded supramolecular processes and from structural relaxations are found in 4-methyl-3-heptanol mixed with 2-ethyl-1-hexylbromide. Although the mean time scales of the underlying relaxations are separated by more than 3 decades, the overall spectra cannot be decomposed into a sum of these processes. This finding challenges the ubiquitous practice of disentangling susceptibility spectra of Debye liquids by adding suitable subspectra. The spectral shape of the studied viscous mixtures is excellently described using the Williams ansatz, here a necessary approach and not as previously considered merely an alternative to additive analyses.

  13. Spectra of conformal sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tlapak, Vaclav

    2015-04-15

    In this thesis the spectra of conformal sigma models defined on (generalized) symmetric spaces are analysed. The spaces where sigma models are conformal without the addition of a Wess-Zumino term are supermanifolds, in other words spaces that include fermionic directions. After a brief review of the general construction of vertex operators and the background field expansion, we compute the diagonal terms of the one-loop anomalous dimensions of sigma models on semi-symmetric spaces. We find that the results are formally identical to the symmetric case. However, unlike for sigma models on symmetric spaces, off diagonal terms that lead to operator mixing are also present. These are not computed here. We then present a detailed analysis of the one-loop spectrum of the supersphere S{sup 3} {sup vertical} {sup stroke} {sup 2} sigma model as one of the simplest examples. The analysis illustrates the power and simplicity of the construction. We use this data to revisit a duality with the OSP(4 vertical stroke 2) Gross-Neveu model that was proposed by Candu and Saleur. With the help of a recent all-loop result for the anomalous dimension of (1)/(2)BPS operators of Gross-Neveu models, we are able to recover the entire zero-mode spectrum of the supersphere model. We also argue that the sigma model constraints and its equations of motion are implemented correctly in the Gross-Neveu model, including the one-loop data. The duality is further supported by a new all-loop result for the anomalous dimension of the ground states of the sigma model. However, higher-gradient operators cannot be completely recovered. It is possible that this discrepancy is related to a known instability of the sigma model. The instability of sigma models is due to symmetry preserving high-gradient operators that become relevant at arbitrarily small values of the coupling. This feature has been observed long ago in one-loop calculations of the O(N)-vector model and soon been realized to be a generic

  14. Ground beetle (Coleoptera, Carabidae) assemblages inhabiting Scots pine stands of Puszcza Piska Forest: six-year responses to a tornado impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skłodowski, Jarosław; Garbalińska, Paulina

    2011-01-01

    Ground beetle assemblages were studied during 2003-08 in the Pisz Forest by comparing stands disturbed by a tornado to undisturbed control stands. The following exploratory questions were put forward. (1) How do the carabid assemblages change during six years following the tornado impact? (2) Does the carabid assemblage recovery begin during the six first post-tornado years? To assess the state of carabid assemblages we used two indices: the MIB (Mean Individual Biomass) and the SPC (Sum of Progressive Characteristics). Carabid assemblages in the disturbed and in the control stands, as expressed by these two indices, were compared using the length of a regression distance (sample distance in a MIB:SPC coordinate system). A cluster analysis revealed that the assemblages of the disturbed and the control stands were different. The tornado-impacted stands produced lower carabid catch rates, but species richness was significantly higher there than in the control stands. They hosted lower proportions of individuals of European species, of large zoophages, and of forest and brachypterous species, than the control stands. The observed reduction in SPC and MIB, and an increase in the regression distances may indicate that the carabid assemblages had not started to recover from the tornado-caused disturbance. Carabid assemblages apparently responded to the tornado in two steps. Firstly, the first three years were characterized by moderate decreases of index values. Secondly, from the fourth to the sixth year after the tornado, many observed changes became magnified. We did not observe clear signals of the recovery of forest carabid assemblages during the six follow-up years.

  15. Bacterial communities associated with the digestive tract of the predatory ground beetle, Poecilus chalcites, and their response to laboratory rearing and antibiotic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Lehman

    2008-06-01

    Ground beetles such as Poecilus chalcites (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are beneficial insects in agricultural systems where they contribute to the control of insect and weed pests. We assessed the complexity of bacterial communities occurring in the digestive tracts of field-collected P. chalcites using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA genes. Bacterial identification was performed by the construction of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and sequence analysis. Intestinal bacteria in field-collected beetles were then compared to those from groups of beetles that were reared in the lab on an artificial diet with and without antibiotics. Direct cell counts estimated 1.5 × 10S bacteria per milliliter of gut. The digestive tract of field-collected P. chalcites produced an average of 4.8 terminal restriction fragments (tRF) for each beetle. The most abundant clones were affiliated with the genus Lactobacillus, followed by the taxa Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridia, and Bacteriodetes. The majority of the sequences recovered were closely related to those reported from other insect gastrointestinal tracts. Lab-reared beetles produced fewer tRF, an average of 3.1 per beetle, and a reduced number of taxa with a higher number of clones from the family Enterobacteriaceae compared to the field-collected beetles. Antibiotic treatment significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the number of tRF per beetle and selected for a less diverse set of bacterial taxa. We conclude that the digestive tract of P. chalcites is colonized by a simple community of bacteria that possess autochthonous characteristics. Laboratory-reared beetles harbored the most common bacteria found in field-collected beetles, and these bacterial communities may be manipulated in the laboratory with the addition of antibiotics to the diet to allow study of functional roles.

  16. Valence excitation energies of alkenes, carbonyl compounds, and azabenzenes by time-dependent density functional theory: Linear response of the ground state compared to collinear and noncollinear spin-flip TDDFT with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isegawa, Miho; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-04-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) holds great promise for studying photochemistry because of its affordable cost for large systems and for repeated calculations as required for direct dynamics. The chief obstacle is uncertain accuracy. There have been many validation studies, but there are also many formulations, and there have been few studies where several formulations were applied systematically to the same problems. Another issue, when TDDFT is applied with only a single exchange-correlation functional, is that errors in the functional may mask successes or failures of the formulation. Here, to try to sort out some of the issues, we apply eight formulations of adiabatic TDDFT to the first valence excitations of ten molecules with 18 density functionals of diverse types. The formulations examined are linear response from the ground state (LR-TDDFT), linear response from the ground state with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDDFT-TDA), the original collinear spin-flip approximation with the Tamm-Dancoff (TD) approximation (SF1-TDDFT-TDA), the original noncollinear spin-flip approximation with the TDA approximation (SF1-NC-TDDFT-TDA), combined self-consistent-field (SCF) and collinear spin-flip calculations in the original spin-projected form (SF2-TDDFT-TDA) or non-spin-projected (NSF2-TDDFT-TDA), and combined SCF and noncollinear spin-flip calculations (SF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA and NSF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA). Comparing LR-TDDFT to TDDFT-TDA, we observed that the excitation energy is raised by the TDA; this brings the excitation energies underestimated by full linear response closer to experiment, but sometimes it makes the results worse. For ethylene and butadiene, the excitation energies are underestimated by LR-TDDFT, and the error becomes smaller making the TDA. Neither SF1-TDDFT-TDA nor SF2-TDDFT-TDA provides a lower mean unsigned error than LR-TDDFT or TDDFT-TDA. The comparison between collinear and noncollinear kernels shows that the noncollinear kernel

  17. Complex Spectra in Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellermann, M.G. von; Jaspers, R. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Marchuk, O. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Giroud, C.; Zastrow, K.D. [UKAEA Culham Laboratory Euratom Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Jupen, C. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden). Physics Dept.; O' Mullane, M.; Summers, H.P.; Whiteford, A. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Applied Physics Dept.

    2005-12-15

    The need for quantitative evaluation of complex line emission spectra as observed in hot fusion plasmas initiated a challenging development of sophisticated interpretation tools based on integrating advanced atomic modelling with detailed treatment of the plasma environment. The successful merging of the two worlds has led to routine diagnostic procedures which have contributed enormously to the understanding of underlying plasma processes and also to a wide acceptance of spectroscopy as a reliable diagnostic method. In this paper three characteristic types of spectra of current and continuing interest are presented. The first is that of medium/heavy species with many ionisation stages revealed in survey VUV and XUV spectra. Such species occur as control gases, as wall materials, as ablated heavy species and possible as layered wall dopants for monitoring erosion. The spectra are complex with line-like and quasi-continuum regions and are amenable to advanced ?pattern recognition' methods. The second type is of few electron, highly ionised systems observed as line-of-sight integrated passive emission spectra in the soft X-ray region. They are analysed successfully in terms of plasma parameters through matching of observation with predicted synthetic spectra. Examples used here include highly resolved helium-like emission spectra of argon, iron and titanium observed on the tokamaks TEXTOR and Tore Supra. The third type, and the emphasis of this work, comprises spectra linked to active beam spectroscopy, that is, charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES). In this case, a complex spectrum is again composed of a (usually) dominating active spectrum and an underlying passive emission spectrum. Its analysis requires modelling of both active and passive features. Examples used here are from the CXRS diagnostic at JET and TEXTOR. They display characteristic features of the main light impurity ions (C{sup +6}, He{sup +2}, N

  18. Qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Terlevich, E; Fernandes, R Cid; Morales-Luis, A B

    2012-01-01

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis, and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is of general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7 (SDSS-DR7), thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to HII galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. A number of byprodu...

  19. The Hilbert transform: Applications to atomic spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Whittaker, K A; Hughes, I G; Adams, C S

    2014-01-01

    In many areas of physics, the Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations are used to extract information about the real part of the optical response of a medium from its imaginary counterpart. In this paper we discuss an alternative but mathematically equivalent approach based on the Hilbert transform. We apply the Hilbert transform to transmission spectra to find the group and refractive indices of a Cs vapor, and thereby demonstrate how the Hilbert transform allows indirect measurement of the refractive index, group index and group delay whilst avoiding the use of complicated experimental set ups.

  20. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-01-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fit by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars' labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of parameters separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach -- CHAT (Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation) -- which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock datasets demonstrate that CHAT can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by...

  1. SM-ROM-GL (Strong Motion Romania Ground Level Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Sorin BORCIA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The SM-ROM-GL database includes data obtained by the processing of records performed at ground level by the Romanian seismic networks, namely INCERC, NIEP, NCSRR and ISPH-GEOTEC, during recent seismic events with moment magnitude Mw ≥ 5 and epicenters located in Romania. All the available seismic records were re-processed using the same basic software and the same procedures and options (filtering and baseline correction, in order to obtain a consistent dataset. The database stores computed parameters of seismic motions, i.e. peak values: PGA, PGV, PGD, effective peak values: EPA, EPV, EPD, control periods, spectral values of absolute acceleration, relative velocity and relative displacement, as well as of instrumental intensity (as defined bz Sandi and Borcia in 2011. The fields in the database include: coding of seismic events, stations and records, a number of associated fields (seismic event source parameters, geographical coordinates of seismic stations, links to the corresponding ground motion records, charts of the response spectra of absolute acceleration, relative velocity, relative displacement and instrumental intensity, as well as some other representative parameters of seismic motions. The conception of the SM-ROM-GL database allows for an easy maintenance; such that elementary knowledge of Microsoft Access 2000 is sufficient for its operation.

  2. Similarity spectra analysis of high-performance jet aircraft noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B; Gee, Kent L; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2013-04-01

    Noise measured in the vicinity of an F-22A Raptor has been compared to similarity spectra found previously to represent mixing noise from large-scale and fine-scale turbulent structures in laboratory-scale jet plumes. Comparisons have been made for three engine conditions using ground-based sideline microphones, which covered a large angular aperture. Even though the nozzle geometry is complex and the jet is nonideally expanded, the similarity spectra do agree with large portions of the measured spectra. Toward the sideline, the fine-scale similarity spectrum is used, while the large-scale similarity spectrum provides a good fit to the area of maximum radiation. Combinations of the two similarity spectra are shown to match the data in between those regions. Surprisingly, a combination of the two is also shown to match the data at the farthest aft angle. However, at high frequencies the degree of congruity between the similarity and the measured spectra changes with engine condition and angle. At the higher engine conditions, there is a systematically shallower measured high-frequency slope, with the largest discrepancy occurring in the regions of maximum radiation.

  3. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Cid Fernandes, R., E-mail: jos@iac.es, E-mail: abml@iac.es, E-mail: rjt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx, E-mail: cid@astro.ufsc.br [Departamento de Fisica-CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  4. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  5. Missing levels in correlated spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bohigas, O

    2004-01-01

    Complete spectroscopy (measurements of a complete sequence of consecutive levels) is often considered as a prerequisite to extract fluctuation properties of spectra. It is shown how this goal can be achieved even if only a fraction of levels are observed. The case of levels behaving as eigenvalues of random matrices, of current interest in nuclear physics, is worked out in detail.

  6. Squeezed States and Helmholtz Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Francisco Delgado, C; Reyes, M A; Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A

    1997-01-01

    The 'classical interpretation' of the wave function psi(x) reveals an interesting operational aspect of the Helmholtz spectra. It is shown that the traditional Sturm-Liouville problem contains the simplest key to predict the squeezing effect for charged particle states.

  7. Universal Behavior in Dirac Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Verbaarschot, J J M

    1997-01-01

    In these lectures we review recent results on universal fluctuations of QCD Dirac spectra and applications of Random Matrix Theory (RMT) to QCD. We review general properties of Dirac spectra and discuss the relation between chiral symmetry breaking and correlations of Dirac eigenvalues. In particular, we will focus on the microscopic spectral density density, i.e. the spectral density near zero virtuality on the scale of a typical level spacing. The relation with Leutwyler-Smilga sum-rules will be discussed. The success of applications of RMT to spectra of 'complex' systems leads us to the introduction of a chiral Random Matrix Theory (chRMT) with the global symmetries of the QCD partition function. Our central conjecture is that it decribes correlations of QCD Dirac spectra. We will review recent universality proofs supporting this conjecture. Lattice QCD results for the microscopic spectral density and for correlations in the bulk of the spectrum are shown to be in perfect agreement with chRMT. We close wit...

  8. Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Kwitter, K B; Kwitter, Karen B.; Henry, Richard B.C.

    2006-01-01

    We present the Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra now available at http://oitwilliams.edu/nebulae. The website offers high-quality, moderate resolution (~7-10 A FWHM) spectra of 128 Galactic planetary nebulae from 3600-9600 A, obtained by Kwitter, Henry, and colleagues with the Goldcam spectrograph at the KPNO 2.1-m or with the RC spectrograph at the CTIO 1.5-m. The master PN table contains atlas data and an image link. A selected object's spectrum is displayed in a zoomable window; line identification templates are provided. In addition to the spectra themselves, the website also contains a brief discussion of PNe as astronomical objects and as contributors to our understanding of stellar evolution. We envision that this website, which concentrates a large amount of data in one place, will be of interest to a variety of users: researchers might need to check the spectrum of a particular object of interest; the non-specialist astronomer might simply be interested in perusing such a collection of spectra; and...

  9. Vibrational spectra of ordered perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsmit, A.F.; Hoefdraad, H.E.; Blasse, G.

    1972-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of the molecular M6+O6 (M = Mo, Te, W) group in ordered perovskites of the type Ba2M2+M6+O6 are reported. These groups have symmetry Oh, whereas their site symmetry is also Oh. An assignment of the internal vibrations is presented.

  10. Spectra of sodium aluminate solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The UV spectra of sodium aluminate solutions were obtained in the sodium oxide concentration range from 59 to 409 g/L and the caustic ratio range from 1.5 to 4.0 to reveal the structure characteristics of them. It is found that a new peak appears at about 370 nm besides peaks at about 220 and 266 nm in all solutions. The new peak is strongly favored by high hydroxide concentration and high caustic ratio. And it only appears when the solutions are prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide and aluminum hydroxide.In addition, the IR and Raman spectra of sodium aluminate solutions with high alkali concentration and high caustic ratio were measured, and the UV spectra of aqueous solutions of Al(H2O)63+ and AlF63- were measured as well. According to the crystal field theory in coordination chemistry as well as the above spectra characteristics, this new peak at about 370 nm is determined as the evidence of a new species of aluminate ion with a coordination number of 6.

  11. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    travels safely and efficiently through the airport. When an aircraft lands, a significant number of tasks must be performed by different groups of ground crew, such as fueling, baggage handling and cleaning. These tasks must be complete before the aircraft is able to depart, as well as check......-in and security services. These tasks are collectively known as ground handling, and are the major source of activity with airports. The business environments of modern airports are becoming increasingly competitive, as both airports themselves and their ground handling operations are changing to private...... ownership. As airports are in competition to attract airline routes, efficient and reliable ground handling operations are imperative for the viability and continued growth of both airports and airlines. The increasing liberalization of the ground handling market prompts ground handling operators...

  12. [Introduction to grounded theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Yu; Windsor, Carol; Yates, Patsy

    2012-02-01

    Grounded theory, first developed by Glaser and Strauss in the 1960s, was introduced into nursing education as a distinct research methodology in the 1970s. The theory is grounded in a critique of the dominant contemporary approach to social inquiry, which imposed "enduring" theoretical propositions onto study data. Rather than starting from a set theoretical framework, grounded theory relies on researchers distinguishing meaningful constructs from generated data and then identifying an appropriate theory. Grounded theory is thus particularly useful in investigating complex issues and behaviours not previously addressed and concepts and relationships in particular populations or places that are still undeveloped or weakly connected. Grounded theory data analysis processes include open, axial and selective coding levels. The purpose of this article was to explore the grounded theory research process and provide an initial understanding of this methodology.

  13. Project CARDS technical information record: parametric and sensitivity analysis and determination of response spectra for horizontal, vertical and rotational motion of a radioactive material shipping package relative to the motion of its support (railcar). Part 2. Continuation of CARDS-TIR-80-3 (Preliminary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, S.R.

    1980-11-26

    The generation of the response spectra was coupled to a parametric and sensitivity analysis. Support accelerations and tiedown forces are presented as functions of time. The parametric analysis found that the horizontal acceleration of the support and the MAR (max absolute relative) horizontal acceleration are relatively insensitive, while the corresponding vertical accelerations are highly sensitive to changes in 4 of the 13 parameters, and the corresponding rotational accelerations are highly sensitive to changes in 8 of the 13 parameters. The tiedown forces are moderately sensitive to changes in 3 of the parameters. (DLC)

  14. Earthquake Risk - SEISMIC_SHAKING_PREDICTED_RESPONSE_RP35_IN: Predicted Responses of Geologic Materials to Seismically Induced Ground Shaking (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:500,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — SEISMIC_SHAKING_PREDICTED_RESPONSE_RP35_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows the distribution and classification of National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  15. Low-latitude ionosphere response to super geomagnetic storm of 17/18 March 2015: Results from a chain of ground-based observations over Indian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh; Sripathi, S.; Sreekumar, Sreeba; Banola, S.; Emperumal, K.; Tiwari, P.; Kumar, Burudu Suneel

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present unique results of equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere response to one of the major geomagnetic storms of the current solar cycle that occurred during 17-18 March 2015, where Dst reached its minimum of -228 nT. Here we utilized data from magnetometers, chain of ionosondes located at Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; geometry: 0.32°N), Hyderabad (17.36°N, 78.47°E; geometry 8.76°N), and Allahabad (25.45°N, 81.85°E; geometry 16.5°N) along with multistation GPS receivers over Indian sector. The observations showed a remarkable increase of h'F to as high as ~560 km over Tirunelveli (magnetic equator) with vertical drift of ~70 m/s at 13:30 UT due to direct penetration of storm time eastward electric fields which exactly coincided with the local time of pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) and caused intense equatorial spread F irregularities in ionosondes and scintillations in GPS receivers at wide latitudes. Plasma irregularities are so intense that their signatures are seen in Allahabad/Lucknow. Storm time thermospheric meridional winds as estimated using two ionosondes suggest the equatorward surge of gravity waves with period of ~2 h. Suppression of anomaly crest on the subsequent day of the storm suggests the complex role of disturbance dynamo electric fields and disturbance wind effects. Our results also show an interesting feature of traveling ionospheric disturbances possibly associated with disturbance meridional wind surge during recovery phase. In addition, noteworthy observations are nighttime westward zonal drifts and PRE-related total electron content enhancements at anomaly crests during main phase and counter electrojet signatures during recovery phase.

  16. Response of equatorial and low latitude ionosphere to 2015 St. Patrick's Day super geomagnetic storm: Results from a chain of ground based observations over Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samireddipalle, Sripathi; Singh, Ram; Sreekumar, Sreeba; Suneel Kumar, Buduru

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present unique results of equatorial and low latitude ionosphere response to one of the major geomagnetic storms of the current solar cycle that occurred during 17-18 March 2015 where Dst reached its minimum of -228 nT. Here we utilized data from magnetometers, chain of ionosondes located at Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; geom: 0.320N), Hyderabad (17.360N, 78.470E; geom: 8.760N) and Allahabad (25.45°N, 81.85°E; geom: 16.50N) along with multi station GPS receivers over Indian sector. The observations showed a remarkable increase of h'F to as high as ~560 km over Tirunelveli (magnetic equator) with vertical drift of ~70 m/s at 13:30 UT due to direct penetration of storm time eastward electric fields which exactly coincided with the local time of Pre-Reversal Enhancement (PRE) and caused intense ESF irregularities in ionosondes and scintillations in GPS receivers at wide latitudes. Plasma irregularities are so intense that their signatures are seen in Allahabad/Lucknow. Stormtime thermospheric meridional winds as estimated using two ionosondes suggest the equatorward surge of gravity waves with period of ~2 hrs. Suppression of anomaly crest on the subsequent day of the storm suggests the complex role of disturbance dynamo electric fields and disturbance wind effects. Our results also show an interesting feature of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) possibly associated with disturbance meridional wind surge during recovery phase. In addition, noteworthy observations are nighttime westward zonal drifts and PRE related TEC enhancements at anomaly crests during main phase and CEJ signatures during recovery phase.

  17. An artificial solar spectrum substantially alters plant development compared with usual climate room irradiance spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, S.W.; Douwstra, P.; Trouwborst, G.; Ieperen, van W.; Harbinson, J.

    2010-01-01

    Plant responses to the light spectrum under which plants are grown affect their developmental characteristics in a complicated manner. Lamps widely used to provide growth irradiance emit spectra which are very different from natural daylight spectra. Whereas specific responses of plants to a

  18. Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Ground Vehicle Robotics Jim Parker Associate Director, Ground Vehicle Robotics UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...DATE 20 AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2013 to 15-08-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a...Willing to take Risk on technology -User Evaluated -Contested Environments -Operational Data Applied Robotics for Installation & Base Ops -Low Risk

  19. Near-UV to near-IR disk-averaged Earth's reflectance spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hamdani, S; Foellmi, C; Berthier, J; Briot, D; François, P; Riaud, P; Schneider, J

    2005-01-01

    We report 320 to 1020nm disk-averaged Earth reflectance spectra obtained from Moon's Earthshine observations with the EMMI spectrograph on the NTT at ESO La Silla (Chile). The spectral signatures of Earth atmosphere and ground vegetation are observed. A vegetation red-edge of up to 9% is observed on Europe and Africa and ~2% upon Pacific Ocean. The spectra also show that Earth is a blue planet when Rayleigh scattering dominates, or totally white when the cloud cover is large.

  20. The Grounded Theory Bookshelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian B. Martin, Ph.D.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bookshelf will provide critical reviews and perspectives on books on theory and methodology of interest to grounded theory. This issue includes a review of Heaton’s Reworking Qualitative Data, of special interest for some of its references to grounded theory as a secondary analysis tool; and Goulding’s Grounded Theory: A practical guide for management, business, and market researchers, a book that attempts to explicate the method and presents a grounded theory study that falls a little short of the mark of a fully elaborated theory.Reworking Qualitative Data, Janet Heaton (Sage, 2004. Paperback, 176 pages, $29.95. Hardcover also available.

  1. Interpretation of the photoelectron spectra of FeS(2)(-) by a multiconfiguration computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clima, Sergiu; Hendrickx, Marc F A

    2007-11-01

    The ground states of FeS(2) and FeS(2)(-), and several low-lying excited electronic states of FeS(2) that are responsible for the FeS(2)(-) photoelectron spectrum, are calculated. At the B3LYP level an open, quasi-linear [SFeS](-) conformation is found as the most stable structure, which is confirmed at the ab initio CASPT2 computational level. Both the neutral and the anionic unsaturated complexes possess high-spin electronic ground states. For the first time a complete assignment of the photoelectron spectrum of FeS(2)(-) is proposed. The lowest energy band in this spectrum is ascribed to an electron detachment from the two highest-lying 3dpi antibonding orbitals (with respect to the iron-sulfur bonding) of iron. The next-lowest experimental band corresponds to an electron removal from nonbonding, nearly pure sulfur orbitals. The two highest bands in the spectra are assigned as electron detachments from pi and sigma bonding mainly sulfur orbitals.

  2. Upper and lower bounds of ground-motion variabilities: implication for source properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Fabrice; Reddy-Kotha, Sreeram; Bora, Sanjay; Bindi, Dino

    2017-04-01

    One of the key challenges of seismology is to be able to analyse the physical factors that control earthquakes and ground-motion variabilities. Such analysis is particularly important to calibrate physics-based simulations and seismic hazard estimations at high frequencies. Within the framework of the development of ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) developments, ground-motions residuals (differences between recorded ground motions and the values predicted by a GMPE) are computed. The exponential growth of seismological near-source records and modern GMPE analysis technics allow to partition these residuals into between- and a within-event components. In particular, the between-event term quantifies all those repeatable source effects (e.g. related to stress-drop or kappa-source variability) which have not been accounted by the magnitude-dependent term of the model. In this presentation, we first discuss the between-event variabilities computed both in the Fourier and Response Spectra domains, using recent high-quality global accelerometric datasets (e.g. NGA-west2, Resorce, Kiknet). These analysis lead to the assessment of upper bounds for the ground-motion variability. Then, we compare these upper bounds with lower bounds estimated by analysing seismic sequences which occurred on specific fault systems (e.g., located in Central Italy or in Japan). We show that the lower bounds of between-event variabilities are surprisingly large which indicates a large variability of earthquake dynamic properties even within the same fault system. Finally, these upper and lower bounds of ground-shaking variability are discussed in term of variability of earthquake physical properties (e.g., stress-drop and kappa_source).

  3. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  4. Using SW4 for 3D Simulations of Earthquake Strong Ground Motions: Application to Near-Field Strong Motion, Building Response, Basin Edge Generated Waves and Earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Are

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, A. J.; Pitarka, A.; Petersson, N. A.; Sjogreen, B.; McCallen, D.; Miah, M.

    2016-12-01

    Simulation of earthquake ground motions is becoming more widely used due to improvements of numerical methods, development of ever more efficient computer programs (codes), and growth in and access to High-Performance Computing (HPC). We report on how SW4 can be used for accurate and efficient simulations of earthquake strong motions. SW4 is an anelastic finite difference code based on a fourth order summation-by-parts displacement formulation. It is parallelized and can run on one or many processors. SW4 has many desirable features for seismic strong motion simulation: incorporation of surface topography; automatic mesh generation; mesh refinement; attenuation and supergrid boundary conditions. It also has several ways to introduce 3D models and sources (including Standard Rupture Format for extended sources). We are using SW4 to simulate strong ground motions for several applications. We are performing parametric studies of near-fault motions from moderate earthquakes to investigate basin edge generated waves and large earthquakes to provide motions to engineers study building response. We show that 3D propagation near basin edges can generate significant amplifications relative to 1D analysis. SW4 is also being used to model earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area. This includes modeling moderate (M3.5-5) events to evaluate the United States Geologic Survey's 3D model of regional structure as well as strong motions from the 2014 South Napa earthquake and possible large scenario events. Recently SW4 was built on a Commodity Technology Systems-1 (CTS-1) at LLNL, new systems for capacity computing at the DOE National Labs. We find SW4 scales well and runs faster on these systems compared to the previous generation of LINUX clusters.

  5. Análise discriminante dos solos por meio da resposta espectral no nível terrestre Soil discrimination analysis by spectral response in the ground level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rafael Nanni

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver e avaliar um método para discriminação das classes de solos a partir de suas respostas espectrais, utilizando-se um sensor em laboratório. Os dados espectrais foram utilizados no desenvolvimento de modelos estatísticos para discriminar as classes de solos de uma área no sudoeste do Estado de São Paulo. Equações discriminantes foram desenvolvidas para as 18 classes. A resposta espectral foi obtida em amostras da porção superficial e da porção subsuperficial dos solos da área de estudo, num total de 370 amostras. As amostras foram coletadas em 185 ha, com uma tradagem por ha. Os resultados demonstraram que as classes de solos podem ser individualizadas e distinguidas pela análise discriminante. A análise registrou índices de acerto acima de 80% de determinação da classe de solo avaliada. O acerto global foi de 90,71% quando se utilizaram todas as classes para a geração dos modelos, e 93,44% quando se utilizaram as dez classes com maior número de indivíduos. O teste estatístico simulado mostrou-se eficiente na análise discriminante, com taxa média de acerto acima de 91%, com erro global de 8,8%. A análise demonstrou redução na qualidade do modelo quando aplicado para um subconjunto de 20% das amostras, com erro global de 33,9%. O método auxilia na discriminação de classes de solos pela sua reflectância, devido às interações físicas com a energia eletromagnética.The objective of this study was to develop and test a discrimination method for soil classes by their spectral response (SR, using a laboratory sensor. Spectral data were used to develop statistical model for discriminating soil classes in an area at the southwest of São Paulo State, Brazil. Discriminant equations were developed for 18 soil classes. The spectral data were obtained in superficial and subsuperficial soil samples in the study area, with a total of 370 samples. The samples were collected in 185 ha

  6. Phonon spectra in quantum wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Dušan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Green's function method, adjusted to bound crystalline structures, was applied to obtain the phonon dispersion law in quantum wires. The condition of the existence of small mechanical atom movements defining phonon spectra can be found by solving the secular equation. This problem was presented graphically for different boundary parameters. The presence of boundaries, as well as the change of boundary parameters, leads to the appearance of new properties of the layered structure. The most important feature is that, beside the allowed energy zones (which are continuous as in the bulk structure, zones of forbidden states appear. Different values of the boundary parameters lead to the appearance of lower and upper energy gaps, or dispersion branches spreading out of the bulk energy zone. The spectra of phonons in corresponding unbound structures were correlated to those in bound structures.

  7. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Snellenburg, Joris J.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm-1 and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps-1. In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  8. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  9. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  10. Displacement spectra and displacement modification factors, based on records from Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Athanassiadou, C. J.; Karakostas, C. Z.; Margaris, B. N.; Kappos, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic displacement spectra (for periods up to 4.0 s) are derived, using a representative sample of acceleration records from Greece, carefully selected based on magnitude, distance and peak ground acceleration criteria, and grouped into three ground type categories according to the Eurocode 8 (EC8) provisions. The modification factor for the elastic design spectrum adopted in EC8 for accounting for damping is verified herein and is found to be satisfactory in the short to medi...

  11. Spectroscopic determination of ground and excited state vibrational potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laane, Jaan

    Far-infrared spectra, mid-infrared combination band spectra, Raman spectra, and dispersed fluorescence spectra of non-rigid molecules can be used to determine the energies of many of the quantum states of conformationally important vibrations such as out-of-plane ring modes, internal rotations, and molecular inversions in their ground electronic states. Similarly, the fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules, together with electronic absorption spectra, provide the information for determining the vibronic energy levels of electronic excited states. One- or two-dimensional potential energy functions, which govern the conformational changes along the vibrational coordinates, can be determined from these types of data for selected molecules. From these functions the molecular structures, the relative energies between different conformations, the barriers to molecular interconversions, and the forces responsible for the structures can be ascertained. This review describes the experimental and theoretical methodology for carrying out the potential energy determinations and presents a summary of work that has been carried out for both electronic ground and excited states. The results for the out-of-plane ring motions of four-, five-, and six-membered rings will be presented, and results for several molecules with unusual properties will be cited. Potential energy functions for the carbonyl wagging and ring modes for several cyclic ketones in their S1(n,pi*) states will also be discussed. Potential energy surfaces for the three internal rotations, including the one governing the photoisomerization process, will be examined for trans-stilbene in both its S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states. For the bicyclic molecules in the indan family, the two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the highly interacting ring-puckering and ring-flapping motions in both the S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states have also been determined using all of the spectroscopic methods mentioned above

  12. GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF SPECTRA OF THE PO2 RADICAL IN THE GAS PHASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YU-YAN; LIU XIAO-YON; LIU HONG-PING; GUo YUAN-QING; HUANG GUANG-MING; DUAN CHUAN-XI

    2000-01-01

    A global analysis of all available and identified spectra of the PO2 radical has been performed. In this analysis, the infrared spectra of the v3 band, the microwave and far infrared laser magnetic resonance transitions in the ground state are fitted simultaneously to the effective Hamiltonian for asymmetric top molecules. Since the analysis absorbs reliable experimental data extensively, it bears the most precise and most complete set of molecular constants for PO2. These molecular constants can be used to reproduce the spectra of PO2 accurately. Attention is also paid to the similarity and difference between PO2 and NO2.

  13. Communication, concepts and grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Frank

    2015-02-01

    This article discusses the relation between communication and conceptual grounding. In the brain, neurons, circuits and brain areas are involved in the representation of a concept, grounding it in perception and action. In terms of grounding we can distinguish between communication within the brain and communication between humans or between humans and machines. In the first form of communication, a concept is activated by sensory input. Due to grounding, the information provided by this communication is not just determined by the sensory input but also by the outgoing connection structure of the conceptual representation, which is based on previous experiences and actions. The second form of communication, that between humans or between humans and machines, is influenced by the first form. In particular, a more successful interpersonal communication might require forms of situated cognition and interaction in which the entire representations of grounded concepts are involved.

  14. Ground energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  15. Ground Motion Prediction Models for Caucasus Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorjiashvili, Nato; Godoladze, Tea; Tvaradze, Nino; Tumanova, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Ground motion prediction models (GMPMs) relate ground motion intensity measures to variables describing earthquake source, path, and site effects. Estimation of expected ground motion is a fundamental earthquake hazard assessment. The most commonly used parameter for attenuation relation is peak ground acceleration or spectral acceleration because this parameter gives useful information for Seismic Hazard Assessment. Since 2003 development of Georgian Digital Seismic Network has started. In this study new GMP models are obtained based on new data from Georgian seismic network and also from neighboring countries. Estimation of models is obtained by classical, statistical way, regression analysis. In this study site ground conditions are additionally considered because the same earthquake recorded at the same distance may cause different damage according to ground conditions. Empirical ground-motion prediction models (GMPMs) require adjustment to make them appropriate for site-specific scenarios. However, the process of making such adjustments remains a challenge. This work presents a holistic framework for the development of a peak ground acceleration (PGA) or spectral acceleration (SA) GMPE that is easily adjustable to different seismological conditions and does not suffer from the practical problems associated with adjustments in the response spectral domain.

  16. A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-28

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  17. Rovibrational spectra of diatomic molecules in strong electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Ferez, R; Schmelcher, P [Departamento de Fisica Moderna and Instituto ' Carlos I' de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the effects of a strong static electric field on the rovibrational spectra of diatomic heteronuclear molecules in a {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} electronic ground state. Using a hybrid computational technique combining discretization and basis set methods the full rovibrational equation of motion is solved. As a prototype for our computations we take the carbon monoxide molecule. For experimentally accessible field strengths we observe that while low-lying states are not significantly affected by the field, for highly excited states strong orientation and hybridization are achieved. We propose an effective rotor Hamiltonian, including the main properties of each vibrational state, to describe the influence of the electric field on the rovibrational spectra of a molecular system with a small coupling between its rotational and vibrational motions. This effective rotor approach goes significantly beyond the rigid rotor approach and is able to describe the effect of the electric field for highly excited states.

  18. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  19. Ground roasted peanuts leads to a lower post-prandial glycemic response than raw peanuts Maní tostado y molido conduce a una menor respuesta glicémica postprandial comparado con maní crudo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. G. Reis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few studies have evaluated the effect of nuts processing on the glycemic response and satiety. Objective: To evaluate the effect of peanut processing on glycemic response, and energy and nutrients intake. Method: Thirteen healthy subjects (4 men and 9 women, with a mean age of 28.5 ± 10 years, BMI 22.7 ± 2.5 kg/m², and body fat 23.7 ± 5.7% participated in this randomized crossover clinical trial. After 10-12 h of fasting, one of the following types of test meals were consumed: raw peanuts with skin (RPS, roasted peanuts without skin, ground-roasted peanuts without skin (GRPWS or control meal. The test meals had the same nutrient composition, and were consumed with 200 ml of water in 15 minutes. Glycemic response was evaluated 2 hours after each meal. Energy and nutrients intake were assessed through diet records reflecting the habitual food intake and food consumption 24 hours after the ingestion of test meal. Result: The area under the glycemic response curve after GRPWS was lower (p = 0.02 the one obtained for RPS. There was no treatment effect on energy intake, macronutrients and fiber consumption after the test meal. Conclusion: The consumption of ground-roasted peanuts may favor the control and prevention of diabetes due to its reduction on postprandial glucose response. However, more prospective studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.Introducción: Escasos estudios han evaluado el efecto del procesado industrial de los frutos secos sobre la respuesta glicérica y la saciedad. Objetivos: Evaluar el efecto del procesamiento de maní sobre la respuesta glicémica y la ingesta de energía y nutrientes. Métodos: Trece sujetos sanos (4 hombres y 9 mujeres, con una edad media de 28,5 ± 10 años, IMC 22,7 ± 2,5 kg/m², y un porcentaje de grasa corporal de 23,7 ± 5,7% participaron en este ensayo clínico aleatorizado y cruzado. Tras 10-12 h de ayuno uno de los siguientes tipos de comidas test fueron consumidas: man

  20. Using 1 -D and 2-D modelling of ground motion for seismic zonation criteria: results for the city of Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Caserta

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The geological information collected in the last years by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica for the city of Rome is used to construct 1- and 2-D models of the nearsurface structure. These models are the basis for the numerical generation of synthetic accelerograms which can simulate the horizontal ground motion (SH waves produced in the different areas of the city by a large (M ? 7 potential earthquake 100 km away in Central Apennines. The proposed methodology yields earthquake engineering parameters (peak ground acceleration and velocity, Arias intensity, energy flux, response spectra whose spatial variations are consistent with the damage distribution caused by the strongest earthquakes felt in Rome during its long history. Based on the macroseismic inforination and the results of the numerical simulations, general criteria for seismic zonation of the city of Rome are proposed.

  1. Absorption spectra of alkali-C₆₀ nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabilloud, Franck

    2014-10-28

    We investigate the absorption spectra of alkali-doped C60 nanoclusters, namely C60Nan, C60Kn, and C60Lin, with n = 1, 2, 6, 12, in the framework of the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). We study the dependence of the absorption spectra on the nature of the alkali. We show that in few cases the absorption spectra depend on the arrangement of the alkali atoms over the fullerene, though sometimes the absorption spectra do not allow us to distinguish between different configurations. When only one or two alkali atoms are adsorbed on the fullerene, the optical response of alkali-doped C60 is similar to that of the anion C60(-) with a strong response in the UV domain. In contrast, for higher concentration of alkali, a strong optical response is predicted in the visible range, particularly when metal-metal bonds are formed. The weak optical response of the I(h)-symmetry C60Li12 is proposed to be used as a signature of its structure.

  2. Electronic and vibrational spectra of some rare earth trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P.; Ghosh, M.; Neogy, D.; Mallick, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of some rare earth (dysprosium and terbium) trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals have been analyzed. Different vibrational frequencies of trifluoromethanesulfonate ions (CF 3SO 3-) are identified and assigned to different vibrations of the SO 3 and CF 3 groups. Electronic transitions of R 3+ ions (R = Dy, Tb) in these salts have been assigned to transitions from the ground to different energy levels of the ground multiplet. The electronic energy levels of the rare earth ions are also determined theoretically with the help of single electron crystal field theory. They are found to yield results not only in good agreement with the observed spectral data but also in good conformity with those obtained previously from magnetic measurements.

  3. Excited state mass spectra of doubly heavy Ξ baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar [Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Surat, Gujarat (India)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, the mass spectra are obtained for doubly heavy Ξ baryons, namely, Ξ{sub cc}{sup +}, Ξ{sub cc}{sup ++}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup -}, Ξ{sub bb}{sup 0}, Ξ{sub bc}{sup 0} and Ξ{sub bc}{sup +}. These baryons consist of two heavy quarks (cc, bb, and bc) with a light (d or u) quark. The ground, radial, and orbital states are calculated in the framework of the hypercentral constituent quark model with Coulomb plus linear potential. Our results are also compared with other predictions, thus, the average possible range of excited states masses of these Ξ baryons can be determined. The study of the Regge trajectories is performed in (n, M{sup 2}) and (J, M{sup 2}) planes and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Lastly, the ground state magnetic moments of these doubly heavy baryons are also calculated. (orig.)

  4. Analysing degeneracies in networks spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Marrec, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks exhibit a high degeneracy at few eigenvalues. We show that a simple transformation of the network's adjacency matrix provides an understanding of? the origins of occurrence of high multiplicities in the networks spectra. We find that the eigenvectors associated with the degenerate eigenvalues shed light on the structures contributing to the degeneracy. Since these degeneracies are rarely observed in model graphs, we present results for various cancer networks. This approach gives an opportunity to search for structures contributing to degeneracy which might have an important role in a network.

  5. Rotational spectra and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Wollrab, James E

    1967-01-01

    Physical Chemistry, A Series of Monographs: Rotational Spectra and Molecular Structure covers the energy levels and rotational transitions. This book is divided into nine chapters that evaluate the rigid asymmetric top molecules and the nuclear spin statistics for asymmetric tops. Some of the topics covered in the book are the asymmetric rotor functions; rotational transition intensities; classes of molecules; nuclear spin statistics for linear molecules and symmetric tops; and classical appearance of centrifugal and coriolis forces. Other chapters deal with the energy levels and effects of ce

  6. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  7. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  8. Ground motion estimation and nonlinear seismic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, D.B.; Hutchings, L.J.

    1995-08-14

    Site specific predictions of the dynamic response of structures to extreme earthquake ground motions are a critical component of seismic design for important structures. With the rapid development of computationally based methodologies and powerful computers over the past few years, engineers and scientists now have the capability to perform numerical simulations of many of the physical processes associated with the generation of earthquake ground motions and dynamic structural response. This paper describes application of a physics based, deterministic, computational approach for estimation of earthquake ground motions which relies on site measurements of frequently occurring small (i.e. M < 3 ) earthquakes. Case studies are presented which illustrate application of this methodology for two different sites, and nonlinear analyses of a typical six story steel frame office building are performed to illustrate the potential sensitivity of nonlinear response to site conditions and proximity to the causative fault.

  9. Fine Spectra of Symmetric Toeplitz Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Altun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine spectra of 2-banded and 3-banded infinite Toeplitz matrices were examined by several authors. The fine spectra of n-banded triangular Toeplitz matrices and tridiagonal symmetric matrices were computed in the following papers: Altun, “On the fine spectra of triangular toeplitz operators” (2011 and Altun, “Fine spectra of tridiagonal symmetric matrices” (2011. Here, we generalize those results to the (2+1-banded symmetric Toeplitz matrix operators for arbitrary positive integer .

  10. Duality properties between spectra and tilings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Spectra and tilings play an important role in analysis and geometry respectively.The relations between spectra and tilings have bafied the mathematicians for a long time.Many conjectures,such as the Fuglede conjecture,are placed on the establishment of relations between spectra and tilings,although there are no desired results.In the present paper we derive some characteristic properties of spectra and tilings which highlight certain duality properties between them.

  11. Ground State Spin Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, J D; Biamonte, J D

    2012-01-01

    Designing and optimizing cost functions and energy landscapes is a problem encountered in many fields of science and engineering. These landscapes and cost functions can be embedded and annealed in experimentally controllable spin Hamiltonians. Using an approach based on group theory and symmetries, we examine the embedding of Boolean logic gates into the ground state subspace of such spin systems. We describe parameterized families of diagonal Hamiltonians and symmetry operations which preserve the ground state subspace encoding the truth tables of Boolean formulas. The ground state embeddings of adder circuits are used to illustrate how gates are combined and simplified using symmetry. Our work is relevant for experimental demonstrations of ground state embeddings found in both classical optimization as well as adiabatic quantum optimization.

  12. Spatial distribution of near-fault ground motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘启方; 袁一凡; 金星

    2004-01-01

    Near-fault strong ground motion of strike-slip and dip-slip of vertical and inclined rectangular fault in half-space and layered half-space is analyzed by dislocation source model. The Fourier spectra ratio of ground motion is adopted to study the characteristics of near-fault ground motion. For both slip models, near-fault strong ground motion with high amplitude is located in a narrow belt area along the projection of the fault on the ground and mainly controlled by the sub-faults nearby. Directivity of strike-slip fault is more dominant in long period for components perpendicular to the fault, and more dominant in long period for components parallel to the fault for dip-slip fault. The deeper the location of the source is, the more slowly the amplitude of ground motion attenuates.There is obvious hanging wall effect in ground motion of inclined fault, and the spatial distribution of ground motion is asymmetric which coincides with observational data. Finally, a fitting function of spatial distribution for near-fault ground motion is proposed and compared with near source factors of the 1997 Uniform Building Code of USA.

  13. Fast computation of morphological area pattern spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijster, Arnold; Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2001-01-01

    An area based counterpart of the binary structural opening spectra is developed It is shown that these area opening and closing spectra can be computed using an adaptation of Tarjan's union-find algorithm These spectra provide rotation, translation, and scale invariant pattern vectors for texture

  14. Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Mr. Jim Parker Associate Director Ground Vehicle Robotics Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Report Documentation Page...Briefing 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2012 to 01-08-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT Provide Transition-Ready, Cost-Effective, and Innovative Robotics and Control System Solutions for Manned, Optionally-Manned, and Unmanned

  15. Multiscale climate emulator of multimodal wave spectra: MUSCLE-spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Ana; Hegermiller, Christie A.; Antolinez, Jose A. A.; Camus, Paula; Vitousek, Sean; Ruggiero, Peter; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Tomás, Antonio; Mendez, Fernando J.

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of multimodal directional wave spectra is important for many offshore and coastal applications, such as marine forecasting, coastal hazard assessment, and design of offshore wave energy farms and coastal structures. However, the multivariate and multiscale nature of wave climate variability makes this complex problem tractable using computationally expensive numerical models. So far, the skill of statistical-downscaling model-based parametric (unimodal) wave conditions is limited in large ocean basins such as the Pacific. The recent availability of long-term directional spectral data from buoys and wave hindcast models allows for development of stochastic models that include multimodal sea-state parameters. This work introduces a statistical downscaling framework based on weather types to predict multimodal wave spectra (e.g., significant wave height, mean wave period, and mean wave direction from different storm systems, including sea and swells) from large-scale atmospheric pressure fields. For each weather type, variables of interest are modeled using the categorical distribution for the sea-state type, the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution for wave height and wave period, a multivariate Gaussian copula for the interdependence between variables, and a Markov chain model for the chronology of daily weather types. We apply the model to the southern California coast, where local seas and swells from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute to the multimodal wave spectrum. This work allows attribution of particular extreme multimodal wave events to specific atmospheric conditions, expanding knowledge of time-dependent, climate-driven offshore and coastal sea-state conditions that have a significant influence on local nearshore processes, coastal morphology, and flood hazards.

  16. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  17. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  18. A Hybrid Ground-Motion Prediction Equation for Earthquakes in Western Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, N.; Yenier, E.; Law, A.; Moores, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of ground-motion amplitudes that may be produced by future earthquakes constitutes the foundation of seismic hazard assessment and earthquake-resistant structural design. This is typically done by using a prediction equation that quantifies amplitudes as a function of key seismological variables such as magnitude, distance and site condition. In this study, we develop a hybrid empirical prediction equation for earthquakes in western Alberta, where evaluation of seismic hazard associated with induced seismicity is of particular interest. We use peak ground motions and response spectra from recorded seismic events to model the regional source and attenuation attributes. The available empirical data is limited in the magnitude range of engineering interest (M>4). Therefore, we combine empirical data with a simulation-based model in order to obtain seismologically informed predictions for moderate-to-large magnitude events. The methodology is two-fold. First, we investigate the shape of geometrical spreading in Alberta. We supplement the seismic data with ground motions obtained from mining/quarry blasts, in order to gain insights into the regional attenuation over a wide distance range. A comparison of ground-motion amplitudes for earthquakes and mining/quarry blasts show that both event types decay at similar rates with distance and demonstrate a significant Moho-bounce effect. In the second stage, we calibrate the source and attenuation parameters of a simulation-based prediction equation to match the available amplitude data from seismic events. We model the geometrical spreading using a trilinear function with attenuation rates obtained from the first stage, and calculate coefficients of anelastic attenuation and site amplification via regression analysis. This provides a hybrid ground-motion prediction equation that is calibrated for observed motions in western Alberta and is applicable to moderate-to-large magnitude events.

  19. Scikit-spectra: Explorative Spectroscopy in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hughes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scikit-spectra is an intuitive framework for explorative spectroscopy in Python. Scikit-spectra leverages the Pandas library for powerful data processing to provide datastructures and an API designed for spectroscopy. Utilizing the new IPython Notebook widget system, scikit-spectra is headed towards a GUI when you want it, API when you need it approach to spectral analysis. As an application, analysis is presented of the surface-plasmon resonance shift in a solution of gold nanoparticles induced by proteins binding to the gold’s surface. Please refer to the scikit-spectra website for full documentation and support: http://hugadams.github.io/scikit-spectra/

  20. Analysis of multi-layer ERBS spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmitt, G.G. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Rosa, L.F.S. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Nandi, S.K. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Vos, M., E-mail: maarten.vos@anu.edu.au [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Electron Rutherford backscattering (ERBS) spectra are presented. • The spectra are fitted based on physical meaningful quantities. • Very consistent results are obtained for spectra taken under different conditions. • This establishes that ERBS can be used to measure film thicknesses. - Abstract: A systematic way of analysis of multi-layer electron Rutherford backscattering spectra is described. The approach uses fitting in terms of physical meaningful parameters. Simultaneous analysis then becomes possible for spectra taken at different incoming energies and measurement geometries. Examples are given to demonstrate the level of detail that can be resolved by this technique.

  1. Properties of artificial networks evolved to contend with natural spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Yaniv; Rostami, Mohammad; Purves, Dale

    2014-07-22

    Understanding why spectra that are physically the same appear different in different contexts (color contrast), whereas spectra that are physically different appear similar (color constancy) presents a major challenge in vision research. Here, we show that the responses of biologically inspired neural networks evolved on the basis of accumulated experience with spectral stimuli automatically generate contrast and constancy. The results imply that these phenomena are signatures of a strategy that biological vision uses to circumvent the inverse optics problem as it pertains to light spectra, and that double-opponent neurons in early-level vision evolve to serve this purpose. This strategy provides a way of understanding the peculiar relationship between the objective world and subjective color experience, as well as rationalizing the relevant visual circuitry without invoking feature detection or image representation.

  2. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullmann John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  3. Ground Enterprise Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Emergent Space Technologies Inc. proposes to develop the Ground Enterprise Management System (GEMS) for spacecraft ground systems. GEMS will provide situational...

  4. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Martínez-Ovalle, S A; Lallena, A M; Mercado, G A; Benites-Rengifo, J L

    2012-12-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10(-6) and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage.

  5. Assessing post-fire ground cover in Mediterranean shrublands with field spectrometry and digital photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montorio Llovería, Raquel; Pérez-Cabello, Fernando; García-Martín, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Fire severity can be assessed by identifying and quantifying the fractional abundance of post-fire ground cover types, an approach with great capacity to predict ecosystem response. Focused on shrubland formations of Mediterranean-type ecosystems, three burned areas (Ibieca and Zuera wildfires and Peñaflor experimental fire) were sampled in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Two different ground measurements were made for each of the 356 plots: (i) 3-band high spatial resolution photography (HSRP) and (ii) the hemispherical-conical reflectance factor (HCRF) in the visible to near-infrared spectral range (VNIR, 400-900 nm). Stepwise multiple lineal regression (SMLR) models were fitted to spectral variables (HCRF, first derivative spectra or FDS, and four absorption indices) to estimate the fractional cover of seven post-fire ground cover types (vegetation and soil - unburned and charred components - and ash - char and ash, individually and as a combined category). Models were developed and validated at the Peñaflor site (training, n = 217; validation, n = 88) and applied to the samples from the Ibieca and Zuera sites (n = 51). The best results were observed for the abundance estimations of green vegetation (Radj.20.70-0.90), unburned soil (Radj.20.40-0.75), and the combination of ashes (Radj.20.65-0.80). In comparison of spectral data, FDS outperforms reflectance or absorption data because of its higher accuracy levels and, importantly, its greater capacity to yield generalizable models. Future efforts should be made to improve the estimation of intermediate severity levels and upscaling the developed models. In the context of fire severity assessment, our study demonstrates the potential of hyperspectral data to estimate in a quick and objective manner post-fire ground cover fractions and thus provide valuable information to guide management responses.

  6. Graviton spectra in string cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galluccio, Massimo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Roma-IT); Litterio, Marco [Istituto Astronomico dell' Universita (Roma-IT); Occhionero, Franco [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Roma-IT)

    1996-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an ω³ increase and initiates an ω⁻⁷ decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre-Big Bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post-Big Bang). We evaluate both analytically and numerically the frequency and the intensity of the peak and we show that they may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak is at variance with ordinarily monotonic (either increasing or decreasing) graviton spectra of canonical cosmologies; its detection would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology.

  7. Graviton Spectra in String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Galluccio, M; Occhionero, F; Galluccio, Massimo; Litterio, Marco; Occhionero, Franco

    1997-01-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an $\\omega^3$ increase and initiates an $\\omega^{-7}$ decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre-Big Bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post-Big Bang). We evaluate both analytically and numerically the frequency and the intensity of the peak and we show that they may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak is at variance with ordinarily monotonic (either increasing or decreasing) graviton spectra of canonical cosmologies; its detection would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology.

  8. [Vibrational spectra of Corallium elatius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lu-wei; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yang

    2013-09-01

    Corallium elatius, which has unique color distribution characteristic, is the most important species of Taiwan precious corals. EPMA, XRD, FTIR and Laser Raman detective methods were used to study the chemical, mineral composition and spectra characteristics of Corallium elatius. The result of EPMA, XRD and FTIR shows the high-Mg calcite mineral componentand the stable minor chemical constituents of the samples. Meanwhile, the cell parameter indicates the lattice distortion and the preferred orientation of calcite grain caused by organic matter. The red part of the samples shows a different Raman spectrum from that of the white part, located at 1517/1128 cm(-1) and 1296/1016 cm(-1). Raman scattering measurement reveals the relationship between the organic matter and color.

  9. Energetic solar electron spectra and gamma-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, Wolfgang

    1996-06-01

    We analyze solar energetic electron events measured with particle detectors on board of the ISEE-3 (ICE) and Helios 1 and 2 spacecraft. Energy spectra in the range 0.1 to tens of MeV are generated applying the results of a careful re-examination of the electron response function of the instruments. The spectral shapes of events observed simultaneously, among them five on all three s/c, are in very good agreement inspite of the sometimes considerable difference in azimuthal and radial distances of the s/c with respect to the flare. These findings suggest that transport processes at the Sun and in the interplanetary medium depend only weakly on the electron energy and that the observed spectra are representative of the accelerated electron spectra at the Sun. A comparison of the electron spectra with SMM gamma-ray spectra gives evidence for the existence of different acceleration and emission mechanism in flares with long (LDEs) and short duration (SDEs) soft X-ray emission.

  10. Photocurrents of cone photoreceptors of the golden-mantled ground squirrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, T W

    1988-10-01

    1. Visual transduction in photoreceptors of the ground squirrel, Citellus lateralis, was studied by recording membrane current from individual cones in small pieces of retina. 2. Brief flashes of light produced transient reductions of the dark current; saturating response amplitudes were up to 67 pA. A flash strength of about 11,000 photons microns-2 at lambda max was required to give a half-saturating response. The stimulus-response relation was well fitted by an exponential saturation curve. Responses below 20% of maximum behaved linearly. 3. The response to a dim flash in most cells had a time to peak of 20-30 ms and resembled the impulse response of a series of five low-pass filters. 4. The variance of the dim-flash response amplitude put an upper limit of 80 fA on the size of the single photon response. Estimates based on the effective collecting area suggest the single photon response to be of the order of 10 fA. 5. Flash responses of squirrel cones usually lacked the undershoot observed in primate cones, although in about 1/3 of the cells a small undershoot developed during recording. 6. Background lights slightly shortened the time to peak of the flash response and reduced the integration time. 7. Spectral sensitivity measurements showed two classes of cones with peak sensitivities at about 520 and 435 nm. Rod sensitivity peaked near 500 nm. Spectral univariance was obeyed by all three classes of cells. 8. The shapes of the spectral sensitivity curves of the rod and both types of cones were similar to each other when plotted on a log wave number scale, but differed significantly from similar plots of monkey and human cone spectra. 9. The kinetics and sensitivity of flash responses of the blue- and green-sensitive cones were indistinguishable.

  11. Reinventing Grounded Theory: Some Questions about Theory, Ground and Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gary; James, David

    2006-01-01

    Grounded theory's popularity persists after three decades of broad-ranging critique. In this article three problematic notions are discussed--"theory," "ground" and "discovery"--which linger in the continuing use and development of grounded theory procedures. It is argued that far from providing the epistemic security promised by grounded theory,…

  12. 近地电缆屏蔽层对高空核电磁脉冲响应的研究%Research on the Response of Cable Sheath Near Ground to HEMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王川川; 朱长青; 谷志锋; 刘登峰

    2011-01-01

    为了研究近地面电缆屏蔽层对高空电磁脉冲的耦合规律,依据传输线理论,计算了在高空核电磁脉冲作用下损耗大地上电缆屏蔽层上的感应电流。利用快速傅立叶变换技术,首先得到近地面电缆屏蔽层感应电流的频域解,然后采用快速傅立叶逆变换技术得到时域解。得到了感应电流随电缆长度、电缆架设高度、电磁脉冲极化角、方位角、俯仰角、端接阻抗和大地电导率等的变化规律。%In order to research the response of cable sheath near ground to HEMP,the induced currents in cable' s shield are calculated based on transmission line theory.By using fast Fourier transform technique,the currents in frequency domain are obtained,then using fast Fourier inverse transform technique the currents in time domain are obtained.The patterns of induced currents with the parameters of the cable' s length,height,polarization angle of electromagnetic pulse,orientation angle of electromagnetic pulse,pitching angle of electromagnetic pulse,resistance and earth conductivity are obtained.

  13. THz spectra of five borates crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Terahertz spectral responses have been studied for five borate crystals Na5[B2P3O13](NBP),Zn3BPO (ZBP),SrB4O7(SBO),Na3La9O3(BO3)8(NLBO)and PbB4O7(PBO).It is found that the samples had good transmission in 0.25-1.5 THz region.Both SBO and NLBO have an absorption coefficient less than 10cm-1.Among them,SBO has not only the smallest absorption coefficient but also a very flat dispersion in the frequency region under investigation.Distinct resonance absorption peaks are observed for ZBP at v1=1.4 THz,v2=2.0 THz and SBO at v=2.4 THz.In the spectrum of PBO,two 8bnormal dispersions appear in the frequency regions 1.44-1.74 and 2.2-2.5 THz.The absorption coetficients and refraction indices of the five crystals are extracted from the THz time-domain(THz-TDB)spectra in 0.25-2.5 THz region.The properties and origins of the spectral responses are addressed.

  14. Ground water in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A.R.

    1960-01-01

    One of the first requisites for the intelligent planning of utilization and control of water and for the administration of laws relating to its use is data on the quantity, quality, and mode of occurrence of the available supplies. The collection, evaluation and interpretation, and publication of such data are among the primary functions of the U.S. Geological Survey. Since 1895 the Congress has made appropriations to the Survey for investigation of the water resources of the Nation. In 1929 the Congress adopted the policy of dollar-for-dollar cooperation with the States and local governmental agencies in water-resources investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey. In 1937 a program of ground-water investigations was started in cooperation with the Oklahoma Geological Survey, and in 1949 this program was expanded to include cooperation with the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board. In 1957 the State Legislature created the Oklahoma Water Resources Board as the principal State water agency and it became the principal local cooperator. The Ground Water Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey collects, analyzes, and evaluates basic information on ground-water resources and prepares interpretive reports based on those data. Cooperative ground-water work was first concentrated in the Panhandle counties. During World War II most work was related to problems of water supply for defense requirements. Since 1945 detailed investigations of ground-water availability have been made in 11 areas, chiefly in the western and central parts of the State. In addition, water levels in more than 300 wells are measured periodically, principally in the western half of the State. In Oklahoma current studies are directed toward determining the source, occurrence, and availability of ground water and toward estimating the quantity of water and rate of replenishment to specific areas and water-bearing formations. Ground water plays an important role in the economy of the State. It is

  15. Detection of ground ice using ground penetrating radar method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gennady M. Stoyanovich; Viktor V. Pupatenko; Yury A. Sukhobok

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) application for the detection of ground ice. We com-bined a reflection traveltime curves analysis with a frequency spectrogram analysis. We found special anomalies at specific traces in the traveltime curves and ground boundaries analysis, and obtained a ground model for subsurface structure which allows the ground ice layer to be identified and delineated.

  16. Collison and Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, G.; Ji, C.; Kuhala, P.;

    2006-01-01

    COMMITTEE MANDATE Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collision and grounding, with the view towards risk assessment and management. Consideration shall be given to the frequency of occurrence, the proba......COMMITTEE MANDATE Concern for structural arrangements on ships and floating structures with regard to their integrity and adequacy in the events of collision and grounding, with the view towards risk assessment and management. Consideration shall be given to the frequency of occurrence...

  17. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    CERN Document Server

    Fossez, K; Nazarewicz, W; Michel, N; Garrett, W R; Płoszajczak, M

    2016-01-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as extreme halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-molecule problem using a non-adiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational ban...

  18. Action and Emission Spectra of the Luminescence of Green PlantMaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollin, G.; Fujimori, E.; Calvin, Melvin

    1957-12-29

    The action and emission spectra of the delayed light emission from Chlorella, Nostoc, and spinach chloroplasts have been measured. The action spectra for Chlorella and for spinach chloroplasts are quite similar to the absorption spectra of these materials. The action spectrum for Nostoc, on the other hand, shows a relatively low activity for chlorophyll and carotenoids and a high activity for phycocyanin. The emission spectra of these materials demonstrates that the luminescence is the result of a transition between the first excited singlet state and the ground state of chlorophyll. Low-temperature studies suggest that the triplet state of chlorophyll is not involved at all in the luminescence of spinach chloroplasts. There is some indication that part of the light emitted from Nostoc is due to a phycocyanin transition.

  19. Coding Issues in Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Alireza

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses grounded theory as one of the qualitative research designs. It describes how grounded theory generates from data. Three phases of grounded theory--open coding, axial coding, and selective coding--are discussed, along with some of the issues which are the source of debate among grounded theorists, especially between its…

  20. Coding Issues in Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Alireza

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses grounded theory as one of the qualitative research designs. It describes how grounded theory generates from data. Three phases of grounded theory--open coding, axial coding, and selective coding--are discussed, along with some of the issues which are the source of debate among grounded theorists, especially between its…

  1. A Grounded Theory of Adult Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    This grounded theory study investigates adult student persistence at a community college. Student persistence in college is a prerequisite for degree achievement, which correlates with higher earnings and overall better quality of life. Persistence rates remain low for adult students, who combine their college endeavors with responsibilities to…

  2. The Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ardila, David R; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Song, Inseok; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D W; Wachter, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra (SASS), which includes 159 stellar spectra (5 to 32 mic; R~100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, like blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, dominated by Hydrogen lines around A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstell...

  3. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  4. On non-forking spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Chernikov, Artem; Shelah, Saharon

    2012-01-01

    Non-forking is one of the most important notions in modern model theory capturing the idea of a generic extension of a type (which is a far-reaching generalization of the concept of a generic point of a variety). To a countable first-order theory we associate its non-forking spectrum - a function of two cardinals kappa and lambda giving the supremum of the possible number of types over a model of size lambda that do not fork over a sub-model of size kappa. This is a natural generalization of the stability function of a theory. We make progress towards classifying the non-forking spectra. On the one hand, we show that the possible values a non-forking spectrum may take are quite limited. On the other hand, we develop a general technique for constructing theories with a prescribed non-forking spectrum, thus giving a number of examples. In particular, we answer negatively a question of Adler whether NIP is equivalent to bounded non-forking. In addition, we answer a question of Keisler regarding the number of cut...

  5. Enhancing the resolution of gpr spectra for pavement engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, F.; Benedetto, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a geophysical method that uses radar pulses to image the subsurface. This non-destructive method uses electromagnetic radiation and detects the reflected signals from subsurface structures. It can detect objects, changes in material, and voids and cracks. GPR has many applications in a number of fields. In the field of civil engineering one of the most advanced technologies used for road pavement monitoring is based on the deployment of advanced GPR systems. One of the most relevant causes of road pavement damage is often referable to water intrusion in structural layers. In this context, GPR has been recently proposed as a method to estimate moisture content in a porous medium without preventive calibration. Hence, the development of methods to obtain an estimate of the moisture content is a crucial research field involving economic, social and strategic aspects in road safety for a great number of public and private Agencies. In particular, a recent new approach was proposed to estimate moisture content in a porous medium basing on the theory of Rayleigh scattering, showing a shift of the frequency peak of the GPR spectrum towards lower frequencies as the moisture content increases in the soil. The weakness characterizing this approach is represented by the needs of high resolution signals, whereas GPR spectra are affected by low resolution. Hence, the rising requirement for high resolution leads to specific demands for improved prediction methods. Recently, a new technique combining the response of the conventional fast Fourier transform (FFT, well known for its high-precision receiving signal level) with that of the MUSIC (multiple signal classification) algorithm, well known for its super-resolution capacity has been proposed. This combined method has been proved to obtain a high precision level in quantifying the shift of the frequency peak of the GPR spectrum. This combined method can perform a reliable coarse estimate of

  6. High Resolution Spectral Analysis of Hiss and Chorus Emissions in Ground Based Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Aliabad, S. P.; Golkowski, M.; Gibby, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of the radiation belts is believed to be controlled in large part by two separate but related classes of naturally occurring plasma waves: ELF/VLF chorus and hiss emissions. Although whistler mode chorus has been extensively studied since the first reports by Storey in 1953, the source mechanism and properties are still subjects of active research. Moreover, the origin of plasmaspheric hiss, the electromagnetic emission believed to be responsible for the gap between the inner and outer radiation belts, has been debated for over four decades. Although these waves can be observed in situ on spacecraft, ground-based observing stations can provide orders of magnitude higher data volumes and decades long data coverage essential for certain long-term and statistical studies of wave properties. Recent observational and theoretical works suggest that high resolution analysis of the spectral features of both hiss and chorus emissions can provide insight into generation processes and be used to validate existing theories. Application of the classic Fourier (FFT) technique unfortunately yields a tradeoff between time and frequency resolution. In additional to Fourier spectra, we employ novel methods to make spectrograms with high time and frequency resolutions, independently using minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR). These techniques are applied to ground based data observations of hiss and chorus made in Alaska. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband, structure less, incoherent emission. We quantify the extent to which plasmaspheric hiss can be a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Likewise, to date, researchers have differentiated between hiss and chorus coherency primarily using qualitative "naked eye" approaches to amplitude spectra. Using a quantitative approach to observed amplitude and we present more rigorous classification criteria for these emissions.

  7. Mechanics of Ship Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    In these notes first a simplified mathematical model is presented for analysis of ship hull loading due to grounding on relatively hard and plane sand, clay or rock sea bottoms. In a second section a more rational calculation model is described for the sea bed soil reaction forces on the sea bottom...

  8. Grounding Anger Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odis E. Simmons, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the things that drew me to grounded theory from the beginning was Glaser and Strauss’ assertion in The Discovery of Grounded Theory that it was useful as a “theoretical foothold” for practical applications (p. 268. From this, when I was a Ph.D student studying under Glaser and Strauss in the early 1970s, I devised a GT based approach to action I later came to call “grounded action.” In this short paper I’ll present a very brief sketch of an anger management program I developed in 1992, using grounded action. I began my research by attending a two-day anger management training workshop designed for training professionals in the most commonly used anger management model. Like other intervention programs I had seen, this model took a psychologizing and pathologizing approach to the issue. Following this, I sat through the full course of an anger management program that used this model, observing the reactions of the participants and the approach of the facilitator. Following each session I conducted open-ended interviews with most of the participants, either individually or in groups of two or three. I had also done previous research in counseling and social work contexts that turned out to be very relevant to an anger management program design.

  9. Grounding in Instant Messaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox Tree, Jean E.; Mayer, Sarah A.; Betts, Teresa E.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated predictions of the "collaborative theory of language use" (Clark, 1996) as applied to instant messaging (IM). This theory describes how the presence and absence of different grounding constraints causes people to interact differently across different communicative media (Clark & Brennan, 1991). In Study 1, we…

  10. Informed Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert

    2012-01-01

    There is a widespread idea that in grounded theory (GT) research, the researcher has to delay the literature review until the end of the analysis to avoid contamination--a dictum that might turn educational researchers away from GT. Nevertheless, in this article the author (a) problematizes the dictum of delaying a literature review in classic…

  11. TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 10 Optionally Manned Vehicles OMV can be driven by a soldier; OMV can drive a soldier; OMV can be remotely operated; OMV can be...all missions for OMV (i.e. shared driving) (i.e. remotely operated) 2 m od al iti es Mission Payloads UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 11 Ground

  12. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  13. Circumstellar Molecular Spectra towards Evolved Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bakker, E J

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the relevance of, and possible scientific gains which can be acquired from studying circumstellar molecular spectra toward evolved stars. Where can we expect circumstellar molecular spectra, why would we want to study these spectra, which molecules might be present, and what can we learn from these studies? We present an overview of reported detections, and discuss some of the results.

  14. Calculation of reactor antineutrino spectra in TEXONO

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Dong Liang; Mao Ze Pu; Wong, T H

    2002-01-01

    In the low energy reactor antineutrino physics experiments, either for the researches of antineutrino oscillation and antineutrino reactions, or for the measurement of abnormal magnetic moment of antineutrino, the flux and the spectra of reactor antineutrino must be described accurately. The method of calculation of reactor antineutrino spectra was discussed in detail. Furthermore, based on the actual circumstances of NP2 reactors and the arrangement of detectors, the flux and the spectra of reactor antineutrino in TEXONO were worked out

  15. FT-Raman and FTIR spectra of photoactive aminobenzazole derivatives in the solid state: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Rodrigo Martins [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Bagé, Grupo de Pesquisa em Espectroscopia de Materiais Fotônicos, 96400-970 Bagé, RS (Brazil); Rodembusch, Fabiano Severo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Grupo de Pesquisa em Fotoquímica Orgânica Aplicada, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, CEP 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Habis, Charles [Northern Virginia Community College, Manassas, VA (United States); Moreira, Eduardo Ceretta, E-mail: eduardomoreira@unipampa.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Bagé, Grupo de Pesquisa em Espectroscopia de Materiais Fotônicos, 96400-970 Bagé, RS (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    This study reports the experimental investigation of two photoactive aminobenzazole derivatives in the solid state by FT-Raman and Infrared Spectroscopies (FTIR) and its comparison with theoretical models. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational frequencies, and corresponding vibrational assignments of these compounds have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms (SIESTA) and Gaussian03 Software Package. The FT-Raman and FTIR spectra were acquired with high resolution and emission frequencies identified by simulating the vibrational modes. The most intense peak observed in the FT-Raman spectra is the in-plane deformation vibrational of O–H bond that could be related to the vibrational region responsible for the stabilization of the enol conformer in the ground state which undergoes ESIPT to form a keto tautomer in the excited state. Additionally, the position of the amino group played an important role on the vibrational characteristics of the studied compounds. Also, the simulations proved to be a good approach in undertaking the FTIR and FT-Raman experiments. The use of graphic correlations helps us to determine the method and basis that best fit the experimental results. - Highlights: • Structural and vibrational properties of two aminobenzazoles were reported. • Comparison between experimental techniques and theoretical models. • The position of the amino group played an important role on the vibrational characteristics of the studied compounds.

  16. Determination of neutron spectra using the programs GNSR and SPECTRIX

    CERN Document Server

    Weyrauch, M; Matzke, M

    2002-01-01

    We describe the capabilities and the application of two computer programs, which have been developed in order to facilitate common tasks in neutron spectrometry: GNSR (calculation of response matrices) and SPECTRIX (unfolding). Gas-filled Neutron Spectrometer Response calculates response functions and response matrices of various gas-filled neutron detectors. It can be configured to accommodate the appropriate gas-fillings and supports a number of different neutron beam configurations with a possibility to input calculated or measured neutron beam spectra. The program includes graphical capabilities as well as a context-sensitive help system. SPECTRIX implements several unfolding algorithms as well as support algorithms for unfolding and includes graphics capabilities and context-sensitive help. We apply both programs to a specific example: calculation of the response matrix of a sup 3 He detector and unfolding of the neutron spectrum of a thick accelerator target using the calculated response matrix.

  17. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over a variety of types of complex terrain: on tops of hills and escarpments, over land downstream of a water surface, and over rolling terrain. Differences between spectra over many types of complex terrain, and over uniform terrain, can be explained by these hypotheses...... is horizontal, and decrease when the flow is uphill, for the longitudinal velocity component only. Since vertical-velocity spectra contain relatively less low wavenumber energy than horizontal-velocity spectra, energetic vertical-velocity fluctuations tend to be in equilibrium with local terrain....

  18. The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-13

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  19. Comparison of reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Ando, Masatoshi; Stookey, George K.

    2000-03-01

    Development of dental caries is associated with the loss of minerals and change in the enamel structure. In this study, we have measured and compared reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel, to investigate its utility in detection and analysis of dental caries. One hundred twenty, 3-mm diameter human enamel cores, with no sign of fluorosis, tetracycline stain, hypoplasia, fracture and restorations, were prepared. The enamel surfaces then were ground and polished. Specimens were placed on a fitted holder with either black or white color for background, with no fluorescence. The baseline spectra were measured using a spectrophotometer with enclosed diffused illumination. Spectra measured from 380 to 780 nm at 5 nm intervals. All measurements were corrected to compensate for the spectrum of illumination. The specimens were divided into two groups and exposed to a demineralizing solution, for 48 and 96 hours, respectively. Reflectance spectra of specimens were measured following lesion induction. All specimens were sectioned and analyzed by transverse microradiography (TMR), where lesion depth and mineral loss ((Delta) Z) were measured. Dimensionality of multi-spectral data was reduced through its conversion to L*a*b* color coordinates and principal component analysis (PCA). Multiple linear regression analysis showed low correlation between L*a*b* and lesion depth and mineral loss. PCA analysis showed higher correlation coefficient, compared to L*a*b*. Preliminary results of this study suggest that multi-spectral measurement and analysis of the tooth surface could be useful in predicting the depth and severity of an early carious lesion.

  20. Unfolding the fast neutron spectra of a BC501A liquid scintillation detector using GRAVEL method

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yonghao; Lei, Jiarong; An, Li; Zhang, Xiaodong; Shao, Jianxiong; Zheng, Pu; Wang, Xinhua

    2013-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectra is useful in basic research and applications. The overall procedure of measuring and unfolding the fast neutron energy spectra with BC501A liquid scintillation detector is described. The recoil proton spectrum of Am-Be neutrons was obtained experimentally. With the NRESP7 code, the response matrix of detector was simulated. Combining the recoil proton spectrum and response matrix, the unfolding of neutron spectra was performed by GRAVEL iterative algorithm. A MatLab program based on the GRAVEL method was developed. The continuous neutron spectrum of Am-Be source and monoenergetic neutron spectrum of D-T source have been unfolded successfully and are in good agreement with their standard reference spectra. The unfolded Am-Be spectrum are more accurate than the spectra unfolded by artificial neural networks in recent years.

  1. Unfolding the fast neutron spectra of a BC501A liquid scintillation detector using GRAVEL method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YongHao; Chen, XiMeng; Lei, JiaRong; An, Li; Zhang, XiaoDong; Shao, JianXiong; Zheng, Pu; Wang, XinHua

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectra is useful in basic research and applications. The overall procedure of measuring and unfolding the fast neutron energy spectra with BC501A liquid scintillation detector is described. The recoil proton spectrum of 241Am-Be neutrons was obtained experimentally. With the NRESP7 code, the response matrix of detector was simulated. Combining the recoil proton spectrum and response matrix, the unfolding of neutron spectra was performed by GRAVEL iterative algorithm. A MatLab program based on the GRAVEL method was developed. The continuous neutron spectrum of 241Am-Be source and monoenergetic neutron spectrum of D-T source have been unfolded successfully and are in good agreement with their standard reference spectra. The unfolded 241Am-Be spectrum are more accurate than the spectra unfolded by artificial neural networks in recent years.

  2. PART I: Theoretical Site Response Estimation for Microzoning Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllidis, P.; Suhadolc, P.; Hatzidimitriou, P. M.; Anastasiadis, A.; Theodulidis, N.

    We estimate the theoretical site response along seven cross sections located in the city of Thessaloniki (Greece). For this purpose the 2-D structural models used are based on the known geometry and the dynamic soil properties derived from borehole measurements and other geophysical techniques. Several double-couple sources have been employed to generate the seismic wavefield, and a hybrid method that combines the modal summation with finite differences, has been deployed to produce synthetic accelerograms to a maximum frequency of 6 Hz for all components of motion. The ratios between the response spectra of signals derived for the 2-D local model and the corresponding spectra of signals derived for the 1-D bedrock reference model at the same site, allow us to estimate the site response due to lateral heterogeneities. We interpret the results in terms of both geological and geometrical features of the models and of the characteristics of the wave propagation. The cases discussed confirm that the geometry and depth of the rock basement, along with the impedance contrast, are responsible for ground amplification phenomena such as edge effects and generation and entrapment of local surface waves. Our analysis also confirms that the peak ground acceleration is not well correlated with damage and that a substantially better estimator for possible damage is the spectral amplification.

  3. Progress of research on the response of information of karst cave drip water to ground conditions%喀斯特洞穴滴水信息对地表环境响应研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘子琦; 熊康宁; 吕小溪; 张乾柱; 付超凡

    2015-01-01

    By reviewing domestic and foreign research progress on the response of information of karst cave drip water to ground conditions,coupled with the research background of global climate change,karst envi-ronmental evolution and drip water's physical and chemical indicators,this paper divides the history of this research into three stages:initial stage,slow development stage and rapid growth stage.This paper also sys-tematically summarizes the research results and understandings of drip water's regular monitoring indicators, stable isotopes,major elements,trace elements,and so on.Meanwhile,it concluded the research progress of drip water's response to atmosphere,vegetation,soil and bedrock.It is suggested that the material re-source and the hydro-geochemical process of drip water should be explored,the research for drip's sensitivity to indicate environment should be enhanced,the environment response mechanism of drip's information should be deeply probed and comprehensive environment elements of cave systems should be monitored.It is also pointed out that the research on the rocky desertification by drip water's indicators remains relatively weak now,which should be the focused topic in the future.%通过系统回顾国内外喀斯特洞穴滴水信息对地表环境响应的研究进展,结合全球气候变化、喀斯特环境演变与滴水理化指标的研究发展背景,把该领域的研究发展历程划分为萌芽期、缓慢发展期和高速增长期3个阶段。对滴水常规监测指标、稳定同位素及常/微量元素等指标的研究成果与认识进行了系统归纳,并对滴水响应外界大气、地表植被、洞穴上覆土壤以及洞顶基岩等4方面的研究进展进行总结。认为应当探究滴水的物质来源及其水文地球化学过程,加强对滴水信息环境指示的敏感性研究,深入认识滴水信息的环境响应机制,对洞穴系统综合环境要素开展监测等,同时指出运用滴水

  4. TDDFT Study of the Electronic Structure, Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Light Emitters of the Amazing Firefly Bioluminescence and Solvation Effects on the Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN,Ai-Min; GUO,Jing-Fu; FENG,Ji-Kang; ZOU,Lu-Yi; LI,Zhong-Wei; GODDARD,John,David

    2008-01-01

    The ground and excited state properties of luciferin (LH2) and oxyluciferin (OxyLH2), the bioluminescent chemicals in the firefly, have been characterized using density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TDDFT) methods. The effects of solvation on the electronic absorption and emission spectra of luciferin and oxyluciferin were predicted with a self-consistent isodensity polarized continuum model of the solvent using TDDFT.The S0→S1 vertical excitation energies in the gas phase and in water were obtained. Optimizations of the excited state geometries permitted the first predictions of the fluorescence spectra for these biologically important molecules. Shifts in both of the absorption and emission spectra on proceeding from the gas phase to aqueous solution were also predicted.

  5. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  6. Infrasonic induced ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ting-Li

    On January 28, 2004, the CERI seismic network recorded seismic signals generated by an unknown source. Our conclusion is that the acoustic waves were initiated by an explosive source near the ground surface. The meteorological temperature and effective sound speed profiles suggested existence of an efficient near-surface waveguide that allowed the acoustic disturbance to propagate to large distances. An explosion occurring in an area of forest and farms would have limited the number of eyewitnesses. Resolution of the source might be possible by experiment or by detailed analysis of the ground motion data. A seismo-acoustic array was built to investigate thunder-induced ground motions. Two thunder events with similar N-wave waveforms but different horizontal slownesses are chosen to evaluate the credibility of using thunder as a seismic source. These impulsive acoustic waves excited P and S reverberations in the near surface that depend on both the incident wave horizontal slowness and the velocity structure in the upper 30 meters. Nineteen thunder events were chosen to further investigate the seismo-acoustic coupling. The consistent incident slowness differences between acoustic pressure and ground motions suggest that ground reverberations were first initiated somewhat away from the array. Acoustic and seismic signals were used to generate the time-domain transfer function through the deconvolution technique. Possible non-linear interaction for acoustic propagation into the soil at the surface was observed. The reverse radial initial motions suggest a low Poisson's ratio for the near-surface layer. The acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions show a consistent reverberation series of the Rayleigh wave type, which has a systematic dispersion relation to incident slownesses inferred from the seismic ground velocity. Air-coupled Rayleigh wave dispersion was used to quantitatively constrain the near-surface site structure with constraints afforded by near-surface body

  7. Calculation of Spectra of Solids:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    The Gilat-Raubenheimer method simplified to tetrahedron division is used to calculate the real and imaginary part of the dynamical response function for electrons. A frequency expansion for the real part is discussed. The Lindhard function is calculated as a test for numerical accuracy. The condu...

  8. IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is one in a series of Ground Water Issue papers which have been prepared in response to needs expressed by the Ground Water Forum. It is based on findings from the research community in concert with experience gained at sites undergoing remediation. the intent of th...

  9. Collective excitations, instabilities, and ground state in dense quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbar, E V; Miransky, V A; Shovkovy, I A; Hashimoto, Michio

    2006-01-01

    We study the spectrum of light plasmons in the (gapped and gapless) two-flavor color superconducting phases and its connection with the chromomagnetic instabilities and the structure of the ground state. It is revealed that the chromomagnetic instabilities in the 4-7th and 8th gluonic channels correspond to two very different plasmon spectra. These spectra lead us to the unequivocal conclusion about the existence of gluonic condensates (some of which can be spatially inhomogeneous) in the ground state. We also argue that spatially inhomogeneous gluonic condensates should exist in the three-flavor quark matter with the values of the mass of strange quark corresponding to the gapless color-flavor locked state.

  10. Near Infrared Spectra of the Orion Bar

    CERN Document Server

    Marconi, A; Natta, A; Walmsley, C M; Spazio, D A S; Firenze, U; Arcetri, O A

    1997-01-01

    We have used the LONGSP spectrometer on the 1.5-m TIRGO telescope to obtain long slit spectra in the J, H, and K wavelength bands towards two positions along the Orion bar. These data have been supplemented with images made using the ARNICA camera mounted on TIRGO as well as with an ESO NTT observation carried out by Dr A. Moorwood. We detect a variety of transitions of hydrogen, helium, OI, FeII, FeIII, and H_2 . From our molecular hydrogen data, we conclude that densities are moderate (3-6 10^4 cm^-3) in the layer responsible for the molecular hydrogen emission and give no evidence for the presence of dense neutral clumps. We also find that the molecular hydrogen bar is likely to be tilted by ~10 degrees relative to the line of sight. We discuss the relative merits of several models of the structure of the bar and conclude that it may be split into two structures separated by 0.2-0.3 parsec along the line of sight. It also seems likely to us that in both structures, density increases along a line perpendicu...

  11. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  12. Ibis ground calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, A.J.; Barlow, E.J.; Tikkanen, T. [Southampton Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica - IASF/CNR, Roma (Italy); Blondel, C.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F. [CEA Saclay - Sap, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Di Cocco, G.; Malaguti, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Bologna - IASF/CNR (Italy); Gabriele, M.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica- IASF/CNR, Palermo (Italy); Quadrini, E. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica-Cosmica, EASF/CNR, Milano (Italy); Volkmer, R. [Institut fur Astronomie und Astrophysik, Tubingen (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    We present an overview of results obtained from IBIS ground calibrations. The spectral and spatial characteristics of the detector planes and surrounding passive materials have been determined through a series of calibration campaigns. Measurements of pixel gain, energy resolution, detection uniformity, efficiency and imaging capability are presented. The key results obtained from the ground calibration have been: - optimization of the instrument tunable parameters, - determination of energy linearity for all detection modes, - determination of energy resolution as a function of energy through the range 20 keV - 3 MeV, - demonstration of imaging capability in each mode, - measurement of intrinsic detector non-uniformity and understanding of the effects of passive materials surrounding the detector plane, and - discovery (and closure) of various leakage paths through the passive shielding system.

  13. Thermoluminescence spectra measured with a Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschberger, P. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Elektrische Messtechnik)

    1991-01-01

    A Michelson interferometer was redesigned to prove its capabilities in the measurement of short-lived, low-intensity thermoluminescence spectra. Interferograms are collected during heating up the thermoluminescent probe in a heater plate. A personal computer controls the data acquisition and processes the Fourier transform. As the results show, even a comparatively simple and limited setup leads to relevant and reproducible spectra. (author).

  14. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  15. Moessbauer Spectra of Clays and Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, F. E.; Wagner, U. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-06-15

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical aspects of the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in studies of clay-based ceramics are described. Moessbauer spectra of pottery clays fired under oxidising, reducing and changing conditions are explained, and the possibilities of using Moessbauer spectra to derive information on the firing temperatures and the kiln atmosphere during firing in antiquity are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  16. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  17. Tunneling spectra of graphene on copper unraveled

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xin; Stradi, Daniele; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    mechanisms, etc. The interpretation of the spectra can be complicated, however. Specifically for graphene grown on copper, there have been conflicting reports of tunneling spectra. A clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the variability is desired. In this work, we have revealed that the root cause...

  18. POLLUX : a database of synthetic stellar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Palacios, A; Josselin, E; Martins, F; Plez, B; Belmas, M; Lebre, A

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic spectra are needed to determine fundamental stellar and wind parameters of all types of stars. They are also used for the construction of theoretical spectral libraries helpful for stellar population synthesis. Therefore, a database of theoretical spectra is required to allow rapid and quantitative comparisons to spectroscopic data. We provide such a database offering an unprecedented coverage of the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We present the POLLUX database of synthetic stellar spectra. For objects with Teff 25 000 K). Their spectra are computed with CMF_FLUX. Both high resolution (R>150 000) optical spectra in the range 3 000 to 12 000 A and spectral energy distributions extending from the UV to near--IR ranges are presented. These spectra cover the HR diagram at solar metallicity. We propose a wide variety of synthetic spectra for various types of stars in a format that is compliant with the Virtual Observatory standards. A user--friendly web interface allows an easy selection of spectra...

  19. Mechanics of Ship Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    In these notes first a simplified mathematical model is presented for analysis of ship hull loading due to grounding on relatively hard and plane sand, clay or rock sea bottoms. In a second section a more rational calculation model is described for the sea bed soil reaction forces on the sea bottom....... Finally, overall hull failure is considered first applying a quasistatic analysis model and thereafter a full dynamic model....

  20. Spectra-selective PbS quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Keke; Deng, Hui; Yang, Xiaokun; Dong, Dongdong; Li, Min; Hu, Long; Liu, Huan; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Traditional photoconductive photodetectors (PDs) commonly respond to higher energy photons compared with the bandgaps of PD active materials. Different from the wide detection spectra of traditional PDs, the present reported PbS quantum dot (QD) PDs can detect the spectra-selective light source. Spectra-selective PDs (ss-PDs) of perovskite/QDs and QD/QDs were respectively implemented by integrating two functional layers. The top layer (facing the light) was utilized to filter the non-target spectra and the bottom layer was used for detection. The response spectrum wavelength and the range of ss-PDs can be conveniently tailored by tuning the QD size. The obtained selectivity factor and normalized detectivity ratio from target and non-target illumination can reach at least 10. A narrow detection range with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) ~100 nm was applied by typical QD/QD based ss-PDs. The prototype ss-PDs were successfully applied in identifying an unknown light source. The convenient tuning and identification capabilities of the present QD based ss-PDs may provide a versatile route to obtain highly spectrum-selective PDs in order to meet the demands for special fields.