WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground coil models

  1. Optimized ground-coupled heat pump system design for northern climate applications. [Including ground coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.; Baxter, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of the performance of a ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) system with a water - source heat pump package designed expressly for such systems operating in a northern climate. The project objective was to minimize the life-cycle cost of a GCHP system by optimizing the design of both the heat pump package and the ground coil in concert. In order to achieve this objective, a number of modelling tools were developed or modified to analyze the heat pump's performance and cost and the ground coil's performance. The life-cycle cost of a GCHP system (water-source heat pump with a horizontal ground coil) for an 1800 ft/sup 2/ (167 m/sup 2/) house in Pittsburgh, PA, was minimized over a 7 year economic life. Simple payback for the optimized GCHP system, relative to conventional air-source heat pumps, was under 3 years. The water-source heat pump package resulting from this optimization is calculated to cost 21% more than its conventional counterpart with a heating coefficient of performance (COP) about 20% higher, and a cooling COP about 23% higher. In the GCHP system modeled, its annual energy savings are predicted to be about 11% compared to a system designed around the conventional heat pump while having about the same installation cost. The major conclusion of this study is - GCHP system performance improvement can be attained by improving the water-source heat pump package at less cost than by buying more ground coil. The following conclusions were drawn from the steady-state performance optimization results: (1) By adding about $100.00 to the manufacturer's cost off construction, both the heating and cooling COPs can be improved by 20% or more. (2) Cooling COP need not be sacrificed for the sake of heating performance and vice versa. 13 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Development of Ground Coils with Low Eddy Current Loss by Applying the Compression Molding Method after the Coil Winding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Aiba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Ota, Satoru; Okada, Shigenori

    In a magnetically levitated transportation (MAGLEV) system, a huge number of ground coils will be required because they must be laid for the whole line. Therefore, stable performance and reduced cost are essential requirements for the ground coil development. On the other hand, because the magnetic field changes when the superconducting magnet passes by, an eddy current will be generated in the conductor of the ground coil and will result in energy loss. The loss not only increases the magnetic resistance for the train running but also brings an increase in the ground coil temperature. Therefore, the reduction of the eddy current loss is extremely important. This study examined ground coils in which both the eddy current loss and temperature increase were small. Furthermore, quantitative comparison for the eddy current loss of various magnet wire samples was performed by bench test. On the basis of the comparison, a round twisted wire having low eddy current loss was selected as an effective ground coil material. In addition, the ground coils were manufactured on trial. A favorable outlook to improve the size accuracy of the winding coil and uneven thickness of molded resin was obtained without reducing the insulation strength between the coil layers by applying a compression molding after winding.

  3. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  4. CS model coil experimental log book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  5. ITER Side Correction Coil Quench model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollet, S.; Bessette, D.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J. L.; Gauthier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2016-12-01

    Previous thermohydraulic studies performed for the ITER TF, CS and PF magnet systems have brought some important information on the detection and consequences of a quench as a function of the initial conditions (deposited energy, heated length). Even if the temperature margin of the Correction Coils is high, their behavior during a quench should also be studied since a quench is likely to be triggered by potential anomalies in joints, ground fault on the instrumentation wires, etc. A model has been developed with the SuperMagnet Code (Bagnasco et al., 2010) for a Side Correction Coil (SCC2) with four pancakes cooled in parallel, each of them represented by a Thea module (with the proper Cable In Conduit Conductor characteristics). All the other coils of the PF cooling loop are hydraulically connected in parallel (top/bottom correction coils and six Poloidal Field Coils) are modeled by Flower modules with equivalent hydraulics properties. The model and the analysis results are presented for five quench initiation cases with/without fast discharge: two quenches initiated by a heat input to the innermost turn of one pancake (case 1 and case 2) and two other quenches initiated at the innermost turns of four pancakes (case 3 and case 4). In the 5th case, the quench is initiated at the middle turn of one pancake. The impact on the cooling circuit, e.g. the exceedance of the opening pressure of the quench relief valves, is detailed in case of an undetected quench (i.e. no discharge of the magnet). Particular attention is also paid to a possible secondary quench detection system based on measured thermohydraulic signals (pressure, temperature and/or helium mass flow rate). The maximum cable temperature achieved in case of a fast current discharge (primary detection by voltage) is compared to the design hot spot criterion of 150 K, which includes the contribution of helium and jacket.

  6. Modeling Endovascular MRI Coil Coupling with Transmit RF Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Madhav; Unal, Orhan; Hurley, Samuel; Samsonov, Alexey; Wang, Peng; Fain, Sean; Kurpad, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To model inductive coupling of endovascular coils with transmit RF excitation for selecting coils for MRI-guided interventions. Methods Independent and computationally efficient FEM models are developed for the endovascular coil, cable, transmit excitation and imaging domain. Electromagnetic and circuit solvers are coupled to simulate net B1+ fields and induced currents and voltages. Our models are validated using the Bloch Siegert B1+ mapping sequence for a series-tuned multimode coil, capable of tracking, wireless visualization and high resolution endovascular imaging. Results Validation shows good agreement at 24, 28 and 34 μT background RF excitation within experimental limitations. Quantitative coil performance metrics agree with simulation. A parametric study demonstrates trade off in coil performance metrics when varying number of coil turns. Tracking, imaging and wireless marker multimode coil features and their integration is demonstrated in a pig study. Conclusion Developed models for the multimode coil were successfully validated. Modeling for geometric optimization and coil selection serves as a precursor to time-consuming and expensive experiments. Specific applications demonstrated include parametric optimization, coil selection for a cardiac intervention and an animal imaging experiment. Significance Our modular, adaptable and computationally efficient modeling approach enables rapid comparison, selection and optimization of inductively-coupled coils for MRI-guided interventions. PMID:26960218

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Study on Ground Coupled Heat Pump with Vertical Spiral Coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新国; 周倩; 赵军; 朱强; 胡璟

    2003-01-01

    The numerical simulation study on the temperature distribution of underground field for the ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) with vertical spiral coil was carried out by using finite element. The distribution and recovery of underground field temperature under different operation ratio and the optimal operation ratio were simulated. The performance parameters, i.e. inlet and outlet temperature of the ground spiral coil in heating and cooling modes were tested, the heat extracted or emitted by the heat pump to the ground was calculated, and the coefficients of performance (COP) of GCHP at heating and cooling modes were analyzed.

  8. Detection of alpha-helical coiled-coil dimer formation by spin-labeled synthetic peptides: a model parallel coiled-coil peptide and the antiparallel coiled coil formed by a replica of the ProP C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillar, Alexander; Tripet, Brian; Zoetewey, David; Wood, Janet M; Hodges, Robert S; Boggs, Joan M

    2003-12-30

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine relative peptide orientation within homodimeric, alpha-helical coiled-coil structures. Introduction of cysteine (Cys) residues into peptides/proteins for spin labeling allows detection of their oligomerization from exchange broadening or dipolar interactions between residues within 25 A of each other. Two synthetic peptides containing Cys substitutions were used: a 35-residue model peptide and the 30-residue ProP peptide. The model peptide is known to form a stable, parallel homodimeric coiled coil, which is partially destabilized by Cys substitutions at heptad a and d positions (peptides C30a and C33d). The ProP peptide, a 30-residue synthetic peptide, corresponds to residues 468-497 of osmoregulatory transporter ProP from Escherichia coli. It forms a relatively unstable, homodimeric coiled coil that is predicted to be antiparallel in orientation. Cys was introduced in heptad g positions of the ProP peptide, near the N-terminus (K473C, creating peptide C473g) or closer to the center of the sequence (E480C, creating peptide C480g). In contrast to the destabilizing effect of Cys substitution at the core heptad a or d positions of model peptides C30a and C33d, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Cys substitutions at the heptad g positions of the ProP peptide had little or no effect on coiled-coil stability. Thermal denaturation analysis showed that spin labeling increased the stability of the coiled coil for all peptides. Strong exchange broadening was detected for both C30a and C33d, in agreement with a parallel structure. EPR spectra of C480g had a large hyperfine splitting of about 90 G, indicative of strong dipole-dipole interactions and a distance between spin-labeled residues of less than 9 A. Spin-spin interactions were much weaker for C473g. These results supported the hypothesis that the ProP peptide primarily formed an antiparallel coiled coil, since formation of a parallel dimer

  9. Mechanical characteristics of the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Dudarev, A; Mayri, C; Miele, P; Sun, Z; ten Kate, H H J; Volpini, G

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been tested at CERN to verify the design parameters of the Barrel Toroid coils (BT). The mechanical behavior of the B0 superconducting coil and its support structure is reported and compared with coil design calculations. The mechanical stresses and structural force levels during cooling down and excitation phases were monitored using strain gauges, position sensors and capacitive force transducers instrumentation. In the ATLAS magnet test facility, a magnetic mirror is used to reproduce the electromagnetic forces present in the BT coils, once these are assembled in toroid in the underground cavern in 2004. (8 refs).

  10. Performance verification tests of JT-60SA CS model coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obana, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: obana.tetsuhiro@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Murakami, Haruyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Takahata, Kazuya; Hamaguchi, Shinji; Chikaraishi, Hirotaka; Mito, Toshiyuki; Imagawa, Shinsaku [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kizu, Kaname; Natsume, Kyohei; Yoshida, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The performance of the JT-60SA CS model coil was verified. • The CS model coil comprised a quad-pancake wound with a Nb{sub 3}Sn CIC conductor. • The CS model coil met the design requirements. - Abstract: As a final check of the coil manufacturing method of the JT-60 Super Advanced (JT-60SA) central solenoid (CS), we verified the performance of a CS model coil. The model coil comprised a quad-pancake wound with a Nb{sub 3}Sn cable-in-conduit conductor. Measurements of the critical current, joint resistance, pressure drop, and magnetic field were conducted in the verification tests. In the critical-current measurement, the critical current of the model coil coincided with the estimation derived from a strain of −0.62% for the Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. As a result, critical-current degradation caused by the coil manufacturing process was not observed. The results of the performance verification tests indicate that the model coil met the design requirements. Consequently, the manufacturing process of the JT-60SA CS was established.

  11. Magnetic field measurements of JT-60SA CS model coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obana, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: obana.tetsuhiro@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Takahata, Kazuya; Hamaguchi, Shinji; Chikaraishi, Hirotaka; Mito, Toshiyuki; Imagawa, Shinsaku [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kizu, Kaname; Murakami, Haruyuki; Natsume, Kyohei; Yoshida, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Magnetic fields of the JT-60SA CS model coil were measured. • While the coil current was held constant at 20 kA, magnetic fields varied slightly with several different long time constants. • We investigated coils consisting of CIC conductors and having long time constants. - Abstract: In a cold test of the JT-60SA CS model coil, which has a quad-pancake configuration consisting of a Nb{sub 3}Sn cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor, magnetic fields were measured using Hall sensors. For a holding coil current of 20 kA, measured magnetic fields varied slightly with long time constants in the range 17–571 s, which was much longer than the time constant derived from a measurement using a short straight sample. To validate the measurements, the magnetic fields of the model coil were calculated using a computational model representing the positions of Nb{sub 3}Sn strands inside the CIC conductor. The calculated results were in good agreement with the measurements. Consequently, the validity of the magnetic field measurements was confirmed. Next, we investigated other coils consisting of CIC conductors and having long time constants. The only commonality among the coils was the use of CIC conductors. At present, there is no obvious way to prevent generation of such magnetic-field variations with long time constants.

  12. Analysis of the cooldown of the ITER central solenoid model coil and insert coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifetto, R.; Brighenti, A.; Isono, T.; Martovetsky, N.; Kawano, K.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2017-01-01

    A series of superconducting insert coils (ICs) made of different materials has been tested since 2000 at JAEA Naka in the bore of the central solenoid model coil at fields up to 13 T and currents up to several tens of kA, fully representative of the ITER operating conditions. Here we focus on the 2015 test of the presently last IC of the series, the central solenoid (CS) insert coil, which was aimed at confirming the performance and properties of the Nb3Sn conductor, manufactured in Japan and used to wind the ITER CS modules in the US. As typical for these large scale applications, the cooldown (CD) from ambient to supercritical He temperature may take a long time, of the order of several weeks, so that it should be useful, also in the perspective of future IC tests, to optimize it. To that purpose, a comprehensive CD model implemented in the 4C code is developed and presented in this paper. The model is validated against the experimental data of an actual CD scenario, showing a very good agreement between simulation and measurements, from 300 to 4.5 K. The maximum temperature difference across the coil, which can only be roughly estimated from the measurements, is then extracted from the results of the simulation and shown to be much larger than the maximum value of 50 K, prescribed on the basis of the allowable thermal stress on the materials. An optimized CD scenario is finally designed using the model for the initial phase of the CD between 300 and 80 K, which allows reducing the needed time by ∼20%, while still satisfying the major constraints. Recommendations are also given for a better location/choice of the thermometers to be used for the monitoring of the maximum temperature difference across the coil.

  13. Review of the ATLAS B0 model coil test program

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgetta, N; Acerbi, E; Berriaud, C; Boxman, H; Broggi, F; Cataneo, F; Daël, A; Delruelle, N; Dudarev, A; Foussat, A; Haug, F; ten Kate, H H J; Mayri, C; Paccalini, A; Pengo, R; Rivoltella, G; Sbrissa, E

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been extensively tested, reproducing the operational conditions of the final ATLAS Barrel Toroid coils. Two test campaigns have taken place on B0, at the CERN facility where the individual BT coils are about to be tested. The first campaign aimed to test the cool-down, warm-up phases and to commission the coil up to its nominal current of 20.5 kA, reproducing Lorentz forces similar to the ones on the BT coil. The second campaign aimed to evaluate the margins above the nominal conditions. The B0 was tested up to 24 kA and specific tests were performed to assess: the coil temperature margin with respect to the design value, the performance of the double pancake internal joints, static and dynamic heat loads, behavior of the coil under quench conditions. The paper reviews the overall test program with emphasis on second campaign results not covered before. 10 Refs.

  14. Modeling of Lossy Inductance in Moving-Coil Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Xiao-Peng; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Zeng, Xin-Wu

    2015-01-01

    The electrical impedance of moving-coil loudspeakers is dominated by the lossy inductance in high frequency range. Using the equivalent electrical circuit method, a new model for the lossy inductance based on separate functions for the magnitude and phase of the impedance is presented. The electr......The electrical impedance of moving-coil loudspeakers is dominated by the lossy inductance in high frequency range. Using the equivalent electrical circuit method, a new model for the lossy inductance based on separate functions for the magnitude and phase of the impedance is presented...

  15. The normal zone propagation in ATLAS B00 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The B00 model coil has been successfully tested in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility at CERN. The coil consists of two double pancakes wound with aluminum stabilized cables of the barrel- and end-cap toroids conductors for the ATLAS detector. The magnet current is applied up to 24 kA and quenches are induced by firing point heaters. The normal zone velocity is measured over a wide range of currents by using pickup coils, voltage taps and superconducting quench detectors. The signals coming from various sensors are presented and analyzed. The results extracted from the various detection methods are in good agreement. It is found that the characteristic velocities vary from 5 to 20 m/s at 15 and 24 kA respectively. In addition, the minimum quench energies at different applied magnet currents are presented. (6 refs).

  16. Synthesis, model and stability of helically coiled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejes, Dora; Raffai, Manuella; Hernadi, Klara

    2013-01-01

    Structural model of helically coiled carbon nanotubes is proposed. It is constructed by means of topological coordinate method. Relaxation and cohesive energy calculation are performed by molecular mechanics, using second-generation bond order potential for hydrocarbons introduced by D. W. Brenner....... Our experiments focused on the production and development of catalysts for the synthesis of helically coiled CNTs (carbon nanotubes). The catalysts were tested in the decomposition of acetylene by CCVD (Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition) method. The carbon deposit was imaged by TEM (Transmission...

  17. Outdoor ground impedance models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenborough, Keith; Bashir, Imran; Taherzadeh, Shahram

    2011-05-01

    Many models for the acoustical properties of rigid-porous media require knowledge of parameter values that are not available for outdoor ground surfaces. The relationship used between tortuosity and porosity for stacked spheres results in five characteristic impedance models that require not more than two adjustable parameters. These models and hard-backed-layer versions are considered further through numerical fitting of 42 short range level difference spectra measured over various ground surfaces. For all but eight sites, slit-pore, phenomenological and variable porosity models yield lower fitting errors than those given by the widely used one-parameter semi-empirical model. Data for 12 of 26 grassland sites and for three beech wood sites are fitted better by hard-backed-layer models. Parameter values obtained by fitting slit-pore and phenomenological models to data for relatively low flow resistivity grounds, such as forest floors, porous asphalt, and gravel, are consistent with values that have been obtained non-acoustically. Three impedance models yield reasonable fits to a narrow band excess attenuation spectrum measured at short range over railway ballast but, if extended reaction is taken into account, the hard-backed-layer version of the slit-pore model gives the most reasonable parameter values.

  18. Modelling of a Coil Steam Generator for CSP applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelagotti, Leonardo; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph;

    2014-01-01

    The project investigates a new design for a CSP plant steam generation system, the Coil Steam Generator (CSG). This system allows faster start-ups and therefore higher daily energy production from the Sun. An analytical thermodynamic simulation model of the evaporator and a mechanical analysis...

  19. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed.

  20. Development of Computational Models for Coiling Process with the Belt Wrapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yonghui; Park, Hyunchul

    2016-10-01

    This study introduces coiling mechanism with the belt wrapper to understand a force equilibrium for successful coiling. By establishing a finite element (FE) model, strips were coiled 2 to 3 rotations by the belt wrapper on the sleeve without coiling tension T, then T was applied to the opposite side of the strips near the pinch roller, and the belt wrapper was removed from the strip coil at the same time. Additionally, analytical model corresponding to FE model was defined by thick and thin cylinder theorems to quantize coiling mechanisms. Especially elasticity of the belt wrapper E [N/m2], coiling tension T [N/m2], and friction coefficient μ were checked on how these variables affect each other, were converted into pressure P [N/m2], and P were used to calculate when the strip coil come untied. For instance, the strip coil came untied when E was lower than 1 × 109 N/m2 corresponding to ( {{{{Pressure}} {{on}} {{outmost}} {{of the belt wrapper}} P_{{o,belt}} }/{{{Pressure} {{on}} {{innermost}} {{of the sleeve}} P_{{i,sleeve}} }} = 0.877} ) . Lastly, radial stress on the outmost of the sleeve σ r,o,sleeve [N/m2] according to E were compared to the previous coiling method with the grooved joint to see how these methods are different. Based on these results, this paper suggests coiling criteria to avoid coiling failure of slip of the strip coil.

  1. Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed

    CERN Document Server

    Durante, M; Ferracin, P; Fessia, P; Gauthier, R; Giloux, C; Guinchard, M; Kircher, F; Manil, P; Milanese, A; Millot, J-F; Muñoz Garcia, J-E; Oberli, L; Perez, J-C; Pietrowicz, S; Rifflet, J-M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F; Todesco, E; Viret, P; Ziemianski, D

    2013-01-01

    This report is the deliverable report 7.3.1 “Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed “. The report has four parts: “Design report for the dipole magnet”, “Dipole magnet structure tested in LN2”, “Nb3Sn strand procured for one dipole magnet” and “One test double pancake copper coil made”. The 4 report parts show that, although the magnet construction will be only completed by end 2014, all elements are present for a successful completion. Due to the importance of the project for the future of the participants and given the significant investments done by the participants, there is a full commitment to finish the project.

  2. Dipole model test with one superconducting coil: results analysed

    CERN Document Server

    Bajas, H; Benda, V; Berriaud, C; Bajko, M; Bottura, L; Caspi, S; Charrondiere, M; Clément, S; Datskov, V; Devaux, M; Durante, M; Fazilleau, P; Ferracin, P; Fessia, P; Gauthier, R; Giloux, C; Guinchard, M; Kircher, F; Manil, P; Milanese, A; Millot, J-F; Muñoz Garcia, J-E; Oberli, L; Perez, J-C; Pietrowicz, S; Rifflet, J-M; de Rijk, G; Rondeaux, F; Todesco, E; Viret, P; Ziemianski, D

    2013-01-01

    This report is the deliverable report 7.3.1 “Dipole model test with one superconducting coil; results analysed “. The report has four parts: “Design report for the dipole magnet”, “Dipole magnet structure tested in LN2”, “Nb3Sn strand procured for one dipole magnet” and “One test double pancake copper coil made”. The 4 report parts show that, although the magnet construction will be only completed by end 2014, all elements are present for a successful completion. Due to the importance of the project for the future of the participants and given the significant investments done by the participants, there is a full commitment to finish the project.

  3. Improved transcranial magnetic stimulation coil design with realistic head modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We are investigating Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a noninvasive technique based on electromagnetic induction which causes stimulation of the neurons in the brain. TMS can be used as a pain-free alternative to conventional electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) which is still widely implemented for treatment of major depression. Development of improved TMS coils capable of stimulating subcortical regions could also allow TMS to replace invasive deep brain stimulation (DBS) which requires surgical implantation of electrodes in the brain. Our new designs allow new applications of the technique to be established for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications of psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Calculation of the fields generated inside the head is vital for the use of this method for treatment. In prior work we have implemented a realistic head model, incorporating inhomogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, allowing the site of neuronal activation to be accurately calculated. We will show how we utilize this model in the development of novel TMS coil designs to improve the depth of penetration and localization of stimulation produced by stimulator coils.

  4. Mathematical Model for Temperature Field of Strip Coil in Cooling and Heating Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ji-quan; SUN Jing-hong; WU Bin; LIAN Jia-chuang

    2005-01-01

    The convection between the strip coil boundary and the surrounding medium was studied,and the math ematical model and boundary conditions for the temperature field of anisotropic strip coil was proposed,and the temperature field of strip coil were calculated by the analytic method.

  5. Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

  6. ITER CS Model Coil and CS Insert Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Michael, P; Minervina, J; Radovinsky, A; Takayasu, M; Thome, R; Ando, T; Isono, T; Kato, T; Nakajima, H; Nishijima, G; Nunoya, Y; Sugimoto, M; Takahashi, Y; Tsuji, H; Bessette, D; Okuno, K; Ricci, M

    2000-09-07

    The Inner and Outer modules of the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) were built by US and Japanese home teams in collaboration with European and Russian teams to demonstrate the feasibility of a superconducting Central Solenoid for ITER and other large tokamak reactors. The CSMC mass is about 120 t, OD is about 3.6 m and the stored energy is 640 MJ at 46 kA and peak field of 13 T. Testing of the CSMC and the CS Insert took place at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) from mid March until mid August 2000. This paper presents the main results of the tests performed.

  7. Modelling of subsonic COIL with an arbitrary magnetic modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beránek, Jaroslav; Rohlena, Karel

    2007-05-01

    The concept of 1D subsonic COIL model with a mixing length was generalized to include the influence of a variable magnetic field on the stimulated emission cross-section. Equations describing the chemical kinetics were solved taking into account together with the gas temperature also a simplified mixing model of oxygen and iodine molecules. With the external time variable magnetic field the model is no longer stationary. A transformation in the system moving with the mixture reduces partial differential equations to ordinary equations in time with initial conditions given either by the stationary flow at the moment when the magnetic field is switched on combined with the boundary conditions at the injector. Advantage of this procedure is a possibility to consider an arbitrary temporal dependence of the imposed magnetic field and to calculate directly the response of the laser output. The method was applied to model the experimental data measured with the subsonic version of the COIL device in the Institute of Physics, Prague, where the applied magnetic field had a saw-tooth dependence. We found that various values characterizing the laser performance, such as the power density distribution over the active zone cross-section, may have a fairly complicated structure given by combined effects of the delayed reaction to the magnetic switching and the flow velocity. This is necessarily translated in a time dependent spatial inhomogeneity of output beam intensity profile.

  8. Assessment of Matrix coils in a canine model of a large bifurcation aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Joon K.; Niimi, Yasunari; Yoshino, Yoshikazu; Khoyama, Shinya; Berenstein, Alejandro [Roosevelt Hospital, Center for Endovascular Surgery, Beth Israel Hyman-Newman Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Controversy exists as to whether Matrix coils are an improvement over bare platinum coils in preventing aneurysm recanalization in endosaccularly coiled large aneurysms. We investigated Matrix coils in a dog model of a wide-necked large bifurcation aneurysm. Six experimental aneurysms were created in dogs and these aneurysms were endosaccularly coiled with 100% Matrix coils. Angiographic and histopathological data were analyzed at 2 weeks and at 3 months. Average aneurysm dimensions were length 17.8 mm, width 8.3 mm, and neck 6.2 mm. Aneurysm coil filling ranged 24.1-41.8% by volume. At 14 days, three of six Matrix-treated aneurysms showed coil compaction and aneurysm recanalization. At 3 months, one additional Matrix-treated aneurysm showed delayed coil compaction and aneurysm recanalization. At 3 months, in three harvested aneurysms, the average measured neck neointima was 0.150 {+-} 0.14 mm. However, in two of the three aneurysms harvested at 3 months, aneurysm recanalization had occurred with neointimal tissue not completely covering the aneurysm orifice. Thick connective fibrous intercoil tissue was observed. No immediate or delayed thrombus formation had occurred. Based on limited data in an experimental bifurcation aneurysm in dogs, Matrix coils appear to induce a thicker aneurysm neck neointima tissue and intercoil granulation response but appear prone to coil compaction and aneurysm recanalization. Modifications to the Matrix coil are likely needed to improve angiographic results in large aneurysms. (orig.)

  9. Analytical Model and Optimized Design of Power Transmitting Coil for Inductively Coupled Endoscope Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Quan; Luo, Weijie; Yan, Guozheng; Yang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    A wireless power transfer system based on the weakly inductive coupling makes it possible to provide the endoscope microrobot (EMR) with infinite power. To facilitate the patients' inspection with the EMR system, the diameter of the transmitting coil is enlarged to 69 cm. Due to the large transmitting range, a high quality factor of the Litz-wire transmitting coil is a necessity to ensure the intensity of magnetic field generated efficiently. Thus, this paper builds an analytical model of the transmitting coil, and then, optimizes the parameters of the coil by enlarging the quality factor. The lumped model of the transmitting coil includes three parameters: ac resistance, self-inductance, and stray capacitance. Based on the exact two-dimension solution, the accurate analytical expression of ac resistance is derived. Several transmitting coils of different specifications are utilized to verify this analytical expression, being in good agreements with the measured results except the coils with a large number of strands. Then, the quality factor of transmitting coils can be well predicted with the available analytical expressions of self- inductance and stray capacitance. Owing to the exact estimation of quality factor, the appropriate coil turns of the transmitting coil is set to 18-40 within the restrictions of transmitting circuit and human tissue issues. To supply enough energy for the next generation of the EMR equipped with a Ø9.5×10.1 mm receiving coil, the coil turns of the transmitting coil is optimally set to 28, which can transfer a maximum power of 750 mW with the remarkable delivering efficiency of 3.55%.

  10. Mechanical-Stress Analytical Modeling for the Design of Coils in Power Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellan D.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern electrical-power systems are often exploited for transmitting high-frequency carrier signals for communications purposes. Series-connected air-core coils represent the fundamental component allowing such applications by providing a proper filtering in the frequency domain. They must be designed, however, to withstand also the line short-circuit current. When a high-magnitude current flows through a coil, strong mechanical stresses are produced within the conductor, leading to possible damage of the coil. In this paper, an approximate analytical model is derived for the relationship between the maximum mechanical stress and the electrical/geometrical parameters of the coil. Such a model provides the guidelines for a fast and safe coil design, whereas numerical simulations are only needed for the design refinement. The presented approach can be extended to other applications such as, for example, the mechanical stress resulting from the inrush currents in the coils of power transformers.

  11. Detailed 3D models of the induced electric field of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T [Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2007-05-21

    Previous models neglected contributions from current elements spanning the full geometric extent of wires in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coils. A detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry is shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of electric field (E-field) models. Modeling E-field dependence based on the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured) where simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured)

  12. Electrothermal model of choking-coils for the analysis of dc-dc converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorecki, Krzysztof, E-mail: gorecki@am.gdynia.pl [Gdynia Maritime University, Department of Marine Electronics, Morska 83, Gdynia (Poland); Detka, Kalina [Pomeranian Higher School in Gdynia, Opata Hackiego 8-10, Gdynia (Poland)

    2012-09-01

    The paper concerns modelling the choking-coil for the needs of the electrothermal analysis of dc-dc converters. A new electrothermal model of the choking-coil is proposed. This model is dedicated for SPICE software and it takes into account nonlinearity of the dependences of the inductance on the current, selfheating and mutual thermal interactions between the core and the winding. The structure of this model is described in detail and its correctness is experimentally verified for the choking-coils with the ferrite and powder cores. Both the characteristics of the choking-coils and the buck converter with these choking-coils were considered. The satisfying agreement between the results of calculations and measurements is obtained.

  13. Dynamic models of heating and cooling coils with one-dimensional air distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijie; Krauss, G.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the simulation models of the plate-fin, air-to-water (or water vapour) heat exchangers used as air-heating or air-cooling and dehumidifying coils in the HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning) systems. The thermal models are used to calculate the heat exchange between distributing air and coil pipes and outlet temperatures of air and heat or chilled fluid. The aerodynamic models are used to account for the pressure drop of the air crossing the coil tubes. They can also be used to optimize the structures of such coils. The models are based on principal laws of heat and mass conservation and fluid mechanics. They are transparent and easy to use. In our work, a coil is considered as an assembly of numbers of basic elements in which all the state variables are unique. Therefore we can conveniently simulate the coils with different structures and different geometric parameters. Two modular programs TRNSYS (Transient System Simulation) and ESACAP are utilized as supporting softwares which make the programming and simulation greatly simplified. The coil elements and a real coil were simulated. The results were compared with the data offered by the manufacturer (company SOFICA) and also with those obtained using critical methods such as NTU method, etc. and good agreement is attained.

  14. Study of Kapton insulated superconducting coils manufactured for the LHC inner triplet model magnets at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, N; Bossert, R; Brandt, J; Chichili, D R; Kerby, J S; Nobrega, A; Novitski, I; Ozelis, J P; Yadav, S; Zlobin, A V

    2000-01-01

    Fermilab has constructed a number of 2 m model quadrupoles as part of an ongoing program to develop and optimize the design of quadrupoles for the LHC Interaction Region inner triplets. The quadrupole design is based upon a two layer shell type coil of multi-filament NbTi strands in Rutherford cable, insulated with Kapton film. As such, the coil size and mechanical properties are critical in achieving the desired prestress and field quality targets for the agent. Throughout the model magnet program, different design and manufacturing techniques have been studied to obtain coils with the required mechanical properties. This paper summarizes the structural material and coil mechanical properties, coil design optimization results and production experience accumulated in the model R&D program. (5 refs).

  15. Simulation Model solves exact the Enigma named Generating high Voltages and high Frequencies by Tesla Coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo Janjanin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Simulation model of Tesla coil has been successfully completed, and has been verified the procedure and functioning. The literature and documentation for the model were taken from the rich sources, especially the copies of Tesla patents. The oscillating system‟s electrical scheme consists of the voltage supply 220/50 Hz, Fe transformer, capacitor and belonging chosen electrical components, the air gap in the primary Tesla coil (air transformer and spark gap in the exit of the coil. The investigation of the oscillating process Tesla coil‟s system using the simulation model in MATLAB & SIMULINK have given the exact solution the enigma named the generating high voltage and high frequency the Tesla‟s coil. The inductance voltage from the spark current in the primary (coil with its high voltage impulse excites the oscillating series circuit Ce-L3-R3 on the secondary of the air transformer to its own damped oscillations

  16. submitter 16 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ Racetrack Model Coil Test Result

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, J C; Bajko, M; Bottura, L; Bordini, B; Chiuchiolo, A; De Rijk, G; Ferracin, P; Feuvrier, J; Grosclaude, P; Juchno, M; Rochepault, E; Rysti, J; Sarasola, X

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European project EuCARD, the High Field Magnet project, led by a CERN-CEA collaboration, implied the development of a large aperture $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole magnet called FRESCA2. The magnet uses four double-pancake block-type coils, each about 1.5 m long. In order to characterize strand and cable properties, as well as to qualify the coil fabrication process, CERN started in 2012 the design and fabrication of the Racetrack Model Coil (RMC) magnet, a short model magnet using the same cable as FRESCA2 magnet with only two flat double-pancake coils about 0.8 m long. In 2013, two superconducting coils have been fabricated, making use of two different types of superconductor. In 2014 and 2015, the coils were tested both in a single and in a double-coil configuration in a support structure based on an external aluminum shell pre-loaded with water-pressurized bladders. In this paper, we describe the design of the RMC magnet and its coils, provide the main parameters of the superconductor, and repo...

  17. Quench evolution and hot spot temperature in the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Boxman, H; Broggi, F; Dolgetta, N; Juster, F P; Tetteroo, M; ten Kate, H H J

    2004-01-01

    The 9-m long superconducting model coil B0 was built to verify design parameters and exercise the construction of the Barrel Toroid magnet of ATLAS Detector. The model coil has been successfully tested at CERN. An intensive test program to study quench propagation through the coil windings as well as the temperature distribution has been carried out. The coil is well equipped with pickup coils, voltage taps, superconducting quench detectors and temperature sensors. The current is applied up to 24 kA and about forty quenches have been induced by firing internal heaters. Characteristic numbers at full current of 24 kA are a normal zone propagation of 15 m/s in the conductor leading to a turn-to-turn propagation of 0.1 m/s, the entire coil in normal state within 5.5 s and a safe peak temperature in the windings of 85 K. The paper summarizes the quench performance of the B0 coil. Based on this experience the full-size coils are now under construction and first test results are awaited by early 2004. 7 Refs.

  18. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand.

  19. Modeled ground water age distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfenden, Linda R.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    The age of ground water in any given sample is a distributed quantity representing distributed provenance (in space and time) of the water. Conventional analysis of tracers such as unstable isotopes or anthropogenic chemical species gives discrete or binary measures of the presence of water of a given age. Modeled ground water age distributions provide a continuous measure of contributions from different recharge sources to aquifers. A numerical solution of the ground water age equation of Ginn (1999) was tested both on a hypothetical simplified one-dimensional flow system and under real world conditions. Results from these simulations yield the first continuous distributions of ground water age using this model. Complete age distributions as a function of one and two space dimensions were obtained from both numerical experiments. Simulations in the test problem produced mean ages that were consistent with the expected value at the end of the model domain for all dispersivity values tested, although the mean ages for the two highest dispersivity values deviated slightly from the expected value. Mean ages in the dispersionless case also were consistent with the expected mean ages throughout the physical model domain. Simulations under real world conditions for three dispersivity values resulted in decreasing mean age with increasing dispersivity. This likely is a consequence of an edge effect. However, simulations for all three dispersivity values tested were mass balanced and stable demonstrating that the solution of the ground water age equation can provide estimates of water mass density distributions over age under real world conditions.

  20. The B00 model coil in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Anashkin, O P; Keilin, V E; Lysenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    A 1-m size model coil has been developed to investigate the transport properties of the three aluminum-stabilized superconductors used in the ATLAS magnets. The coil, named B00, is also used for debugging the cryogenic, power and control systems of the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility. The coil comprises two double pancakes made of the barrel toroid and end-cap toroid conductors and a single pancake made of the central solenoid conductor. The pancakes are placed inside an aluminum coil casing. The coil construction and cooling conditions are quite similar to the final design of the ATLAS magnets. The B00 coil is well equipped with various sensors to measure thermal and electrodynamic properties of the conductor inside the coils. Special attention has been paid to the study of the current diffusion process and the normal zone propagation in the ATLAS conductors and windings. Special pick-up coils have been made to measure the diffusion at different currents and magnetic field values. (6 refs).

  1. Dynamic Models of Heating and Cooling Coils with One—Dimensional Air Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangZijie; G.Krauss

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation models of the plate-fin,air-to-water(or water vapour) heat exchangers used as air-heating or air-cooling and dehumidifying colis in the HVAC(Heating,Ventilation and AIr-Conditioning)systems.The thermal models are used to calculate the heat exchange between distributing air and coil pipes and outlet temperatures of air and heat or chilled fluid.The aerodynamic models are used to account for the pressure drop of the air crossing the coil tubes,They can also be used to optimize the structres of such coils.The models are based on principal laws of teat and mass conservation and fluid mechanics.They are transparent and easy to use.In our work,a coil is considered as an assembly of numbers of basic elements in which all the state variables are unique.Therefore we can conveniently simulate the coils with different structures and different geometric parameters.Two modular programs TRNSYS(Transient System Simulation)and ESACAP are utilized as supporting softwares which make the programming and simulation greatly simplified.The coil elements and a real coil were simulated.The results were compared with the data offered by the manufacturer(company SOFICA) and also with those obtained using critical methods such as NTU method ,etc.and good agreement is attained.

  2. Insulating process for HT-7U central solenoid model coils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The HT-7U superconducting Tokamak is a whole superconducting magnetically confined fusion device. The insulating system of its central solenoid coils is critical to its properties. In this paper the forming of the insulating system and the vacuum-pressure-impregnating (VPI) are introduced, and the whole insulating process is verified under the superconducting experiment condition.

  3. Heat load characteristics and new design using one-coil model superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jizo, Yoshihiro; Akagi, Hidenari; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Terai, Motoaki; Shinobu, Masatoshi

    Superconducting magnets (SCM) for Maglev trains are vibrated by the electromagnetic force arising from the magnetic field of higher harmonics, which is due to the arrangement of the ground coils. The heat load within the liquid helium temperature region increases by the vibration of the magnets. This paper reports a heat load generation estimation mechanism due to the above-mentioned vibration, as well as effective measures of reducing heat load generation. In addition, we show how a one-coil type SCM can reduce the heat load generation in electromagnetic disturbance tests.

  4. The proposal and realization on more exact modeling of COIL performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shouxian; Li; Xiaojian; Shu; Yanyi; Du; Hua; Su; Yan; Li; Zhen; Yu

    2013-01-01

    The chemical oxygen–iodine laser(COIL)is the shortest-wavelength high-power chemical laser that has been demonstrated.The characteristics,such as good atmospheric propagation,short wavelength and excellent transmission through optical fibers,make the COIL a good candidate for high-power laser application.To model the complete COIL lasing interaction,a three-dimensional formulation of the fluid dynamics,species continuity and radiation transport equations is necessary.The computational effort to calculate the flow field over the entire nozzle bank with a grid fine enough to resolve the injection holes is so large as to preclude doing the calculation.The approach to modeling chemical lasers then has been to reduce the complexity of the model to correspond to the available computational capability,adding details as computing power increased.The modeling of lasing in the COIL medium is proposed,which is coupling with the effects induced by transverse injection of secondary gases,non-equilibrium chemical reactions,nozzle tail flow and boundary layer.The coupled steady solutions of the fluid dynamics and optics in a COIL complex three-dimensional cavity flow field are obtained following the proposal.The modeling results show that these effects have some influence on the lasing properties.A feasible methodology and a theoretical tool are offered to predict the beam quality for large-scale COIL devices.

  5. Modeling of an once through helical coil steam generator of a superheated cycle for sizing analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Sik; Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Eui Kwang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A thermal sizing code, named as HSGSA (Helical coil Steam Generator Sizing Analyzer), for a sodium heated helical coil steam generator is developed for KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor) design. The theoretical modeling of the shell and tube sides is described and relevant correlations are presented. For assessment of HSGSA, a reference plant design case is compared to the calculational outputs from HSGSA simulation. 9 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  6. Modelling of Moving Coil Actuators in Fast Switching Valves Suitable for Digital Hydraulic Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Christian; Roemer, Daniel Beck; Bech, Michael Møller

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of digital hydraulic machines is strongly dependent on the valve switching time. Recently, fast switching have been achieved by using a direct electromagnetic moving coil actuator as the force producing element in fast switching hydraulic valves suitable for digital hydraulic...... machines. Mathematical models of the valve switching, targeted for design optimisation of the moving coil actuator, are developed. A detailed analytical model is derived and presented and its accuracy is evaluated against transient electromagnetic finite element simulations. The model includes...... an estimation of the eddy currents generated in the actuator yoke upon current rise, as they may have significant influence on the coil current response. The analytical model facilitates fast simulation of the transient actuator response opposed to the transient electro-magnetic finite element model which...

  7. Thermal-Hydraulic Issues in the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) Test and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanino, R.; Bagnasco, M.; Fillunger, H.; Heller, R.; Savoldi Richard, L.; Suesser, M.; Zahn, G.

    2004-06-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) was tested in the Toska facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe during 2001 (standalone) and 2002 (in the background magnetic field of the LCT coil). The TFMC is a racetrack coil wound in five double pancakes on stainless steel radial plates using Nb3Sn dual-channel cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) with a thin circular SS jacket. The coil was cooled by supercritical helium in forced convection at nominal 4.5 K and 0.5 MPa. Instrumentation, all outside the coil, included voltage taps, pressure and temperature sensors, as well as flow meters. Additionally, differential pressure drop measurement was available on the two pancakes DP1.1 and DP1.2, equipped with heaters. Two major thermal-hydraulic issues in the TFMC tests will be addressed here: 1) the pressure drop along heated pancakes and the comparison with friction factor correlations; 2) the quench initiation and propagation. Other thermal-hydraulic issues like heat generation and exchange in joints, radial plates, coil case, or the effects of the resistive heaters on the helium dynamics, have been already addressed elsewhere.

  8. Switching transients in a superconducting coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    A study is made of the transients caused by the fast dump of large superconducting coils. Theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and actual measurements are used. Theoretical analysis can only be applied to the simplest of models. In the computer simulations two models are used, one in which the coil is divided into ten segments and another in which a single coil is employed. The circuit breaker that interrupts the current to the power supply, causing a fast dump, is represented by a time and current dependent conductance. Actual measurements are limited to measurements made incidental to performance tests on the MFTF Yin-yang coils. It is found that the breaker opening time is the critical factor in determining the size and shape of the transient. Instantaneous opening of the breaker causes a lightly damped transient with large amplitude voltages to ground. Increasing the opening time causes the transient to become a monopulse of decreasing amplitude. The voltages at the external terminals are determined by the parameters of the external circuit. For fast opening times the frequency depends on the dump resistor inductance, the circuit capacitance, and the amplitude on the coil current. For slower openings the dump resistor inductance and the current determine the amplitude of the voltage to ground at the terminals. Voltages to ground are less in the interior of the coil, where transients related to the parameters of the coil itself are observed.

  9. A Simplified Model to Calculate AC Losses in Large 2G HTS Coils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech;

    2015-01-01

    . The model presented uses H formulation which directly solves magnetic fields, and the general partial differential equations (PDEs) module in Comsol Multiphysics is used to implement the model. Afterwards, the model is used to simulate the excitation stage of a racetrack HTS coil with 350 tapes. The AC...

  10. Statistical coil model of the unfolded state: resolving the reconciliation problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhishek K; Colubri, Andrés; Freed, Karl F; Sosnick, Tobin R

    2005-09-13

    An unfolded state ensemble is generated by using a self-avoiding statistical coil model that is based on backbone conformational frequencies in a coil library, a subset of the Protein Data Bank. The model reproduces two apparently contradicting behaviors observed in the chemically denatured state for a variety of proteins, random coil scaling of the radius of gyration and the presence of significant amounts of local backbone structure (NMR residual dipolar couplings). The most stretched members of our unfolded ensemble dominate the residual dipolar coupling signal, whereas the uniformity of the sign of the couplings follows from the preponderance of polyproline II and beta conformers in the coil library. Agreement with the NMR data substantially improves when the backbone conformational preferences include correlations arising from the chemical and conformational identity of neighboring residues. Although the unfolded ensembles match the experimental observables, they do not display evidence of native-like topology. By providing an accurate representation of the unfolded state, our statistical coil model can be used to improve thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of protein folding.

  11. Statistical Methods for Quality Control of Steel Coils Manufacturing Process using Generalized Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díaz, J. Carlos

    2009-11-01

    Fault detection and diagnosis is an important problem in process engineering. Process equipments are subject to malfunctions during operation. Galvanized steel is a value added product, furnishing effective performance by combining the corrosion resistance of zinc with the strength and formability of steel. Fault detection and diagnosis is an important problem in continuous hot dip galvanizing and the increasingly stringent quality requirements in automotive industry has also demanded ongoing efforts in process control to make the process more robust. When faults occur, they change the relationship among these observed variables. This work compares different statistical regression models proposed in the literature for estimating the quality of galvanized steel coils on the basis of short time histories. Data for 26 batches were available. Five variables were selected for monitoring the process: the steel strip velocity, four bath temperatures and bath level. The entire data consisting of 48 galvanized steel coils was divided into sets. The first training data set was 25 conforming coils and the second data set was 23 nonconforming coils. Logistic regression is a modeling tool in which the dependent variable is categorical. In most applications, the dependent variable is binary. The results show that the logistic generalized linear models do provide good estimates of quality coils and can be useful for quality control in manufacturing process.

  12. Numerical modeling of thermal evolution in hot metal coiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troyani, N.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of coiling and uncoiling in the transfer table stage has important effects on the downstream temperature evolution throughout the hot bar in hot rolling, consequently, it has significant effects on both the uniformity of final mechanical properties and uniformity of final metallurgical properties. Consideration is given herein to the evolution of bar distribution of temperature in the transfer table, when coiling is present, in order to establish possible causes for the lack of the stated uniformity for eventual possible solutions. To address these issues, the mathematical equation of heat diffusion in a shape changing domain, is solved using a novel numerical strategy that uses both Finite Elements and Finite Differences. Numerical results are presented.

    El uso de estrategias para el bobinado y enderezado en la etapa de la mesa de transporte tiene repercusiones importantes en la evolución de la temperatura, aguas abajo, en el planchón de metal caliente; en consecuencia, tiene efectos significativos sobre la uniformidad de las propiedades mecánicas y metalúrgicas finales una vez concluido el proceso. Este trabajo estudia la evolución de la distribución de temperatura en la etapa de la mesa de transporte, en procesos de bobinado, con el fin de establecer causas que puedan originar la ausencia de la citada uniformidad. Para el estudio se resuelve la ecuación de difusión del calor en un dominio que cambia con el tiempo en una novedosa estrategia numérica que integra Elementos Finitos y Diferencias Finitas. Se presentan resultados numéricos de la simulación.

  13. Modelling of Moving Coil Actuators in Fast Switching Valves Suitable for Digital Hydraulic Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Christian; Roemer, Daniel Beck; Bech, Michael Møller

    2015-01-01

    an estimation of the eddy currents generated in the actuator yoke upon current rise, as they may have significant influence on the coil current response. The analytical model facilitates fast simulation of the transient actuator response opposed to the transient electro-magnetic finite element model which...

  14. Nb{sub 3}Al insert experiment log book. 3rd experiment of CS model coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Makoto; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Isono, Takaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-10-01

    The cool down of CS model coil and Nb{sub 3}Al insert was started on March 4, 2002. It took almost one month and immediately started coil charge since April 3, 2002. The charge test of Nb{sub 3}Al insert and CS model coil was completed on May 2, 2002. All of the experiments including the warm up was also completed on May 30, 2002. In this campaign, total shot numbers were 102 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was about 5.2 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. (author)

  15. Test of the ITER TF Insert and Central Solenoid Model Coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Takayasu, M; Minervini, J; Isono, T; Sugimoto, M; Kato, T; Kawano, K; Koisumi, N; Nakajima, H; Nunova, Y; Okuno, K; Tsuji, H; Oshikiri, M; Mitchell, N; Takahashi, Y; Egorov, S; Rodin, I; Zanino, R; Savoldi, L

    2002-07-29

    The Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) was designed and built by ITER collaboration between the European Union, Japan, Russian Federation and the United States in 1993-2001. Three heavily instrumented insert coils have been also built for testing in the background field of the CSMC to cover a wide operational space. The TF Insert was designed and built by the Russian Federation to simulate the conductor performance under the ITER TF coil conditions. The TF Insert Coil was tested in the CSMC Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Japan in September-October 2001. Some measurements were performed also on the CSMC to study effects of electromagnetic and cooldown cycles. The TF Insert coil was charged successfully, without training, in the background field of the CSMC to the design current of 46 kA at 13 T peak field. The TF Insert met or exceeded all design objectives, however some interesting results require thorough analyses. This paper presents the overview of main results of the testing--magnet critical parameters, ac losses, joint performance, effect of cycles on performance, quench and thermo-hydraulic characteristics and some results of the post-test analysis.

  16. Coil fraction-dependent phase behaviour of a model globular protein–polymer diblock copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Carla S. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Olsen, Bradley D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of the model globular protein–polymer block copolymer mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) is explored across a range of polymer coil fractions from 0.21 to 0.82 to produce a phase diagram for these materials as a function of molecular composition. Overall, four types of morphologies were observed: hexagonally packed cylinders, perforated lamellae, lamellae, and disordered nanostructures. Across all coil fractions and morphologies, a lyotropic re-entrant order–disorder transition in water was observed, with disordered structures below 30 wt% and above 70 wt% and well-ordered morphologies at intermediate concentrations. Solid state samples prepared by solvent evaporation show moderately ordered structures similar to those observed in 60 wt% solutions, suggesting that bulk structures result from kinetic trapping of morphologies which appear at lower concentrations. While highly ordered cylindrical nanostructures are observed around a bioconjugate polymer volume fraction of 0.3 and well-ordered lamellae are seen near a volume fraction of 0.6, materials at lower or higher coil fractions become increasingly disordered. Notable differences between the phase behaviour of globular protein–polymer block copolymers and coil–coil diblock copolymers include the lack of spherical nanostructures at either high or low polymer coil fractions as well as shifted phase boundaries between morphologies which result in an asymmetric phase diagram.

  17. Modeling and synthesis of strong ground motion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S T G Raghu Kanth

    2008-11-01

    Success of earthquake resistant design practices critically depends on how accurately the future ground motion can be determined at a desired site. But very limited recorded data are available about ground motion in India for engineers to rely upon. To identify the needs of engineers, under such circumstances, in estimating ground motion time histories, this article presents a detailed review of literature on modeling and synthesis of strong ground motion data. In particular, modeling of seismic sources and earth medium, analytical and empirical Green’s functions approaches for ground motion simulation, stochastic models for strong motion and ground motion relations are covered. These models can be used to generate realistic near-field and far-field ground motion in regions lacking strong motion data. Numerical examples are shown for illustration by taking Kutch earthquake-2001 as a case study.

  18. A Simplified Model to Calculate AC Losses in Large 2G HTS Coils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech;

    2015-01-01

    AC losses are of great significance to quantify the performance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) devices. This paper presents a simplified model to calculate AC losses in large 2G HTS coils, which serves as a baseline to study HTS large scale applications such as electric machines. The m...

  19. A nonlinear dynamic model of a once-through, helical-coil steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1993-07-01

    A dynamic model of a once-through, helical-coil steam generator is presented. The model simulates the advanced liquid metal reactor superheated cycle steam generator with a four-region, moving-boundary, drift-flux model. The model is described by a set of nonlinear differential equations derived from the fundamental equations of conversation of mass, energy, and momentum. Sample results of steady-state and transient calculations are presented.

  20. The SMC (Short Model Coil) Nb3Sn Program: FE Analysis with 3D Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kokkinos, C; Guinchard, M; Karppinen, M; Manil, P; Perez, J C; Regis, F

    2012-01-01

    The SMC (Short Model Coil) project aims at testing superconducting coils in racetrack configuration, wound with Nb3Sn cable. The degradation of the magnetic properties of the cable is studied by applying different levels of pre-stress. It is an essential step in the validation of procedures for the construction of superconducting magnets with high performance conductor. Two SMC assemblies have been completed and cold tested in the frame of a European collaboration between CEA (FR), CERN and STFC (UK), with the technical support from LBNL (US). The second assembly showed remarkable good quench results, reaching a peak field of 12.5T. This paper details the new 3D modeling method of the SMC, implemented using the ANSYS® Workbench environment. Advanced computer-aided-design (CAD) tools are combined with multi-physics Finite Element Analyses (FEA), in the same integrated graphic interface, forming a fully parametric model that enables simulation driven development of the SMC project. The magnetic and structural ...

  1. An Antenna-Theory Method for Modeling High-Frequency RF Coils: A Segmented Birdcage Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest that center-fed dipole antenna analytics can be employed in the optimized design of high-frequency MRI RF coil applications. The method is illustrated in the design of a single-segmented birdcage model and a short multisegmented birdcage model. As a byproduct, it is shown that for a long single-segmented birdcage model, the RF field within it is essentially a TEM mode and has excellent planar uniformity. For a short shielded multisegmented birdcage model, the RF field is optimized with a target-field approach with an average SAR functional. The planar homogeneity of the optimized RF field is significantly improved compared with that of a single-segmented birdcage model with the same geometry. The accuracy of the antenna formulae is also verified with numerical simulations performed via commercial software. The model discussed herein provides evidence for the effectiveness of antenna methods in future RF coil analysis.

  2. Development of a single-layer Nb3Sn common coil dipole model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor Novitski et al.

    2002-12-13

    A high-field dipole magnet based on the common coil design was developed at Fermilab for a future Very Large Hadron Collider. A short model of this magnet with a design field of 11 T in two 40-mm apertures is being fabricated using the react-and-wind technique. In order to study and optimize the magnet design two 165-mm long mechanical models were assembled and tested. A technological model consisting of magnet straight section and ends was also fabricated in order to check the tooling and the winding and assembly procedures. This paper describes the design and technology of the common coil dipole magnet and summarizes the status of short model fabrication.The results of the mechanical model tests and comparison with FE mechanical analysis are also presented.

  3. Modelling of flexi-coil springs with rubber-metal pads in a locomotive running gear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michálek T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, flexi-coil springs are commonly used in the secondary suspension stage of railway vehicles. Lateral stiffness of these springs is influenced by means of their design parameters (number of coils, height, mean diameter of coils, wire diameter etc. and it is often suitable to modify this stiffness in such way, that the suspension shows various lateral stiffness in different directions (i.e., longitudinally vs. laterally in the vehicle-related coordinate system. Therefore, these springs are often supplemented with some kind of rubber-metal pads. This paper deals with modelling of the flexi-coil springs supplemented with tilting rubber-metal tilting pads applied in running gear of an electric locomotive as well as with consequences of application of that solution of the secondary suspension from the point of view of the vehicle running performance. This analysis is performed by means of multi-body simulations and the description of lateral stiffness characteristics of the springs is based on results of experimental measurements of these characteristics performed in heavy laboratories of the Jan Perner Transport Faculty of the University of Pardubice.

  4. COMPARISON OF CELLULOSE ACETATE POLYMER AND ELECTROLYTIC DETACHABLE COILS FOR TREATMENT OF CANINE ANEURYSMAL MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨新健; 吴中学; 李佑祥; 孙异临; 尹可

    2002-01-01

    Objective.Electrolytic detachable coils (EDC) have been the main embolic materials for intracranial aneurysms.Liquid aneurysmal embolic materials represented by cellulose acetate polymer (CAP) are still in controversy.In this research,the embolization results and pathological reactions after embolization of canine aneurysmal models with EDC or CAP were observed and compared. Methods.The canine aneurysmal models constructed by anastomosis of venous pouches were randomly grouped.The aneurysms were respectively occluded with CAP and electrolytic detachable coils that was named by Wu electrolytic detachable coil (WEDC) and made by us.Angiogram follow ups were performed at 24 hour,2 week,and 2 month after embolization.The occluded aneurysms were dissected in each stage for light microscopic,electron microscopic,and histochemical research. Results.The effect of embolization was significantly better with WEDC than that with CAP ( χ 2=5.56,P< 0.05) .Post embolized complications such as aneurysm rupture and stenosis of parent arteries could only be found in CAP group.Pathological research showed that CAP mass could packed the aneurysms more densely than coils.Acute chemical damage of aneurysmal wall and inflammatory cell infiltration was prominently found in early stage after CAP embolization.Organization of thrombus inside aneurysms and formation of endothelial tissue over the orifices of aneurysmal necks could be found in both groups 2 months after embolization.But parts of coils might be exposed outside endothelial layer. Conclusions.EDC are still the most safe,efficient,and reliable instruments to embolize aneurysm.CAP should be improved further to solve the problem of strong chemical corrosion and difficulty in control before it is widely used.

  5. Exactly Solvable Model for Helix-Coil-Sheet Transitions in Protein Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, John S

    2010-01-01

    In view of the important role helix-sheet transitions play in protein aggregation, we introduce a simple model to study secondary structural transitions of helix-coil-sheet systems using a Potts model starting with an effective Hamiltonian. This energy function depends on four parameters that approximately describe entropic and enthalpic contributions to the stability of a polypeptide in helical and sheet conformations. The sheet structures involve long-range interactions between residues which are far in sequence, but are in contact in real space. Such contacts are included in the Hamiltonian. Using standard statistical mechanical techniques, the partition function is solved exactly using transfer matrices. Based on this model, we study thermodynamic properties of polypeptides, including phase transitions between helix, sheet, and coil structures.

  6. The AC loss evaluation of central solenoid model coil for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yi, E-mail: shiyi@ipp.ac.cn; Wu, Yu; Hao, QiangWang; Liu, Bo; Yang, Yilin

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • In this study, The AC loss of CFETR CSMC is calculated. • The main AC losses type and mechanics of CFETR CSMC are introduced, where the hysteresis and coupling loss of Nb{sub 3}Sn and NbTi coil are estimated. • The low frequency eddy current loss calculation of stainless steel structural components is carried out by ANSYS with 3-D separate model. • In the case of conductor joints, a 3-D ANSYS code is also used to obtain the eddy current losses for the metal components. - Abstract: The AC loss of Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) of China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is calculated in order to be able to determine the allowable excitation current shape in time with respect to the available cooling capacity at liquid helium temperature. Firstly, the structure and operation parameters of CFETR CSMC are summarized including the superconductor, conductor and magnetic field distribution characteristic. Secondly, the main AC losses type and mechanics of CFETR CSMC are introduced, where the hysteresis and coupling loss of Nb{sub 3}Sn and NbTi coil are estimated using of the model data and a calculation flux density distribution in the cross-section of model coil by ANSYS 2-D model. Thirdly, the low frequency eddy current loss calculation of stainless steel structural components is carried out by ANSYS/EMAG code with 3-D separately for tension rods, plates and beams model. The interaction between several components is not considered. In the case of conductor joints, a 3-D ANSYS code is also used with current force to obtain the eddy current losses for the metal components. Lastly, the individual loss components are summed up. The significant conclusions are made which can provide the valuable guidance for safe operation of CSMC.

  7. Electromagnetic fields inside a lossy, multilayered spherical head phantom excited by MRI coils: models and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2004-05-21

    The precise evaluation of electromagnetic field (EMF) distributions inside biological samples is becoming an increasingly important design requirement for high field MRI systems. In evaluating the induced fields caused by magnetic field gradients and RF transmitter coils, a multilayered dielectric spherical head model is proposed to provide a better understanding of electromagnetic interactions when compared to a traditional homogeneous head phantom. This paper presents Debye potential (DP) and Dyadic Green's function (DGF)-based solutions of the EMFs inside a head-sized, stratified sphere with similar radial conductivity and permittivity profiles as a human head. The DP approach is formulated for the symmetric case in which the source is a circular loop carrying a harmonic-formed current over a wide frequency range. The DGF method is developed for generic cases in which the source may be any kind of RF coil whose current distribution can be evaluated using the method of moments. The calculated EMFs can then be used to deduce MRI imaging parameters. The proposed methods, while not representing the full complexity of a head model, offer advantages in rapid prototyping as the computation times are much lower than a full finite difference time domain calculation using a complex head model. Test examples demonstrate the capability of the proposed models/methods. It is anticipated that this model will be of particular value for high field MRI applications, especially the rapid evaluation of RF resonator (surface and volume coils) and high performance gradient set designs.

  8. Frequency-difference MIT imaging of cerebral haemorrhage with a hemispherical coil array: numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharni, M; Griffiths, H; Ledger, P D

    2010-08-01

    The feasibility of detecting a cerebral haemorrhage with a hemispherical MIT coil array consisting of 56 exciter/sensor coils of 10 mm radius and operating at 1 and 10 MHz was investigated. A finite difference method combined with an anatomically realistic head model comprising 12 tissue types was used to simulate the strokes. Frequency-difference images were reconstructed from the modelled data with different levels of the added phase noise and two types of a priori boundary errors: a displacement of the head and a size scaling error. The results revealed that a noise level of 3 m degrees (standard deviation) was adequate for obtaining good visualization of a peripheral stroke (volume approximately 49 ml). The simulations further showed that the displacement error had to be within 3-4 mm and the scaling error within 3-4% so as not to cause unacceptably large artefacts on the images.

  9. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  10. Modified Bean Model and FEM Method Combined for Persistent Current Calculation in Superconducting Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Völlinger, Christine; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    Field variations in the LHC superconducting magnets, e. g. during the ramping of the magnets, induce magnetization currents in the superconducting material, the so-called persistent currents that do not decay but persist due to the lack of resistivity. This paper describes a semi-analytical hysteresis model for hard superconductors, which has been developed for the computation of the total field errors arising from persistent currents. Since the superconducting coil is surrounded by a ferromagnetic yoke structure, the persistent current model is combined with the finite element method (FEM), as the non-linear yoke can only be calculated numerically. The used finite element method is based on a reduced vector potential formulation that avoids the meshing of the coil while calculating the part of the field arising from the source currents by means of the Biot-Savart Law. The combination allows to determine persistent current induced field errors as function of the excitation and for arbitrarily shaped iron yoke...

  11. Nanofluids heat transfer and flow analysis in vertical spirally coiled tubes using Eulerian two-phase turbulent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naphon, P.; Arisariyawong, T.; Nualboonrueng, T.

    2017-07-01

    A computation fluid dynamics study has been performed to analyze the nanofluids heat transfer and flow characteristics in the spirally coiled tubes. Eulerian two-phase turbulent model is applied to simulate the heat transfer and flow characteristics in the vertical spirally coiled tube. The spirally coiled tubes are fabricated by bending a 8.50 mm inner diameter straight copper tube into a spiral-coil with two different curvature ratios of 0.035, 0.060. The predicted results are verified with the present measured data. Reasonable agreement is obtained from the comparison between the measured data and the predicted results. In addition, due to the centrifugal force, the induced secondary flow has significant effect on the heat transfer enhancement as flowing through the spirally coiled tube. Effects of curvature, nanofluids concentration and hot water temperature on the nanofluids heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop are considered.

  12. Modeling for IFOG Vibration Error Based on the Strain Distribution of Quadrupolar Fiber Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yunhao

    2016-07-21

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environment, especially in vibrational environment, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents a mathematical model for IFOG to theoretically compute the short-term rate errors caused by mechanical vibration. The computational procedures are mainly based on the strain distribution of quadrupolar fiber coil measured by stress analyzer. The definition of asymmetry of strain distribution (ASD) is given in the paper to evaluate the winding quality of the coil. The established model reveals that the high ASD and the variable fiber elastic modulus in large strain situation are two dominant reasons that give rise to nonreciprocity phase shift in IFOG under vibration. Furthermore, theoretical analysis and computational results indicate that vibration errors of both open-loop and closed-loop IFOG increase with the raise of vibrational amplitude, vibrational frequency and ASD. Finally, an estimation of vibration-induced IFOG errors in aircraft is done according to the proposed model. Our work is meaningful in designing IFOG coils to achieve a better anti-vibration performance.

  13. Modeling for IFOG Vibration Error Based on the Strain Distribution of Quadrupolar Fiber Coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxing Gao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG in harsh environment, especially in vibrational environment, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents a mathematical model for IFOG to theoretically compute the short-term rate errors caused by mechanical vibration. The computational procedures are mainly based on the strain distribution of quadrupolar fiber coil measured by stress analyzer. The definition of asymmetry of strain distribution (ASD is given in the paper to evaluate the winding quality of the coil. The established model reveals that the high ASD and the variable fiber elastic modulus in large strain situation are two dominant reasons that give rise to nonreciprocity phase shift in IFOG under vibration. Furthermore, theoretical analysis and computational results indicate that vibration errors of both open-loop and closed-loop IFOG increase with the raise of vibrational amplitude, vibrational frequency and ASD. Finally, an estimation of vibration-induced IFOG errors in aircraft is done according to the proposed model. Our work is meaningful in designing IFOG coils to achieve a better anti-vibration performance.

  14. Ground Motion Prediction Models for Caucasus Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorjiashvili, Nato; Godoladze, Tea; Tvaradze, Nino; Tumanova, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Ground motion prediction models (GMPMs) relate ground motion intensity measures to variables describing earthquake source, path, and site effects. Estimation of expected ground motion is a fundamental earthquake hazard assessment. The most commonly used parameter for attenuation relation is peak ground acceleration or spectral acceleration because this parameter gives useful information for Seismic Hazard Assessment. Since 2003 development of Georgian Digital Seismic Network has started. In this study new GMP models are obtained based on new data from Georgian seismic network and also from neighboring countries. Estimation of models is obtained by classical, statistical way, regression analysis. In this study site ground conditions are additionally considered because the same earthquake recorded at the same distance may cause different damage according to ground conditions. Empirical ground-motion prediction models (GMPMs) require adjustment to make them appropriate for site-specific scenarios. However, the process of making such adjustments remains a challenge. This work presents a holistic framework for the development of a peak ground acceleration (PGA) or spectral acceleration (SA) GMPE that is easily adjustable to different seismological conditions and does not suffer from the practical problems associated with adjustments in the response spectral domain.

  15. De-novo modeling and ESR validation of a cyanobacterial F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase subunit bb' left-handed coiled coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Oleg A; Zaida, Tarek M; Voeller, Petra; Lill, Holger; Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2009-03-01

    The structure and functional role of the dimeric external stalk of F(o)F(1)-ATP synthases have been very actively researched over the last years. To understand the function, detailed knowledge of the structure and protein packing interactions in the dimer is required. In this paper we describe the application of structural prediction and molecular modeling approaches to elucidate the structural packing interaction of the cyanobacterial ATP synthase external stalk. In addition we present biophysical evidence derived from ESR spectroscopy and site directed spin labeling of stalk proteins that supports the proposed structural model. The use of the heterodimeric bb' dimer from a cyanobacterial ATP synthase (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803) allowed, by specific introduction of spin labels along each individual subunit, the evaluation of the overall tertiary structure of the subunits by calculating inter-spin distances. At defined positions in both b and b' subunits, reporter groups were inserted to determine and confirm inter-subunit packing. The experiments showed that an approximately 100 residue long section of the cytoplasmic part of the bb'-dimer exists mostly as an elongated alpha-helix. The distant C-terminal end of the dimer, which is thought to interact with the delta-subunit, seemed to be disordered in experiments using soluble bb' proteins. A left-handed coiled coil packing of the dimer suggested from structure prediction studies and shown to be feasible in molecular modeling experiments was used together with the measured inter-spin distances of the inserted reporter groups determined in ESR experiments to support the hypothesis that a significant portion of the bb' structure exists as a left-handed coiled coil.

  16. An Antenna-Theory Method for Modeling High-Frequency RF Coils: A Segmented Birdcage Example

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Chen; Victor Taracila; Timothy Eagan; Hiroyuki Fujita; Xingxian Shou; Tanvir Baig; Robert Brown

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that center-fed dipole antenna analytics can be employed in the optimized design of high-frequency MRI RF coil applications. The method is illustrated in the design of a single-segmented birdcage model and a short multisegmented birdcage model. As a byproduct, it is shown that for a long single-segmented birdcage model, the RF field within it is essentially a TEM mode and has excellent planar uniformity. For a short shielded multisegmented birdcage model, the RF field is optimized ...

  17. Coil response inversion for very early time modelling of helicopter-borne time-domain electromagnetic data and mapping of near-surface geological layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schamper, Cyril Noel Clarence; Auken, Esben; Sørensen, Kurt Ingvard K.I.

    2014-01-01

    by the geometry of the transmitter loop, we denote it the 'Coil Response'. The modelling of a helicopter-borne time-domain system by an equivalent electronic circuit shows that the time decay of the coil response remains identical whatever the position of the receiver loop, which is confirmed by field......Very early times in the order of 2-3 μs from the end of the turn-off ramp for time-domain electromagnetic systems are crucial for obtaining a detailed resolution of the near-surface geology in the depth interval 0-20 m. For transient electromagnetic systems working in the off time, an electric...... current is abruptly turned off in a large transmitter loop causing a secondary electromagnetic field to be generated by the eddy currents induced in the ground. Often, however, there is still a residual primary field generated by remaining slowly decaying currents in the transmitter loop. The decay...

  18. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: An Automated Procedure to Obtain Coil-specific Models for Field Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Ewald, Lars; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Field calculations for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly implemented online in neuronavigation systems and in more realistic offline approaches based on finite-element methods. They are often based on simplified and/or non-validated models of the magnetic vector...... potential of the TMS coils. Objective: To develop an approach to reconstruct the magnetic vector potential based on automated measurements. Methods: We implemented a setup that simultaneously measures the three components of the magnetic field with high spatial resolution. This is complemented by a novel...... approach to determine the magnetic vector potential via volume integration of the measured field. Results: The integration approach reproduces the vector potential with very good accuracy. The vector potential distribution of a standard figure-of-eight shaped coil determined with our setup corresponds well...

  19. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of LTS cables for the DEMO TF coil using simplified models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowska Monika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The conceptual design activities for the DEMOnstration reactor (DEMO – the prototype fusion power plant – are conducted in Europe by the EUROfusion Consortium. In 2015, three design concepts of the DEMO toroidal field (TF coil were proposed by Swiss Plasma Center (EPFL-SPC, PSI Villigen, Italian National Agency for New Technologies (ENEA Frascati, and Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA Cadarache. The proposed conductor designs were subjected to complete mechanical, electromagnetic, and thermal-hydraulic analyses. The present study is focused on the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the candidate conductor designs using simplified models. It includes (a hydraulic analysis, (b heat removal analysis, and (c assessment of the maximum temperature and the maximum pressure in each conductor during quench. The performed analysis, aimed at verification whether the proposed design concepts fulfil the established acceptance criteria, provides the information for further improvements of the coil and conductors design.

  20. Beyond the nearest-neighbor Zimm-Bragg model for helix-coil transition in peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murza, Adrian; Kubelka, Jan

    2009-02-01

    The nearest-neighbor (micro = 1) variant of the Zimm and Bragg (ZB) model has been extensively used to describe the helix-coil transition in biopolymers. In this work, we investigate the helix-coil transition for a 21-residue alanine peptide (AP) with the ZB model up to fourth nearest neighbor (micro = 1, 2, 3, and 4). We use a matrix approach that takes into account combinations of any number of helical stretches of any length and therefore gives the exact statistical weight of the chain within the assumptions of the ZB model. The parameters of the model are determined by fitting the temperature-dependent circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared experimental spectra of the AP. All variants of the model fit the experimental data, thus giving similar results in terms of the macroscopic observables, such as temperature-dependent fractional helicity. However, the resulting microscopic parameters, such as distributions of the individual residue helical probabilities and free energy surfaces, vary significantly depending on the variant of the model. Overall, the mean residue enthalpy and entropy (in the absolute value) both increase with micro, but combined yield essentially the same "effective" value of the ZB propagation parameters for all micro. Greater helical probabilities for individual residues are predicted for larger micro, in particular, near the center of the sequence. The ZB nucleation parameters increase with increasing micro, which results in a lower free energy barrier to helix nucleation and lower apparent "cooperativity" of the transition. The significance of the long-range interactions for the predictions of ZB model for helix-coil transition, the calculated model parameters and the limitations of the model are discussed.

  1. Applying Modeling Tools to Ground System Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Peter

    2012-01-01

    As part of a long-term effort to revitalize the Ground Systems (GS) Engineering Section practices, Systems Modeling Language (SysML) and Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) have been used to model existing GS products and the procedures GS engineers use to produce them.

  2. Two-spring model for active compression textiles with integrated NiTi coil actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschuh, B.; Newman, D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a two-spring model to predict the performance of hybrid compression textiles combining passive elastic fabrics and integrated NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) coil actuators. An analytic model that treats passive fabric-SMA coil systems as conjoined linear springs is presented to predict garment passive and active counter-pressure as a function of 11 design variables. For a fixed SMA coil design (encompassing five design variables), the model predicts that passive fabric material modulus, initial length, width and thickness determine both passive counter-pressure magnitude and activation stroke length, and that passive and active pressures are highly dependent on the relative unstretched lengths of the conjoined SMA-fabric system compared to the total limb circumference. Several passive fabrics were tested to determine their moduli and to generally assess the fabric linearity model assumption: two fabrics (spandex and neoprene) were found to behave linearly up to 200% strain, while two other fabrics (flat polyester elastic and a tri-laminate Lycra) were found to be nonlinear in the same strain envelope. Five hypothetical compression tourniquet designs are presented using experimentally determined fabric characteristics and previously studied SMA actuators developed at MIT. The performance of each tourniquet design is discussed with a specific focus on mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suit design requirements, with designs presented that achieve the full MCP design specification (\\gt 29.6 kPa) while minimizing (\\lt 5 mm) garment thickness. The modeling framework developed in this effort enables compression garment designers to tailor counter-pressure and activation stroke properties of active compression garments based on a variety of design parameters to meet a wide range of performance specifications.

  3. Physiologically-relevant measurements of flow through coils and stents: towards improved modeling of endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Michael; Levitt, Michael; Geindreau, Christian; Rolland Du Roscoat, Sabine; Johnson, Luke; Chivukula, Keshav; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    The hemodynamic environment in cerebral aneurysms undergoing flow-diverting stent (FDS) or coil embolization treatment plays a critical role in long-term outcomes. Standard modeling approaches to endovascular coils and FDS simplify the complex geometry into a homogenous porous volume or surface through the addition of a Darcy-Brinkman pressure loss term in the momentum equation. The inertial and viscous loss coefficients are typically derived from published in vitro studies of pressure loss across FDS and coils placed in a straight tube, where the only fluid path is across the treatment - an unrealistic representation of treatment apposition in vivo. The pressure drop across FDS and coils in side branch aneurysms located on curved parent vessels is measured. Using PIV, the velocity at the aneurysm neck plane is reconstructed and used to determine loss coefficients for better models of endovascular coils or FDS that account for physiological placement and vessel curvature. These improved models are incorporated into CFD simulations and validated against in vitro model PIV velocity, as well as compared to microCT-based coil/stent-resolving CFD simulations of patient-specific treated aneurysm flow.

  4. A numerical model for ground temperature determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczur, M.; Polepszyc, I.; Biernacka, B.; Sapińska-Śliwa, A.

    2016-09-01

    The ground surface temperature and the temperature with respect to depth are one of the most important issues for geotechnical and environmental applications as well as for plants and other living organisms. In geothermal systems, temperature is directly related to the energy resources in the ground and it influences the efficiency of the ground source system. The ground temperature depends on a very large number of parameters, but it often needs to be evaluated with good accuracy. In the present work, models for the prediction of the ground temperature with a focus on the surface temperature at which all or selected important ground and environmental phenomena are taken into account have been analysed. It has been found that the simplest models and the most complex model may result in a similar temperature variation, yet at a very low depth and for specific cases only. A detailed analysis shows that taking into account different types of pavement or a greater depth requires more complex and advanced models.

  5. Structural and biochemical characterizations of an intramolecular tandem coiled coil protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Donghyuk; Kim, Gwanho; Kim, Gyuhee; Zheng, Xu; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Lee, Sangho

    2014-12-12

    Coiled coil has served as an excellent model system for studying protein folding and developing protein-based biomaterials. Most designed coiled coils function as oligomers, namely intermolecular coiled coils. However, less is known about structural and biochemical behavior of intramolecular coiled coils where coiled coil domains are covalently linked in one polypeptide. Here we prepare a protein which harbors three coiled coil domains with two short linkers, termed intramolecular tandem coiled coil (ITCC) and characterize its structural and biochemical behavior in solution. ITCC consists of three coiled coil domains whose sequences are derived from Coil-Ser and its domain swapped dimer. Modifications include positioning E (Glu) residue at "e" and K (Lys) at "g" positions throughout heptad repeats to enhance ionic interaction among its constituent coiled coil domains. Molecular modeling of ITCC suggests a compact triple helical bundle structure with the second and the third coiled coil domains forming a canonical coiled coil. ITCC exists as a mixture of monomeric and dimeric species in solution. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals ellipsoidal molecular envelopes for both dimeric and monomeric ITCC in solution. The theoretically modeled structures of ITCC dock well into the envelopes of both species. Higher ionic strength shifts the equilibrium into monomer with apparently more compact structure while secondary structure remains unchanged. Taken together, our results suggest that our designed ITCC is predominantly monomeric structure through the enhanced ionic interactions, and its conformation is affected by the concentration of ionic species in the buffer.

  6. α/β coiled coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Marcus D; Mendler, Claudia T; Bassler, Jens; Karamichali, Ioanna; Ridderbusch, Oswin; Lupas, Andrei N; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2016-01-15

    Coiled coils are the best-understood protein fold, as their backbone structure can uniquely be described by parametric equations. This level of understanding has allowed their manipulation in unprecedented detail. They do not seem a likely source of surprises, yet we describe here the unexpected formation of a new type of fiber by the simple insertion of two or six residues into the underlying heptad repeat of a parallel, trimeric coiled coil. These insertions strain the supercoil to the breaking point, causing the local formation of short β-strands, which move the path of the chain by 120° around the trimer axis. The result is an α/β coiled coil, which retains only one backbone hydrogen bond per repeat unit from the parent coiled coil. Our results show that a substantially novel backbone structure is possible within the allowed regions of the Ramachandran space with only minor mutations to a known fold.

  7. A Nonlinear Model of Mix Coil Spring – Rubber for Vertical Suspension of Railway Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitriu Mădălina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on a nonlinear model to represent the mechanical behaviour of a mix coil spring - rubber used in the secondary suspension of passenger rail vehicles. The principle of the model relies on overlapping of the forces corresponding to three components - the elastic component, the viscous component and the dry friction component. The model has two sources on non-linearity, in the elastic force and the friction force, respectively. The main attributes of the model are made visible by its response to an imposed displacement-type harmonic excitation. The results thus obtained from the applications of numerical simulation show a series of basic properties of the model, namely the dependence on amplitude and the excitation frequency of the model response, as well as of its stiffness and damping.

  8. Recharge estimation for transient ground water modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyrkama, Mikko I; Sykes, Jon F; Normani, Stefano D

    2002-01-01

    Reliable ground water models require both an accurate physical representation of the system and appropriate boundary conditions. While physical attributes are generally considered static, boundary conditions, such as ground water recharge rates, can be highly variable in both space and time. A practical methodology incorporating the hydrologic model HELP3 in conjunction with a geographic information system was developed to generate a physically based and highly detailed recharge boundary condition for ground water modeling. The approach uses daily precipitation and temperature records in addition to land use/land cover and soils data. The importance of the method in transient ground water modeling is demonstrated by applying it to a MODFLOW modeling study in New Jersey. In addition to improved model calibration, the results from the study clearly indicate the importance of using a physically based and highly detailed recharge boundary condition in ground water quality modeling, where the detailed knowledge of the evolution of the ground water flowpaths is imperative. The simulated water table is within 0.5 m of the observed values using the method, while the water levels can differ by as much as 2 m using uniform recharge conditions. The results also show that the combination of temperature and precipitation plays an important role in the amount and timing of recharge in cooler climates. A sensitivity analysis further reveals that increasing the leaf area index, the evaporative zone depth, or the curve number in the model will result in decreased recharge rates over time, with the curve number having the greatest impact.

  9. First Test Results on ITER CS Model Coil and CS Insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Michael, P; Minervini, J; Radovinsky, A; Takayasu, M; Thome, R; Ando, T; Isono, T; Kato, T; Nakajima, H; Nishijima, G; Nunoya, Y; Sugimoto, M; Takahashi, Y; Tsuji, H; Bessette, D; Okuno, K; Ricci, M; Maix, R

    2000-10-12

    The Inner and Outer modules of the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) were built by US and Japanese home teams in collaboration with European and Russian teams to demonstrate the feasibility of a superconducting Central Solenoid for ITER and other large tokamak reactors. The CSMC mass is about 120 t, OD is about 3.6 m and the stored energy is 640 MJ at 46 kA and peak field of 13 T. Testing of the CSMC and the CS Insert took place at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) from mid March until mid August 2000. This paper presents the main results of the tests performed.

  10. Nonlinear instabilities induced by the F coil power amplifier at FTU: Modeling and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccarian, L. [Dip. di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Universita di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1 - 00133 Roma (Italy); Boncagni, L. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65 - 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Cascone, D. [Dip. di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Universita di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1 - 00133 Roma (Italy); Centioli, C. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65 - 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Cerino, S. [Dip. di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Universita di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1 - 00133 Roma (Italy); Gravanti, F.; Iannone, F. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65 - 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Mecocci, F.; Pangione, L. [Dip. di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Universita di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1 - 00133 Roma (Italy); Podda, S. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65 - 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Vitale, V. [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, CP 65 - 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)], E-mail: vitale@frascati.enea.it; Vitelli, R. [Dip. di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Universita di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1 - 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we focus on the instabilities caused by the nonlinear behavior of the F coil current amplifier at FTU. This behavior induces closed-loop instability of the horizontal position stabilizing loop whenever the requested current is below the circulating current level. In the paper we first illustrate a modeling phase where nonlinear dynamics are derived and identified to reproduce the open-loop responses measured by the F coil current amplifier. The derived model is shown to successfully reproduce the experimental behavior by direct comparison with experimental data. Based on this dynamic model, we then reproduce the closed-loop scenario of the experiment and show that the proposed nonlinear model successfully reproduces the nonlinear instabilities experienced in the experimental sessions. Given the simulation setup, we next propose a nonlinear control solution to this instability problem. The proposed solution is shown to recover stability in closed-loop simulations. Experimental tests are scheduled for the next experimental campaign after the FTU restart.

  11. 3D model of a matrix source of negative ions: RF driving by a large area planar coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerdzhiev, A.; Lishev, St.; Tarnev, Kh.; Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-01

    Based on three-dimensional (3D) modeling, different manners of a planar-coil inductive discharge driving of a plasma source completed as a matrix of small-radius hydrogen discharges are studied regarding a proper choice of an efficient and alike rf power deposition into the separate discharges of the matrix. Driving the whole matrix by a single coil and splitting it to blocks of discharge tubes, with single coil driving of each block, are the two cases considered. The results from the self-consistent model presented for a block of discharge tubes show its reliability in ensuring the same spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the discharges completing the block. Since regarding the construction of the matrix, its driving as a whole by a single coil is the most reasonable decision, three modifications of the coil design have been tested: two zigzag coils with straight conductors passing, respectively, between and through the bottoms of the discharge tubes and a coil with an "omega" shaped conductor on the bottom of each tube. Among these three configurations, the latter ‒ a coil with an Ω-shaped conductor on the bottom of each tube ‒ shows up with the highest rf efficiency of an inductive discharge driving, shown by results for the rf current induced in the discharges obtained from an electrodynamical description. In all the cases considered the spatial distribution of the induced current density is analysed based on the manner of the penetration into the plasma of the wave field sustaining the inductive discharges.

  12. Development and experimental validation of a computational model for a helically coiled steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colorado, D.; Hernandez, J.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencia Aplicadas (CIICAp), Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos (UAEM), Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, C.P. 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Papini, D.; Santini, L.; Ricotti, M.E. [Department of Energy, CeSNEF-Nuclear Engineering Division, Politecnico di, Milano, Via La Masa, 34, 20156, Milan (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    A computational model is developed to describe the thermo-fluid-dynamic behaviour of a helically coiled steam generator device working with water and widely adopted in the nuclear industry. The discretized governing equations are coupled using an implicit step by step method. The mathematical model includes: a subcooled liquid region, a two-phase flow region, and a superheated vapour region (according to the once-through nature of the heat exchanger). All the flow variables (enthalpies, temperatures, pressures, vapour qualities, velocities, heat fluxes, etc.), together with the thermo-physical properties, are evaluated at each point of the grid in which the domain is discretized. A full-scale experimental investigation carried out at SIET thermal-hydraulics labs in Piacenza (Italy), and aimed at characterizing the fluid-dynamic behaviour of two-phase flows in helically coiled tubes, is referenced in the present paper. Two-phase pressure drops data reduction allowed optimizing a suitable form of the friction factor multiplier required by momentum balance equation. Comparisons of the numerical simulations with a wide range of two-phase pressure drops measurements (experiments conducted both in diabatic and adiabatic conditions) are shown in order to validate the proposed model. (authors)

  13. Liquid rope coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Ribe; M. Habibi; D. Bonn

    2012-01-01

    A thin stream or rope of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a steadily rotating helical coil. Tabletop laboratory experiments in combination with a numerical model for slender liquid ropes reveal that finite-amplitude coiling can occur in four distinct regimes (visco

  14. Modelling and Practical Implementation of 2-Coil Wireless Power Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless power transfer (WPT based on inductive coupling could be potentially applied in many practical applications. It has attracted a lot of research interests in the last few years. In this paper, the modelling, design, and implementation of a 2-coil WPT system are represented. The prototype system can be implemented using conventional power electronic devices such as MOSFETs with very low costs as it works in relative low frequency range (less than 1 MHz. In order to find out about the optimal working area for the WPT system, the circuit model based on the practical parameters from the prototype is built. The relationships between the exciting frequency, coupling, and output power are analyzed based on the circuit and magnetic principles. Apart from the theoretic study, the detailed implementation of the WPT prototype including the coil design, digital frequency generation, and high frequency power electronics is also introduced in this paper. Experiments are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the circuit analysis. By carefully tuning the circuit parameters, the prototype is able to deliver 20 W power through 2.2 meter distance with 20–30% efficiency.

  15. CCHMM_PROF: a HMM-based coiled-coil predictor with evolutionary information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Fariselli, Piero; Krogh, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The widespread coiled-coil structural motif in proteins is known to mediate a variety of biological interactions. Recognizing a coiled-coil containing sequence and locating its coiled-coil domains are key steps towards the determination of the protein structure and function. Different...... tools are available for predicting coiled-coil domains in protein sequences, including those based on position-specific score matrices and machine learning methods. RESULTS: In this article, we introduce a hidden Markov model (CCHMM_PROF) that exploits the information contained in multiple sequence...... alignments (profiles) to predict coiled-coil regions. The new method discriminates coiled-coil sequences with an accuracy of 97% and achieves a true positive rate of 79% with only 1% of false positives. Furthermore, when predicting the location of coiled-coil segments in protein sequences, the method reaches...

  16. Test of the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil and CS Insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Michael, P; Minervini, J; Radovinsky, A; Takayasu, M; Gung, C Y; Thome, R; Ando, T; Isono, T; Hamada, K; Kato, T; Kawano, K; Koizumi, N; Matsui, K; Nakajima, H; Nishijima, G; Nunoya, Y; Sugimoto, M; Takahasi, Y; Hsuji, H; Bessette, D; Okuno, K; Mitchell, N; Ricci, M; Zanino, R; Savoldi, L; Arai, K; Ninomiya, A

    2001-09-25

    The Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) was designed and built from 1993 to 1999 by an ITER collaboration between the US and Japan, with contributions from the European Union and the Russian Federation. The main goal of the project was to establish the superconducting magnet technology necessary for a large-scale fusion experimental reactor. Three heavily instrumented insert coils were built to cover a wide operational space for testing. The CS Insert, built by Japan, was tested in April-August of 2000. The TF Insert, built by Russian Federation, will be tested in the fall of 2001. The NbAl Insert, built by Japan, will be tested in 2002. The testing takes place in the CSMC Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Japan. The CSMC was charged successfully without training to its design current of 46 kA to produce 13 T in the magnet bore. The stored energy at 46 kA was 640 MJ. This paper presents the main results of the CSMC and the CS Insert testing--magnet critical parameters, ac losses, joint performance, quench characteristics and some results of the post-test analysis.

  17. Current diffusion and normal zone propagation inside the aluminum stabilized superconductor of ATLAS model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; Pellegatta, M; ten Kate, H H J

    2003-01-01

    The normal zone propagation inside the B/sub O/ model coil of the ATLAS Toroidal magnet has been measured over a large range of applied currents. Typical values for the longitudinal propagation vary from 0.3 to 15 m/s at 8 and 24 kA, respectively. A new analytical expression for the longitudinal quench propagation inside superconducting cables is presented. It describes the propagation inside superconducting wires as well as the propagation inside large stabilized superconductors. It is found that in the limit case of high currents, the stabilizer functions only as a heat-sink. The model is compared to experimental data and a good correlation is found. (10 refs).

  18. Electrical analysis of CFETR CS model coil%CFETR CS模型线圈的电磁分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆亮; 刘小刚; 汪献伟; 施毅; 武玉

    2016-01-01

    In the conceptual design stage of the Chinese fusion engineering testing reactor (CFETR), in order to design and manufacture the central solenoid coil, a model coil consisting of Nb3Sn inside coil and NbTi outside coil was conceptually designed. Internal magnetic field of wires with line current model was solved with data processing to achieve the precise calculation. On this basis, the electromagnetic parameters were calculated, such as the inductance of the coil and the electromagnetic force.%在中国聚变工程试验堆(CFETR)的概念设计阶段,为了将来正确设计和顺利加工其中心螺线管(CS)线圈,设计了一个由Nb3Sn内线圈和NbTi外线圈组成的模型线圈。采用线电流模型和后期数据处理的方法对其磁场做了精确计算,解决了线电流模型不能计算导线内部磁场的问题。在此基础上计算了线圈的电感和电磁应力等参数。

  19. The SMC (Short Model Coil) dipole: An R&D program for Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, J C; Bordini, B; Canfer, S; Ellwood, G; Feuvrier, J; Guinchard, M; Karppinen, M; Kokkinos, C; Manil, P; Milanese, A; Oberli, L; Regis, F; de Rijk, G

    2012-01-01

    The Short Model Coil (SMC) assembly has been designed, as test bench for short racetrack coils wound with Nb3Sn cable. The mechanical structure comprises an iron yoke surrounded by a 20 mm thick aluminium alloy shell, and includes four loading pads that transmit the required pre-compression from the outer shell into the two coils. The outer shell is pre-tensioned with mechanical keys that are inserted with the help of pressurized bladders and two 30 mm diameter aluminium alloy rods provide the axial loading to the coil ends. The outer shell, the axial rods, and the coils are instrumented with strain gauges, which allow precise monitoring of the loading conditions during the assembly and at cryogenic temperature during the magnet test. Two SMC assemblies have been completed and cold tested in the frame of a European collaboration between CEA (FR), CERN and STFC (UK) and with the technical support from LBNL (US). This paper describes the main features of the SMC assembly, the experience from the dummy assembli...

  20. The Short Model Coil (SMC) dipole: an R&D program towards Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bajko, M; Canfer, S; Ellwood, G; Feuvrier, J; Guinchard, M; Karppinen, M; Kokkinos, C; Manil, P; Milanese, A; Oberli, L; Perez, J-C; Regis, F; de Rijk, G

    2011-01-01

    The Short Model Coil (SMC) assembly has been designed, as test bench for short racetrack coils wound with Nb3Sn cable. The mechanical structure comprises an iron yoke surrounded by a 20 mm thick aluminium alloy shell, and includes four loading pads that transmit the required pre-compression from the outer shell into the two coils. The outer shell is pre-tensioned with mechanical keys that are inserted with the help of pressurized bladders and two 30 mm diameter aluminium alloy rods provide the axial loading to the coil ends. The outer shell, the axial rods, and the coils are instrumented with strain gauges, which allow precise monitoring of the loading conditions during the assembly and at cryogenic temperature during the magnet test. Two SMC assemblies have been completed and cold tested in the frame of a European collaboration between CEA (FR), CERN and STFC (UK) and with the technical support from LBNL (US). This paper describes the main features of the SMC assembly, the experience from the dummy assemblie...

  1. Ground energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  2. A 3-dimensional model for inductively coupled plasma etching reactors: Coil generated plasma asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, M.J.; Collison, W.Z.; Grapperhaus, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) reactors are being developed as high plasma density, low gas pressure sources for etching and deposition of semiconductor materials. In this paper, the authors describe a 3-dimensional, time dependent model for ICP reactors whose intent is to provide an infrastructure to investigate asymmetries in plasma etching and deposition tools. The model is a 3-dimensional extension of a previously described 2-dimensional simulation called the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). HPEM-3D consists of an electromagnetics module (EMM), a Boltzmann-electron energy module (BEM) and a fluid-chemical kinetics simulation (FKS). The inductively coupled electromagnetic fields are produced by the EMM. Results from HPEM-3D will be discussed for reactors using etching (Cl{sub 2}, BCl{sub 3}) and non-etching (Ar, Ar/N{sub 2}) gas mixtures, and which have geometrical asymmetries such as wafer clamps and load-lock bays. The authors show how details in the design of the coil, such as the value of the termination capacitance or number of turns, lead to azimuthal variations in the inductive electric field.

  3. Ground-water models: Validate or invalidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehoeft, J.D.; Konikow, L.F.

    1993-01-01

    The word validation has a clear meaning to both the scientific community and the general public. Within the scientific community the validation of scientific theory has been the subject of philosophical debate. The philosopher of science, Karl Popper, argued that scientific theory cannot be validated, only invalidated. Popper’s view is not the only opinion in this debate; however, many scientists today agree with Popper (including the authors). To the general public, proclaiming that a ground-water model is validated carries with it an aura of correctness that we do not believe many of us who model would claim. We can place all the caveats we wish, but the public has its own understanding of what the word implies. Using the word valid with respect to models misleads the public; verification carries with it similar connotations as far as the public is concerned. Our point is this: using the terms validation and verification are misleading, at best. These terms should be abandoned by the ground-water community.

  4. Channel Modeling for Air-to-Ground Wireless Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingcheng Shi; Di He; Bin Li; Jianwu Dou

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss several large⁃scale fading models for different environments. The COST231⁃Hata model is adapted for air⁃to⁃ground modeling. We propose two criteria for air⁃to⁃ground channel modelling based on test data derived from field testing in Beijing. We develop a new propagation model that is more suitable for air⁃to⁃ground communication that pre⁃vious models. We focus on improving this propagation model using the field test data.

  5. Relational grounding facilitates development of scientifically useful multiscale models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We review grounding issues that influence the scientific usefulness of any biomedical multiscale model (MSM. Groundings are the collection of units, dimensions, and/or objects to which a variable or model constituent refers. To date, models that primarily use continuous mathematics rely heavily on absolute grounding, whereas those that primarily use discrete software paradigms (e.g., object-oriented, agent-based, actor typically employ relational grounding. We review grounding issues and identify strategies to address them. We maintain that grounding issues should be addressed at the start of any MSM project and should be reevaluated throughout the model development process. We make the following points. Grounding decisions influence model flexibility, adaptability, and thus reusability. Grounding choices should be influenced by measures, uncertainty, system information, and the nature of available validation data. Absolute grounding complicates the process of combining models to form larger models unless all are grounded absolutely. Relational grounding facilitates referent knowledge embodiment within computational mechanisms but requires separate model-to-referent mappings. Absolute grounding can simplify integration by forcing common units and, hence, a common integration target, but context change may require model reengineering. Relational grounding enables synthesis of large, composite (multi-module models that can be robust to context changes. Because biological components have varying degrees of autonomy, corresponding components in MSMs need to do the same. Relational grounding facilitates achieving such autonomy. Biomimetic analogues designed to facilitate translational research and development must have long lifecycles. Exploring mechanisms of normal-to-disease transition requires model components that are grounded relationally. Multi-paradigm modeling requires both hyperspatial and relational grounding.

  6. Modeling and simulation on temperature performance in fiber optic gyroscope fiber coil of shipborne strapdown inertial navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yueze; Ma, Lin; Yu, Hao; Gao, Hongyu; Yuan, Yujie

    2016-10-01

    Compared with the traditional gyros, Fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) based on sagnac effect has the significant features, such as, long life, low cost, wide dynamic range, etc. These features have developed new applications of the gyroscope not only in industrial application area but also in aerospace application area. Now, the FOG has played a very important role in shipborne Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS). The fiber coil, as one of the most critical components in FOG, is extremely sensitive to changes in temperature. Here, by study the environment temperature in shipborne SINS, the temperature performance of the FOG was analyzed. Firstly, on the base of the research about the theory of Shupe non-reciprocal errors caused by temperature, the discrete mathematics formula of the temperature error in FOG of SINS was built .Then the element model of the fiber coil in SINS was built based on the discrete model of the fiber coil in temperature error in FOG. A turn-by-turn quantization temperature bias error model is establish. Finally, based on the temperature models mentioned above, the temperature performance of FOG in shipborne SINS was analyzed. With finite element analysis, numerical simulations were carried out to quantitatively analyze the angular error induced by temperature excitation in SINS. The model was validated by comparing numerical and experimental results.

  7. Representing environment-induced helix-coil transitions in a coarse grained peptide model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Globisch, Christoph; Sayar, Mehmet; Peter, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Coarse grained (CG) models are widely used in studying peptide self-assembly and nanostructure formation. One of the recurrent challenges in CG modeling is the problem of limited transferability, for example to different thermodynamic state points and system compositions. Understanding transferability is generally a prerequisite to knowing for which problems a model can be reliably used and predictive. For peptides, one crucial transferability question is whether a model reproduces the molecule's conformational response to a change in its molecular environment. This is of particular importance since CG peptide models often have to resort to auxiliary interactions that aid secondary structure formation. Such interactions take care of properties of the real system that are per se lost in the coarse graining process such as dihedral-angle correlations along the backbone or backbone hydrogen bonding. These auxiliary interactions may then easily overstabilize certain conformational propensities and therefore destroy the ability of the model to respond to stimuli and environment changes, i.e. they impede transferability. In the present paper we have investigated a short peptide with amphiphilic EALA repeats which undergoes conformational transitions between a disordered and a helical state upon a change in pH value or due to the presence of a soft apolar/polar interface. We designed a base CG peptide model that does not carry a specific (backbone) bias towards a secondary structure. This base model was combined with two typical approaches of ensuring secondary structure formation, namely a C α -C α -C α -C α pseudodihedral angle potential or a virtual site interaction that mimics hydrogen bonding. We have investigated the ability of the two resulting CG models to represent the environment-induced conformational changes in the helix-coil equilibrium of EALA. We show that with both approaches a CG peptide model can be obtained that is environment-transferable and that

  8. Coiled-coil protein composition of 22 proteomes – differences and common themes in subcellular infrastructure and traffic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Iris

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in diverse organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems and tissues, motors, levers, rotating arms, and possibly springs. Mutations in long coiled-coil proteins have been implemented in a growing number of human diseases. Using the coiled-coil prediction program MultiCoil, we have previously identified all long coiled-coil proteins from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have established a searchable Arabidopsis coiled-coil protein database. Results Here, we have identified all proteins with long coiled-coil domains from 21 additional fully sequenced genomes. Because regions predicted to form coiled-coils interfere with sequence homology determination, we have developed a sequence comparison and clustering strategy based on masking predicted coiled-coil domains. Comparing and grouping all long coiled-coil proteins from 22 genomes, the kingdom-specificity of coiled-coil protein families was determined. At the same time, a number of proteins with unknown function could be grouped with already characterized proteins from other organisms. Conclusion MultiCoil predicts proteins with extended coiled-coil domains (more than 250 amino acids to be largely absent from bacterial genomes, but present in archaea and eukaryotes. The structural maintenance of chromosomes proteins and their relatives are the only long coiled-coil protein family clearly conserved throughout all kingdoms, indicating their ancient nature. Motor proteins, membrane tethering and vesicle transport proteins are the dominant eukaryote-specific long coiled-coil proteins, suggesting that coiled-coil proteins have gained functions in the increasingly complex processes of subcellular infrastructure maintenance and trafficking control of the eukaryotic cell.

  9. Moral Distress Model Reconstructed Using Grounded Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hsun-Kuei; Chin, Chi-Chun; Hsu, Min-Tao

    2016-12-29

    The problems of nurse burnout and manpower shortage relate to moral distress. Thus, having a good understanding of moral distress is critical to developing strategies that effectively improve the clinical ethical climate and improve nursing retention in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to reconstruct the model of moral distress using the grounded theory. Twenty-five staff nurses at work units who attend to the needs of adult, pediatric, acute, and critical disease or end-of-life-care patients were recruited as participants using theoretical sampling from three teaching hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected using intensive, 2- to 3-hour interviews with each participant. Audio recordings of the interviews were made and then converted into transcripts. The data were analyzed using the grounded theory. In the clinical setting, the perspective that nurses take toward clinical moral events reflects their moral values, which trigger moral cognition, provocation, and appraisal. The moral barriers that form when moral events that occur in clinical settings contradict personal moral values may later develop into moral distress. In handling moral barriers in the clinical environment, nurses make moral judgments and determine what is morally correct. Influenced by moral efficacy, the consequence may either be a moral action or an expression of personal emotion. Wasting National Health Insurance resources and Chinese culture are key sources of moral distress for nurses in Taiwan. The role of self-confidence in promoting moral efficacy and the role of heterodox skills in promoting moral actions represent findings that are unique to this study. The moral distress model was used in this study to facilitate the development of future nursing theories. On the basis of our findings, we suggested that nursing students be encouraged to use case studies to establish proper moral values, improve moral cognition and judgment capabilities, and promote moral actions to better handle the

  10. Estimation of critical current distribution in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x cables and coils using a self-consistent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Donghui; Xia, Jing; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets can generate high magnetic fields. Multi-filamentary Ag-alloy sheathed Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x (Bi-2212) round wire can have a high critical current density in a very high magnetic field. Thus, Bi-2212 has great potential for the development of high-field magnets. For safe and reliable operation of superconducting magnets, it is necessary to estimate the critical current during the design of cables and coils. In this paper, we extend the self-consistent model proposed by Zermeño et al to study the critical current of Bi-2212 cables and coils. First, based on the distribution of Bi-2212 filaments and the experimental test of the critical current of a single strand, the critical currents in cables and coils are calculated. The self-field effect on the critical current is also analyzed. Then, we use an equivalent model to to estimate critical current of large superconducting coils. The equivalent model can effectively estimate the critical current in coils. Using the equivalent model, the results of coils in self-field and high field are compared and discussed. The method and results could be useful for the design of high-field coils.

  11. Toroidal modelling of RMP response in ASDEX Upgrade: coil phase scan, q 95 dependence, and toroidal torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ryan, D.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    The plasma response to the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields, produced by the ELM control coils in ASDEX Upgrade experiments, is computationally modelled using the MARS-F/K codes (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681, Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). A systematic investigation is carried out, considering various plasma and coil configurations as in the ELM control experiments. The low q plasmas, with {{q}95}˜ 3.8 (q 95 is the safety factor q value at 95% of the equilibrium poloidal flux), responding to low n (n is the toroidal mode number) field perturbations from each single row of the ELM coils, generates a core kink amplification effect. Combining two rows, with different toroidal phasing, thus leads to either cancellation or reinforcement of the core kink response, which in turn determines the poloidal location of the peak plasma surface displacement. The core kink response is typically weak for the n  =  4 coil configuration at low q, and for the n  =  2 configuration but only at high q ({{q}95}˜ 5.5 ). A phase shift of around 60 degrees for low q plasmas, and around 90 degrees for high q plasmas, is found in the coil phasing, between the plasma response field and the vacuum RMP field, that maximizes the edge resonant field component. This leads to an optimal coil phasing of about 100 (-100) degrees for low (high) q plasmas, that maximizes both the edge resonant field component and the plasma surface displacement near the X-point of the separatrix. This optimal phasing closely corresponds to the best ELM mitigation observed in experiments. A strong parallel sound wave damping moderately reduces the core kink response but has minor effect on the edge peeling response. For low q plasmas, modelling shows that both the resonant electromagnetic torque and the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque (due to the presence of 3D magnetic field perturbations) contribute to the toroidal flow damping, in particular near the

  12. Numerical Modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Iraklis; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Pajewski, Lara

    2014-05-01

    Numerical methods are needed in order to solve Maxwell's equations in complicated and realistic problems. Over the years a number of numerical methods have been developed to do so. Amongst them the most popular are the finite element, finite difference implicit techniques, frequency domain solution of Helmontz equation, the method of moments, transmission line matrix method. However, the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) is considered to be one of the most attractive choice basically because of its simplicity, speed and accuracy. FDTD first introduced in 1966 by Kane Yee. Since then, FDTD has been established and developed to be a very rigorous and well defined numerical method for solving Maxwell's equations. The order characteristics, accuracy and limitations are rigorously and mathematically defined. This makes FDTD reliable and easy to use. Numerical modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a very useful tool which can be used in order to give us insight into the scattering mechanisms and can also be used as an alternative approach to aid data interpretation. Numerical modelling has been used in a wide range of GPR applications including archeology, geophysics, forensic, landmine detection etc. In engineering, some applications of numerical modelling include the estimation of the effectiveness of GPR to detect voids in bridges, to detect metal bars in concrete, to estimate shielding effectiveness etc. The main challenges in numerical modelling of GPR for engineering applications are A) the implementation of the dielectric properties of the media (soils, concrete etc.) in a realistic way, B) the implementation of the geometry of the media (soils inhomogeneities, rough surface, vegetation, concrete features like fractures and rock fragments etc.) and C) the detailed modelling of the antenna units. The main focus of this work (which is part of the COST Action TU1208) is the accurate and realistic implementation of GPR antenna units into the FDTD

  13. Cryogenic performance and numerical modeling of a helium refrigerator for the JT-60SA coil test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrand, Alexandre; Abdel-Maksoud, Walid; Genini, Laurent; Juster, François-Paul

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the JT-60SA project, a cryogenic loop, dedicated to the tests of the JT-60SA Toroidal Field Coils, is planned to be installed at CEA Saclay. To analyze the dynamic thermal behavior of the cryogenic loop and to optimize the cryogenic process control of the coil test facility, dynamic simulations will be carried out with the software EcosimPro. This paper deals with the validation of the software. Experimental power measurements in pure refrigeration on a helium refrigerator have been compared to computations. Results are close and allow validating the software. The modeling of the JT-60SA CTF cryogenic test loop is also described in order to give an overview of the next computations.

  14. Numerical simulation and validation on heat exchange performance of pile spiral coil ground heat exchanger%桩基螺旋型地埋管换热器换热性能的数值模拟与验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨卫波; 杨晶晶; 孔磊

    2016-01-01

    The new trends in energy savings and greenhouse gas reductions are expecting to explore the utilization of shallow geothermal energy. The most popular way to exploit shallow geothermal energy resources is the ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) system with using ground as a heat source. Because underground temperature is rather constant compared with ambient air temperature, the GCHP could achieve higher efficiency as well as more stable performance compared with traditional air source heat pumps. Thus the GCHP system becomes increasingly popular in commercial and institutional buildings. In general, a vertical borehole with ground heat exchanger (GHE) is used as the mainstream of GCHP system. However, the wide application of this type of GCHP technology has been limited by its higher initial cost and substantial land areas required to install the GHE. For this reason, the foundation piles of buildings have been used as part of GHE in recent years to reduce the cost of drilling borehole and save the required land area. This innovative idea of utilizing what are usually called “energy piles”, has led to notable progress in the field of GCHP systems. It has become particularly attractive because it lowers total cost and spatial requirements, and offers the higher renewable contribution. In this paper, a novel configuration of an energy pile with a spiral coil was proposed. In order to investigate the effects of various factors on heat exchange performance of the pile spiral coil GHE, a numerical model of the pile with a spiral coil was developed. Based on the numerical solution of the model, the effects of pile diameter, pile depth, spiral coil group number and soil type on the heat exchange rate and soil temperature distribution of the spiral pile GHE were analyzed. The results indicated that increasing foundation pile diameter can improve the thermal storage capacity and thus enhance heat exchange rate of pile. But increase in foundation pile diameter can also

  15. DEVS Models of Palletized Ground Stacking in Storeyed Grain Warehouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Shu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Processed grain stored in storeyed warehouse is generally stacked on the ground without pallets. However, in order to improve the storing way, we developed a new stacking method, palletized ground stacking. Simulation should be used to present this new storing way. DEVS provides a formalized way to describe the system model. In this paper, DEVS models of palletized ground stacking in storeyed grain warehouse are given and a simulation model is developed by AutoMod.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Ground Response during Diaphragm Wall Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yong-chun; WANG Jian-hua

    2008-01-01

    Construction of diaphragm wall panels may cause considerable stress changes in heavily overconsolidated soil deposits and can induce substantial ground movement. The 3D Lagrangian method was adopted to model the mechanical response of ground, including horizontal normal stress and shear stress, lateral ground displacement and vertical ground surface settlement, during the slurry trenching and concreting of diaphragm wall panels. Numerical results show that slurry trenching leads to horizontal stress relief of ground, reducing the horizontal stress of the ground from initial K0 pressure to hydrostatic betonite pressure. Wet concrete pressure lies between the hydrostatic bentonite pressure and the initial K0 pressure, so it can compensate partially the horizontal stress loss of the ground adjacent to the trench and thus reduce the lateral movement of the trench face as well as the vertical settlement of the ground surface.

  17. An improved FEM model for computing transport AC loss in coils made of RABiTS YBCO coated conductors for electric machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, Mark D.; Rodriguez-Zermeno, Victor M.; Hong, Zhiyong; Yuan, Weijia; Flack, Timothy J.; Coombs, Timothy A.

    2011-04-01

    AC loss can be a significant problem for any applications that utilize or produce an AC current or magnetic field, such as an electric machine. The authors investigate the electromagnetic properties of high temperature superconductors with a particular focus on the AC loss in superconducting coils made from YBCO coated conductors for use in an all-superconducting electric machine. This paper presents an improved 2D finite element model for the cross-section of such coils, based on the H formulation. The model is used to calculate the transport AC loss of a racetrack-shaped coil using constant and magnetic field-dependent critical current densities, and the inclusion and exclusion of a magnetic substrate, as found in RABiTS (rolling-assisted biaxially textured substrate) YBCO coated conductors. The coil model is based on the superconducting stator coils used in the University of Cambridge EPEC Superconductivity Group's all-superconducting permanent magnet synchronous motor design. To validate the modeling results, the transport AC loss of a stator coil is measured using an electrical method based on inductive compensation by means of a variable mutual inductance. Finally, the implications of the findings on the performance of the motor are discussed.

  18. 连续管线管在青海油田地面集输管线的应用%Coiled Tubing Application in Qinghai Oil Field Ground Gathering Pipeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏强; 王琪; 秦跃平; 张阿军

    2013-01-01

    针对目前油田地面集输管线采用无缝管单根焊接方式造成的焊口多、空气污染严重、劳动强度高等问题,使用连续管线管替代无缝管进行地面集输管线项目试验.介绍了试验用连续管线管的拉伸性能,以及试验现场布管、焊接、焊后水压试验、防腐层补伤等工艺过程.试验结果表明,与无缝管相比,连续管线管用作地面集输管线具有施工效率高、安全性及质量可靠等优点.%Aiming at some problems occurred in adopting seamless steel pipe to conduct each single pipe welding in oil field ground gathering pipeline, such as many welded junction, serious air pollution, high labour intensity and so on. It adopted coiled tubing to replace seamless steel pipe to carry out ground gathering pipeline trial project, introduced the tensile performance of coiled tubing used in experiment, layout pipe in field, welding, hydrostatic test after welding, coating repaire and other process. The test results indicated that compared with seamless steel pipe, coiled tubing used for ground gathering pipeline is with high construction efficiency, high safety, reliable quality and etc.

  19. Discrete step model of helix-coil kinetics: Distribution of fluctuation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Douglas

    1996-07-01

    A method is outlined for the computer simulation of the cooperative kinetics required to construct the distribution function for time intervals between fluctuations in conformational states in macromolecules. Using the helix-coil transition in polyamino acids as an example, we develop a Monte Carlo cellular automata approximation of the kinetics of this system in discrete time. This approximation is tested against a number of exact solutions for homopolymers and is then used to calculate moments of the distribution function for the time intervals between switches in conformational state at a given site (e.g., given a switch from coil to helix at zero time, how long will it take before the state switches back). The maximum-entropy method is used to construct the very broad distribution function from the moments. In heteropolymers the diffusion of helix-coil boundaries is reduced, helix being more localized on strong helix-forming residues. We investigate the effect of a specific sequence of amino acid residues on conformational fluctuations by using the known σ and s values for the naturally occurring amino acids to simulate the kinetics of helix formation (limiting the range of cooperativity to the α-helix) in sperm whale myoglobin, giving the time evolution to the equilibrium probability profile in this system.

  20. Computational Grounded Cognition: A New Alliance between Grounded Cognition and Computational Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni ePezzulo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grounded theories assume that there is no central module for cognition. According to this view, all cognitive phenomena, including those considered the province of amodal cognition such as reasoning, numeric and language processing, are ultimately grounded in (and emerge from a variety of bodily, affective, perceptual and motor processes. The development and expression of cognition is constrained by the embodiment of cognitive agents and various contextual factors (physical and social in which they are immersed. The grounded framework has received numerous empirical confirmations. Still, there are very few explicit computational models that implement grounding in sensory, motor and affective processes as intrinsic to cognition, and demonstrate that grounded theories can mechanistically implement higher cognitive abilities. We propose a new alliance between grounded cognition and computational modeling towards a novel multidisciplinary enterprise: Computational Grounded Cognition. We clarify the defining features of this novel approach and emphasize the importance of using the methodology of Cognitive Robotics, which permits simultaneous consideration of multiple aspects of grounding, embodiment, and situatedness, showing how they constrain the development and expression of cognition.

  1. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  2. Hydrostatic grounding line parameterization in ice sheet models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Seroussi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of grounding line migration is essential to simulate accurately the behavior of marine ice sheets and investigate their stability. Here, we assess the sensitivity of numerical models to the parameterization of the grounding line position. We run the MISMIP3D benchmark experiments using a two-dimensional shelfy-stream approximation (SSA model with different mesh resolutions and different sub-element parameterizations of grounding line position. Results show that different grounding line parameterizations lead to different steady state grounding line positions as well as different retreat/advance rates. Our simulations explain why some vertically depth-averaged model simulations exhibited behaviors similar to full-Stokes models in the MISMIP3D benchmark, while the vast majority of simulations based on SSA showed results deviating significantly from full-Stokes results. The results reveal that differences between simulations performed with and without sub-element parameterization are as large as those performed with different approximations of the stress balance equations and that the reversibility test can be passed at much lower resolutions than the steady-state grounding line position. We conclude that fixed grid models that do not employ such a parameterization should be avoided, as they do not provide accurate estimates of grounding line dynamics, even at high spatial resolution. For models that include sub-element grounding line parameterization, a mesh resolution lower than 2 km should be employed.

  3. Coiled-Coil Design: Updated and Upgraded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils are ubiquitous protein-folding and protein-interaction domains in which two or more α-helical chains come together to form bundles. Through a combination of bioinformatics analysis of many thousands of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures, plus empirical protein engineering and design studies, there is now a deep understanding of the sequence-to-structure relationships for this class of protein architecture. This has led to considerable success in rational design and what might be termed in biro de novo design of simple coiled coils, which include homo- and hetero-meric parallel dimers, trimers and tetramers. In turn, these provide a toolkit for directing the assembly of both natural proteins and more complex designs in protein engineering, materials science and synthetic biology. Moving on, the increased and improved use of computational design is allowing access to coiled-coil structures that are rare or even not observed in nature, for example α-helical barrels, which comprise five or more α-helices and have central channels into which different functions may be ported. This chapter reviews all of these advances, outlining improvements in our knowledge of the fundamentals of coiled-coil folding and assembly, and highlighting new coiled coil-based materials and applications that this new understanding is opening up. Despite considerable progress, however, challenges remain in coiled-coil design, and the next decade promises to be as productive and exciting as the last.

  4. Sensitivities and uncertainties of modeled ground temperatures in mountain environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Model evaluation is often performed at few locations due to the lack of spatially distributed data. Since the quantification of model sensitivities and uncertainties can be performed independently from ground truth measurements, these analyses are suitable to test the influence of environmental variability on model evaluation. In this study, the sensitivities and uncertainties of a physically based mountain permafrost model are quantified within an artificial topography. The setting consists of different elevations and exposures combined with six ground types characterized by porosity and hydraulic properties. The analyses are performed for a combination of all factors, that allows for quantification of the variability of model sensitivities and uncertainties within a whole modeling domain. We found that model sensitivities and uncertainties vary strongly depending on different input factors such as topography or different soil types. The analysis shows that model evaluation performed at single locations may not be representative for the whole modeling domain. For example, the sensitivity of modeled mean annual ground temperature to ground albedo ranges between 0.5 and 4 °C depending on elevation, aspect and the ground type. South-exposed inclined locations are more sensitive to changes in ground albedo than north-exposed slopes since they receive more solar radiation. The sensitivity to ground albedo increases with decreasing elevation due to shorter duration of the snow cover. The sensitivity in the hydraulic properties changes considerably for different ground types: rock or clay, for instance, are not sensitive to uncertainties in the hydraulic properties, while for gravel or peat, accurate estimates of the hydraulic properties significantly improve modeled ground temperatures. The discretization of ground, snow and time have an impact on modeled mean annual ground temperature (MAGT that cannot be neglected (more than 1 °C for several

  5. Theoretical Modeling and Implementation of Traveling Wave Sensor Based on PCB Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on analyzing characteristics of Rogowski coil, a new type of PCB traveling wave sensor with simple structure, high linearity, and anti-interference ability is proposed. The sensor has fine physical structure, which can effectively resist external electromagnetic interference by anti-interference measurement. In addition, it can greatly improve mutual inductance based on simple combinations. Simulations show that the new PCB traveling wave sensor can validly extract and deliver traveling wave signal and therefore realize fault location and protection accurately.

  6. Numerical modeling of 3-D Position Reconstruction from 3-Axial Planar Spiral Coil Sensor Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Sanjaya, Edi; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2011-01-01

    A sensitivity profile of a planar spiral coil sensor (PSCS) is proposed and use to generate the relation of 3-D position of object observed using three (PSCS)-s, one in each x, y, and z axis to the sensors response. A numerical procedure using self consistent field-like method to reconstruct the real position of observed object from sensor sensitivity is presented and the results are discussed. Unfortunately, the procedure fails to approach the desired results due to the existence of quadratic terms.

  7. Self-correction coil: operation mechanism of self-correction coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoyama, K.

    1983-06-01

    We discuss here the operation mechanism of self-correction coil with a simple model. At the first stage, for the ideal self-correction coil case we calculate the self-inductance L of self-correction coil, the mutual inductance M between the error field coil and the self-correction coil, and using the model the induced curent in the self-correction coil by the external magnetic error field and induced magnetic field by the self-correction coil. And at the second stage, we extend this calculation method to non-ideal self-correction coil case, there we realize that the wire distribution of self-correction coil is important to get the high enough self-correction effect. For measure of completeness of self-correction effect, we introduce the efficiency eta of self-correction coil by the ratio of induced magnetic field by the self-correction coil and error field. As for the examples, we calculate L, M and eta for two cases; one is a single block approximation of self-correction coil winding and the other is a two block approximation case. By choosing the adequate angles of self-correction coil winding, we can get about 98% efficiency for single block approximation case and 99.8% for two block approximation case. This means that by using the self-correction coil we can improve the field quality about two orders.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics model for predicting flow of viscous fluids in a large fermentor with hydrofoil flow impellers and internal cooling coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly; Humphrey

    1998-03-01

    Considerable debate has occurred over the use of hydrofoil impellers in large-scale fermentors to improve mixing and mass transfer in highly viscous non-Newtonian systems. Using a computational fluid dynamics software package (Fluent, version 4.30) extensive calculations were performed to study the effect of impeller speed (70-130 rpm), broth rheology (value of power law flow behavior index from 0.2 to 0.6), and distance between the cooling coil bank and the fermentor wall (6-18 in.) on flow near the perimeter of a large (75-m3) fermentor equipped with A315 impellers. A quadratic model utilizing the data was developed in an attempt to correlate the effect of A315 impeller speed, power law flow behavior index, and distance between the cooling coil bank and the fermentor wall on the average axial velocity in the coil bank-wall region. The results suggest that there is a potential for slow or stagnant flow in the coil bank-wall region which could result in poor oxygen and heat transfer for highly viscous fermentations. The results also indicate that there is the potential for slow or stagnant flow in the region between the top impeller and the gas headspace when flow through the coil bank-wall region is slow. Finally, a simple guideline was developed to allow fermentor design engineers to predict the degree of flow behind a bank of helical cooling coils in a large fermentor with hydrofoil flow impellers.

  9. Coil Design for High Misalignment Tolerant Inductive Power Transfer System for EV Charging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafeel Ahmed Kalwar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The inductive power transfer (IPT system for electric vehicle (EV charging has acquired more research interest in its different facets. However, the misalignment tolerance between the charging coil (installed in the ground and pick-up coil (mounted on the car chassis, has been a challenge and fundamental interest in the future market of EVs. This paper proposes a new coil design QDQ (Quad D Quadrature that maintains the high coupling coefficient and efficient power transfer during reasonable misalignment. The QDQ design makes the use of four adjacent circular coils and one square coil, for both charging and pick-up side, to capture the maximum flux at any position. The coil design has been modeled in JMAG software for calculation of inductive parameters using the finite element method (FEM, and its hardware has been tested experimentally at various misaligned positions. The QDQ coils are shown to be capable of achieving good coupling coefficient and high efficiency of the system until the misalignment displacement reaches 50% of the employed coil size.

  10. Designing Stable Antiparallel Coiled Coil Dimers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾宪纲; 周海梦

    2001-01-01

    The history of antiparallel coiled coil dimer design is briefly reviewed and the main principles governing the successful designs are explained. They include analysis of the inter-subunit electrostatic repulsion for determining partners for dimerization and of the buried polar interaction for determining the relative orientation of the partners. A theory is proposed to explain the lack of antiparallel coiled coil homodimers in nature.

  11. Examination of Interaction Spring and Damping Model connecting Ground and Piled Foundations in Liqueaction Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshihisa; Ogawa, Yoshimi

    There are many bridges in lowland areas in East Tokyo and soft ground in Tokyo Bay Coast. A bare possibility is that these structures might suffer disastrous damage due to liquefaction when the area is hit by a large earthquake. In this paper, interaction spring and damping model considering a process of liquefaction and relationship between natural period of ground and pier are proposed, and it is verified by using the dynamic centrifugal model test in level 2 earthquake motion. As the result, it is verified that the response of pier and footing behaviors of the test and the analysis can be well corresponded, the interaction spring and damping model considering the process of liquefaction and the relationship between natural period of ground and pier is suitable for the purpose.

  12. Reduction of large-scale numerical ground water flow models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, P.T.M.; Heemink, A.W.; Testroet, C.B.M.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical models are often used for simulating ground water flow. Written in state space form, the dimension of these models is of the order of the number of model cells and can be very high (> million). As a result, these models are computationally very demanding, especially if many different scena

  13. Launch and Landing Effects Ground Operations (LLEGO) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    LLEGO is a model for understanding recurring launch and landing operations costs at Kennedy Space Center for human space flight. Launch and landing operations are often referred to as ground processing, or ground operations. Currently, this function is specific to the ground operations for the Space Shuttle Space Transportation System within the Space Shuttle Program. The Constellation system to follow the Space Shuttle consists of the crewed Orion spacecraft atop an Ares I launch vehicle and the uncrewed Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The Constellation flight and ground systems build upon many elements of the existing Shuttle flight and ground hardware, as well as upon existing organizations and processes. In turn, the LLEGO model builds upon past ground operations research, modeling, data, and experience in estimating for future programs. Rather than to simply provide estimates, the LLEGO model s main purpose is to improve expenses by relating complex relationships among functions (ground operations contractor, subcontractors, civil service technical, center management, operations, etc.) to tangible drivers. Drivers include flight system complexity and reliability, as well as operations and supply chain management processes and technology. Together these factors define the operability and potential improvements for any future system, from the most direct to the least direct expenses.

  14. Digital Modeling Phenomenon Of Surface Ground Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Voina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With the development of specialized software applications it was possible to approach and resolve complex problems concerning automating and process optimization for which are being used field data. Computerized representation of the shape and dimensions of the Earth requires a detailed mathematical modeling, known as "digital terrain model". The paper aims to present the digital terrain model of Vulcan mining, Hunedoara County, Romania. Modeling consists of a set of mathematical equations that define in detail the surface of Earth and has an approximate surface rigorously and mathematical, that calculated the land area. Therefore, the digital terrain model means a digital representation of the earth's surface through a mathematical model that approximates the land surface modeling, which can be used in various civil and industrial applications in. To achieve the digital terrain model of data recorded using linear and nonlinear interpolation method based on point survey which highlights the natural surface studied. Given the complexity of this work it is absolutely necessary to know in detail of all topographic elements of work area, without the actions to be undertaken to project and manipulate would not be possible. To achieve digital terrain model, within a specialized software were set appropriate parameters required to achieve this case study. After performing all steps we obtained digital terrain model of Vulcan Mine. Digital terrain model is the complex product, which has characteristics that are equivalent to the specialists that use satellite images and information stored in a digital model, this is easier to use.

  15. Mathematical model to determine the dimensions of superconducting cylindrical coils with a given central field - the case study for MgB2 conductors with isotropic Ic(B) characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitel, Jozef; Melišek, Tibor; Tropeano, Matteo; Nardelli, Davide; Tumino, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a mathematical model which enables to design cylindrical coils with a given central field, made of the superconducting conductor with isotropic Ic(B) characteristic. The model results in a computer code that enables to find out the coil dimensions, and to calculate the coil parameters such as critical current, maximum field in the winding and field non-uniformity on the coil axis. The Ic(B) characteristic of the conductor is represented by the set of data measured in discrete points. This approach allows us to express the Ic(B) as a function linearized in parts. Then, it is possible to involve the central field of the coil, coil dimensions, and parameters of the conductor, including its Ic(B) characteristic, in one equation which can be solved using ordinary numerical non-linear methods. Since the coil dimensions and conductor parameters are mutually linked in one equation with respect to a given coil central field, it is possible to analyze an influence of one parameter on the other one. The model was applied to three commercially available MgB2/Ni/Cu conductors produced by Columbus Superconductors. The results of simulations with the Ic(B) data at 20 K illustrate that there exists a set of winding geometries that generate a required central field, changing from a disc shape to long thin solenoid. Further, we analyze how the thickness of stabilizing copper influences the coil dimensions, overall conductor length, coil critical current, maximum field in the winding. An influence of the safety coefficient in operating current on coil dimensions and other above mentioned parameters is studied as well. Finally, we compare the coil dimensions, overall conductor length as well as coil critical current and maximum field in the winding if the value of required central field changes between 1 and 3 T.

  16. Modeling of earthquake ground motion in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrainsson, Hjortur

    In recent years, the utilization of time histories of earthquake ground motion has grown considerably in the design and analysis of civil structures. It is very unlikely, however, that recordings of earthquake ground motion will be available for all sites and conditions of interest. Hence, there is a need for efficient methods for the simulation and spatial interpolation of earthquake ground motion. In addition to providing estimates of the ground motion at a site using data from adjacent recording stations, spatially interpolated ground motions can also be used in design and analysis of long-span structures, such as bridges and pipelines, where differential movement is important. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for rapid generation of horizontal earthquake ground motion at any site for a given region, based on readily available source, path and site characteristics, or (sparse) recordings. The research includes two main topics: (i) the simulation of earthquake ground motion at a given site, and (ii) the spatial interpolation of earthquake ground motion. In topic (i), models are developed to simulate acceleration time histories using the inverse discrete Fourier transform. The Fourier phase differences, defined as the difference in phase angle between adjacent frequency components, are simulated conditional on the Fourier amplitude. Uniformly processed recordings from recent California earthquakes are used to validate the simulation models, as well as to develop prediction formulas for the model parameters. The models developed in this research provide rapid simulation of earthquake ground motion over a wide range of magnitudes and distances, but they are not intended to replace more robust geophysical models. In topic (ii), a model is developed in which Fourier amplitudes and Fourier phase angles are interpolated separately. A simple dispersion relationship is included in the phase angle interpolation. The accuracy of the interpolation

  17. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  18. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  19. Coil Welding Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  20. Starfire poloidal coil systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Kim, S.H.; Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.

    1980-01-01

    The poloidal coils for STARFIRE consists of three systems: (1) equilibrium field (EF) coils; (2) ohmic heating (OH) coils; and (3) correction field (CF) coils. The EF coils are superconducting and lie outside the toroidal field (TF) coils. These coils provide the bulk of the equilibrium field necessary to keep the plasma positioned in the vacuum chamber with the desired cross sectional shape and pressure and current distributions. Having these coils outside of the TF coils requires that they have a larger stored energy and larger currents but eases the assembly, maintenance, and reliability of the coils. The STARFIRE OH system is relatively small compared to tokamaks in which the current is entirely ohmically driven. It is designed to provide sufficient flux in the early startup to raise the plasma current to the point (1 to 2 MA) where the rf current drive can take over.

  1. Optimum coil insertion speed of various coils in brain aneurysm embolization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Yoshifumi; Takeuchi, Masataka; Fukasaku, Kazuaki

    2016-10-01

    A coil must comprise material with shape memory to perform optimal coil embolization. To achieve this, the alloy characteristics of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness) must be understood. In this experiment, a catheter was fixed in the bright position and the movement of the coil was observed under a constant rate of insertion; the optimal insertion rate during clinical use was investigated. The first coil insertion speed was evaluated using simulated aneurysms in an in vivo arterial model. The results showed that the insertion force relates to the deployment shape of the coil, that the feedback through the force indicator using sound is very effective, and that the recorder is useful for analysis of coil embolization. The inserted coils during aneurysm embolization were able to wind uniformly within the aneurysm due to a variety of factors (guiding or micro-catheter position and kick-back phenomenon such as delivery wire). Optimal speed is achieved with proper coil design, which allows the coil to be inserted into the aneurysm. The shape and size of the aneurysm can help determine the necessary size and design of the coil that should be used during the optimal speed range. Aneurysm wall and coil characteristics are considered, along with the friction state of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness), leading to improvements in safety during the insertion procedure at optimum speed.

  2. Mathematical model to determine the dimensions of superconducting cylindrical coils with a given central field – the case study for MgB{sub 2} conductors with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitel, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.pitel@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Melišek, Tibor [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Tropeano, Matteo; Nardelli, Davide; Tumino, Andrea [Columbus Superconductors, Via delle Terre Rosse 30, I-16133 Genova (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Influence of the winding geometry on central field of cylindrical coils is studied. • Procedure to determine dimensions of coils with a given central field is developed. • The model is applied to MgB{sub 2}/Ni/Cu conductors with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic. • Influence of the thickness of stabilizing copper on coil parameters is analyzed. • Optimization with respect to coil operating current and wire length is discussed. - Abstract: In this work, we present a mathematical model which enables to design cylindrical coils with a given central field, made of the superconducting conductor with isotropic I{sub c}(B) characteristic. The model results in a computer code that enables to find out the coil dimensions, and to calculate the coil parameters such as critical current, maximum field in the winding and field non-uniformity on the coil axis. The I{sub c}(B) characteristic of the conductor is represented by the set of data measured in discrete points. This approach allows us to express the I{sub c}(B) as a function linearized in parts. Then, it is possible to involve the central field of the coil, coil dimensions, and parameters of the conductor, including its I{sub c}(B) characteristic, in one equation which can be solved using ordinary numerical non-linear methods. Since the coil dimensions and conductor parameters are mutually linked in one equation with respect to a given coil central field, it is possible to analyze an influence of one parameter on the other one. The model was applied to three commercially available MgB{sub 2}/Ni/Cu conductors produced by Columbus Superconductors. The results of simulations with the I{sub c}(B) data at 20 K illustrate that there exists a set of winding geometries that generate a required central field, changing from a disc shape to long thin solenoid. Further, we analyze how the thickness of stabilizing copper influences the coil dimensions, overall conductor length, coil critical current, maximum

  3. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of aircraft ground deicing model

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft ground deicing plays an important role of guaranteeing the aircraft safety. In practice, most airports generally use as many deicing fluids as possible to remove the ice, which causes the waste of the deicing fluids and the pollution of the environment. Therefore, the model of aircraft ground deicing should be built to establish the foundation for the subsequent research, such as the optimization of the deicing fluid consumption. In this article, the heat balance of the deicing proce...

  4. An improved FEM model for computing transport AC loss in coils made of RABiTS YBCO coated conductors for electric machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ainslie, Mark D; Rodriguez Zermeno, Victor Manuel; Hong, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    AC loss can be a significant problem for any applications that utilize or produce an AC current or magnetic field, such as an electric machine. The authors investigate the electromagnetic properties of high temperature superconductors with a particular focus on the AC loss in superconducting coils...... Superconductivity Group's all-superconducting permanent magnet synchronous motor design. To validate the modeling results, the transport AC loss of a stator coil is measured using an electrical method based on inductive compensation by means of a variable mutual inductance. Finally, the implications of the findings...... on the performance of the motor are discussed....

  5. Adsorption of zinc ions on bone char using helical coil-packed bed columns and its mass transfer modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno-Pérez, J.; Bonilla-Petriciolet, A.; Rojas-Mayorga, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the assessment of helical coil-packed bed columns for Zn2+ adsorption on bone char. Zn2+ adsorption breakthrough curves have been obtained using helical coil columns with different characteristics and a comparison has been conducted with respect to the results of straight fixed...

  6. Sensitivities and uncertainties of modeled ground temperatures in mountain environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Before operational use or for decision making, models must be validated, and the degree of trust in model outputs should be quantified. Often, model validation is performed at single locations due to the lack of spatially-distributed data. Since the analysis of parametric model uncertainties can be performed independently of observations, it is a suitable method to test the influence of environmental variability on model evaluation. In this study, the sensitivities and uncertainty of a physically-based mountain permafrost model are quantified within an artificial topography consisting of different elevations and exposures combined with six ground types characterized by their hydraulic properties. The analyses performed for all combinations of topographic factors and ground types allowed to quantify the variability of model sensitivity and uncertainty within mountain regions. We found that modeled snow duration considerably influences the mean annual ground temperature (MAGT. The melt-out day of snow (MD is determined by processes determining snow accumulation and melting. Parameters such as the temperature and precipitation lapse rate and the snow correction factor have therefore a great impact on modeled MAGT. Ground albedo changes MAGT from 0.5 to 4°C in dependence of the elevation, the aspect and the ground type. South-exposed inclined locations are more sensitive to changes in ground albedo than north-exposed slopes since they receive more solar radiation. The sensitivity to ground albedo increases with decreasing elevation due to shorter snow cover. Snow albedo and other parameters determining the amount of reflected solar radiation are important, changing MAGT at different depths by more than 1°C. Parameters influencing the turbulent fluxes as the roughness length or the dew temperature are more sensitive at low elevation sites due to higher air temperatures and decreased solar radiation. Modeling the individual terms of the energy

  7. The role of hand calculations in ground water flow modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitjema, Henk

    2006-01-01

    Most ground water modeling courses focus on the use of computer models and pay little or no attention to traditional analytic solutions to ground water flow problems. This shift in education seems logical. Why waste time to learn about the method of images, or why study analytic solutions to one-dimensional or radial flow problems? Computer models solve much more realistic problems and offer sophisticated graphical output, such as contour plots of potentiometric levels and ground water path lines. However, analytic solutions to elementary ground water flow problems do have something to offer over computer models: insight. For instance, an analytic one-dimensional or radial flow solution, in terms of a mathematical expression, may reveal which parameters affect the success of calibrating a computer model and what to expect when changing parameter values. Similarly, solutions for periodic forcing of one-dimensional or radial flow systems have resulted in a simple decision criterion to assess whether or not transient flow modeling is needed. Basic water balance calculations may offer a useful check on computer-generated capture zones for wellhead protection or aquifer remediation. An easily calculated "characteristic leakage length" provides critical insight into surface water and ground water interactions and flow in multi-aquifer systems. The list goes on. Familiarity with elementary analytic solutions and the capability of performing some simple hand calculations can promote appropriate (computer) modeling techniques, avoids unnecessary complexity, improves reliability, and is likely to save time and money. Training in basic hand calculations should be an important part of the curriculum of ground water modeling courses.

  8. An Empirically Grounded Model of the Adoption of Intellectual Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    1992-01-01

    Data on adoption of 43 user-developed computing applications in 3 large corporations were analyzed to develop an empirically grounded model of the adoption process for intellectual technologies. A five-stage model consisting of Resource Acquisition, Application Development, Adoption/Renewal, Routinization/Enhancement, and External Adoption was…

  9. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  10. User interface for ground-water modeling: Arcview extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, M.-S.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation for ground-water modeling often involves handling large input and output data sets. A geographic information system (GIS) provides an integrated platform to manage, analyze, and display disparate data and can greatly facilitate modeling efforts in data compilation, model calibration, and display of model parameters and results. Furthermore, GIS can be used to generate information for decision making through spatial overlay and processing of model results. Arc View is the most widely used Windows-based GIS software that provides a robust user-friendly interface to facilitate data handling and display. An extension is an add-on program to Arc View that provides additional specialized functions. An Arc View interface for the ground-water flow and transport models MODFLOW and MT3D was built as an extension for facilitating modeling. The extension includes preprocessing of spatially distributed (point, line, and polygon) data for model input and postprocessing of model output. An object database is used for linking user dialogs and model input files. The Arc View interface utilizes the capabilities of the 3D Analyst extension. Models can be automatically calibrated through the Arc View interface by external linking to such programs as PEST. The efficient pre- and postprocessing capabilities and calibration link were demonstrated for ground-water modeling in southwest Kansas.

  11. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  12. Numerical simulation of welds of thick steel sheets for some experimental models towards ITER TF coil case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmignani, B.; Toselli, G. E-mail: toselli@bologna.enea.it; Interlandi, S.; Lucca, F. E-mail: lucca@tempe.mi.cnr.it; Marin, A

    2001-11-01

    In order to set up the welding techniques to be utilized for ITER TF coil case, it was considered that the numerical simulations might be an important tool in order to give some information on deformations and residual stresses due to the different phases of welding. TIG and SAW with filler material are the welding techniques considered. By the numerical point of view, until 1998, the numerical simulation of these welding types was practically an uninvestigated problem. Studies, researches and developments have been carried out with the aim to single out the calculation tools and methodologies to be used. Reference has been made to some experimental models with simple geometry and reduced dimensions, which, however, consider a more complex experimental model. The welds of these models were followed by several measures for different physical quantities of interest to be compared with the corresponding numerical results. Subsequently, studies and researches, still in course, concerned simplifications of the numerical procedures, which, however, can produce equivalent results and are able to simulate the welds of more complex pieces, having big dimensions.

  13. GOES-R Ground Segment Technical Reference Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, R. G.; Burnett, M.; Khanna, R.

    2012-12-01

    NOAA Geostationary Environmental Operational Satellite -R Series (GOES-R) Ground Segment Project (GSP) has developed a Technical Reference Model (TRM) to support the documentation of technologies that could form the basis for a set of requirements that could support the evolution towards a NESDIS enterprise ground system. Architecture and technologies in this TRM can be applied or extended to other ground systems for planning and development. The TRM maps GOES-R technologies to the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Consolidated Reference Model (CRM) V 2.3 Technical Services Standard (TSS). The FEA TRM categories are the framework for the GOES-R TRM. This poster will present the GOES-R TRM.

  14. Model grid and infiltration values for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the model grid and infiltration values simulated in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water...

  15. Model grid and infiltration values for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the model grid and infiltration values simulated in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water...

  16. Aeolian dunes as ground truth for atmospheric modeling on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Titus, T.N.; Michaels, T.I.; Fenton, L.K.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Martian aeolian dunes preserve a record of atmosphere/surface interaction on a variety of scales, serving as ground truth for both Global Climate Models (GCMs) and mesoscale climate models, such as the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). We hypothesize that the location of dune fields, expressed globally by geographic distribution and locally by dune centroid azimuth (DCA), may record the long-term integration of atmospheric activity across a broad area, preserving GCM-scale atmospheric trends. In contrast, individual dune morphology, as expressed in slipface orientation (SF), may be more sensitive to localized variations in circulation, preserving topographically controlled mesoscale trends. We test this hypothesis by comparing the geographic distribution, DCA, and SF of dunes with output from the Ames Mars GCM and, at a local study site, with output from MRAMS. When compared to the GCM: 1) dunes generally lie adjacent to areas with strongest winds, 2) DCA agrees fairly well with GCM modeled wind directions in smooth-floored craters, and 3) SF does not agree well with GCM modeled wind directions. When compared to MRAMS modeled winds at our study site: 1) DCA generally coincides with the part of the crater where modeled mean winds are weak, and 2) SFs are consistent with some weak, topographically influenced modeled winds. We conclude that: 1) geographic distribution may be valuable as ground truth for GCMs, 2) DCA may be useful as ground truth for both GCM and mesoscale models, and 3) SF may be useful as ground truth for mesoscale models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Modeling and analysis of ground target radiation cross section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiang; LOU GuoWei; LI XingGuo

    2008-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the passive millimeter wave (MMW) radiometer detection, the ground target radiation cross section is modeled as the new token for the target MMW radiant characteristics. Its ap-plication and actual testing are discussed and analyzed. The essence of passive MMW stealth is target radiation cross section reduction.

  18. A statistical model-based technique for accounting for prostate gland deformation in endorectal coil-based MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Amir M; Sharifi, Reza; Agarwal, Harsh K; Turkbey, Baris; Bernardo, Marcelino; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford; Kruecker, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy procedures, combining high-resolution endorectal coil (ERC)-MRI with Computed Tomography (CT) images has shown to improve the diagnostic specificity for malignant tumors. Despite such advantage, there exists a major complication in fusion of the two imaging modalities due to the deformation of the prostate shape in ERC-MRI. Conventionally, nonlinear deformable registration techniques have been utilized to account for such deformation. In this work, we present a model-based technique for accounting for the deformation of the prostate gland in ERC-MR imaging, in which a unique deformation vector is estimated for every point within the prostate gland. Modes of deformation for every point in the prostate are statistically identified using a set of MR-based training set (with and without ERC-MRI). Deformation of the prostate from a deformed (ERC-MRI) to a non-deformed state in a different modality (CT) is then realized by first calculating partial deformation information for a limited number of points (such as surface points or anatomical landmarks) and then utilizing the calculated deformation from a subset of the points to determine the coefficient values for the modes of deformations provided by the statistical deformation model. Using a leave-one-out cross-validation, our results demonstrated a mean estimation error of 1mm for a MR-to-MR registration.

  19. Development of modelling tools for thermo-hydraulic analyses and design of JT-60SA TF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.lacroix@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Portafaix, Christophe [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barabaschi, Pietro [Fusion For Energy, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Duchateau, Jean-Luc; Hertout, Patrick; Lamaison, Valerie; Nicollet, Sylvie; Reynaud, Pascal [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Villari, Rosaria [Euratom-ENEA Association, IT-00044 Frascati (Italy); Zani, Louis [Fusion For Energy, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    In the framework of the JT-60SA project, the Toroidal Field (TF) coils design has required to address reliably the choice between multiple design options and to calculate the temperature margin criterion for the superconductor. For this purpose, a tool was developed in two stages, interfacing the ANSYS code, used to model the thermal diffusion between the casing and the winding pack, with the GANDALF code which solves the 1D thermo-hydraulics inside each conductor. The first version of this Thermo-hydraulic EXtended TOol (TEXTO) was developed for producing conservative results and has allowed to simulate the fast discharge of the magnet, providing valuable results such as the mass flow expelled from each pancake. In the second stage, the ANSYS code was configured for modelling the helium transport in the casing and in the winding pack, thus computing more realistic transverse heat fluxes to be injected into the GANDALF code for an accurate calculation of the temperature margin. This second version of TEXTO, which integrates the TACOS (Thermo-hydraulic Ansys COmputation Semi 3D) module, has been used for studying the feasibility of positioning the helium inlets in the electrical connections. The temperature margin has then been found close but below the criterion of 1 K.

  20. Ground states of the SU(N) Heisenberg model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Naoki; Tanabe, Yuta

    2007-02-02

    The SU(N) Heisenberg model with various single-row representations is investigated by quantum Monte Carlo simulations. While the zero-temperature phase boundary agrees qualitatively with the theoretical predictions based on the 1/N expansion, some unexpected features are also observed. For N> or =5 with the fundamental representation, for example, it is suggested that the ground states possess exact or approximate U(1) degeneracy. In addition, for the representation of Young tableau with more than one column, the ground state shows no valence-bond-solid order even at N greater than the threshold value.

  1. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of Tcs measurement in conductor 1A of the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil using the M&M code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2000-08-01

    We present a first study of current sharing temperature ( Tcs) tests performed over the last few months in the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) experiment at JAERI, Naka, Japan. The CSMC is a superconducting magnet, layer-wound two-in-hand using 18 layers of Nb 3Sn two-channel cable-in-conduit conductors, which very recently reached a record 13 T at 46 kA DC operation. Here we apply the multi-conductor Mithrandir (M&M) code to a selected set of shots with different transport currents (30, 40, and 46 kA) and we concentrate on conductor 1A on the innermost (i.e., with highest magnetic field) layer. In the test, resistive heaters located upstream of layers 1 and 2 are used to progressively and quasi-steadily increase the supercritical helium inlet temperature in the coil. The Tcs is reached when a threshold of 0.5 mV resistive voltage is measured across the coil, after which the heaters are turned off and the coil current is dumped. Computed results are compared with experimental data, showing good agreement in the inlet and outlet temperatures of all four heated conductors, both as Tcs is reached (30, 40 kA) and during the whole hour-long transient from nominal conditions to Tcs reached (46 kA).

  2. Analysis of the local worst-case SAR exposure caused by an MRI multi-transmit body coil in anatomical models of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Murbach, Manuel; Christ, Andreas; Cabot, Eugenia; Kuster, Niels

    2011-08-01

    Multi-transmit coils are increasingly being employed in high-field magnetic resonance imaging, along with a growing interest in multi-transmit body coils. However, they can lead to an increase in whole-body and local specific absorption rate (SAR) compared to conventional body coils excited in circular polarization for the same total incident input power. In this study, the maximum increase of SAR for three significantly different human anatomies is investigated for a large 3 T (128 MHz) multi-transmit body coil using numerical simulations and a (generalized) eigenvalue-based approach. The results demonstrate that the increase of SAR strongly depends on the anatomy. For the three models and normalization to the sum of the rung currents squared, the whole-body averaged SAR increases by up to a factor of 1.6 compared to conventional excitation and the peak spatial SAR (averaged over any 10 cm3 of tissue) by up to 13.4. For some locations the local averaged SAR goes up as much as 800 times (130 when looking only at regions where it is above 1% of the peak spatial SAR). The ratio of the peak spatial SAR to the whole-body SAR increases by a factor of up to 47 and can reach values above 800. Due to the potentially much larger power deposition, additional, preferably patient-specific, considerations are necessary to avoid injuries by such systems.

  3. Analysis of the local worst-case SAR exposure caused by an MRI multi-transmit body coil in anatomical models of the human body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Murbach, Manuel; Christ, Andreas; Cabot, Eugenia; Kuster, Niels, E-mail: neufeld@itis.ethz.ch [Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in Society (IT' IS), Zeughausstr. 43, 8004 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-08-07

    Multi-transmit coils are increasingly being employed in high-field magnetic resonance imaging, along with a growing interest in multi-transmit body coils. However, they can lead to an increase in whole-body and local specific absorption rate (SAR) compared to conventional body coils excited in circular polarization for the same total incident input power. In this study, the maximum increase of SAR for three significantly different human anatomies is investigated for a large 3 T (128 MHz) multi-transmit body coil using numerical simulations and a (generalized) eigenvalue-based approach. The results demonstrate that the increase of SAR strongly depends on the anatomy. For the three models and normalization to the sum of the rung currents squared, the whole-body averaged SAR increases by up to a factor of 1.6 compared to conventional excitation and the peak spatial SAR (averaged over any 10 cm{sup 3} of tissue) by up to 13.4. For some locations the local averaged SAR goes up as much as 800 times (130 when looking only at regions where it is above 1% of the peak spatial SAR). The ratio of the peak spatial SAR to the whole-body SAR increases by a factor of up to 47 and can reach values above 800. Due to the potentially much larger power deposition, additional, preferably patient-specific, considerations are necessary to avoid injuries by such systems.

  4. Exploring the limits of a very large Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor: the 80 kA conductor of the ITER toroidal field model coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Ciazynski, D.; Guerber, O.; Park, S.H.; Zani, L. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Fietz, W.H.; Ulbricht, A.; Zahn, G. [Association Euratom-FZK Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    In Phase II experiment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) the operation limits of its 80 kA Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor were explored. To increase the magnetic field on the conductor, the TFMC was tested in presence of another large coil: the EURATOM-LCT coil. Under these conditions the maximum field reached on the conductor, was around 10 tesla. This exploration has been performed at constant current, by progressively increasing the coil temperature and monitoring the coil voltage drop in the current sharing regime. Such an operation was made possible thanks to the very high stability of the conductor. The aim of these tests was to compare the critical properties of the conductor with expectations and assess the ITER TF conductor design. These expectations are based on the documented critical field and temperature dependent properties of the 720 superconducting strands which compose the conductor. In addition the conductor properties are highly dependent on the strain, due to the compression appearing on Nb{sub 3}Sn during the heat treatment of the pancakes and related to the differential thermal compression between Nb{sub 3}Sn and the stainless steel jacket. No precise model exists to predict this strain, which is therefore the main information, which is expected from these tests. The method to deduce this strain from the different tests is presented, including a thermalhydraulic analysis to identify the temperature of the critical point and a careful estimation of the field map across the conductor. The measured strain has been estimated in the range -0.75% to -0.79 %. This information will be taken into account for ITER design and some adjustment of the ITER conductor design is under examination. (authors)

  5. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  6. CHEMICAL REACTIONS SIMULATED BY GROUND-WATER-QUALITY MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, David B.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent literature concerning the modeling of chemical reactions during transport in ground water is examined with emphasis on sorption reactions. The theory of transport and reactions in porous media has been well documented. Numerous equations have been developed from this theory, to provide both continuous and sequential or multistep models, with the water phase considered for both mobile and immobile phases. Chemical reactions can be either equilibrium or non-equilibrium, and can be quantified in linear or non-linear mathematical forms. Non-equilibrium reactions can be separated into kinetic and diffusional rate-limiting mechanisms. Solutions to the equations are available by either analytical expressions or numerical techniques. Saturated and unsaturated batch, column, and field studies are discussed with one-dimensional, laboratory-column experiments predominating. A summary table is presented that references the various kinds of models studied and their applications in predicting chemical concentrations in ground waters.

  7. Developments in Ground-Motion Modeling in Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G. M.; Boore, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent well-recorded earthquakes in Eastern North America (ENA) have led us to re-evaluate concepts that have been "standard fare" in the development of ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for ENA for decades, including all published GMPEs that are used in current practice (e.g. Atkinson and Boore, 2011, 2006, 1995; Pezeshk et al., 2011; Campbell, 2003; Toro et al., 1997, etc.). Assumptions common to all ENA GMPEs that may not be true include the following. (1) Typical ENA stress drops, in the context of a Brune model representation of the source spectrum, are in the range of 150-300 bars, with the exception of occasional high-stress events like the 1988 Saguenay earthquake. (2) Attenuation of ground motions can be modeled with a frequency-independent geometric spreading function, either bilinear or trilinear in shape (e.g. Street and Turcotte, 1975; Herrmann and Kijko, 1983; Atkinson and Mereu, 1992; Atkinson, 2004; Boatwright and Seekins, 2011), and an associated frequency-dependent anelastic attenuation term related to the regional Quality factor. The use of a bilinear or trilinear form models the transition from geometric spreading of body waves at close distances to slower surface-wave-type spreading at regional distances. We use ground-motion recordings from recent ENA events to re-examine these basic tenets of GMPE development, in light of constraints on the problem provided at low frequencies by seismic moment, and at high frequencies by stresses inferred from Empirical Greens Function (EGF) analysis. We find strong evidence, in both ground-motion data and from the constraints, that geometric attenuation may be frequency dependent. Moreover, EGF stress drops may be very high (>500 bars) - but they do not lead to particularly large high-frequency ground motions, at least at distances for which we have observations. More complex models of ENA source and attenuation processes appear to be required in order to reconcile our growing ground-motion database

  8. Evaluation of Grounding Impedance of a Complex Lightning Protective System Using Earth Ground Clamp Measurements and ATP Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, V. A.; Mata, Angel G.

    2010-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. A total of nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long, on average) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each of the nine downconductors is connected to a 7.62-meter radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced 6-meter long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bounded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple direction around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall of potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the downconductors grounding impedance, an Earth Ground Clamp (a stakeless grounding resistance measuring device) and a LPS Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model are used. The Earth Ground Clamp is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding impedance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the Earth Ground Clamp measurements.

  9. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Physics Models For Diagnostics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The project will use high-fidelity physics models and simulations to simulate real-time operations of cryogenic and systems and calculate the status/health of the systems. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators. The capability will also be used to conduct planning and analysis of cryogenic system operations. This project will develop and implement high-fidelity physics-based modeling techniques tosimulate the real-time operation of cryogenics and other fluids systems and, when compared to thereal-time operation of the actual systems, provide assessment of their state. Physics-modelcalculated measurements (called “pseudo-sensors”) will be compared to the system real-timedata. Comparison results will be utilized to provide systems operators with enhanced monitoring ofsystems' health and status, identify off-nominal trends and diagnose system/component failures.This capability can also be used to conduct planning and analysis of cryogenics and other fluidsystems designs. This capability will be interfaced with the ground operations command andcontrol system as a part of the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance (AGSM) project to helpassure system availability and mission success. The initial capability will be developed for theLiquid Oxygen (LO2) ground loading systems.

  10. Detailed Modeling of Grounding Solutions for the ITER ICRF Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrytsya, V.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.; Louche, F.; Durodié, F.

    2011-12-01

    The excitation of non-TEM modes around the ITER ICRF antenna plug can considerably increase the level of RF voltages and currents on the ITER plug. First study of these modes and a solution to avoid them in the ITER ion cyclotron range of frequencies were reported in [1]. In this work a detailed analysis of electrical properties of the ITER ICRF antenna with the plug was studied for different grounding solutions with CST Microwave Studio® [2]. Conclusions of an earlier work [ 1 ] were confirmed on the detailed model of the antenna with the plug. Different grounding contacts (capacitive, galvanic and mixed capacitive-galvanic) as well as their distribution inside the plug gap were analyzed. It was shown that capacitive and mixed capacitive-galvanic grounding are less effective because they demand high values of the capacitance and are more sensitive to the frequency and antenna spectrum. In particular a galvanic grounding realized by the contacts put around the perimeter of the plug gap at lm behind the front face of the antenna is the most suitable solution from the electromagnetic point of view. An optimization of the layout and arrangement of the contacts in order to assess and optimize the current distribution on them is under way. Measurements on a scaled mock-up of the complete antenna and the plug are under way for modeling results confirmation.

  11. MRI Slice Segmentation and 3D Modelling of Temporomandibular Joint Measured by Microscopic Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirg, O.; Liberda, O.; Smekal, Z.; Sprlakova-Pukova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices and 3D modelling of the temporomandibular joint disc in order to help physicians diagnose patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The most common joint dysfunction is due to the disc. The disc is a soft tissue, which in principle cannot be diagnosed by the CT method. Therefore, a 3D model is made from the MRI slices, which can image soft tissues. For the segmentation of the disc in individual slices a new method is developed based on spatial distribution and anatomical TMJ structure with automatic thresholding. The thresholding is controlled by a genetic algorithm. The 3D model is realized using the marching cube method.

  12. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.

    2012-04-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this contribution, I will present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored in 3D. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  13. Reduced M(atrix) theory models: ground state solutions

    CERN Document Server

    López, J L

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to find exact ground state solutions to reduced models of the SU($N$) invariant matrix model arising from the quantization of the 11-dimensional supermembrane action in the light-cone gauge. We illustrate the method by applying it to lower dimensional toy models and for the SU(2) group. This approach could, in principle, be used to find ground state solutions to the complete 9-dimensional model and for any SU($N$) group. The Hamiltonian, the supercharges and the constraints related to the SU($2$) symmetry are built from operators that generate a multicomponent spinorial wave function. The procedure is based on representing the fermionic degrees of freedom by means of Dirac-like gamma matrices, as was already done in the first proposal of supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum cosmology. We exhibit a relation between these finite $N$ matrix theory ground state solutions and SUSY quantum cosmology wave functions giving a possible physical significance of the theory even for finite $N$.

  14. Lumped-Parameter Models for Windturbine Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    The design of modern wind turbines is typically based on lifetime analyses using aeroelastic codes. In this regard, the impedance of the foundations must be described accurately without increasing the overall size of the computationalmodel significantly. This may be obtained by the fitting of a l...... ground. The importance of including an accurate model of the dynamic soil-structure interaction in an aeroelastic code is discussed. Furthermore, the sensibility of the response to changes in the soil properties is examined....

  15. Determining extreme parameter correlation in ground water models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Mary Cole; Østerby, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In ground water flow system models with hydraulic-head observations but without significant imposed or observed flows, extreme parameter correlation generally exists. As a result, hydraulic conductivity and recharge parameters cannot be uniquely estimated. In complicated problems, such correlation...... correlation coefficients, but it required sensitivities that were one to two significant digits less accurate than those that required using parameter correlation coefficients; and (3) both the SVD and parameter correlation coefficients identified extremely correlated parameters better when the parameters...

  16. Coiling of an elastic beam inside a disk: A model for spider-capture silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elettro, Hervé; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations of capillary-induced spooling of fibers inside droplets both in spider capture silk and in synthetic systems, we investigate the behavior of a fiber packed in a drop. Using a simplified 2D model, we provide analytical predictions for the buckling threshold and the deep post-buckling asymptotic behavior. The threshold for spooling is found to be in particularly good agreement with experimental results. We further solve the Elastica equations for a fiber confined in a soft potential, and track the equilibrium paths using numerical continuation techniques. A wealth of different paths corresponding to different symmetries is uncovered, and their stability is finally discussed.

  17. Computational analysis of residue contributions to coiled-coil topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jorge; Lazaridis, Themis

    2011-11-01

    A variety of features are thought to contribute to the oligomeric and topological specificity of coiled coils. In previous work, we examined the determinants of oligomeric state. Here, we examine the energetic basis for the tendency of six coiled-coil peptides to align their α-helices in antiparallel orientation using molecular dynamics simulations with implicit solvation (EEF1.1). We also examine the effect of mutations known to disrupt the topology of these peptides. In agreement with experiment, ARG or LYS at a or d positions were found to stabilize the antiparallel configuration. The modeling suggests that this is not due to a-a' or d-d' repulsions but due to interactions with e' and g' residues. TRP at core positions also favors the antiparallel configuration. Residues that disfavor parallel dimers, such as ILE at d, are better tolerated in, and thus favor the antiparallel configuration. Salt bridge networks were found to be more stabilizing in the antiparallel configuration for geometric reasons: antiparallel helices point amino acid side chains in opposite directions. However, the structure with the largest number of salt bridges was not always the most stable, due to desolvation and configurational entropy contributions. In tetramers, the extent of stabilization of the antiparallel topology by core residues is influenced by the e' residue on a neighboring helix. Residues at b and c positions in some cases also contribute to stabilization of antiparallel tetramers. This work provides useful rules toward the goal of designing coiled coils with a well-defined and predictable three-dimensional structure.

  18. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of aircraft ground deicing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft ground deicing plays an important role of guaranteeing the aircraft safety. In practice, most airports generally use as many deicing fluids as possible to remove the ice, which causes the waste of the deicing fluids and the pollution of the environment. Therefore, the model of aircraft ground deicing should be built to establish the foundation for the subsequent research, such as the optimization of the deicing fluid consumption. In this article, the heat balance of the deicing process is depicted, and the dynamic model of the deicing process is provided based on the analysis of the deicing mechanism. In the dynamic model, the surface temperature of the deicing fluids and the ice thickness are regarded as the state parameters, while the fluid flow rate, the initial temperature, and the injection time of the deicing fluids are treated as control parameters. Ignoring the heat exchange between the deicing fluids and the environment, the simplified model is obtained. The rationality of the simplified model is verified by the numerical simulation and the impacts of the flow rate, the initial temperature and the injection time on the deicing process are investigated. To verify the model, the semi-physical experiment system is established, consisting of the low-constant temperature test chamber, the ice simulation system, the deicing fluid heating and spraying system, the simulated wing, the test sensors, and the computer measure and control system. The actual test data verify the validity of the dynamic model and the accuracy of the simulation analysis.

  19. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stanfield, R. [US Army CECOM, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Fort Belvoir, VA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  20. Optimized ground coupled heat pump mechanical package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This project addresses the question of how well a ground coupled heat pump system could perform with a heat pump which was designed specifically for such systems operating in a northern climate. Conventionally, systems are designed around water source heat pumps which are not designed for ground coupled heat pump application. The objective of the project is to minimize the life cycle cost for a ground coupled system given the freedom to design the heat pump and the ground coil in concert. In order to achieve this objective a number of modeling tools were developed which will likely be of interest in their own right.

  1. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Belcher, Wayne R.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the ground-water flow system and previous less extensive ground-water flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect ground-water flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the ground-water flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural ground-water discharge occurring through evapotranspiration and spring flow; the history of ground-water pumping from 1913 through 1998; ground-water recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were

  2. An empirical model for salt removal percentage in water under the effect of different current intensities of current carrying coil at different flow rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameen S. AbdelHady

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic treatment of hard water is an alternative, simple approach by which the hard water that needs to be treated flows through a magnetic field. This field is created by inducing current in a coil wrapped around a pipe. Consequently some of its properties, such as total dissolved salts (TDS, conductivity (Ec and PH change. The primary purpose of hard water treatment is to decrease TDS in the incoming liquid stream. Using performance data from the application of different magnetic field densities on the different flow levels of water, empirical mathematical models were developed relating the salt removal percentage (SRP to operating flow rate and current of the coil. The obtained experimental results showed that the SRP increased with increasing the current at low flow rates (up to 0.75 ml/s.

  3. Ground Contact Model for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Way, David

    2012-01-01

    The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2) has been successful in simulating the flight of launch vehicles and entry bodies on earth and other planets. POST 2 has been the primary simulation tool for the Entry Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of numerous Mars lander missions such as Mars Pathfinder in 1997, the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (MER-A and MER-B) in 2004, Mars Phoenix lander in 2007, and it is now the main trajectory simulation tool for Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) in 2012. In all previous missions, the POST 2 simulation ended before ground impact, and a tool other than POST 2 simulated landing dynamics. It would be ideal for one tool to simulate the entire EDL sequence, thus avoiding errors that could be introduced by handing off position, velocity, or other fight parameters from one simulation to the other. The desire to have one continuous end-to-end simulation was the motivation for developing the ground interaction model in POST 2. Rover landing, including the detection of the postlanding state, is a very critical part of the MSL mission, as the EDL landing sequence continues for a few seconds after landing. The method explained in this paper illustrates how a simple ground force interaction model has been added to POST 2, which allows simulation of the entire EDL from atmospheric entry through touchdown.

  4. Experimental validation of a lap-type joint AC loss model with an ITER correction coil conductor joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolando, G.; Hansheng, F.; Hongwei, L.; Lin, W.; Wu, W.; Foussat, A.; Ilin, Y.; Libeyre, P.; Nijhuis, A.

    2014-01-01

    The ITER correction coils (CC) system features shaking hands lap-type joints to interface the terminations of the conductors. The feasibility of operating plasma scenarios depends on the ability of the magnets to retain sufficient temperature and current margins. In this respect, the joints represen

  5. A Statistical Model-based Technique for Accounting for Prostate Gland Deformation in Endorectal Coil-based MR Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tahmasebi, A.M.; Sharifi, R.; Agarwal, H.K.; Turkbey, B.; Bernardo, M.; Choyke, P.; Pinto, P.; Wood, B.; Kruecker, J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction of endorectal coil (ERC) in magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the prostate gland has significantly improved the visualization of the prostate anatomy and provides a better contrast betweencancerous and healthy tissue in the prostate. In prostate brachytherapy procedures, combining high

  6. A model of the ground surface temperature for micrometeorological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Julian S.; Erell, Evyatar

    2017-07-01

    Micrometeorological models at various scales require ground surface temperature, which may not always be measured in sufficient spatial or temporal detail. There is thus a need for a model that can calculate the surface temperature using only widely available weather data, thermal properties of the ground, and surface properties. The vegetated/permeable surface energy balance (VP-SEB) model introduced here requires no a priori knowledge of soil temperature or moisture at any depth. It combines a two-layer characterization of the soil column following the heat conservation law with a sinusoidal function to estimate deep soil temperature, and a simplified procedure for calculating moisture content. A physically based solution is used for each of the energy balance components allowing VP-SEB to be highly portable. VP-SEB was tested using field data measuring bare loess desert soil in dry weather and following rain events. Modeled hourly surface temperature correlated well with the measured data (r 2 = 0.95 for a whole year), with a root-mean-square error of 2.77 K. The model was used to generate input for a pedestrian thermal comfort study using the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS). The simulation shows that the thermal stress on a pedestrian standing in the sun on a fully paved surface, which may be over 500 W on a warm summer day, may be as much as 100 W lower on a grass surface exposed to the same meteorological conditions.

  7. A coiled-coil domain acts as a molecular ruler to regulate O-antigen chain length in lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Clarke, Bradley R; Huang, Hexian; Tuukkanen, Anne; Danciu, Iulia; Svergun, Dmitri I; Hussain, Rohanah; Liu, Huanting; Whitfield, Chris; Naismith, James H

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain bacterial polysaccharides have important roles in pathogenicity. In Escherichia coli O9a, a model for ABC transporter-dependent polysaccharide assembly, a large extracellular carbohydrate with a narrow size distribution is polymerized from monosaccharides by a complex of two proteins, WbdA (polymerase) and WbdD (terminating protein). Combining crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering, we found that the C-terminal domain of WbdD contains an extended coiled-coil that physically separates WbdA from the catalytic domain of WbdD. The effects of insertions and deletions in the coiled-coil region were analyzed in vivo, revealing that polymer size is controlled by varying the length of the coiled-coil domain. Thus, the coiled-coil domain of WbdD functions as a molecular ruler that, along with WbdA:WbdD stoichiometry, controls the chain length of a model bacterial polysaccharide.

  8. Numerical modeling of seasonally freezing ground and permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolsky, Dmitry J.

    2007-12-01

    This thesis represents a collection of papers on numerical modeling of permafrost and seasonally freezing ground dynamics. An important problem in numerical modeling of temperature dynamics in permafrost and seasonally freezing ground is related to parametrization of already existing models. In this thesis, a variation data assimilation technique is presented to find soil properties by minimizing the discrepancy between in-situ measured temperatures and those computed by the models. The iterative minimization starts from an initial approximation of the soil properties that are found by solving a sequence of simple subproblems. In order to compute the discrepancy, the temperature dynamics is simulated by a new implementation of the finite element method applied to the heat equation with phase change. Despite simplifications in soil physics, the presented technique was successfully applied to recover soil properties, such as thermal conductivity, soil porosity, and the unfrozen water content, at several sites in Alaska. The recovered properties are used in discussion on soil freezing/thawing and permafrost dynamics in other parts of this thesis. Another part of this thesis concerns development of a numerical thermo-mechanical model of seasonal soil freezing on the lateral scale of several meters. The presented model explains observed differential frost heave occurring in non-sorted circle ecosystems north of the Brooks Range in the Alaskan tundra. The model takes into account conservation principles for energy, linear momentum and mass of three constituents: liquid water, ice and solid particles. The conservation principles are reduced to a computationally convenient system of coupled equations for temperature, liquid water pressure, porosity, and the velocity of soil particles in a three-dimensional domain with cylindrical symmetry. Despite a simplified rheology, the model simulates the ground surface motion, temperature, and water dynamics in soil and explains

  9. Three-dimensional deformation response of a NiTi shape memory helical-coil actuator during thermomechanical cycling: experimentally validated numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, B.; Nicholson, D. E.; Saleeb, A. F.; Padula, S. A., II; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2016-09-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators often operate under a complex state of stress for an extended number of thermomechanical cycles in many aerospace and engineering applications. Hence, it becomes important to account for multi-axial stress states and deformation characteristics (which evolve with thermomechanical cycling) when calibrating any SMA model for implementation in large-scale simulation of actuators. To this end, the present work is focused on the experimental validation of an SMA model calibrated for the transient and cyclic evolutionary behavior of shape memory Ni49.9Ti50.1, for the actuation of axially loaded helical-coil springs. The approach requires both experimental and computational aspects to appropriately assess the thermomechanical response of these multi-dimensional structures. As such, an instrumented and controlled experimental setup was assembled to obtain temperature, torque, degree of twist and extension, while controlling end constraints during heating and cooling of an SMA spring under a constant externally applied axial load. The computational component assesses the capabilities of a general, multi-axial, SMA material-modeling framework, calibrated for Ni49.9Ti50.1 with regard to its usefulness in the simulation of SMA helical-coil spring actuators. Axial extension, being the primary response, was examined on an axially-loaded spring with multiple active coils. Two different conditions of end boundary constraint were investigated in both the numerical simulations as well as the validation experiments: Case (1) where the loading end is restrained against twist (and the resulting torque measured as the secondary response) and Case (2) where the loading end is free to twist (and the degree of twist measured as the secondary response). The present study focuses on the transient and evolutionary response associated with the initial isothermal loading and the subsequent thermal cycles under applied constant axial load. The experimental

  10. Coil system for plasmoid thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskridge, Richard H. (Inventor); Lee, Michael H. (Inventor); Martin, Adam K. (Inventor); Fimognari, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A coil system for a plasmoid thruster includes a bias coil, a drive coil and field coils. The bias and drive coils are interleaved with one another as they are helically wound about a conical region. A first field coil defines a first passage at one end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil. A second field coil defines a second passage at an opposing end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil.

  11. Modeling of Strong Ground Motion in "The Geysers" Geothermal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, N.; Convertito, V.; Maercklin, N.; Zollo, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Geysers is a vapor-dominated geothermal field located about 120 km north of San Francisco, California. The field is actively exploited since the 1960s, and it is now perhaps the most important and most productive geothermal field in the USA. The continuous injection of fluids and the stress perturbations of this area has resulted in induced seismicity which is clearly felt in the surrounding villages. Thus, based on these considerations, in the present work Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) are derived, as they play key role in seismic hazard analysis control and for monitoring the effects of the seismicity rate levels. The GMPEs are derived through the mixed non-linear regression technique for both Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) and Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA). This technique includes both fixed effects and random effects and allows to account for both inter-event and intra-event dependencies in the data. In order to account for site/station effects, a two steps approach has been used. In the first step, regression analysis is performed without station corrections and thus providing a reference model. In the second step, based on the residual distribution at each station and the results of a Z-test, station correction coefficients are introduced to get final correct model. The data from earthquakes recorded at 29 stations for the period September 2007 through November 2010 have been used. The magnitude range is (1.0 geothermal fields with respect to those obtained from natural seismic events. The residual analysis is performed at individual stations to check the reliability of the station corrections and for evaluating the fitting reliability of the retrieved model. The best model has been chosen on the basis of inter-event standard error and R-square test. After the introduction of the site/station correction factor, an improvement in the fit is observed, which resulted in total standard error reduction and increased R-square values.

  12. A heat transfer model of a horizontal ground heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, R. E.; Shtern, Yu. I.; Shtern, M. Yu.; Rogachev, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Ground-source heat pumps are gaining popularity in Eastern Europe, especially those which are using the horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX). Due to the difficulty of accessing GHX after the installation, materials and the quality of the installation must satisfy the very high requirements. An inaccurate calculation of GHX can be the reason of a scarcity of heat power in a crucial moment. So far, there isn't any appropriate mathematical description of the horizontal GHX which takes into account the mutual influence of GHX pipes on each other. To solve this problem we used the temperature wave approach. As a result, a mathematical model which describes the dependence of the heat transfer rate per unit length of the horizontal GHX pipe on the thermal properties of soil, operating time of GHX and the distance between pipes was obtained. Using this model, heat transfer rates per unit length of a horizontal GHX were plotted as functions of the distance between pipes and operating time. The modeling shows that heat transfer rates decreases rapidly with the distance between pipes lower then 2 meters. After the launch of heat pump, heat power of GHX is reduced during the first 20 - 30 days and get steady after that. The obtained results correlate with experimental data. Therefore the proposed mathematical model can be used to design a horizontal GHX with the optimal characteristics, and predict its capability during operation.

  13. Application of modified vector fitting to grounding system modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, D.; Camargo, M.; Herrera, J.; Torres, H. [National University of Colombia (Colombia). Research Program on Acquisition and Analysis of Signals - PAAS], Emails: dyjimeneza@unal.edu.co, mpcamargom@unal.edu.co; Vargas, M. [Siemens S.A. - Power Transmission and Distribution - Energy Services (Colombia)

    2007-07-01

    The transient behavior of grounding systems (GS) influences greatly the performance of electrical networks under fault conditions. This fact has led the authors to present an application of the Modified Vector Fitting (MVF)1 methodology based upon the frequency response of the system, in order to find a rational function approximation and an equivalent electrical network whose transient behavior is similar to the original one of the GS. The obtained network can be introduced into the EMTP/ATP program for simulating the transient behavior of the GS. The MVF technique, which is a modification of the Vector Fitting (VF) technique, allows identifying state space models from the Frequency Domain Response for both single and multiple input-output systems. In this work, the methodology is used to fit the frequency response of a grounding grid, which is computed by means of the Hybrid Electromagnetic Model (HEM), finding the relation between voltages and input currents in two points of the grid in frequency domain. The model obtained with the MVF shows a good agreement with the frequency response of the GS. Besides, the model is tested in EMTP/ATP finding a good fitting with the calculated data, which demonstrates the validity and usefulness of the MVF. (author)

  14. Solutions for Safe Hot Coil Evacuation and Coil Handling in Case of Thick and High Strength Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Sieberer Stefan; Pichler Lukas; Hackl Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Currently hot rolling plants are entering the market segment for thick gauges and high strength steel grades where the elastic bending property of the strip leads to internal forces in the coil during coiling operation. The strip tends to open. Primetals is investigating several possibilities to facilitate safe coil evacuation and coil handling under spring-back conditions. The contribution includes finite element models of such mechanical solutions. Results of parameter variation and stabili...

  15. Multivariable parametric cost model for space and ground telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd

    2016-09-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper hypothesizes a single model, based on published models and engineering intuition, for both ground and space telescopes: OTA Cost (X) D (1.75 +/- 0.05) λ (-0.5 +/- 0.25) T-0.25 e (-0.04) Y Specific findings include: space telescopes cost 50X to 100X more ground telescopes; diameter is the most important CER; cost is reduced by approximately 50% every 20 years (presumably because of technology advance and process improvements); and, for space telescopes, cost associated with wavelength performance is balanced by cost associated with operating temperature. Finally, duplication only reduces cost for the manufacture of identical systems (i.e. multiple aperture sparse arrays or interferometers). And, while duplication does reduce the cost of manufacturing the mirrors of segmented primary mirror, this cost savings does not appear to manifest itself in the final primary mirror assembly (presumably because the structure for a segmented mirror is more complicated than for a monolithic mirror).

  16. Subunit b-dimer of the Escherichia coli ATP synthase can form left-handed coiled-coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2008-06-01

    One remaining challenge to our understanding of the ATP synthase concerns the dimeric coiled-coil stator subunit b of bacterial synthases. The subunit b-dimer has been implicated in important protein interactions that appear necessary for energy conservation and that may be instrumental in energy conservation during rotary catalysis by the synthase. Understanding the stator structure and its interactions with the rest of the enzyme is crucial to the understanding of the overall catalytic mechanism. Controversy exists on whether subunit b adopts a classic left-handed or a presumed right-handed dimeric coiled-coil and whether or not staggered pairing between nonhomologous residues in the homodimer is required for intersubunit packing. In this study we generated molecular models of the Escherichia coli subunit b-dimer that were based on the well-established heptad-repeat packing exhibited by left-handed, dimeric coiled-coils by employing simulated annealing protocols with structural restraints collected from known structures. In addition, we attempted to create hypothetical right-handed coiled-coil models and left- and right-handed models with staggered packing in the coiled-coil domains. Our analyses suggest that the available structural and biochemical evidence for subunit b can be accommodated by classic left-handed, dimeric coiled-coil quaternary structures.

  17. Application of Microstructure Engineering in Steel Coil Cooling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng-dong; D Q Jin; I V Samarasekera; J K Brimacombe

    2005-01-01

    The coil cooling and its role in a hot strip mill were reviewed.A mathematical model was developed to describe and analyze the thermal history and its impact on precipitation phenomena during coil cooling for plain car bon,HSLA-V and HSLA-Nb steels.The predicted result of the thermal model was compared with that measured from industrial coil.The effect of cooling condition and coil dimension on the thermal history and final mechanical properties of the steel strip was examined.The coiling temperature and cooling rate have crucial influence on the precipitation strengthening.

  18. Modeling the high-latitude ground response to the excitation of the ionospheric MHD modes by atmospheric electric discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, E.; Mazur, N.; Pilipenko, V.; Baddeley, L.

    2016-11-01

    The ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) and fast magnetosonic (FMS) waveguide, which can trap the electromagnetic wave energy in the range from fractions of Hz to several Hz, are characteristic features of the upper ionosphere. Their role in the electromagnetic impulsive coupling between atmospheric discharge processes and the ionosphere can be elucidated with a proper model. The presented model is based on numerical solution of coupled wave equations for electromagnetic modes in the ionosphere and atmosphere in a realistic ionosphere modeled with the use of IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) vertical profiles. The geomagnetic field is supposed to be nearly vertical, so the model can be formally applied to high latitudes, though the main features of ground ULF structure will be qualitatively similar at middle latitudes as well. The modeling shows that during the lightning discharge a coupled wave system comprising IAR and MHD waveguide is excited. Using the model, the spatial structure, frequency spectra, and polarization parameters have been calculated at various distances from a vertical dipole. In the lightning proximity (about several hundred kilometer) only the lowest IAR harmonics are revealed in the radial magnetic component spectra. At distances >800 km the multiband spectral structure is formed predominantly by harmonics of FMS waveguide modes. The model predictions do not contradict the results of search coil magnetometer observations on Svalbard; however, the model validation demands more dedicated experimental studies.

  19. Optimal Bitter Coil Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kobelev, V

    2016-01-01

    Bitter coil is an electromagnet used for the generation of exceptionally strong magnetic fields. The upper bound of magnet flux density is restricted by several factors. One principal restriction is the high stresses due to Lorentz forces in the coil. The Lorentz forces generate the distributed body force, which acts as the pressure of magnetic field. The common radial thickness profile of the Bitter coil is constant. In this paper the possibility of optimization by means of non-constant radial thickness profile of the Bitter coil is studied. The close form expression for optimal thickness profile is obtained. Both designs are compared and the considerable improvement of magnetic flux density is demonstrated. Moreover, the optimal design improves the shape of cooling channels. Namely, the highest cross-section of cooling channel is at the most thermally loaded inner surface of the coil.

  20. Optimization of a ground coupled heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, V.D.; Catan, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    A cooperative analytical project has optimized a horizontal ground coil heat pump system for the Pittsburgh climate. This is the first step in the exploration of several advanced designs including various ground coil devices and advanced heat pump components. The project made use of new and existing design tools to simulate system performance and determine first cost. The system life cycle cost was minimized while constraining the system to meet the design day cooling load using a function minimizing program. Among the system parameters considered were: air-to-refrigerant frontal area, air-to-refrigerant fin pitch, air-to-refrigerant air flowrate, compressor displacement, liquid-to-refrigerant coil length, liquid-to-refrigerant coil diameter, ground coil fluid flowrate, ground coil length, and ground coil depth.

  1. A regression model to estimate regional ground water recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, David L; Delin, Geoffrey N

    2007-01-01

    A regional regression model was developed to estimate the spatial distribution of ground water recharge in subhumid regions. The regional regression recharge (RRR) model was based on a regression of basin-wide estimates of recharge from surface water drainage basins, precipitation, growing degree days (GDD), and average basin specific yield (SY). Decadal average recharge, precipitation, and GDD were used in the RRR model. The RRR estimates were derived from analysis of stream base flow using a computer program that was based on the Rorabaugh method. As expected, there was a strong correlation between recharge and precipitation. The model was applied to statewide data in Minnesota. Where precipitation was least in the western and northwestern parts of the state (50 to 65 cm/year), recharge computed by the RRR model also was lowest (0 to 5 cm/year). A strong correlation also exists between recharge and SY. SY was least in areas where glacial lake clay occurs, primarily in the northwest part of the state; recharge estimates in these areas were in the 0- to 5-cm/year range. In sand-plain areas where SY is greatest, recharge estimates were in the 15- to 29-cm/year range on the basis of the RRR model. Recharge estimates that were based on the RRR model compared favorably with estimates made on the basis of other methods. The RRR model can be applied in other subhumid regions where region wide data sets of precipitation, streamflow, GDD, and soils data are available.

  2. Kinetic modeling of water sorption by roasted and ground coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Baptestini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to model the kinetics of water sorption in roasted and ground coffee. Crude Arabica coffee beans with an initial moisture content of 0.1234 kgwkgdm-1 were used. These beans were roasted to a medium roast level (SCCA # 55 and ground at three particle sizes: coarse (1.19 mm, medium (0.84 mm and fine (0.59 mm. To obtain the water sorption isotherms and the isosteric heat, different conditions of temperature and relative humidity were analyzed using the dynamic method at 25ºC (0.50, 0.60, 0.70, and 0.80 of RH and 30°C (0.30, 0.40, 0.50, 0.60, 0.70, and 0.80 of RH and using the static method at 25ºC (0.332 and 0.438 of RH. The GAB model best represented the hygroscopic equilibrium of roasted coffee at every particle size. Isosteric heat of sorption for the fine particle size increased with increments of equilibrium moisture content, indicating a strong bond energy between water molecules and the product components. The Gibbs free energy decreased with the increase in equilibrium moisture content and with temperature.

  3. Accurate Antenna Models in Ground Penetrating Radar Diffraction Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2002-01-01

    Linear inversion schemes based on the concept of diffraction tomography have proven successful for ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging. In many GPR surveys, the antennas of the GPR are located close to the air-soil interface and, therefore, it is important to incorporate the presence of this i......Linear inversion schemes based on the concept of diffraction tomography have proven successful for ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging. In many GPR surveys, the antennas of the GPR are located close to the air-soil interface and, therefore, it is important to incorporate the presence...... of this interface in the inversion scheme (see Hansen, T.B. and Meincke Johansen, P., IEEE Trans. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol.38, p.496-506, 2000). Hansen and Meincke Johansen modeled the antennas as ideal (Hertzian) electric dipoles. Since practical GPR antennas are not ideal, it is of interest...... to investigate the validity of this model. We extend that formulation to hold for arbitrary antennas. For simplicity, the 2.5D case is considered, that is, it is assumed that the scattering object in the soil is invariant in one direction, which, for instance, is the case for a pipe. The arbitrary antennas...

  4. Optimized ground coupled heat pump mechanical package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The system which was optimized was a horizontal earth coil in a given house in the Pittsburgh area. The types of components used in the heat pump are essentially conventional. The method of this study is derived from one used to optimize an air-source heat pump for operation at standard steady state conditions. A computer model, created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is used to predict heat pump performance for specified configuration and operating conditions. A predetermined set of design parameters is automatically altered by a constrained minimization program (a Numerical Algorithms Group library routine hereafter referred to as the optimizer) to find the combination for which the highest COP is predicted by the heat pump model. In the present study, the set of parameters to be varied include some pertaining to the ground coil as well as some pertaining to the heat pump. The optimizer, in this case, pursues a minimum life cycle cost which is calculated using the heat pump model, a ground coil model (called FTECM for Fast Transient Earth Coil model), and a parameterized cost model. The flow chart shows how the optimizer interacts with these programs to minimize life cycle cost.

  5. Study on the performance improvement of the high temperature superconducting coil with several separated coils at the edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguri, S.; Oka, T.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.

    2008-09-01

    In designing high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils, it is important to secure large magnetic fields and stored energy using shorter tape length. Thus, it is necessary to improve the transport current performance of the coils. The critical current and n-value of an HTS tape depend on magnetic fields and flux angles under constant temperature. Considering these dependencies, we established a model to analyze coil critical current. This model clarifies that relatively large electric fields are generated at the coil edges. This adversely affects the transport current performance. In this study, the coil edge is separated into several coils, keeping the total tape length constant. This increases the coil critical current, stored energy, central magnetic field, and also the coil volume, which contains vacancies created by the separation. To estimate coil performance, we calculated the stored energy density, whose denominator is the increased coil volume. This stored energy density reaches its maximum value when the number of the separated coils is eight. At this optimum separation, the central magnetic field increases by 13%, and the stored energy improves by 43%, compared to a rectangular coil wound with the same tape length.

  6. Regionally Adaptable Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) from Empirical Models of Fourier and Duration of Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Sanjay; Scherbaum, Frank; Kuehn, Nicolas; Stafford, Peter; Edwards, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The current practice of deriving empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) involves using ground motions recorded at multiple sites. However, in applications like site-specific (e.g., critical facility) hazard ground motions obtained from the GMPEs are need to be adjusted/corrected to a particular site/site-condition under investigation. This study presents a complete framework for developing a response spectral GMPE, within which the issue of adjustment of ground motions is addressed in a manner consistent with the linear system framework. The present approach is a two-step process in which the first step consists of deriving two separate empirical models, one for Fourier amplitude spectra (FAS) and the other for a random vibration theory (RVT) optimized duration (Drvto) of ground motion. In the second step the two models are combined within the RVT framework to obtain full response spectral amplitudes. Additionally, the framework also involves a stochastic model based extrapolation of individual Fourier spectra to extend the useable frequency limit of the empirically derived FAS model. The stochastic model parameters were determined by inverting the Fourier spectral data using an approach similar to the one as described in Edwards and Faeh (2013). Comparison of median predicted response spectra from present approach with those from other regional GMPEs indicates that the present approach can also be used as a stand-alone model. The dataset used for the presented analysis is a subset of the recently compiled database RESORCE-2012 across Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean region.

  7. Commercial applications for COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  8. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  9. Computational study for the effects of coil configuration on blood flow characteristics in coil-embolized cerebral aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Tomohiro; Ii, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Tomoyoshi; Fujinaka, Toshiyuki; Hirata, Masayuki; Ozaki, Tomohiko; Wada, Shigeo

    2016-07-21

    Coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms with inhomogeneous coil distribution leads to an incomplete occlusion of the aneurysm. However, the effects of this factor on the blood flow characteristics are still not fully understood. This study investigates the effects of coil configuration on the blood flow characteristics in a coil-embolized aneurysm using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The blood flow analysis in the aneurysm with coil embolization was performed using a coil deployment (CD) model, in which the coil configuration was constructed using a physics-based simulation of the CD. In the CFD results, total flow momentum and kinetic energy in the aneurysm gradually decayed with increasing coil packing density (PD), regardless of the coil configuration attributed to deployment conditions. However, the total shear rate in the aneurysm was relatively high and the strength of the local shear flow varied based on the differences in coil configuration, even at adequate PDs used in clinical practice (20-25 %). Because the sufficient shear rate reduction is a well-known factor in the blood clot formation occluding the aneurysm inside, the present study gives useful insight into the effects of coil configuration on the treatment efficiency of coil embolization.

  10. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  11. A coiled-coil domain acts as a molecular ruler in LPS chain length regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuukkanen, Anne; Danciu, Iulia; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hussain, Rohanah; Liu, Huanting; Whitfield, Chris; Naismith, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Long-chain bacterial polysaccharides play important roles in pathogenicity. In Escherichia coli O9a, a model for ABC transporter dependent polysaccharide assembly, a large extracellular carbohydrate with a narrow distribution of size is polymerized from monosaccharides by a complex of two proteins, WbdA (polymerase) and WbdD (terminating protein). Such careful control of polymerization is recurring theme in biology. Combining crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering, we show that the C-terminal domain of WbdD contains an extended coiled-coil that physically separates WbdA from the catalytic domain of WbdD. The effects of insertions and deletions within the coiled-coil region were analyzed in vivo, revealing that polymer size is controlled by varying the length of the coiled-coil domain. Thus, the coiled-coil domain of WbdD functions as a molecular ruler that, along with WbdA:WbdD stoichiometry, controls the chain length of a model bacterial polysaccharide. PMID:25504321

  12. Coiling Temperature Control in Hot Strip Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanari, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Hiroaki

    Coiling temperature is one of the most significant factors in products of hot strip mill to determine material properties such as strength, toughness of steel, so it is very important to achieve accurate coiling temperature control (CTC). Usually there are a few pyrometers on the run out table in hot strip mill, therefore temperature model and its adapting system have large influences on the accuracy of CTC. Also unscheduled change of rolling speed has a bad effect to keep coiling temperature as its target. Newly developed CTC system is able to get very accurate coiling temperature against uncertain factors and disturbances by adopting easily identified temperature model, learning method and dynamic set up function. The features of the CTC system are discussed with actual data, and the effectiveness of the system is shown by actual control results.

  13. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric propagation known as the Helliwell absorption curves, but some recent studies have found that the model overestimates (by 20-100 dB) the VLF energy reaching the magnetosphere. It was subsequently suggested that conversion of wave energy into electrostatic modes may be responsible for the error. We utilize a newly available extensive record of VLF transmitter energy reaching the magnetosphere, taken from the DEMETER satellite, and perform a direct comparison with a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation. Although the model does not include the effect of ionospheric irregularities, it correctly predicts the average total power injected into the magnetosphere within several dB. The results, particularly at nighttime, appear to be robust against the variability of the ionospheric electron density. We conclude that the global effect of irregularity scattering on whistler mode conversion to quasi-electrostatic may be no larger than 6 dB.

  14. Parallel finite element modeling of earthquake ground response and liquefaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinchi Lu(陆金池); Jun Peng(彭军); Ahmed Elgamal; Zhaohui Yang(杨朝晖); Kincho H. Law

    2004-01-01

    Parallel computing is a promising approach to alleviate the computational demand in conducting large-scale finite element analyses. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for earthquake ground response and liquefaction using the parallel nonlinear finite element program, ParCYCLIC, designed for distributed-memory message-passing parallel computer systems. In ParCYCLIC, finite elements are employed within an incremental plasticity, coupled solid-fluid formulation. A constitutive model calibrated by physical tests represents the salient characteristics of sand liquefaction and associated accumulation of shear deformations. Key elements of the computational strategy employed in ParCYCLIC include the development of a parallel sparse direct solver, the deployment of an automatic domain decomposer, and the use of the Multilevel Nested Dissection algorithm for ordering of the finite element nodes. Simulation results of centrifuge test models using ParCYCLIC are presented. Performance results from grid models and geotechnical simulations show that ParCYCLIC is efficiently scalable to a large number of processors.

  15. Eigenvectors in the superintegrable model II: ground-state sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Au-Yang, Helen; Perk, Jacques H H [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, 145 Physical Sciences, Stillwater, OK 74078-3072 (United States)], E-mail: helenperk@yahoo.com, E-mail: perk@okstate.edu

    2009-09-18

    In 1993, Baxter gave 2{sup m{sub Q}} eigenvalues of the transfer matrix of the N-state superintegrable chiral Potts model with the spin-translation quantum number Q, where m{sub Q} = lfloor(NL - L - Q)/Nrfloor. In our previous paper we studied the Q = 0 ground-state sector, when the size L of the transfer matrix is chosen to be a multiple of N. It was shown that the corresponding {tau}{sub 2} matrix has a degenerate eigenspace generated by the generators of r = m{sub 0} simple sl{sub 2} algebras. These results enable us to express the transfer matrix in the subspace in terms of these generators E{sup {+-}}{sub m} and H{sub m} for m = 1, ..., r. Moreover, the corresponding 2{sup r} eigenvectors of the transfer matrix are expressed in terms of rotated eigenvectors of H{sub m}.

  16. Modeling and control for hydraulic transmission of unmanned ground vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岩; 张泽; 秦绪情

    2014-01-01

    Variable pump driving variable motor (VPDVM) is the future development trend of the hydraulic transmission of an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV). VPDVM is a dual-input single-output nonlinear system with coupling, which is difficult to control. High pressure automatic variables bang-bang (HABB) was proposed to achieve the desired motor speed. First, the VPDVM nonlinear mathematic model was introduced, then linearized by feedback linearization theory, and the zero-dynamic stability was proved. The HABB control algorithm was proposed for VPDVM, in which the variable motor was controlled by high pressure automatic variables (HA) and the variable pump was controlled by bang-bang. Finally, simulation of VPDVM controlled by HABB was developed. Simulation results demonstrate the HABB can implement the desired motor speed rapidly and has strong robustness against the variations of desired motor speed, load and pump speed.

  17. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  18. Improved SNR of phased-array PERES coils via simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RodrIguez, Alfredo O [Centro de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Mexico, DF, 09340 (Mexico); Medina, LucIa [DISCA, Instituto de Investigacion en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-728, Admo. No. 20, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2005-09-21

    A computational comparison of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was performed between a conventional phased array of two circular-shaped coils and a petal resonator surface array. The quasi-static model and phased-array optimum SNR were combined to derive an SNR formula for each array. Analysis of mutual inductance between coil petals was carried out to compute the optimal coil separation and optimum number of petal coils. Mutual interaction between coil arrays was not included in the model because this does not drastically affect coil performance. Phased arrays of PERES coils show a 114% improvement in SNR over that of the simplest circular configuration. (note)

  19. LHCb magnet coils arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Each of the two coils for the LHCb magnet comprises 15 individual monolayer 'pancakes' of identical trapezoidal racetrack shape, and is bent at 45 degrees on the two transverse sides. Each pancake consists of eight turns of conductor, wound from a single length (approx. 290 m) of extruded aluminium. The coils have arrived at CERN; one of them is seen here being unloaded above the LHCb experimental cavern.

  20. Coiling of yield stress fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Rahmani; M. Habibi; A. Javadi; D. Bonn

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the coiling of a filament of a yield stress fluid falling on a solid surface. We use two kinds of yield stress fluids, shaving foam and hair gel, and show that the coiling of the foam is similar to the coiling of an elastic rope. Two regimes of coiling (el

  1. Constraint Cooling of Hot Rolled Coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-juan; ZHANG Chun-li

    2004-01-01

    The layer thermal conductivity during constraint cooling of hot rolled coil was described by using equivalent thermal conductivity model and finite element method. Two radial stress concentration zones in constraint cooled coil were shown by numerical analysis, and the tension stress was assumed to be the main factor to induce stress corrosion. The experimental results show that the longer the water cooling time is, the smaller the grain size and the more uniform the grains are.

  2. Linear Rogowski coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the employment and development of fast current pulses require sophisticated systems to perform measurements. Rogowski coils are used to diagnose cylindrical shaped beams; therefore, they are designed and built with a toroidal structure. Recently, to perform experiments of radiofrequency biophysical stresses, flat transmission lines have been developed. Therefore, in this work we developed a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. The system is first approached by means of transmission line theory. We found that, if the pulse width to be diagnosed is comparable with the propagation time of the signal in the detector, it is necessary to impose a uniform current as input pulse, or to use short coils. We further analysed the effect of the resistance of the coil and the influence of its magnetic properties. As a result, the device we developed is able to record pulses lasting for some hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the inductance, load impedance, and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response is characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (˜100 ps). The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the fidelity of the response depends both on the magnetic core characteristics and on the current distribution along the plane conductors.

  3. DESIGNING A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE MODEL WITH TECHNOLOGY ORIENTED APPROACH USING FAHP TECHNIQUE: A CASE STUDY IN COIL INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDOLHAMID S. GHADIKOLAEI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the distinctive attributes of today’s successful companies is having at least one competitive advantage in one known area. Technological competency is an important advantage which helps improve the firm’s competitiveness. In fact, suitable use of new technologies can dramatically influence the innovation speed, decrease the time of product development cycle and also increase the rate of new product introduction. Firm-specific technological competencies help explain why a firm is different, how it changes over time, and whether it is capable of remaining competitive. In this study, technological competency factors (technology management, process technology, product technology are prioritized according to the competitive advantage levels(customer satisfaction, brand reputation, new product introduction, market share and competitive priorities (cost, price, quality, flexibility, time using fuzzy Analytic hierarchy process (FAHP with the aim of maximizing the nonfinancial performance at coil manufacture industry. The results indicate that within Iran coil industry, process technology is of greater importance than technology management and product technology.

  4. Starch gelatinization in coiled heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelder, J D H; Ptasinski, K J; Kerkhof, P J A M

    2004-01-01

    A gelatinizing model food derived from a 5% w/w cross-linked waxy maize starch suspension was simulated in coiled heaters to assess the impact of centrifugal forces on flow and heat transfer. For four coil diameters (D = 0.25, 1, 2.5, and infinity m) and three flow rates (w = 0.5, 1, and 2 m/s), heat transfer, viscous development, and the severity of channeling were evaluated. Increasing curvature proved to suppress channeling as a result of more uniform heating and gelatinization. The maximum attainable viscosity was also higher, implying a lower starch consumption for a target viscosity. Higher flow rates necessitated longer heaters, and the maximum viscosity decreased. Moderate product velocities are therefore recommended.

  5. Finite Element Analyses and Instrumentation Layout for Single Coil Testing of TF Coils in HT-7U

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文革; 翁佩德

    2003-01-01

    The HT-7U tokamak is a magnetically-confined full superconducting fusion device,consisting of superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and superconducting poloidal field (PF)coils. These coils are wound with cable-in-conductor (CICC) which is based on UNK NbTi wiresmade in Russian [1]. A single D-shaped toroidal field magnet coil will be tested for large andexpensive magnets systems before assembling them in the toroidal configuration. This paperdescribes the layout of the instrumentation for a superconducting test facility based on the resultsof a finite element modeling of the single coil of toroidal magnetic field (TF) coils in HT-7Utokamak device. At the same time, the design of coil support structure in the test facility isparticularly discussed in some detail.

  6. Electromagnetic modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar responses to complex targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonis

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the electromagnetic modelling of composite structures for Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) applications. It was developed within the Short-Term Scientific Mission ECOST-STSM-TU1208-211013-035660, funded by COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar". The Authors define a set of test concrete structures, hereinafter called cells. The size of each cell is 60 x 100 x 18 cm and the content varies with growing complexity, from a simple cell with few rebars of different diameters embedded in concrete at increasing depths, to a final cell with a quite complicated pattern, including a layer of tendons between two overlying meshes of rebars. Other cells, of intermediate complexity, contain pvc ducts (air filled or hosting rebars), steel objects commonly used in civil engineering (as a pipe, an angle bar, a box section and an u-channel), as well as void and honeycombing defects. One of the cells has a steel mesh embedded in it, overlying two rebars placed diagonally across the comers of the structure. Two cells include a couple of rebars bent into a right angle and placed on top of each other, with a square/round circle lying at the base of the concrete slab. Inspiration for some of these cells is taken from the very interesting experimental work presented in Ref. [1]. For each cell, a subset of models with growing complexity is defined, starting from a simple representation of the cell and ending with a more realistic one. In particular, the model's complexity increases from the geometrical point of view, as well as in terms of how the constitutive parameters of involved media and GPR antennas are described. Some cells can be simulated in both two and three dimensions; the concrete slab can be approximated as a finite-thickness layer having infinite extension on the transverse plane, thus neglecting how edges affect radargrams, or else its finite size can be fully taken into account. The permittivity of concrete can be

  7. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-coil design with improved focality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, P.; Lee, E. G.; Hadimani, R. L.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique for neuromodulation that can be used as a non-invasive therapy for various neurological disorders. In TMS, a time varying magnetic field generated from an electromagnetic coil placed on the scalp is used to induce an electric field inside the brain. TMS coil geometry plays an important role in determining the focality and depth of penetration of the induced electric field responsible for stimulation. Clinicians and basic scientists are interested in stimulating a localized area of the brain, while minimizing the stimulation of surrounding neural networks. In this paper, a novel coil has been proposed, namely Quadruple Butterfly Coil (QBC) with an improved focality over the commercial Figure-8 coil. Finite element simulations were conducted with both the QBC and the conventional Figure-8 coil. The two coil's stimulation profiles were assessed with 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. The coils were positioned on the vertex and the scalp over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to stimulate the brain. Computer modeling of the coils has been done to determine the parameters of interest-volume of stimulation, maximum electric field, location of maximum electric field and area of stimulation across all 50 head models for both coils.

  8. Discharge areas for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents discharge areas in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient model. Natural ground-water discharge occurs...

  9. Boundary of the ground-water flow model by IT Corporation (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the steady-state ground-water flow model built by IT Corporation (1996). The regional, 20-layer ground-water flow...

  10. Discharge areas for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents discharge areas in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient model. Natural ground-water discharge...

  11. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  12. Ferrite core non-linearity in coils for magnetic neurostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-10-01

    The need to correctly predict the voltage across terminals of mm-sized coils, with ferrite core, to be employed for magnetic stimulation of the peripheral neural system is the motivation for this work. In such applications, which rely on a capacitive discharge on the coil to realise a transient voltage curve of duration and strength suitable for neural stimulation, the correct modelling of the non-linearity of the ferrite core is critical. A demonstration of how a finite-difference model of the considered coils, which include a model of the current-controlled inductance in the coil, can be used to correctly predict the time-domain voltage waveforms across the terminals of a test coil is presented. Five coils of different dimensions, loaded with ferrite cores, have been fabricated and tested: the measured magnitude and width of the induced pulse are within 10% of simulated values.

  13. Validating global hydrological models by ground and space gravimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU JiangCun; SUN HePing; XU JianQiao

    2009-01-01

    The long-term continuous gravity observations obtained by the superconducting gravimeters (SG) at seven globally-distributed stations are comprehensively analyzed. After removing the signals related to the Earth's tides and variations in the Earth's rotation, the gravity residuals are used to describe the seasonal fluctuations in gravity field. Meanwhile, the gravity changes due to the air pressure loading are theoretically modeled from the measurements of the local air pressure, and those due to land water and nontidal ocean loading are also calculated according to the corresponding numerical models. The numerical results show that the gravity changes due to both the air pressure and land water loading are as large as 100×10-9 m s-2 in magnitude, and about 10×10-9 m s-2 for those due to the nontidal ocean loading in the coastal area. On the other hand, the monthly-averaged gravity variations over the area surrounding the stations are derived from the spherical harmonic coefficients of the GRACE-recovered gravity fields, by using Gaussian smoothing technique in which the radius is set to be 600 km. Compared the land water induced gravity variations, the SG observations after removal of tides, polar motion effects, air pressure and nontidal ocean loading effects and the GRACE-derived gravity variations with each other, it is inferred that both the ground- and space-based gravity observations can effectively detect the seasonal gravity variations with a magnitude of 100×10-9 m s-2 induced by the land water loading. This implies that high precision gravimetry is an effective technique to validate the reliabilities of the hydrological models.

  14. Baculovirus FP25K Localization: Role of the Coiled-Coil Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garretson, Tyler A; McCoy, Jason C; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Two types of viruses are produced during the baculovirus life cycle: budded virus (BV) and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). A particular baculovirus protein, FP25K, is involved in the switch from BV to ODV production. Previously, FP25K from the model alphabaculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was shown to traffic ODV envelope proteins. However, FP25K localization and the domains involved are inconclusive. Here we used a quantitative approach to study FP25K subcellular localization during infection using an AcMNPV bacmid virus that produces a functional AcMNPV FP25K-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein. During cell infection, FP25K-GFP localized primarily to the cytoplasm, particularly amorphous structures, with a small fraction being localized in the nucleus. To investigate the sequences involved in FP25K localization, an alignment of baculovirus FP25K sequences revealed that the N-terminal putative coiled-coil domain is present in all alphabaculoviruses but absent in betabaculoviruses. Structural prediction indicated a strong relatedness of AcMNPV FP25K to long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1) open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p), which contains an N-terminal coiled-coil domain responsible for cytoplasmic retention. Point mutations and deletions of this domain lead to a change in AcMNPV FP25K localization from cytoplasmic to nuclear. The coiled-coil and C-terminal deletion viruses increased BV production. Furthermore, a betabaculovirus FP25K protein lacking this N-terminal coiled-coil domain localized predominantly to the nucleus and exhibited increased BV production. These data suggest that the acquisition of this N-terminal coiled-coil domain in FP25K is important for the evolution of alphabaculoviruses. Moreover, with the divergence of preocclusion nuclear membrane breakdown in betabaculoviruses and membrane integrity in alphabaculoviruses, this domain represents an alphabaculovirus adaptation for nuclear trafficking

  15. Structure, dynamics, and hydration of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)10, in aqueous media: a chemical equilibrium analysis of triple helix-to-single coil transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Minakawa, Ayako; Okuyama, Kenji

    2009-10-29

    The structure, dynamics, and hydration behavior of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)(10) (PPG10), were investigated in pure water and dilute acetic acid over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric relaxation (DR) techniques that spanned frequencies from 1 kHz to 20 GHz. All samples showed pronounced dielectric dispersion with two major relaxation processes around 3 MHz and 20 GHz. Because DR measurements sensitively probe dipoles and their dynamics, the structures and ionization states of the carboxy and amino termini of aqueous PPG10 were precisely determined from the relaxation times and strengths in the 3 MHz frequency range. In solution, PPG10 formed mixtures of monodisperse rods as triple helices with lengths and diameters of 8.6 and 1.5 nm, respectively, and monomeric random coils with radii of approximately 1.4 nm. Ionization of the C-terminus was suppressed by the addition of acetic acid in both states. The fraction of random coils (f(coil)) was found to be a function of temperature (T) and the concentration of PPG10 (c). At low temperatures, small f(coil) values were found, which increased with temperature to reach f(coil) = 1 at approximately 60 degrees C, irrespective of c. This phenomenon, well-known as a triple helix-to-single coil transition, is discussed on the basis of the chemical reaction, (PPG10)(3) 3PPG10, with an equilibrium constant of K = 3(c/55.6)(2)f(coil)(3)(1 - f(coil))(-1). The standard enthalpy change evaluated from Arrhenius plots (ln K versus T(-1)) was found to change dramatically at the same transition temperature that was previously determined by using optical rotation experiments. The other major DR process, observed at approximately 20 GHz, was assigned to free and hydrated water molecules and used to determine the average hydration number (m) per PPG10. The m values for the triple helix and random coil state at 25 degrees C were evaluated to be m(th) = 60-70 and m(coil) = 250-270. The m

  16. Ground-motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes, part II: Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Brad T.; Graves, Robert W.; Rodgers, Arthur; Brocher, Thomas M.; Simpson, Robert W.; Dreger, Douglas; Petersson, N. Anders; Larsen, Shawn C.; Ma, Shuo; Jachens, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    We simulate long-period (T>1.0–2.0 s) and broadband (T>0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenario earthquakes (Mw 6.7–7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault, we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions, compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with about 50% of the urban area experiencing modified Mercalli intensity VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland earthquake and the 2007 Mw 5.45 Alum Rock earthquake show that the U.S. Geological Survey’s Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area for Hayward fault earthquakes, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions for the suite of scenarios exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute much of this difference to the seismic velocity structure in the San Francisco Bay area and how the NGA models account for basin amplification; the NGA relations may underpredict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins. The simulations also suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period.

  17. Altitudes of the top of model layers for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the altitudes of the tops of 16 model layers simulated in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient flow...

  18. TESLA Coil Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Sloan’s work was actually predated by the earlier work of Nikola Tesla . Sloan mistakenly identified " Tesla Coils" as lumped tuned resonators. The...Lefvw WsnJ L REPORT o]i 3. REPRT TYPE AND OATES COVEIRD May 1992 Special/Aug 1992 - May 1992 Z TITLE AND 5U§nUT S. FUNDING NUMIHRS Tesla Coil Research...STATEMENT 1211. ’ISTRIUUTION COOD Approved for public release; dis~ribution is unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Masrmum 200 worw) High repetition rate Tesla

  19. Use of a ground-water flow model with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability, Clark County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, D.T.; Wilkinson, J.M.; Orzol, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    A ground-water flow model was used in conjunction with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability in Clark County, Washington. Using the particle-tracking program, particles were placed in every cell of the flow model (about 60,000 particles) and tracked backwards in time and space upgradient along flow paths to their recharge points. A new computer program was developed that interfaces the results from a particle-tracking program with a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS was used to display and analyze the particle-tracking results. Ground-water vulnerability was evaluated by selecting parts of the ground-water flow system and combining the results with ancillary information stored in the GIS to determine recharge areas, characteristics of recharge areas, downgradient impact of land use at recharge areas, and age of ground water. Maps of the recharge areas for each hydrogeologic unit illustrate the presence of local, intermediate, or regional ground-water flow systems and emphasize the three-dimensional nature of the ground-water flow system in Clark County. Maps of the recharge points for each hydrogeologic unit were overlaid with maps depicting aquifer sensitivity as determined by DRASTIC (a measure of the pollution potential of ground water, based on the intrinsic characteristics of the near-surface unsaturated and saturated zones) and recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems. A large number of recharge areas were identified, particularly in southern Clark County, that have a high aquifer sensitivity, coincide with areas of recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems, or both. Using the GIS, the characteristics of the recharge areas were related to the downgradient parts of the ground-water system that will eventually receive flow that has recharged through these areas. The aquifer sensitivity, as indicated by DRASTIC, of the recharge areas for downgradient parts of the flow system was mapped for each hydrogeologic unit. A number of

  20. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuzaki Daisuke

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe.

  1. Modeling and Simulation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-28

    Wilhelm, A. N., Surgenor, B. W., and Pharoah, J. G., “Design and evaluation of a micro-fuel-cell-based power system for a mobile robot ,” Mechatronics ...of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA bU.S. Army RDECOM-TARDEC, Warren, MI, USA ABSTRACT Long-duration missions challenge ground robot systems with respect...to energy storage and efficient conversion to power on demand. Ground robot systems can contain multiple power sources such as fuel cell, battery and

  2. Ground motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes II:Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard, B T; Graves, R W; Rodgers, A; Brocher, T M; Simpson, R W; Dreger, D; Petersson, N A; Larsen, S C; Ma, S; Jachens, R C

    2009-11-04

    We simulate long-period (T > 1.0-2.0 s) and broadband (T > 0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenarios earthquakes (Mw 6.7-7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area with about 50% of the urban area experiencing MMI VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland and 2007 Mw 4.5 Alum Rock earthquakes show that the USGS Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute at least some of this difference to the relatively narrow width of the Hayward fault ruptures. The simulations suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by including a dependence on the rupture speed and increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period. The simulations also indicate that the NGA relations may under-predict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins.

  3. A coherency function model of ground motion at base rock corresponding to strike-slip fault

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁海平; 刘启方; 金星; 袁一凡

    2004-01-01

    At present, the method to study spatial variation of ground motions is statistic analysis based on dense array records such as SMART-1 array, etc. For lacking of information of ground motions, there is no coherency function model of base rock and different style site. Spatial variation of ground motions in elastic media is analyzed by deterministic method in this paper. Taking elastic half-space model with dislocation source of fault, near-field ground motions are simulated. This model takes strike-slip fault and earth media into account. A coherency function is proposed for base rock site.

  4. Upper Bounds on the Degeneracy of the Ground State in Quantum Field Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asao Arai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Axiomatic abstract formulations are presented to derive upper bounds on the degeneracy of the ground state in quantum field models including massless ones. In particular, given is a sufficient condition under which the degeneracy of the ground state of the perturbed Hamiltonian is less than or equal to the degeneracy of the ground state of the unperturbed one. Applications of the abstract theory to models in quantum field theory are outlined.

  5. Model for ground motion and atmospheric overpressure due to underground nuclear explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.; Walker, J.J.

    1980-10-01

    A physical model is proposed to describe the ground motion pattern resulting from an underground nulear explosion in an idealized homogeneous medium. Irregular behaviors in the observed ground motion are assumed to be perturbations caused by the local inhomogeneity of the ground medium. Our model correlates the ground motions at any point in the spalled zone to the initial acceleration pulse at the ground zero. Interestingly, the model predicts that the ground motion first comes to a stop at a definite radius about the ground zero, and the region expands both outward and inward as time goes on. We believe that this result is closely related to a phenomenon observed at NTS. In the far field approximation, we also calculate the overpressure in the lower atmosphere generated by the ground motion. We demonstrate that the irregular component of the ground motion does not affect the overpressure history in any significant way. Consequently the model ground motion can be used as a good approximation in generating the atmospheric overpressure.

  6. Planar, monolithically integrated coil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozeboom, F.; Reefman, D.; Klootwijk, J.H.; Tiemeijer, L.F.; Ruigrok, J.

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a means to integrate planar coils on silicon, while providing a high inductance. This high inductance is achieved through a special back- and front sided shielding of a material. In many applications, high-value inductors are a necessity. In particular, this holds for

  7. An orientable search coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, P. J.; Poblocki, M.

    2017-01-01

    We provide a design for a low cost orientable search coil that can be used to investigate the variation of magnetic flux with angle. This experiment is one of the required practical activities in the current A level physics specification for the AQA examination board in the UK. We demonstrate its performance and suggest other suitable investigations that can be undertaken.

  8. Validation and modeling of earthquake strong ground motion using a composite source model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Zeng et al. (1994) have proposed a composite source model for synthetic strong ground motion prediction. In that model, the source is taken as a superposition of circular subevents with a constant stress drop. The number of subevents and their radius follows a power law distribution equivalent to the Gutenberg and Richter's magnitude-frequency relation for seismicity. The heterogeneous nature of the composite source model is characterized by its maximum subevent size and subevent stress drop. As rupture propagates through each subevent, it radiates a Brune's pulse or a Sato and Hirasawa's circular crack pulse. The method has been proved to be successful in generating realistic strong motion seismograms in comparison with observations from earthquakes in California, eastern US, Guerrero of Mexico, Turkey and India. The model has since been improved by including scattering waves from small scale heterogeneity structure of the earth, site specific ground motion prediction using weak motion site amplification, and nonlinear soil response using geotechnical engineering models. Last year, I have introduced an asymmetric circular rupture to improve the subevent source radiation and to provide a consistent rupture model between overall fault rupture process and its subevents. In this study, I revisit the Landers, Loma Prieta, Northridge, Imperial Valley and Kobe earthquakes using the improved source model. The results show that the improved subevent ruptures provide an improved effect of rupture directivity compared to our previous studies. Additional validation includes comparison of synthetic strong ground motions to the observed ground accelerations from the Chi-Chi, Taiwan and Izmit, Turkey earthquakes. Since the method has evolved considerably when it was first proposed, I will also compare results between each major modification of the model and demonstrate its backward compatibility to any of its early simulation procedures.

  9. Effects of coil length on tube compression in electromagnetic forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effects of the length of solenoid coil on tube compression in electromagnetic forming were investigated either by theory analysis or through sequential coupling numerical simulation. The details of the electromagnetic and the mechanical models in the simulation were described. The results show that the amplitude of coil current waveform and the current frequency decrease with the increase of the coil length. And the peak value of magnetic pressure is inversely proportional to the coil length. The distribution of the magnetic force acting on the tube is inhomogeneous while the tube is longer than the coil. The shortened coil length causes the increases of the maximum deformation and energy efficiency. The numerically calculated result and the experimental one of the final tube profile are in good agreement.

  10. Design, Analysis, Prototyping, and Experimental Evaluation of an Efficient Double Coil Magnetorheological Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Hu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A double coil magnetorheological (MR valve with an outer annular resistance gap was designed and prototyped. The finite element modeling and analysis of double coil MR valve were carried out using ANSYS/Emag software, and the optimal magnetic field distribution and magnetic flux density of the double coil MR valve were achieved. The mechanism of the pressure drop was studied by building a mathematical model of pressure drop in the double coil MR valve. The proposed double coil MR valve was prototyped and its performance was experimentally evaluated. The new MR valve design has improved the efficiency of double coil MR valve significantly.

  11. Ground motion modeling of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake II: Ground motion estimates for the 1906 earthquake and scenario events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard, B; Brocher, T; Dreger, D; Frankel, A; Graves, R; Harmsen, S; Hartzell, S; Larsen, S; McCandless, K; Nilsson, S; Petersson, N A; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Tkalcic, H; Zoback, M L

    2007-02-09

    We estimate the ground motions produced by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake making use of the recently developed Song et al. (2008) source model that combines the available geodetic and seismic observations and recently constructed 3D geologic and seismic velocity models. Our estimates of the ground motions for the 1906 earthquake are consistent across five ground-motion modeling groups employing different wave propagation codes and simulation domains. The simulations successfully reproduce the main features of the Boatwright and Bundock (2005) ShakeMap, but tend to over predict the intensity of shaking by 0.1-0.5 modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) units. Velocity waveforms at sites throughout the San Francisco Bay Area exhibit characteristics consistent with rupture directivity, local geologic conditions (e.g., sedimentary basins), and the large size of the event (e.g., durations of strong shaking lasting tens of seconds). We also compute ground motions for seven hypothetical scenarios rupturing the same extent of the northern San Andreas fault, considering three additional hypocenters and an additional, random distribution of slip. Rupture directivity exerts the strongest influence on the variations in shaking, although sedimentary basins do consistently contribute to the response in some locations, such as Santa Rosa, Livermore, and San Jose. These scenarios suggest that future large earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault may subject the current San Francisco Bay urban area to stronger shaking than a repeat of the 1906 earthquake. Ruptures propagating southward towards San Francisco appear to expose more of the urban area to a given intensity level than do ruptures propagating northward.

  12. A Rigorous Investigation on the Ground State of the Penson-Kolb Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kai-Hua; TIAN Guang-Shan; HAN Ru-Qi

    2003-01-01

    By using either numerical calculations or analytical methods, such as the bosonization technique, the ground state of the Penson-Kolb model has been previously studied by several groups. Some physicists argued that, as far as the existence of superconductivity in this model is concerned, it is canonically equivalent to the negative-U Hubbard model.However, others did not agree. In the present paper, we shall investigate this model by an independent and rigorous approach. We show that the ground state of the Penson-Kolb model is nondegenerate and has a nonvanishing overlap with the ground state of the negative-U Hubbard model. Furthermore, we also show that the ground states of both the models have the same good quantum numbers and may have superconducting long-range order at the same momentum q = 0. Our results support the equivalence between these models.

  13. An analysis of the numerical model influence on the ground temperature profile determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczur, Marek; Polepszyc, Inga; Sapińska-Śliwa, Aneta; Gonet, Andrzej

    2017-02-01

    The estimation of the ground temperature profile with respect to the depth and time is the key issue in many engineering applications which use the ground as a source of thermal energy. In the present work, the influence of the model components on the calculated ground temperature distribution has been analysed in order to develop an accurate and robust model for the prediction of the ground temperature profile. The presented mathematical model takes into account all the key phenomena occurring in the soil and on its top surface. The impact of individual model elements on the temperature of the soil has been analysed. It has been found that the simplest models and the most complex model result in a similar temperature variation over the simulation period, but only at a low depth. A detailed analysis shows that a larger depth requires more complex models and the calculation with the use of simple models results in an incorrect temperature and a theoretical COP estimation.

  14. Train-induced ground vibrations: modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ditzel, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ground vibrations generated by high-speed trains are of great concern because of the possible damage they can cause to buildings or other structures near the track, and the annoyance to the public living in the vicinity of the track. Particularly in soft-soil regions, where the wave speed is compara

  15. Common Grounds for Modelling Mathematics in Educational Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuper, Walther

    2010-01-01

    Two kinds of software, CAS and DGS, are starting to work towards mutual integration. This paper envisages common grounds for such integration based on principles of computer theorem proving (CTP). Presently, the CTP community seems to lack awareness as to which of their products' features might serve mathematics education from high-school to…

  16. Convolutional Models for Landmine Identification with Ground Penetrating Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roth, F.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents new developments in the area of target identification with ground penetrating radar (GPR) intended for the identification of plastic and metal cased antipersonnel (AP) landmines from a single measured GPR return signal, called A-scan. The target identification is formulated as a

  17. Data-driven prediction and design of bZIP coiled-coil interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Jenifer B; Keating, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    Selective dimerization of the basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors presents a vivid example of how a high degree of interaction specificity can be achieved within a family of structurally similar proteins. The coiled-coil motif that mediates homo- or hetero-dimerization of the bZIP proteins has been intensively studied, and a variety of methods have been proposed to predict these interactions from sequence data. In this work, we used a large quantitative set of 4,549 bZIP coiled-coil interactions to develop a predictive model that exploits knowledge of structurally conserved residue-residue interactions in the coiled-coil motif. Our model, which expresses interaction energies as a sum of interpretable residue-pair and triplet terms, achieves a correlation with experimental binding free energies of R = 0.68 and significantly out-performs other scoring functions. To use our model in protein design applications, we devised a strategy in which synthetic peptides are built by assembling 7-residue native-protein heptad modules into new combinations. An integer linear program was used to find the optimal combination of heptads to bind selectively to a target human bZIP coiled coil, but not to target paralogs. Using this approach, we designed peptides to interact with the bZIP domains from human JUN, XBP1, ATF4 and ATF5. Testing more than 132 candidate protein complexes using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay confirmed the formation of tight and selective heterodimers between the designed peptides and their targets. This approach can be used to make inhibitors of native proteins, or to develop novel peptides for applications in synthetic biology or nanotechnology.

  18. Solutions for Safe Hot Coil Evacuation and Coil Handling in Case of Thick and High Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieberer Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently hot rolling plants are entering the market segment for thick gauges and high strength steel grades where the elastic bending property of the strip leads to internal forces in the coil during coiling operation. The strip tends to open. Primetals is investigating several possibilities to facilitate safe coil evacuation and coil handling under spring-back conditions. The contribution includes finite element models of such mechanical solutions. Results of parameter variation and stability limits of case studies are presented in the paper.

  19. Minimax Current Density Coil Design

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Michael; Lopez, Hector Sanchez; Ng, Michael; Crozier, Stuart; 10.1088/0022-3727/43/9/095001

    2010-01-01

    'Coil design' is an inverse problem in which arrangements of wire are designed to generate a prescribed magnetic field when energized with electric current. The design of gradient and shim coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important examples of coil design. The magnetic fields that these coils generate are usually required to be both strong and accurate. Other electromagnetic properties of the coils, such as inductance, may be considered in the design process, which becomes an optimization problem. The maximum current density is additionally optimized in this work and the resultant coils are investigated for performance and practicality. Coils with minimax current density were found to exhibit maximally spread wires and may help disperse localized regions of Joule heating. They also produce the highest possible magnetic field strength per unit current for any given surface and wire size. Three different flavours of boundary element method that employ different basis functions (triangular elements...

  20. Modelling floor heating systems using a validated two-dimensional ground coupled numerical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Kragh, Jesper; Roots, Peter

    2005-01-01

    the floor. This model can be used to design energy efficient houses with floor heating focusing on the heat loss through the floor construction and foundation. It is found that it is impor-tant to model the dynamics of the floor heating system to find the correct heat loss to the ground, and further......This paper presents a two-dimensional simulation model of the heat losses and tempera-tures in a slab on grade floor with floor heating which is able to dynamically model the floor heating system. The aim of this work is to be able to model, in detail, the influence from the floor construction...... and foundation on the performance of the floor heating sys-tem. The ground coupled floor heating model is validated against measurements from a single-family house. The simulation model is coupled to a whole-building energy simu-lation model with inclusion of heat losses and heat supply to the room above...

  1. Magnetic resonance butterfly coils: Design and application for hyperpolarized 13C studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca; Attanasio, Simona

    2013-01-01

    of dedicated coils capable of providing large field of view with high Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) data is of fundamental importance. This work presents magnetostatic simulations and tests of two butterfly coils with different geometries, both designed for 13C hyperpolarized studies of pig heart with a clinical...... 3T scanner. In particular, the paper provides details of the design, modeling, construction and application of the butterfly style coils. While both coils could be successfully employed in single configuration (linear mode), the second prototype was used to design a quadrature surface coil...... constituted by the butterfly and a circular loop both in receive (RX) mode while using a birdcage coil as transmitter (TX). The performance of this coils configuration was compared with the single TX/RX birdcage coil, in order to verify the advantage of the proposed configuration over the volume coil...

  2. Design of a quadrature surface coil for hyperpolarized 13C MRS cardiac metabolism studies in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, G.; Frijia, F.; Hartwig, V.;

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the design of a quadrature surface coil constituted by a circular loop and a butterfly coil, employed in transmit/receive (TX/RX) mode for hyperpolarized 13C studies of pig heart with a clinical 3T scanner. The coil characterization is performed by developing an SNR model...... for coil performance evaluation in terms of coil resistance, sample-induced resistance and magnetic field pattern. Experimental SNR-vs.-depth profiles, extracted from the [1-13C]acetate phantom chemical shift image (CSI), showed good agreement with the theoretical SNR-vs.-depth profiles. Moreover......, the performance of the quadrature coil was compared with the single TX/RX circular and TX/RX butterfly coil, in order to verify the advantage of the proposed configuration over the single coils throughout the volume of interest for cardiac imaging in pig. Finally, the quadrature surface coil was tested...

  3. An optimized ground-coupled heat pump system design for northern climate applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.; Baxter, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of the performance of a ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) system with a water-source heat pump package designed expressly for such systems operating in a northern climate. The project objective was to minimize the life-cycle cost of a GCHP system by optimizing the design of both the heat pump package and the group coil in concert. In order to achieve this objective, a number of modelling tools were developed to analyze the heat pump's performance and cost, and the ground coil's performance.

  4. Force modulated conductance of artificial coiled-coil protein monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Alexander; Hendler, Ziv; Berkovich, Inbal; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2013-01-01

    Studies of charge transport through proteins bridged between two electrodes have been the subject of intense research in recent years. However, the complex structure of proteins makes it difficult to elucidate transport mechanisms, and the use of simple peptide oligomers may be an over simplified model of the proteins. To bridge this structural gap, we present here studies of charge transport through artificial parallel coiled-coil proteins conducted in dry environment. Protein monolayers uniaxially oriented at an angle of ∼ 30° with respect to the surface normal were prepared. Current voltage measurements, obtained using conductive-probe atomic force microscopy, revealed the mechano-electronic behavior of the protein films. It was found that the low voltage conductance of the protein monolayer increases linearly with applied force, mainly due to increase in the tip contact area. Negligible compression of the films for loads below 26 nN allowed estimating a tunneling attenuation factor, β(0) , of 0.5-0.6 Å(-1) , which is akin to charge transfer by tunneling mechanism, despite the comparably large charge transport distance. These studies show that mechano-electronic behavior of proteins can shed light on their complex charge transport mechanisms, and on how these mechanisms depend on the detailed structure of the proteins. Such studies may provide insightful information on charge transfer in biological systems.

  5. Federated Ground Station Network Model and Interface Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Common Ground Architecture® CIA confidentiality, integrity, availability CONOPS concept of operations CSR certificate signing request DMZ de...MGSN describes its services and implements RPC using XML-RPC. Use of XML-RPC implies use of the Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP) as the transport ... transport protocol. This means that the large numbers of languages with XML support are already close to compatible with SOAP, if a library does not

  6. Thermomechanical modelling of ground response under environmental actions.

    OpenAIRE

    Samat, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters, such as landslides triggered by heavy rains, rock deformations and soil cracking in presence of temperature changes and other phenomena related to climatic actions, show the relevance of investigating the effects of the interactions between the atmosphere and the earth ground surface where main human activities develop. The prediction of such hazard requires an adequate knowledge of the changes in hydro-geological conditions under climatic actions. Having advanced constitut...

  7. Temperature Profile Measurements During Heat Treatment of BSCCO 2212 Coils

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The temperature profile of two different BSCCO 2212 coils has been analyzed. The profiles are obtained from thermocouples imbedded in the windings during the heat treatment that activates the 2212. The melting and freezing of the 2212 is clearly observed. A model that describes the data and can be used to guide the processing of new coils has been developed.

  8. Boundary of the ground-water flow model by IT Corporation (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the steady-state ground-water flow model built by IT Corporation (1996). The regional, 20-layer ground-water flow model...

  9. Modelling the Impact of Ground Planes on Antenna Radiation Using the Method of Auxiliary Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2007-01-01

    The Method of Auxiliary Sources is employed to model the impact of finite ground planes on the radiation from antennas. In many cases the computational cost of available commercial tools restricts the simulations to include only a small ground plane or, by use of the image principle, the infinitely...

  10. Improved lower bounds on the ground-state entropy of the antiferromagnetic Potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Chiuan; Shrock, Robert

    2015-05-01

    We present generalized methods for calculating lower bounds on the ground-state entropy per site, S(0), or equivalently, the ground-state degeneracy per site, W=e(S(0)/k(B)), of the antiferromagnetic Potts model. We use these methods to derive improved lower bounds on W for several lattices.

  11. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    KAUST Repository

    Ni, Xu

    2014-11-13

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  12. Vadose zone-attenuated artificial recharge for input to a ground water model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, William E; Wurstner, Signe K; Eslinger, Paul W

    2007-01-01

    Accurate representation of artificial recharge is requisite to calibration of a ground water model of an unconfined aquifer for a semiarid or arid site with a vadose zone that imparts significant attenuation of liquid transmission and substantial anthropogenic liquid discharges. Under such circumstances, artificial recharge occurs in response to liquid disposal to the vadose zone in areas that are small relative to the ground water model domain. Natural recharge, in contrast, is spatially variable and occurs over the entire upper boundary of a typical unconfined ground water model. An improved technique for partitioning artificial recharge from simulated total recharge for inclusion in a ground water model is presented. The improved technique is applied using data from the semiarid Hanford Site. From 1944 until the late 1980s, when Hanford's mission was the production of nuclear materials, the quantities of liquid discharged from production facilities to the ground vastly exceeded natural recharge. Nearly all hydraulic head data available for use in calibrating a ground water model at this site were collected during this period or later, when the aquifer was under the diminishing influence of the massive water disposals. The vadose zone is typically 80 to 90 m thick at the Central Plateau where most production facilities were located at this semiarid site, and its attenuation of liquid transmission to the aquifer can be significant. The new technique is shown to improve the representation of artificial recharge and thereby contribute to improvement in the calibration of a site-wide ground water model.

  13. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Céspedes

    Full Text Available Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous to Plasmodium falciparum were identified in the P. vivax genome. The peptides identified in silico were chemically synthesized; circular dichroism studies indicated partial or high α-helical content. Antigenicity was evaluated using human sera samples from malaria-endemic areas of Colombia and Papua New Guinea. Eight of these fragments were selected and used to assess immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. ELISA assays indicated strong reactivity of serum samples from individuals residing in malaria-endemic regions and sera of immunized mice, with the α-helical coiled coil structures. In addition, ex vivo production of IFN-γ by murine mononuclear cells confirmed the immunogenicity of these structures and the presence of T-cell epitopes in the peptide sequences. Moreover, sera of mice immunized with four of the eight antigens recognized native proteins on blood-stage P. vivax parasites, and antigenic cross-reactivity with three of the peptides was observed when reacted with both the P. falciparum orthologous fragments and whole parasites. Results here point to the α-helical coiled coil peptides as possible P. vivax malaria vaccine candidates as were observed for P. falciparum. Fragments selected here warrant further study in humans and non-human primate models to assess their protective efficacy as single components or assembled as hybrid linear epitopes.

  14. Coiled-coil forming peptides for the induction of silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Božič Abram, Sabina [Department of Synthetic Biology and Immunology, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Graduate School of Biomedicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Aupič, Jana [Department of Synthetic Biology and Immunology, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Doctoral Programme in Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Dražić, Goran [Laboratory for Materials Chemistry, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gradišar, Helena [Department of Synthetic Biology and Immunology, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); EN-FIST, Centre of Excellence, Trg Osvobodilne fronte 13, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Jerala, Roman, E-mail: roman.jerala@ki.si [Department of Synthetic Biology and Immunology, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); EN-FIST, Centre of Excellence, Trg Osvobodilne fronte 13, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia)

    2016-04-08

    Biopolymers with defined sequence patterns offer an attractive alternative for the formation of silver nanoparticle (AgNP). A set of coiled-coil dimer forming peptides was tested for their AgNP formation ability. Seventeen of those peptides mediated the formation of AgNPs in aqueous solution at neutral pH, while the formation of a coiled-coil dimer inhibited the nanoparticle generation. A QSAR regression model on the relationship between sequence and function suggests that in this peptide type the patterns KXQQ and KXEE are favorable, whereas Ala residues appear to have an inhibitory effect. UV–VIS spectra of the obtained nanoparticles gave a peak at around 420 nm, typical for AgNPs in the size range around 40 nm, which was confirmed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Peptide-induced AgNPs exhibited good antibacterial activity, even after a 15 min contact time, while they had low toxicity to human cells at the same concentrations. These results show that our designed peptides generate AgNPs with antibacterial activity at mild conditions and might be used for antibacterial coatings. - Highlights: • 17 of the 30 tested coiled-coil forming peptides induce AgNP formation. • Coiled-coil dimer formation suppresses AgNP generation of individual peptides. • Size of the peptide-induced silver nanoparticles is around 40 nm. • QSAR analysis points to the importance of KXQQ and KXEE motifs for AgNP generation. • Peptide-induced silver nanoparticles exhibit antibacterial activity.

  15. Progress of the ITER Correction Coils in China

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, J; Han, S; Yu, X; Du, S; Li, C; Fang, C; Wang, L; Zheng, W; Liu, L; Wen, J; Li, H; Libeyre, P; Dolgetta, N; Cormany, C; Sgobba, S

    2014-01-01

    The ITER Correction Coils (CC) include three sets of six coils each, distributed symmetrically around the tokamak to correct error fields. Each pair of coils, located on opposite sides of the tokamak, is series connected with polarity to produce asymmetric fields. The manufacturing of these superconducting coils is undergoing qualification of the main fabrication processes: winding into multiple pancakes, welding helium inlet/outlet on the conductor jacket, turn and ground insulation, vacuum pressure impregnation, inserting into an austenitic stainless steel case, enclosure welding, and assembling the terminal service box. It has been proceeding by an intense phase of R\\&D, trials tests, and final adjustment of the tooling. This paper mainly describes the progress in ASIPP for the CC manufacturing process before and on qualification phase and the status of corresponding equipment which are ordered or designed for each process. Some test results for the key component and procedure are also presented.

  16. Lateral boundary of the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the lateral boundary and model domain of the area simulated by the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional...

  17. Lateral boundary of the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the lateral boundary and model domain of the area simulated by the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional...

  18. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...

  19. Introduction to COIL

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, David

    2008-01-01

    By reciprocal arrangement between WIT and the National College of Ireland, you are now able to access their collection directly - more than 100,000 items. This form of direct consortial borrowing has never been tried before in Ireland. Before you borrow your first book, you will have to set up a COIL account, which is straightforward. The items which you reserve online will be posted to us, for you to collect, at the front desk in the Luke Wadding library, afterwards. The Initiat...

  20. Transient modeling of the ground thermal conditions using satellite data in the Lena River delta, Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Sebastian; Peter, Maria; Langer, Moritz; Schwamborn, Georg; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Etzelmüller, Bernd; Boike, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Permafrost is a sensitive element of the cryosphere, but operational monitoring of the ground thermal conditions on large spatial scales is still lacking. Here, we demonstrate a remote-sensing-based scheme that is capable of estimating the transient evolution of ground temperatures and active layer thickness by means of the ground thermal model CryoGrid 2. The scheme is applied to an area of approximately 16 000 km2 in the Lena River delta (LRD) in NE Siberia for a period of 14 years. The forcing data sets at 1 km spatial and weekly temporal resolution are synthesized from satellite products and fields of meteorological variables from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. To assign spatially distributed ground thermal properties, a stratigraphic classification based on geomorphological observations and mapping is constructed, which accounts for the large-scale patterns of sediment types, ground ice and surface properties in the Lena River delta. A comparison of the model forcing to in situ measurements on Samoylov Island in the southern part of the study area yields an acceptable agreement for the purpose of ground thermal modeling, for surface temperature, snow depth, and timing of the onset and termination of the winter snow cover. The model results are compared to observations of ground temperatures and thaw depths at nine sites in the Lena River delta, suggesting that thaw depths are in most cases reproduced to within 0.1 m or less and multi-year averages of ground temperatures within 1-2 °C. Comparison of monthly average temperatures at depths of 2-3 m in five boreholes yielded an RMSE of 1.1 °C and a bias of -0.9 °C for the model results. The highest ground temperatures are calculated for grid cells close to the main river channels in the south as well as areas with sandy sediments and low organic and ice contents in the central delta, where also the largest thaw depths occur. On the other hand, the lowest temperatures are modeled for the eastern part, which is an

  1. A remark on ground state of boundary Izergin-Korepin model

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    We study the ground state of the boundary Izergin-Korepin model. The boundary Izergin-Korepin model is defined by so-called $R$-matrix and $K$-matrix for $U_q(A_2^{(2)})$ which satisfy Yang-Baxter equation and boundary Yang-Baxter equation respectively. The ground state associated with identity $K$-matrix $K(z)=id$ was constructed in earlier study [Yang and Zhang, Nucl.Phys.B596,495-(2001)]. We construct the free field realization of the ground state associated with nontrivial diagonal $K$-matrix.

  2. Ground-state entanglement in a three-spin transverse Ising model with energy current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yong; Liu Dan; Long Gui-Lu

    2007-01-01

    The ground-state entanglement associated with a three-spin transverse Ising model is studied. By introducing an energy current into the system, a quantum phase transition to energy-current phase may be presented with the variation of external magnetic field; and the ground-state entanglement varies suddenly at the critical point of quantum phase transition. In our model, the introduction of energy current makes the entanglement between any two qubits become maximally robust.

  3. A Method of Auxiliary Sources Approach for Modelling the Impact of Ground Planes on Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2006-01-01

    The Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) is employed to model the impact of finite ground planes on the radiation from antennas. Two different antenna test cases are shown and the calculated results agree well with reference measurements......The Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) is employed to model the impact of finite ground planes on the radiation from antennas. Two different antenna test cases are shown and the calculated results agree well with reference measurements...

  4. Transfer function models to quantify the delay between air and ground temperatures in thawed active layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zenklusen Mutter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Air temperatures influence ground temperatures with a certain delay, which increases with depth. Borehole temperatures measured at 0.5 m depth in Alpine permafrost and air temperatures measured at or near the boreholes have been used to model this dependency. Statistical transfer function models have been fitted to the daily difference series of air and ground temperatures measured at seven different permafrost sites in the Swiss Alps.

    The relation between air and ground temperature is influenced by various factors such as ground surface cover, snow depth, water or ground ice content. To avoid complications induced by the insulating properties of the snow cover and by phase changes in the ground, only the mostly snow-free summer period when the ground at 0.5 m depth is thawed has been considered here. All summers from 2006 to 2009 have been analysed, with the main focus on summer 2006.

    The results reveal that in summer 2006 daily air temperature changes influence ground temperatures at 0.5 m depth with a delay ranging from one to six days, depending on the site. The fastest response times are found for a very coarse grained, blocky rock glacier site whereas slower response times are found for blocky scree slopes with smaller grain sizes.

  5. Ground State Properties of Superheavy Nuclei in Macroscopic-Microscopic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Qi-Jun; REN Zhong-Zhou; ZHANG Xiao-Ping; ZHENG Qiang

    2008-01-01

    The ground state properties of superheavy nuclei are systematically calculated by the macroscopic-microscopic (MM) model with the Nilsson potential The calculations well produced the ground state binding energies,a-decay energies,and half lives of superheavy nuclei.The calculated results are systematically compared with available experimental data.The calculated results are also compared with theoretical results from other MM models and from relativistic mean-field model.The calculations and comparisons show that the MM model is reliable in superheavy region and that the MM model results are not very sensitive to the choice of microscopic single-particle potential.

  6. SIMULATION OF STEEL COIL HEAT TRANSFER IN HPH FURNACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Y. Gu; G. Chen; M.C. Zhang; X.C. Dai

    2005-01-01

    The mathematical model has been established for the simulation of steel coil's heat transfer during annealing thermal process in HPH (high performance hydrogen) furnace. The equivalent radial thermal conductivity is adopted by statistical analysis regression approach through the combination of a large quantity of production data collected in practice and theoretical analyses. The effect of the number of coils on circulating flow gas is considered for calculating the convection heat transfer coefficient. The temperature within the coil is predicted with the developed model during the annealing cycle including heating process ard cooling process. The good consistency between the predicted results and the experimental data has demonstrated that the mathematical model established and the parameters identified by this paper are scientifically feasible and the effective method of calculation for coil equivalent radial heat transfer coefficient and circulating gas flow has been identified successfully, which largely enhances the operability and feasibility of the mathematic model. This model provides a theoretical basis and an effective means to conduct studies on the impact that foresaid factors may imposed on the steel coil's temperature field, to analyze the stress within coils, to realize online control and optimal production and to increase facility output by increasing heating and cooling rates of coils without producing higher thermal stress.

  7. Pumpage for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents ground-water discharged from the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) through pumped wells. Pumping from wells in...

  8. Exact ground-state phase diagrams for the spin-3/2 Blume Emery Griffiths model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canko, Osman; Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa

    2008-05-01

    We have calculated the exact ground-state phase diagrams of the spin-3/2 Ising model using the method that was proposed and applied to the spin-1 Ising model by Dublenych (2005 Phys. Rev. B 71 012411). The calculated, exact ground-state phase diagrams on the diatomic and triangular lattices with the nearest-neighbor (NN) interaction have been presented in this paper. We have obtained seven and 15 topologically different ground-state phase diagrams for J>0 and Jnon-uniform phases. We have also constructed the exact ground-state phase diagrams of the model on the triangular lattice and found 20 and 59 fundamental phase diagrams for J>0 and J<0, respectively, the conditions for the existence of uniform and intermediate phases have also been found.

  9. Electromagnetic Design of Superconducting Dipoles Based on Sector Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, Ezio

    2007-01-01

    We study the coil lay-outs of superconducting dipoles for particle accelerators based on the sector geometry. We show that a simple model based on a sector coil with a wedge allows us to derive an equation giving the short sample field as a function of the aperture, coil width, cable properties and superconducting material. The equation agrees well with the actual results of several dipole coils that have been built in the last 30 years. The improvements due to the grading technique and the iron yoke are also studied. The proposed equation can be used as a benchmark to judge the efficiency of the coil design, and to carry out a global optimization of an accelerator lay-out.

  10. Thermophoresis of polymers: nondraining vs draining coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Konstantin I; Köhler, Werner

    2014-06-10

    Present theories for the thermophoretic mobility of polymers in dilute solution without long-ranged electrostatic interaction are based on a draining coil model with short-ranged segment-solvent interaction. We show that the characteristic thermophoretic interaction decays as r(-2) with the distance from the chain segment, which is of much longer range than the underlying rapidly decaying binary van der Waals interaction (∝ r(-6)). As a consequence, thermophoresis on the monomer level is governed by volume forces, resulting in hydrodynamic coupling between the chain segments. The inner parts of the nondraining coil do not actively participate in thermophoresis. The flow lines penetrate only into a thin surface layer of the coil and cause tangential stresses along the surface of the entire coil, not the individual segments. This model is motivated by recent experimental findings for thermoresponsive polymers and core-shell particles, and it explains the well-known molar mass independent thermophoretic mobility of polymers in dilute solution.

  11. Analytical approach to calculation of response spectra from seismological models of ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Erdal

    1988-01-01

    An analytical approach to calculate response spectra from seismological models of ground motion is presented. Seismological models have three major advantages over empirical models: (1) they help in an understanding of the physics of earthquake mechanisms, (2) they can be used to predict ground motions for future earthquakes and (3) they can be extrapolated to cases where there are no data available. As shown with this study, these models also present a convenient form for the calculation of response spectra, by using the methods of random vibration theory, for a given magnitude and site conditions. The first part of the paper reviews the past models for ground motion description, and introduces the available seismological models. Then, the random vibration equations for the spectral response are presented. The nonstationarity, spectral bandwidth and the correlation of the peaks are considered in the calculation of the peak response.

  12. A Strongly Grounded Stable Model Semantics for Full Propositional Language

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Answer set programming is one of the most praised frameworks for declarative programming in general and non-monotonic reasoning in particular. There has been many efforts to extend stable model semantics so that answer set programs can use a more extensive syntax. To such endeavor, the community of non-monotonic reasoning has introduced extensions such as equilibrium models and FLP semantics. However, both of these extensions suffer from two problems: intended models according to such extensi...

  13. Design of Electromagnetic Moving-coil type Voice Coil Motor for Scanning mirror of Barcode reader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Bu Hyun; Lee, Jeong Woo; Shim, Hyun Ho; Park, Sang Goo [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Yop [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A voice coil actuator with moving coil type for scanning mirror system of barcode reader has been developed. The actuator has a simple structure including a magnet, a coil and a pin. The performance of the actuator is analyzed by a linearized theoretical model. And the dynamic performance of the proposed actuator is predicted through motor constant and restoring constant obtained by finite element simulations. The theoretical model was verified by the prototype which has 64 Hz resonance frequency and 60 deg reflecting angle. We also discovered that that 3 V input can make the actuator rotate over 61.8 deg reflecting angle at 50 Hz resonance frequency. The proposed actuator can simplify its driving configuration because of its implementation of open-loop control.

  14. Characterization of coiled SMA actuators for humanoid robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potnuru, Akshay; Tadesse, Yonas

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present modeling and characterization of coiled SMA spring actuators that are fabricated by coiling cylindrical SMA wires on to a threaded screw mandrel and applying heat treatment. Here, we evaluate a theoretical model that describes the actuation behavior of SMA coiled springs based on the constitutive model of SMA. We have experimentally verified the developed theoretical model and analyzed various parameters with respect to temperature change during actuation. The model was coded in Simulink® and the effects of various parameters with respect to temperature change were investigated. Simulations were compared with experiments and good agreement was obtained. We also show, how the high tension winding of SMA on the mandrel help in better performance and understanding of the fabricated coiled SMAs.

  15. Using MODFLOW 2000 to model ET and recharge for shallow ground water problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doble, Rebecca C; Simmons, Craig T; Walker, Glen R

    2009-01-01

    In environments with shallow ground water elevation, small changes in the water table can cause significant variations in recharge and evapotranspiration fluxes. Particularly, where ground water is close to the soil surface, both recharge and evapotranspiration are regulated by a thin unsaturated zone and, for accuracy, must be represented using nonconstant and often nonlinear relationships. The most commonly used ground water flow model today, MODFLOW, was originally designed with a modular structure with independent packages representing recharge and evaporation processes. Systems with shallow ground water, however, may be better represented using either a recharge function that varies with ground water depth or a continuous recharge and evapotranspiration function that is dependent on depth to water table. In situations where the boundaries between recharging and nonrecharging cells change with time, such as near a seepage zone, a continuous ground water flux relationship allows recharge rates to change with depth rather than having to calculate them at each stress period. This research article describes the modification of the MODFLOW 2000 recharge and segmented evapotranspiration packages into a continuous recharge-discharge function that allows ground water flux to be represented as a continuous process, dependent on head. The modifications were then used to model long-term recharge and evapotranspiration processes on a saline, semiarid floodplain in order to understand spatial patterns of salinization, and an overview of this process is given.

  16. Finite Element Modeling of Unbounded Grounding System Considering Soil Ionization Characteristic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin; LI Jingli; YANG Qing; SIMA Wenxia; SUN Caixin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to calculate accurately the grounding performance of an unbounded grounding system under high-magnitude fault current.In this work,a finite element model is presented to compute the characteristic parameters of the grounding system in frequency domain.The ionization phenomenon in the soil surrounding the grounding electrode is taken into account by setting the resistivity of every soil element while the resistivity of each element is varying with the electric field intensity;not a priori hypothesis on the geometrical shape of the ionized region around the electrodes has to be enforced.Open boundaries of the grounding system are represented by introducing a spatial transformation formulation,which translates the semi-infinite space into the finite space without shortening the domain as in the traditional approach.The suggested modeling is validated by comparison of the calculated results,which are laid out for grounding rod and grounding grid,with experimental and simulation results found in literature.

  17. Ground-state energies of the nonlinear sigma model and the Heisenberg spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shoucheng; Schulz, H. J.; Ziman, Timothy

    1989-01-01

    A theorem on the O(3) nonlinear sigma model with the topological theta term is proved, which states that the ground-state energy at theta = pi is always higher than the ground-state energy at theta = 0, for the same value of the coupling constant g. Provided that the nonlinear sigma model gives the correct description for the Heisenberg spin chains in the large-s limit, this theorem makes a definite prediction relating the ground-state energies of the half-integer and the integer spin chains. The ground-state energies obtained from the exact Bethe ansatz solution for the spin-1/2 chain and the numerical diagonalization on the spin-1, spin-3/2, and spin-2 chains support this prediction.

  18. Ground-water flow modeling of the Culebra dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaVenue, A.M.; Cauffman, T.L.; Pickens, J.F. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This hydrogeologic modeling study has been performed as part of the regional hydrologic characterization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. The study has produced an estimation of the transmissivity and Darcy-velocity distributions in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The results of this study are intended to support Sandia National Laboratories performance-assessment calculations. The three-dimensional finite-difference code SWIFT II was employed for the numerical modeling, using a variable-fluid-density and single-porosity formulation. The spatial scale of the model, 21.3 km by 30.6 km, was chosen to allow simulation of regional-scale pumping tests conducted at the H-3 and H-11 hydropads and the WIPP-13 borehole, which are located south, southeast, and northwest, respectively, of the center of the WIPP site. The modeled area includes and extends beyond the controlled area defined by the WIPP-site boundaries. The work performed in this study consisted of modeling the hydrogeology of the Culebra in two stages: steady-state modeling to develop the best estimate of the undisturbed head distribution (i.e., of the hydraulic conditions before excavation of the WIPP shafts, which began in 1981) and superimposed transient modeling of local hydrologic response to excavation of the four WIPP shafts at the center of the WIPP site, as well as to various well tests. The transient modeling used the calculated steady-state freshwater heads as initial conditions. 144 refs., 98 figs., 23 tabs.

  19. Initial hydraulic heads for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the hydraulic-head values in 16 model layers used to initiate the transient simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow...

  20. Hazard-consistent ground motions generated with a stochastic fault-rupture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Akemi, E-mail: nishida.akemi@jaea.go.jp [Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 178-4-4, Wakashiba, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0871 (Japan); Igarashi, Sayaka, E-mail: igrsyk00@pub.taisei.co.jp [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, 344-1 Nase-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0051 (Japan); Sakamoto, Shigehiro, E-mail: shigehiro.sakamoto@sakura.taisei.co.jp [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, 344-1 Nase-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0051 (Japan); Uchiyama, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo.uchiyama@sakura.taisei.co.jp [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, 344-1 Nase-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0051 (Japan); Yamamoto, Yu, E-mail: ymmyu-00@pub.taisei.co.jp [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, 344-1 Nase-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0051 (Japan); Muramatsu, Ken, E-mail: kmuramat@tcu.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering, Tokyo City University, 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Takada, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: takada@load.arch.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Architecture, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    obtain these acceleration deviations. A similar tendency can be found for some other seismic-source characteristics, meaning that ground motions obtained in this study cannot be generated by simulations of deterministic fault-rupture models with averaged seismic-source characteristics. Generated ground motions incorporate differences between each seismic-source characteristic, and they are effectively available for PRAs of structures.

  1. Multi-channel transmit/receive metal detector coil design for vehicular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil, Mehmet Ali; Yeǧin, Korkut; Bellikli, Hasan; Tura, Levent; Nazlı, Hakki; Daǧ, Mahmut

    2014-05-01

    Metal detector coil design has been matured to great extent over the years. However, vehicle mounted or remotely operated metal detectors require different specifications and these specifications dictate multiple transmit and receive coils operating in various settings. Unlike handheld operation, detector is more susceptible to metallic body of the vehicle. Moreover, ground calibration is also different than handheld devices. Coil geometries and intercoupling between them play a significant role in system design and performance. In this study, we study different coil geometries for vehicular applications. Starting from well-known coil geometries, we placed coils on dry, wet and ferrous soil to understand the interaction mechanism. Simulation studies are performed in frequency domain but the results are all applicable to time domain pulse based detector systems.

  2. Dynamic corner frequency in source spectral model for stochastic synthesis of ground motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodan Sun; Xiaxin Tao; Guoxin Wang; Taojun Liu

    2009-01-01

    The static corner frequency and dynamic corner frequency in stochastic synthesis of ground motion from finite-fault modeling are introduced, and conceptual disadvantages of the two are discussed in this paper. Furthermore, the non-uniform radiation of seismic wave on the fault plane, as well as the trend of the larger rupture area, the lower corner frequency, can be described by the source spectral model developed by the authors. A new dynamic corner frequency can be developed directly from the model. The dependence of ground motion on the size of subfault can be eliminated if this source spectral model is adopted in the synthesis. Finally, the approach presented is validated from the comparison between the synthesized and observed ground motions at six rock stations during the Northridge earthquake in 1994.

  3. Developing Uncertainty Models for Robust Flutter Analysis Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Starr; Lind, Rick; Kehoe, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A ground vibration test can be used to obtain information about structural dynamics that is important for flutter analysis. Traditionally, this information#such as natural frequencies of modes#is used to update analytical models used to predict flutter speeds. The ground vibration test can also be used to obtain uncertainty models, such as natural frequencies and their associated variations, that can update analytical models for the purpose of predicting robust flutter speeds. Analyzing test data using the -norm, rather than the traditional 2-norm, is shown to lead to a minimum-size uncertainty description and, consequently, a least-conservative robust flutter speed. This approach is demonstrated using ground vibration test data for the Aerostructures Test Wing. Different norms are used to formulate uncertainty models and their associated robust flutter speeds to evaluate which norm is least conservative.

  4. Development of a Subject-Specific Foot-Ground Contact Model for Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer N; Hass, Chris J; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2016-09-01

    Computational walking simulations could facilitate the development of improved treatments for clinical conditions affecting walking ability. Since an effective treatment is likely to change a patient's foot-ground contact pattern and timing, such simulations should ideally utilize deformable foot-ground contact models tailored to the patient's foot anatomy and footwear. However, no study has reported a deformable modeling approach that can reproduce all six ground reaction quantities (expressed as three reaction force components, two center of pressure (CoP) coordinates, and a free reaction moment) for an individual subject during walking. This study proposes such an approach for use in predictive optimizations of walking. To minimize complexity, we modeled each foot as two rigid segments-a hindfoot (HF) segment and a forefoot (FF) segment-connected by a pin joint representing the toes flexion-extension axis. Ground reaction forces (GRFs) and moments acting on each segment were generated by a grid of linear springs with nonlinear damping and Coulomb friction spread across the bottom of each segment. The stiffness and damping of each spring and common friction parameter values for all springs were calibrated for both feet simultaneously via a novel three-stage optimization process that used motion capture and ground reaction data collected from a single walking trial. The sequential three-stage process involved matching (1) the vertical force component, (2) all three force components, and finally (3) all six ground reaction quantities. The calibrated model was tested using four additional walking trials excluded from calibration. With only small changes in input kinematics, the calibrated model reproduced all six ground reaction quantities closely (root mean square (RMS) errors less than 13 N for all three forces, 25 mm for anterior-posterior (AP) CoP, 8 mm for medial-lateral (ML) CoP, and 2 N·m for the free moment) for both feet in all walking trials. The

  5. Endothelial cell proliferation in swine experimental aneurysm after coil embolization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Mitome-Mishima

    Full Text Available After coil embolization, recanalization in cerebral aneurysms adversely influences long-term prognosis. Proliferation of endothelial cells on the coil surface may reduce the incidence of recanalization and further improve outcomes after coil embolization. We aimed to map the expression of proliferating tissue over the aneurysmal orifice and define the temporal profile of tissue growth in a swine experimental aneurysm model. We compared the outcomes after spontaneous thrombosis with those of coil embolization using histological and morphological techniques. In aneurysms that we not coiled, spontaneous thrombosis was observed, and weak, easily detachable proliferating tissue was evident in the aneurysmal neck. In contrast, in the coil embolization group, histological analysis showed endothelial-like cells lining the aneurysmal opening. Moreover, immunohistochemical and morphological analysis suggested that these cells were immature endothelial cells. Our results indicated the existence of endothelial cell proliferation 1 week after coil embolization and showed immature endothelial cells in septal tissue between the systemic circulation and the aneurysm. These findings suggest that endothelial cells are lead to and proliferate in the former aneurysmal orifice. This is the first examination to evaluate the temporal change of proliferating tissue in a swine experimental aneurysm model.

  6. Electric field depth–focality tradeoff in transcranial magnetic stimulation: simulation comparison of 50 coil designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Various transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil designs are available or have been proposed. However, key coil characteristics such as electric field focality and attenuation in depth have not been adequately compared. Knowledge of the coil focality and depth characteristics can help TMS researchers and clinicians with coil selection and interpretation of TMS studies. Objective To quantify the electric field focality and depth of penetration of various TMS coils. Methods The electric field distributions induced by 50 TMS coils were simulated in a spherical human head model using the finite element method. For each coil design, we quantified the electric field penetration by the half-value depth, d1/2, and focality by the tangential spread, S1/2, defined as the half-value volume (V1/2) divided by the half-value depth, S1/2 = V1/2/d1/2. Results The 50 TMS coils exhibit a wide range of electric field focality and depth, but all followed a depth–focality tradeoff: coils with larger half-value depth cannot be as focal as more superficial coils. The ranges of achievable d1/2 are similar between coils producing circular and figure-8 electric field patterns, ranging 1.0–3.5 cm and 0.9–3.4 cm, respectively. However, figure-8 field coils are more focal, having S1/2 as low as 5 cm2 compared to 34 cm2 for circular field coils. Conclusions For any coil design, the ability to directly stimulate deeper brain structures is obtained at the expense of inducing wider electrical field spread. Novel coil designs should be benchmarked against comparison coils with consistent metrics such as d1/2 and S1/2. PMID:22483681

  7. SSC 40 mm short model construction experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Carson, J.A.; Dickey, C.E.; Gonczy, I.; Koska, W.A.; Strait, J.B.

    1990-04-01

    Several short model SSC magnets have been built and tested at Fermilab. They establish a preliminary step toward the construction of SSC long models. Many aspects of magnet design and construction are involved. Experience includes coil winding, curing and measuring, coil end part design and fabrication, ground insulation, instrumentation, collaring and yoke assembly. Fabrication techniques are explained. Design of tooling and magnet components not previously incorporated into SSC magnets are described. 14 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Considerations on the Mathematical model for Calculating the Single-phase Grounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATAI Ildiko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented the results obtained using a mathematical model, conceived in order to analyze the effects of grounding faults that occur in a medium voltage network. Measurements were made on a real electric network. Calculated results using the mathematical model are compared with the actual measurements.

  9. On modeling of the evaporation of chemical warfare agents on the ground

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westin, S.N.; Winter, S.; Karlsson, E.; Hin, A.; Oeseburg, F.

    1998-01-01

    A model for evaporation of chemical warfare agents on the ground has been developed. The process of evaporation is described in three steps: (1) the immediate drop enlargement due to impact momentum is modeled using an empirical correlation from technical literature; (2) further enlargement caused b

  10. An assembly model for simulation of large-scale ground water flow and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junqi; Christ, John A; Goltz, Mark N

    2008-01-01

    When managing large-scale ground water contamination problems, it is often necessary to model flow and transport using finely discretized domains--for instance (1) to simulate flow and transport near a contamination source area or in the area where a remediation technology is being implemented; (2) to account for small-scale heterogeneities; (3) to represent ground water-surface water interactions; or (4) some combination of these scenarios. A model with a large domain and fine-grid resolution will need extensive computing resources. In this work, a domain decomposition-based assembly model implemented in a parallel computing environment is developed, which will allow efficient simulation of large-scale ground water flow and transport problems using domain-wide grid refinement. The method employs common ground water flow (MODFLOW) and transport (RT3D) simulators, enabling the solution of almost all commonly encountered ground water flow and transport problems. The basic approach partitions a large model domain into any number of subdomains. Parallel processors are used to solve the model equations within each subdomain. Schwarz iteration is applied to match the flow solution at the subdomain boundaries. For the transport model, an extended numerical array is implemented to permit the exchange of dispersive and advective flux information across subdomain boundaries. The model is verified using a conventional single-domain model. Model simulations demonstrate that the proposed model operated in a parallel computing environment can result in considerable savings in computer run times (between 50% and 80%) compared with conventional modeling approaches and may be used to simulate grid discretizations that were formerly intractable.

  11. Transfer model of water-soluble material in saturated/unsaturated ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shun; Kawai, Katsuyuki; Kakui, Shunsuke; Tachibana, Shinya; Kanazawa, Shinichi; Iizuka, Atsushi

    The ground pollution is one of the most serious environmental issues all over the world now. Industrial wastes discharged from various human activities infiltrate to the ground, diffuse and damage to plants and animals indirectly. Therefore, it is strongly requested to know the transfer behavior of contaminant movement in the ground. In this study, continuous equations and advection-dispersion equation are derived from mass conservation laws in soil, water, air and dissolved material phases. These governing equations are applied to the constitutive model for unsaturated soil and formulated in the framework of the initial boundary value problems with the finite element method The soil/water/air coupled analysis program, DACSAR-M_ad, applied mass transfer equation to is coded. Here, the mass within the ground due to loading is simulated with this code.

  12. Evaluation of Horizontal Electric Field Under Different Lightning Current Models by Perfect Ground Assumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jianfeng; LI Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Lightning electromagnetics can affect the reliability of the power system or communication system.Therefore,evaluation of electromagnetic fields generated by lightning return stroke is indispensable.Arnold sommerfeld proposed a model to calculate the electromagnetic field,but it involved the time-consuming sommerfeld integral.However,perfect conductor ground assumption can account for fast calculation,thus this paper reviews the perfect ground equation for evaluation of lightning electromagnetic fields,presents three engineering lightning return stroke models,and calculates the horizontal electric field caused by three lightning return stroke models.According to the results,the amplitude of lightning return stroke has a strong impact on horizontal electric fields,and the steepness of lightning return stroke influences the horizontal electric fields.Moreover,the perfect ground method is faster than the sommerfeld integral method.

  13. Improvement of Prediction Method for Strip Coiling Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Qing-bo; WANG Zhao-dong; WANG Zhe-ying; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2003-01-01

    In order to improve the control precision of strip coiling temperature for hot strip mill, the BP neural network was combined with mathematical model to calculate convective heat-transfer coefficient of laminar flow cooling. The off-line calculated results indicate that the standard deviation of coiling temperature prediction is reduced by 22.84 % with the convective heat-transfer coefficient calculated by BP neural network. The prospects of this method for on-line application are bright. This method is more helpful to increasing the control precision of coiling temperature for hot strip steel.

  14. Magnetic mirror structure for testing shell-type quadrupole coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, N.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents magnetic and mechanical designs and analyses of the quadrupole mirror structure to test single shell-type quadrupole coils. Several quadrupole coils made of different Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, cable insulation and pole materials were tested using this structure at 4.5 and 1.9 K. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, spot heaters, temperature sensors and strain gauges to study their mechanical and thermal properties and quench performance. The results of the quadrupole mirror model assembly and test are reported and discussed.

  15. Magnetic mirror structure for testing shell-type quadrupole coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Tartaglia, N.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents magnetic and mechanical designs and analyses of the quadrupole mirror structure to test single shell-type quadrupole coils. Several quadrupole coils made of different Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, cable insulation and pole materials were tested using this structure at 4.5 and 1.9 K. The coils were instrumented with voltage taps, spot heaters, temperature sensors and strain gauges to study their mechanical and thermal properties and quench performance. The results of the quadrupole mirror model assembly and test are reported and discussed.

  16. Coiled-coil conformation of a pentamidine-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Tadeo; Pous, Joan; Subirana, Juan A; Campos, J Lourdes

    2010-03-01

    The coiled-coil structure formed by the complex of the DNA duplex d(ATATATATAT)(2) with pentamidine is presented. The duplex was found to have a mixed structure containing Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairs. The drug stabilizes the coiled coil through the formation of cross-links between neighbouring duplexes. The central part of the drug is found in the minor groove as expected, whereas the charged terminal amidine groups protrude and interact with phosphates from neighbouring molecules. The formation of cross-links may be related to the biological effects of pentamidine, which is used as an antiprotozoal agent in trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis and pneumonias associated with AIDS. The DNA sequence that was used is highly abundant in most eukaryotic genomes. However, very few data are available on DNA sequences which only contain A.T base pairs.

  17. Empirically Grounded Agent-Based Models of Innovation Diffusion: A Critical Review

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Innovation diffusion has been studied extensively in a variety of disciplines, including sociology, economics, marketing, ecology, and computer science. Traditional literature on innovation diffusion has been dominated by models of aggregate behavior and trends. However, the agent-based modeling (ABM) paradigm is gaining popularity as it captures agent heterogeneity and enables fine-grained modeling of interactions mediated by social and geographic networks. While most ABM work on innovation diffusion is theoretical, empirically grounded models are increasingly important, particularly in guiding policy decisions. We present a critical review of empirically grounded agent-based models of innovation diffusion, developing a categorization of this research based on types of agent models as well as applications. By connecting the modeling methodologies in the fields of information and innovation diffusion, we suggest that the maximum likelihood estimation framework widely used in the former is a promising paradigm...

  18. Ground-State Transition in a Two-Dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xiao-Ping; ZHENG Zhi-Gang

    2011-01-01

    The ground state of a generalized Frenkel-Kontorova model with a transversaJ degree of freedom is studied. When the coupling strength, K, and the frequency of & single-Atom vibration in the transversaJ direction, ωou are increased, the ground state of the model undergoes a transition from a two-dimensional configuration to a one-dimensional one. This transition can manifest in different ways. Furthermore, we find that the prerequisite of a two-dimensionai ground state is θ≠1//q.%The ground state of a generalized Frenkel-Kontorova model with a transversal degree of freedom is studied.When the coupling strength,K,and the frequency of a single-atom vibration in the transversal direction,ωoy,are increased,the ground state of the model undergoes a transition from a two-dimensional configuration to a one-dimensional one.This transition can manifest in different ways.Furthermore,we find that the prerequisite of a two-dimensional ground state is θ ≠ 1/q.In recent years,the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model has been applied to a variety of physical systems,such as adsorbed monolayers,[1,2] Josephsonjunction arrays,[3-5] tribology[6-8] and charge-density waves.[9,10] Experimental and large-scale simulation data at the nanoscale have become available,and more complicated FK-type models have been investigated using simulations of molecular dynamics.[11

  19. Bounding Ground Motions for Hayward Fault Scenario Earthquakes Using Suites of Stochastic Rupture Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, A. J.; Xie, X.; Petersson, A.

    2007-12-01

    The next major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay area is likely to occur on the Hayward-Rodgers Creek Fault system. Attention on the southern Hayward section is appropriate given the upcoming 140th anniversary of the 1868 M 7 rupture coinciding with the estimated recurrence interval. This presentation will describe ground motion simulations for large (M > 6.5) earthquakes on the Hayward Fault using a recently developed elastic finite difference code and high-performance computers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our code easily reads the recent USGS 3D seismic velocity model of the Bay Area developed in 2005 and used for simulations of the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes. Previous work has shown that the USGS model performs very well when used to model intermediate period (4-33 seconds) ground motions from moderate (M ~ 4-5) earthquakes (Rodgers et al., 2008). Ground motions for large earthquakes are strongly controlled by the hypocenter location, spatial distribution of slip, rise time and directivity effects. These are factors that are impossible to predict in advance of a large earthquake and lead to large epistemic uncertainties in ground motion estimates for scenario earthquakes. To bound this uncertainty, we are performing suites of simulations of scenario events on the Hayward Fault using stochastic rupture models following the method of Liu et al. (Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 96, 2118-2130, 2006). These rupture models have spatially variable slip, rupture velocity, rise time and rake constrained by characterization of inferred finite fault ruptures and expert opinion. Computed ground motions show variability due to the variability in rupture models and can be used to estimate the average and spread of ground motion measures at any particular site. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No.W-7405-Eng-48. This is

  20. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  1. From the ground up: building a participatory evaluation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Victoria; Carrillo, Christina; Wallerstein, Nina

    2011-01-01

    We engaged in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project with the New Mexico Department of Health (DOH) and its 32 county-based health councils. We report on the process of the collaborative development of an evaluation model that would identify and link council actions to intermediate system change. We used multiple data sources and interactive, iterative processes to systematically examine and document the health council system including document review, a statewide partnership survey, and multiple meetings with partners. We highlight lessons and challenges in our CBPR process, including the need for community partners to overcome the fear of evaluation, the use of multiple participatory mechanisms, the value of a linking agent, and understanding multiple data needs. The time and resources of this participatory evaluation process enabled successful navigation of two important issues: (1) increased attention to statewide accountability of collaborative public health initiatives, and (2) increased expectation by health councils or other community partnerships to have a recognized voice in defining measures for this accountability.

  2. Stability of the electroweak ground state in the Standard Model and its extensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Luzio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We review the formalism by which the tunnelling probability of an unstable ground state can be computed in quantum field theory, with special reference to the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. We describe in some detail the approximations implicitly adopted in such calculation. Particular attention is devoted to the role of scale invariance, and to the different implications of scale-invariance violations due to quantum effects and possible new degrees of freedom. We show that new interactions characterized by a new energy scale, close to the Planck mass, do not invalidate the main conclusions about the stability of the Standard Model ground state derived in absence of such terms.

  3. Non-Stationary Modelling and Simulation of Near-Source Earthquake Ground Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fouskitakis, G. N.

    This paper is concerned with modelling and simulation of near-source earthquake ground motion. Recent studies have revealed that these motions show heavy non-stationary behaviour with very low frequencies dominating parts of the earthquake sequence. Modelling and simulation of this behaviour...... by an epicentral distance of 16 km and measured during the 1979 Imperial valley earthquake in California (USA). The results of the study indicate that while all three approaches can succesfully predict near-source ground motions, the Neural Network based one gives somewhat poorer simulation results....

  4. Non-Stationary Modelling and Simulation of Near-Source Earthquake Ground Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fouskitakis, G. N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with modelling and simulation of near-source earthquake ground motion. Recent studies have revealed that these motions show heavy non-stationary behaviour with very low frequencies dominating parts of the earthquake sequence. Modeling and simulation of this behaviour...... by an epicentral distance of 16 km and measured during the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California (U .S .A.). The results of the study indicate that while all three approaches can successfully predict near-source ground motions, the Neural Network based one gives somewhat poorer simulation results....

  5. Latitudinal characteristics of below- and above-ground biomass of Typha: a modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaeda, Takashi; Hai, Dinh Ngoc; Manatunge, Jagath; Williams, David; Roberts, Jane

    2005-08-01

    The latitudinal differences in the growth characteristics of Typha are largely unknown, although a number of studies have pointed out the effects of climate on the growth and productivity of Typha. Therefore, a dynamic growth model was developed for Typha to examine the effects of latitudinal changes in temperature and radiation on partitioning of the total biomass during the growing season into rhizomes, roots, flowering and vegetative shoots, and inflorescences. After validating the model with data from growth studies of Typha found in past literature, it was used to investigate the dynamics of above- and below-ground biomasses at three latitudes: 30 degrees, 40 degrees and 50 degrees. Regardless of the initial rhizome biomass, both above- and below-ground biomass values converged to a latitude-specific equilibrium produced by the balance between the total production and respiration and mortality losses. Above-ground biomass was high from 10 degrees to 35 degrees latitude with sufficient radiation, despite high metabolic losses; however, it decreased markedly at higher latitudes due to a low photosynthetic rate. Below-ground biomass, on the other hand, increased with latitude up to 40 degrees due to decreasing metabolic losses, and then markedly decreased at higher latitudes. Above-ground biomass was enhanced with an increasing number of cohorts regardless of latitude. However, although more cohorts resulted in a larger below-ground biomass at low latitudes, the largest below-ground biomass was provided by a smaller number of cohorts at high latitudes. This difference is due to low production rates of late-season cohorts in high latitudes, compared with consumption for shooting and establishing foliage. The model could be used to predict the potential growth of Typha in given conditions over a wide range of latitudes and is useful for practical applications such as wetland management or wastewater treatment systems using Typha.

  6. An assessment of aquifer storage recovery using ground water flow models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Christopher S; Anderson, Mary P

    2006-01-01

    Owing to increased demands on ground water accompanied by increased drawdowns, technologies that use recharge options, such as aquifer storage recovery (ASR), are being used to optimize available water resources and reduce adverse effects of pumping. In this paper, three representative ground water flow models were created to assess the impact of hydrogeologic and operational parameters/factors on recovery efficiency of ASR systems. Flow/particle tracking and solute transport models were used to track the movement of water during injection, storage, and recovery. Results from particle tracking models consistently produced higher recovery efficiency than the solute transport models for the parameters/properties examined because the particle tracking models neglected mixing of the injected and ambient water. Mixing between injected and ambient water affected recovery efficiency. Results from this study demonstrate the interactions between hydrogeologic and operational parameters on predictions of recovery efficiency. These interactions are best simulated using coupled numerical ground water flow and transport models that include the effects of mixing of injected water and ambient ground water.

  7. Implementation of a planar coil of wires as a sinus-galvanometer. Analysis of the coil magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Stoyanov, Dimitar G

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical analysis on the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field of a compass needle and the magnetic field of a straight infinite current-carrying wire. Implementation of a planar horizontal coil of wires has been shown as a sinus galvanometer. The magnetic field over the planar coil of wires has been examined by experiment. The coil could be used as a model for straight infinite current wire in demonstration set-ups or could be given as an assignment in Physics laboratory workshops.

  8. Implementation of a planar coil of wires as a sinus-galvanometer. Analysis of the coil magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Stoyanov, Dimitar G.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical analysis on the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field of a compass needle and the magnetic field of a straight infinite current-carrying wire. Implementation of a planar horizontal coil of wires has been shown as a sinus galvanometer. The magnetic field over the planar coil of wires has been examined by experiment. The coil could be used as a model for straight infinite current wire in demonstration set-ups or could be given as an assignment in Physic...

  9. Modeling of the ground-to-SSFMB link networking features using SPW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the modeling and simulation of the networking features of the ground-to-Space Station Freedom manned base (SSFMB) link using COMDISCO signal processing work-system (SPW). The networking features modeled include the implementation of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) protocols in the multiplexing of digitized audio and core data into virtual channel data units (VCDU's) in the control center complex and the demultiplexing of VCDU's in the onboard baseband signal processor. The emphasis of this work has been placed on techniques for modeling the CCSDS networking features using SPW. The objectives for developing the SPW models are to test the suitability of SPW for modeling networking features and to develop SPW simulation models of the control center complex and space station baseband signal processor for use in end-to-end testing of the ground-to-SSFMB S-band single access forward (SSAF) link.

  10. Can Magnetic Coil Ease Tinnitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Updates Technology Horizons Can magnetic coil ease tinnitus? VA trial aims to find out February 3, ... pain. See, for example, this 2009 review study . Tinnitus and Veterans Tinnitus has been one of the ...

  11. First coil for the SC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1955-01-01

    The coils for the SC magnet were stored in the large hangar of the Cointrin Airport (to make sure that they would be available before snow and ice would block the roads and canals from Belgium, where they were built).

  12. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  13. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  14. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  15. HELMHOLTZ COILS FOR MEASURING MAGNETIC MOMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Dobrodeyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal configuration of the double Helmholtz coils for measuring of the magnetic dipole moments was defined. It was determined that measuring coils should have round shape and compensative coils – the square one. Analytically confirmed the feasibility of the proposed configuration of these coils as primary transmitters of magnetic dipole moments.

  16. Simulation of Thermal Processes in Superconducting Pancake Coils Cooled by GM Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebioda, M.; Rymaszewski, J.; Korzeniewska, E.

    2014-04-01

    This article presents the thermal model of a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system with the closed cycle helium cryocooler. The authors propose the use of contact-cooled coils with maintaining the possibility of the system reconfiguring. The model assumes the use of the second generation superconducting tapes to make the windings in the form of flat discs (pancakes). The paper presents results for a field model of the single pancake coil and the winding system consisting of several coils.

  17. Intelligent Control on Hot Strip Coiling Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new intelligent control scheme for hot strip coiling temperature is presented. In this scheme, the prediction model of finishing temperature and the presetting model of main cooling zone are establish based on BP neural network, the feed-forward open-loop control model of main cooling zone is constructed based on T-S fuzzy neural network, a new improved structure of T-S fuzzy neural network is developed, and the feedback close-loop control model of precision cooling zone is obtained based on fuzzy control. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme has been demonstrated by computer simulation with a satisfactory result.

  18. A modelling approach to determine the origin of urban ground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowsdale, Sam A; Lerner, David N

    2007-04-01

    A simple modelling approach was developed to link patterns of urban land-use with ground water flow and chemistry in three dimensions and was applied to characterize the origin of recharge in the aquifer beneath the old industrial city of Nottingham, UK. The approach involved dividing land uses into types, and times into periods, and assigning the recharge from each an individual tracer-solute with a unit concentration. The computer code MT3DMS was used to track the multiple tracer-solutes in transient, three-dimensional simulations of the important urban aquifer. A depth-specific hydrochemical dataset collected in parallel supported the model predictions. At depth under the industrial area studied, a large component of ground water originated of older agricultural origin, with relatively low nitrate concentrations. Shallower ground water originated mainly from residential and industrial areas, with higher nitrate concentrations probably arising from leaking sewers and contaminated land. The results highlighted the spectrum of ground water from different origins that amalgamate even at short well screens in a non-pumped borehole and remind us that the non-point-source pollution of ground water from anthropogenic activities will involve more years of slow degradation of quality.

  19. Generation of a mixture model ground-motion prediction equation for Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendel, A.; Kuehn, N. M.; Scherbaum, F.

    2012-12-01

    In probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) empirically derived ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) are usually applied to estimate the ground motion at a site of interest as a function of source, path and site related predictor variables. Because GMPEs are derived from limited datasets they are not expected to give entirely accurate estimates or to reflect the whole range of possible future ground motion, thus giving rise to epistemic uncertainty in the hazard estimates. This is especially true for regions without an indigenous GMPE where foreign models have to be applied. The choice of appropriate GMPEs can then dominate the overall uncertainty in hazard assessments. In order to quantify this uncertainty, the set of ground motion models used in a modern PSHA has to capture (in SSHAC language) the center, body, and range of the possible ground motion at the site of interest. This was traditionally done within a logic tree framework in which existing (or only slightly modified) GMPEs occupy the branches of the tree and the branch weights describe the degree-of-belief of the analyst in their applicability. This approach invites the problem to combine GMPEs of very different quality and hence to potentially overestimate epistemic uncertainty. Some recent hazard analysis have therefore resorted to using a small number of high quality GMPEs as backbone models from which the full distribution of GMPEs for the logic tree (to capture the full range of possible ground motion uncertainty) where subsequently generated by scaling (in a general sense). In the present study, a new approach is proposed to determine an optimized backbone model as weighted components of a mixture model. In doing so, each GMPE is assumed to reflect the generation mechanism (e. g. in terms of stress drop, propagation properties, etc.) for at least a fraction of possible ground motions in the area of interest. The combination of different models into a mixture model (which is learned from

  20. Strong ground-motion prediction from Stochastic-dynamic source models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guatteri, Mariagiovanna; Mai, P.M.; Beroza, G.C.; Boatwright, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the absence of sufficient data in the very near source, predictions of the intensity and variability of ground motions from future large earthquakes depend strongly on our ability to develop realistic models of the earthquake source. In this article we simulate near-fault strong ground motion using dynamic source models. We use a boundary integral method to simulate dynamic rupture of earthquakes by specifying dynamic source parameters (fracture energy and stress drop) as spatial random fields. We choose these quantities such that they are consistent with the statistical properties of slip heterogeneity found in finite-source models of past earthquakes. From these rupture models we compute theoretical strong-motion seismograms up to a frequency of 2 Hz for several realizations of a scenario strike-slip Mw 7.0 earthquake and compare empirical response spectra, spectra obtained from our dynamic models, and spectra determined from corresponding kinematic simulations. We find that spatial and temporal variations in slip, slip rise time, and rupture propagation consistent with dynamic rupture models exert a strong influence on near-source ground motion. Our results lead to a feasible approach to specify the variability in the rupture time distribution in kinematic models through a generalization of Andrews' (1976) result relating rupture speed to apparent fracture energy, stress drop, and crack length to 3D dynamic models. This suggests that a simplified representation of dynamic rupture may be obtained to approximate the effects of dynamic rupture without having to do full dynamic simulations.

  1. pH-dependent Response of Coiled Coils: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulation Study

    CERN Document Server

    Enciso, Marta; Site, Luigi Delle

    2013-01-01

    In a recent work we proposed a coarse-grained methodology for studying the response of peptides when simulated at different values of pH; in this work we extend the methodology to analyze the pH-dependent behavior of coiled coils. This protein structure presents a remarkable chain stiffness andis formed by two or more long helical peptides that are interacting like the strands of a rope. Chain length and rigidity are the key aspects needed to extend previous peptide interaction potentials to this particular case; however the original model is naturally recovered when the length or the ridigity of the simulated chain are reduced. We apply the model and discuss results for two cases: (a) the folding/unfolding transition of a generic coiled coil as a function of pH; (b) behavior of a specific sequence as a function of the acidity conditions. In this latter case results are compared with experimental data from the literature in order to comment about the consistency of our approach.

  2. Peptidyl Materials Formed Through Click Chemistry Enhanced Coiled-Coil Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Biologically derived materials offer a level of sophistication synthetically fabricated materials have only attempted to mimic. This level of complexity may be found in materials such as peptides. Implementing new theory and modeling, peptides with the propensity to form coiled-coil (CC) bundles were designed and synthesized. Through the use of this de novo approach, modeling allowed prediction of the feasibility to include non-natural amino acids conducive to click chemistry into the peptide. Amino acids showcasing thiol or alkyne functionalities were considered owing to the ability of these moieties to participate in the thiol-ene and copper click reactions respectively. Once synthesized, the peptides decorated with these clickable motifs were placed in solution and allowed to self-assemble into CC's. CD spectroscopy and DLS experiments confirmed the formation and assembly of CC's. Click reactions were then incited to link the CC assemblies together and form a network with predictable dimensionality and pore size between CC bundles. To incite network formation, click reactions between CC side chain residues and suitably functionalized crosslinkers were implemented. The linking of coiled-coils and material formation were assessed using DLS and TEM.

  3. Vessel grounding in entrance channels: case studies and physical model tests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tulsi, K

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Physical model studies were conducted of a 250K DWT fully laden iron ore vessel grounding on the side slopes of the outbound channel at a major Australian port. A key deliverable of the study was to estimate the tug force required to pull the vessel...

  4. Sensitivity analysis of ground level ozone in India using WRF-CMAQ models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Sumit; Chatani, Satoru; Mahtta, Richa; Goel, Anju; Kumar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Ground level ozone is emerging as a pollutant of concern in India. Limited surface monitoring data reveals that ozone concentrations are well above the prescribed national standards. This study aims to simulate the regional and urban scale ozone concentrations in India using WRF-CMAQ models. Sector-

  5. The ground state energy of the mean field spin glass model

    CERN Document Server

    Koukiou, Flora

    2008-01-01

    From the study of a functional equation of Gibbs measures we calculate the limiting free energy of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model at a particular value of (low) temperature. This implies the following lower bound for the ground state energy $\\epsilon_0$ \\[\\epsilon_0\\geq -0.7833...,\\] close to the replica symmetry breaking and numerical simulations values.

  6. Characteristics of aerodynamic sound sources generated by coiled wires in a uniform air-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Nishida, K.; Saitoh, K.

    2003-11-01

    This study deals experimentally with aerodynamic sounds generated by coiled wires in a uniform air-flow. The coiled wire is a model of the hair dryer's heater. In the experiment, the effects of the coil diameter D, wire diameter d and coil spacing s of the coiled wire on the aerodynamic sound have been clarified. The results of frequency analyses of the aerodynamic sounds show that an Aeolian sound is generated by the coiled wire, when s/d is larger than 1. Also the peak frequencies of Aeolian sounds generated by the coiled wires are higher than the ones generated by a straight cylinder having the same diameter d. To clarify the characteristics of the aerodynamic sound sources, the directivity of the aerodynamic sound generated by the coiled wire has been examined, and the coherent function between the velocity fluctuation around the coiled wire and the aerodynamic sound has been calculated. Moreover, the band overall value of coherent output power between the sound and the velocity fluctuations has been calculated. This method has clarified the sound source region of the Aeolian sound generated by the coiled wire. These results show that the Aeolian sound is generated by the arc part of the coiled wire, which is located in the upstream side of the air-flow.

  7. Power Loss Analysis and Comparison of Segmented and Unsegmented Energy Coupling Coils for Wireless Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sai Chun; McDannold, Nathan J

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigated the power losses of unsegmented and segmented energy coupling coils for wireless energy transfer. Four 30-cm energy coupling coils with different winding separations, conductor cross-sectional areas, and number of turns were developed. The four coils were tested in both unsegmented and segmented configurations. The winding conduction and intrawinding dielectric losses of the coils were evaluated individually based on a well-established lumped circuit model. We found that the intrawinding dielectric loss can be as much as seven times higher than the winding conduction loss at 6.78 MHz when the unsegmented coil is tightly wound. The dielectric loss of an unsegmented coil can be reduced by increasing the winding separation or reducing the number of turns, but the power transfer capability is reduced because of the reduced magnetomotive force. Coil segmentation using resonant capacitors has recently been proposed to significantly reduce the operating voltage of a coil to a safe level in wireless energy transfer for medical implants. Here, we found that it can naturally eliminate the dielectric loss. The coil segmentation method and the power loss analysis used in this paper could be applied to the transmitting, receiving, and resonant coils in two- and four-coil energy transfer systems.

  8. Dimensionless Maps for the Validity of Analytical Ground Heat Transfer Models for GSHP Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Conti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides plain and handy expressions to decide the most suitable analytical model for the thermal analysis of the ground source in vertical ground-coupled heat pump applications. We perform a comprehensive dimensionless analysis of the reciprocal deviation among the classical infinite, finite, linear and cylindrical heat source models in purely conductive media. Besides, we complete the framework of possible boreholes model with the “hollow” finite cylindrical heat source solution, still lacking in the literature. Analytical expressions are effective tools for both design and performance assessment: they are able to provide practical and general indications on the thermal behavior of the ground with an advantageous tradeoff between calculation efforts and solution accuracy. This notwithstanding, their applicability to any specific case is always subjected to the coherence of the model assumptions, also in terms of length and time scales, with the specific case of interest. We propose several dimensionless criteria to evaluate when one model is practically equivalent to another one and handy maps that can be used for both design and performance analysis. Finally, we found that the finite line source represents the most suitable model for borehole heat exchangers (BHEs, as it is applicable to a wide range of space and time scales, practically providing the same results of more complex models.

  9. Modeling analysis of ground water recharge potential on alluvial fans using limited data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munévar, A; Mariño, M A

    1999-01-01

    A modeling approach is developed to evaluate the potential for artificial recharge on alluvial fans in the Salinas Valley, California, using limited data of soil texture, soil hydraulic properties, and interwell stratigraphy. Promising areas for surface recharge are identified and mapped on a broad-scale using soil surveys, geologic investigations, permeability tests, and seasonal ground water response to rainfall and runoff. Two-dimensional representations of the vadose zone at selected sites are then constructed from drillers'logs and soil material types are estimated. Next, hydraulic properties are assigned to each soil material type by comparing them to laboratory-tested cores of similar soils taken from one site. Finally, water flow through the vadose zone is modeled in two dimensions at seven sites using a transient, finite-difference, variably saturated flow model. Average infiltration rates range from 0.84 to 1.54 cm/hr and recharge efficiency, the percentage of infiltrated water that reaches the water table, varies from 51% to 79%. Infiltration rates and recharge efficiency are found to be relatively insensitive to recharge basin ponding depth due to the thickness of the vadose zones modeled (31 to 84 m). The impact of artificial recharge on the Salinas Valley ground water basin is investigated by simulating the regional ground water response to surface spreading and streamflow augmentation with a recently calibrated, finite-element, ground water-surface water model for the basin. It was determined that a combined approach of surface recharge and streamflow augmentation significantly reduces the state of ground water overdraft and, to a lesser extent, reduces the rate of sea water intrusion.

  10. Control of critical coupling in a coiled coaxial cable resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Wei, Tao; Wang, Tao; Fan, Jun; Xiao, Hai

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports a coiled coaxial cable resonator fabricated by cutting a slot in a spring-like coiled coaxial cable to produce a periodic perturbation. Electromagnetic coupling between two neighboring slots was observed. By manipulating the number of slots, critical coupling of the coiled coaxial cable resonator can be well controlled. An ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio (over 50 dB) at the resonant frequency band was experimentally achieved from a coiled coaxial cable resonator with 38 turns. A theoretic model is developed to understand the device physics. The proposed device can be potentially used as a high quality and flexibly designed band-stop filter or a sensor in structural health monitoring.

  11. Thermal and Fluid Modeling of the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed (CRYOTE) Ground Test Article (GTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryk, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Walls, Laurie; Stopnitzky, Benny; Rhys, Noah; Wollen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor thermal and fluid system models to data acquired from a ground test article (GTA) for the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed - CRYOTE. To accomplish this analysis, it was broken into four primary tasks. These included model development, pre-test predictions, testing support at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC} and post-test correlations. Information from MSFC facilitated the task of refining and correlating the initial models. The primary goal of the modeling/testing/correlating efforts was to characterize heat loads throughout the ground test article. Significant factors impacting the heat loads included radiative environments, multi-layer insulation (MLI) performance, tank fill levels, tank pressures, and even contact conductance coefficients. This paper demonstrates how analytical thermal/fluid networks were established, and it includes supporting rationale for specific thermal responses seen during testing.

  12. Strong Ground Motion in the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake: a 1Directional - 3Component Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avila, Maria Paola Santisi; Lenti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Local wave amplification due to strong seismic motions in surficial multilayered soil is influenced by several parameters such as the wavefield polarization and the dynamic properties and impedance contrast between soil layers. The present research aims at investigating seismic motion amplification in the 2011 Tohoku earthquake through a one-directional three-component (1D-3C) wave propagation model. A 3D nonlinear constitutive relation for dry soils under cyclic loading is implemented in a quadratic line finite element model. The soil rheology is modeled by mean of a multi-surface cyclic plasticity model of the Masing-Prandtl-Ishlinskii-Iwan (MPII) type. Its major advantage is that the rheology is characterized by few commonly measured parameters. Ground motions are computed at the surface of soil profiles in the Tohoku area (Japan) by propagating 3C signals recorded at rock outcrops, during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Computed surface ground motions are compared to the Tohoku earthquake records at alluvial ...

  13. REEVALUATION OF EXISTING GROUND STRUCTURE MODEL GAINED THROUGH MICROTREMOR ARRAY METHOD BY USING FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF MODEL SURVEIED THROUGH H/V SPECTRUM - ON GROUND STRUCTURE OF FUKUI PLAIN -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Yuzuru; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Tatsuya; Kagawa, Takao

    In order to reduce discrepancies between ground models based on the microtremor array observation in Fukui Plain and models by the H/V survey method and gravity analysis, the existing array ground models were reevaluated. The representative of the dispersion curves was selected so as to fit a theoretical fundamental mode dispersion curve of the H/V ground model. By using the method of selection, a reasonable reevaluation became possible. As a result the correspondences among the three models were much improved as a whole, but in the edge site of the Plain the differences against the gravity model are not reduced.

  14. Rice Cellulose SynthaseA8 Plant-Conserved Region Is a Coiled-Coil at the Catalytic Core Entrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rushton, Phillip S.; Olek, Anna T.; Makowski, Lee; Badger, John; Steussy, C. Nicklaus; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2016-11-22

    The crystallographic structure of a rice (Oryza sativa) cellulose synthase, OsCesA8, plant-conserved region (P-CR), one of two unique domains in the catalytic domain of plant CesAs, was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Two antiparallel α-helices form a coiled-coil domain linked by a large extended connector loop containing a conserved trio of aromatic residues. The P-CR structure was fit into a molecular envelope for the P-CR domain derived from small-angle X-ray scattering data. The P-CR structure and molecular envelope, combined with a homology-based chain trace of the CesA8 catalytic core, were modeled into a previously determined CesA8 small-angle X-ray scattering molecular envelope to produce a detailed topological model of the CesA8 catalytic domain. The predicted position for the P-CR domain from the molecular docking models places the P-CR connector loop into a hydrophobic pocket of the catalytic core, with the coiled-coil aligned near the entrance of the substrate UDP-glucose into the active site. In this configuration, the P-CR coiled-coil alone is unlikely to regulate substrate access to the active site, but it could interact with other domains of CesA, accessory proteins, or other CesA catalytic domains to control substrate delivery.

  15. Thermal-economic modeling and optimization of vertical ground-coupled heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanaye, Sepehr; Niroomand, Behzad [Energy Systems Improvement Laboratory (ESIL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Tehran 16488 (Iran)

    2009-04-15

    The optimal design process of a ground source heat pump includes thermal modeling of the system and selection of optimal design parameters which affect the system performance as well as initial and operational costs. In this paper, the modeling and optimizing processes of a ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) with closed vertical ground heat exchanger (VGHX) are presented. To verify the modeling procedure of heat pump and VGHX systems, the simulation outputs were compared with the corresponding values reported in the literature and acceptable accuracy was obtained. Then an objective function (the sum of annual operating and investment costs of the system) was defined and minimized, exposed to the specified constraints to estimate the optimum design parameters (decision variables). Two Nelder-Mead and genetic algorithm optimization techniques were applied to guarantee the validity of the optimization results. For the given heating/cooling loads and various climatic conditions, the optimum values of heat pump design parameters (saturated temperature/pressure of condenser and evaporator) as well as VGHX design parameters (inlet and outlet temperatures of the ground water source, pipe diameter, depth and number of boreholes) were predicted. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis of change in the total annual cost of the system and optimum design parameters with the climatic conditions, cooling/heating capacity, soil type, and number of boreholes were discussed. Finally, the sensitivity analysis of change in optimum design parameters with increase in the investment and electricity costs was performed. (author)

  16. Update on Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Models for Ground and Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper reports on recent revisions and improvements to our ground telescope cost model and refinements of our understanding of space telescope cost models. One interesting observation is that while space telescopes are 50X to 100X more expensive than ground telescopes, their respective scaling relationships are similar. Another interesting speculation is that the role of technology development may be different between ground and space telescopes. For ground telescopes, the data indicates that technology development tends to reduce cost by approximately 50% every 20 years. But for space telescopes, there appears to be no such cost reduction because we do not tend to re-fly similar systems. Thus, instead of reducing cost, 20 years of technology development may be required to enable a doubling of space telescope capability. Other findings include: mass should not be used to estimate cost; spacecraft and science instrument costs account for approximately 50% of total mission cost; and, integration and testing accounts for only about 10% of total mission cost.

  17. Lumped-Parameter Models for Wind-Turbine Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Liingaard, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The design of modern wind turbines is typically based on lifetime analyses using aeroelastic codes. In this regard, the impedance of the foundations must be described accurately without increasing the overall size of the computational model significantly. This may be obtained by the fitting of a ...... ground. The importance of including an accurate model of the dynamic soil-structure interaction in an aeroelastic code is discussed. Furthermore, the sensibility of the response to changes in the soil properties is examined....

  18. Ground-State Bands of Fm and No Isotopes in Cluster Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chang; REN Zhong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the ground-state rotational bands of nuclei with Z ≥ 100 using cluster model proposed by Buck et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 202501]. The core-cluster decomposition of each nucleus is determined by the corresponding electric quadrupole transition strength B(E2 : 2+ → 0+). The theoretical spectra of fermium and nobelium isotopes are compared with available experimental data. Good agreement between model and data is obtained.

  19. Massless ground state for a compact SU(2 matrix model in 4D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyonell Boulton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We show the existence and uniqueness of a massless supersymmetric ground state wavefunction of a SU(2 matrix model in a bounded smooth domain with Dirichlet boundary conditions. This is a gauge system and we provide a new framework to analyze the quantum spectral properties of this class of supersymmetric matrix models subject to constraints which can be generalized for arbitrary number of colors.

  20. Ground-state diagrams for lattice-gas models of catalytic CO oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S.Bzovska

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on simple lattice models of catalytic carbon dioxide synthesis from oxygen and carbon monoxide, phase diagrams are investigated at temperature T=0 by incorporating the nearest-neighbor interactions on a catalyst surface. The main types of ground-state phase diagrams of two lattice models are classified describing the cases of clean surface and surface containing impurities. Nonuniform phases are obtained and the conditions of their existence dependent on the interaction parameters are established.

  1. Documentation of finite-difference model for simulation of three-dimensional ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trescott, Peter C.; Larson, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    User experience has indicated that the documentation of the model of three-dimensional ground-water flow (Trescott and Larson, 1975) should be expanded. This supplement is intended to fulfill that need. The original report emphasized the theory of the strongly implicit procedure, instructions for using the groundwater-flow model, and practical considerations for application. (See also W76-02962 and W76-13085) (Woodard-USGS)

  2. The Role of Filtration in Maintaining Clean Heat Exchanger Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yang; James E. Braun; Eckhard A. Groll

    2004-06-30

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the role of filtration in maintaining clean heat exchanger coils and overall performance. Combinations of 6 different levels of filtration (MERV 14, 11, 8, 6, 4, and no filter) and 4 different coils (an eight-row lanced-fin coil, HX8L), (an eight-row wavy-fin coil, HX8W), (a four-row lanced-fin coil, HX4L) and (a two-row lanced-fin coil, HX2L) were tested at 4 different air velocities (1.52, 2.03, 2.54,3.05 m/s (300, 400, 500, 600 ft/min)). The fouled conditions were obtained after injection of 600 grams of ASHRAE standard dust upstream of the filter/coil combination. This magnitude of dust is representative of a year of normal operation for an air conditioning system. The air-side pressure drops of the coils and filters and air-side heat transfer coefficients of the coils were determined from the measurements under the clean and fouled conditions. Depending upon the filter and coil test, the coil pressure drops increased in the range of 6%-30% for an air velocity at 2.54 m/s (500 ft/min). The impact was significantly greater for tests performed without a filter. The largest relative effect of fouling on pressure drop occurs for coils with fewer rows and having lanced fins. Coils with a greater number of rows can hold more dust so that a fixed amount of dust has a relatively smaller impact. The impact of fouling on air-side heat transfer coefficients was found to be relatively small. In some cases, heat transfer was actually enhanced due to additional turbulence caused by the presence of dust. The experimental results for pressure drops and heat transfer coefficients were correlated and the correlations were implemented within computer models of prototypical rooftop air conditioners and used to evaluate the impact of fouling on cooling capacity and EER. The equipment cooling capacity is reduced with fouling primarily because of a decrease in air flow due to the increase pressure drop rather than due to changes in h

  3. Statistical analysis for HTS coil considering inhomogeneous Ic distribution of HTS tape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hong Woo; Lee, Ji Ho; Lee, Woo Seung; Ko, Tae Kuk [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Critical current of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil is influenced by its own self magnetic field. Direction and density distribution of the magnetic field around the coil are fixed after the shape of the coil is decided. If the entire part of the HTS tape has homogeneous Ic distribution characteristic, quench would be initiated in fixed location on the coil. However, the actual HTS tape has inhomogeneous Ic distribution along the length. If the Ic distribution of the HTS tape is known, we can expect the spot within the HTS coil that has the highest probability to initiate the quench. In this paper, Ic distribution within the HTS coil under self-field effect is simulated by MATLAB. In the simulation procedure, Ic distribution of the entire part of the HTS tape is assume d to follow Gaussian-distribution by central limit theorem. The HTS coil model is divided into several segments, and the critical current of each segment is calculated based on the-generalized Kim model. Single pancake model is simulated and self-field of HTS coil is calculated by Biot-Savart's law. As a result of simulation, quench-initiating spot in the actual HTS coil can be predicted statistically. And that statistical analysis can help detect or protect the quench of the HTS coil.

  4. Ground moving target signal model and power calculation in forward scattering micro radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Teng; HU Cheng; MIKHAIL Cherniakov

    2009-01-01

    Forward scattering micro radar is used for situation awareness;its operational range is relatively short because of the battery power and local horizon,the free space propagation model is not appropriate.The ground moving targets,such as humans,cars and tanks,have only comparable size with the transmitted signal wavelength;the point target model and the linear change of observation angle are not applicable.In this paper,the signal model of ground moving target is developed based on the case of forward scattering micro radar,considering the two-ray propagation model and area target model,and nonlinear change of observation angle as well as high order phase error.Furthermore,the analytical form of the received power from moving target has been obtained.Using the simulated forward scattering radar cross section,the received power of theoretical calculation is near to that of measured data.In addition,the simulated signal model of ground moving target is perfectly matched with the experimented data.All these results show the correctness of analytical calculation completely.

  5. Simplified heat exchange model of fan coil in wet cooling conditions%适用于湿工况的风机盘管简化换热模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌飞; 杨春节

    2012-01-01

    针对半集中式空调系统风机盘管的换热计算问题,通过干湿工况转换方法,设计了一种适用于湿工况的风机盘管换热模型.根据能量平衡和热传递原理,简化了该换热模型,使换热量仅由冷水流量、进水温度、盘管风量和进风温度等独立控制变量确定.在实际风机盘管上进行了仿真验证,得到了不同工作条件下的换热曲线.实验结果表明,该简化换热模型计算精度较高.%To solve the heat exchange calculation problem of the fan coil in the semi-centralized air conditioning system, through a wet-dry switching method, designs a heat transfer model of the fan coil for wet cooling conditions. Based on the energy balance and heat transfer principles, simplifies the heat transfer model in which the heat exchange capacity can be simply determined by the chilled water flow rate, temperature of supply chilled water, and flow rate and temperature of supply air as independent variables. By means of a fan coil unit simulation test, obtains the heat exchange curves in different conditions. The result shows a higher accuracy of model.

  6. Modeling ground surface uplift during CO2 sequestration: the case of In Salah, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Rutqvist, Jonny; Finsterle, Stefan; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2016-04-01

    Observable ground deformation, common in storage projects, carries useful information on processes occurring at the injection depth. The Krechba gas field at In Salah (Algeria) is one of the best known sites for studying ground surface deformation during geological storage. Being the first industrial-scale on-shore CO2 demonstration project, the site is well known for satellite-based ground-deformation monitoring data of remarkable quality. In this work, we carry out coupled fluid flow and geomechanical simulations to understand the uplift at three different CO2 injection wells (KB-501, KB-502, KB-503). Previous numerical studies focused on the KB-502 injection well, where a double-lobe uplift pattern has been observed in the ground-deformation data. The observed uplift patterns at KB-501 and KB-503 are different, but also indicate the influence of deep fracture zone mechanical responses. The current study improves the previous modeling approach by introducing an injection reservoir and a fracture zone, both responding to a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. In addition, we model a stress-dependent permeability and bulk modulus, according to a dual continuum model. Mechanical and hydraulic properties were determined through inverse modeling by matching the simulated spatial and temporal evolution of uplift to the corresponding InSAR observations as well as by matching simulated and measured pressures. The numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with observed spatial and temporal variation of ground surface uplift, as well as with measured pressures. The estimated values for the parameterized mechanical and hydraulic properties are in good agreement with previous numerical results, although with uncertainty.

  7. Permafrost landscapes in transition - towards modeling interactions, thresholds and feedbacks related to ice-rich ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Sebastian; Langer, Moritz; Lee, Hanna; Berntsen, Terje; Boike, Julia; Krinner, Gerhard; Aalstad, Kristoffer; Schanke Aas, Kjetil; Peter, Maria; Heikenfeld, Max; Etzelmüller, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Thawing of permafrost is governed by a complex interplay of different processes, of which only conductive heat transfer is taken into account in most model studies. However, heat conduction alone can not account for the dynamical evolution of many permafrost landscapes, e.g. in areas rich in ground ice shaped by thermokarst ponds and lakes. Novel process parameterizations are required to include such phenomena in future projections of permafrost thaw and hereby triggered climatic feedbacks. Recently, we have demonstrated a physically-based parameterization for thaw process in ice-rich ground in the permafrost model CryoGrid 3, which can reproduce the formation of thermokarst ponds and subsidence of the ground following thawing of ice-rich subsurface layers. Long-term simulations for different subsurface stratigraphies in the Lena River Delta, Siberia, demonstrate that the hydrological regime can both accelerate and delay permafrost thawing. If meltwater from thawed ice-rich layers can drain, the ground subsides while at the same time the formation of a talik is delayed. If the meltwater pools at the surface, a pond is formed which enhances heat transfer in the ground and leads to the formation of a talik. The PERMANOR project funded by the Norwegian Research Council until 2019 will extend this work by integrating such small-scale processes in larger-scale Earth System Models (ESMs). For this purpose, the project will explore and develop statistical approaches, in particular tiling, to represent permafrost landscape dynamics on subgrid scale. Ultimately, PERMANOR will conceptualize process understanding from in-situ studies to develop new model algorithms and pursue their implementation in a coupled ESM framework.

  8. Dynamic model for predicting growth of Salmonella spp. in ground sterile pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velugoti, Padmanabha Reddy; Bohra, Lalit K; Juneja, Vijay K; Huang, Lihan; Wesseling, Audrey L; Subbiah, Jeyamkondan; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2011-06-01

    A predictive model for Salmonella spp. growth in ground pork was developed and validated using kinetic growth data. Salmonella spp. kinetic growth data in ground pork were collected at several isothermal conditions (between 10 and 45°C) and Baranyi model was fitted to describe the growth at each temperature, separately. The maximum growth rates (μ(max)) estimated from the Baranyi model were modeled as a function of temperature using a modified Ratkowsky equation. To estimate bacterial growth under dynamic temperature conditions, the differential form of the Baranyi model, in combination with the modified Ratkowsky equation for rate constants, was solved numerically using fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The dynamic model was validated using five different dynamic temperature profiles (linear cooling, exponential cooling, linear heating, exponential heating, and sinusoidal). Performance measures, root mean squared error, accuracy factor, and bias factor were used to evaluate the model performance, and were observed to be satisfactory. The dynamic model can estimate the growth of Salmonella spp. in pork within a 0.5 log accuracy under both linear and exponential cooling profiles, although the model may overestimate or underestimate at some data points, which were generallySalmonella spp., since low temperature conditions could alter the cell physiology. To obtain an accurate estimate of Salmonella spp. growth using the models reported in this work, it is suggested that the models be used at temperatures above 7°C, the minimum growth temperature for Salmonella spp. in pork.

  9. The coiling of electrified liquid jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Rodriguez, Javier; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    We have carried out a numerical study of the coiling regime which takes place when an electrified liquid jet issuing from an orifice drilled in a metal plate electrode reaches the counter electrode. Based on the slenderness assumption, we have derived the set of one-dimensional dynamical equations by averaging the underlying balance laws over the jet cross sections (Cosserat rod model). Therefore, our equations and boundary conditions are related to those obtained by N.M. Ribe (Ann. Rev Fluid Mech., 2012) for the coiling of liquid ropes, but including electrostatic effects. In a first approach, we have simplified the electrical terms entering the problem by assuming a constant external electric field between electrodes, and that the charges are convected by the jet surface interacting electrostatically with each other via the local interaction approximation (Yarin et al., 2001). We have numerically investigated the problem in order to analize how the coiling regime depends on the dimensionless parameters of the problem, i.e., the Reynolds number, the electrical Bond number and the capillary number. In particular, we have found that both the displacement of the centerline of the jet and its cross-sectional stretching greatly depend on the electrostatic effects. Thanks to the MINECO (Spain) for partial support under grant DPI2010-20450-C03-02.

  10. Improved ground hydrology calculations for global climate models (GCMs) - Soil water movement and evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramopoulos, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Choudhury, B.

    1988-01-01

    A physically based ground hydrology model is presented that includes the processes of transpiration, evaporation from intercepted precipitation and dew, evaporation from bare soil, infiltration, soil water flow, and runoff. Data from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies GCM were used as inputs for off-line tests of the model in four 8 x 10 deg regions, including Brazil, Sahel, Sahara, and India. Soil and vegetation input parameters were caculated as area-weighted means over the 8 x 10 deg gridbox; the resulting hydrological quantities were compared to ground hydrology model calculations performed on the 1 x 1 deg cells which comprise the 8 x 10 deg gridbox. Results show that the compositing procedure worked well except in the Sahel, where low soil water levels and a heterogeneous land surface produce high variability in hydrological quantities; for that region, a resolution better than 8 x 10 deg is needed.

  11. Energy of ground state in B-B'-U-Hubbard model in approximation of static fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Mironov, G I

    2002-01-01

    To explain some features of CuO sub 2 base high-temperature superconductors (HTSC) one should take account of possibility of electron transfer to the crystalline structure mode next to the nearest one. It terms of approximation of static fluctuations one calculated the energy of ground state in two-dimensional B-B'-U Hubbard model. Lattice is assumed to consist of two sublattices formed by various type atoms. The calculation results of ground state energy are compared with the precise solution for one-dimensional Hubbard model derived previously. Comparison of the precise and the approximated solutions shows that approximation of static fluctuations describes adequately behavior of the Hubbard studied model within both weak and strong correlation ranges

  12. Study of the relation between evaluation of strain distribution on superconducting coil and mechanical heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Minoru; Herai, Toshiki; Suzuki, Eiji

    2002-10-01

    In the superconducting Maglev system, on-board superconducting magnets (SCMs) are vibrated at various frequencies according to the train speed by the electromagnetic disturbance which is caused when the train passes over ground coils. Then a mechanical loss is generated inside the inner vessel in the SCM. This phenomenon increases the heat load on the cryogenic equipment in the SCM. It has been surmised that the mechanical heat inside the inner vessel is generated by the frictional heat caused by the relative microscopic slips between fasteners and superconducting coil (SC coil). Nevertheless, heat generation mechanisms inside the inner vessel have not been studied sufficiently. In this study, we suggest a hypothesis that the frictional heat generated by the relative microscopic slips between fasteners and a SC coil will be indicated if the calculated strain distribution on the SC coil is evaluated. The results of this study supported this hypothesis.

  13. Hierarchical neural network model of the visual system determining figure/ground relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masayuki

    2017-07-01

    One of the most important functions of the visual perception in the brain is figure/ground interpretation from input images. Figural region in 2D image corresponding to object in 3D space are distinguished from background region extended behind the object. Previously the author proposed a neural network model of figure/ground separation constructed on the standpoint that local geometric features such as curvatures and outer angles at corners are extracted and propagated along input contour in a single layer network (Kikuchi & Akashi, 2001). However, such a processing principle has the defect that signal propagation requires manyiterations despite the fact that actual visual system determines figure/ground relation within the short period (Zhou et al., 2000). In order to attain speed-up for determining figure/ground, this study incorporates hierarchical architecture into the previous model. This study confirmed the effect of the hierarchization as for the computation time by simulation. As the number of layers increased, the required computation time reduced. However, such speed-up effect was saturatedas the layers increased to some extent. This study attempted to explain this saturation effect by the notion of average distance between vertices in the area of complex network, and succeeded to mimic the saturation effect by computer simulation.

  14. The value of long-term monitoring in the development of ground-water-flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Daniel T.; Hart, David J.; Krohelski, James T.

    2004-01-01

    As environmental issues have come to the forefront of public concern, so has the awareness of the importance of ground water in the overall water cycle and as a source of the Nation’s drinking water. Heightened interest has spawned a host of scientific enterprises (Taylor and Alley, 2001). Some activities are directed toward collection of water-level data and related information to monitor the physical and chemical state of the resource. Other activities are directed at interpretive studies undertaken, for example, to optimize the location of new water-supply wells or to protect rivers and lakes fed by ground water. An important type of interpretive study is the computer ground-water-flow model that inte- grates field data in a mathematical framework. Long-term, systematic collection of hydro- logic data is crucial to the construction and testing of ground-water models so that they can reproduce the evolution of flow systems and forecast future conditions. 

  15. Modelling runoff in the northern boreal forest using SLURP with snow ripening and frozen ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Laurent, M. E.; Valeo, C.

    2003-04-01

    Northern Manitoba is rich in water resources and the management of this water resource is affected by the hydrological processes taking place in the primarily Boreal forested, flat landscape of the region. This work provides insight into large-scale hydrological modelling in this area using the SLURP hydrological model while incorporating the effects of ripening snow and frozen ground. SLURP was applied to two large watersheds in northern Manitoba. The Taylor River watershed (800 square-km) and the Burntwood River watershed (7000 square-km) were used as study boundaries for the calibration and validation of the original SLURP model (version 12.2) and a modified version that incorporated frozen ground and ripening snow. Digital Elevation Models were derived with ARC/INFO's TOPOGRID function, and in conjunction with digital land cover data, ASAs and their associated physiographic data were derived using SLURPView. A thorough literature review of boreal forest hydrology provided initial parameter estimates. Daily data from 1984 to 1998 were used to calibrate and verify the original model under a variety of meteorological conditions. Calibration on the Taylor River watershed produced respectable results, and model verification efficiencies over the 15 year period were quite good. Verification performance of the Taylor parameter set on the Burntwood River watershed was not acceptable, but only modifications to the evapotranspiration parameters were required to bring model performance up to acceptable levels. Comparisons between observed and computed hydrographs identified problems with spring snowmelt timing, peak and volume prediction. This may be attributed to a lack of consideration for frozen ground in the model, and the use of the temperature index method for snowmelt. Simulations that incorporated a widely used frozen ground infiltration model into SLURP did not improve model performance. However, when SLURP's snowmelt routine was modified to consider the effects

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A POPULATION BALANCE MODEL TO SIMULATE FRACTIONATION OF GROUND SWITCHGRASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimi, L.J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Lau, A.K. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation; Emami, M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Afzal, M [University of New Brunswick

    2011-01-01

    The population balance model represents a time-dependent formulation of mass conservation for a ground biomass that flows through a set of sieves. The model is suitable for predicting the change in size and distribution of ground biomass while taking into account the flow rate processes of particles through a grinder. This article describes the development and application of this model to a switchgrass grinding operation. The mass conservation formulation of the model contains two parameters: breakage rate and breakage ratio. A laboratory knife mill was modified to act as a batch or flow-through grinder. The ground switchgrass was analyzed over a set of six Tyler sieves with apertures ranging from 5.66 mm (top sieve) to 1 mm (bottom sieve). The breakage rate was estimated from the sieving tests. For estimating the breakage ratio, each of the six fractions was further ground and sieved to 11 fractions on a set of sieves with apertures ranging from 5.66 to 0.25 mm (and pan). These data formed a matrix of values for determining the breakage ratio. Using the two estimated parameters, the transient population balance model was solved numerically. Results indicated that the population balance model generally underpredicted the fractions remaining on sieves with 5.66, 4.00, and 2.83 mm apertures and overpredicted fractions remaining on sieves with 2.00, 1.41, and 1.00 mm apertures. These trends were similar for both the batch and flow-through grinder configurations. The root mean square of residuals (RSE), representing the difference between experimental and simulated mass of fractions, was 0.32 g for batch grinding and 0.1 g for flow-through grinding. The breakage rate exhibited a linear function of the logarithm of particle size, with a regression coefficient of 0.99.

  17. Relation of landslides triggered by the Kiholo Bay earthquake to modeled ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Edwin L.; Hartzell, Stephen H.; Jibson, Randall W.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Schmitt, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The 2006 Kiholo Bay, Hawaii, earthquake triggered high concentrations of rock falls and slides in the steep canyons of the Kohala Mountains along the north coast of Hawaii. Within these mountains and canyons a complex distribution of landslides was triggered by the earthquake shaking. In parts of the area, landslides were preferentially located on east‐facing slopes, whereas in other parts of the canyons no systematic pattern prevailed with respect to slope aspect or vertical position on the slopes. The geology within the canyons is homogeneous, so we hypothesize that the variable landslide distribution is the result of localized variation in ground shaking; therefore, we used a state‐of‐the‐art, high‐resolution ground‐motion simulation model to see if it could reproduce the landslide‐distribution patterns. We used a 3D finite‐element analysis to model earthquake shaking using a 10 m digital elevation model and slip on a finite‐fault model constructed from teleseismic records of the mainshock. Ground velocity time histories were calculated up to a frequency of 5 Hz. Dynamic shear strain also was calculated and compared with the landslide distribution. Results were mixed for the velocity simulations, with some areas showing correlation of landslide locations with peak modeled ground motions but many other areas showing no such correlation. Results were much improved for the comparison with dynamic shear strain. This suggests that (1) rock falls and slides are possibly triggered by higher frequency ground motions (velocities) than those in our simulations, (2) the ground‐motion velocity model needs more refinement, or (3) dynamic shear strain may be a more fundamental measurement of the decoupling process of slope materials during seismic shaking.

  18. Generalized isotropic Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models: ground state entanglement and quantum entropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, José A.; Finkel, Federico; González-López, Artemio; Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Tempesta, Piergiulio

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a new class of generalized isotropic Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models with \\text{su}(m+1) spin and long-range non-constant interactions, whose non-degenerate ground state is a Dicke state of \\text{su}(m+1) type. We evaluate in closed form the reduced density matrix of a block of L spins when the whole system is in its ground state, and study the corresponding von Neumann and Rényi entanglement entropies in the thermodynamic limit. We show that both of these entropies scale as alog L when L tends to infinity, where the coefficient a is equal to (m  -  k)/2 in the ground state phase with k vanishing \\text{su}(m+1) magnon densities. In particular, our results show that none of these generalized Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models are critical, since when L\\to ∞ their Rényi entropy R q becomes independent of the parameter q. We have also computed the Tsallis entanglement entropy of the ground state of these generalized \\text{su}(m+1) Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models, finding that it can be made extensive by an appropriate choice of its parameter only when m-k≥slant 3 . Finally, in the \\text{su}(3) case we construct in detail the phase diagram of the ground state in parameter space, showing that it is determined in a simple way by the weights of the fundamental representation of \\text{su}(3) . This is also true in the \\text{su}(m+1) case; for instance, we prove that the region for which all the magnon densities are non-vanishing is an (m  +  1)-simplex in {{{R}}m} whose vertices are the weights of the fundamental representation of \\text{su}(m+1) .

  19. Testing alternative ground water models using cross-validation and other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.W.; Hill, M.C.; Perona, P.; Burlando, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many methods can be used to test alternative ground water models. Of concern in this work are methods able to (1) rank alternative models (also called model discrimination) and (2) identify observations important to parameter estimates and predictions (equivalent to the purpose served by some types of sensitivity analysis). Some of the measures investigated are computationally efficient; others are computationally demanding. The latter are generally needed to account for model nonlinearity. The efficient model discrimination methods investigated include the information criteria: the corrected Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and generalized cross-validation. The efficient sensitivity analysis measures used are dimensionless scaled sensitivity (DSS), composite scaled sensitivity, and parameter correlation coefficient (PCC); the other statistics are DFBETAS, Cook's D, and observation-prediction statistic. Acronyms are explained in the introduction. Cross-validation (CV) is a computationally intensive nonlinear method that is used for both model discrimination and sensitivity analysis. The methods are tested using up to five alternative parsimoniously constructed models of the ground water system of the Maggia Valley in southern Switzerland. The alternative models differ in their representation of hydraulic conductivity. A new method for graphically representing CV and sensitivity analysis results for complex models is presented and used to evaluate the utility of the efficient statistics. The results indicate that for model selection, the information criteria produce similar results at much smaller computational cost than CV. For identifying important observations, the only obviously inferior linear measure is DSS; the poor performance was expected because DSS does not include the effects of parameter correlation and PCC reveals large parameter correlations. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  20. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi [University of Patras, 26505 Rio, Patras (Greece); Perrakis, Anastassis, E-mail: a.perrakis@nki.nl [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-31

    The GemC1 coiled-coil structure has subtle differences compared with its homologues Geminin and Idas. Co-expression experiments in cells and biophysical stability analysis of the Geminin-family coiled coils suggest that the GemC1 coiled coil alone is unstable. GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin–Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  1. Deformation of Linked Polymer Coils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董朝霞; 李明远; 吴肇亮; 林梅钦

    2003-01-01

    Linked polymer solution (LPS) is defined as the solution of linked polymer coils (LPCs) dispersed in water, composed of low concentration partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) and aluminum citrate (crosslinker). In the work, the conformational changes of LPCs under different conditions were investigated by the methods of membrane filtering under low pressure, dynamic light scattering and core flooding experiments. The results showed that in some conditions the LPCs could be compressed mechanically to 1/158.5 of their original volume because of relatively lower HPAM cross-linking. The hydration property of LPCs was similar to that of normal polymer coils. The deformation of LPCs was more restricted than that of ordinary polymer coils under the flow shear stress or the shift of hydration equilibrium caused in the variation of the electrolyte concentration which is responsible for the effective plugging in the throats of porous media when LPCs are used for deep diverting.

  2. Automatic tuning of flexible interventional RF receiver coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venook, Ross D; Hargreaves, Brian A; Gold, Garry E; Conolly, Steven M; Scott, Greig C

    2005-10-01

    Microcontroller-based circuitry was built and tested for automatically tuning flexible RF receiver coils at the touch of a button. This circuitry is robust to 10% changes in probe center frequency, is in line with the scanner, and requires less than 1 s to tune a simple probe. Images were acquired using this circuitry with a varactor-tunable 1-inch flexible probe in a phantom and in an in vitro porcine knee model. The phantom experiments support the use of automatic tuning by demonstrating 30% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) losses for 5% changes in coil center frequency, in agreement with theoretical calculations. Comparisons between patellofemoral cartilage images obtained using a 3-inch surface coil and the surgically-implanted 1-inch flexible coil reveal a worst-case local SNR advantage of a factor of 4 for the smaller coil. This work confirms that surgically implanted coils can greatly improve resolution in small-field-of-view (FOV) applications, and demonstrates the importance and feasibility of automatically tuning such probes.

  3. Behavior and Stability of Ground Ice on Ceres: Modeling Water Vapor Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, M. E.; Byrne, S.; Schorghofer, N.; Schmidt, B. E.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C.

    2016-12-01

    Telescopic observations of Ceres in 2014 suggest the existence of a transient water vapor exosphere [1] being produced at a rate of 6kg/s. With the arrival of the Dawn spacecraft at Ceres, additional data is available to constrain sources of the detection. Our models are described in [2] and are based on the work of [3]. We model three scenarios: pore-filling ground ice, excess ground ice, and exposed surface ice. We calculate the surface temperature of Ceres over one year, based on current orbital parameters, for input to the vapor production model based on [4,5]. We assume that ground ice has been present on Ceres over the lifetime of the solar system. For pore-filling ground ice, we assume a 50% volume fraction of ice within the regolith and an overlying sublimation lag that grows from an initially near-zero thickness 4.5 Gyr ago. Vapor produced currently by Ceres-wide ice-table retreat is on the order of 0.1 kg/s. It is unlikely the 6 kg/s exosphere is produced by sublimation of pore-filling ground ice. Massive ground ice results in thinner sublimation lags over the course of solar system history. To match the 6kg/s whole-Ceres vapor production, we require enough ice such that the current sublimation lag accumulated over 4.5 Gyr would be 1m at low latitudes. Sublimation of a layer that would match the results of [6] would be currently producing a factor of 10 less water vapor that observed by [1]. Exposed surface ice at the equator could produce up to 1kg/s/km2 of water given the correct season [2]. A few km2 of surface ice, if close to the equator and observed at the right time of year, could produce the vapor observation of [1]. However, bright spots (possibly exposed surface ice) occur at high latitudes and within craters a few km in diameter. Crater wall shadowing can quickly compound the latitudinal variation in water vapor production, reducing vapor production to a few percent of the shadow-free case. Our results suggest the exosphere observed in [1] was

  4. Reactive chemical transport in ground-water hydrology: Challenges to mathematical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Apps, J.A.

    1990-07-01

    For a long time, earth scientists have qualitatively recognized that mineral assemblages in soils and rocks conform to established principles of chemistry. In the early 1960's geochemists began systematizing this knowledge by developing quantitative thermodynamic models based on equilibrium considerations. These models have since been coupled with advective-dispersive-diffusive transport models, already developed by ground-water hydrologists. Spurred by a need for handling difficult environmental issues related to ground-water contamination, these models are being improved, refined and applied to realistic problems of interest. There is little doubt that these models will play an important role in solving important problems of engineering as well as science over the coming years. Even as these models are being used practically, there is scope for their improvement and many challenges lie ahead. In addition to improving the conceptual basis of the governing equations, much remains to be done to incorporate kinetic processes and biological mediation into extant chemical equilibrium models. Much also remains to be learned about the limits to which model predictability can be reasonably taken. The purpose of this paper is to broadly assess the current status of knowledge in modeling reactive chemical transport and to identify the challenges that lie ahead.

  5. Advantages of analytically computing the ground heat flux in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Daly, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the ground heat flux accounts for a significant fraction of the surface energy balance. In land surface models, the ground heat flux is typically estimated through a numerical solution of the heat conduction equation. Recent research has shown that this approach introduces errors in the estimation of the energy balance. In this paper, we calibrate a land surface model using a numerical solution of the heat conduction equation with four different vertical spatial resolutions. It is found that the thermal conductivity is the most sensitive parameter to the spatial resolution. More importantly, the thermal conductivity values are directly related to the spatial resolution, thus rendering any physical interpretation of this value irrelevant. The numerical solution is then replaced by an analytical solution. The results of the numerical and analytical solutions are identical when fine spatial and temporal resolutions are used. However, when using resolutions that are typical of land surface models, significant differences are found. When using the analytical solution, the ground heat flux is directly calculated without calculating the soil temperature profile. The calculation of the temperature at each node in the soil profile is thus no longer required, unless the model contains parameters that depend on the soil temperature, which in this study is not the case. The calibration is repeated, and thermal conductivity values independent of the vertical spatial resolution are obtained. The main conclusion of this study is that care must be taken when interpreting land surface model results that have been obtained using numerical ground heat flux estimates. The use of exact analytical solutions, when available, is recommended.

  6. Detection of shallow buried objects using an autoregressive model on the ground penetrating radar signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabelek, Daniel P.; Ho, K. C.

    2013-06-01

    The detection of shallow buried low-metal content objects using ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a challenging task. This is because these targets are right underneath the ground and the ground bounce reflection interferes with their detections. They do not create distinctive hyperbolic signatures as required by most existing GPR detection algorithms due to their special geometric shapes and low metal content. This paper proposes the use of the Autoregressive (AR) modeling method for the detection of these targets. We fit an A-scan of the GPR data to an AR model. It is found that the fitting error will be small when such a target is present and large when it is absent. The ratio of the energy in an Ascan before and after AR model fitting is used as the confidence value for detection. We also apply AR model fitting over scans and utilize the fitting residual energies over several scans to form a feature vector for improving the detections. Using the data collected from a government test site, the proposed method can improve the detection of this kind of targets by 30% compared to the pre-screener, at a false alarm rate of 0.002/m2.

  7. Modeling Ice Table Depth, Ground Ice Content, and δD-δ18O of Ground Ice in the Cold Dry Soils of Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D. A.; Lacelle, D.; Pollard, W.; Davila, A.; McKay, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    In the upper McMurdo Dry Valleys, ice table depths range from 0 to 80 cm. This study explores the effects of ground temperature and humidity and advective flows on water vapour flux and ice table depth using the REGO vapour-diffusion model.

  8. Coil Optimization for HTS Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    for different tape parameters Ici, ni and Ci, where Ici, ni and Ci are critical current, n - value and price of the ith tape respectively and i=1, 2, 3…, further optimization with respect to cost vs. HTS losses has been performed. Allowing for different types of HTS tapes in the coils, a guidance to which tape....... The proposed coil design is optimized with respect to minimizing the perpendicular field while still maximizing the amplitude of fundamental space harmonic. This guarantees the lowest HTS loss density and best utilization of expensive HTS material in the field winding of the SM. Additionally, accounting...

  9. Electromagnetic Gun With Commutated Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic gun includes electromagnet coil, turns of which commutated in sequence along barrel. Electrical current fed to two armatures by brushes sliding on bus bars in barrel. Interaction between armature currents and magnetic field from coil produces force accelerating armature, which in turn, pushes on projectile. Commutation scheme chosen so magnetic field approximately coincides and moves with cylindrical region defined by armatures. Scheme has disadvantage of complexity, but in return, enables designer to increase driving magnetic field without increasing armature current. Attainable muzzle velocity increased substantially.

  10. Double helix dipole design applied to magnetic resonance: a novel NMR coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J; Soleilhavoup, A; Wong, A; Guiga, A; Sakellariou, D

    2013-10-01

    A new radio frequency coil design for NMR experiments is presented. The coil generates a magnetic field purely perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the main magnet, and its sensitivity is higher than the traditional transversal resonators. This is achieved by adding the contribution of two tilted solenoid coils fed with opposite currents. The work presents the mathematical model for the new coil, numerical simulations performed to validate that model and a comparison with an equivalent saddle coil. The new design is tested experimentally in low- and high-field NMR experiments and compared with results obtained with equivalent saddle coils. The results lead to conclude that the new design provides better sensitivity than the transverse resonators commonly used in NMR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Horizontal ground coupled heat pump: Thermal-economic modeling and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanaye, Sepehr; Niroomand, Behzad [Energy Systems Improvement Laboratory (ESIL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST) (Iran)

    2010-12-15

    The modeling and optimizing processes of a Ground Coupled Heat Pump (GCHP) with closed Horizontal Ground Heat eXchanger (HGHX) are presented in this paper. After thermal modeling of GCHP including HGHX, the optimum design parameters of the system were estimated by minimizing a defined objective function (total of investment and operation costs) subject to a list of constraints. This procedure was performed applying Genetic Algorithm technique. For given heating/cooling loads and various climatic conditions, the optimum values of saturated temperature/pressure of condenser and evaporator as well as inlet and outlet temperatures of the water source in cooling and heating modes were predicted. Then, for our case study, the design parameters as well as the configuration of HGHX were obtained. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis of change in the total annual cost of the system and optimum design parameters with the climatic conditions, cooling/heating capacity, and soil type were discussed. (author)

  12. Ground states of bilayered and extended t-J-U models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voo, Khee-Kyun, E-mail: kkvoo@mail.oit.edu.tw

    2015-09-04

    The ground states of bilayered and extended t-J-U models are investigated with renormalized mean field theory. The trial wave functions are Gutzwiller projected Hartree–Fock states, and the site double occupancies are variational parameters. It is found that a spontaneous interlayer phase separation (PS) may arise in bilayers. In electron–hole doping asymmetric systems, the propensity for PS is stronger in electron doped bands. Via a PS, superconductivity can survive to lower doping densities, and antiferromagnetism in electron doped systems may survive to higher doping densities. The result is related to the superconducting cuprates. - Highlights: • Ground states in doped bilayered t-J-U models are studied. • Variational wave functions are Gutzwiller projected wave functions. • Site double occupancies are variational parameters. • Spontaneous interlayer phase separation may occur in bilayers. • Stronger tendency toward phase separation in electron doped bilayers.

  13. ARMA models for earthquake ground motions. Seismic safety margins research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, M. K.; Kwiatkowski, J. W.; Nau, R. F.; Oliver, R. M.; Pister, K. S.

    1981-02-01

    Four major California earthquake records were analyzed by use of a class of discrete linear time-domain processes commonly referred to as ARMA (Autoregressive/Moving-Average) models. It was possible to analyze these different earthquakes, identify the order of the appropriate ARMA model(s), estimate parameters, and test the residuals generated by these models. It was also possible to show the connections, similarities, and differences between the traditional continuous models (with parameter estimates based on spectral analyses) and the discrete models with parameters estimated by various maximum-likelihood techniques applied to digitized acceleration data in the time domain. The methodology proposed is suitable for simulating earthquake ground motions in the time domain, and appears to be easily adapted to serve as inputs for nonlinear discrete time models of structural motions. 60 references, 19 figures, 9 tables.

  14. Near-field wireless sensing of single and multiple open-ended micro coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yousaf

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present near-field wireless sensing of single and multiple open-ended micro coils using an electrically small loop antenna. Wirelessly characterized parameters of open-ended micro coils include its resonance frequency, quality factor and inductance. Moreover a wireless frequency-dependent analytical model was developed. Micro coil inductance was extracted from the wirelessly measured signal using a constraint-based least-squares approach. Wireless measurements and analytical fit of micro coils are in strong agreement which validates the analytical model. Finite element method (FEM simulations of the coupled system were done in COMSOL Multiphysics.

  15. Characterization of vibration and acoustic noise in a gradient-coil insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, G Z; Mechefske, C K; Rutt, B K

    2004-09-01

    High-speed switching of current in gradient coils within high magnetic field strength magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners results in high acoustic sound pressure levels (SPL) in and around these machines. To characterize the vibration properties as well as the acoustic noise properties of the gradient coil, a finite-element (FE) model was developed using the dimensional design specifications of an available gradient-coil insert and the concentration of the copper windings in the coil. This FE model was then validated using experimentally collected vibration data. A computational acoustic noise model was then developed based on the validated FE model. The validation of the finite-element analysis results was done using experimental modal testing of the same gradient coil in a free-free state (no boundary constraints). Based on the validated FE model, boundary conditions (supports) were added to the model to simulate the operating condition when the gradient-coil insert is in place in an MRI machine. Vibration analysis results from the FE model were again validated through experimental vibration testing with the gradient-coil insert installed in the MRI scanner and excited using swept sinusoidal time waveforms. The simulation results from the computational acoustic noise model were also validated through experimental noise measurement from the gradient-coil insert in the MRI scanner using swept sinusoidal time waveform inputs. Comparisons show that the FE model predicts the vibration properties and the computational acoustic noise model predicts the noise characteristic properties extremely accurately.

  16. Biochemical and molecular dynamic simulation analysis of a weak coiled coil association between kinesin-II stalks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinath Doodhi

    Full Text Available DEFINITION: Kinesin-2 refers to the family of motor proteins represented by conserved, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric Osm3/Kif17 class of motors. BACKGROUND: Kinesin-II, a microtubule-based anterograde motor, is composed of three different conserved subunits, named KLP64D, KLP68D and DmKAP in Drosophila. Although previous reports indicated that coiled coil interaction between the middle segments of two dissimilar motor subunits established the heterodimer, the molecular basis of the association is still unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present a detailed heterodimeric association model of the KLP64D/68D stalk supported by extensive experimental analysis and molecular dynamic simulations. We find that KLP64D stalk is unstable, but forms a weak coiled coil heteroduplex with the KLP68D stalk when coexpressed in bacteria. Local instabilities, relative affinities between the C-terminal stalk segments, and dynamic long-range interactions along the stalks specify the heterodimerization. Thermal unfolding studies and independent simulations further suggest that interactions between the C-terminal stalk fragments are comparatively stable, whereas the N-terminal stalk reversibly unfolds at ambient temperature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results obtained in this study suggest that coiled coil interaction between the C-terminal stalks of kinesin-II motor subunits is held together through a few hydrophobic and charged interactions. The N-terminal stalk segments are flexible and could uncoil reversibly during a motor walk. This supports the requirement for a flexible coiled coil association between the motor subunits, and its role in motor function needs to be elucidated.

  17. [Two Cases of Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Complicated with Delayed Coil Protrusion after Coil Embolization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Takashi; Ogata, Atsushi; Ebashi, Ryo; Takase, Yukinori; Masuoka, Jun; Kawashima, Masatou; Abe, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. Case 1:An 82-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small anterior communicating artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Eighteen days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the right anterior cerebral artery was observed without any symptoms. Further coil protrusion did not develop after 28 days. Case 2:A 78-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small left middle cerebral artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Twenty days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the left middle cerebral artery was observed, with a transient ischemic attack. Further coil protrusion did not develop. Both patients recovered with antithrombotic treatment. Even though delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization is rare, it should be recognized as a long-term complication of coil embolization for cerebral aneurysms.

  18. Ground vibrations due to pile and sheet pile driving : prediction models of today

    OpenAIRE

    Deckner, Fanny; Viking, Kenneth; Hintze, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    As part of aconstruction work pile and sheet pile driving unavoidably generates vibrations.As of today construction works are often located in urban areas and along withsociety’s increasing concern of environmental impact the need for vibrationprediction prior to construction is of immediate interest. This study presents a review of the predictionmodels existing today. For prediction of ground vibrations from pile and sheetpile driving there are roughly three different types of models; empiri...

  19. Ground-state phase diagram of the Kondo lattice model on triangular-to-kagome lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Akagi, Yutaka; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the ground-state phase diagram of the Kondo lattice model with classical localized spins on triangular-to-kagome lattices by using a variational calculation. We identify the parameter regions where a four-sublattice noncoplanar order is stable with a finite spin scalar chirality while changing the lattice structure from triangular to kagome continuously. Although the noncoplanar spin states appear in a wide range of parameters, the spin configurations on the kagome network beco...

  20. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    parameter uncertainty decreased significantly when TLRG data was included in the inversion. The forced infiltration experiment caused changes in unsaturated zone storage, which were monitored using TLRG and ground-penetrating radar. A numerical unsaturated zone model was subsequently conditioned on both...... in gravity due to unmonitored non-hydrological effects, and the requirement of a gravitationally stable reference station. Application of TLRG in hydrology should be combined with other geophysical and/or traditional monitoring methods....

  1. SuReSim: simulating localization microscopy experiments from ground truth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, Varun; Herrmannsdörfer, Frank; Heilemann, Mike; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become a widely used tool in many areas of research. However, designing and validating super-resolution experiments to address a research question in a technically feasible and scientifically rigorous manner remains a fundamental challenge. We developed SuReSim, a software tool that simulates localization data of arbitrary three-dimensional structures represented by ground truth models, allowing users to systematically explore how changing experimental parameters can affect potential imaging outcomes.

  2. Ground state phase diagram of the half-filled bilayer Hubbard model

    OpenAIRE

    Golor, Michael; Reckling, Timo; Classen, Laura; Scherer, Michael M.; Wessel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Employing a combination of functional renormalization group calculations and projective determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we examine the Hubbard model on the square lattice bilayer at half filling. From this combined analysis, we obtain a comprehensive account on the ground state phase diagram with respect to the extent of the system's metallic and (antiferromagnetically ordered) Mott-insulating as well as band-insulating regions. By means of an unbiased functional renormalizatio...

  3. Centrifuge model test on earthquake-induced differential settlement of foundation on cohesive ground

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAMOTO; Yasuhiro; HOTTA; Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic centrifuge model test was conducted to study the earthquake-induced differential settlement of foundation on cohesive ground, and the influence of asymmetry of building was investigated. During the experiment, the overconsolidated kaolin clay ground with a three-dimensional asymmetrical structure model was shaken by a basically balanced input motion, and bender elements were used to measure shear wave velocities of model ground to reveal the soil fabric evolution during and after shaking. The test results show that, the total seismic settlement of foundation is composed of instantaneous and long-term post-earthquake settlements, and most of the differential settlement occurs immediately after the earthquake while the post-earthquake settlement is relatively uniform despite its large amplitude. The asymmetry of building affects the settlement behavior considerably. Compared with 1-or 2-dimensional structures, more evident differential settlement occurs under threedimensional asymmetrical building during shaking, which accounts for one-half of the total seismic settlements and results in complex spatial tilting effects of foundation.

  4. The grounding of higher order concepts in action and language: a cognitive robotics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramandinoli, Francesca; Marocco, Davide; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we present a neuro-robotic model that uses artificial neural networks for investigating the relations between the development of symbol manipulation capabilities and of sensorimotor knowledge in the humanoid robot iCub. We describe a cognitive robotics model in which the linguistic input provided by the experimenter guides the autonomous organization of the robot's knowledge. In this model, sequences of linguistic inputs lead to the development of higher-order concepts grounded on basic concepts and actions. In particular, we show that higher-order symbolic representations can be indirectly grounded in action primitives directly grounded in sensorimotor experiences. The use of recurrent neural network also permits the learning of higher-order concepts based on temporal sequences of action primitives. Hence, the meaning of a higher-order concept is obtained through the combination of basic sensorimotor knowledge. We argue that such a hierarchical organization of concepts can be a possible account for the acquisition of abstract words in cognitive robots. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Centrifuge model test on earthquake-induced differential settlement of foundation on cohesive ground

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YanGuo; CHEN YunMin; SHAMOTO Yasuhiro; HOTTA Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic centrifuge model test was conducted to study the earthquake-induced differential settlement of foundation on cohesive ground, and the influence of asymmetry of building was investigated. During the experiment, the overconsolidated kaolin clay ground with a three-dimensional asymmetrical structure model was shaken by a basically balanced input motion, and bender elements were used to measure shear wave velocities of model ground to reveal the soil fabric evolution during and after shaking. The test results show that, the total seismic settlement of foundation is composed of instantaneous and long-term post-earthquake settlements, and most of the differential settlement occurs immediately after the earthquake while the post-earthquake settlement is relatively uniform despite its large amplitude. The asymmetry of building affects the settlement behavior considerably. Compared with 1- or 2-dimensional structures, more evident differential settlement occurs under three-dimensional asymmetrical building during shaking, which accounts for one-half of the total seismic settlements and results in complex spatial tilting effects of foundation.

  6. A mixed space-time and wavenumber-frequency domain procedure for modelling ground vibration from surface railway tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroma, S. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Hussein, M. F. M.; Ntotsios, E.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for studying ground vibration in which the railway track is modelled in the space-time domain using the finite element method (FEM) and, for faster computation, discretisation of the ground using either FEM or the boundary element method (BEM) is avoided by modelling it in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The railway track is coupled to the ground through a series of rectangular strips located at the surface of the ground; their vertical interaction is described by a frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness matrix whose elements are represented by discrete lumped parameter models. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed firstly through frequency domain analysis using as excitation a stationary harmonic load applied on the rail. The interaction forces at the ballast/ground interface are calculated using the FE track model in the space-time domain, transformed to the wavenumber domain, and used as input to the ground model for calculating vibration in the free field. Additionally, time domain simulations are also performed with the inclusion of nonlinear track parameters. Results are presented for the coupled track/ground model in terms of time histories and frequency spectra for the track vibration, interaction forces and free-field ground vibration. For the linear track model, the results from the mixed formulation are in excellent agreement with those from a semi-analytical model formulated in the wavenumber-frequency domain, particularly in the vicinity of the loading point. The accuracy of the mixed formulation away from the excitation point depends strongly on the inclusion of through-ground coupling in the lumped parameter model, which has been found to be necessary for both track dynamics and ground vibration predictions.

  7. Evaluation of brightness temperature from a forward model of ground-based microwave radiometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rambabu; J S Pillai; A Agarwal; G Pandithurai

    2014-06-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are getting great attention in recent years due to their capability to profile the temperature and humidity at high temporal and vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. The process of retrieving these parameters from the measurements of radiometric brightness temperature () includes the inversion algorithm, which uses the background information from a forward model. In the present study, an algorithm development and evaluation of this forward model for a ground-based microwave radiometer, being developed by Society for Applied Microwave Electronics Engineering and Research (SAMEER) of India, is presented. Initially, the analysis of absorption coefficient and weighting function at different frequencies was made to select the channels. Further the range of variation of for these selected channels for the year 2011, over the two stations Mumbai and Delhi is discussed. Finally the comparison between forward-model simulated s and radiometer measured s at Mahabaleshwar (73.66°E and 17.93°N) is done to evaluate the model. There is good agreement between model simulations and radiometer observations, which suggests that these forward model simulations can be used as background for inversion models for retrieving the temperature and humidity profiles.

  8. Magnetic field uniformity of the practical tri-axial Helmholtz coils systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand, R

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, effects of the assembly misalignments and the manufacturing mismatches on the magnetic field uniformity of a practical tri-axial Helmholtz coils system have been modeled mathematically. These undesired effects regularly occur in any practical tri-axial Helmholtz coils system. To confirm the mathematical calculations, a tri-axial Helmholtz coils system has been constructed and the uniformity of its magnetic field has been measured under different conditions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the mathematical analyses.

  9. Finite difference time domain method forward simulation of complex geoelectricity ground penetrating radar model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Qian-wei; FENG De-shan; HE Ji-shan

    2005-01-01

    The ground penetrating radar(GPR) forward simulation all aims at the singular and regular models, such as sandwich model, round cavity, square cavity, and so on, which are comparably simple. But as to the forward of curl interface underground or "v" figure complex model, it is difficult to realize. So it is important to forward the complex geoelectricity model. This paper takes two Maxwell's vorticity equations as departure point, makes use of the principles of Yee's space grid model theory and the basic principle finite difference time domain method, and deduces a GPR forward system of equation of two dimensional spaces. The Mur super absorbed boundary condition is adopted to solve the super strong reflection on the interceptive boundary when there is the forward simulation. And a self-made program is used to process forward simulation to two typical geoelectricity model.

  10. Coupled Coils, Magnets and Lenz's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results. (Contains 6 figures and 1 footnote.)

  11. Generalization of Helmholtz coil problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Dejan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary intent of this work is to propose a simple analytical method for designing coil systems for homogeneous and gradient magnetostatic field generation. Coil system consists of two identical coaxial (regular polygonal current loops. In the space between the loops, there is nearly homogeneous or nearly linear distribution of the magnetic field along the axes depending on the currents' direction. First, we derived a suitable, simple and general expression for the magnetic field along the axes due to a polygonal current loop. We emphasize the importance of the role of this expression for further analysis. The total on-axes magnetic field is the result of superposition of the magnetic fields that each loop generates separately. The proper distance between the loops and the current orientation make the system to become either Helmholtz coil or anti-Helmholtz coil. In this paper we give exact, analytical and general expression for this optimal distance that provides the magnetic field to be homogeneous (linear as much as possible. We based our study on Taylor series expansion of the total magnetic field, demanding that the first contaminating term must be canceled, in both, symmetric and asymmetric case.

  12. 3D Modelling of a Tunnel Re-excavation in Soft Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hilar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of the shallow tunnel at Brezno started using the Pre-Vault Method. The tunnel excavation, in complicated geological conditions, led to many difficulties which finally resulted in a collapse, when a significant part of the temporary tunnel lining collapsed. Various options for re-excavating the tunnel were evaluated prior to further construction. Finally a decision was made to separate the collapsed area into sections 9 m in length using 16 m-wide, transversally oriented pile walls, to improve the stability of the collapsed ground. The walls were constructed from the surface prior to excavation. It was also decided to re-excavate a collapsed area using the Sprayed Concrete Lining (SCL method. Due to problematic soft ground conditions, which had been made even worse by the collapse, some additional support measures had to be considered prior to re-excavation (ground improvement, micropile umbrellas embedded into the pile walls, etc.This paper describes numerical modelling of the tunnel re-excavation through the collapsed area. Initial calculations of the tunnel re-excavation were made using a 2D finite element method. Subsequently, further calculations to evaluate the rock mass behaviour in the collapsed area were provided in 3D. The 2D calculations were used to provide sensitivity studies, while 3D modelling was mainly used for evaluating the tunnel face stability (impact of the pile walls, impact of ground improvement together with other factors (length of advances, moment of the temporary invert closure, etc. The results of the modelling were compared with the monitoring results.The paper also briefly describes the construction experience (technical problems, performance of various support measures, etc. The excavation and the primary lining construction were completed in 2006, and the tunnel was opened for traffic in April 2007.

  13. GSFLOW - Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model Based on the Integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Regan, R. Steven; Prudic, David E.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    The need to assess the effects of variability in climate, biota, geology, and human activities on water availability and flow requires the development of models that couple two or more components of the hydrologic cycle. An integrated hydrologic model called GSFLOW (Ground-water and Surface-water FLOW) was developed to simulate coupled ground-water and surface-water resources. The new model is based on the integration of the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW). Additional model components were developed, and existing components were modified, to facilitate integration of the models. Methods were developed to route flow among the PRMS Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) and between the HRUs and the MODFLOW finite-difference cells. This report describes the organization, concepts, design, and mathematical formulation of all GSFLOW model components. An important aspect of the integrated model design is its ability to conserve water mass and to provide comprehensive water budgets for a location of interest. This report includes descriptions of how water budgets are calculated for the integrated model and for individual model components. GSFLOW provides a robust modeling system for simulating flow through the hydrologic cycle, while allowing for future enhancements to incorporate other simulation techniques.

  14. High Re wall-modeled LES of aircraft wake vortices in ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Olivier; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Duponcheel, Matthieu

    2014-11-01

    We have been able to perform wall-resolved LES, using a fourth order code, to simulate (aircraft) wake vortices interacting with the ground, also with cross or head winds, up to Reynolds numbers of the order of Re = Γ / ν = 2 ×104 . The present work aims at providing higher Re simulations, and also simulations with rough walls (e.g., grass), through the use of LES with near wall modeling. Various types of models are compared: point-wise and averaged algebraic models, and two-layers models. When using averaged models, the averaging methodology is of importance, since there is essentially no homogeneous direction in the case of wake vortices in ground effects. Uni- and multi-directional averaging strategies, with and without additional time averaging will be considered. When two-layer models are used, a RANS sub-layer will be compared to a simpler approach based on simplified turbulent boundary layer equations. The approaches are first validated on simpler flows, channel flow or wake flow, for which reference wall-resolved LES or DNS results are available. Research fellow (Ph.D. student) at the F.R.S.-FNRS (Belgium)

  15. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  16. Trust and Partner Selection in Social Networks: An Experimentally Grounded Model

    CERN Document Server

    Boero, Riccardo; Squazzoni, Flaminio

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimentally grounded model on the relevance of partner selection for the emergence of trust and cooperation among individuals. By combining experimental evidence and network simulation, our model investigates the link of interaction outcome and social structure formation and shows that dynamic networks lead to positive outcomes when cooperators have the capability of creating more links and isolating free-riders. By emphasizing the self-reinforcing dynamics of interaction outcome and structure formation, our results cast the argument about the relevance of interaction continuity for cooperation in new light and provide insights to guide the design of new lab experiments.

  17. The ground state of the D=11 supermembrane and matrix models on compact regions

    CERN Document Server

    Boulton, L; Restuccia, A

    2015-01-01

    We establish a general framework for the analysis of boundary value problems at zero energy of matrix models on compact regions. This allows us to prove existence and uniqueness of ground state wavefunctions for the mass operator of the D=11 regularized supermembrane theory (and therefore the N=16 supersymmetric matrix model) on a ball of finite radius. Our results rely on the structure of the associated Dirichlet form and a factorization in terms of the supersymmetric charges. They also rely on the polynomial structure of the potential and various other supersymmetric properties of the system.

  18. The ground state of the D = 11 supermembrane and matrix models on compact regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Lyonell; Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2016-09-01

    We establish a general framework for the analysis of boundary value problems of matrix models at zero energy on compact regions. We derive existence and uniqueness of ground state wavefunctions for the mass operator of the D = 11 regularized supermembrane theory, that is the N = 16 supersymmetric SU (N) matrix model, on balls of finite radius. Our results rely on the structure of the associated Dirichlet form and a factorization in terms of the supersymmetric charges. They also rely on the polynomial structure of the potential and various other supersymmetric properties of the system.

  19. User Guide and Documentation for Five MODFLOW Ground-Water Modeling Utility Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.; Paschke, Suzanne S.; Litke, David W.

    2008-01-01

    This report documents five utility programs designed for use in conjunction with ground-water flow models developed with the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW ground-water modeling program. One program extracts calculated flow values from one model for use as input to another model. The other four programs extract model input or output arrays from one model and make them available in a form that can be used to generate an ArcGIS raster data set. The resulting raster data sets may be useful for visual display of the data or for further geographic data processing. The utility program GRID2GRIDFLOW reads a MODFLOW binary output file of cell-by-cell flow terms for one (source) model grid and converts the flow values to input flow values for a different (target) model grid. The spatial and temporal discretization of the two models may differ. The four other utilities extract selected 2-dimensional data arrays in MODFLOW input and output files and write them to text files that can be imported into an ArcGIS geographic information system raster format. These four utilities require that the model cells be square and aligned with the projected coordinate system in which the model grid is defined. The four raster-conversion utilities are * CBC2RASTER, which extracts selected stress-package flow data from a MODFLOW binary output file of cell-by-cell flows; * DIS2RASTER, which extracts cell-elevation data from a MODFLOW Discretization file; * MFBIN2RASTER, which extracts array data from a MODFLOW binary output file of head or drawdown; and * MULT2RASTER, which extracts array data from a MODFLOW Multiplier file.

  20. Hubbard models with nearly flat bands: Ground-state ferromagnetism driven by kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Patrick; Richter, Johannes; Derzhko, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    We consider the standard repulsive Hubbard model with a flat lowest-energy band for two one-dimensional lattices (diamond chain and ladder) as well as for a two-dimensional lattice (bilayer) at half filling of the flat band. The considered models do not fall in the class of Mielke-Tasaki flat-band ferromagnets, since they do not obey the connectivity conditions. However, the ground-state ferromagnetism can emerge, if the flat band becomes dispersive. To study this kinetic-energy-driven ferromagnetism we use perturbation theory and exact diagonalization of finite lattices. We find as a typical scenario that small and moderate dispersion may lead to a ferromagnetic ground state for sufficiently large on-site Hubbard repulsion U >Uc , where Uc increases monotonically with the acquired bandwidth. However, we also observe for some specific parameter cases, that (i) ferromagnetism appears at already very small Uc, (ii) ferromagnetism does not show up at all, (iii) the critical on-site repulsion Uc is a nonmonotonic function of the bandwidth, or that (iv) a critical bandwidth is needed to open the window for ground-state ferromagnetism.

  1. Mathematical model for takeoff simulation of a wing in proximity to the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinaci, Omer Kemal

    2016-06-01

    Aircraft flying close to the ground benefit from enhanced efficiency owing to decreased induced drag and increased lift. In this study, a mathematical model is developed to simulate the takeoff of a wing near the ground using an Iterative Boundary Element Method (IBEM) and the finite difference scheme. Two stand-alone sub-codes and a mother code, which enables communication between the sub-codes, are developed to solve for the self-excitation of the Wing-In-Ground (WIG) effect. The aerodynamic force exerted on the wing is calculated by the first sub-code using the IBEM, and the vertical displacement of the wing is calculated by the second sub-code using the finite difference scheme. The mother code commands the two sub-codes and can solve for the aerodynamics of the wing and operating height within seconds. The developed code system is used to solve for the force, velocity, and displacement of an NACA6409 wing at a 4° Angle of Attack (AoA) which has various numerical and experimental studies in the literature. The effects of thickness and AoA are then investigated and conclusions were drawn with respect to generated results. The proposed model provides a practical method for understanding the flight dynamics and it is specifically beneficial at the pre-design stages of a WIG effect craft.

  2. Modelling the spatial pattern of ground thaw in a small basin in the arctic tundra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Endrizzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the arctic tundra the ground is normally composed by a relatively thin organic soil layer, overlying mineral sediment. Subsurface water drainage generally occurs in the organic layer for its high hydraulic conductivity. However, the organic layer shows significant decrease of hydraulic conductivity with depth. The position and the topography of the frost table, which here acts as a relatively impermeable surface, are therefore crucial in determining the hillslope drainage rate. This work aims at understanding how the topography of the ground surface affects the spatial variability of the depth of thaw in a 1 km2 low-elevation arctic tundra basin with a fine resolution model that fully couples energy and water flow processes. The simulations indicate that the spatial patterns of ground thaw are not dominated by slope and aspect, but are instead entirely controlled by the spatial distribution of soil moisture, which is determined by subsurface flow patterns. Measured thaw depths have a similar range of variability to the simulated values for each stage of active layer development, although the model slightly overestimated the depth of thaw.

  3. Human and avian running on uneven ground: a model-based comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn-Jeffery, A. V.; Blum, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Birds and humans are successful bipedal runners, who have individually evolved bipedalism, but the extent of the similarities and differences of their bipedal locomotion is unknown. In turn, the anatomical differences of their locomotor systems complicate direct comparisons. However, a simplifying mechanical model, such as the conservative spring–mass model, can be used to describe both avian and human running and thus, provides a way to compare the locomotor strategies that birds and humans use when running on level and uneven ground. Although humans run with significantly steeper leg angles at touchdown and stiffer legs when compared with cursorial ground birds, swing-leg adaptations (leg angle and leg length kinematics) used by birds and humans while running appear similar across all types of uneven ground. Nevertheless, owing to morphological restrictions, the crouched avian leg has a greater range of leg angle and leg length adaptations when coping with drops and downward steps than the straight human leg. On the other hand, the straight human leg seems to use leg stiffness adaptation when coping with obstacles and upward steps unlike the crouched avian leg posture. PMID:27655670

  4. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Céspedes, Nora; Habel, Catherine; Lopez-Perez, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous...

  5. The many types of interhelical ionic interactions in coiled coils - an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Markus; Stetefeld, Jörg; Burkhard, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Coiled coils represent the most frequent protein oligomerization motif in nature and are involved in many important biological processes. The prototype interhelical ionic interaction for coiled coils described in literature is an i to i+5 ionic interaction from heptad position g to e', but other possible ionic interactions have also been described. Here we use a statistical approach to systematically analyze all high-quality coiled-coil structures in the RCSB protein database for their interhelical ionic interactions. We provide a complete listing of all possible arrangements and analyze the frequency of their occurrence in the primary sequence together with their probability of formation in the quaternary structure of the coiled coils. We show that the classical i to i+5 ionic interaction is indeed characteristic for parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils. But we also show that there are many more i to i+2 ionic interactions in parallel tetrameric and pentameric coiled coils, and in antiparallel coiled coils the classical i to i+5 ionic interaction is in none of the oligomerizations states the most frequently observed ionic interaction. We also demonstrate that many ionic interactions involve residues at the core positions that are usually occupied by hydrophobic residues and that such interhelical ionic interactions are a hallmark feature of dimeric coiled coils.

  6. A Little Knowledge of Ground Motion: Explaining 3-D Physics-Based Modeling to Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Users of earthquake planning scenarios require the ground-motion map to be credible enough to justify costly planning efforts, but not all ground-motion maps are right for all uses. There are two common ways to create a map of ground motion for a hypothetical earthquake. One approach is to map the median shaking estimated by empirical attenuation relationships. The other uses 3-D physics-based modeling, in which one analyzes a mathematical model of the earth's crust near the fault rupture and calculates the generation and propagation of seismic waves from source to ground surface by first principles. The two approaches produce different-looking maps. The more-familiar median maps smooth out variability and correlation. Using them in a planning scenario can lead to a systematic underestimation of damage and loss, and could leave a community underprepared for realistic shaking. The 3-D maps show variability, including some very high values that can disconcert non-scientists. So when the USGS Science Application for Risk Reduction's (SAFRR) Haywired scenario project selected 3-D maps, it was necessary to explain to scenario users—especially engineers who often use median maps—the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of the two approaches. We used authority, empirical evidence, and theory to support our choice. We prefaced our explanation with SAFRR's policy of using the best available earth science, and cited the credentials of the maps' developers and the reputation of the journal in which they published the maps. We cited recorded examples from past earthquakes of extreme ground motions that are like those in the scenario map. We explained the maps on theoretical grounds as well, explaining well established causes of variability: directivity, basin effects, and source parameters. The largest mapped motions relate to potentially unfamiliar extreme-value theory, so we used analogies to human longevity and the average age of the oldest person in samples of

  7. Geostatical Modelling For Ground Water Pollution in Salem by Using Gis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground waters are the major resources to meet out the entire requirements. Pollution of air, water and land has an effect on the quality of the ground waters. The chemical characteristics of groundwater in Salem taluk of Salem district have been studied using Geostatistical modeling to evaluate the suitability of water for irrigation and domestic uses. The 32 water samples from PWD wells taken during the years 1999 to 2009 for post monsson and pre monsoon were tested for various chemical parameters like pH and TDS .The Geostatistical analyst of mean, mode, standard deviation, cluster & simple to study the spatial pattern of contamination movement for the years 1999 to 2009. Trend analysis was performed to identify trends in the input dataset. The concentrations of physical and chemical constituents in the water samples were compared with the World Health Organization (WHO standard to know the suitability of water for drinking.

  8. Documentation of the Santa Clara Valley regional ground-water/surface-water flow model, Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Li, Zhen; Faunt, C.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Santa Clara Valley is a long, narrow trough extending about 35 miles southeast from the southern end of San Francisco Bay where the regional alluvial-aquifer system has been a major source of water. Intensive agricultural and urban development throughout the 20th century and related ground-water development resulted in ground-water-level declines of more than 200 feet and land subsidence of as much as 12.7 feet between the early 1900s and the mid-1960s. Since the 1960s, Santa Clara Valley Water District has imported surface water to meet growing demands and reduce dependence on ground-water supplies. This importation of water has resulted in a sustained recovery of the ground-water flow system. To help support effective management of the ground-water resources, a regional ground-water/surface-water flow model was developed. This model simulates the flow of ground water and surface water, changes in ground-water storage, and related effects such as land subsidence. A numerical ground-water/surface-water flow model of the Santa Clara Valley subbasin of the Santa Clara Valley was developed as part of a cooperative investigation with the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The model better defines the geohydrologic framework of the regional flow system and better delineates the supply and demand components that affect the inflows to and outflows from the regional ground-water flow system. Development of the model includes revisions to the previous ground-water flow model that upgraded the temporal and spatial discretization, added source-specific inflows and outflows, simulated additional flow features such as land subsidence and multi-aquifer wellbore flow, and extended the period of simulation through September 1999. The transient-state model was calibrated to historical surface-water and ground-water data for the period 197099 and to historical subsidence for the period 198399. The regional ground-water flow system consists of multiple aquifers that are grouped

  9. Influence of turn-to-turn resistivity and coil geometrical size on charging characteristics of no-electrical-insulation REBCO pancake coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Song, H.

    2016-07-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) no-electrical-insulation (NEI) coils demonstrate great advantages in thermal stability and self-protection features. However, an intrinsic delay is observed in the charging process and as a result there maybe a possible settle-out problem. It becomes more critical for large HTS coils with more turns, such as the magnets for the accelerator system and DC induction heater applications. This paper presents detailed studies on the charging characteristics of NEI coils. Firstly, two different no-electrical-insulation coils are wound: the first is directly wound using only REBCO tapes with brass lamination, which is called a no-insulation (NI) coil. The other one is co-wound with stainless steel (SS) strips and REBCO tapes whose copper stabilizer is electroplated, which is called a metallic insulation (MI) coil. Fast discharging tests are performed on the two coils and their equivalent turn-to-turn resistivity is calculated. A similar discharging delay is observed on both coils, but the turn-to-turn resistivity of the SS co-wound coil is much higher than that of the first coil. Then the resistivity data is directly applied to an equivalent circuit network model which is developed to predict the charging behaviours. The model calculates coil voltage, currents along the azimuthal and radial directions, as well as the induced magnetic field. A practical charging time is defined to characterize the field ramping process considering the charging delay between field ramping and current charging. The charging behaviours are extensively analyzed and compared in terms of three primary factors: equivalent turn-to-turn resistivity, coil size and ramping rate. The results show that the charging time increases dramatically with the coil size and may be too long to be practical for large-scale applications using HTS coils with low turn-to-turn resistivity. Increasing the turn-to-turn resistivity enables one to accelerate the charging process

  10. Numerical modelling of ground-borne noise and vibration in buildings due to surface rail traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, P.; Degrande, G.; Augusztinovicz, F.

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with the numerical computation of the structural and acoustic response of a building to an incoming wave field generated by high-speed surface railway traffic. The source model consists of a moving vehicle on a longitudinally invariant track, coupled to a layered ground modelled with a boundary element formulation. The receiver model is based on a substructuring formulation and consists of a boundary element model of the soil and a finite element model of the structure. The acoustic response of the building's rooms is computed by means of a spectral finite element formulation. The paper investigates the structural and acoustic response of a multi-story portal frame office building up to a frequency of 150 Hz to the passage of a Thalys high-speed train at constant velocity. The isolation performance of three different vibration countermeasures: a floating-floor, a room-in-room, and base-isolation, are examined.

  11. Hybrid predictions of railway induced ground vibration using a combination of experimental measurements and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, K. A.; Verbraken, H.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Along with the rapid expansion of urban rail networks comes the need for accurate predictions of railway induced vibration levels at grade and in buildings. Current computational methods for making predictions of railway induced ground vibration rely on simplifying modelling assumptions and require detailed parameter inputs, which lead to high levels of uncertainty. It is possible to mitigate against these issues using a combination of field measurements and state-of-the-art numerical methods, known as a hybrid model. In this paper, two hybrid models are developed, based on the use of separate source and propagation terms that are quantified using in situ measurements or modelling results. These models are implemented using term definitions proposed by the Federal Railroad Administration and assessed using the specific illustration of a surface railway. It is shown that the limitations of numerical and empirical methods can be addressed in a hybrid procedure without compromising prediction accuracy.

  12. The OML-SprayDrift model for predicting pesticide drift and deposition from ground boom sprayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfstrøm, Per; Bruus, Marianne; Andersen, Helle Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    at increasing distances. The vertical concentration profile downwind has a maximum just above the ground in our observations and calculations. The model accounts for the meteorological conditions, droplet ejection velocity and size spectrum. Model validation led to an R2 value of 0.78, and 91% of the calculated......In order to predict the exposure of hedgerows and other neighboring biotopes to pesticides from field-spray applications, an existing Gaussian atmospheric dispersion and deposition model was developed to model the changes in droplet size due to evaporation affecting the deposition velocity....... The Gaussian tilting plume principle was applied inside the stayed track. The model was developed on one set of field experiments using a flat-fan nozzle and validated against another set of field experiments using an air-induction nozzle. The vertical spray-drift profile was measured using hair curlers...

  13. Ground Signatures of EMIC Waves obtained From a 3D Global Wave Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.; Zong, Q.; Zhang, L.

    2016-12-01

    EMIC waves generated in the inner magnetosphere are important drivers of radiation belt particle loss. Van Allen Probes and ground observations of EMIC waves suggest that localized magnetospheric sources inject waves that are guided along geomagnetic field lines and then reflected and refracted in the low altitude magnetosphere [Kim, E.-H., and J. R. Johnson (2016), Geophys. Res. Lett., 43, 13-21, doi:10.1002/2015GL066978] before entering the ionosphere. The waves then spread horizontally within the F-region waveguide and propagate to the ground. To understand the observed properties of EMIC waves, a global 3D model of ULF waves in Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and neutral atmosphere has been developed. The simulation domain extends from Earth's surface to a spherical boundary a few tens of thousands of km in radius. The model uses spherical coordinates and incorporates an overset Yin-Yang grid that eliminates the singularity at the polar axis and improves uniformity of the grid in the polar areas [Kageyama, A., and T. Sato (2004), Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 5, Q09005, doi:10.1029/2004GC000734]. The geomagnetic field in the model is general, but is dipole in this study. The plasma is described as a set of electron and multiple species ion conducting fluids. Realistic 3D density profiles of various ion species as well as thermospheric parameters are provided by the Canadian Ionosphere Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) [Martynenko O.V. et al. (2014), J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 120, 51-61, doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2014.08.014]. The global ULF wave model is applied to study propagation of EMIC waves excited in the equatorial plane near L=7. Wave propagation along field lines, reflection and refraction in the zone of critical frequencies, and further propagation through the ionosphere to the ground are discussed.

  14. Seismic hazard assessment for Myanmar: Earthquake model database, ground-motion scenarios, and probabilistic assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C. H.; Wang, Y.; Thant, M.; Maung Maung, P.; Sieh, K.

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed an earthquake and fault database, conducted a series of ground-shaking scenarios, and proposed seismic hazard maps for all of Myanmar and hazard curves for selected cities. Our earthquake database integrates the ISC, ISC-GEM and global ANSS Comprehensive Catalogues, and includes harmonized magnitude scales without duplicate events. Our active fault database includes active fault data from previous studies. Using the parameters from these updated databases (i.e., the Gutenberg-Richter relationship, slip rate, maximum magnitude and the elapse time of last events), we have determined the earthquake recurrence models of seismogenic sources. To evaluate the ground shaking behaviours in different tectonic regimes, we conducted a series of tests by matching the modelled ground motions to the felt intensities of earthquakes. Through the case of the 1975 Bagan earthquake, we determined that Atkinson and Moore's (2003) scenario using the ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) fits the behaviours of the subduction events best. Also, the 2011 Tarlay and 2012 Thabeikkyin events suggested the GMPEs of Akkar and Cagnan (2010) fit crustal earthquakes best. We thus incorporated the best-fitting GMPEs and site conditions based on Vs30 (the average shear-velocity down to 30 m depth) from analysis of topographic slope and microtremor array measurements to assess seismic hazard. The hazard is highest in regions close to the Sagaing Fault and along the Western Coast of Myanmar as seismic sources there have earthquakes occur at short intervals and/or last events occurred a long time ago. The hazard curves for the cities of Bago, Mandalay, Sagaing, Taungoo and Yangon show higher hazards for sites close to an active fault or with a low Vs30, e.g., the downtown of Sagaing and Shwemawdaw Pagoda in Bago.

  15. Properties of the ground state in a spin-2 transverse Ising model with the presence of a crystal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜伟; 魏国柱; 杜安; 张起

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the ground state in the spin-2 transverse Ising model with the presence of a crystal field arestudied by using the effective-field theory with correlations. The longitudinal and transverse magnetizations, the phasediagram and the internal energy in the ground state are given numerically for a honeycomb lattice (z=3).

  16. Properties of the ground state in a spin—2 transverse Ising model with the presence of a srystal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜伟; 魏国柱; 等

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the ground state in the spin-2 transverse Ising model with the presence of a crystal of a crystal field are studied by using the effective-field theory with correlations,The longitudinal and transverse magnetizations,the phase diagram and the internal energy in the ground state are given numerically for a honeycomb lattice(z=3).

  17. How do People Make Sense of Unfamiliar Visualizations?: A Grounded Model of Novice's Information Visualization Sensemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sukwon; Kim, Sung-Hee; Hung, Ya-Hsin; Lam, Heidi; Kang, Youn-ah; Yi, Ji Soo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we would like to investigate how people make sense of unfamiliar information visualizations. In order to achieve the research goal, we conducted a qualitative study by observing 13 participants when they endeavored to make sense of three unfamiliar visualizations (i.e., a parallel-coordinates plot, a chord diagram, and a treemap) that they encountered for the first time. We collected data including audio/video record of think-aloud sessions and semi-structured interview; and analyzed the data using the grounded theory method. The primary result of this study is a grounded model of NOvice's information Vlsualization Sensemaking (NOVIS model), which consists of the five major cognitive activities: 1 encountering visualization, 2 constructing a frame, 3 exploring visualization, 4 questioning the frame, and 5 floundering on visualization. We introduce the NOVIS model by explaining the five activities with representative quotes from our participants. We also explore the dynamics in the model. Lastly, we compare with other existing models and share further research directions that arose from our observations.

  18. A phenomenological model of the muon density profile on the ground of very inclined air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, H. P.; Billoir, P.; Deligny, O.; Hebbeker, T.

    2010-09-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays generate extensive air showers in Earth's atmosphere. A standard approach to reconstruct the energy of an ultra-high energy cosmic rays is to sample the lateral profile of the particle density on the ground of the air shower with an array of surface detectors. For cosmic rays with large inclinations, this reconstruction is based on a model of the lateral profile of the muon density observed on the ground, which is fitted to the observed muon densities in individual surface detectors. The best models for this task are derived from detailed Monte-Carlo simulations of the air shower development. We present a phenomenological parametrization scheme which allows to derive a model of the average lateral profile of the muon density directly from a fit to a set of individual Monte-Carlo simulated air showers. The model reproduces the detailed simulations with a high precision. As an example, we generate a muon density model which is valid in the energy range 10 18 eV < E < 10 20 eV and the zenith angle range 60°<θ<90°. We will further demonstrate a way to speed up the simulation of such muon profiles by three orders of magnitude, if only the muons in the shower are of interest.

  19. Air Pollution Modelling to Predict Maximum Ground Level Concentration for Dust from a Palm Oil Mill Stack

    OpenAIRE

    Regina A. A.; I. Mohammad Halim Shah

    2010-01-01

    The study is to model emission from a stack to estimate ground level concentration from a palm oil mill. The case study is a mill located in Kuala Langat, Selangor. Emission source is from boilers stacks. The exercise determines the estimate the ground level concentrations for dust to the surrounding areas through the utilization of modelling software. The surround area is relatively flat, an industrial area surrounded by factories and with palm oil plantations in the outskirts. The model uti...

  20. A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against Asymmetric Homeland Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against Asymmetric Homeland Threat Ronald L. Cypert Scientific...units, along with coordination at the state and federal agency level, a dynamic process modeling capability was chosen to chart the myriad...COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Process Model for Deployment Planning of Ground-based Air Defense System Against

  1. Design of a shielded coil element of a matrix gradient coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Littin, Sebastian; Layton, Kelvin J.; Kroboth, Stefan; Yu, Huijun; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2017-08-01

    The increasing interest in spatial encoding with non-linear magnetic fields has intensified the need for coils that generates such fields. Matrix coils consisting of multiple coil elements appear to offer a high flexibility in generating customized encoding fields and are particularly promising for localized high resolution imaging applications. However, coil elements of existing matrix coils were primarily designed and constructed for better shimming and therefore are not expected to achieve an optimal performance for local spatial encoding. Moreover, eddy current properties of such coil elements were not fully explored. In this work, an optimization problem is formulated based on the requirement of local non-linear encoding and eddy current reduction that results in novel designs of coil elements for an actively-shielded matrix gradient coil. Two metrics are proposed to assess the performance of different coil element designs. The results are analyzed to reveal new insights into coil element design.

  2. Scaffolds, levers, rods and springs: diverse cellular functions of long coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A; Meier, I

    2004-08-01

    Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in a variety of organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems, motors, levers, rotating arms and possibly springs. A growing number of human diseases are found to be caused by mutations in long coiled-coil proteins. This review summarizes our current understanding of the multifaceted group of long coiled-coil proteins in the cytoskeleton, nucleus, Golgi and cell division apparatus. The biophysical features of coiled-coil domains provide first clues toward their contribution to the diverse protein functions and promise potential future applications in the area of nanotechnology. Combining the power of fully sequenced genomes and structure prediction algorithms, it is now possible to comprehensively summarize and compare the complete inventory of coiled-coil proteins of different organisms.

  3. Investigation on an RFID planar coil for a wireless communicative aortic stent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talleb, Hakeim; Faci, Salim; Lautru, David; Hanna, Victor Fouad; Wiart, Joe

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an investigation on a potential biomedical RFID planar coil operating at 13.56 MHz for measuring the blood pressure level, mounted inside an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The results show that a wireless communication is achieved in a perimeter of 60 cm, while respecting the ISO 15693 standard for vicinity contactless cards. Measurement and electromagnetic simulation results show that the inductive coupling is deteriorating if the planar coil is in direct contact with water without correctly encapsulating this coil. An electric model is given for our proposed RFID planar coil immersed in water.

  4. Repeats in transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Seema

    2013-06-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil proteins (TACC1, 2, and 3) are essential proteins associated with the assembly of spindle microtubules and maintenance of bipolarity. Dysregulation of TACCs is associated with tumorigenesis, but studies of microsatellite instability in TACC genes have not been extensive. Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat instability is known to cause many types of cancer. The present in silico analysis of SSRs in human TACC gene sequences shows the presence of mono- to hexa-nucleotide repeats, with the highest densities found for mono- and di-nucleotide repeats. Density of repeats is higher in introns than in exons. Some of the repeats are present in regulatory regions and retained introns. Human TACC genes show conservation of many repeat classes. Microsatellites in TACC genes could be valuable markers for monitoring numerical chromosomal aberrations and or cancer.

  5. Acidic pH triggers conformational changes at the NH2-terminal propeptide of the precursor of pulmonary surfactant protein B to form a coiled coil structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañares-Hidalgo, A; Pérez-Gil, J; Estrada, P

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B is synthesized as a larger precursor, proSP-B. We report that a recombinant form of human SP-BN forms a coiled coil structure at acidic pH. The protonation of a residue with pK=4.8±0.06 is the responsible of conformational changes detected by circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence emission. Sedimentation velocity analysis showed protein oligomerisation at any pH condition, with an enrichment of the species compatible with a tetramer at acidic pH. Low 2,2,2,-trifluoroethanol concentration promoted β-sheet structures in SP-BN, which bind Thioflavin T, at acidic pH, whereas it promoted coiled coil structures at neutral pH. The amino acid stretch predicted to form β-sheet parallel association in SP-BN overlaps with the sequence predicted by several programs to form coiled coil structure. A synthetic peptide ((60)W-E(85)) designed from the sequence of the amino acid stretch of SP-BN predicted to form coiled coil structure showed random coil conformation at neutral pH but concentration-dependent helical structure at acidic pH. Sedimentation velocity analysis of the peptide indicated monomeric state at neutral pH (s20, w=0.55S; Mr~3kDa) and peptide association (s20, w=1.735S; Mr=~14kDa) at acidic pH, with sedimentation equilibrium fitting to a Monomer-Nmer-Mmer model with N=6 and M=4 (Mr=14692Da). We propose that protein oligomerisation through coiled-coil motifs could then be a general feature in the assembly of functional units in saposin-like proteins in general and in the organization of SP-B in a functional surfactant, in particular. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Coil Migration through a Neuroform 3 Stent during Endovascular Coiling. A Case Report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, A

    2009-07-29

    Summary: A 43-year-old woman attended for stent assisted coiling. A Neuroform 30 x 4.5 mm stent had been successfully placed over the left periophthalmic aneurysm. During the coiling the first coil migrated through the crowns in the stent, lodging at the MCA bifurcation. We believe that the coil herniated through the overlying stent due to the carotid siphon curvature and the open cell design. Furthermore the distal markers of the stent impeded coil extraction with a MERCI device.

  7. Atmospheric Effects for Ground Target Signature Modeling. 3. Discussion and Application of the ASL Scattering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-01

    Potential Use of Tactical Microwave Radio (TMR) for Transmission of Weather Radar Data," ECOM-5524, December 1973. 42. Lindberg, James D., and...frared Radiometer ," ECOM-5556, February 1975. 74. Miers, B. T., and H. S. Oey, "An Evaluation of the Hydrometeorological Ground Truth Facility at...Chemical Transport Pgrm Division of Biomedical and Environmental Rsch ATTN: US Atomic Energy Commission Washington, DC 20545 Commander Naval Air

  8. Simulated potentiometric surface contours at end of simulation (1998) in model layer 1 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These contours represent the simulated potentiometric surface at the end of simulation (1998) in model layer 1 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  9. Simulated potentiometric surface contours at end of simulation (1998) in model layer 16 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These contours represent the simulated potentiometric surface at the end of simulation (1998) in model layer 16 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  10. Simulated potentiometric surface contours at end of simulation (1998) in model layer 1 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These contours represent the simulated potentiometric surface at the end of simulation (1998) in model layer 1 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  11. Simulated potentiometric surface contours at end of simulation (1998) in model layer 16 of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These contours represent the simulated potentiometric surface at the end of simulation (1998) in model layer 16 of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow...

  12. MODEL INFORMASI PUBLIK DI ERA MEDIA SOSIAL: KAJIAN GROUNDED TEORI DI PEMDA SUKOHARJO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Purworini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Model komunikasi yang diterapkan di instansi pemerintah daerah menarik untuk diteliti dari kajian public relations. Model komunikasi yang tampak dilakukan satu arah diyakini oleh banyak kalangan akan bergeser ke komunikasi dua arah seiring dengan maraknya perkembangan media sosial. Penelitian di bidang ini tentu sangat relevan mengingat humas secara ideal memiliki peran signifikan dalam mengelola komunikasi di instansi. Penelitian ini dilakukan di pemerintah daerah Sukoharjo. Penelitian dilakukan dengan yang teknik kualitatif dengan analisis data menggunakan grounded theory. Dari analisis yang dilakukan, dapat dijelaskan bahwa humas pemda Sukoharjo menganut model komunikasi satu arah, dimana model ini bertumpu pada diseminasi informasi kepada publik. Ini menjelaskan nilai utama yang melekat dalam komunikasi di humas pemda. Nilai utama termasuk pola komunikasi, tipe informasi dan media yang digunakan. Komunikasi satu arah terbentuk karena pengaruh SDM yang ada dan peraturan yang berlaku di instansi tersebut.

  13. Evaluating Topographic Effects on Ground Deformation: Insights from Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan

    2015-07-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assume the Earth's surface as flat. However, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals generated by a spherical pressure source embedded in an elastic homogeneous media and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g., slope, aspect, curvature). For this, we bring together the results presented in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D finite element (FE) model results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas due to diverse topographic features (e.g., collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars).

  14. Forward modeling of seepage of reservoir dam based on ground penetrating radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueli WU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The risk of the reservoir dam seepage will bring the waste of water resources and the loss of life and property. The ground penetrating radar (GPR is designed as a daily inspection system of dams to improve the existing technology which can't determine the actual situation of the dam seepage tunnel coordinates. The finite difference time domain (FDTD is used to solve the Yee's grids discreatization in two-dimensional space, and its electromagnetic distribution equation is obtained as well. Based on the actual structure of reservoir dam foundation, the ideal model of air layer, concrete layer, clay layer and two water seepage holes is described in detail, and the concrete layer interference model with limestone interference point is established. The system architecture is implemented by using MATLAB, and the forward modeling is performed. The results indicate that ground penetrating radar can be used for deep target detection. Through comparing the detection spectrum of three kinds of frequency electromagnetic wave by changing the center frequency of the GPR electromagnetic wave of 50 MHz, 100 MHz and 200 MHz, it is concluded that the scanning result is more accurate at 100 MHz. At the same time, the simulation results of the interference model show that this method can be used for the detection of complex terrain.

  15. STEPP: A Grounded Model to Assure the Quality of Instructional Activities in e-Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy AHMED ABDELAZIZ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present theoretical paper aims to develop a grounded model for designing instructional activities appropriate to e-learning and online learning environments. The suggested model is guided by learning principles of cognitivism, constructivism, and connectivism learning principles to help online learners constructing meaningful experiences and moving from knowledge acquisition to knowledge creation process. The proposed model consists of five dynamic and grounded domains that assure the quality of designing and using e-learning activities: Ø Social Domain; Ø Technological Domain; Ø Epistemological Domain; Ø Psychological domain; and Ø Pedagogical Domain. Each of these domains needs four types of presences to reflect the design and the application process of e-learning activities. These four presences are: Ø cognitive presence, Ø human presence, Ø psychological presence and Ø mental presence. Applying the proposed model (STEPP throughout all online and adaptive e-learning environments may improve the process of designing and developing e-learning activities to be used as mindtools for current and future learners.

  16. Estimating ground water recharge using flow models of perched karstic aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Menachem; Gvirtzman, Haim

    2007-01-01

    The fraction of rain that is annually recharged to ground water is a function of the transient quantities of precipitation (wet vs. dry years) as well as other meteorological and geologic factors, and thus it is very difficult to estimate. In this study, we have used long records (20 to 30 years) of precipitation and spring discharge to reconstruct the transient character of yearly recharge. These data sets were used to calibrate numerical ground water flow models on the less than 3 km(2) scale for four separate perched karstic aquifers in the Judean and Samarian Mountains of Israel. The stratification and karstic character of the local carbonate rock aquifers cause ground water to flow through discrete dissolution channels and to discharge at isolated springs. An innovative, dual-porosity approach was used where a finite-difference solution simulates flow in the rock matrix, while the karstic channels are simulated using computationally simple drains. Perched conditions are also simulated innovatively using MODFLOW by treating the bottom unsaturated layer as if it is saturated, but by assuming zero pressure head throughout the "unsaturated" layer. Best fitting between measured and computed spring hydrograph data has allowed us to develop a set of empirical functions relating measured precipitation to recharge to the aquifer. The generic methodology presented gives insight into the suspected changes in aquifer recharge rates between particularly wet or dry years.

  17. Performance and Economic Modeling of Horizontally Drilled Ground-Source Heat Pumps in Select California Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiryadinata, Steven

    Service life modeling was performed to gage the viability of unitary 3.5 kWt, ground-source terminal heat pumps (GTHP) employing horizontal directionally drilled geothermal heat exchangers (GHX) over air-source terminal heat pumps (PTHP) in hotels and motels and residential apartment building sectors in California's coastal and inland climates. Results suggest the GTHP can reduce hourly peak demand for the utility by 7%-25% compared to PTHP, depending on the climate and building type. The annual energy savings, which range from -1% to 5%, are highly dependent on the GTHP pump energy use relative to the energy savings attributed to the difference in ground and air temperatures (DeltaT). In mild climates with small ?T, the pump energy use may overcome any advantage to utilizing a GHX. The majority of total levelized cost savings - ranging from 0.18/ft2 to 0.3/ft 2 - are due to reduced maintenance and lifetime capital cost normally associated with geothermal heat pump systems. Without these reductions (not validated for the GTHP system studied), the GTHP technology does not appear to offer significant advantages over PTHP in the climate zones studied here. The GTHP levelized cost was most sensitive to variations in installed cost and in some cases, energy use (influenced by climate zone choice), which together highlights the importance of climate selection for installation, and the need for larger market penetration of ground-source systems in order to bring down installed costs as the technology matures.

  18. Probabilistic Modeling for Risk Assessment of California Ground Water Contamination by Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, M.; Troiano, J.; Spurlock, F.

    2007-12-01

    The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) is responsible for the registration of pesticides in California. DPR's Environmental Monitoring Branch evaluates the potential for pesticide active ingredients to move to ground water under legal agricultural use conditions. Previous evaluations were primarily based on threshold values for specific persistence and mobility properties of pesticides as prescribed in the California Pesticide Contamination Prevention Act of 1985. Two limitations identified with that process were the univariate nature where interactions of the properties were not accounted for, and the inability to accommodate multiple values of a physical-chemical property. We addressed these limitations by developing a probabilistic modeling method based on prediction of potential well water concentrations. A mechanistic pesticide transport model, LEACHM, is used to simulate sorption, degradation and transport of a candidate pesticide through the root zone. A second empirical model component then simulates pesticide degradation and transport through the vadose zone to a receiving ground water aquifer. Finally, degradation during transport in the aquifer to the well screen is included in calculating final potential well concentrations. Using Monte Carlo techniques, numerous LEACHM simulations are conducted using random samples of the organic carbon normalized soil adsorption coefficients (Koc) and soil dissipation half-life values derived from terrestrial field dissipation (TFD) studies. Koc and TFD values are obtained from gamma distributions fitted to pooled data from agricultural-use pesticides detected in California ground water: atrazine, simazine, diuron, bromacil, hexazinone, and norflurazon. The distribution of predicted well water concentrations for these pesticides is in good agreement with concentrations measured in domestic wells in coarse, leaching vulnerable soils of Fresno and Tulure Counties. The leaching potential of a new

  19. Computational dosimetry for grounded and ungrounded human models due to contact current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwok Hung; Hattori, Junya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Taki, Masao

    2013-08-01

    This study presents the computational dosimetry of contact currents for grounded and ungrounded human models. The uncertainty of the quasi-static (QS) approximation of the in situ electric field induced in a grounded/ungrounded human body due to the contact current is first estimated. Different scenarios of cylindrical and anatomical human body models are considered, and the results are compared with the full-wave analysis. In the QS analysis, the induced field in the grounded cylindrical model is calculated by the QS finite-difference time-domain (QS-FDTD) method, and compared with the analytical solution. Because no analytical solution is available for the grounded/ungrounded anatomical human body model, the results of the QS-FDTD method are then compared with those of the conventional FDTD method. The upper frequency limit for the QS approximation in the contact current dosimetry is found to be 3 MHz, with a relative local error of less than 10%. The error increases above this frequency, which can be attributed to the neglect of the displacement current. The QS or conventional FDTD method is used for the dosimetry of induced electric field and/or specific absorption rate (SAR) for a contact current injected into the index finger of a human body model in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 100 MHz. The in situ electric fields or SAR are compared with the basic restrictions in the international guidelines/standards. The maximum electric field or the 99th percentile value of the electric fields appear not only in the fat and muscle tissues of the finger, but also around the wrist, forearm, and the upper arm. Some discrepancies are observed between the basic restrictions for the electric field and SAR and the reference levels for the contact current, especially in the extremities. These discrepancies are shown by an equation that relates the current density, tissue conductivity, and induced electric field in the finger with a cross-sectional area of 1 cm2.

  20. Global Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations and Trends Inferred from Satellite Observations, Modeling, and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Randall; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Boys, Brian; Philip, Sajeev; Lee, Colin; Snider, Graydon; Weagle, Crystal

    2014-05-01

    Outdoor fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a leading environmentally-related cause of premature mortality worldwide. However, ground-level PM2.5 monitors remain sparse in many regions of the world. Satellite remote sensing from MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS yields a powerful global data source to address this issue. Global modeling (GEOS-Chem) plays a critical role in relating these observations to ground-level concentrations. The resultant satellite-based estimates of PM2.5 indicate dramatic variation around the world, with implications for global public health. A new ground-based aerosol network (SPARTAN) offers valuable measurements to understand the relationship between satellite observations of aerosol optical depth and ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. This talk will highlight recent advances in combining satellite remote sensing, global modeling, and ground-based measurements to improve understanding of global population exposure to outdoor fine particulate matter.

  1. Performance evaluation of matrix gradient coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Schultz, Gerrit; Testud, Frederik; Welz, Anna Masako; Weber, Hans; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new performance measure of a matrix coil (also known as multi-coil) from the perspective of efficient, local, non-linear encoding without explicitly considering target encoding fields. An optimization problem based on a joint optimization for the non-linear encoding fields is formulated. Based on the derived objective function, a figure of merit of a matrix coil is defined, which is a generalization of a previously known resistive figure of merit for traditional gradient coils. A cylindrical matrix coil design with a high number of elements is used to illustrate the proposed performance measure. The results are analyzed to reveal novel features of matrix coil designs, which allowed us to optimize coil parameters, such as number of coil elements. A comparison to a scaled, existing multi-coil is also provided to demonstrate the use of the proposed performance parameter. The assessment of a matrix gradient coil profits from using a single performance parameter that takes the local encoding performance of the coil into account in relation to the dissipated power.

  2. Temperature Profile Measurements During Heat Treatment of BSCCO 2212 Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, Alvin; /Fermilab

    2011-04-14

    The temperature profile of two different BSCCO 2212 coils has been analyzed. The profiles are obtained from thermocouples imbedded in the windings during the heat treatment that activates the 2212. The melting and freezing of the 2212 is clearly observed. A model that describes the data and can be used to guide the processing of new coils has been developed. We have obtained the thermal history of two BSCCO coils, one from NHMFL (1) that had 10 layers of 1 mm diameter wire with 0.15 mm insulation and a second coil from OST that had 24 layers with similar insulation and conductor size. Both coils had thermocouples imbedded in the windings and excellent recordings of the temperature over the whole reaction cycle were available for analysis. There are several features that we will address in this note. Measurements have shown that the I{sub c} of the conductor is a sensitive function of its thermal history. This brings up the question of the absolute accuracy of the thermometry in the range around 882 C, the MP of 2212. The reference for the treatment profile is really related to this MP and to small deviations around it. Since the heat of fusion of 2212 is rather large, it generates a clear signal during the melting and cooling transition that automatically generates the relative temperature markers. The physics is the same as the way ice in water maintains an isothermal environment until it is all melted. A related question is the thermal response time of the coil package. The temperature cycles that are being used to optimize strand and small coils can have rapid changes easily implemented whereas a large coil may have such a large thermal time constant that the optimum cycle may not be attainable. A simple analytical model that works well for small solenoids has been developed and an ANSYS (5) program that works for larger coils with more complicated geometry has been set up but will not be discussed in this note.

  3. Quenching in coupled adiabatic coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C.

    1985-03-01

    The prediction of the effects of a quench on stress and temperature is an important aspect of the design of superconducting magnets. Of particular interest, and the exclusive topic of this study, is the prediction of the effects of quenching in coupled adiabatic coils, such as the multi-section windings of a high field NMR spectrometer magnet. The predictive methods used here are based on the measurement of the time of propagation of quench between turns. From this measurement an approximate algorithum for the propagation time is used in a code which solves the linear differential equations for the coil currents and calculates the movement of normal zone boundaries and hence the associated winding resistance.

  4. Isostatic gravity map of the Death Valley ground-water model area, Nevada and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponce, D.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Morin, R.L.; Mankinen, E.A.

    2002-03-12

    Gravity investigations of the Death Valley ground-water model area are part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (Interagency agreement DE-AI08-96NV11967) to help characterize the geology and hydrology of southwestern Nevada and parts of California. The Death Valley ground-water model is located between lat 35 degrees 00' and 38 degrees 15' N., and long 115 degrees and 118 degrees W. An isostatic gravity map of the Death Valley ground-water model was prepared from over 40,000 gravity stations, most of which are publicly available on a CD-ROM of gravity data of Nevada (Ponce, 1997). The map also includes gravity data recently collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (Mankinen and others, 1998; Morin and Blakely, 1999). A subset of these gravity data in the Nevada Test Site and vicinity were described in detail by Harris and others (1989) who included information on gravity meters used, dates of collection, sources, descriptions of base stations, plots of data, and digital and paper lists of principal facts. For display purposes only, gravity data within Yucca Flat were thinned by a factor of 10. The digital gravity data set was gridded at an interval of 400 m using a computer program (Webring, 1981) based on a minimum curvature algorithm by Briggs (1974). The resulting grid was then interpolated to a 200-m grid to minimize pixel size, and then it was color contoured.

  5. Development of Neural Network Model for Predicting Peak Ground Acceleration Based on Microtremor Measurement and Soil Boring Test Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerh, T; Lin, J. S; Gunaratnam, D

    2012-01-01

    .... This paper is therefore aimed at developing a neural network model, based on available microtremor measurement and on-site soil boring test data, for predicting peak ground acceleration at a site...

  6. Long-range magnetic fields in the ground state of the Standard Model plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    In thermal equilibrium the ground state of the plasma of Standard Model particles is determined by temperature and exactly conserved combinations of baryon and lepton numbers. We show that at non-zero values of the global charges a translation invariant and homogeneous state of the plasma becomes unstable and the system transits into a new state, containing a large-scale magnetic field. The origin of this effect is the parity-breaking character of weak interactions and chiral anomaly. This situation can occur in the early Universe and may play an important role in its subsequent evolution.

  7. Long-Range Magnetic Fields in the Ground State of the Standard Model Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2012-09-01

    In thermal equilibrium the ground state of the plasma of Standard Model particles is determined by temperature and exactly conserved combinations of baryon and lepton numbers. We show that at nonzero values of the global charges a translation invariant and homogeneous state of the plasma becomes unstable and the system transits into a new equilibrium state, containing a large-scale magnetic field. The origin of this effect is the parity-breaking character of weak interactions and chiral anomaly. This situation could occur in the early Universe and may play an important role in its subsequent evolution.

  8. Ground states of bilayered and extended t-J-U models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voo, Khee-Kyun

    2015-09-01

    The ground states of bilayered and extended t-J-U models are investigated with renormalized mean field theory. The trial wave functions are Gutzwiller projected Hartree-Fock states, and the site double occupancies are variational parameters. It is found that a spontaneous interlayer phase separation (PS) may arise in bilayers. In electron-hole doping asymmetric systems, the propensity for PS is stronger in electron doped bands. Via a PS, superconductivity can survive to lower doping densities, and antiferromagnetism in electron doped systems may survive to higher doping densities. The result is related to the superconducting cuprates.

  9. Ground-State Phase Diagram of Transverse Spin-2 Ising Model with Longitudinal Crystal-Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The transverse spin-2 Ising ferromagnetic model with a longitudinal crystal-field is studied within the mean-field theory based on Bogoliubov inequality for the Gibbs free energy. The ground-state phase diagram and the tricritical point are obtained in the transverse field Ω/z J-longitudinal crystal D/zJ field plane. We find that there are the first order-order phase transitions in a very smallrange of D/zJ besides the usual first order-disorder phase transitions and the second order-disorder phase transitions.

  10. Ground truth methods for optical cross-section modeling of biological aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter, J.; Thrush, E.; Santarpia, J.; Chaudhry, Z.; Gilberry, J.; Brown, D. M.; Brown, A.; Carter, C. C.

    2011-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems have demonstrated some capability to meet the needs of a fastresponse standoff biological detection method for simulants in open air conditions. These systems are designed to exploit various cloud signatures, such as differential elastic backscatter, fluorescence, and depolarization in order to detect biological warfare agents (BWAs). However, because the release of BWAs in open air is forbidden, methods must be developed to predict candidate system performance against real agents. In support of such efforts, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) has developed a modeling approach to predict the optical properties of agent materials from relatively simple, Biosafety Level 3-compatible bench top measurements. JHU/APL has fielded new ground truth instruments (in addition to standard particle sizers, such as the Aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) or GRIMM aerosol monitor (GRIMM)) to more thoroughly characterize the simulant aerosols released in recent field tests at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG). These instruments include the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), the Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS), and the Aspect Aerosol Size and Shape Analyser (Aspect). The SMPS was employed as a means of measuring smallparticle concentrations for more accurate Mie scattering simulations; the UVAPS, which measures size-resolved fluorescence intensity, was employed as a path toward fluorescence cross section modeling; and the Aspect, which measures particle shape, was employed as a path towards depolarization modeling.

  11. Towards a Multi-Variable Parametric Cost Model for Ground and Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Parametric cost models can be used by designers and project managers to perform relative cost comparisons between major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades; enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment; and, provide a basis for estimating total project cost between related concepts. This paper hypothesizes a single model, based on published models and engineering intuition, for both ground and space telescopes: OTA Cost approximately (X) D(exp (1.75 +/- 0.05)) lambda(exp(-0.5 +/- 0.25) T(exp -0.25) e (exp (-0.04)Y). Specific findings include: space telescopes cost 50X to 100X more ground telescopes; diameter is the most important CER; cost is reduced by approximately 50% every 20 years (presumably because of technology advance and process improvements); and, for space telescopes, cost associated with wavelength performance is balanced by cost associated with operating temperature. Finally, duplication only reduces cost for the manufacture of identical systems (i.e. multiple aperture sparse arrays or interferometers). And, while duplication does reduce the cost of manufacturing the mirrors of segmented primary mirror, this cost savings does not appear to manifest itself in the final primary mirror assembly (presumably because the structure for a segmented mirror is more complicated than for a monolithic mirror).

  12. Understanding Ground Motion in Las Vegas: Insights from Data Analysis and Two-Dimensional Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; McCallen, D

    2004-02-05

    Seismic ground motions are amplified in low velocity sedimentary basins relative to adjacent sites on high velocity hard rock. We used historical recordings of NTS nuclear explosions and earthquake recordings in Las Vegas Valley to quantify frequency-dependent basin amplification using Standard Spectral Ratios. We show that amplifications, referred to as site response, can reach a factor of 10 in the frequency band 0.4-2.0 Hz. Band-averaged site response between 0.4-2.0 Hz is strongly correlated with basin depth. However, it is also well known that site response is related to shallow shear-wave velocity structure. We simulated low frequency (f<1Hz) ground motion and site response with two-dimensional elastic finite difference simulations. We demonstrate that physically plausible models of the shallow subsurface, including low velocity sedimentary structure, can predict relative amplification as well as some of the complexity in the observed waveforms. This study demonstrates that site response can be modeled without invoking complex and computationally expensive three-dimensional structural models.

  13. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox (Columbia, MO)

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  14. Ground-motion modeling of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, part II: Ground-motion estimates for the 1906 earthquake and scenario events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, B.T.; Brocher, T.M.; Dolenc, D.; Dreger, D.; Graves, R.W.; Harmsen, S.; Hartzell, S.; Larsen, S.; McCandless, K.; Nilsson, S.; Petersson, N.A.; Rodgers, A.; Sjogreen, B.; Zoback, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate the ground motions produce by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake making use of the recently developed Song et al. (2008) source model that combines the available geodetic and seismic observations and recently constructed 3D geologic and seismic velocity models. Our estimates of the ground motions for the 1906 earthquake are consistent across five ground-motion modeling groups employing different wave propagation codes and simulation domains. The simulations successfully reproduce the main features of the Boatwright and Bundock (2005) ShakeMap, but tend to over predict the intensity of shaking by 0.1-0.5 modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) units. Velocity waveforms at sites throughout the San Francisco Bay Area exhibit characteristics consistent with rupture directivity, local geologic conditions (e.g., sedimentary basins), and the large size of the event (e.g., durations of strong shaking lasting tens of seconds). We also compute ground motions for seven hypothetical scenarios rupturing the same extent of the northern San Andreas fault, considering three additional hypocenters and an additional, random distribution of slip. Rupture directivity exerts the strongest influence on the variations in shaking, although sedimentary basins do consistently contribute to the response in some locations, such as Santa Rosa, Livermore, and San Jose. These scenarios suggest that future large earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault may subject the current San Francisco Bay urban area to stronger shaking than a repeat of the 1906 earthquake. Ruptures propagating southward towards San Francisco appear to expose more of the urban area to a given intensity level than do ruptures propagating northward.

  15. Design and performance issues of RF coils utilized in ultra high field MRI: experimental and numerical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Kangarlu, Alayar; Chakeress, Donald W

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, two TEM resonators were evaluated experimentally and numerically at 8 tesla (T) (340 MHz for 1H imaging). The coils were constructed to be 21.2-cm long (standard) and 11-cm long (a proposed less claustrophobic design). The experimental evaluation was done on a single cadaver using an ultra high field, 8 T, whole-body magnet. The numerical modeling was performed using an in-house finite difference time domain packagethat treats the coil and the load (anatomically detailed human head model) as a single system. The coils were tested with quadrature excitation at different coil alignment positions with respect to human head. For head imaging at 8 T, the overall numerical and experimental results demonstrated that when compared to the longer coil, the shorter coil provides superior signal-to-noise ratio, coil sensitivity, and excite field in the biological regions that lie within both of the coils' structures. A study of the RF (excite/receive fields) homogeneity showed variations in the performance of both coils that are mostly dependant on the region of interest and the position of coil with respect to the head. As such, depending on the application, the shorter coil could be effectively utilized.

  16. Enhancing the design of a superconducting coil for magnetic energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indira, Gomathinayagam, E-mail: gindu80@gmail.com [EEE Department, Prince Shri Venkateshwara Padmavathy Engineering College, Chennai (India); UmaMaheswaraRao, Theru, E-mail: umesh.theru@gmail.com [Divison of Power Engineering and Management, Anna University, Chennai (India); Chandramohan, Sankaralingam, E-mail: cdramo@gmail.com [Divison of Power Engineering and Management, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • High magnetic flux density of SMES coil to reduce the size. • YBCO Tapes for the construction of HTS magnets. • Relation between energy storage and length of the coil wound by various materials. • Design with a certain length of second-generation HTS. - Abstract: Study and analysis of a coil for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system is presented in this paper. Generally, high magnetic flux density is adapted in the design of superconducting coil of SMES to reduce the size of the coil and to increase its energy density. With high magnetic flux density, critical current density of the coil is degraded and so the coil is wound with High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) made of different materials. A comparative study is made to emphasize the relationship between the energy storage and length of the coil wound by Bi2223, SF12100, SCS12100 and YBCO tapes. Recently for the construction of HTS magnets, YBCO tapes have been used. Simulation models for various designs have been developed to analyze the magnetic field distribution for the optimum design of energy storage. The design which gives the maximum stored energy in the coil has been used with a certain length of second-generation HTS. The performance analysis and the results of comparative study are done.

  17. Quench absorption coils: a quench protection concept for high-field superconducting accelerator magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink, M.; Salmi, T.

    2017-06-01

    A quench protection concept based on coupled secondary coils is studied for inductively transferring energy out of a quenching superconducting dipole and thus limiting the peak hotspot temperature. So-called ‘quench absorption coils’ are placed in close proximity to the superconducting coils and are connected in series with a diode for the purpose of preventing current transformation during regular operation. During a quench, current is then transformed into the quench absorption coils so that a significant fraction of the stored magnetic energy is dissipated in the these coils. Numerical calculations are performed to determine the impact of such a concept and to evaluate the dimensions of the quench absorption coils needed to obtain significant benefits. A previously constructed 15 T Nb3Sn block coil is taken as a reference layout. Finite-element calculations are used to determine the combined inductive and thermal response of this system and these calculations are validated with a numerical model using an adiabatic approximation. The calculation results indicate that during a quench the presence of the quench absorption coils reduces the energy dissipated in the superconducting coils by 45% and reduces the hotspot temperature by over 100 K. In addition, the peak resistive voltage over the superconducting coils is significantly reduced. This suggests that this concept may prove useful for magnet designs in which the hotspot temperature is a design driver.

  18. 基于改进Preisach模型的音圈电机复杂迟滞建模%Complex hysteresis modeling for a voice coil motor based on improved preisach model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党选举; 梁卫; 姜辉

    2012-01-01

    针对音圈电机在高频响、高速、高加速度运动时存在的一种特殊复杂迟滞特性,提出一种改进的Preisach迟滞与RBF神经网络相结合的动态迟滞混合模型.采用逐次逼近的思想,第一级通过构造一个改进型Preisach模型,引入非单调信息,使其输出具有非单调迟滞特性.第二级采用动态RBF神经网络对第一级输出的相位和幅值进行补偿,实现对音圈电机实际输出的高精度逼近.基于实测数据的仿真实验结果表明,所提出的模型对一般迟滞和非单调复杂迟滞的建模都是有效的.与动态神经网络建模相比,具有更高的模型精度.%A special complex hysteresis characteristic exists in a voice coil motor (VCM) under high-frequency response, high-speed and high-acceleration motion making the system performance go worse. In order to achieve a precise positioning control for a VCM, a hybrid hysteresis model consisting of an improved Preisach model and a RBF dynamic neural network was proposed. In the improved Preisach model, non-monotonic information was introduced for describing the non-monotonic hysteresis behavior. Based on the former, a dynamic radial basis function (RBF) neural network was used to compensate the amplitude and phase error between the dynamic Preisach output and the real VCM hysteresis for a higher accuracy. Finally, the simulation results based on the measured data showed that the proposed hybrid model is effective not only for general hysteresis modeling but also for non-monotonic complex hysteresis modeling. Comparing with the dynamic neural network modeling, this hybrid model had a higher accuracy.

  19. ERA-Interim forced H-TESSEL and WRF schemes for modeling ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, M. J.; Dutra, E.; Vieira, G.; Miranda, P.; Fragoso, M.; Ramos, M.

    2009-04-01

    Permafrost is central to the carbon cycle and to the climate system and is recognized by the WCRP/WMO as a key element of the Earth System in which research efforts should focus. Compared with the Arctic, very little is known about the distribution, thickness, and properties of permafrost in the Antarctic. The main reason for this is the scarce network of permafrost temperature monitoring boreholes, as well as the short number of active layer monitoring sites. According to the IPCC in the last decades regions underlain by permafrost have been reduced in extent, and a warming of the ground has been observed in many areas. This study focus on Livingston and Deception Islands (South Shetlands), located in the Antarctic Peninsula region, one of the Earth's regions where warming has been more significant in the last 50 years. Our work is integrated in a project focusing on studying the influence of climate change on permafrost temperatures, which includes systematic and long-term terrain monitoring and also modeling using mesoscale meteorological models. A significant contribution will be the evaluation of the possibilities for using the mesoscale modeling approaches to other areas of the Antarctic Peninsula where no data exist on permafrost temperatures. Climate variability of the Antarctic Peninsula region was studied using the new reanalysis product from ECMWF Era-Interim and observational data from meteorological monitoring sites and boreholes run by our group. Monthly and annual cycles of near surface climate variables are compared. The modeling approach includes the H-TESSEL (Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land) and the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting), both forced with ERA-Interim for modeling ground temperatures in the study region. Simulations of both land surface and mesoscale models are compared with the observational data of soil temperatures. Preliminary results are presented and show that our approach can provide a good tool

  20. Solar wind driven empirical forecast models of the time derivative of the ground magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wintoft Peter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical models are developed to provide 10–30-min forecasts of the magnitude of the time derivative of local horizontal ground geomagnetic field (|dBh/dt| over Europe. The models are driven by ACE solar wind data. A major part of the work has been devoted to the search and selection of datasets to support the model development. To simplify the problem, but at the same time capture sudden changes, 30-min maximum values of |dBh/dt| are forecast with a cadence of 1 min. Models are tested both with and without the use of ACE SWEPAM plasma data. It is shown that the models generally capture sudden increases in |dBh/dt| that are associated with sudden impulses (SI. The SI is the dominant disturbance source for geomagnetic latitudes below 50° N and with minor contribution from substorms. However, at occasions, large disturbances can be seen associated with geomagnetic pulsations. For higher latitudes longer lasting disturbances, associated with substorms, are generally also captured. It is also shown that the models using only solar wind magnetic field as input perform in most cases equally well as models with plasma data. The models have been verified using different approaches including the extremal dependence index which is suitable for rare events.

  1. A theory for modeling ground-water flow in heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Construction of a ground-water model for a field area is not a straightforward process. Data are virtually never complete or detailed enough to allow substitution into the model equations and direct computation of the results of interest. Formal model calibration through optimization, statistical, and geostatistical methods is being applied to an increasing extent to deal with this problem and provide for quantitative evaluation and uncertainty analysis of the model. However, these approaches are hampered by two pervasive problems: 1) nonlinearity of the solution of the model equations with respect to some of the model (or hydrogeologic) input variables (termed in this report system characteristics) and 2) detailed and generally unknown spatial variability (heterogeneity) of some of the system characteristics such as log hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, recharge and discharge, and boundary conditions. A theory is developed in this report to address these problems. The theory allows construction and analysis of a ground-water model of flow (and, by extension, transport) in heterogeneous media using a small number of lumped or smoothed system characteristics (termed parameters). The theory fully addresses both nonlinearity and heterogeneity in such a way that the parameters are not assumed to be effective values. The ground-water flow system is assumed to be adequately characterized by a set of spatially and temporally distributed discrete values, ?, of the system characteristics. This set contains both small-scale variability that cannot be described in a model and large-scale variability that can. The spatial and temporal variability in ? are accounted for by imagining ? to be generated by a stochastic process wherein ? is normally distributed, although normality is not essential. Because ? has too large a dimension to be estimated using the data normally available, for modeling purposes ? is replaced by a smoothed or lumped approximation y?. (where y is a

  2. Ab initio optimization principle for the ground states of translationally invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Shi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a simple and fundamental numeric scheme dubbed as ab initio optimization principle (AOP) is proposed for the ground states of translational invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models. The idea is to transform a nondeterministic-polynomial-hard ground-state simulation with infinite degrees of freedom into a single optimization problem of a local function with finite number of physical and ancillary degrees of freedom. This work contributes mainly in the following aspects: (1) AOP provides a simple and efficient scheme to simulate the ground state by solving a local optimization problem. Its solution contains two kinds of boundary states, one of which play the role of the entanglement bath that mimics the interactions between a supercell and the infinite environment, and the other gives the ground state in a tensor network (TN) form. (2) In the sense of TN, a novel decomposition named as tensor ring decomposition (TRD) is proposed to implement AOP. Instead of following the contraction-truncation scheme used by many existing TN-based algorithms, TRD solves the contraction of a uniform TN in an opposite way by encoding the contraction in a set of self-consistent equations that automatically reconstruct the whole TN, making the simulation simple and unified; (3) AOP inherits and develops the ideas of different well-established methods, including the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD), network contractor dynamics, density matrix embedding theory, etc., providing a unified perspective that is previously missing in this fields. (4) AOP as well as TRD give novel implications to existing TN-based algorithms: A modified iTEBD is suggested and the two-dimensional (2D) AOP is argued to be an intrinsic 2D extension of DMRG that is based on infinite projected entangled pair state. This paper is focused on one-dimensional quantum models to present AOP. The benchmark is given on a transverse Ising

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: Improved coil design for deep brain investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, L. J.; Marketos, P.; Williams, P. I.; Melikhov, Y.; Jiles, D. C.; Starzewski, J. H.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports on a design for a coil for transcranial magnetic stimulation. The design shows potential for improving the penetration depth of the magnetic field, allowing stimulation of subcortical structures within the brain. The magnetic and induced electric fields in the human head have been calculated with finite element electromagnetic modeling software and compared with empirical measurements. Results show that the coil design used gives improved penetration depth, but also indicates the likelihood of stimulation of additional tissue resulting from the spatial distribution of the magnetic field.

  4. Dual inductive link coil design for a neural recording system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Alexander; Troyk, Philip R

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an approach to the physical design of the coils used in a dual inductive link to provide two-way wireless communication and power for a neural recording system. The design approach makes use of an analytic model of the link performance in terms of the physical parameters of the link, which allows physical parameters to be iterated on a computer rather than on the bench to find the optimal design within the physical restrictions imposed. In particular, this approach was used to choose the optimal implant data coil sizing to maximize the difference between the contributions of the constructive and destructive paths of the reverse telemetry signal.

  5. GWM-a ground-water management process for the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model (MODFLOW-2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlfeld, David P.; Barlow, Paul M.; Mulligan, Anne E.

    2005-01-01

    GWM is a Ground?Water Management Process for the U.S. Geological Survey modular three?dimensional ground?water model, MODFLOW?2000. GWM uses a response?matrix approach to solve several types of linear, nonlinear, and mixed?binary linear ground?water management formulations. Each management formulation consists of a set of decision variables, an objective function, and a set of constraints. Three types of decision variables are supported by GWM: flow?rate decision variables, which are withdrawal or injection rates at well sites; external decision variables, which are sources or sinks of water that are external to the flow model and do not directly affect the state variables of the simulated ground?water system (heads, streamflows, and so forth); and binary variables, which have values of 0 or 1 and are used to define the status of flow?rate or external decision variables. Flow?rate decision variables can represent wells that extend over one or more model cells and be active during one or more model stress periods; external variables also can be active during one or more stress periods. A single objective function is supported by GWM, which can be specified to either minimize or maximize the weighted sum of the three types of decision variables. Four types of constraints can be specified in a GWM formulation: upper and lower bounds on the flow?rate and external decision variables; linear summations of the three types of decision variables; hydraulic?head based constraints, including drawdowns, head differences, and head gradients; and streamflow and streamflow?depletion constraints. The Response Matrix Solution (RMS) Package of GWM uses the Ground?Water Flow Process of MODFLOW to calculate the change in head at each constraint location that results from a perturbation of a flow?rate variable; these changes are used to calculate the response coefficients. For linear management formulations, the resulting matrix of response coefficients is then combined with other

  6. Voice Coil Actuator for Active Vibration Isolation in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusa, E.; Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Maddaleno, F.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    data fitting has been found in order to model the magnetic force path within the airgap. Voice coil electric parameters have been also designed by checking the correspondence between the expected and actual values on a small preliminary prototype. The experimental validation of the FEM models included the characterisation of the magnets, the construction of the first magnetic actuator and the design of the power amplifier prototype. The comparison between numerical and experimental results showed a good agreement for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional FEM models, at least for what the static behaviour of the actuator is concerned. The power amplifier design was particularly difficult because of the specifications of low power dissipation, low noise, output current and voltage, related to the maximum actuation force and its resolution, added to the requirements imposed by the control systems. Some results of the final tests on a ground test rig simulating the space equipment to be isolated are reported. The system performed as required in open and closed loop in dynamic operating conditions.

  7. Ground-State Behavior of the Quantum Compass Model in an External Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ke-Wei; CHEN Qing-Hu

    2011-01-01

    @@ Ground-state(GS)properties of the two-dimensional(2D)quantum compass model in an external field on a square 5×5 lattice are investigated by using the exact diagonalization(ED)method.We obtain the GS energy and evaluate quantities such as its correlation functions,nearest-neighbor entanglement and local order parameter.As the external field is presented,the first-order quantum phase point is absent and the system exhibits the behaviors of the second-order phase transition.%Ground-state (GS) properties of the two-dimensional (2D) quantum compass model in an external Geld on a square 5x5 lattice are investigated by using the exact diagonalization (ED) method. We obtain the GS energy and evaluate quantities such as its correlation functions, nearest-neighbor entanglement and local order parameter. As the external Geld is presented, the first-order quantum phase point is absent and the system exhibits the behaviors of the second-order phase transition.

  8. Inversion model validation of ground emissivity. Contribution to the development of SMOS algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Demontoux, François; Ruffié, Gilles; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Grant, Jennifer; Hernandez, Daniel Medina

    2007-01-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), is the second mission of 'Earth Explorer' to be developed within the program 'Living Planet' of the European Space Agency (ESA). This satellite, containing the very first 1.4GHz interferometric radiometer 2D, will carry out the first cartography on a planetary scale of the moisture of the grounds and the salinity of the oceans. The forests are relatively opaque, and the knowledge of moisture remains problematic. The effect of the vegetation can be corrected thanks a simple radiative model. Nevertheless simulations show that the effect of the litter on the emissivity of a system litter + ground is not negligible. Our objective is to highlight the effects of this layer on the total multi layer system. This will make it possible to lead to a simple analytical formulation of a model of litter which can be integrated into the calculation algorithm of SMOS. Radiometer measurements, coupled to dielectric characterizations of samples in laboratory can enable us to characterize...

  9. Understanding the Laminar Distribution of Tropospheric Ozone from Ground-Based, Airborne, Spaceborne, and Modeling Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newchurch, Mike; Johnson, Matthew S.; Huang, Guanyu; Kuang, Shi; Wang, Lihua; Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Laminar ozone structure is a ubiquitous feature of tropospheric-ozone distributions resulting from dynamic and chemical atmospheric processes. Understanding the characteristics of these ozone laminae and the mechanisms responsible for producing them is important to outline the transport pathways of trace gases and to quantify the impact of different sources on tropospheric background ozone. In this study, we present a new method to detect ozone laminae to understand their climatological characteristics of occurrence frequency in terms of thickness and altitude. We employ both ground-based and airborne ozone lidar measurements and other synergistic observations and modeling to investigate the sources and mechanisms such as biomass burning transport, stratospheric intrusion, lightning-generated NOx, and nocturnal low-level jets that are responsible for depleted or enhanced tropospheric ozone layers. Spaceborne (e.g., OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), TROPOMI (Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument), TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution)) measurements of these laminae will observe greater horizontal extent and lower vertical resolution than balloon-borne or lidar measurements will quantify. Using integrated ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne observations in a modeling framework affords insight into how to gain knowledge of both the vertical and horizontal evolution of these ubiquitous ozone laminae.

  10. Reconciling professional identity: A grounded theory of nurse academics' role modelling for undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, A; Mills, J; Birks, M; Budden, L

    2017-09-05

    Role modelling by experienced nurses, including nurse academics, is a key factor in the process of preparing undergraduate nursing students for practice, and may contribute to longevity in the workforce. A grounded theory study was undertaken to investigate the phenomenon of nurse academics' role modelling for undergraduate students. The study sought to answer the research question: how do nurse academics role model positive professional behaviours for undergraduate students? The aims of this study were to: theorise a process of nurse academic role modelling for undergraduate students; describe the elements that support positive role modelling by nurse academics; and explain the factors that influence the implementation of academic role modelling. The study sample included five second year nursing students and sixteen nurse academics from Australia and the United Kingdom. Data was collected from observation, focus groups and individual interviews. This study found that in order for nurse academics to role model professional behaviours for nursing students, they must reconcile their own professional identity. This paper introduces the theory of reconciling professional identity and discusses the three categories that comprise the theory, creating a context for learning, creating a context for authentic rehearsal and mirroring identity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mosquito coil emissions and health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weili; Zhang, Junfeng; Hashim, Jamal H; Jalaludin, Juliana; Hashim, Zailina; Goldstein, Bernard D

    2003-09-01

    Burning mosquito coils indoors generates smoke that can control mosquitoes effectively. This practice is currently used in numerous households in Asia, Africa, and South America. However, the smoke may contain pollutants of health concern. We conducted the present study to characterize the emissions from four common brands of mosquito coils from China and two common brands from Malaysia. We used mass balance equations to determine emission rates of fine particles (particulate matter pollutant concentrations resulting from burning mosquito coils could substantially exceed health-based air quality standards or guidelines. Under the same combustion conditions, the tested Malaysian mosquito coils generated more measured pollutants than did the tested Chinese mosquito coils. We also identified a large suite of volatile organic compounds, including carcinogens and suspected carcinogens, in the coil smoke. In a set of experiments conducted in a room, we examined the size distribution of particulate matter contained in the coil smoke and found that the particles were ultrafine and fine. The findings from the present study suggest that exposure to the smoke of mosquito coils similar to the tested ones can pose significant acute and chronic health risks. For example, burning one mosquito coil would release the same amount of PM(2.5) mass as burning 75-137 cigarettes. The emission of formaldehyde from burning one coil can be as high as that released from burning 51 cigarettes.

  12. Modeling short wave radiation and ground surface temperature: a validation experiment in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliotti, P.; Cremonese, E.; Dallamico, M.; Gruber, S.; Migliavacca, M.; Morra di Cella, U.

    2009-12-01

    Permafrost distribution in high-mountain areas is influenced by topography (micro-climate) and high variability of ground covers conditions. Its monitoring is very difficult due to logistical problems like accessibility, costs, weather conditions and reliability of instrumentation. For these reasons physically-based modeling of surface rock/ground temperatures (GST) is fundamental for the study of mountain permafrost dynamics. With this awareness a 1D version of GEOtop model (www.geotop.org) is tested in several high-mountain sites and its accuracy to reproduce GST and incoming short wave radiation (SWin) is evaluated using independent field measurements. In order to describe the influence of topography, both flat and near-vertical sites with different aspects are considered. Since the validation of SWin is difficult on steep rock faces (due to the lack of direct measures) and validation of GST is difficult on flat sites (due to the presence of snow) the two parameters are validated as independent experiments: SWin only on flat morphologies, GST only on the steep ones. The main purpose is to investigate the effect of: (i) distance between driving meteo station location and simulation point location, (ii) cloudiness, (iii) simulation point aspect, (iv) winter/summer period. The temporal duration of model runs is variable from 3 years for the SWin experiment to 8 years for the validation of GST. The model parameterization is constant and tuned for a common massive bedrock of crystalline rock like granite. Ground temperature profile is not initialized because rock temperature is measured at only 10cm depth. A set of 9 performance measures is used for comparing model predictions and observations (including: fractional mean bias (FB), coefficient of residual mass (CMR), mean absolute error (MAE), modelling efficiency (ME), coefficient of determination (R2)). Results are very encouraging. For both experiments the distance (Km) between location of the driving meteo

  13. Analysis of quench in the NHMFL REBCO prototype coils for the 32 T Magnet Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breschi, M.; Cavallucci, L.; Ribani, P. L.; Gavrilin, A. V.; Weijers, H. W.

    2016-05-01

    A 32 T all-superconductive magnet with high field REBCO inner coils is under development at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida, USA. As part of the development activity, two prototype coils with full scale radial dimensions and final design features, but with reduced axial length were constructed. The prototype coils consist of six dry-wound double pancakes modules with uninsulated conductor and insulated stainless steel cowind. Quench studies on one of the prototype coils at 4.2 K in self-field and in a background magnetic field of 15 T were performed by activating a set of quench protection heaters. In this paper, we present a numerical analysis of the experimental results of the quench tests of one of the prototype coils. The numerical analysis was carried out through a coupled electro-thermal FEM model developed at the University of Bologna. The model is based on the coupling with distributed contact resistances of the coil pancakes described as 2D elements. A homogenization procedure of the REBCO tape and other coil materials is presented, which allows reducing the number of degrees of freedom and the computational effort. The model is applied to the analysis of the current and voltage evolutions during the experimental quench tests on the prototype coil.

  14. User's guide to Model Viewer, a program for three-dimensional visualization of ground-water model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Paul A.; Winston, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    Model Viewer is a computer program that displays the results of three-dimensional groundwater models. Scalar data (such as hydraulic head or solute concentration) may be displayed as a solid or a set of isosurfaces, using a red-to-blue color spectrum to represent a range of scalar values. Vector data (such as velocity or specific discharge) are represented by lines oriented to the vector direction and scaled to the vector magnitude. Model Viewer can also display pathlines, cells or nodes that represent model features such as streams and wells, and auxiliary graphic objects such as grid lines and coordinate axes. Users may crop the model grid in different orientations to examine the interior structure of the data. For transient simulations, Model Viewer can animate the time evolution of the simulated quantities. The current version (1.0) of Model Viewer runs on Microsoft Windows 95, 98, NT and 2000 operating systems, and supports the following models: MODFLOW-2000, MODFLOW-2000 with the Ground-Water Transport Process, MODFLOW-96, MOC3D (Version 3.5), MODPATH, MT3DMS, and SUTRA (Version 2D3D.1). Model Viewer is designed to directly read input and output files from these models, thus minimizing the need for additional postprocessing. This report provides an overview of Model Viewer. Complete instructions on how to use the software are provided in the on-line help pages.

  15. [Importance of an automatic measurement base on the first coil diameter in regard to coil embolization of a cerebral aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Takumi; Furukawa, Hajime; Shimizu, Keiji; Oonishi, Kumiko; Sakai, Shinji; Imamura, Hirotoshi; Sakai, Chiaki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We compared the accuracy in evaluating an unrapture aneurysm between NV and 3D-DSA. In vitro, we evaluated the accuracy in calculating the volume of the Aneurysm model. We compared the diameter of the first coil and estimated the diameter of the Aneurysm. The Aneurysm size calculated by NV resembled the first coil more than the size measured by 3D-DSA. In clinical cases, the measurement of NV is objective; the measurement of 3D-DSA, however, is subjective by person. NV has an automatic measurement that is useful for clinical cases.

  16. Simulation of YBCO Tape and Coils in HTS Maglev System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Mengxiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of running high temperature superconducting maglev train, the AC(Alternating Current loss of superconducting coil is directly related to its safe operation and operating cost. In this paper, the simulation model was built based on the finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics, and mainly simulated and calculated the AC losses of YBCO(Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide tape and coils. In this model, as the solving object, the singular and infinite long YBCO tape and coils model was solved with H-formulation and the nonlinear characteristic (E-J constitutive law and anisotrophy (B-J characteristic were taken into consideration as the theoretical foundation. Then on the basis of the model under maglev suspension system, AC losses under different amplitude and frequence AC currents were calculated. The results shows that under different frequencies and dynamic components, the local maximum AC loss of YBCO tape and coils occurs when the steady-state DC(Direct Current current is 30A. Then comparing with old maglev suspension system, the new system can greatly reduce the energy consumption and the material cost.

  17. Modelling the Influence of Ground Surface Relief on Electric Sounding Curves Using the Integral Equations Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balgaisha Mukanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of electrical sounding of a medium with ground surface relief is modelled using the integral equations method. This numerical method is based on the triangulation of the computational domain, which is adapted to the shape of the relief and the measuring line. The numerical algorithm is tested by comparing the results with the known solution for horizontally layered media with two layers. Calculations are also performed to verify the fulfilment of the “reciprocity principle” for the 4-electrode installations in our numerical model. Simulations are then performed for a two-layered medium with a surface relief. The quantitative influences of the relief, the resistivity ratios of the contacting media, and the depth of the second layer on the apparent resistivity curves are established.

  18. Radon (222Rn) in ground water of fractured rocks: A diffusion/ion exchange model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Kraemer, T.F.; Shapiro, A.

    2004-01-01

    Ground waters from fractured igneous and high-grade sialic metamorphic rocks frequently have elevated activity of dissolved radon (222Rn). A chemically based model is proposed whereby radium (226Ra) from the decay of uranium (238U) diffuses through the primary porosity of the rock to the water-transmitting fracture where it is sorbed on weathering products. Sorption of 226Ra on the fracture surface maintains an activity gradient in the rock matrix, ensuring a continuous supply of 226Ra to fracture surfaces. As a result of the relatively long half-life of 226Ra (1601 years), significant activity can accumulate on fracture surfaces. The proximity of this sorbed 226Ra to the active ground water flow system allows its decay progeny 222Rn to enter directly into the water. Laboratory analyses of primary porosity and diffusion coefficients of the rock matrix, radon emanation, and ion exchange at fracture surfaces are consistent with the requirements of a diffusion/ion- exchange model. A dipole-brine injection/withdrawal experiment conducted between bedrock boreholes in the high-grade metamorphic and granite rocks at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States (42??56???N, 71??43???W) shows a large activity of 226Ra exchanged from fracture surfaces by a magnesium brine. The 226Ra activity removed by the exchange process is 34 times greater than that of 238U activity. These observations are consistent with the diffusion/ion-exchange model. Elutriate isotopic ratios of 223Ra/226Ra and 238U/226Ra are also consistent with the proposed chemically based diffusion/ion-exchange model.

  19. Modeling of Regional Climate Change Effects on Ground-Level Ozone and Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Perry E.; Knowlton, Kim; Carr, Jessie L.; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The adverse respiratory effects of ground-level ozone are well-established. Ozone is the air pollutant most consistently projected to increase under future climate change. Purpose To project future pediatric asthma emergency department visits associated with ground-level ozone changes, comparing 1990s to 2020s. Methods This study assessed future numbers of asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0–17 years using (1) baseline New York City metropolitan area emergency department rates, (2) a dose–response relationship between ozone levels and pediatric asthma emergency department visits, and (3) projected daily 8-hour maximum ozone concentrations for the 2020s as simulated by a global-to-regional climate change and atmospheric chemistry model. Sensitivity analyses included population projections and ozone precursor changes. This analysis occurred in 2010. Results In this model, climate change could cause an increase in regional summer ozone-related asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0–17 years of 7.3% across the New York City metropolitan region by the 2020s. This effect diminished with inclusion of ozone precursor changes. When population growth is included, the projections of morbidity related to ozone are even larger. Conclusions The results of this analysis demonstrate that the use of regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models make possible the projection of local climate change health effects for specific age groups and specific disease outcomes – such as emergency department visits for asthma. Efforts should be made to improve on this type of modeling to inform local and wider-scale climate change mitigation and adaptation policy. PMID:21855738

  20. A five states survivability model for missions with ground-to-air threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Tina; Niklasson, Lars

    2013-05-01

    Fighter pilots are exposed to the risk of getting hit by enemy fire when flying missions with ground-to-air threats. A tactical support system including a survivability model could aid the pilot to assess and handle this risk. The survivability model presented here is a Markov model with five states; Undetected, Detected, Tracked, Engaged and Hit. The output from the model is the probabilities that the aircraft is in these states during the mission. The enemy's threat systems are represented with sensor and weapon areas and the transitions between the states depend on whether or not the aircraft is within any of these areas. Contrary to previous work, the model can capture the behaviors that the enemy's sensor systems communicate and that the risk of getting hit depends on the enemy's knowledge regarding the aircraft's kinematics. The paper includes a discussion regarding the interpretation of the states and the factors that influence the transitions between the states. Further developments are also identified for using the model to aid fighter pilots and operators of unmanned aerial vehicles with planning and evaluating missions as well as analyzing the situation during flight.