WorldWideScience

Sample records for grocery shopping behavior

  1. Video-Based Grocery Shopping Intervention Effect on Purchasing Behaviors Among Latina Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; Cortés, Dharma E; Garcia, Samantha; Duan, Lei; Black, David S

    2017-05-01

    To compare changes in food-purchasing knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavior after viewing nutrition education videos among Los Angeles, California Latinas responsible for household grocery shopping. From February to May 2015, a convenience sample of 113 Latinas watched 1 video (El Carrito Saludable) featuring MyPlate guidelines applied to grocery shopping (1-video intervention) and another convenience sample of 105 Latinas watched 2 videos (El Carrito Saludable and Ser Consciente), the latter featuring mindfulness to support attention and overcome distractions while grocery shopping (2-video intervention). We administered questionnaires before and after intervention. A preselected sample in each intervention condition (n = 72) completed questionnaires at 2-months after intervention and provided grocery receipts (before and 2-months after intervention). Knowledge improved in both intervention groups (P shopping list (both P < .05) and purchased more healthy foods (d = 0.60; P < .05) at 2 months than did the 1-video group. Culturally tailored videos that model food-purchasing behavior and mindfulness show promise for improving the quality of foods that Latinas bring into the home.

  2. Grocery store podcast about omega-3 fatty acids influences shopping behaviors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangia, Deepika; Palmer-Keenan, Debra M

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether listening to a podcast about omega-3 fatty acids (n-3s) while grocery shopping increased shoppers' awareness about and purchases of seafood and other foods rich in n-3s. Repeated-measures design with a convenience sample (n = 56) of grocery shoppers who listened to the podcast while shopping. Pre- and postintervention semistructured interviews were conducted. The Theory of Reasoned Action was the study's framework. Shoppers were primarily females (mean age, 41 ± 15.3 years). Their perceived ability to buy [t(55) = 6.27, P Podcasts may effectively communicate nutrition information. More research with a larger sample size is needed to evaluate the effects of the podcast on long-term changes in shopping behavior. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Price learning during grocery shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    of what consumers learn about prices during grocery shopping. Three measures of price knowledge corresponding to different levels of price information processing were applied. Results indicate that price learning does take place and that episodic price knowledge after store exit is far more widespread...... than expected. Consequently, a new view of how consumer price knowledge evolves during grocery shopping is presented....

  4. Price learning during grocery shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    Many attempts have been made to measure consumers' price knowledge for groceries. However, the results have varied considerably and conflict with results of reference price research. This is the first study to examine price knowledge before, during, and after store visit, thus enabling a study...... of what consumers learn about prices during grocery shopping. Three measures of price knowledge corresponding to different levels of price information processing were applied. Results indicate that price learning does take place and that episodic price knowledge after store exit is far more widespread...... than expected. Consequently, a new view of how consumer price knowledge evolves during grocery shopping is presented....

  5. Price knowledge during grocery shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Grunert, Klaus G

    2014-01-01

    Past research on consumer price knowledge has varied considerably partly due to differences in how and when price knowledge is measured.This paper applies a multi-point, multi-measure approach to reconcile differences in past price knowledge research by examining systematicrelationships between...... accessible at the store exit. These findings enable the authors to reconcile diverging results from past research,showing how consumer price knowledge evolves and suggesting that the vast majority of consumers learn about prices, whether consciously orunconsciously, during grocery shopping. Thus, when...... applying a multi-point, multi-measure approach, consumers appear to know more aboutprices than suggested by past research. Determinants of price knowledge are also examined and the results indicate that price knowledge buildsup not only because of active search but also due to accidental exposure to prices...

  6. CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR DURING ONLINE GROCERY SHOPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hanus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today consumers can buy almost any product using the Internet. Online nutritional and grocery shopping is becoming increasingly popular. The aim of this paper is to present the conditions of online grocery shopping and consumers’ attitude towards buying food via the Internet based. The assessment is based on secondary information sources. With online grocery supermarkets there are no limitations connected with localization and opening hours, and consumers have access to a large range of stores and products online across the world. The most important advantages of online shopping are convenience and time saving, while the most significant disadvantages for consumers involve the risk of incorrectly valuating some products and apprehension about the selection and handling of perishables, such as vegetables, eggs, and meat products.

  7. What influences Latino grocery shopping behavior? Perspectives on the small food store environment from managers and employees in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Flack, Jennifer C; Baquero, Barbara; Linnan, Laura A; Gittelsohn, Joel; Pickrel, Julie L; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2016-01-01

    To inform the design of a multilevel in-store intervention, this qualitative study utilized in-depth semistructured interviews with 28 managers and 10 employees of small-to-medium-sized Latino food stores (tiendas) in San Diego, California, to identify factors within the tienda that may influence Latino customers' grocery-shopping experiences and behaviors. Qualitative data analysis, guided by grounded theory, was performed using open coding. Results suggest that future interventions should focus on the physical (i.e., built structures) and social (i.e., economic and sociocultural) dimensions of store environments, including areas where the two dimensions interact, to promote the purchase of healthy food among customers.

  8. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    for online grocery shopping. It builds the model on 2 components, intention formation (which is basically the TPB) and a learning component. 614 respondents in Denmark participated in the study. The results show that Perceived Behavioral Control has little influence on the intention to buy grocery products......Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...

  9. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    for online grocery shopping. It builds the model on 2 components, intention formation (which is basically the TPB) and a learning component. 614 respondents in Denmark participated in the study. The results show that Perceived Behavioral Control has little influence on the intention to buy grocery products......Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...

  10. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne

    Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...... for online grocery shopping. It builds the model on 2 components, intention formation (which is basically the TPB) and a learning component. 614 respondents in Denmark participated in the study. The results show that Perceived Behavioral Control has little influence on the intention to buy grocery products...

  11. CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR DURING ONLINE GROCERY SHOPPING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabriela Hanus

    2016-01-01

    .... With online grocery supermarkets there are no limitations connected with localization and opening hours, and consumers have access to a large range of stores and products online across the world...

  12. Customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip experiences in grocery retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    on individual shopping trips is a prerequisite for developing customer loyalty. However, there is surprisingly little research focusing on satisfaction with individual shopping trips. On the contrary, satisfaction is normally conceptualised and studied as an overall evaluation of a given retailer based on all...... encounters with that retailer. There are relatively few studies of satisfaction within the grocery retail sector. However, because grocery shopping is a frequently recurring activity that is often routine and task-oriented in nature, and thus dominated by utilitarian rather than hedonic concerns, different...... mechanisms may be at work than in other retail settings such as themed flagship stores, which are visited less regularly and are oriented more towards creating hedonic shopping experiences. This paper develops a conceptual framework for analysing customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip...

  13. Customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip experiences in grocery retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    on individual shopping trips is a prerequisite for developing customer loyalty. However, there is surprisingly little research focusing on satisfaction with individual shopping trips. On the contrary, satisfaction is normally conceptualised and studied as an overall evaluation of a given retailer based on all...... mechanisms may be at work than in other retail settings such as themed flagship stores, which are visited less regularly and are oriented more towards creating hedonic shopping experiences. This paper develops a conceptual framework for analysing customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip...... experiences in grocery retailing. The framework makes at least two important contributions to the literature. First, it focuses on customer satisfaction with individual shopping trips whereas previous research and theoretical frameworks have addressed either overall satisfaction with the retailer, service...

  14. An integrative conceptual framework for analyzing customer satisfaction with shopping trip experiences in grocery retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Grocery retailers aim to satisfy customers, and because grocery shopping trips are frequently recurring, they must do socontinuously. Surprisingly, little research has addressed satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trips. This article therefore develops a conceptual framework for analyzing...... customer satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trip experiences within a overall ‘disconfirmation of expectations model’ of customer satisfaction. The contribution of the framework is twofold. First, by focusing on satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trips, previous research...... on satisfaction is extended to a context marked by frequently recurring, often tedious and routine activities. Understanding what causes satisfaction/dissatisfaction with individual shopping trips is required to explain overall, cumulative satisfaction with a retailer, which has been the focus of prior research...

  15. Factors Influencing Consumers Intention for Online Grocery Shopping - A Proposed Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi, SFF; Thoo, AC; Tan, LC; Muharam, FM; Talib, NA

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, Internet is one of the most popular platforms for people to do online shopping including grocery items. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the determinants of customer intentions for online grocery shopping. Till now, there is no consensus on what are the factors that actually influencing people to shop grocery items through Internet. This paper aims to explore the factors such as social influences, facilitating conditions, hedonic motivations, perceived risk and perceived trust that influence the consumer intention to purchase grocery online. Questionnaires will be the main instrument of the study and they will be distributed to target respondents using Internet survey. Respondents of the study will be selected using convenience sampling. After data collection, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) will be employed for data analysis. Overall, the result of the study is important to retailers to identify the important factors in increasing their customers’ intention to purchase grocery online.

  16. Relationship between Fear of Falling and Preceived Difficulty with Grocery Shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C S; McLeod, K M

    2017-01-01

    Fear of falling is associated with self-imposed restrictions of basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), leading greater risk for functional decline and falls. The inability to independently grocery shop, a food-related IADL, negatively affects nutritional status and survival among seniors. Thus, this study examined the relationship between the fear of falling and difficulty with grocery shopping among seniors (n=98, mean age=82, 83% female), taking into account their functional capacity. Demographic profile, eating problems, physical fitness (mobility, balance, endurance, leg strength), and fear of falling (balance confidence, falls efficacy) were measured. Fifty-six percent of participants reported difficulty with grocery shopping. Those who reported difficulty had significantly lower scores for dynamic balance, balance confidence and fall efficacy compared to those who did not. This study revealed a relationship between the fear of falling and perceived difficulty with grocery shopping. Interventions should address fear of falling among the frail seniors.

  17. Analysis of Expectations of Electronic Grocery Shopping for Potential Customer Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikkila Jukka

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The special nature of groceries, especially perishables, challenges the possibilities of digital channels i.e. computers and networks to improve customer service. We report the findings of theme interviews on the potential of electronic commerce (EC of groceries with 33 experts of grocery industry and EC, most of them senior executives, in 23 organisations in Finland during the Autumn of 1997. The specific areas of interest in the study are the predicted volume of EC in grocery shopping, the most potential customer segments, the anticipated benefits of EC to customers, and supplier strategies and infrastructure alternatives. Benefits of ECS (electronic grocery shopping are analysed for three selected potential customer groups in terms of phases in consumer buying process as well as two different infrastructure solutions. It seems that an EGS build on top of current grocery industry infrastructure can only satisfy one major consumer group. In order to gain momentum EGS needs a dedicated infrastructure within which logistic efficiency can be increased.

  18. The Six-Food Elimination Diet for Eosinophilic Esophagitis Increases Grocery Shopping Cost and Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher Wolf, W; Huang, Kevin Z; Durban, Raquel; Iqbal, Zahra J; Robey, Benjamin S; Khalid, Farah J; Dellon, Evan S

    2016-12-01

    The six-food elimination diet (SFED), where dairy, wheat, eggs, soy, nuts, and seafood are avoided, is an effective treatment for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Patient-related costs of this approach, however, are unknown. We aimed to assess the cost of and ease of shopping for an SFED compared to an unrestricted diet. A dietitian with expertise in EoE generated menus meeting dietary requirements for a week's worth of meals for the SFED and an unrestricted diet. We compared prices and the number of missing items for both diets at standard and specialty grocery stores. The average weekly price of the SFED at a standard supermarket was $92.54 compared to $79.84 for an unrestricted diet (p = 0.0001). A patient shopping at a standard grocery store needed a higher proportion of items from a second store compared to an unrestricted diet (32 vs. 3 %, p = 0.0001). The prices of the SFED and unrestricted diet using a specialty supermarket were comparable ($106.47 vs. $105.96, p = 0.81), as was the percentage of items requiring a trip to a second store (6 vs. 2 % items, p = 0.03). Shopping at a specialty grocery store increased weekly grocery costs by $13.93 (p = 0.04) for the SFED and $26.12 (p = 0.03) for the unrestricted diet. In conclusion, for patients shopping at standard grocery stores, the cost of an SFED is higher, and an SFED requires more items from a second store. These differences disappear at specialty grocery stores, but costs were significantly higher. This cost and logistical burden can inform patients when selecting dietary therapy.

  19. Food Shopping Behaviors and Exposure to Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, Shannon N.; Schulz, Amy J.; Israel, Barbara A.; Mentz, Graciela; Miranda, Patricia Y.; Opperman, Alisha; Odoms-Young, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined food shopping behaviors, particularly distance to grocery shop, and exposure to discrimination. Design Cross-sectional observational study utilizing data from a community survey, neighborhood food environment observations, and the decennial census. Setting Three communities in Detroit, Michigan, USA. Subjects Probability sample of 919 African-American, Latino, and White adults in 146 census blocks and 69 census block groups. Results On average, respondents shopped for groceries 3·1 miles from home, with 30·9% shopping within one mile and 22·3% more than five miles from home. Longer distance to shop was associated with being younger, African-American (compared to Latino), a woman, higher socioeconomic status, lower satisfaction with the neighborhood food environment, and living in a neighborhood with higher poverty, without a large grocery store, and farther from the nearest supermarket. African-Americans and those with the lowest incomes were particularly likely to report unfair treatment at food outlets. Each mile increase in distance to shop was associated with a 7% increase in the odds of unfair treatment; this relationship did not differ by race/ethnicity. Conclusions This study suggests that unfair treatment in retail interactions warrants investigation as a pathway by which restricted neighborhood food environments and food shopping behaviors may adversely affect health and contribute to health disparities. Efforts to promote “healthy” and equitable food environments should emphasize local availability and affordability of a range of healthy food products, as well as fair treatment while shopping regardless of race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status. PMID:23534814

  20. Online Shopping Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Shahzad, Hashim

    2015-01-01

    Online shopping is a very much developed phenomena in Scandinavian countries. Different online factors impact online consumers’ behavior differently depending on the environment of different regions. Sweden is one of the developed and technologically advanced countries. To see the impact of different factors on consumers’ online shopping behavior, the purpose of this study is to analyse the factors that influence consumers’ online shopping behavior in Sweden’s context. One of the objectives o...

  1. Managing critical incidents in grocery shopping by community-living people with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsson, Anna; Ohman, Annika; Cutchin, Malcolm; Nygård, Louise

    2013-07-01

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain in their ordinary housing and continue to use public space despite increasing disabilities. The aim of this study was to discover and describe problematic situations and critical incidents that took place when people with AD performed the ordinary outside-home activity of grocery shopping and how these were met by them. Individual interviews (n = 12) and participant observations (n = 8) with six informants were performed and analysed using a grounded theory approach. The findings are presented in six categories and each category describes different critical incidents and actions used to meet these. The categories were: (a) Remembering to bring things when leaving home, (b) Finding the way to and from the grocery shop without getting lost, (c) Finding a way through traffic when not feeling safe, (d) Finding objects when organization is disrupted, (e) Choosing when a lot of objects and products are available, and (f) Finding a method to pay when payment opportunities are restricted. The core category, "A challenging and unstable process of meeting critical incidents in grocery shopping", was characterised by reflections and creativity to achieve relative harmony in each critical incident. In conclusion, it is important that relatives and professionals take into account relevant actions to help people with AD coordinate with their environment.

  2. Total energy requirements of shopping for food. [Supermarkets, Grocery Stores, Dairies, Butcheries, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, M.G.; Earle, M.D.

    1982-12-01

    This survey investigated the total energy requirements of shopping for food in New Zealand. It is part of the Food Technology Research Centre's ongoing research into total energy use in the New Zealand food system. A sample survey of over 700 customers of 7 selected shops in Palmerston North was undertaken. An examination of the sample parameters and other factors indicate that the Palmerston North sample is probably representative of the national situation. However, there may be some need to verify this with other surveys particularly of large supermarkets. The primary objective of this survey was to determine representative energy intensities (MJ of energy per kilogram of food purchased) for the shopping step of the food chain. However, in the process much data were generated which may be of use and interest to a wider audience. These data include analysis of round trip distance, trip purpose, energy use per trip, characteristics of the shopping population, total transport cost of shopping, and purchase details. The mean energy intensity was found to be 13.21 MJ/kg (+- 7.7%). This energy intensity varied according to the shop type: Supermarkets (12.79 MJ/kg), Groceries (12.87 MJ/kg), Dairies (16.36 MJ/kg), Butcheries (16.35 MJ/kg) and Green groceries (7.17 MJ/kg). These energy intensities were found to very significantly according to the customer's sex and the shopping day. The total energy requirements of shopping for food in New Zealand were estimated to be 11.58 PJ/yr. Indirect energy requirements (energy embodied in the vehicles and transport infrastructures) were found to account for 63% of this total. The direct energy requirements (fuel) were estimated to be 4.3 PJ/yr ($70 million on 15 November 1981 costings).

  3. Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Service Curriculum on Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Grocery Shop, Prepare Food, and Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice R.; Johnston, Jan H.; Brosi, Whitney A.; Jaco, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Shop, Cook and Eat curriculum was designed to provide education about concepts of empowerment and assistive technology for grocery shopping, preparing food, and eating. The curriculum included examples and hands-on demonstrations of assistive technology devices for grocery shopping, food…

  4. Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Service Curriculum on Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Grocery Shop, Prepare Food, and Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice R.; Johnston, Jan H.; Brosi, Whitney A.; Jaco, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Shop, Cook and Eat curriculum was designed to provide education about concepts of empowerment and assistive technology for grocery shopping, preparing food, and eating. The curriculum included examples and hands-on demonstrations of assistive technology devices for grocery shopping, food…

  5. General and food-selection specific parenting style in relation to the healthfulness of parent-child choices while grocery shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; Graham, Dan J; Ullrich, Emily; MacPhee, David

    2017-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated that parenting style is related to children's health and eating patterns, and that parenting can vary across time and context. However, there is little evidence about similarities and differences between general, self-reported parenting style and observed parenting during grocery shopping. The goals of this study were to investigate links between general parenting style, parental warmth and limit setting (important dimensions of parenting style) during grocery shopping, and the healthfulness of foods chosen. Participants were 153 parent (88 mothers) - child (6-9 years old) dyads. Dyads were brought to a laboratory set up like a grocery store aisle and asked to choose two items from each of three categories (cookies/crackers, cereals, chips/snacks). Parents were observed in terms of warmth, responsiveness, autonomy granting, and limit setting; children were observed in terms of resistance and negotiation. Parents reported behaviors related to general parenting. Regression analyses were used to test study hypotheses. Observed parental limit setting was related to general parenting style; observed warmth was not. Observed limit setting (but not observed warmth or self-reported parenting style) was related to the healthfulness of food choices. Limit setting appears to be the dimension of parenting style that is expressed during grocery shopping, and that promotes healthier food choices. Implications are discussed regarding consistencies in parenting style across situations as well as contributions of parenting style to the development of children's healthy eating.

  6. Supporting grocery shopping for students with intellectual disability:a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C; Satsangi, Rajiv; Bartlett, Whitney

    2017-08-01

    Decades of research exist supporting various types of self-operating prompting systems, including picture, audio and video to help students with disabilities acquire skills, especially to teach life skills. While many facets of life skills are important to target for instruction for secondary students with intellectual disability, one receiving declining attention is grocery shopping. Using a single subject alternating treatment design with two high school students with intellectual disability, the authors analysed the impact of three self-operating prompts systems - picture, audio and video - on students' successful selection of grocery items, independence in completing the task (i.e., percent of steps not prompted), and task completion time. Results showed video prompting to be most successful prompting system for both students for selecting grocery items. However, independence and task completion time varied significantly for the students across the prompting systems. It is important to match the correct prompting system to individual students' skills, needs and preference, but also to balance efficiency - both for educators and students. Implications for Rehabilitation Video prompting is an effective instructional strategy, but must be considered in light of time and skill to create the video prompts as well as social stigmatization of use in natural community settings. It is important to match the correct prompting system to each student, but also to balance efficiency - both for educators and students.

  7. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne

    Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...

  8. Comparing Self-Management Strategies Delivered via an iPhone to Promote Grocery Shopping and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Karen H.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Langone, John

    2015-01-01

    Four students with moderate intellectual disabilities used electronic lists delivered on an iPhone to assist them in skills related to community-based grocery shopping. An alternating treatments design was used to assist in comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of three different types of lists (Text Only, Audio + Text, and Picture + Text).…

  9. Comparing Self-Management Strategies Delivered via an iPhone to Promote Grocery Shopping and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Karen H.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Langone, John

    2015-01-01

    Four students with moderate intellectual disabilities used electronic lists delivered on an iPhone to assist them in skills related to community-based grocery shopping. An alternating treatments design was used to assist in comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of three different types of lists (Text Only, Audio + Text, and Picture + Text).…

  10. Factors affecting Purchase behavior of Women grocery consumer- An Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, Dr. Anu Nagpal

    2014-01-01

    Women are most powerful consumers in the world as they control almost 80 percent of the household spending. And no longer can the womens spending powers and influence be neglected. The role of women in the society and their effects has changed. Most of the marketers know that women are different, but we actually need a deep rooted understanding of how and why they are different. Studying women could be interesting as Family grocery shopping is the accepted domain of women; however, modern so...

  11. Online grocery retailing: What do consumers think?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular. Design/methodology/approach: Seven focus group interviews, four in the United...... Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework...... beliefs in predicting internet shopping behavior. Practical implications: The findings could be used to direct attention to consumer beliefs about internet grocery shopping which have the potential of acting as barriers to this line of e-commerce. Originality/value: To shed some light on the role...

  12. State anxiety as a moderator of real world grocery shopping performance among people with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Elise H; Fowler, Christopher A; Rempfer, Melisa V

    2016-12-30

    Anxiety is frequently overlooked as a factor when examining task performance among individuals with serious mental illness. Given the known effects of anxiety on performance in general populations, it is important to examine anxiety and performance within a serious mental illness population. This study examined state anxiety during a grocery-shopping task among 106 individuals diagnosed with a serious mental illness. Results indicate that state anxiety may impact task performance through its relationship with knowledge about grocery-shopping skills. These data suggest the need to examine further the impact of anxiety on task performance in serious mental illness. Furthermore, the identification and treatment of anxiety in persons with SMI may serve to improve functional outcomes and rehabilitation efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Patterns of Individual Shopping Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Krumme, Coco; Pentland, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Much of economic theory is built on observations of aggregate, rather than individual, behavior. Here, we present novel findings on human shopping patterns at the resolution of a single purchase. Our results suggest that much of our seemingly elective activity is actually driven by simple routines. While the interleaving of shopping events creates randomness at the small scale, on the whole consumer behavior is largely predictable. We also examine income-dependent differences in how people shop, and find that wealthy individuals are more likely to bundle shopping trips. These results validate previous work on mobility from cell phone data, while describing the unpredictability of behavior at higher resolution.

  14. Online grocery retailing: What do consumers think?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework...... of consumers in an underperforming and understudied branch of internet retailing. Barriers in the consumers' minds to shop for groceries online are identified using an established theoretical framework.......Purpose: To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular. Design/methodology/approach: Seven focus group interviews, four in the United...

  15. Consumer Poultry Handling Behavior in the Grocery Store and In-Home Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Amy K; Chambers, Delores H; Chambers, Edgar; Godwin, Sandria L; Cates, Sheryl C

    2016-04-01

    Considerable work on consumers' food safety habits has highlighted issues associated with home food preparation. However, consumer handling of foods, such as poultry, during shopping and storage has not been noted. The objective of this study was to determine consumer behaviors during purchasing and initial storage of raw poultry to determine potential cross-contamination issues. A shop-along observational study was conducted to determine actual shopping, transportation, and storage behavior of consumers who purchase raw poultry products. Neither hand sanitizer nor wipes were observed in 71% of grocery store meat sections of stores visited. Plastic bags could be found in the meat section 85% of the time, but only 25% of shoppers used the bag for their raw poultry purchases. During checkout, the poultry was bagged separately from other products 71% of the time. A majority of shoppers stored raw poultry in the original package without an additional container or overwrap. Overall, there needs to be an increase in food safety education on the handling of poultry during purchasing, transportation, and storage.

  16. What information do consumers consider, and how do they look for it, when shopping for groceries online?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L; Chang, Betty P I; Reidy, John

    2015-06-01

    Previous research investigating what information shoppers seek when purchasing groceries has used either lab-experiments or observed shoppers in supermarkets. The present research investigates this question in a relatively naturalistic online-grocery environment. Forty participants completed their weekly shopping online while their eye-movements were recorded. Ten of the participants were subsequently interviewed to gain insight into their information seeking behaviour. We found that, when looking for products, 95% of participants navigated through the 'virtual departments', 80% used the 'search' facility, and 68% browsed the special offer pages. Once on the product pages, participants tended to look at the pictures of products, rather than examine detailed product information. To explain these findings, we suggest that online grocery sites simulate familiar supermarket environments, which may explain why consumers prefer to browse categories of products rather than use search terms. We also suggest that additional strategies are needed if consumers are to be encouraged to view detailed product information. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. What information do consumers consider, and how do they look for it, when shopping for groceries online?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L.; Chang, Betty P.I.; Reidy, John

    2015-01-01

    Previous research investigating what information shoppers seek when purchasing groceries has used either lab-experiments or observed shoppers in supermarkets. The present research investigates this question in a relatively naturalistic online-grocery environment. Forty participants completed their weekly shopping online while their eye-movements were recorded. Ten of the participants were subsequently interviewed to gain insight into their information seeking behaviour. We found that, when looking for products, 95% of participants navigated through the ‘virtual departments’, 80% used the ‘search’ facility, and 68% browsed the special offer pages. Once on the product pages, participants tended to look at the pictures of products, rather than examine detailed product information. To explain these findings, we suggest that online grocery sites simulate familiar supermarket environments, which may explain why consumers prefer to browse categories of products rather than use search terms. We also suggest that additional strategies are needed if consumers are to be encouraged to view detailed product information. PMID:25660339

  18. Trip distribution for limited destinations: a case study for grocery shopping trips in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Sander; Thomas, Tom; Tutert, Bas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new trip distribution model for destinations that are not homogeneously distributed. The model is a gravity model in which the spatial configuration of destinations is incorporated in the modeling process. The performance was tested on a survey with reported grocery sho

  19. Carbon footprint of shopping (grocery) bags in China, Hong Kong and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Subramanian Senthilkannan; Li, Y.; Hu, J. Y.; Mok, P. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon footprint has become a term often used by the media in recent days. The human carbon footprint is professed to be a very serious global threat and every nation is looking at the possible options to reduce it since its consequences are alarming. A carbon footprint is a measure of the impact of human activities on earth and in particular on the environment; more specifically it relates to climate change and to the total amount of greenhouse gases produced, measured in units of carbon dioxide emitted. Effort of individuals in minimizing the carbon footprint is vital to save our planet. This article reports a study of the carbon footprint of various types of shopping bags (plastic, paper, non-woven and woven) using life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) technique in two stages. The first stage (baseline study), comprised the study of the impact of different types of shopping bags in the manufacturing phase, without considering their usage and disposal phases (cradle to gate stage). The LCIA was accomplished by the IPCC 2007 method, developed by the Inter Panel on Climate Change in SIMAPRO 7.2. The GWP (Global Warming Potential) values calculated by the IPCC 2007 method for 100 years were considered as a directive to compare the carbon footprint made by the different types of shopping bags under consideration. The next stage was the study of the carbon footprint of these bags including their usage and disposal phases (cradle to grave stage) and the results derived were compared with the results derived from the baseline study, which is the major focus of this research work. The values for usage and end-of-life phases were obtained from the survey questionnaire performed amongst different user groups of shopping bags in China, Hong Kong and India. The results show that the impact of different types of shopping bags in terms of their carbon footprint potential is very high if no usage and disposal options were provided. When the carbon footprint values from different

  20. Home grocery delivery improves the household food environments of behavioral weight loss participants: Results of an 8-week pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemeier Heather M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Household food availability is consistently linked to dietary intake; yet behavioral weight control treatment includes only minimal instruction on how to change the home environment to support dietary goals. This pilot study examined whether it is feasible to change the household food environments of behavioral weight loss participants through the use of a commercially available grocery home delivery service. Methods Overweight participants (N = 28; BMI = 31.7 ± 3.6 kg/m2; 89.3% women, 47.9 ± 9.5 years were randomly assigned to 8-weeks of standard behavioral weight loss (SBT or to SBT plus home food delivery (SBT+Home. SBT+Home participants were instructed to do their household grocery shopping via an online service affiliated with a regional supermarket chain and were reimbursed for delivery charges. Results Compared to SBT, SBT+Home produced significantly greater reductions in the total number of foods in the home (p = .01 and number of foods that were high in fat (p = .002. While the groups did not differ in 8-week weight losses, within SBT+Home there was a trend for the number of home deliveries to be associated with weight loss (p = .08. Participants reported that the home delivery service was easy to use and that it helped decrease impulse purchases and lead to healthier choices; however, few planned to continue using the service after the study. Conclusion Encouraging weight loss participants to use a commercially available online grocery ordering and home delivery service reduces the overall number of food items in the home and decreases access to high-fat food choices. More research is needed to determine whether this is a viable strategy to strengthen stimulus control and improve weight loss outcomes.

  1. Determinants of Shopping Behavior of Urban Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, MR

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the influence of geo-demographic settings of commercial centers, customer attractions in shopping malls, and route to shopping of urban shoppers. The present research analyzes retailing patterns in urban areas in reference to customer orientation strategies, product search behavior and enhancing the customer value. Interrelationship among urban retailing, marketplace ambiance, conventional shopping wisdom of customers, long-term customer services, and technology led sellin...

  2. A shopper's eye view of food safety at retail stores: lessons from photographs taken while grocery shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retail grocery stores are the source of over 50% of food sales in the U.S., representing the most important sector for consumer food choices. Food safety-related infrastructure, procedures, and practices at retail grocery stores play an important role in protecting public health. Beyond actual risk ...

  3. Energy Efficiency in Grocery Distribution in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation of the development of the energy efficiency of grocery distribution from 1960 to the present in Denmark, covering both the distribution to the shops and the shopping transport (distribution from shops to individual homes)......Evaluation of the development of the energy efficiency of grocery distribution from 1960 to the present in Denmark, covering both the distribution to the shops and the shopping transport (distribution from shops to individual homes)...

  4. Healthy grocery shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the list of ingredients. These are unhealthy trans fats. The closer to the beginning of the list ... food contains. The label will give the total trans fat content, and you want this to be zero. ...

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Nutritional Smartphone Application for Making Smart and Healthy Choices in Grocery Shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Desiree; Torres, Michelle; Vélez, Jammy; Grullon, Jhensen; Negrón, Edwin; Pérez, Cynthia M; Palacios, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    This study developed a smartphone nutritional application (app) for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores and tested its feasibility, usability, satisfaction and acceptability. "MyNutriCart" was developed following the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) model. The goals of the app were to improve food selection when purchasing foods in the grocery stores based on a pre-defined budget, to improve dietary patterns based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and to improve weight status. It was evaluated within a pilot randomized trial using a convenient sample of 26 overweight or obese adults aged 21-45 years for 8 weeks. The developed app provided a grocery list of healthy foods to meet the individual requirements of all family members within a budget following the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The average use of the app was 75% on each purchase and only 37% of the recommended products were purchased. The main reasons for not purchasing the recommended items were that participants did not like these (28.5%) and that the item was unavailable in the supermarket (24.3%). Over 50% of participants considered the app as feasible, usable, satisfactory, and acceptable (p < 0.05). "MyNutriCart" is the first available app for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores. This app could be used as a tool to translate recommendations into a practical grocery list that meet the needs of a family within a budget.

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Nutritional Smartphone Application for Making Smart and Healthy Choices in Grocery Shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Desiree; Torres, Michelle; Vélez, Jammy; Grullon, Jhensen; Negrón, Edwin; Pérez, Cynthia M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study developed a smartphone nutritional application (app) for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores and tested its feasibility, usability, satisfaction and acceptability. Methods “MyNutriCart” was developed following the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) model. The goals of the app were to improve food selection when purchasing foods in the grocery stores based on a pre-defined budget, to improve dietary patterns based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and to improve weight status. It was evaluated within a pilot randomized trial using a convenient sample of 26 overweight or obese adults aged 21–45 years for 8 weeks. Results The developed app provided a grocery list of healthy foods to meet the individual requirements of all family members within a budget following the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The average use of the app was 75% on each purchase and only 37% of the recommended products were purchased. The main reasons for not purchasing the recommended items were that participants did not like these (28.5%) and that the item was unavailable in the supermarket (24.3%). Over 50% of participants considered the app as feasible, usable, satisfactory, and acceptable (p app for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores. This app could be used as a tool to translate recommendations into a practical grocery list that meet the needs of a family within a budget. PMID:28261527

  7. Consumer protection and grocery

    OpenAIRE

    Sklář, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with consumer protection and grocery section regulations. It's objective is to evaluate whether grocery stores stick to law while selling food and to analyze attitudes and behavior of consumers. The theoretical part deals with definition of consumer and other related concepts and with obligations of food sellers and consumer rights. The practical part consists of three parts that contain expert commentary, own research performed through grocery stores and survey tak...

  8. Food Shopping and Acquisition Behaviors in Relation to BMI among Residents of Low-Income Communities in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Angela D; Ma, Xiaonan; Hutto, Brent; Sharpe, Patricia A; Bell, Bethany A; Wilcox, Sara

    2017-09-16

    Low-income areas in which residents have poor access to healthy foods have been referred to as "food deserts." It is thought that improving food access may help curb the obesity epidemic. Little is known about where residents of food deserts shop and if shopping habits are associated with body mass index (BMI). We evaluated the association of food shopping and acquisition (e.g., obtaining food from church, food pantries, etc.) with BMI among 459 residents of low-income communities from two South Carolina counties, 81% of whom lived in United States Department of Agriculture-designated food deserts. Participants were interviewed about food shopping and acquisition and perceptions of their food environment, and weight and height were measured. Distances to food retail outlets were determined. Multivariable linear regression analysis was employed. Our study sample comprising largely African-American women had an average BMI of 32.5 kg/m². The vast majority of study participants shopped at supermarkets (61%) or supercenters/warehouse clubs (27%). Shopping at a supercenter or warehouse club as one's primary store was significantly associated with a 2.6 kg/m² higher BMI compared to shopping at a supermarket, independent of demographics, socioeconomics, physical activity, and all other food shopping/acquisition behaviors. Persons who reported shopping at a small grocery store or a convenience or dollar store as their tertiary store had a 2.6 kg/m² lower BMI. Respondents who perceived lack of access to adequate food shopping in their neighborhoods as a problem had higher BMI. Living in a food desert census tract was not significantly associated with BMI. Other shopping attributes, including distance to utilized and nearest grocery stores, were not independently associated with BMI. These findings call into question the idea that poor spatial access to grocery stores is a key underlying factor affecting the obesity epidemic. Future research should consider assessing

  9. Urban food environments and residents' shopping behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannuscio, Carolyn C; Tappe, Karyn; Hillier, Amy; Buttenheim, Alison; Karpyn, Allison; Glanz, Karen

    2013-11-01

    Food environments may promote or undermine healthy behaviors, but questions remain regarding how individuals interact with their local food environments. This study incorporated an urban food environment audit as well as an examination of residents' food shopping behaviors within that context. In 2010, the research team audited the variety and healthfulness of foods available in 373 Philadelphia stores, using the validated Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores (NEMS-S); higher scores indicate more diverse and healthful food inventories. The team also surveyed urban residents (n=514) regarding their food shopping. Descriptive and multivariate analyses (conducted in 2012) assessed variation in retail food environments and in shoppers' store choices. Corner and convenience stores were common (78.6% of food retail outlets) and had the lowest mean NEMS-S scores of any store type. Most participants (94.5%) did their primary food shopping at higher-scoring chain supermarkets, and the majority of participants did not shop at the supermarket closest to home. Supermarket offerings varied, with significantly fewer healthful foods at supermarkets closest to the homes of disadvantaged residents. In multivariate analyses, participants were significantly more likely to shop at supermarkets closest to home if those supermarkets had higher NEMS-S scores. These data suggest that, when possible, shoppers chose supermarkets that offered more variety and more healthful foods. Findings from this study also reinforce concern regarding unhealthy immediate food environments for disadvantaged residents, who disproportionately relied on nearby stores with more limited food items. Interventions to improve nutrition and health should address not only food store proximity but also diversity of healthful foods available. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  10. The impact of geographic context on e-shopping behavior

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have examined what factors affect the adoption of e-shopping (electronic shopping), why people adopt e-shopping, and what changes in activity – travel patterns will occur as a response to e-shopping. Very few studies to date, however, have investigated the impact of geographic context on people’s e-shopping behavior. This study reexamines the explanatory factors that are related to people’s e-shopping patterns through a study of the Columbus Metropolitan Area, OH. It focuses on...

  11. Internet Shopping Behavior of College of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyici, Mubin

    2012-01-01

    Internet is an important facilitator for human and humans use this medium almost every phase. As a shopping medium, internet attract human so attract researcher. Younger people can adapt newer technologies so they can adapt internet as shopping tool. In this research it is tried to define college of education students' online shopping behavior and…

  12. Shopping in the Real World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Darren; Clemmensen, Nils Jakob; Skov, Mikael B.

    2009-01-01

    Shopping in the real world is becoming an increasingly interactive experience as stores integrate various technologies to support shoppers. Based on an empirical study of supermarket shoppers, we designed a mobile context-aware system called the Context- Aware Shopping Trolley (CAST). The aim...... of the system is to support shopping in supermarkets through context-awareness and acquiring user attention. Thus, the interactive trolley guides and directs shoppers in the handling and finding of groceries. An empirical evaluation showed that shoppers using CAST adapted in different shopping behavior than...

  13. An Exploratory Analysis of Online Shopping Behavior in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Veysel Ertemel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Alongside the technologic developments, transformation in user behavior and business models has been observed. New areas and models are emerged in a lot of grounds like the communication of people or daily activities. So a new face put for shopping behavior by the e-commerce, which is one of the novelties. This study tries to research online shopping behavior in Turkey. With a quantitative research, device usage, the reasons behind to shop or not to shop online, online shopping category and e-commerce site preferences, payment methods, international e-commerce and online marketplace usage is investigated. As implications of the research, “saving time“ is found to be the foremost reason for shopping online in Turkey and “travel and bookings” category is found as the most shopped category among the results of the survey.

  14. Smart Shopping Carts: How Real-Time Feedback Influences Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ittersum, van K.; Wansink, B.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Sheehan, D.

    2013-01-01

    Although interest in smart shopping carts is increasing, both retailers and consumer groups have concerns about how real-time spending feedback will influence shopping behavior. Building on budgeting and spending theories, the authors conduct three lab and grocery store experiments that robustly sho

  15. Smart shopping carts : How real-time feedback influences spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, Koert; Wansink, B.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Sheehan, D.

    2013-01-01

    Although interest in smart shopping carts is increasing, both retailers and consumer groups have concerns about how real-time spending feedback will influence shopping behavior. Building on budgeting and spending theories, the authors conduct three lab and grocery store experiments that robustly sho

  16. Smart Shopping Carts: How Real-Time Feedback Influences Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ittersum, van K.; Wansink, B.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Sheehan, D.

    2013-01-01

    Although interest in smart shopping carts is increasing, both retailers and consumer groups have concerns about how real-time spending feedback will influence shopping behavior. Building on budgeting and spending theories, the authors conduct three lab and grocery store experiments that robustly sho

  17. Smart shopping carts : How real-time feedback influences spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, Koert; Wansink, B.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Sheehan, D.

    2013-01-01

    Although interest in smart shopping carts is increasing, both retailers and consumer groups have concerns about how real-time spending feedback will influence shopping behavior. Building on budgeting and spending theories, the authors conduct three lab and grocery store experiments that robustly sho

  18. Smart shopping carts : How real-time feedback influences spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, Koert; Wansink, B.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Sheehan, D.

    2013-01-01

    Although interest in smart shopping carts is increasing, both retailers and consumer groups have concerns about how real-time spending feedback will influence shopping behavior. Building on budgeting and spending theories, the authors conduct three lab and grocery store experiments that robustly

  19. Smart Shopping Carts: How Real-Time Feedback Influences Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ittersum, van K.; Wansink, B.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Sheehan, D.

    2013-01-01

    Although interest in smart shopping carts is increasing, both retailers and consumer groups have concerns about how real-time spending feedback will influence shopping behavior. Building on budgeting and spending theories, the authors conduct three lab and grocery store experiments that robustly

  20. Shopping for fruits and vegetables. Food and retail qualities of importance to low-income households at the grocery store.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Caroline B; Sobal, Jeffery; Dollahite, Jamie S

    2010-04-01

    Purchasing fruits and vegetables is an integral part of managing food consumption and dietary quality. This study examined how low-income adults who had primary responsibility for household food purchases considered retail produce decisions. We used a qualitative research approach based on grounded theory and an ecological conceptual framework. Twenty-eight low-income rural, village, and inner city heads of households in upstate New York, USA, were selected by purposive and theoretical sampling and interviewed about fruit and vegetable shopping habits, attitudes toward local food stores, and where and how they would prefer to buy produce. Analyses revealed their concerns were organized around five themes: store venue; internal store environment; product quality; product price; relationships with the stores. An unanticipated finding was the differing social relations that appear to exist between participant consumers, store employees and management, and the store itself as a representation of the larger retail food system. Attitudes toward retail food stores in this study are described as passive or fatalistic indifference, supportive, opportunistic, and confrontational (change agents). These attitudes are related to how shoppers considered retail fruit and vegetable choice, access, and availability. These findings suggest ways to individualize nutrition education and consumer education messages.

  1. Ant Foraging Behavior for Job Shop Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahad Diyana Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ant Colony Optimization (ACO is a new algorithm approach, inspired by the foraging behavior of real ants. It has frequently been applied to many optimization problems and one such problem is in solving the job shop problem (JSP. The JSP is a finite set of jobs processed on a finite set of machine where once a job initiates processing on a given machine, it must complete processing and uninterrupted. In solving the Job Shop Scheduling problem, the process is measure by the amount of time required in completing a job known as a makespan and minimizing the makespan is the main objective of this study. In this paper, we developed an ACO algorithm to minimize the makespan. A real set of problems from a metal company in Johor bahru, producing 20 parts with jobs involving the process of clinching, tapping and power press respectively. The result from this study shows that the proposed ACO heuristics managed to produce a god result in a short time.

  2. A Large-Scale Study of Online Shopping Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Nalchigar, Soroosh; Weber, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    The continuous growth of electronic commerce has stimulated great interest in studying online consumer behavior. Given the significant growth in online shopping, better understanding of customers allows better marketing strategies to be designed. While studies of online shopping attitude are widespread in the literature, studies of browsing habits differences in relation to online shopping are scarce. This research performs a large scale study of the relationship between Internet browsing hab...

  3. Shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Frants; Arvedsen, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Shopping behandles som fænomen og begivenhed og som konkret undervisningstilgang til Visuel Kultur......Shopping behandles som fænomen og begivenhed og som konkret undervisningstilgang til Visuel Kultur...

  4. The Association between Food Security and Store-Specific and Overall Food Shopping Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaonan; Liese, Angela D; Hibbert, James; Bell, Bethany A; Wilcox, Sara; Sharpe, Patricia A

    2017-03-30

    Food security is a severe problem in the United States. Few studies have examined its relationship with food shopping behaviors. This study aimed to examine the association between food security and store-specific and overall food shopping among residents of low-income neighborhoods. We conducted a cross-sectional study. Five hundred twenty-seven households were recruited from two counties in South Carolina from November 2013 to May 2014, and 474 households were included in the final analysis. Food security was assessed using the 18-item US-Household Food Security Module questionnaire, and classified into three categories: high or marginal food security (FS), low food security (LFS), and very low food security (VLFS). Store-specific shopping behaviors including frequency, store type, and transportation were queried via in-person interview for the three most-frequented grocery stores. Distance from participants' homes to their reported stores was calculated using Geographic Information Systems. Multivariate linear regression for analyses of distance and frequency and multinomial/ordinary logistic regression for analyses of store type and transportation were used. Compared to FS participants, a significantly higher proportion of VLFS participants reported a convenience/dollar store as their most-frequented store (odds ratio [OR] 2.31, 95% CI 1.08 to 4.95) or a lack of transportation (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.25 to 3.33). They also shopped less frequently (b=-.31, P=0.03) at their third most-frequented store and traveled fewer total miles for shopping (b=-4.71, P=0.04). In analyses considering all stores jointly, LFS participants had lower odds of shopping at both supermarkets and convenience/dollar stores (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.91) compared to food-secure residents. The current findings suggest that households with VLFS tend to shop more frequently in stores that have less-healthful options, such as convenience/dollar stores. These findings lend support to ongoing

  5. The interplay of internet addiction and compulsive shopping behaviors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Jungkun; Lee, Seungsin; Lee, Sukhyung Bryan

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationship between Internet addiction and compulsive shopping in offline versus online settings, and the role of consumers' self-esteem on their offline behavior and compulsive e-buying tendencies...

  6. Shopping in the Real World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Darren; Clemmensen, Nils Jakob; Skov, Mikael B.

    2009-01-01

    Shopping in the real world is becoming an increasingly interactive experience as stores integrate various technologies to support shoppers. Based on an empirical study of supermarket shoppers, we designed a mobile context-aware system called the Context- Aware Shopping Trolley (CAST). The aim...... of the system is to support shopping in supermarkets through context-awareness and acquiring user attention. Thus, the interactive trolley guides and directs shoppers in the handling and finding of groceries. An empirical evaluation showed that shoppers using CAST adapted in different shopping behavior than...... traditional trolley shoppers by exhibiting a more uniform behavior in terms of product sequence collection and ease of finding products and thus, CAST supported the shopping experience....

  7. Effects of Website Interactivity on Online Retail Shopping Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Hafizul

    Motivations to engage in retail online shopping can include both utilitarian and hedonic shopping dimensions. To cater to these consumers, online retailers can create a cognitively and esthetically rich shopping environment, through sophisticated levels of interactive web utilities and features, offering not only utilitarian benefits and attributes but also providing hedonic benefits of enjoyment. Since the effect of interactive websites has proven to stimulate online consumer’s perceptions, this study presumes that websites with multimedia rich interactive utilities and features can influence online consumers’ shopping motivations and entice them to modify or even transform their original shopping predispositions by providing them with attractive and enhanced interactive features and controls, thus generating a positive attitude towards products and services offered by the retailer. This study seeks to explore the effects of Web interactivity on online consumer behavior through an attitudinal model of technology acceptance.

  8. GENDER AND SHOPPING BEHAVIOR OUTCOMES IN THE CONTEXT OF SHOPPING CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Nicoleta ABRUDAN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding consumer behavior can be divided into three parts: before visiting the stores or shopping centers, during the visit, and after. From the point of view of the final result intended by retailers, satisfying customers in terms of profitability, all three components are equally important. A relevant segmentation criterion for most products and stores is gender. Previous research suggests that gender influences shopping motivations, the way people shop and shopping behavior outcomes. The purpose of this article is to investigate if there are, indeed, differences between shopping behavior outputs of women and men (affective loyalty (satisfaction and conative loyalty, as found by certain researchers, and also in terms of the factors that influence the formation of conative loyalty. The results confirm that there are few significant differences in the satisfaction level, although for women all values are slightly higher, and none in the repurchase and recommendation intentions between the two genders. Conative loyalty formation (defined as intent to repurchase and recommend takes place differently between the two genders.

  9. Reflections on: Online grocery shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is included in the First Monday Special Issue #6: Commercial applications of the Internet, published in July 2006. Special Issue editor Mark A. Fox asked authors to submit additional comments regarding their articles.

  10. Reflections on: Online grocery shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    This paper is included in the First Monday Special Issue #6: Commercial applications of the Internet, published in July 2006. Special Issue editor Mark A. Fox asked authors to submit additional comments regarding their articles.

  11. Mothers' self-reported grocery shopping behaviours with their 2- to 7-year-old children: relationship between feeding practices and mothers' willingness to purchase child-requested nutrient-poor, marketed foods, and fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lively, Kathryn; Babawale, Oluborode; Thompson, David M; Morris, Amanda S; Harris, Jennifer L; Sisson, Susan B; Cheney, Marshall K; Lora, Karina R

    2017-09-07

    To assess relationships between mothers' feeding practices (food as a reward, food for emotion regulation, modelling of healthy eating) and mothers' willingness to purchase child-marketed foods and fruits/vegetables (F&V) requested by their children during grocery co-shopping. Cross-sectional. Mothers completed an online survey that included questions about feeding practices and willingness (i.e. intentions) to purchase child-requested foods during grocery co-shopping. Feeding practices scores were dichotomized at the median. Foods were grouped as nutrient-poor or nutrient-dense (F&V) based on national nutrition guidelines. Regression models compared mothers with above-the-median v. at-or-below-the-median feeding practices scores on their willingness to purchase child-requested food groupings, adjusting for demographic covariates. Participants completed an online survey generated at a public university in the USA. Mothers (n 318) of 2- to 7-year-old children. Mothers who scored above-the-median on using food as a reward were more willing to purchase nutrient-poor foods (β=0·60, P<0·0001), mothers who scored above-the-median on use of food for emotion regulation were more willing to purchase nutrient-poor foods (β=0·29, P<0·0031) and mothers who scored above-the-median on modelling of healthy eating were more willing to purchase nutrient-dense foods (β=0·22, P<0·001) than were mothers with at-or-below-the-median scores, adjusting for demographic covariates. Mothers who reported using food to control children's behaviour were more willing to purchase child-requested, nutrient-poor foods. Parental feeding practices may facilitate or limit children's foods requested in grocery stores. Parent-child food consumer behaviours should be investigated as a route that may contribute to children's eating patterns.

  12. Food shopping behaviors of residents in two Bronx neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Dannefer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous researchers have documented associations between neighborhood food environments and residents’ diets. However, few quantitative studies have examined the food shopping behaviors of residents in low-income neighborhoods, including the types of stores patronized and frequency of visits. This study presents findings on the food shopping behaviors of residents in the Bronx neighborhoods of West Farms and Fordham. Methods: Street-intercept surveys were conducted in spring 2012 with residents of West Farms and Fordham as part of a broader program evaluation. The survey included questions on general food shopping behaviors including visits to neighborhood bodegas (corner stores and supermarkets, mode of transportation to the supermarket most commonly frequented, and the primary source for purchases of fruits and vegetables. Results: The survey was conducted with 505 respondents. The sample was 59% Hispanic and 34% black, with a median age of 45 years. Thirty-four percent of respondents had less than a high school education, 30% were high school graduates or had their GED, and 36% had attended some college. Almost all respondents (97% shopped at supermarkets in their neighborhood; 84% usually shopped at a supermarket within their neighborhood, and 16% usually shopped at a supermarket outside of their neighborhood. Most respondents (95% shopped at bodegas in their neighborhood, and 65% did so once per day or more. Conclusions: Residents of these neighborhoods have high exposure to local food stores, with the vast majority of respondents shopping at neighborhood supermarkets and bodegas and almost 2 in 3 respondents going to bodegas every day. These findings demonstrate the important role of supermarkets and bodegas in local residents’ shopping patterns and support the inclusion of these stores in efforts to create food environments that support and promote healthy eating.

  13. Semantic Assessment of Shopping Behavior Using Trajectories, Shopping Related Actions, and Context Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Shan, C.; Gritti, T.; Wiggers, P.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of automatic understanding of customers' shopping behavior and acting according to their needs is relevant in the marketing domain, attracting a lot of attention lately. In this work, we focus on the task of automatic assessment of customers' shoppingbehavior, by proposing a multi- l

  14. Semantic Assessment of Shopping Behavior Using Trajectories, Shopping Related Actions, and Context Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Shan, C.; Gritti, T.; Wiggers, P.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of automatic understanding of customers' shopping behavior and acting according to their needs is relevant in the marketing domain, attracting a lot of attention lately. In this work, we focus on the task of automatic assessment of customers' shoppingbehavior, by proposing a multi-

  15. A Study on Factors Affecting the Behavioral Intention to use Mobile Shopping Fashion Apps in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Miladinovic, Jelena; Hong, Xiang,

    2016-01-01

    Mobile shopping is gaining increased attention in the mobile commerce research area. Trends show an increase in the development and usage of online shopping. Existing research has focused on mobile commerce and studied mobile shopping in general. This study addresses the present gap in the literature regarding the acceptance of mobile shopping applications for fashion goods (m-shopping fashion apps), by investigating the factors that affect users’ behavioral intention to use m-shopping fashio...

  16. Essays On the Empirical Analysis of Grocery Retailing and Consumer Shopping behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Florez Acosta, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cette thèse est composée de trois essaies portant sur l'analyse empirique de la grande distribution et le comportement d'achat des consommateurs. Le premier chapitre est dédié à l'étude des programmes de fidélité des supermarchés et leur impact sur la demande de marques de distributeur (MDD). Souvent les supermarchés lient les avantages fidélité à l'achat en marques de distributeurs, quelles sont les motivations des supermarchés à faire cela? C'est la question que cette étude cherche à répond...

  17. Pricing Strategy versus Heterogeneous Shopping Behavior under Market Price Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Álvarez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the ubiquitous problem of a seller competing in a market of a product with dispersed prices and having limited information about both his competitors’ prices and the shopping behavior of his potential customers. Given the distribution of market prices, the distribution of consumers’ shopping behavior, and the seller’s cost as inputs, we find the computational solution for the pricing strategy that maximizes his expected profits. We analyze the seller’s solution with respect to different exogenous perturbations of parametric and functional inputs. For that purpose, we produce synthetic price data using the family of Generalized Error Distributions that includes normal and quasiuniform distributions as particular cases, and we also generate consumers’ shopping data from different behavioral assumptions. Our analysis shows that, beyond price mean and dispersion, the shape of the price distribution plays a significant role in the seller’s pricing solution. We focus on the seller’s response to an increasing diversity in consumers’ shopping behavior. We show that increasing heterogeneity in the shopping distribution typically lowers seller’s prices and expected profits.

  18. Shopping Behavior Recognition using a Language Modeling Analogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Wiggers, P.; Shan, C.

    2012-01-01

    Automatic understanding and recognition of human shopping behavior has many potential applications, attracting an increasing interest inthe market- ing domain. The reliability and performance of the automatic recognition system is highly in uenced by the adopted theoretical model of behavior. In thi

  19. Comparison of the Risks of Shopping Behavior and Opioid Abuse Between Tapentadol and Oxycodone and Association of Shopping Behavior and Opioid Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Cepeda, M. Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Kihm, Mary A.; Mastrogiovanni, Greg; Yuan, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study compared the risks of opioid shopping behavior and opioid abuse between tapentadol immediate release and oxycodone immediate release and, to validate the definition of shopping, examined the association between opioid shopping and opioid abuse further. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study using linked dispensing and diagnosis databases followed opioid-naive patients for development of shopping behavior and/or opioid abuse during 1 year after initial ex...

  20. Semantic Assessment of Shopping Behavior Using Trajectories, Shopping Related Actions, and Context Information

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, M.C.; Rothkrantz , L.J.M.; Shan, C.; Gritti, T.; Wiggers, P.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of automatic understanding of customers' shopping behavior and acting according to their needs is relevant in the marketing domain, attracting a lot of attention lately. In this work, we focus on the task of automatic assessment of customers' shoppingbehavior, by proposing a multi- level framework. The framework is supported at low-level by different types of cameras, which are synchronized, facilitating effcient processing of information. A fish-eyecamera is used for tracking...

  1. How Traumatic Violence Permanently Changes Shopping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigirci, Ozge; Rockmore, Marc; Wansink, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic experiences - such as combat, living in a conflict country or war-torn nation, or experiencing a violent crime or natural disaster - change social relationships and may also influence a life-time of consumer relationships with brands and shopping. Our focus on this previously overlooked area is centered on an analysis of the long-term shopping habits of 355 combat veterans. We show that those who experienced heavy trauma (e.g., heavy combat) exhibited similar disconnection from brands as others have experienced in social relationships. They became more transactional in that they were more open to switching brands, to trying new products, and buying the least expensive alternative (p < 0.01). In contrast, those who had experienced a light trauma were more influenced by ads and more open to buying brands even when they cost more (p < 0.00). Trauma, such as combat, may change one's decision horizon. Functionality and price become more important, which is consistent with the idea that they are more focused on the present moment than on building on the past or saving for the future.

  2. How Traumatic Violence Permanently Changes Shopping Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Sigirci

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic experiences – such as combat, living in a conflict country or war-torn nation, or experience a violent crimes or natural disasters – change social relationships and may also influence a life-time of consumer relationships with brands and shopping. Our focus on this previously overlooked area is centered on an analysis of the long-term shopping habits 355 combat veterans. We show that those who experienced heavy trauma (e.g., heavy combat exhibited similar disconnection from brands as others have experienced in social relationships. They became more transactional in that they were more open to switching brands, to trying new products, and buying the least expensive alternative (p<0.01. In contrast, those who had experienced a light trauma were more influenced by ads and more open to buying brands even when they cost more (p<0.00. Trauma, such as combat, may change one’s decision horizon. Functionality and price become more important, which is consistent with the idea that they are more focused on the present moment than on building on the past or saving for the future.

  3. How Online Shopping Is Affecting Consumers Buying Behavior in Pakistan?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Nazir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Internet has developed in new delivery channels electronic transactions are increasing rapidly. This need has arisen to understand how they perceive directly to buy consumers. Most of the people who use the internet to purchase goods online, but that there are still some reasons for which consumers are reluctant to buy online. The attitudes of people toward the purchase online are different in Pakistan. The purpose of this study is to review the factors felt reservation of consumers in online shopping. The main objective of this research is to study, especially what are factors affecting the consumers directly for online shopping. To this end, a survey was conducted and the 120 questionnaires were distributed among the students of different universities and the general public. The replies have been analyzed by means of frequency distribution, average and chart analysis. The results of the survey analysis has shown that most of the people already shopping online and prefer to make their purchases online, but there are some factors such as psychological factors, social factors emotional factors, and the privacy factors which affect the buyer attitudes of online purchases. The protection of privacy and security are major problems that affect the behavior of the population to buy online. Various attitudes of consumers toward online shopping are not in rest in the study which reveals that the purchase online is easy, comfortable and better that conventional shopping due to various factors. Price, the trust, the convenience and the recommendations have been identified as important factors. Price was considered to be the most fascinating and affecting factor for the majority of students and the general public. Most of the consumers hesitate not to do shopping online, because of the insecure payment and transactions systems.

  4. Doctor-Shopping Behavior among Patients with Eye Floaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Gow-Lieng; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-07-13

    Patients suffering from eye floaters often resort to consulting more than one ophthalmologist. The purpose of this study, using the Health Belief Model (HBM), was to identify the factors that influence doctor-shopping behavior among patients with eye floaters. In this cross-sectional survey, 175 outpatients who presented floaters symptoms were enrolled. Data from 143 patients (77 first time visitors and 66 doctor-shoppers) who completed the questionnaire were analyzed. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that women and non-myopia patients were significantly related with frequent attendance and doctor switching. Though the HBM has performed well in a number of health behaviors studies, but most of the conceptual constructors of HBM did not show significant differences between the first time visitors and true doctor-shoppers in this study. Motivation was the only significant category affecting doctor-shopping behavior of patients with eye floaters.

  5. Doctor-Shopping Behavior among Patients with Eye Floaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gow-Lieng Tseng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from eye floaters often resort to consulting more than one ophthalmologist. The purpose of this study, using the Health Belief Model (HBM, was to identify the factors that influence doctor-shopping behavior among patients with eye floaters. In this cross-sectional survey, 175 outpatients who presented floaters symptoms were enrolled. Data from 143 patients (77 first time visitors and 66 doctor-shoppers who completed the questionnaire were analyzed. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that women and non-myopia patients were significantly related with frequent attendance and doctor switching. Though the HBM has performed well in a number of health behaviors studies, but most of the conceptual constructors of HBM did not show significant differences between the first time visitors and true doctor-shoppers in this study. Motivation was the only significant category affecting doctor-shopping behavior of patients with eye floaters.

  6. Comparison of the risks of shopping behavior and opioid abuse between tapentadol and oxycodone and association of shopping behavior and opioid abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Kihm, Mary A; Mastrogiovanni, Greg; Yuan, Yingli

    2014-12-01

    This study compared the risks of opioid shopping behavior and opioid abuse between tapentadol immediate release and oxycodone immediate release and, to validate the definition of shopping, examined the association between opioid shopping and opioid abuse further. This retrospective cohort study using linked dispensing and diagnosis databases followed opioid-naive patients for development of shopping behavior and/or opioid abuse during 1 year after initial exposure to tapentadol or oxycodone. Shopping was defined by having overlapping opioid prescriptions from >1 prescriber filled at ≥3 pharmacies; abuse by having International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision diagnoses reflecting opioid abuse, addiction, or dependence. To determine their association, we cross-tabulated shopping and opioid abuse and calculated odds ratios. Risks of developing each outcome were estimated using logistic regression. Among 277,401 participants initiating opioid use with tapentadol (39,524) or oxycodone (237,877), 0.6% developed shopping behavior, 0.75% developed abuse. Higher proportions of patients in the oxycodone group developed shopping behavior and abuse than in the tapentadol group (shopping: adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.45 [0.36-0.55]; abuse: 0.44 [0.37-0.54]). Shopping behavior and abuse were associated; of those with shopping behavior, 6.5% had abuse. Age (18 to 64 y), sex (male), prior benzodiazepine use, paying cash, and history (mood disorders, abuse of nonopioid medications, and back pain) were risk factors for developing either outcome. Shopping behavior and abuse measure complementary, but associated, constructs, which further validates the current definition of shopping. The risk of developing either is lower among patients who initiate opioid use with tapentadol than those who initiate opioid use with oxycodone.

  7. Opioid shopping behavior: how often, how soon, which drugs, and what payment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Chow, Wing; Mastrogiovanni, Gregory; Henderson, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Doctor shopping (obtaining opioid prescriptions from multiple prescribers) is one example of opioid abuse and diversion. The authors assessed how soon shopping behavior was observed after opioid exposure, number of events per shopper, preferred opioids, and method of payment. This was a cohort study. Individuals with ≤1 dispensing for any opioid in 2008 were followed for 18 months. Shopping behavior was defined as ≤2 prescriptions by different prescribers with ≤1 day of overlap and filled at ≤3 pharmacies. Of 25,161,024 subjects, 0.30% exhibited shopping behavior. Opioid-experienced subjects were 13.7 times more likely to exhibit shopping behavior and had more shopping episodes than opioid-naive subjects. Time to first shopping event was 246.90 ± 163.61 days. Number of episodes was 2.74 ± 4.66. Most subjects with shopping behavior (55.27%) had 1 shopping episode, whereas 9.52% had ≤6 episodes; 88.99% had ≤4 prescribers. Subjects with shopping behavior filled schedule II opioids more often than subjects without shopping behavior (19.51% vs 10.89%) and more often paid in cash (44.85% vs 18.54%). Three of 1000 people exposed to opioids exhibit shopping behavior, on average, 8 months after exposure. Opioid shoppers seek strong opioids, avoid combination products, often pay cash, and obtain prescriptions from few prescribers. © 2012 The Author(s).

  8. Supporting the Supermarket Shopping Experience through a Context-Aware Shopping Trolley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Darren; Clemmensen, Nils Jakob; Skov, Mikael B.

    2009-01-01

    Shopping in the real world is becoming an increasingly interactive experience as stores integrate various technologies to support shoppers. Based on an empirical study of supermarket shoppers, we designed a mobile context-aware system called the Context- Aware Shopping Trolley (CAST). The aim...... of the system is to support shopping in supermarkets through context-awareness and acquiring user attention. Thus, the interactive trolley guides and directs shoppers in the handling and finding of groceries. An empirical evaluation showed that shoppers using CAST adapted in different shopping behavior than...... traditional trolley shoppers by exhibiting a more uniform behavior in terms of product sequence collection and ease of finding products and thus, CAST supported the shopping experience....

  9. Supporting the Supermarket Shopping Experience through a Context-Aware Shopping Trolley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Darren; Clemmensen, Nils Jakob; Skov, Mikael B.

    2009-01-01

    of the system is to support shopping in supermarkets through context-awareness and acquiring user attention. Thus, the interactive trolley guides and directs shoppers in the handling and finding of groceries. An empirical evaluation showed that shoppers using CAST adapted in different shopping behavior than...... traditional trolley shoppers by exhibiting a more uniform behavior in terms of product sequence collection and ease of finding products and thus, CAST supported the shopping experience.......Shopping in the real world is becoming an increasingly interactive experience as stores integrate various technologies to support shoppers. Based on an empirical study of supermarket shoppers, we designed a mobile context-aware system called the Context- Aware Shopping Trolley (CAST). The aim...

  10. THE IMPACT OF RELIGION ON SHOPPING BEHAVIOR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikolaos I Migdalis; Nasya Tomlekova; Panayotis K Serdaris; Yordan G Yordanov

    2014-01-01

    .... The results showed that there were statistical differences in several caves. We found that microculture develops different patterns of behavior for Christian and Muslim consumers, based on their religious preferences...

  11. Supermarket Choice, Shopping Behavior, Socioeconomic Status, and Food Purchases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechey, Rachel; Monsivais, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Both SES and supermarket choice have been associated with diet quality. This study aimed to assess the contributions of supermarket choice and shopping behaviors to the healthfulness of purchases and social patterning in purchases. Observational panel data on purchases of fruit and vegetables and less-healthy foods/beverages from 2010 were obtained for 24,879 households, stratified by occupational social class (analyzed in 2014). Households' supermarket choice was determined by whether they ever visited market-defined high- or low-price supermarkets. Analyses also explored extent of use within supermarket choice groups. Shopping behaviors included trip frequency, trip size, and number of store chains visited. Households using low-price (and not high-price) supermarkets purchased significantly lower percentages of energy from fruit and vegetables and higher percentages of energy from less-healthy foods/beverages than households using high-price (and not low-price) supermarkets. When controlling for SES and shopping behaviors, the effect of supermarket choice was reduced but remained significant for both fruit and vegetables and less-healthy foods/beverages. The extent of use of low- or high-price supermarkets had limited effects on outcomes. More-frequent trips and fewer small trips were associated with healthier purchasing for both outcomes; visiting more store chains was associated with higher percentages of energy from fruit and vegetables. Although both supermarket choice and shopping behaviors are associated with healthfulness of purchases, neither appears to contribute to socioeconomic differences. Moreover, differences between supermarket environments may not be primary drivers of the relationship between supermarket choice and healthfulness of purchases. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Students’ online purchasing behavior in Malaysia: Understanding online shopping attitude

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Zendehdel; Laily Hj Paim; Syuhaily Bint Osman

    2015-01-01

    Studies examining the factors that affect the online purchasing behavior of consumers are rare, despite the prospective advance of e-commerce in Malaysia. The present study examines particular factors that influence the attitude of potential consumers to purchase online by using the attributes from the diffusion of innovations theory of Rogers, the attribute of perception of risk, and the subjective norms toward online purchasing. Consumers’ perceived risks of online shopping have become a vi...

  13. Online Shopping In The UK

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, K.K.; K. K. Karthick; M. Saravana Kumar

    2011-01-01

    This paper will contribute to current academic literature in the area of online retailing and consumer behaviour. Our research outlines a survey conducted with respondents from the UK to ascertain their attitudes to grocery shopping both off and online. The findings indicate that, whilst the vast majority of our sample has experience of online shopping, few actively engage in online grocery shopping. Some of the reasons for this are highlighted and the key issues relate to consumer trust and ...

  14. CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR TOWARDS ONLINE SHOPPING

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi S

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing internet literacy, the prospect of online marketing is increasing. There are millions of people online any time and they all are a potential consumer in the online market. Since there are so many providers, the most important thing for organizations is to understand what are consumer wants and needs in this competitive business environment. Customer buying behaviors are influenced by different factors such as culture, social class, references group relation, family, salary...

  15. Factors Influencing Consumer Behavior Towards Online Shopping in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to identify factors that may affect consumer behavior in Saudi Arabia while shopping online. Although Saudi Arabia has the largest and fastest growing ICT in the Middle East and the online shopping activities in Saudi are increasing rapidly, it is still lagging behind the global development. The four factors–website design quality, perceived trust, perceived convenience and advertisements & promotions were selected from the available literature. A survey was conducted and questionnaire that includes 25 questions was distributed randomly to a sample of 107 participants in Dammam city (in the Eastern Province of the kingdom. The collected data was analyzed by using SPSS software. The result indicates one hypothesis has been accepted. The findings of the study are analyzed and discussed further at the end of this paper.

  16. Urban association rules: uncovering linked trips for shopping behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, Yuji; Hobin, Juan N Bautista; Ratti, Carlo; Blat, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the method of urban association rules and its uses for extracting frequently appearing combinations of stores that are visited together to characterize shoppers' behaviors. The Apriori algorithm is used to extract the association rules (i.e., if -> result) from customer transaction datasets in a market-basket analysis. An application to our large-scale and anonymized bank card transaction dataset enables us to output linked trips for shopping all over the city: the method enables us to predict the other shops most likely to be visited by a customer given a particular shop that was already visited as an input. In addition, our methodology can consider all transaction activities conducted by customers for a whole city in addition to the location of stores dispersed in the city. This approach enables us to uncover not only simple linked trips such as transition movements between stores but also the edge weight for each linked trip in the specific district. Thus, the proposed methodo...

  17. How Can Stores Sustain Their Businesses? From Shopping Behaviors and Motivations to Environment Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J.C. Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to (1 discover consumer purchasing behaviors while shopping as a tourist and shopping at home, and (2 investigate tourist shopping preferences for an ideal shopping environment. A sample of 1,235 respondents participated in this study. Survey participants were asked to evaluate what store attributes they desired and what sources of information they used while selecting a store to shop in during their trips. Results indicate that consumers utilized various shopping channels while shopping in various environments. Also, different types of consumers exhibited clear preferences toward their ideal shopping environment. The results of this study are helpful for future service providers, tourism businesses, and tourism retailers to plan product development, provide better services, and equip a wider range of service skills.

  18. Retail Shopping Lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses consumers' shopping lists. The current study is based on a survey of 871 lists collected at retail grocery stores. Most items on shopping lists appear on the product category level rather than the brand level. The importance of the brand level varies considerably across product....... The paper ends with a discussion and with suggestions for future research....

  19. DEVELOPMENTS AND CLASSIFICATIONS OF ONLINE SHOPPING BEHAVIOR IN GERMANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Brusch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the field of online shopping, new developments can be identified; e.g. the allowance of product returns (management of product returns and the ordering and delivery of products from an Internet retailer in the same day (same-day delivery. Our contribution provides a brief overview of these developments (i.e. major trends and of the advanced e-commerce market (in Germany. Additionally, an empirical investigation of German online shoppers will be used to describe these shoppers as a whole and to classify them into groups with similar purchasing behavior. Our paper will support the selection and addressing of proper target groups.

  20. Decreasing Supermarket Tantrums by Increasing Shopping Tasks: Advantages of Pre-Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Ashley E.; Williams, W. Larry; Seniuk, Holly A.

    2014-01-01

    A brief training package consisting of pre-teaching of appropriate grocery item--gathering skills and reinforcement for appropriate behavior was used to teach a child diagnosed with autism to remain in a store and participate in shopping without exhibiting tantrums. The training package began with teaching the necessary component skills and…

  1. Decreasing Supermarket Tantrums by Increasing Shopping Tasks: Advantages of Pre-Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Ashley E.; Williams, W. Larry; Seniuk, Holly A.

    2014-01-01

    A brief training package consisting of pre-teaching of appropriate grocery item--gathering skills and reinforcement for appropriate behavior was used to teach a child diagnosed with autism to remain in a store and participate in shopping without exhibiting tantrums. The training package began with teaching the necessary component skills and…

  2. Consumer Buying Behavior Towards Online Shopping Stores in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrdad Salehi

    2011-01-01

    The Internet as a global medium is quickly gaining interest and attractiveness as the most revolutionary marketing tool. The global nature of communication and shopping has as well redefined, seeing that it is the perfect vehicle for online shopping stores. Online convenient shop is mostly reflected in shorter time and less energy spent, including shipping cost reduction, less crowd and queues than real markets, unlimited time and space, which all increase convenience of shopping. Internet sh...

  3. Outpatient-shopping behavior and survival rates in newly diagnosed cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Shang-Jyh; Wang, Shiow-Ing; Liu, Chien-Hsiang; Yaung, Chih-Liang

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the appropriateness of the definition of outpatient-shopping behavior in Taiwanese patients. Linked study of 3 databases (Taiwan Cancer Registry, National Health Insurance [NHI] claim database, and death registry database). Outpatient shopping behavior was defined as making at least 4 or 5 physician visits to confirm a cancer diagnosis. We analyzed patient-related factors and the 5-year overall survival rate of the outpatient-shopping group compared with a nonshopping group. Using the household registration database and NHI database, we determined the proportion of outpatient shopping, characteristics of patients who did and did not shop for outpatient therapy, time between diagnosis and start of regular treatment, and medical service utilization in the shopping versus the nonshopping group. Patients with higher incomes were significantly more likely to shop for outpatient care. Patients with higher comorbidity scores were 1.4 times more likely to shop for outpatient care than patients with lower scores. Patients diagnosed with more advanced cancer were more likely to shop than those who were not. Patients might be more trusting of cancer diagnoses given at higher-level hospitals. The nonshopping groups had a longer duration of survival over 5 years. Health authorities should consider charging additional fees after a specific outpatient- shopping threshold is reached to reduce this behavior. The government may need to reassess the function of the medical sources network by shrinking it from the original 4 levels to 2 levels, or by enhancing the referral function among different hospital levels.

  4. Consumer Online Grocery Buying Intention

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Jan Møller; Solgaard, Hans Stubbe

    2003-01-01

    This paper tests the ability of two consumer theories - the theory of reasoned action and the theory of planned behavior - in predicting consumer online grocery buying intention. In addition, a comparison of the two theories is conducted. Data were collected from two web-based surveys of Danish (n=1222) and Swedish (n=1038) consumers using self-administered questionnaires. Lisrel results suggest that the theory of planned behavior (with the inclusion of a path from subjective norm to attitude...

  5. Students’ online purchasing behavior in Malaysia: Understanding online shopping attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Zendehdel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies examining the factors that affect the online purchasing behavior of consumers are rare, despite the prospective advance of e-commerce in Malaysia. The present study examines particular factors that influence the attitude of potential consumers to purchase online by using the attributes from the diffusion of innovations theory of Rogers, the attribute of perception of risk, and the subjective norms toward online purchasing. Consumers’ perceived risks of online shopping have become a vital subject in research because they directly influence users’ attitude toward online purchasing. The structural equation modeling method was used to analyze the data gathered on students using e-commerce, and, thus, to validate the model. According to the results, consumers’ attitude toward online purchasing affects the intention toward online purchasing. The other influential factors are compatibility, relative advantage, and subjective norm.

  6. Grocery E-commerce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Bjerre, Mogens

    This book attempts to shed light on why it is so difficult to develop and maintain successful businesses in the grocery e-commerce arena. Within the last five years, "Grocery e-commerce" has experienced both consistent successes such as Tesco.com and irrevocable failures such as Webvan.com. Niels...... Kornum and Mogens Bjerre bring key researchers together to investigate the factors contributing to the success of "Grocery e-commerce", particularly in countries that had the earliest and most extensive experiences in this field: the USA, the UK and Scandinavia. The authors argue that "Grocery e-commerce...... country comparisons and new empirical evidence in order to address the long-term prospects for the survival of "Grocery e-commerce". Recommendations as to how managers should respond to its challenges are also made. Academics, students and researchers focussing on marketing, consumer behaviour, logistics...

  7. Customer Buying Behavior : - Online shopping towards electronic product

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dan; Yang, Liuzi

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Online shopping in EU has been shown to a good potential market. The electronic equipment takes a high percent of the individuals shopping. Compared with other goods, online shopping of electronic goods adds great convenience to the life of the people. Buying electronic gadgets online gives customers an opportunity to find a great variety of product online, and customers can review a wide selection of products and find special offers and discount with the best deals online. In the co...

  8. Using Eye Tracking to Explore Consumers' Visual Behavior According to Their Shopping Motivation in Mobile Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yoon Min; Lee, Kun Chang

    2017-07-01

    Despite a strong shift to mobile shopping trends, many in-depth questions about mobile shoppers' visual behaviors in mobile shopping environments remain unaddressed. This study aims to answer two challenging research questions (RQs): (a) how much does shopping motivation like goal orientation and recreation influence mobile shoppers' visual behavior toward displays of shopping information on a mobile shopping screen and (b) how much of mobile shoppers' visual behavior influences their purchase intention for the products displayed on a mobile shopping screen? An eye-tracking approach is adopted to answer the RQs empirically. The experimental results showed that goal-oriented shoppers paid closer attention to products' information areas to meet their shopping goals. Their purchase intention was positively influenced by their visual attention to the two areas of interest such as product information and consumer opinions. In contrast, recreational shoppers tended to visually fixate on the promotion area, which positively influences their purchase intention. The results contribute to understanding mobile shoppers' visual behaviors and shopping intentions from the perspective of mindset theory.

  9. Shopping behavior for ADHD drugs: results of a cohort study in a pharmacy database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Berwaerts, Joris; Yuan, Yingli; Mastrogiovanni, Greg

    2014-09-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications are subject to abuse, misuse, and diversion. Obtaining ADHD prescriptions from multiple prescribers or filled across multiple pharmacies, known as 'doctor shopping', may reflect such unsanctioned use. We sought to create a definition of shopping behavior that differentiated ADHD medications from medications with low risk of diversion, i.e. asthma medications, and describe the incidence, frequency, and demography of shopping behavior. This was a retrospective cohort study in a pharmacy database-LRx-covering 65 % of US retail pharmacies. Subjects had ADHD or asthma medication dispensed between February 2011 and January 2012. We followed subjects for 18 months to assess the number with overlapping dispensings from different prescribers, and the number of prescribers and pharmacies involved in those dispensings. We included 4,402,464 subjects who were dispensed ADHD medications, and 6,128,025 subjects who were dispensed asthma medications. Overlapping prescriptions from two or more prescribers dispensed by three or more pharmacies was four times more frequent in the ADHD cohort than in the asthma cohort. Using this definition, ADHD medication shopping behavior was more common among experienced users than naïve users, and was most common in subjects aged 10-39 years. Among subjects who shopped, 57.4 % shopped only once (accounting for 22.4 % of episodes), and 9.2 % shopped six or more times (accounting for 42.0 % of episodes). Shoppers more often received stimulant ADHD drugs than non-stimulants. Overlapping prescriptions by different prescribers and filled at three or more pharmacies defines ADHD medication shopping. Shopping behavior is most common in adolescents and younger adults. A small proportion of shoppers is responsible for a large number of shopping episodes.

  10. The Travel to Shop Behavior of Consumers in Equilibrium Market Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bacon, Robert W

    1992-01-01

    ... that shop is visited, must be identified. A key feature of prior studies using conventional models of spatial consumer behavior is that they have shown how to identify the market areas of competing centers...

  11. The Grocery Sector from the 1960s to the Present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    , the paper serves as a case study of the introduction of the motor vehicle in Denmark. Both the supply of goods to the retail outlets (the wholesale side) and the shopping transport are covered. The period covered has seen both a profound restructuring of the grocery sector structure (incl. a reduction...

  12. Factors Affecting the Behavior of Engineering Students toward Safety Practices in the Machine Shop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Kristian M. Neria

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the factors that affect the behavior of engineering student toward safety practices in the machine shop. Descriptive type of research was utilized in the study. Results showed that most of the engineering students clearly understand the signage shown in the machine shop. Students are aware that they should not leave the machines unattended. Most of the engineering students handle and use the machine properly. The respondents have an average extent of safety practices in the machine shop which means that they are applying safety practices in their every activity in machine shop. There is strong relationship between the safety practices and the factors affecting behavior in terms of signage, reminder of teacher and rules and regulation.

  13. The households purchase behavior and visitors shopping – amusing centre Olympia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Foret

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the paper is devoted to the problems of the households purchase behavior in the Czech Republic. The main part is based on own empirical results from own marketing research conducted in 2005–2006. The results concerns on influences of food-stuffs purchases, clothes and shoes purchases, household equipments purchases and differences among them. In the second part is presented increasing number of shopping – amusing centres in the Czech Republic. These trends are changing purchase behavior our consumers. In Spring 2006 was conducted own marketing research of visitors shopping – amusing centre Olympia in Brno Modřice. Some more detail results give their basic sociodemographic characteristics as well as shopping orientations. The purchase in the shopping – amusing centres is a part of the contemporary life style, leisure and amusement.

  14. Factors Affecting the Online Shopping Behavior: An Empirical Investigation in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngo Tan Vu Khanh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Online shopping has become new type of retail shopping. It has now been adopted all over the world including Vietnam. This shopping method is still not as well known or accepted as in many other countries, and though the knowledge of online shopping in Vietnam is now beginning to increase rapidly, to know the factors influencing online shopping behavior of Vietnam consumers there are several articles written. The main objective of this study is to analyze factors affecting on online shopping behavior of consumers that might be one of the most important issues of e-commerce and marketing field. However, there is very limited knowledge about online consumer behavior because it is a complicated socio-technical phenomenon and involves too many factors. The model was assessed based on the data collected from 238 participants using a survey questionnaire. Finally regression analysis was used on data in order to test hypothesizes of study. This study can be considered as an applied research from purpose perspective and descriptive-survey with regard to the nature and method.

  15. Shopping in discount stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zielke, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of price-related attributions, emotions and value perception on the intention to shop at grocery discounters in an integrated framework. Moderating effects of price consciousness are also analyzed. The results show that the proposed model explains almost three quart...... effect, followed by the efficiency of the business model attribution. The unfairness to stakeholders and the tricks in price communication attribution mostly influence the shopping intention for less price-conscious customers.......This paper analyzes the impact of price-related attributions, emotions and value perception on the intention to shop at grocery discounters in an integrated framework. Moderating effects of price consciousness are also analyzed. The results show that the proposed model explains almost three...

  16. Evaluating the effect factors of planning behavior on online shopping behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar sadat Mesbahi JAhromi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In today's competitive environment, the development of e-commerce and information technology, the scope of vendors has changed, this factors led to coordinate organizations with the revolution in electronic communications and they choose the business of Internet new way to earn and compete competitors. However, the business of internet industry not yet reached the stage of maturity and more customers prefer the traditional purchasing channels,. Hence, this paper examines the effect of planning behavior factors on the Internet purchasing behavior . Knowing the impact of these factors can lead to further encourage customers to adopt Internet shopping and to prosper internet business in iran .The population of the study,student 4 State University of Tehran,Tarbiat Modarres University,Allameh Tabatabai University and Shahid Beheshti university.Required data were selected and collected through a standard questionnaire of 25 questions,from 386 students by cluster sampling method.Testing hypotheses have done through structural equation modeling using Lisrel. The results of the analysis showed that the conceptual model have a good fit. Moreover, it was found that had significant effect positive attitude towards online shopping and subjective norms on Internet shopping intentions and Internet shopping intentions on perceived behavioral control but was not confirmed significant influence of perceived behavioral control on the Internet shopping intention.

  17. Food Shopping Perceptions, Behaviors, and Ability to Purchase Healthful Food Items in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Bernestine B.; Johnson, Glenda S.; Yadrick, M. Kathleen; Richardson, Valerie; Simpson, Pippa M.; Gossett, Jeffrey M.; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Bogle, Margaret L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the agreement between perceptions, behaviors, and ability to purchase healthful food in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD). Design: A regional food store survey of healthful food options in supermarkets, small/medium stores, and convenience stores. Focus group discussions were conducted on shopping perceptions and behaviors.…

  18. Food Shopping Perceptions, Behaviors, and Ability to Purchase Healthful Food Items in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Bernestine B.; Johnson, Glenda S.; Yadrick, M. Kathleen; Richardson, Valerie; Simpson, Pippa M.; Gossett, Jeffrey M.; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Bogle, Margaret L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the agreement between perceptions, behaviors, and ability to purchase healthful food in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD). Design: A regional food store survey of healthful food options in supermarkets, small/medium stores, and convenience stores. Focus group discussions were conducted on shopping perceptions and behaviors.…

  19. Pedestrian Choice Behavior at Shopping Mall Intersections in China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitgood, Stephen; Davey, Gareth; Huang, Xiaoyi; Fung, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Pedestrian navigation through public spaces reflects the nature of interaction between behavior and environment. This study compared pedestrian choice behavior at shopping mall intersections in China and the United States. The study found that in both countries (a) pedestrians chose movement patterns that involved the fewest steps and (b) there…

  20. Keeping an Uphill Edge: Managing Cleaning Behaviors at a Ski Shop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Jessica; Livesey, Josh; McHaffie, Elizabeth; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Several behaviors in a ski shop were identified as being deficient using Austin's Performance Diagnostic Checklist (2000) and Daniels and Daniels' PIC/NIC Analysis (2004). During a 4-week baseline, 7 cleaning behaviors were monitored and 5 were subsequently targeted in an intervention package using an ABC design. The intervention included: a task…

  1. Preschoolers' influence on and help with beverage selection at the grocery store is linked to maternal responsiveness and child beverage intake: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Karina R; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Guzman, Melissa; Wakefield, Dorothy; Sisson, Susan B; Mayeux, Lara

    2016-12-01

    Children's involvement in beverage selection or purchase has seldom been investigated. The responsiveness dimension of parental feeding styles has been related to healthy maternal feeding practices. Assessing mothers' reports of responsiveness and demandingness in grocery stores may shed light on influences on purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and fruit juice (FJ). Study objectives were to explore whether (1) maternal responsiveness and demandingness were associated with preschoolers' a) help with selection of and b) influence on SSB and FJ purchases during grocery shopping and whether (2) preschoolers' a) help with selection of and b) influence on SSB and FJ purchases were associated with child intake of these beverages. Mothers of 3-to-5-year-old children (n=185) who co-shopped with the child completed the Caregiver Feeding Style Questionnaire, reported frequency of child help with selection and influence on beverage purchase via questionnaire, and provided a one-day weekend food recall for the child. In adjusted logistic regressions, responsiveness was associated with child help selecting FJ (OR=6.50, 95% CI[1.04, 40.75], pparenting behaviors associated with grocery shopping should be explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Codeine Shopping Behavior in a Retrospective Cohort of Chronic Noncancer Pain Patients: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenaf, Chouki; Kabore, Jean-Luc; Delorme, Jessica; Pereira, Bruno; Mulliez, Aurélien; Roche, Lucie; Eschalier, Alain; Delage, Noémie; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Codeine is a widely used opioid analgesic but studies on its misuse in chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) are still lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of codeine shopping behavior in CNCP patients and to identify the associated risk factors. This was a population-based retrospective cohort study from the French health insurance claims database from 2004 to 2014. The main outcome was the one-year incidence of codeine shopping behavior defined as ≥1 day of overlapping prescriptions written by ≥2 different prescribers and filled in ≥3 different pharmacies. A total of 1,958 CNCP patients treated with codeine were included, with a mean age of 62.7 ± 16.1 years, 36.8% men. The 1-year incidence rate of codeine shopping behavior was 4.03% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.07-5.28). In multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with shopping behavior were younger age (≤40 years) (hazard ratio [HR] = 7.29; 95% CI, 4.28-12.42), mental health disorders (HR = 2.25; 95% CI, 1.08-4.67), concurrent use of anxiolytic benzodiazepines (HR = 3.12; 95% CI, 1.55-6.26), and previous use of strong opioids (HR = 2.94; 95% CI, 1.24-6.98). The incidence of codeine shopping behavior in CNCP patients was 4% and risk factors identified were shared with those of opioid abuse. Shopping behavior for codeine was not infrequent in CNCP patients. The risk factors identified in this study are similar to those identified for opioid abuse in other studies. Appropriate use of codeine from the perspectives of patients and healthcare providers should be encouraged. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Doctor Shopping Behavior for Zolpidem Among Insomnia Patients in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tzu-Hsuan; Lee, Yen-Ying; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Lin, You-Meei

    2015-07-01

    Although zolpidem is listed as a controlled drug in Taiwan, patients' behavior has not been restricted and has led to the problem of doctor shopping behavior (DSB), leading to overutilization of medical resources and excess spending. The National Health Insurance Administration in Taiwan has instituted a new policy to regulate physicians' prescribing behavior and decrease DSB. This retrospective study aimed to analyze the DSB for zolpidem by insomnia patients and assess related factors. Data were extracted from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. Individuals with a diagnosis of insomnia who received more than one prescription of zolpidem in 2008 were followed for 24 mo. Doctor shopping was defined as ≥ 2 prescriptions by different doctors within ≥ 1 day overlapping in the duration of therapy. The percentage of zolpidem obtained through doctor shopping was used as an indicator of the DSB of each patient. Among the 6,947 insomnia patients who were prescribed zolpidem, 1,652 exhibited DSB (23.78%). The average dose of zolpidem dispensed for each patient during 24 mo was 244.21 daily defined doses. The doctor shopping indicator (DSI) was 0.20 (standard deviation, 0.23) among patients with DSB. Younger age, chronic diseases, high number of diseases, higher premium status, high socioeconomic status, and fewer people served per practicing physicians were all factors significantly related to doctor shopping behavior. Doctor shopping for zolpidem appears to be an important issue in Taiwan. Implementing a proper referral system with efficient data exchange by physician or pharmacist-led medication reconciliation process might reduce DSB. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. On the relationship between weight status and doctor shopping behavior-evidence from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoqi

    2013-11-01

    A recent study has suggested that overweight and obese people are more likely to consult a range of physicians (doctor shopping). The consistency of this finding with multiple measures of doctor shopping and controls for socioeconomic circumstances was interrogated. Ninety-nine thousand four hundred seven Australians aged 45 and over who had sought primary healthcare at least five times within 6 months of a survey (2006-2008). (i) The count of different physicians consulted; a binary indicator of (ii) >= three different physicians; (iii) >= five different physicians; and iv) a measure that took into account multiple consultations with the same physician were investigated. Weight status was measured using Body Mass Index (BMI) based on self-reported height and weight. Controls included socioeconomic circumstances, demographics, health, and neighborhood factors. In comparison to people with "normal" BMI, the likelihood of doctor shopping was lower among overweight (Incidence Rate Ratio: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96, 0.98) and obese people (0.95: 0.93, 0.96). This negative correlation between doctor shopping behavior and weight status was consistent after full adjustment and across different outcome measures. In contrast with recent evidence from the US, overweight and obese Australians are less prone to doctor shopping behavior than their peers with "normal" BMI. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. Investigating the effects of sales promotions on customer behavioral intentions at duty-free shops: An Incheon International Airport case study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Jin-Woo; Choi, Yu-Jin; Moon, Woo-Choon

    2013-01-01

    .... The identified sales promotion factors that influence the behavioral intentions of customers at duty-free shops are potentially useful for analyzing the possible trends and changes in duty-free shop customer buying behavior.

  6. Effective Factors on Iranian Consumers Behavior in Internet Shopping: A Soft Computing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghasemaghaei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Nowadays, the Internet is increasingly becoming the fastest growing shopping channel in these days. Moreover, it has been predicted that the city of Isfahan in Iran will experience a sharp increase in the Internet and the Web usage in the next decade. However, the factors affect the shopping of different products via the Internet have received a little direct research attention so far. Thus, there is an inherent need to investigate the nature and perceptions of consumers and the suitability of different types of products and services and also the role of each factor which impacts consumers’ behavior in choosing between buying from the Internet or traditional stores. Our case study is Isfahan Iran. Approach: The present study aimed to consider the influencing factors on consumer e-shopping behavior for different types of products. The data were obtained from 412 volunteers who had the Internet shopping experience and were analyzed using MLP neural networks and logistic regression for each types of product. Then, after comparing the accuracy of these methods, the most important factors which motivate the consumers to buy online were determined by the trained neural network. Results: Compared to the logistic regression, the neural network method showed a better performance in predicting the factors which affect on consumer online shopping behavior with the accuracy of at around 93% for all types of products included in this study. Conclusion: The results showed that companies should invest on different factors for different types of products to motivate consumers to shop online from them. Again, for each sort of products some factors are more important than the others. This study also suggested the merits of ANNs as non-linear predictors in commercial studies which can be used in reverse engineering as well.

  7. Shopping Behaviors of Low-income Families during a 1-Month Period of Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darko, Janice; Eggett, Dennis L.; Richards, Rickelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore food shopping behaviors among low-income families over the course of the month. Design: Two researchers conducted 13 90-minute focus groups. Setting: Two community organizations serving low-income populations and a university campus. Participants: Low-income adults (n = 72) who were the primary household food shoppers and who…

  8. PENGARUH SHOPPING LIFESTYLE DAN FASHION INVOLVEMENT TERHADAP IMPULSE BUYING BEHAVIOR MASYARAKAT KOTA MAKASSAR

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. NASIR, ST. NUR MULTAZAMI

    2016-01-01

    2016 Indrianty Sudirman Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh shopping lifestyle dan fashion involvement terhadap impulse buying behavior masyarakat kota Makassar, untuk mengetahui sejauh mana kedua fktor tersebut mempengaruhi sikap konsumen dalam melakukan impulse buying. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode deskriptif yang melibatkan 100 orang responden. Pengumpulan data dilakukan dengan menggunakan pembagian kuesioner. Data yang diperoleh dianalisis d...

  9. Automatic detection of suspicious behavior of pickpockets with track-based features in a shopping mall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Baan, J.; Burghouts, G.J.; Eendebak, P.T.; Huis, J.R. van; Dijk, J.; Rest, J.H.C. van

    2014-01-01

    Proactive detection of incidents is required to decrease the cost of security incidents. This paper focusses on the automatic early detection of suspicious behavior of pickpockets with track-based features in a crowded shopping mall. Our method consists of several steps: pedestrian tracking, feature

  10. Shopping Behaviors of Low-income Families during a 1-Month Period of Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darko, Janice; Eggett, Dennis L.; Richards, Rickelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore food shopping behaviors among low-income families over the course of the month. Design: Two researchers conducted 13 90-minute focus groups. Setting: Two community organizations serving low-income populations and a university campus. Participants: Low-income adults (n = 72) who were the primary household food shoppers and who…

  11. Identification of Variables and Factors Impacting Consumer Behavior in On-line Shopping in India: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhikara, Sudesh

    On-line shopping is a recent phenomenon in the field of E-Business and is definitely going to be the future of shopping in the world. Most of the companies are running their on-line portals to sell their products/services. Though online shopping is very common outside India, its growth in Indian Market, which is a large and strategic consumer market, is still not in line with the global market. The potential growth of on-line shopping has triggered the idea of conducting a study on on-line shopping in India. The present research paper has used exploratory study to depict and highlight the various categories of factors and variables impacting the behavior of consumers towards on-line shopping in India. The data was collected through in-depth interviews on a sample of 41 respondents from Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Bangalore. The results of the study show that on-line shopping in India is basically impacted by five categories of factors like demographics factor, Psychographics factor, Online shopping feature and policies, Technological factor, Security factor. The results of the study are used to present a comprehensive model of on-line shopping which could be further used by the researchers and practitioners for conducting future studies in the similar area. A brief operational definition of all the factors and variables impacting on-line shopping in India is also described. And finally practical implications of the study are also elucidated.

  12. Effective Factors in Environmental Health Status of Grocery Stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Asadi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the Study: This study was carried out to determine the effective factors in environmental health status of grocery stores in the city of Qom (located in the center of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 283 grocery stores from 3 different regions were selected randomly using stratified sampling. Data were gathered through observation, interview, and questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of two sections: section 1 dealt with some shop managers’ features including the age, educational level, job satisfaction, passing “food and occupational hygiene training courses”, store ownership, duration of employment, and features of stores including their location (Region and environmental health condition. And section 2 dealt with the important aspects of regulations of Article 13. The data analyzed using statistical procedures such as Spearman Rank Correlation and Multivariate Regression Analysis. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: Among the investigated factors, the manager’s educational level had a greater impact on the environmental health conditions of grocery stores. The ownership status of grocery stores, Job satisfaction and passing “food and occupational hygiene training courses” were next in the ranking, respectively (p <0.001 for all measures, except for shop ownership, for which p-value was <0.02. Conclusions: Planning and implementation of effective operational and strategic programs addressing the above mentioned issues seems to be necessary. Such programs will improve the health status of the stores over time.

  13. Why do you shop there? A mixed methods study mapping household food shopping patterns onto weekly routines of black women

    OpenAIRE

    DiSantis, Katherine Isselmann; Hillier, Amy; Holaday, Rio; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2016-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of initiatives to increase healthy food access may be affected by where people decide to shop. People with poor neighborhood access to large grocery stores develop shopping patterns that require traveling to other areas, and some people who do have neighborhood access also travel elsewhere for food shopping. We sought to gain an understanding of household food shopping patterns in a sample of Black women in terms of where they shopped and why. Methods All food sho...

  14. Consumers' multifaceted deal knowledge in a grocery retail setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2016-01-01

    of deal price status, typical deal price knowledge, and deal-spotting ability. Results show reasonably stable knowledge of typical deal prices, while knowledge of deal price status and deal-spotting ability improves significantly during grocery shopping. Surprisingly, consumers’ deal knowledge...... is not conditional on purchasing a special thus indicating that most consumers, consciously or unconsciously, scan for promotion signals when shopping groceries. In addition, the results suggest consumers are not easily fooled, as the vast majority is able to spot ‘good’ and ‘bad’ deals, while also possessing...... typical deal price knowledge. Furthermore, the findings suggest that consumers store internal reference deal prices. Retailers are therefore well advised to consider mixed depth and creative discount patterns to prevent ‘perfect’ perceptions of typical deal prices....

  15. Consumers' multifaceted deal knowledge in a grocery retail setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Despite its relevance to retailers, studies of consumers’ deal knowledge have been few. This study explores consumers’ deal knowledge before, during, and after the store visit applying a between-subjects field-study design with 1204 respondents. In particular, the authors investigate perception...... of deal price status, typical deal price knowledge, and deal-spotting ability. Results show reasonably stable knowledge of typical deal prices, while knowledge of deal price status and deal-spotting ability improves significantly during grocery shopping. Surprisingly, consumers’ deal knowledge...... is not conditional on purchasing a special thus indicating that most consumers, consciously or unconsciously, scan for promotion signals when shopping groceries. In addition, the results suggest consumers are not easily fooled, as the vast majority is able to spot ‘good’ and ‘bad’ deals, while also possessing...

  16. Doctor Shopping Behavior and the Diversion of Prescription Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    "Doctor shopping" as a means of prescription opioid diversion is examined. The number and percentage of prescriptions and morphine-equivalent milligrams diverted in this manner are estimated by state and molecule for the period 2008-2012. Eleven billion prescriptions with unique patient, doctor, and pharmacy identifiers were used to construct diversion "events" that involved between 1 and 6 unique doctors and between 1 and 6 unique pharmacies. Diversion thresholds were established based on the probability of each contingency. A geographically widespread decline occurred between 2008 and 2012. The number of prescriptions diverted fell from approximately 4.30 million (1.75% of all prescriptions) in 2008 to approximately 3.37 million (1.27% of all prescriptions) in 2012, and the number of morphine-equivalent milligrams fell from approximately 6.55 metric tons (2.95% of total metric tons) in 2008 to approximately 4.87 metric tons (2.19% of total metric tons) in 2012. Diversion control efforts have likely been effective. But given increases in opioid-related deaths, opioid-related drug treatment admissions, and the more specific resurgence of heroin-related events, it is clear that additional public health measures are required.

  17. Factors influencing social shopping behavior of fashion in Tehran apparel market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rahim Esfidani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Social shopping behavior of fashion embraces various activities, direct/indirect complex and dynamic interpersonal happening during the process of buying fashion and causes customers’ pleasure and satisfaction from purchasing intention, which in long-term helps sales improvement. This study has taken place in city of Tehran, Iran in order to assess the social purchase behavior of consumers and drivers in the field of fashion garments. Data analysis was performed using partial least squares. Research findings indicate a significant positive relationship between obsessed with fashion garments and the five dimensions of social shopping behavior. On the other hand, there is a positive and meaningful relationship between materialism and the need for uniqueness by consumers’ involvement toward fashion apparel.

  18. The Influences of Perceived Factors on Consumer Purchasing Behavior: In the Perspective of Online Shopping Capability of Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingcong Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, firstly, based on related researches about consumer online purchasing behavior before, we proposed that there were some perceived factors that influence perceived value which has a direct impact on consumer’s online purchasing decision-making. Secondly, on the analysis for the antecedent of consumer perceived factors with online shopping, we proposed the definition of online shopping capability of consumer and try to explore what factors would affect consumers’ perceived value when they are online shopping in the perspective of consumer’s online shopping capability and their different influences on consumer purchasing behavior. We designed a questionnaire and obtained 1359 valid data from our investigation. Data analysis indicates that besides online shopping capability of consumers, there are other four significant common factors such as trust, perceived risk, perceived benefit and perceived cost, have significant influences on consumers’ perceived value. The causal relation among online shopping capability of consumers, the other four perceived factors and perceived value and consumer online purchasing behavior are verified using confirmatory factor analysis. We explored the differences and their changing way among different kinds of consumers. Discussions for the results indicated that consumers with different shopping experiences have different online shopping capabilities and significant differences on the other four perceived factors.

  19. Investigating the effect of online service quality of internet duty-free shops on trust and behavioral intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Ahn Choi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study seeks to identify the effect of service quality in internet duty-free shops on a customer's trust and behavioral intention.Design/methodology/approach: For this analysis, a survey was executed targeting customers who have used an internet duty-free shop. A total of 210 questionnares were anaylyzed using structural equation modeling.Findings: The results revealed that a high online service quality experience using an internet duty-free shop had a positive effect on the customers' trust. In addition, trust also had a positive effect on the customers' behavioral intention.Originality/value: This study is the first paper that examines the effect of online service quality in internet duty-free shops in Korea. Results of this study could be used as basic data to help establish day to day management strategies for internet duty-free shops.

  20. Shopping behaviors of low-income families during a 1-month period of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darko, Janice; Eggett, Dennis L; Richards, Rickelle

    2013-01-01

    To explore food shopping behaviors among low-income families over the course of the month. Two researchers conducted 13 90-minute focus groups. Two community organizations serving low-income populations and a university campus. Low-income adults (n = 72) who were the primary household food shoppers and who had at least 1 child less than 18 years old. Shopping behavior changes during 1 month. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and coded independently by 2 researchers. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate sociodemographic variables such as age, sex, race/ethnicity, and participation in food assistance programs. Economics played a key role in participants' food shopping behaviors and influenced food availability throughout the month. To overcome economic barriers, participants used food and emergency assistance programs and engaged in menu planning, price matching, storing food, using credit cards, and receiving financial assistance from family members and/or neighbors. Low-income families made strategic decisions to maintain a food supply throughout the month. These results suggest limited economics throughout the month may hinder families' ability to consume a varied, nutrient-rich diet, which may have an impact on future health status. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Consumption Values, Personal Characteristics and Behavioral Intentions in Mobile Shopping Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujipun Assarut

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Past literature has indicated that consumption value is an important factor in consumer decision making on whether to adopt online shopping. However, most studies have focused only on a single product or service type and, therefore, generalization of the results has been limited. Moreover, previous studies of the indirect effects of personal characteristics on the adoption of online shopping have emphasized solely the importance of utilitarian values. None have investigated the indirect effects of consumption values that include both utilitarian and hedonic aspects. This study examines the relationships between consumption values, personal characteristics and behavioral intentions in the adoption of mobile shopping from the perspectives of different product and service types. The results reveal convenience, security and emotional values as the common values which consumers of fashion goods and accommodations consider when deciding whether to purchase via a mobile device. Apart from the most common values, travelers also consider conditional and epistemic values when assessing whether to reserve accommodation using a mobile device. Moreover, innovativeness and self-efficacy were both shown to exert significant indirect effects, via consumption values, on consumers’ intentions to adopt mobile shopping. Managerial implications and suggestions are further discussed.

  2. A Role of Referring Website on Online Shopping Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HoEun Chung; JungKun Park

    2009-01-01

    .... The purpose of the present study is two-folds. Firstly, the study defines different behavior patterns when consumers visit an online store through a referring website versus when consumers directly enter to an online store sans a referring website...

  3. How Peer Communication and Engagement Motivations Influence Social Media Shopping Behavior: Evidence from China and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sidharth; Men, Linjuan Rita

    2015-10-01

    Based on consumer socialization theory, this study proposes and tests a conceptual model of social media shopping behavior, which links the antecedents of user motivations of engagement and peer communication about products to shopping behavior through social media. A cross-cultural survey was conducted with social media users in two culturally distinct markets with the largest Internet population: China (n=304) and the United States (n=328). Findings showed that social interaction, information, and remuneration were positive antecedents of peer communication for users from both countries. Peer communication positively impacted social media shopping behavior, and cultural differences were observed, with social interaction being important to Chinese users' shopping behavior, while remuneration was more important to American users. Implications are discussed.

  4. THE STUDY OF COMPULSIVE BEHAVIOR IN ONLINE SHOPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Cristache

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the prevalence of Internet in our everyday life, little is known about consumer buying behavior in on-line purchases. Moreover, consumer buying disorder (CBD, one of the new addictions of the era, is poorly researched in the Romanian literature. This study aimed at identifying whether this disorder is present among Romanian students that purchase on-line through a questionnaire applied to 100 students attending the University „Dunarea de Jos” of Galati. An analysis of the responses yields that a 13% of the studied sample indeed presents characteristics of this disorder and confirms previous global studies that the compulsive buyers are majoritarian women. This work increases our understanding of on-line consumer buying behavior and will contribute to future research on similar topics.

  5. Present Food Shopping Habits in the Spanish Adult Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Achón

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Information on grocery shopping patterns is one key to understanding dietary changes in recent years in Spain. This report presents an overview of Spanish food shopping patterns in the adult population. A cross-sectional, nationally representative telephone survey was conducted in Spain. Individuals were asked about food shopping responsibility roles, types of visited food stores, time spent, additional behaviors while shopping, the influence of marketing/advertising and, in particular, fresh produce shopping profile. Binary logistic regression models were developed. The final random sample included 2026 respondents aged ≥18 years, of which 1223 were women and 803 were men. Women reported being in charge of most of the food shopping activities. Looking for best prices, more than looking for healthy or sustainable foods, seemed to be a general behavior. Supermarkets were the preferred retail spaces for food price consideration, convenience, variety and availability. Fresh produce shopping was associated with traditional markets and neighborhood stores in terms of reliance and personalized service. It is essential to highlight the importance of the role played by women. They are the main supporters concerned in preserving adequate dietary habits. Economic factors, more than health or food sustainability, are commonly considered by the population. Traditional markets may play an important role in preserving some healthy dietary habits of the Mediterranean food culture in Spain.

  6. Present Food Shopping Habits in the Spanish Adult Population: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achón, María; Serrano, María; García-González, Ángela; Alonso-Aperte, Elena; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2017-05-18

    Information on grocery shopping patterns is one key to understanding dietary changes in recent years in Spain. This report presents an overview of Spanish food shopping patterns in the adult population. A cross-sectional, nationally representative telephone survey was conducted in Spain. Individuals were asked about food shopping responsibility roles, types of visited food stores, time spent, additional behaviors while shopping, the influence of marketing/advertising and, in particular, fresh produce shopping profile. Binary logistic regression models were developed. The final random sample included 2026 respondents aged ≥18 years, of which 1223 were women and 803 were men. Women reported being in charge of most of the food shopping activities. Looking for best prices, more than looking for healthy or sustainable foods, seemed to be a general behavior. Supermarkets were the preferred retail spaces for food price consideration, convenience, variety and availability. Fresh produce shopping was associated with traditional markets and neighborhood stores in terms of reliance and personalized service. It is essential to highlight the importance of the role played by women. They are the main supporters concerned in preserving adequate dietary habits. Economic factors, more than health or food sustainability, are commonly considered by the population. Traditional markets may play an important role in preserving some healthy dietary habits of the Mediterranean food culture in Spain.

  7. [Organization and technology in the grocery store sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambetti, Edy

    2014-01-01

    In Italy, grocery stores develop an annual turnover of 92 billion of , (data referred to 2013) and have 28.232 stores spread over a commercial area of 17.224.000 m2. The business involved are 252, linked with 30 important distribution leader companies. The total workforce is about 280.000 people. The grocery stores structure is composed by suppliers and producers warehouses and different kinds of stores (hypermarkets, supermarkets, shops and discounts). In the stores, the technological progress concerns fundamentally back-office operations; the improvement of information and computer science is the main renewal source. Other tasks as receiving goods and stocking shelves are still executed without specific inovations. In terms of organization, we observed a strong increase of part-time workers, the development of atypical contract and thie inclination to contract the easiest jobs (for example, stocking shelves). Also the warehouses often use to sub-contract the picking tasks. The increase of on-line shopping, also concerning the groceries, represents the most relevant evolution in tire near future.

  8. Estimating Willingness to Pay for Continued Use of Plastic Grocery Bags and Willingness to Accept for Switching Completely to Reusable Bags

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we provide a theoretical framework for a dichotomous-choice contingent valuation survey for plastic and reusable shopping bags and consequential analysis of that data. By using interval regression analysis, a mean willingness to pay for continued use of plastic grocery bags and a mean willingness to accept to use reusable bags for all grocery shopping trips are estimated. The subsidy level was statistically robust while the tax level was not; this led us to the conclusion as ci...

  9. The Influences of Perceived Factors on Consumer Purchasing Behavior: In the Perspective of Online Shopping Capability of Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Yingcong Xu; Lu Long; Lingying Zhang; Wojie Tan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, firstly, based on related researches about consumer online purchasing behavior before, we proposed that there were some perceived factors that influence perceived value which has a direct impact on consumer’s online purchasing decision-making. Secondly, on the analysis for the antecedent of consumer perceived factors with online shopping, we proposed the definition of online shopping capability of consumer and try to explore what factors would affect consumers’ perceived value ...

  10. Trying Harder and Doing Worse: How Grocery Shoppers Track In-Store Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ittersum, van K.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Wansink, B.

    2010-01-01

    Although almost one in three U.S. households shops on a budget, it remains unclear whether and how shoppers track their in-store spending to stay within those budgets. A field study and two laboratory studies offer four key generalizations about budget shoppers in grocery stores: (1) They predominan

  11. Trying Harder and Doing Worse : How Grocery Shoppers Track In-Store Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, Koert; Pennings, Joost M. E.; Wansink, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Although almost one in three U.S. households shops on a budget, it remains unclear whether and how shoppers track their in-store spending to stay within those budgets. A field study and two laboratory studies offer four key generalizations about budget shoppers in grocery stores: (1) They predominan

  12. Green Marketing and Its Impacts on Consumer Behavior in Sports Shops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Shahlaee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was investigation of green marketing and its impacts on consumer behavior in sports shops in East Azerbaijan province of Iran. The present study is functionalized by objectives and done by field. The study statistical society was sports shops in East Azerbaijan and 210 samples were chosen randomly according to Morgan sampling method and 196 questionnaires were collected finally. The author-prepared questionnaire’s validity was approved by some experts in sport management and marketing. Field and the reliability were assessed by pilot study using Chronbach’s Alpha (α= 819% which showed that the tool was reliable. The questionnaire had 30 items rated by Lakers scale. Questionnaire introduction contained demographic pieces information of age, income and education degree. Results shows that a significant relationship between green products features, green promotion, green pricing and green distributing with consumer green behavior; and education, income, and age, but not marital status, gender had a moderating effect on consumer green sports behavior.

  13. Automatic detection of suspicious behavior of pickpockets with track-based features in a shopping mall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Henri; Baan, Jan; Burghouts, Gertjan J.; Eendebak, Pieter T.; van Huis, Jasper R.; Dijk, Judith; van Rest, Jeroen H. C.

    2014-10-01

    Proactive detection of incidents is required to decrease the cost of security incidents. This paper focusses on the automatic early detection of suspicious behavior of pickpockets with track-based features in a crowded shopping mall. Our method consists of several steps: pedestrian tracking, feature computation and pickpocket recognition. This is challenging because the environment is crowded, people move freely through areas which cannot be covered by a single camera, because the actual snatch is a subtle action, and because collaboration is complex social behavior. We carried out an experiment with more than 20 validated pickpocket incidents. We used a top-down approach to translate expert knowledge in features and rules, and a bottom-up approach to learn discriminating patterns with a classifier. The classifier was used to separate the pickpockets from normal passers-by who are shopping in the mall. We performed a cross validation to train and evaluate our system. In this paper, we describe our method, identify the most valuable features, and analyze the results that were obtained in the experiment. We estimate the quality of these features and the performance of automatic detection of (collaborating) pickpockets. The results show that many of the pickpockets can be detected at a low false alarm rate.

  14. Multi-outlet/multi-format grocery retailing : Some issues and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Several trends and shifts in consumer behavior (e.g., desire for convenience) have resulted in grocery retailers opening more stores and new formats (e.g., AH ToGo and AH XL) next to their existing ones (regular supermarket). By using this strategy grocery retailers try to attract new customers

  15. Multi-outlet/multi-format grocery retailing : Some issues and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Several trends and shifts in consumer behavior (e.g., desire for convenience) have resulted in grocery retailers opening more stores and new formats (e.g., AH ToGo and AH XL) next to their existing ones (regular supermarket). By using this strategy grocery retailers try to attract new customers (inc

  16. The roles of constraint-based and dedication-based influences on user's continued online shopping behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su-Chao; Chou, Chi-Min

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine empirically the role of constraint-based and dedication-based influences as drivers of the intention to continue using online shopping websites. Constraint-based influences consist of two variables: trust and perceived switching costs. Dedication-based influences consist of three variables: satisfaction, perceived usefulness, and trust. The current results indicate that both constraint-based and dedication-based influences are important drivers of the intention to continue using online shopping websites. The data also shows that trust has the strongest total effect on online shoppers' intention to continue using online shopping websites. In addition, the results indicate that the antecedents of constraint-based influences, technical bonds (e.g., perceived operational competence and perceived website interactivity) and social bonds (e.g., perceived relationship investment, community building, and intimacy) have indirect positive effects on the intention to continue using online shopping websites. Based on these findings, this research suggests that online shopping websites should build constraint-based and dedication-based influences to enhance user's continued online shopping behaviors simultaneously.

  17. Preferences of men and women in the Czech Republic when shopping for food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Turčínková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Buying behavior of men and women shows considerable differences. The individual stages of purchase decision-making process lead to convergence or conversely deepening of these differences. The paper provides results of analysis of chosen aspects of consumer behavior of men and women in the Czech Republic. It focuses on the grocery shopping in small-sized shops. Due to the complexity of the problem the research could not cover all aspects associated with this topic. It identifies who in a household is responsible for grocery shopping, how often and in what quantity of purchases. The paper examines to what extent is a purchase planned and by what a consumer is usually stimulated to an impulsive shopping. Further, it describes factors leading to a choice of shopping place and to a satisfaction with shopping conditions. The primary data was collected through a method of in-depth interviews conducted from January to March 2011 on a sample of 56 respondents in the three smaller stores in the Moravské Budějovice, and via questionnaire survey which took place in all regions of the Czech Republic (n = 5809 among respondents aged 12+. The results confirmed we can observe differences in shopping behavior of women and man, even though the importance of various factors taken into account when making a choice of a particular food product show significant differences from the gender perspective (none of the analyzed factors was found to have higher statistical significance than weak, p < .05. The qualitative research, however, revealed that women tend to make more frequent purchases and keep a certain level of supplies at home, while men tend to leave shopping till it becomes necessary, they are more likely to stick to their shopping list and more loyal to their favorite products. Women are more flexible when in need to replace a missing product with its substitute. The proportion of impulsively purchased items in a shopping basket is higher for women than

  18. Incidence of tramadol shopping behavior in a retrospective cohort of chronic non-cancer pain patients in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenaf, Chouki; Kabore, Jean-Luc; Delorme, Jessica; Pereira, Bruno; Mulliez, Aurélien; Roche, Lucie; Eschalier, Alain; Delage, Noémie; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Opioid analgesic use in chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) is increasingly prevalent, but the benefits and risks are inadequately understood. In France, tramadol is one of the most used prescription opioids, but studies on its misuse liability in CNCP are still lacking. The aim was to assess the incidence of tramadol shopping behavior in CNCP patients and to identify the associated risk factors. A retrospective cohort of CNCP patients aged 18 years and older treated by tramadol for at least six consecutive months between 2005 and 2013 from a sample of the French Health Insurance database was established. Doctor shopping was defined as at least 1 day of overlapping prescriptions written by two or more different prescribers and filled in at least three different pharmacies. A total of 3505 CNCP patients were included with a majority of women (66.4%) and a mean age of 66.4 ± 14.7 years. The median tramadol treatment duration was 260 [interquartile range: 211-356] days. The 1-year incidence rate of tramadol shopping behavior was 1.0% [95%CI: 0.7-1.5]. On multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with tramadol shopping behavior were age (hazard ratio [HR] = 7.4 [95%CI: 2.8-19.7] for age shopping behavior incidence appears low in CNCP patients but may represent a public health concern given the widespread use of tramadol. Education and best monitoring of high-risk patients are needed to reduce doctor shopping. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. ShopComm: Community-Supported Online Shopping for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkovenko, Katerina; Tigwell, Garreth W; Norrie, Christopher S; Waite, Miriam; Herron, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The United Kingdom has an ageing population whose members experience significant life transitions as they grow older, for example, losing mobility due to deteriorating health. For these adults, digital technology has the potential to sustain their independence and improve their quality of life. However older adults can be reluctant to use digital solutions. In this paper, we review a local charity providing a grocery shopping service for older adults who are unable to go themselves. We explore how older adults perceive the benefits and drawbacks of both physical and digital shopping. Using these insights, we designed ShopComm to enable and support older adults with mobility impairments to shop online.

  20. The effects of shopping environment on consumption emotions, perceived values and behavioral intentions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Heidarzadeh Hanzaee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to develop and to test a comprehensive model that investigates the effect of shopping environment on consumption emotion, perceived value and behavioral intentions in tourism setting. The proposed model specifies the effect of environment perceptions on consumption emotions (pleasure and arousal, hedonic and utilitarian value, which in turn emotions and values affect tourist’s satisfaction and behavioral intentions. Data were collected through tourists who visited a tourist city by using cluster random sampling method. A total of 410 questionnaires were used for data analysis. Structural equations modeling (SEM by using LISREL was performed to empirically test the relationships between the constructs of this research. Results show that environment has a positive and significant influence on pleasure and arousal. However, the effect of environment perceptions on behavioral intentions was not significant. In addition, results indicate that pleasure and arousal have positive and significant effects on tourist’s values. Findings also indicate that hedonic and utilitarian values had direct effect on customer satisfaction and the effect of satisfaction on behavioral intention was positive and significant. Finally, it suggests that service providers should focus on components of environment in a way that contributes positively in creating positive emotions in customers, which in turn consumption emotions enhance perceived value and positive behavioral intentions.

  1. Toward retail product recognition on grocery shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Gül; Kuzu, Rıdvan S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of retail product recognition on grocery shelf images. We present a technique for accomplishing this task with a low time complexity. We decompose the problem into detection and recognition. The former is achieved by a generic product detection module which is trained on a specific class of products (e.g. tobacco packages). Cascade object detection framework of Viola and Jones [1] is used for this purpose. We further make use of Support Vector Machines (SVMs) to recognize the brand inside each detected region. We extract both shape and color information; and apply feature-level fusion from two separate descriptors computed with the bag of words approach. Furthermore, we introduce a dataset (available on request) that we have collected for similar research purposes. Results are presented on this dataset of more than 5,000 images consisting of 10 tobacco brands. We show that satisfactory detection and classification can be achieved on devices with cheap computational power. Potential applications of the proposed approach include planogram compliance control, inventory management and assisting visually impaired people during shopping.

  2. Investigating the effects of sales promotions on customer behavioral intentions at duty-free shops: An Incheon International Airport case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Park

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper seeks to investigate the effects of sales promotions at airport duty-free shops by testing a conceptual model that considers price, coupons, free gifts, points, satisfaction, value, image, and behavioral intentions simultaneously.Design/methodology/approach: For this testing, structural equation modeling was applied to data collected from duty-free shop users at Incheon International Airport.Findings: Price and coupons were found as significant drivers of customer satisfaction, which was directly related to customer value, image, and behavioral intentions.Originality/value: This paper is the first research that examines the effects of sales promotions at the duty-free shops of Incheon International Airport. The identified sales promotion factors that influence the behavioral intentions of customers at duty-free shops are potentially useful for analyzing the possible trends and changes in duty-free shop customer buying behavior.

  3. Consumer Behavior in Shopping Streets: The Importance of the Salesperson's Professional Personal Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Natalia; Olarte-Pascual, Cristina; Pelegrín-Borondo, Jorge; Sierra-Murillo, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2010s, the emergence of a new consumer has begun. In this context, consumer behavior represents one of the greatest interests of marketing scholars and business managers due to their need to adapt their companies' strategies to the new frontier. In order to advance understanding of this new consumer, this article focuses on analyzing consumer behavior in shopping streets. Thus, the aim of this research is to know what customers value in terms of salesperson–customer interaction quality nowadays. To achieve this, the authors conducted two studies. The results of the first study show that customers cite personal attention as the primary factor motivating their preference for small retailers in shopping streets. However, this motivation is not as relevant one for those who prefer malls. This result provides a point on which to research service quality incorporating personal attention in a second study. Using the SERVQUAL-P scale, the authors elaborate three lenses through which the quality of service from the customer's point of view can be analyzed: normative expectations, predictive expectations, and the importance of each attribute. The most striking result is that the dimensions of expectations (normative and predictive) are the same; these results demonstrate that customers are coherent in making assessments of their expectations, evaluating service quality and satisfaction with similar criteria. However, these dimensions are different from the dimensions of importance. Our main contribution lies in the finding that personal attention, when assessed using the scale of attribute importance, is split into two dimensions: (1) courteous attention and (2) personal relationship. Courteous attention is always welcome, but personal relationships are less valued and are often even rejected. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for marketing practices and research. PMID:26903927

  4. Consumer Behavior in Shopping Streets: The Importance of the Salesperson's Professional Personal Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Natalia; Olarte-Pascual, Cristina; Pelegrín-Borondo, Jorge; Sierra-Murillo, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2010s, the emergence of a new consumer has begun. In this context, consumer behavior represents one of the greatest interests of marketing scholars and business managers due to their need to adapt their companies' strategies to the new frontier. In order to advance understanding of this new consumer, this article focuses on analyzing consumer behavior in shopping streets. Thus, the aim of this research is to know what customers value in terms of salesperson-customer interaction quality nowadays. To achieve this, the authors conducted two studies. The results of the first study show that customers cite personal attention as the primary factor motivating their preference for small retailers in shopping streets. However, this motivation is not as relevant one for those who prefer malls. This result provides a point on which to research service quality incorporating personal attention in a second study. Using the SERVQUAL-P scale, the authors elaborate three lenses through which the quality of service from the customer's point of view can be analyzed: normative expectations, predictive expectations, and the importance of each attribute. The most striking result is that the dimensions of expectations (normative and predictive) are the same; these results demonstrate that customers are coherent in making assessments of their expectations, evaluating service quality and satisfaction with similar criteria. However, these dimensions are different from the dimensions of importance. Our main contribution lies in the finding that personal attention, when assessed using the scale of attribute importance, is split into two dimensions: (1) courteous attention and (2) personal relationship. Courteous attention is always welcome, but personal relationships are less valued and are often even rejected. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for marketing practices and research.

  5. Food shopping behaviours and exposure to discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, Shannon N; Schulz, Amy J; Israel, Barbara A; Mentz, Graciela; Miranda, Patricia Y; Opperman, Alisha; Odoms-Young, Angela M

    2014-05-01

    The present study examined food shopping behaviours, particularly distance to grocery shop, and exposure to discrimination. Cross-sectional observational study utilizing data from a community survey, neighbourhood food environment observations and the decennial census. Three communities in Detroit, Michigan, USA. Probability sample of 919 African-American, Latino and white adults in 146 census blocks and sixty-nine census block groups. On average, respondents shopped for groceries 3·1 miles (4·99 km) from home, with 30·9 % shopping within 1 mile (1·61 km) and 22·3 % shopping more than 5 miles (8·05 km) from home. Longer distance to shop was associated with being younger, African-American (compared with Latino), a woman, higher socio-economic status, lower satisfaction with the neighbourhood food environment, and living in a neighbourhood with higher poverty, without a large grocery store and further from the nearest supermarket. African-Americans and those with the lowest incomes were particularly likely to report unfair treatment at food outlets. Each mile (1·61 km) increase in distance to shop was associated with a 7 % increase in the odds of unfair treatment; this relationship did not differ by race/ethnicity. The study suggests that unfair treatment in retail interactions warrants investigation as a pathway by which restricted neighbourhood food environments and food shopping behaviours may adversely affect health and contribute to health disparities. Efforts to promote 'healthy' and equitable food environments should emphasize local availability and affordability of a range of healthy food products, as well as fair treatment while shopping regardless of race/ethnicity or socio-economic status.

  6. Using a virtual grocery store to simulate shopping behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van H.W.I.; Yu, T.; Broek, van den E.M.F.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Simulating a store environment by using virtual reality techniques offers important potential advantages for research into consumer behaviour. Through the use of virtual reality, the store can be simulated in a realistic and cost-efficient way [1,9]. This allows researchers to collect

  7. Using a virtual grocery store to simulate shopping behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van H.W.I.; Yu, T.; Broek, van den E.M.F.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Simulating a store environment by using virtual reality techniques offers important potential advantages for research into consumer behaviour. Through the use of virtual reality, the store can be simulated in a realistic and cost-efficient way [1,9]. This allows researchers to collect d

  8. Using a virtual grocery store to simulate shopping behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van H.W.I.; Yu, T.; Broek, van den E.M.F.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Simulating a store environment by using virtual reality techniques offers important potential advantages for research into consumer behaviour. Through the use of virtual reality, the store can be simulated in a realistic and cost-efficient way [1,9]. This allows researchers to collect d

  9. Personality Traits as Predictors of Shopping Motivations and Behaviors: A Canonical Correlation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gohary

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between Big Five personality traits with shopping motivation variables consisting of compulsive and impulsive buying, hedonic and utilitarian shopping values. Two hundred forty seven college students were recruited to participate in this research. Bivariate correlation demonstrates an overlap between personality traits; consequently, canonical correlation was performed to prevent this phenomenon. The results of multiple regression analysis suggested conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness as predictors of compulsive buying, impulsive buying and utilitarian shopping values. In addition, the results showed significant differences between males and females on conscientiousness, neuroticism, openness, compulsive buying and hedonic shopping value. Besides, using hierarchical regression analysis, we examined sex as moderator between Big Five personality traits and shopping variables, but we didn’t find sufficient evidence to prove it.

  10. Driving online shopping: Spending and behavioral differences among women in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-maghrabi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a revised technology acceptance model that integrates expectation confirmation theory to measure gender differences with regard to continuance online shopping intentions in Saudi Arabia. The sample consists of 650 female respondents. A structural equation model confirms model fit. Perceived enjoyment, usefulness, and subjective norms are determinants of online shopping continuance in Saudi Arabia. High and low online spenders among women in Saudi Arabia are equivalent. The structural weights are also largely equivalent, but the regression paths from perceived site quality to perceived usefulness is not invariant between high and low e-shoppers in Saudi Arabia. This research moves beyond online shopping intentions and includes factors affecting online shopping continuance. The research model explains 60% of the female respondents’ intention to continue shopping online. Online strategies cannot ignore either the direct and indirect spending differences on continuance intentions, and the model can be generalized across Saudi Arabia.

  11. EVALUATING FACTORS INFLUENCING GROCERY STORE CHOICE

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Marco A.; Emerson, Robert D.; House, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes consumer preferences toward grocery store choices given a set of attributes of stores. This information will then be used to make inferences on how the opening of a Wal-Mart supercenter would affect the other grocery stores in a small city.

  12. Science Shops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1999-01-01

    The paper prsents the overall concept of science shops as practised in most of the European science shops and present the concept practised and some experience obtained at the Technical University of Denmark. An outline for the planning of new sceince shops is presented.......The paper prsents the overall concept of science shops as practised in most of the European science shops and present the concept practised and some experience obtained at the Technical University of Denmark. An outline for the planning of new sceince shops is presented....

  13. Science Shops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1999-01-01

    The paper prsents the overall concept of science shops as practised in most of the European science shops and present the concept practised and some experience obtained at the Technical University of Denmark. An outline for the planning of new sceince shops is presented.......The paper prsents the overall concept of science shops as practised in most of the European science shops and present the concept practised and some experience obtained at the Technical University of Denmark. An outline for the planning of new sceince shops is presented....

  14. Impact of Online Shopping on the Purchase Behavior of Consumers in Chennai City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.VARADARAJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Online shopping or e-shopping is a form of electronic commerce which allows consumers to directly buy goods or services from a seller over the Internet using a web browser. The proliferation of online group buying websites is changing marketing strategies and buyers' habits without doubt. The study focuses on the impact of online shopping on the purchase behaviour of consumers in Chennai city. Questionnaire was used to collect the primary data. The sample size of the study was 150 and the sample design adopted was convenience sampling. This paper tried to find out the impact of online market towards purchase behaviour of consumers and gives suggestions to improve the same.

  15. RETAILERS PERCEPTION TOWARDS ONLINE SHOPPING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. P. Jayalakshmi; Jolly John

    2017-01-01

    Few developments have altered India‘s lifestyle more quickly and more completely than the Internet. Online access has enabled people from all walks of life to bring entire libraries, entertainment venues, post offices and financial centers to a workplace, to a desktop or to a shirt pocket. The Internet‘s largest and most meaningful impact may very well be on the way consumers shop for everything from gifts, gadgets and groceries to clothing, cars, and cruises. The ease and selection that the ...

  16. Effects of financial incentives for the purchase of healthy groceries on dietary intake and weight outcomes among older adults: A randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Tanja V E; Bannon, Annika L; Moore, Reneé H

    2016-05-01

    Providing financial incentives can be a useful behavioral economics strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable intake among consumers. It remains to be determined whether financial incentives can promote intake of other low energy-dense foods and if consumers who are already using promotional tools for their grocery purchases may be especially responsive to receiving incentives. This randomized controlled trial tested the effects of offering financial incentives for the purchase of healthy groceries on 3-month changes in dietary intake, weight outcomes, and the home food environment among older adults. A secondary aim was to compare frequent coupon users (FCU) and non-coupon users (NCU) on weight status, home food environment, and grocery shopping behavior. FCU (n = 28) and NCU (n = 26) were randomly assigned to either an incentive or a control group. Participants in the incentive group received $1 for every healthy food or beverage they purchased. All participants completed 3-day food records and a home food inventory and had their height, weight, and waist circumference measured at baseline and after 3 months. Participants who were responsive to the intervention and received financial incentives significantly increased their daily vegetable intake (P = 0.04). Participants in both groups showed significant improvements in their home food environment (P = 0.0003). No significant changes were observed in daily energy intake or weight-related outcomes across groups (P 0.73). Increased consumption of vegetables did not replace intake of more energy-dense foods. Incentivizing consumers to make healthy food choices while simultaneously reducing less healthy food choices may be important.

  17. [Trend in buprenorphine and methadone shopping behavior in France from 2004 to 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernisant, Mélanie; Delorme, Jessica; Kabore, Jean-Luc; Brousse, Georges; Laporte, Catherine; Zenut, Marie; Chenaf, Chouki; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    The opioid maintenance treatments (OMT) are widely misused and diverted in many countries. Doctor shopping represented the main way to obtain high quantities of opioids in abuse/diversion. The aim of this study was to assess the trends in the prevalence of doctor shopping for high dosage buprenorphine (HDB) and methadone (MTD) from 2004 to 2014 by using the French Health Insurance claims. This was a cross-sectional study of patients treated by OMT (High Dosage Buprenorphine or Methadone) between 2004 and 2014 from a representative sample of the French Health Insurance claims. Doctor shopping was defined as at least 1 day of overlapping prescriptions, written by at least 2 different prescribers and filled in at least 3 different pharmacies. HDB patients were more likely men (77.9 % in 2014) with a mean age ranged from 33.4±7.6 years in 2004 to 39.5±9.3 years in 2014, Pshopping for HDB decreased from 2004 to 2014 (12.6 % versus 3.9 %, Pshopping for MTD was very low during the period study (0.2 % to 0.5 %). Overall, the prevalence of doctor shopping was higher for HDB than for MTD whatever the year (Pshopping for HDB decreased significantly during the last decade while doctor shopping for MTD remained nearly inexistent even if it could be underestimated because of dispensations in specialized centers and in hospitals not comprised in the insurance claims. The low rates of doctor shopping reported in these last years could result from the guidelines for good practices in OMT use made in 2004 and the adjustments of ANSM (French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety) for HDB best use made in 2011. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of visualizing healthy eaters and mortality reminders on nutritious grocery purchases: an integrative terror management and prototype willingness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Simon; Arndt, Jamie; Goldenberg, Jamie L; Vess, Matthew; Vail, Kenneth E; Gibbons, Frederick X; Rogers, Ross

    2015-03-01

    To use insights from an integration of the terror management health model and the prototype willingness model to inform and improve nutrition-related behavior using an ecologically valid outcome. Prior to shopping, grocery shoppers were exposed to a reminder of mortality (or pain) and then visualized a healthy (vs. neutral) prototype. Receipts were collected postshopping and food items purchased were coded using a nutrition database. Compared with those in the control conditions, participants who received the mortality reminder and who were led to visualize a healthy eater prototype purchased more nutritious foods. The integration of the terror management health model and the prototype willingness model has the potential for both basic and applied advances and offers a generative ground for future research. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Hot or Not: An Analysis of Online Professor-Shopping Behavior of Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Tarique M.

    2010-01-01

    With the proliferation of Web sites that allow students to praise or disparage their instructors depending on their whims, instructors across the country essentially are becoming subjects of comparison shopping by prospective students. Using a sample survey of 258 students majoring in business at a public university on the west coast of the United…

  20. Food shopping perceptions, behaviors, and ability to purchase healthful food items in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOODS 2000, a nutritional survey conducted in 18 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, provided information about dietary intake. A food store survey investigated the availability and price of foods. One focus group on shopping perceptions was conducted in each of nine counties. Foods p...

  1. Hot or Not: An Analysis of Online Professor-Shopping Behavior of Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Tarique M.

    2010-01-01

    With the proliferation of Web sites that allow students to praise or disparage their instructors depending on their whims, instructors across the country essentially are becoming subjects of comparison shopping by prospective students. Using a sample survey of 258 students majoring in business at a public university on the west coast of the United…

  2. Customer experience with online shopping : what are the unique experiences customers seek from online shopping?

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Daoyan

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a great change in consumers' shopping behavior along with technological change. Online shopping is the use of computer technology for better shopping performance. Retailers are busy in studying consumers' behavior to see their attitudes toward online shopping and to meet the demand of online shoppers. Due to my interest in online business, I have also decided to study about customers' attitudes toward online shopping and specifically regarding factors that...

  3. Personal characteristics, cooking at home and shopping frequency influence consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustat, Jeanette; Lee, Yu-Sheng; O'Malley, Keelia; Luckett, Brian; Myers, Leann; Terrell, Leonetta; Amoss, Lisa; Fitzgerald, Erin; Stevenson, Peter T; Johnson, Carolyn C

    2017-06-01

    This study examines how the consumption of fruits and vegetables is affected by home cooking habits and shopping patterns, including distance to patronized stores and frequency of shopping, in two low-income predominantly African American urban neighborhoods in New Orleans, Louisiana. In-person interviews were conducted in 2013 with 901 adult residents who identified themselves as the primary household shopper. Respondents were asked where and how often they shopped and answered a food frequency questionnaire. Addresses were geocoded and distances to the stores where respondents shopped were calculated. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between food consumption and personal factors, neighborhood factors and shopping habits. Consumption of daily servings of fresh produce increased by 3% for each additional trip to a grocery store, by 76% for shopping at a farmer's market, and by 38% for preparing food at home. Each additional trip to a convenience store increased the frequency of consumption of chips, candy and pastries by 3%. The distance from residence to the type of store patronized was not associated with consumption of produce or chips, candy or pastries. Shopping at full-service grocery stores, farmer's markets and cooking at home were positively associated with the consumption of fresh produce while shopping at convenience stores was associated with increased consumption of chips, candy and pastries. These findings are useful for designing programmatic interventions to increase fresh fruit and vegetable consumption among residents in low-income urban communities.

  4. Kinect sensing of shopping related actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.; Koc, A.K.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Shan, C.; Wiggers, P.

    2011-01-01

    Surveillance systems in shopping malls or supermarkets are usually used for detecting abnormal behavior. We used the distributed video cameras system to design digital shopping assistants which assess the behavior of customers while shopping, detect when they need assistance, and offer their support

  5. Kinect sensing of shopping related actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.; Koc, A.K.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Shan, C.; Wiggers, P.

    2011-01-01

    Surveillance systems in shopping malls or supermarkets are usually used for detecting abnormal behavior. We used the distributed video cameras system to design digital shopping assistants which assess the behavior of customers while shopping, detect when they need assistance, and offer their support

  6. Clustering of Customers Based on Shopping Behavior and Employing Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Bafghi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Clustering of customers is a vital case in marketing and customer relationship management. In traditional marketing, a market seller is categorized based on general characteristics like clients’ statistical information and their lifestyle features. However, this method seems unable to cope with today’s challenges. In this paper, we present a method for the classification of customers based on variables such as shopping cases and financial information related to the customers’ interactions. One measure of similarity was defined as clustering and clustering quality function was further defined. Genetic algorithms been used to ensure the accuracy of clustering.

  7. Internet Shopping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2004-01-01

    Nowadays you no longer need to walk round hundreds of shops looking for the items you need. You can shop for just about anything from your armchair. All you need is a computer and access(进入) to the Internet.

  8. Doctor-Shopping Behaviors among Traditional Chinese Medicine Users in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hwai; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Tu, Chun-Yi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-08-07

    Doctor-shopping has caused an increase in medical expense, potential to receive duplicate medications, and suffer adverse drug reactions. We carried out a population-based retrospective study aimed at examining the user patterns of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) ambulatory care in Taiwan. We retrieved complete TCM ambulatory visit datasets for the year 2007 from the National Health Insurance database in Taiwan. We defined the patients whose distribution of TCM physician numbers scored more than 97.5 percent (more than, or equal to, five TCM physicians) within one year as TCM doctor-shoppers. In total, 6,596,814 subjects (28.9%) paid TCM visits during that year. All 177,728 subjects (2.69%) who visited more than five (including) TCM physicians were classified as TCM shoppers. The most prevalent diagnostic grouping was upper respiratory infections (44.7%) and sprains and strains (44.0%). Men had a lower odds ratio (OR) among TCM shoppers than women (OR = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.93-0.96). Younger people were less likely to be TCM shoppers than other people were. The ORs of TCM shoppers were higher among veterans and low-income patients (OR = 1.29 (1.23-1.35), and 1.33 (1.27-1.41)). In conclusion, health education on the potential of drug interactions and iatrogenic health risks incurred from doctor-shopping should be addressed to those high-risk patients.

  9. FOOD SHOPPING BEHAVIORS AND SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS INFLUENCE OBESITY RATES IN SEATTLE AND IN PARIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Moudon, Anne Vernez; Jiao, Junfeng; Aggarwal, Anju; Charreire, Helene; Chaix, Basile

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the associations between food environment at the individual level, socioeconomic status (SES) and obesity rates in two cities: Seattle and Paris. Methods Analyses of the SOS (Seattle Obesity Study) were based on a representative sample of 1340 adults in metropolitan Seattle and King County. The RECORD (Residential Environment and Coronary Heart Disease) cohort analyses were based on 7,131 adults in central Paris and suburbs. Data on socio-demographics, health and weight were obtained from a telephone survey (SOS) and from in-person interviews (RECORD). Both studies collected data on and geocoded home addresses and food shopping locations. Both studies calculated GIS network distances between home and the supermarket that study respondents listed as their primary food source. Supermarkets were further stratified into three categories by price. Modified Poisson regression models were used to test the associations among food environment variables, SES and obesity. Results Physical distance to supermarkets was unrelated to obesity risk. By contrast, lower education and incomes, lower surrounding property values, and shopping at lower-cost stores were consistently associated with higher obesity risk. Conclusion Lower SES was linked to higher obesity risk in both Paris and Seattle, despite differences in urban form, the food environments, and in the respective systems of health care. Cross-country comparisons can provide new insights into the social determinants of weight and health. PMID:23736365

  10. Small Convenience Stores and the Local Food Environment: An Analysis of Resident Shopping Behavior Using Multilevel Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Ryan Richard; Akhund, Ali; Adjoian, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Local food environments can influence the diet and health of individuals through food availability, proximity to retail stores, pricing, and promotion. This study focused on how small convenience stores, known in New York City as bodegas, influence resident shopping behavior and the food environment. Using a cross-sectional design, 171 bodegas and 2118 shoppers were sampled. Small convenience stores in New York City. Any bodega shopper aged 18+ who purchased food or beverage from a participating store. Data collection consisted of a store assessment, a health and behavior survey given to exiting customers, and a bag check that recorded product information for all customer purchases. Descriptive statistics were generated for bodega store characteristics, shopper demographics, and purchase behavior. Multilevel models were used to assess the influence of product availability, placement, and advertising on consumer purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), water, and fruits and vegetables. Seventy-one percent of participants reported shopping at bodegas five or more times per week, and 35% reported purchasing all or most of their monthly food allotment at bodegas. Model results indicated that lower amounts of available fresh produce were significantly and independently associated with a higher likelihood of SSB purchases. A second, stratified multilevel model showed that the likelihood of purchasing an SSB increased with decreasing varieties of produce when produce was located at the front of the store. No significant effects were found for water placement and beverage advertising. Small convenience stores in New York City are an easily accessible source of foods and beverages. Bodegas may be suitable for interventions designed to improve food choice and diet.

  11. Children's Influence -Regarding Home Delivery Grocery Bags with Familyfood Optima AB in Focus.

    OpenAIRE

    Haglund, Josefin; Stenberg, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Background Children are influencing the family’s decision making process regarding food products. The children’s spending power is increasing and they become consumers in an early age. By influencing the parents, the children make them buy products that they had not planned to buy or make the parents avoid products that they usually would have bought. Online food shopping is increasing in Sweden and the home delivery grocery bag is the category of online food that has increased the most from ...

  12. One-to-one modeling and simulation: a new approach in customer relationship management for grocery retail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydar, Cem M.

    2002-03-01

    The ever-increasing competition in retail industry puts pressure on retailers to deal with their customers more efficiently. Currently most companies use Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems to maximize the customer satisfaction level by trying to understand more about their behaviors. However, one disadvantage of the current approaches is that they focus on the segmentation of customers into homogenous groups and they disregard examining the one-to-one relationship of each individual's behavior toward each product. Therefore, individual behavior cannot be captured in detail. Modeling individual behavior for each product enables several strategies of pricing by keeping the customer satisfaction at the maximum level. One example is offering a personal discount on a particular item to a customer who is price sensitive to that particular product. Therefore, you can still sell other products at the non-discounted level to this customer by keeping him satisfied. In this paper, individual pricing approach is discussed. The aim of this study is to develop a conceptual framework to analyze the feasibility of individual pricing. Customer behaviors can be modeled individually with respect to each product for a grocery store. Several factors can be used to determine these behaviors such as customer's need, brand loyalty and price sensitivity. Each customer can be modeled as an adaptive agent using qualitative descriptions of behaviors (i.e., highly price sensitive). Then, the overall shopping behavior can be simulated using a multi-agent Monte-Carlo simulation. It is expected that with this approach, retailers will be able to determine better strategies to obtain more profits, better sales and better customer satisfaction.

  13. Lhokseumawe Shopping Center (Arsitektur Kontekstual)

    OpenAIRE

    Harahap, Cyntia Harmaytha

    2015-01-01

    Aceh, Lhokseumawe especially, has the potential to be developed as a locomotive for economic development are considered very promising in line with population growth and economic Lhokseumawe. However, the fastgrowing economy is inversely proportional to the shopping facilities available in Lhokseumawe. Behavior of society who increasingly developed and developing raises people's desire for a comprehensive shopping facilities, good, safe, and comfortable. Then the constructio...

  14. Shopping problems among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Potenza, Marc N; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Cavallo, Dana A; Desai, Rani A

    2011-01-01

    Although shopping behavior among adolescents is normal, for some, the shopping becomes problematic. An assessment of adolescent shopping behavior along a continuum of severity and its relationship to other behaviors and health issues is incompletely understood. A large sample of high school students (n = 3999) was examined using a self-report survey with 153 questions concerning demographic characteristics, shopping behaviors, other health behaviors including substance use, and functioning variables such as grades and violent behavior. The overall prevalence of problem shopping was 3.5% (95% CI, 2.93-4.07). Regular smoking, marijuana and other drug use, sadness and hopelessness, and antisocial behaviors (e.g., fighting, carrying weapons) were associated with problem shopping behavior in both boys and girls. Heavy alcohol use was significantly associated with problem shopping only in girls. Problem shopping appears fairly common among high school students and is associated with symptoms of depression and a range of potentially addictive and antisocial behaviors. Significant distress and diminished behavioral control suggest that excessive shopping may often have significant associated morbidity. Additional research is needed to develop specific prevention and treatment strategies for adolescents who report problems with shopping. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Psychological Insights and Guidance of College Students’ Online Shopping Behavior%大学生网络购物的心理透视及教育引导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉雪

    2014-01-01

    Among College students, online shopping has become a relatively stable and common way of shopping. Through qualitative research, we found several psychologies concerning college students’ online shopping behavior:three-saving psychology (saving time, trouble and money), curiosity, conformist psychology, impulsive psychology, fashionable psychology, entertainment psychology and venting psychology. According to these seven psychologies, five kinds of countermeasure were proposed:forming sensible cognition of online shopping experiences, constraining online shopping behavior rationally, conducting online consuming education, promoting ecological consumption culture, building good environment of online shopping, thus, guiding college students' network consumption to a healthy and orderly orientation.%网络购物在大学生群体中已经成为一种比较稳定且普遍的购物方式。大学生网络购物背后有三省心理(省时、省事、省钱)、好奇心理、从众心理、冲动心理、达人心理、娱乐心理和发泄心理。针对这七种心理,可以从合理认知网购体验,理性约束网购行为,开展网络消费教育,弘扬生态消费文化,构建良好的网络消费环境几方面来引导大学生网络消费向健康有序的方向发展。

  16. Doctor Shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments. PMID:23346518

  17. Shopping Malls - ShoppingCenters

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Collected from a variety of sources both commercial and internal, this layer represents shopping center locations within Volusia County and is maintained by the...

  18. Shopping Malls - ShoppingCenters

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Collected from a variety of sources both commercial and internal, this layer represents shopping center locations within Volusia County and is maintained by the...

  19. Exploring Multi-Channel Shopping Behavior Towards It & C Products, Based on Business Students Opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristinel Vasiliu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Young people have rapidly adopted the practice of using a variety of channels through which to shop, especially for products that require thorough information on features and price. IT & C products fall into this category, and buyers using multiple channels benefit from the advantages of information from online stores and reduced risks associated with the acquisition from traditional stores. The aim of this article is to identify young people preference for buying IT & C products from companies that distribute them across multiple channels. In this regard, an exploratory research was conducted on a sample of 340 students. The main results showed the high frequency use of Internet as a means of searching the information needed for purchasing IT & C products, the low share of exclusively online purchase, the fact that they are being perceived by students as both a need and a desire, and the weak expression of views about products purchased in the virtual environment. Price and quality are the main criteria in choosing them. Originality of this article is determined by identifying students’ preference for firms practicing multi-channel distribution strategy for IT & C products. Basically, people that we investigated gather online information about these products, from companies’ sites, but they mainly buy them in traditional stores.

  20. Association between Satisfaction with State of Health and Meals, Physical Condition and Food Diversity, Health Behavior, and Perceptions of Shopping Difficulty among Older People Living Alone in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, M; Yokoyama, T; Takemi, Y; Fukuda, Y; Nakaya, T; Kusama, K; Yoshiike, N; Nozue, M; Yoshiba, K; Murayama, N

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine perceptions of shopping difficulty, and the relationships with satisfaction with state of health and meals, physical condition, food diversity and health behavior in older people living alone in Japan. A cross-sectional, multilevel survey was designed. The questionnaire was distributed by mail and self-completed by participants. The sample was drawn from seven towns and cities across Japan. A geographic information system was used to select the sample of older people living alone, by proximity to a supermarket. In total, 2,346 older people (827 men and 1,519 women) completed the questionnaire. The dependent variable was whether shopping was easy or difficult. A logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, socioeconomic status and proximity of residence to a supermarket using stepwise variable analyses. The response rate was 67.8%. Overall, 14.5% of men and 21.7% of women considered shopping difficult. The stepwise logistic analysis showed that the factors most strongly related to shopping difficulty were a subjective feeling of poor health (men: OR = 3.01, women: OR = 2.16) and lack of satisfaction with meals (men: OR = 2.82, women: OR = 3.69). Other related physical condition and dietary factors were requiring nursing care (men: OR = 3.69, women: OR = 1.54), a high level of frailty, measured using the frailty index score (women: OR = 0.36) and low food diversity score (men: OR = 1.84, women: OR = 1.36). The study found that older people's assessment of their shopping difficulty was related to satisfaction aspects, including a subjective feeling of poor health, and lack of satisfaction with meals, as well as physical condition. These have a greater influence on shopping difficulty than income in both sexes, and proximity to a supermarket in women.

  1. FOOD SAFETY SYSTEMS’ FUNCTIONING IN POLISH NETWORKS OF GROCERY STORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł NOWICKI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the way how the food safety systems are functioning in Polish networks of grocery stores. The study was conducted in the fourth quarter of 2012 in the south‐eastern Poland. There were chosen three organizations that meet certain conditions: medium size Polish grocery network without participation of foreign capital and up to 30 retail locations within the group. Studies based on a case study model. The research found that regular and unannounced inspections carried out to each store's, impact on increasing safety of food offered and the verification of GHP requirements on the headquarters level has a significant impact on the safety of food offered as well as on the knowledge and behavior of employees. In addition it was found that the verification and analysis of food safety management system is an effective tool for improving food safety. It was also shown that in most cases there is no formal crisis management system for the food protection in the surveyed companies and employees are only informed of what to do in case of an emergency.

  2. Dimensions of Consumer's Perceived Risk in Online Shopping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Naiyi

    2004-01-01

    Perceived risk is an important concept in consumer behavior in online shopping. It impedes the adopting online shopping. A structure model with seven factors of consumer's perceived risk in online shopping is developed in this paper. The results have the descriptive power about Chinese consumers' perceived risk in Internet shopping and provide framework for managerial use in China's e-commerce market environment.

  3. PREDICTION OF CONSUMERS' INTENSION THROUGH THEIR BEHAVIOR OBSERVATION IN UBIQUITOUS SHOP SPACE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Somkiat SAE-UENG; Sineenard PINYAPONG; Akihiro OGINO; Toshikazu KATO

    2008-01-01

    This paper has studied and observed the consumer behavior by collecting all kinds of actions of consumers and applying the ubiquitous environment which are RFID and camera sensors to gathering log data...

  4. Gender Differences in Online Shopping Behavior and Strategy Research on Network Marketing%网购行为性别差异与网络营销策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张姝姝; 张智光

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes consumers' online shopping behaviors through questionnaire survey and SPSS analysis. It is found that men and women have different attitudes towards shopping and advertising. Men are more rational and women emotional. Men focus attention to the whole process of consumption among other things risk perception more on consumption itself while women pay Through the Principal Component Analysis, the dimensions are reduced, the relative factors are picked up and their impacts on male and female consumers are analyzed. It turns out that factors like interest in online shopping, sensitivity to pictures, degree of influence by others and price have relatively significant influences on females while the significant influential factors for males are online shopping planning and willingness to spend time on online shopping.%采用问卷调查方式,运用SPSS软件对不同性别消费者网上购物的行为进行分析,发现男女在购物比例、消费金额、风险感知及广告态度等方面存在差异性:男性更加理性,女性更加感性;男性注重消费本身,女性注重消费过程等。通过主成分分析法降维,提取因子,得到这些因子对男性和女性消费者的影响程度,发现网购乐趣、图片敏感度、网购受他人影响程度、价格因素对女性购物的影响较大;而网购计划性、花费网购时间意愿因素对男性网购影响较大。

  5. Food Shopping Perceptions, Behaviors And Ability To Purchase Healthy Food Items In The Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: To examine the agreement between perceptions, behaviors and ability to purchase healthy foods in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD). Methods: FOODS 2000, a nutritional survey conducted in 18 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, provided information about dietary intake. A food ...

  6. Forecast Collaboration in Grocery Supply Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aastrup, Jesper; Gammelgaard, Britta

    -requisites, degree of forecast collaboration, demand related contingency factors and outcomes/KPIs based. The hypotheses are tested in a survey among Danish grocery suppliers. The survey findings provide evidence of a positive effect of collaborative orientation and retailer competencies and trustworthiness...... on the degress of forecast collaboration. Also, campaign frequency as a demand related contingency variable is found to positively affect degree of forecast collaboration. Finally, the survey findings provide evidence of a positive effect of degree of forecast collaboration on inventory levels and forecast...

  7. US Household Food Shopping Patterns: Dynamic Shifts Since 2000 And Socioeconomic Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Dalia; Robinson, Whitney R; Ng, Shu Wen; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Popkin, Barry M

    2015-11-01

    Under the assumption that differential food access might underlie nutritional disparities, programs and policies have focused on the need to build supermarkets in underserved areas, in an effort to improve dietary quality. However, there is limited evidence about which types of stores are used by households of different income levels and differing races/ethnicities. We used cross-sectional cluster analysis to derive shopping patterns from US households' volume food purchases by store from 2000 to 2012. Multinomial logistic regression identified household socioeconomic characteristics that were associated with shopping patterns in 2012. We found three food shopping patterns or clusters: households that primarily shopped at grocery stores, households that primarily shopped at mass merchandisers, and a combination cluster in which households split their purchases among multiple store types. In 2012 we found no income or race/ethnicity differences for the cluster of households that primarily shopped at grocery stores. However, low-income non-Hispanic blacks (versus non-Hispanic whites) had a significantly lower probability of belonging to the mass merchandise cluster. These varied shopping patterns must be considered in future policy initiatives. Furthermore, it is important to continue studying the complex rationales for people's food shopping patterns. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  8. İnternet Alışverişi Tüketici Davranışını Belirleyen Etmenler: Planlı Davranış Teorisi (TPB ile Ampirik Bir Test = Determinations of Customers’ Internet Shopping Behavior: Empirical Test with the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Hamit TURAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, because of the developments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs, Internet has penetrated significantly to our daily lives and caused important changes in customers’ shopping behaviors. Individuals widely differ in their behaviors of online shopping. To know more and to have detailed information on psychological and cognitive factors of customers’ online shopping behavior or reasons of them not shopping online, would reveal valuable insights to firms in forming their corporate Internet strategies. In this study, Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB, widely used in socio - psychology literature, is tested with Structural Equation Modeling (SEM technique to determine customers’ online shopping behaviors. Empirical results revealed very significant support to the underlying theoretical model.

  9. 网购认知与顾客抱怨行为的关系研究%The Relationship between Online Shopping Perception and Customer Complaint Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴化勇; 鲍升华

    2012-01-01

    在网络购物过程中,顾客会因各种产品质量问题而感到不满意,从而产生抱怨行为。基于此,文章在网络购物背景下,分析顾客抱怨行为的影响因素,通过层级回归方法,重点探讨网购认知与顾客抱怨行为的关系。研究发现网购认知与顾客抱怨行为倾向之间存在正向关系,网购认知越高,顾客抱怨行为倾向越高。并且网购认知对向卖方抱怨、私下抱怨以及向第三方机构抱怨等三类抱怨行为均存在较大影响。因此电子商务企业应加强顾客抱怨管理,提升顾客满意度。%The customer complaint behavior (CCB)could be caused by service failure and the consequent perceived dissatisfaction in online shopping. This paper analyzes the influence factors of CCB, focus on relationship between online shopping perception and CCB through hierarchical regression. The results show that online shopping has a positive effect on CCB. There is a significant influence of online shopping perception on direct complaint, private complaint and third-party complaint. So e-commerce businesses should strengthen customer complaints management to improve customer's satisfaction.

  10. Window shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Shy, Oz

    2013-01-01

    The terms "window shopping" and "showrooming" refer to the activity in which potential buyers visit a brick-and-mortar store to examine a product but end up either not buying it or buying the product from an online retailer. This paper analyzes potential buyers who differ in their preference for after-sale service that is not offered by online retailers. For some buyers, making a trip to the brick-and-mortar store is costly; however, going to the store to examine the product has the advantage...

  11. Window shopping

    OpenAIRE

    SHY, Oz

    2013-01-01

    The terms "window shopping" and "showrooming" refer to the activity in which potential buyers visit a brick-and-mortar store to examine a product but end up either not buying it or buying the product from an online retailer. This paper analyzes potential buyers who differ in their preference for after-sale service that is not offered by online retailers. For some buyers, making a trip to the brick-and-mortar store is costly; however, going to the store to examine the product has the advantage...

  12. 城市居民购物消费行为研究进展与展望%Progress and Prospects of the Research on Shopping Behavior of Urban Residents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩会然; 焦华富; 王荣荣; 戴柳燕

    2011-01-01

    Shopping behavior of urban residents is the main content of the research about urban commercial ac-tivities,and researches on its characteristics and decision-making process can provide a basis for urban commer-cial network planning.Shopping behavior is one of the most important research fields of urban geography and behavioral geography,and it is necessary to review its developing history,appraise its research progress and dis-cuss its future developing trends.Geographical researches on residents’consumption behavior particularly em-phasize on consumers’spatial selection activities and spatial-temporal characteristic of obtaining goods or ser-vices.The shopping behavior is the basic consumption behavior as a dynamic link within the urban activities sys-tem,so most researches on consumption behavior take residents’shopping behavior as a case.Shopping behav-ior study of Chinese urban residents refers to corresponding detailed study on type of goods,trip distance,travel time,travel frequency,travel mode and trip purpose of urban residents according to the different ages,different occupations and different income.Based on explaining the foreign theory and method study of shopping behav-ior,the paper reviews the domestic study progress of related shopping behavior.The review indicates that the studies on shopping behavior were shifted from the macroscopic supply level to the demand level at home and abroad;the foreign studies mainly concentrated on basic theories,characteristics and influence factors,forecast-ing and model simulation and so on;the domestic studies mainly focused on the macroscopic level studies of commercial spatial structures based on shopping behavior,the spatial-temporal characteristics,decision-making and influencing factors of shopping behavior.Through comparing the research situation of domestic and foreign residents’shopping behaviors,it has been found that there was a large gap between our country and the western counties in the field

  13. Measuring consumer perceptions of online shopping convenience

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Margarida Bernardo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this master thesis is to identify which dimensions of convenience affect consumers’ intention of using online shopping. Also it explores a conceptual model to measuring consumer perceptions of online shopping convenience. This paper contains prospects about online consumer behavior, and the results have important implications for retailers, managers and marketers, related to online shopping strategies. An empirical investigation was carried out to test the hypotheses. In order t...

  14. Fashion and the Urban Teenager Behavior at Shopping Malls in Medellin La moda y el comportamiento adolescente urbano en centros comerciales de Medellín

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Piedrahíta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a qualitative research that pretends to understand how the teen consumers behave and their relationship with fashion at shopping malls. Specifically, the paper describes the clothing usage of teenagers at shopping malls, the activities young people develop at these shopping environments and the present elements in the initial stages of the fashion purchase process. This research uses the technique of participant observation, complemented by short and in-depth interviews. The study confirms the social nature of teenagers’ behavior at shopping malls, giving high importance to group belonging. Lonely teenagers are not found and their behavior depends on the group size. This might explain the high frequency of visits to shopping malls, since these are places positioned in most teenagers’ mind as “meeting points”.Este artículo presenta los resultados de una investigación cualitativa que pretendecomprender cómo es el comportamiento del consumidor adolescente y su relación con lamoda en el ambiente de los centros comerciales. Específicamente, se describe el uso delvestuario por parte del adolescente en centros comerciales, se determinan las actividadesque desarrollan los jóvenes en estos ambientes y se identifican los elementos presentesen las etapas iniciales del ciclo de compra del vestuario. En esta investigación se empleala técnica de la observación participante, acompañada de entrevistas breves y entrevistasen profundidad. El estudio confirma la naturaleza social del comportamiento adolescenteen un centro comercial, donde la pertenencia a un grupo es esencial. No se encuentranadolescentes solos y su comportamiento depende del tamaño del grupo. Lo anterior podríaexplicar la alta frecuencia con la que visitan los centros comerciales, lugares posicionadosen la mente de la mayoría de los adolescentes como “puntos de encuentro”.

  15. The brand architecture of grocery retailers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Esbjerg, Lars

    2009-01-01

    on these concepts has taken an internal management perspective on how retailers can manipulate aspects of the retail setting to serve their own interests. Then, we develop an alternative conceptualisation of retailer brand architecture that takes into account that consumers (and other constituents) are active co......This article discusses how the brand architecture of grocery retailers set material and symbolic boundaries for consumer choice, thus limiting consumer sovereignty. The article first discusses previous work on store atmospherics, servicescapes and brand architecture. It is argued that work based......- constructors of material and symbolic aspects of retail settings. It is discussed how consumers participate in constructing retailer brand architecture and how this concept differs from previous research. Implications for both research and practice are discussed....

  16. The brand architecture of grocery retailers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Esbjerg, Lars

    2009-01-01

    on these concepts has taken an internal management perspective on how retailers can manipulate aspects of the retail setting to serve their own interests. Then, we develop an alternative conceptualisation of retailer brand architecture that takes into account that consumers (and other constituents) are active co......This article discusses how the brand architecture of grocery retailers set material and symbolic boundaries for consumer choice, thus limiting consumer sovereignty. The article first discusses previous work on store atmospherics, servicescapes and brand architecture. It is argued that work based......- constructors of material and symbolic aspects of retail settings. It is discussed how consumers participate in constructing retailer brand architecture and how this concept differs from previous research. Implications for both research and practice are discussed....

  17. Investigation Analysis on consumer of College students psychology and behavior characteristics online shopping%大学生网购心理和消费行为特征的调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敬龙; 张汉玉

    2012-01-01

    As an important form of e-commerce in China,Online shopping has demonstrated strong momentum.College students are important component of the Online shopping consumers,is also main consumer in the future.Analyzing psychological characteristics and behavioral characteristics of college students online shopping has the vital significance on The development of the online shopping market.%网络购物作为电子商务的一种重要形式,在我国展现出强势的劲头。大学生是网络购物消费者的重要组成部分,也是未来网络购物的消费主体。对其网购心理和消费行为特征进行分析研究,对网络购物市场的发展有重要意义。

  18. Shopping online and/or in-store? A structural equation model of the relationships between e-shopping and in-store shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Farag, Sendy; Schwanen, Tim; Dijst, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Searching product information or buying goods online is becoming increasingly popular and could affect shopping trips. However, the relationship between e-shopping and in-store shopping is currently unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate empirically how the frequencies of online searching, online buying, and non-daily shopping trips relate to each other, after controlling for sociodemographic, land use, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics. Data were collected from 826 respon...

  19. Shopping online and/or in-store? A structural equation model of the relationships between e-shopping and in-store shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Farag, Sendy; Schwanen, Tim; Dijst, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Searching product information or buying goods online is becoming increasingly popular and could affect shopping trips. However, the relationship between e-shopping and in-store shopping is currently unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate empirically how the frequencies of online searching, online buying, and non-daily shopping trips relate to each other, after controlling for sociodemographic, land use, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics. Data were collected from 826 respon...

  20. [Analysis of behavior related to use of the Internet, mobile telephones, compulsive shopping and gambling among university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Olivares, Rosario; Lucena, Valentina; Pino, M José; Herruzo, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain knowledge about habits related to addictive behaviour (pathological gambling, Internet, compulsive shopping, use of mobile telephones, etc.) that may be displayed by young students at the University of Cordoba (Spain), and to relate this behaviour with variables such as age, sex, course year, macro-field of study (arts/sciences) and the consumption of substances such as alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and cocaine. Using an ex-post facto single-group design (Montero & Leon, 2007), we applied a questionnaire especially designed to gather socio-demographic information on substance use and behavioural patterns related to "non-substance" addictions, which included the Shopping Addiction Test, Echeburua's Internet Addiction Test (2003) and Fernandez-Montalvo and Echeburua's Short Pathological Gambling Questionnaire (1997). A total of 1,011 students participated in the study (42.7% males and 57.3% females), with an age range of 18 to 29. Significant differences were found between mean score on the questionnaires and variables such as age, sex, field of studies and course year. It would seem that being female is a protective factor for Internet and gambling addiction, being a sciences student is a risk factor for gambling addiction, and being older and being an arts student are risk factors for shopping addiction. In conclusion, it can be stated that the students surveyed showed moderate incidence of behaviours such as Internet browsing, gambling, shopping and mobile phone use, whilst a very small group are close to having an addiction problem with such behaviours.

  1. 消费者创新性对移动购物行为的影响机制研究--基于计划行为理论视角%Mechanism of Influences of Consumer Innovativeness on Mobile Shopping Behavior from a Perspective of Theory of Planned Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘遗志; 汤定娜

    2015-01-01

    Theory of planned behavior is a famous relationship theory on attitude‐behavior and it has good ex‐planatory and predictive power on individual behavior .Based on theory of planned behavior ,we conducted an empirical study exploring the influence mechanism of consumers’ innovation on their mobile shopping behavior . The results show that there are no significant effects of consumer innovativeness on mobile shopping subjective norms which have no significant effects on mobile shopping intention .And consumer innovativeness has signifi‐cant effects on consumers’ mobile shopping intention by consumers’ mobile shopping attitudes and perceived control ,w hich significantly affects the mobile shopping behavior ,w hile mobile shopping intention played a par‐tial mediating role between mobile shopping perceived control and mobile shopping behavior .%计划行为理论是著名的态度行为关系理论,它对个体行为具有良好解释力和预测力。文章基于计划行为理论,实证研究了消费者创新性对移动购物行为的影响机制。结果表明:消费者创新性对移动购物主观规范影响不显著,移动购物主观规范对移动购物意向影响不显著;消费者创新性通过移动购物态度和移动购物知觉控制显著影响移动购物意向,进而显著影响移动购物行为;移动购物意向在移动购物知觉控制和移动购物行为的关系中起部分中介作用。

  2. Opportunity and Implications of Grocery E-Commerce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangkilde, Mads

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To incorporate the element of sustainability of advantages into the concept ofFirst-Mover Advantage for analysis on grocery e-commerce. Grocery e-commerce is a relatively unexplored phenomenon in Denmark and I seek to explain this via the concept of FMA. In order to fully understand...... and coupled with previous empirical findings on grocery e-commerce. Findings: a) Providing insights into the concept of first- mover advantage, b) sustainability of advantages and c) providing a framework for analysis on advantages sought by acting entrepreneurial. Value: The applicability of the concept...... of first-mover advantage is very descriptive to date. With thispaper and hopefully more to follow, I wish to transform the FMA concepts into a tool for analysis addressing the very crucial element that is not dealt with today -sustainability.Keywords : First-Mover Advantage; e-commerce; grocery industry...

  3. Drivers of perceived service quality in selected informal grocery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Driver of perceived service quality in selected informal grocery retail stores in ... Understanding and meeting customers' needs are essential for the success of ..... 1In developing the data-gathering instrument, an extensive literature review was.

  4. Strategy of image management in retail shops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Soče Kraljević

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A sound positioning in consumers’ mind, along with strong promotion support, brought many retail shops to the top. This is mostly thanks to the image created in the consumers’ mind. A retail shop’s image may but need not conform to reality. Image often looks like a cliché. It overstates certain elements of the shop while simply omitting others. That is exactly why image is of great importance and often crucial to consumer behavior. This paper aims at determining the impact of image on customer behavior in the course of decision making about shopping and choosing a particular retail shop. Image is a significant factor of success of every company, hence also of a retail shops. It is a relatively strong value and a component of creating competitive advantage. But if we do not pay sufficient attention to image, it can become counterproductive. Instead to, like an additional value helps creating and maintaining the advantage in competition and realization of business aims, transforms into a limiting factor. Therefore, it is imperative to identify the elements of image that are of greatest importance to customers. Research has shown that customers choose the retail shop first and after that products and brands within this shop. When it comes to the supermarket, as a kind of retail shop, research has shown that two out of three shopping decisions are made by the customer on the spot, that is, without previous planning. That practically means that we can influence customers with different sales techniques. The paper suggests different strategies of image management for supermarkets and conventional shops. For supermarkets it is the “widest assortment” strategy, while for conventional shops the strategy is that of a “selected group of products“. Improvements to research methods will enable getting more information about customer behavior, while pressures of increased competition in the business environment will force retailers to get

  5. ADOPTION OF ECR PRACTICES IN MINNESOTA GROCERY STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Paul F. PHUMPIU; King, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) is an industry-wide, collaborative initiative to re-engineer the grocery supply chain. This report presents findings from a study of ECR adoption in Minnesota grocery stores. Data were collected through interviews with managers of forty stores that are broadly distributed over store sizes, locations, and organizational forms. The interviews focused on business practices and technologies related to inventory management and ordering, shelf-space allocation and ...

  6. The impact of investments on e-grocery logistics operations

    OpenAIRE

    Kämäräinen, Vesa

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, various business models have been implemented in e-grocery retailing, however, in most cases, without success. The biggest stumbling block has been logistics, and some inefficient operation has frequently led to capital being used up on operating expenses. Therefore, improving overall logistical efficiency can be seen as one of the most important steps towards profitability. This dissertation aims at understanding different e-grocery logistics system implementation alternativ...

  7. Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution: Transportation Means Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    The report serves as a background report for the project "Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution". It contains a systematic overview of physical characteristics of the typical technologies, including energy and environmental effects.......The report serves as a background report for the project "Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution". It contains a systematic overview of physical characteristics of the typical technologies, including energy and environmental effects....

  8. Consumers’ Attitude towards Online Shopping : Factors influencing Gotland consumers to shop online

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan, Muhammad Umar; Uddin, Md. Nasir

    2011-01-01

    In the era of globalization electronic marketing is a great revolution.  Over the last decade maximum business organizations are running with technological change.  Online shopping or marketing is the use of technology (i.e., computer) for better marketing performance. And retailers are devising strategies to meet the demand of online shoppers; they are busy in studying consumer behavior in the field of online shopping, to see the consumer attitudes towards online shopping. Therefore we have ...

  9. The Association between Self-Reported Grocery Store Access, Fruit and Vegetable Intake, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, and Obesity in a Racially Diverse, Low-Income Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren Nichol; DeFosset, Amelia Rose; Smith, Lisa V; Kuo, Tony

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to examine the relationship between self-reported time and distance to the nearest retail grocery store, healthy and unhealthy food consumption, and objectively measured body mass index (BMI). We conducted a survey with 1,503 racially diverse, low-income residents at five public health centers in Los Angeles County. Most participants reported shopping at a supermarket (86.7%) and driving (59.9%) to their usual source for groceries. Over half reported living less than a mile from (58.9%) and traveling 5 min or less to reach (50.3%) the nearest grocery store. In the multivariable regression models, neither self-reported distance nor time to the nearest grocery store was consistently associated with fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, or BMI. Results suggest that the need to consider access and quality as well as urban planning and transportation, when examining the relationship between the retail food environment and health outcomes.

  10. The association between self-reported grocery store access, fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and obesity in a racially diverse, low-income population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Nichol Gase

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to examine the relationship between self-reported time and distance to the nearest retail grocery store, healthy and unhealthy food consumption, and objectively measured body mass index. We conducted a survey with 1,503 racially diverse, low-income residents at five public health centers in Los Angeles County. Most participants reported shopping at a supermarket (86.7% and driving (59.9% to their usual source for groceries. Over half reported living less than a mile from (58.9% and traveling five minutes or less to reach (50.3% the nearest grocery store. In the multivariable regression models, neither self-reported distance nor time to the nearest grocery store was consistently associated with fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, or body mass index. Results suggest the need to consider access and quality as well as urban planning and transportation, when examining the relationship between the retail food environment and health outcomes.

  11. Investigating the Sustainability of Kesko’s Grocery Supply Chain: Comparison and Recommendation for Grocery Supply Chain in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Dinh, Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to investigate Kesko’s grocery supply chain and find out sustainable practices along it. The main objective of the thesis is to compare Kesko’s sustainable supply chain practices with Vietnamese grocery retailers’ and through which draws out a set of recommendation for the latter. The literature review revisits related terms and concepts, which are retail, supply chain management, sustainability and sustainable supply chain management (SSCM). Also in this part, a SSCM fra...

  12. 78 FR 45567 - Proposed Collection, Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Bureau... assistance participation, grocery shopping, and meal preparation. These ] data enhance the understanding of...' eating and drinking behaviors, food assistance participation, grocery and meal shopping, food preparation...

  13. Retail grocery store marketing strategies and obesity: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Karen; Bader, Michael D M; Iyer, Shally

    2012-05-01

    In-store food marketing can influence food-purchasing behaviors and warrants increased attention given the dramatic rise in obesity. Descriptive and experimental studies of key marketing components have been conducted by consumer scientists, marketing researchers, and public health experts. This review synthesizes research and publications from industry and academic sources and provides direction for developing and evaluating promising interventions. Literature sources for the review were English-language articles published from 1995 to 2010, identified from multidisciplinary search indexes, backward searches of cited articles, review articles, industry reports, and online sources. Only articles that focused on physical grocery stores and food products were included. Data collection occurred in 2010 and 2011. Articles were classified in the categories of product, price, placement, and promotion and divided into controlled laboratory experiments, observation, and field experiments; 125 primary peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria. Narrative synthesis methods were used. Key findings were synthesized by category of focus and study design. Evidence synthesis was completed in 2011. Findings suggest several strategies for in-store marketing to promote healthful eating by increasing availability, affordability, prominence, and promotion of healthful foods and/or restricting or de-marketing unhealthy foods. Key results of research in controlled laboratory studies should be adapted and tested in real-world in-store settings. Industry methods for assessing consumer behavior, such as electronic sales data and individually linked sales information from loyalty card holders, can help public health researchers increase the scientific rigor of field studies. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Online versus conventional shopping: consumers' risk perception and regulatory focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Guda; Kerkhof, Peter; Fennis, Bob M

    2007-10-01

    In two experiments, the impact of shopping context on consumers' risk perceptions and regulatory focus was examined. We predicted that individuals perceive an online (vs. conventional) shopping environment as more risky and that an online shopping environment, by its risky nature, primes a prevention focus. The findings in Study 1 demonstrate these effects by using self-report measures for risk perception and prevention focus. In Study 2, we replicated these findings and demonstrated that the effect of an online shopping environment carries over to behavior in a domain unrelated to shopping.

  15. Promoting Independence through Assistive Technology: Evaluating Audio Recorders to Support Grocery Shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.; Satsangi, Rajiv; Bartlett, Whitney; Weng, Pei-Lin

    2012-01-01

    In light of a positive research base regarding technology-based self-operating prompting systems (e.g., iPods), yet a concern about the sustainability of such technologies after a research project is completed, this study sought to explore the effectiveness and efficiency of an audio recorder, a low-cost, more commonly accessible technology to…

  16. Regional differences of consumer preferences when shopping for regional products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Kalábová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents partial results of a research on consumer preferences when shopping for groceries. It is focused on regional products and consumer preferences in relation to the country of origin of food products. The main objective of this paper is to find the existence of spatial relationships between spatial deployment of regional products and consumer preferences for regional products. It will be necessary to create a data model for monitoring the deployment of regional products and also a data model for tracking important indicators of consumer behavior in all regions of the Czech Republic. The results are based on questionnaire survey that was conducted within the period from October 2010 to January 2011 on a sample of 3767 respondents from the Czech Republic, via both online questionnaires and their printed version. For the data collection the questionnaire system ReLa, developed by the Department of Marketing and Trade at Faculty of Business and Economics at Mendel University in Brno, was used. Data was processed with statistical software STATISTICA (ver. 10. Spatial visualisation was processed with GIS software ArcGIS (ver. 10.1. Preferences for food of Czech origin were analysed in relation to identification criteria. The research results show that the origin of food has an important role in consumer purchase decision-making. There is no significant difference in importance of this factor based on gender of consumers, however, we could prove moderate dependence on respondent’s occupation, education and age. We could also experience regional differences in levels of preferences of local products or products of Czech origin in regard of 14 regions of the Czech Republic. χ2 (N = 3767 = 245.25; p < 0.001. Value of Pearson’s coefficient of contingency is 0.334.

  17. Virtual Shopping and Impulse Purchasing Strengths and Weaknesses in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Hussain

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzed the perceptive of consumers doing online shopping and impulse purchasing. This study examined the behavior of thirty consumers who were asked to fill the questionnaire based on some close ended questions. The focus of this investigation was to discuss the strengths and Weaknesses of online shopping and impulse purchasing in developing country like Pakistan. Today consumers choose and buy things while sitting at home through internet and buy things impulsively. Do consumer in Pakistan are using Internet for shopping online? Do they make more impulse purchase on the Internet? Does online shopping save time? Do online shopping is more attractive or consumer feels lack of trust? Impacts of advertising are also discussed. We covered the virtual shopping weakness and strengths in our VSIPSWP (Virtual Shopping and Impulse Purchasing Strengths and Weaknesses in Pakistan Models.

  18. Grocery e-commerce in the UK and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Bjerre, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    is exemplified by examining the interaction of the forces having created grocery e-commerce markets in the UK and Denmark. The application of the model reveals that besides the usual identification of competition intensity, the persistency of market reach efforts of a focal firm and the value attraction of its...

  19. Prevalence of phosphorus containing food additives in grocery stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeen B. Leon

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, phosphorus additives are commonly present in groceries and contribute significantly to the phosphorus content of foods. Moreover, phosphorus additive foods are less costly than additive-free foods. As a result, phosphorus additives may be an important contributor to hyperphosphatemia among persons with chronic kidney disease

  20. Gains and losses of exclusivity in grocery retailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekimpe, M.G.; Gielens, K.J.P.; Gijsbrechts, E.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates that convenience goods should be distributed as intensively as possible. Still, exclusivity arrangements are rapidly gaining way in grocery retailing. We discuss the possible performance outcomes of exclusivity deals, and propose a unified framework (i) to quantify the g

  1. Analysis of the Online Consumer Shopping Behavior%影响网络消费者购买行为的因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶文

    2001-01-01

    The e-commerce market and the traditional physical market has caused the great difference between the online consumer shopping behavior and the traditional consumer behavior.The author analyses the impacts of some factors on these variations.The aim of this article is to explore something useful for the online retailers so as to make optimal Internet marketing strategy and choose appropriate Internet marketing tools.%由于电子商务市场与传统实体市场存在着很大的不同,导致网络消费者的购买行为与传统的消费者购买行为产生了较大的差异,本文对引起这些差异的因素及其影响进行了分析,以期有助于网络零售商制定适合于网络销售的营销战略和营销工具。

  2. An iPad™-based picture and video activity schedule increases community shopping skills of a young adult with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckley, Elizabeth; Tincani, Matt; Guld Fisher, Amanda

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the iPad 2™ with Book Creator™ software to provide visual cues and video prompting to teach shopping skills in the community to a young adult with an autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. A multiple probe across settings design was used to assess effects of the intervention on the participant's independence with following a shopping list in a grocery store across three community locations. Visual cues and video prompting substantially increased the participant's shopping skills within two of the three community locations, skill increases maintained after the intervention was withdrawn, and shopping skills generalized to two untaught shopping items. Social validity surveys suggested that the participant's parent and staff favorably viewed the goals, procedures, and outcomes of intervention. The iPad 2™ with Book Creator™ software may be an effective way to teach independent shopping skills in the community; additional replications are needed.

  3. Shopping with Acquired Brain Injuries, Coping Strategies and Maslowian Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Jonas E; Skehan, Terry; Rydén, Monica; Lagerkrans, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A positive outcome of the modern welfare state is prolonged life expectancy. In Sweden, the expected life span has increased with approximatively 25 years during the 20th century [Statistics Sweden]. However, ageing is associated with an increased risk for acquiring cognitive and physical disabilities. This study is based on anonymized interviews with groups of older persons who experience cognitive problems and relatives. The interviewees were asked about everyday activities like shopping groceries, clothes or other necessities. The interviewees identified problems and described a series of strategies for coping. This paper uses fictionalized characters to present problems and coping strategies that the interviewees use to overcome cognitive challenges when shopping groceries. The strategies range from complete withdrawal, an increased dependency on proxies to the development of elaborate techniques to mask their problem and obtain assistance. Following the current trend in the design of the Swedish sales environment - large scale, abundance of goods and Maslowian strategies for making people stay longer (and spend more money) - accessibility in the built environment is often an absent friend.

  4. Supporting shop floor intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Peter; Schmidt, Kjeld; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    1999-01-01

    Many manufacturing enterprises are now trying to introduce various forms of flexible work organizations on the shop floor. However, existing computer-based production planning and control systems pose severe obstacles for autonomous working groups and other kinds of shop floor control to become r......-to-day production planning by supporting intelligent and responsible workers in their situated coordination activities on the shop floor....

  5. Power Service Shops

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TVA's Power Service Shops provides expert repair and maintenance of power system components and large industrial equipment. With world-class maintenance facilities...

  6. A qualitative study of nutritional behaviors in adults with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plow, Matthew; Finlayson, Marcia

    2012-12-01

    Few studies have explored how people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) cope with impairments and disability to participate in nutritional behaviors, such as meal preparation and grocery shopping. Thus, we conducted a qualitative study among eight individuals with MS who experienced mobility impairments. The eight individuals participated in semistructured, face-to-face interviews that focused on obtaining narratives about day-to-day dietary habits, preparing food, grocery shopping, and going to restaurants. Interviews were analyzed using an inductive category and theme development approach. Overall themes were (a) "it's a lot of work," (b) "it's not just up to me," (c) sifting through nutritional information, and (d) "why I eat what I eat." Participants frequently reported fatigue and mobility impairments as barriers to engagement in nutritional behaviors and often described family members as the "gatekeepers" for food selection and preparation (i.e., providing tangible support). Future research should explore the effectiveness of nutritional interventions that target family dynamics and create a supportive social environment to promote healthy eating habits and nutritional autonomy.

  7. Eyes wide shopped: shopping situations trigger arousal in impulsive buyers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfas, Benjamin G; Büttner, Oliver B; Florack, Arnd

    2014-01-01

    The present study proposes arousal as an important mechanism driving buying impulsiveness. We examined the effect of buying impulsiveness on arousal in non-shopping and shopping contexts. In an eye-tracking experiment, we measured pupil dilation while participants viewed and rated pictures of shopping scenes and non-shopping scenes. The results demonstrated that buying impulsiveness is closely associated with arousal as response to viewing pictures of shopping scenes. This pertained for hedonic shopping situations as well as for utilitarian shopping situations. Importantly, the effect did not emerge for non-shopping scenes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that arousal of impulsive buyers is independent from cognitive evaluation of scenes in the pictures.

  8. Fashion and the Urban Teenager Behavior at Shopping Malls in Medellin La moda y el comportamiento adolescente urbano en centros comerciales de Medellín

    OpenAIRE

    Verónica Piedrahíta; Lina M Ceballos; Mauricio Bejarano

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a qualitative research that pretends to understand how the teen consumers behave and their relationship with fashion at shopping malls. Specifically, the paper describes the clothing usage of teenagers at shopping malls, the activities young people develop at these shopping environments and the present elements in the initial stages of the fashion purchase process. This research uses the technique of participant observation, complemented by short and in-de...

  9. 购物网站满意度与冲动购买行为的关系%Relationship between shopping site satisfaction and impulse buying behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐信诚; 王素芬

    2011-01-01

    为了研究购物网站顾客满意与顾客购买行为的关系,收集并整理了购物网站满意度与冲动购买行为的相关文献,找出了影响购物网站满意度的因素,应用结构方程模型并通过实证研究分析了购物网站满意度和顾客冲动购买行为的关系.结果表明,顾客对购物网站的满意容易导致冲动购买.%In order to study the relationship between shopping site satisfaction and buying beliavior,this paper collected and compiled the literatures of website satisfaction and impulse buying behavior,and we also did an empirical research through structural equation models(SEM)on the basis of American customer satisfaction index(ACSI).At last,we find that the customer's satisfaction can easily lead to impulse buying.

  10. Priorities of Smartphone Online Shopping Applications for Young People

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Takashi; Yatsuhashi, Jiro; Mizutani, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    With widespread use of smartphones, many people use smartphone online shopping applications to enjoy online purchasing. However, Japanese young people’s behavior and perceptions with regard to smartphone online shopping applications are unclear. To reveal these perceptions and priorities, this study examined Japanese respondents’ adoption of online shopping applications on smartphones by applying a choice-based conjoint analysis. This study revealed that our respondents place the highest prio...

  11. An Analysis of Consumer Behavior of Network Shopping Group%新生代消费群体的网络购物消费行为分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄琍

    2012-01-01

    伴随着互联网的普及,网络购物成为消费者新的消费方式,深刻影响了人们的消费习惯。网络购物就是以国际互联网络为基础,利用数字化的信息和网络媒体的交互性来辅助营销目标实现的一种新型购物方式。特别是80后("后"指年代)、90后这些新生代的消费者伴随着互联网成长,与传统的60后、70后消费者在消费行为上有很多不同,惯性思维中的"孩子们"如今成了消费的主力,而90后是中国未来的消费生力军.产品若想获得这群人的青睐,特别是那些服装、手机、奢侈品企业,就需要从终端渠道营销、品牌沟通、外观设计等方面调整,迎合他们的消费心理。%Based on the Internet,online shopping is a new type of shopping,and makes use of the interactiveness of digital information and web media to help achieve marketing objectives.New generation of consumers such as the post 80s and 90s differ in consumer behavior from the 60s and 70s generation.Nowadays the former have constituted majority of customers and will be a major player in the future respectively.Producers should adjust terminal marketing channel,brand management and appearance design to meet with consumption psychology if such enterprises as produce costumes,cell phones,and luxury goods want to be popular for these groups.

  12. New Shopping Spree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING WENLEI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Tempting discounts are available within just one click. Zhao Lei, a software engineer in Beijing0 loves the one-hour lunch break at noon,as it is the best time for him to check "today'sspecial" at his favorite group buying web-sites. Sometimes he searches for great deals at directory sites devoted to the new shop-ping spree.

  13. Deregulating Sunday Shop Policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, E.; Gradus, R.H.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Sunday shop opening is deregulated to the municipal level in the Netherlands. Despite positive effects on economic growth and employment, many municipalities restrict Sunday shop opening. Based on 2003 data we show that diverse local characteristics, like the size of municipalities and religious and

  14. Deregulating Sunday Shop Policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dijkgraaf (Elbert); R.H.J.M. Gradus (Raymond)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractSunday shop opening is deregulated to the municipal level in the Netherlands. Despite positive effects on economic growth and employment, many municipalities restrict Sunday shop opening. Based on 2003 data we show that diverse local characteristics, like the size of municipalities and r

  15. 网络环境下消费者购物放弃行为的分析%Research and Analysis on the Behavior of Shopping Abandonment Under the Network Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武峰

    2016-01-01

    Online transactions often occur the behavior of shopping abandonment which shows the purchase inten-tion of consumers but no payment. Study on the motivation of the consumers' shopping abandonment behavior is very important to meet the consumption and improve the service. Through exploratory factor analysis (EFA), the concept model that influences the online shopping abandonment is constructed from eight aspects including the motivation of using shopping cart, network capability, operation risk, psychological experience, business product, merchant service and business reputation. Then, the model is built by the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), to establish the concept model of structural equation test, which finds that the consumers are the direct factors that lead to shopping abandon-ment behavior, while the merchants are the indirect factors. However, the merchants are the starting motivation for the consumer abandonment behavior. Thus, only the merchants study the psychological motivation of consumer abandon-ment behavior carefully can they reduce the abandonment behavior effectively.%网上交易经常会发生消费者有购买意向,却没有付款的消费放弃行为。通过探索性因子分析(EFA)方法建立以购物车使用动机、网络能力、操作风险、心理感受、意向选择、商家产品、商家服务和商家信誉八个方面构建影响网购放弃行为的概念模型,再结合验证性因子分析(CFA)方法建立结构方程检验概念模型,发现消费者自身因素是导致网购放弃行为的直接因素,而商家只是间接影响,但商家因素是消费者产生消费行为的起始动因,商家只有认真研究消费者网购的心理动因,才能有效减少放弃行为的发生。

  16. 影响高校学生网络购买行为的因素%Influencing Factors of College Students' Online Shopping Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯樱樱

    2011-01-01

    高校学生一直都是网络购物的主体,为了探讨如何促进高校学生的网络购买行为,以高校学生存当当网上的购买经历为例,设计调查问卷,收集数据;运用多元回归分析法研究了网站信息反馈速度、网站满意度、信任度、购买意愿和态度对高校沉重网络购买行为的影响。研究表明,网站信息反馈速度、网站满意度、信任度、购买意愿对高校学生的网络购买行为均有显著的正向影响。研究结果对当今电子商务网站的建设有一定的参考价值。%University students are the main participants of online shopping. Based on the data collected from college students' purchase experience in Dangdang, this paper, by using multiple regression analysis, analyzed the influencing factors of college students' network purchase behavior, including the speed of website information feedback, website satisfaction, trust, purchase intention and attitude. The research showed that the speed of website information feedback, website satisfaction, trust, purchase intent had significantly positive effect on university students' network purchase behavior. The results had a certain reference value for e-commerce website construction.

  17. UNDERSTANDING THE BARRIERS: GROCERY STORES AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED SHOPPERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Khattab

    2015-11-01

    Grocery stores include many different zones and services with the aisles area being one of the main barriers to access for people with impaired vision.  This area features many different sections such as canned goods, dry packaged goods, spices, drinks and snacks, baking supplies, baby items, cereals, cleaning products, pet supplies, and health and beauty items.  For visually impaired individuals, however, it can be hard to reach these various sections and to find the relevant products.  The purpose of this paper is to present a study that sought to understand the barriers that shoppers with vision impairment (VI face in the grocery store`s built environment. The research approach was based on the application of the ethnography method, Think-aloud Protocol (TAP, Interviews, and behavioural mapping method.

  18. A framework for understanding grocery purchasing in a low-income urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Drew A; Palmer, Anne M; Beckham, Sarah W; Surkan, Pamela J

    2013-05-01

    Research demonstrates that food desert environments limit low-income shoppers' ability to purchase healthy foods, thereby increasing their likelihood of diet-related illnesses. We sought to understand how individuals in an urban American food desert make grocery-purchasing decisions, and specifically why unhealthy purchases arise. Analysis is based on ethnographic data from participant observation, 37 in-depth interviews, and three focus groups with low-income, primarily African American shoppers with children. We found participants had detailed knowledge of and preference for healthy foods, but the obligation to consistently provide food for their families required them to apply specific decision criteria which, combined with structural qualities of the supermarket environment, increased unhealthy purchases and decreased healthy purchases. Applying situated cognition theory, we constructed an emic model explaining this widely shared grocery-purchasing decision process and its implications. This context-specific understanding of behavior suggests that multifaceted, system-level approaches to intervention are needed to increase healthy purchasing in food deserts.

  19. Mercury Shopping Cart Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Mercury Shopping Cart Interface (MSCI) is a reusable component of the Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) program described in another article. MSCI is a means of encapsulating the logic and information needed to describe an orderable item consistent with Mercury Shopping Cart service protocol. Designed to be used with Web-browser software, MSCI generates Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages on which ordering information can be entered. MSCI comprises two types of Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) modules: template modules and shopping-cart logic modules. Template modules generate HTML pages for entering the required ordering details and enable submission of the order via a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) post. Shopping cart modules encapsulate the logic and data needed to describe an individual orderable item to the Mercury Shopping Cart service. These modules evaluate information entered by the user to determine whether it is sufficient for the Shopping Cart service to process the order. Once an order has been passed from MSCI to a deployed Mercury Shopping Cart server, there is no further interaction with the user.

  20. Online shopping hesitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chang-Hoan; Kang, Jaewon; Cheon, Hongsik John

    2006-06-01

    This study was designed to understand which factors influence consumer hesitation or delay in online product purchases. The study examined four groups of variables (i.e., consumer characteristics, contextual factors perceived uncertainty factors, and medium/channel innovation factors) that predict three types of online shopping hesitation (i.e., overall hesitation, shopping cart abandonment, and hesitation at the final payment stage). We found that different sets of delay factors are related to different aspects of online shopping hesitation. The study concludes with suggestion for various delay-reduction devices to help consumers close their online decision hesitation.

  1. An Integrated Model For Online shopping, Using Selective Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Rabiei Dastjerdi

    Full Text Available As in traditional shopping, customer acquisition and retention are critical issues in the success of an online store. Many factors impact how, and if, customers accept online shopping. Models presented in recent years, only focus on behavioral or technolo ...

  2. Can a virtual supermarket bring realism into the lab? Comparing shopping behavior using virtual and pictorial store representations to behavior in a physical store

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van Erica; Broek, van den Eva; Trijp, van Hans C.M.; Yu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Immersive virtual reality techniques present new opportunities for research into consumer behavior. The current study examines whether the increased realism of a virtual store compared to pictorial (2D) stimuli elicits consumer behavior that is more in line with behavior in a physical store. We

  3. Can a virtual supermarket bring realism into the lab? Comparing shopping behavior using virtual and pictorial store representations to behavior in a physical store

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van Erica; Broek, van den Eva; Trijp, van Hans C.M.; Yu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Immersive virtual reality techniques present new opportunities for research into consumer behavior. The current study examines whether the increased realism of a virtual store compared to pictorial (2D) stimuli elicits consumer behavior that is more in line with behavior in a physical store. We exam

  4. Market Concentration and Profitability of the Grocery Retailers in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindřich Špička

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to internationally compare the market concentration of grocery retailers in the six countries of Central Europe – Austria, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia. The market concentration was measured by CR4 ratio, Herfindahl-Hirschman Index and the GRS index. Data covered the period 2010 – 2015. The secondary data came from the Euromonitor International and Bureau van Dijk databases. The results showed that the market structure of the Central European grocery retailers has mostly a character of asymmetric oligopoly. The pairwise correlation did not reveal any strong relationship between the market power and profitability of the grocery retailers. The Central European grocery market is controlled by strong national retail chains and multinational companies which operate modern grocery retail formats. However, traditional grocery retailers are still popular in Hungary while traditional individual grocers in other countries are disappearing or gradually joining the networking system based on franchising.

  5. Spatial competition between shopping centers

    OpenAIRE

    António Brandão; João Correia-da-Silva; Joana Pinho

    2010-01-01

    We study competition between two shopping centers (department stores or shopping malls) located at the extremes of a linear city. In contrast with the existing literature, we do not restrict consumers to make all their purchases at a single place. We obtain this condition as an equilibrium result. In the case of competition between a shopping mall and a department store, we find that the shops at the mall, taken together, obtain a lower profit than the department store. However, the shops at ...

  6. Performance on a computerized shopping task significantly predicts real world functioning in persons diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloyaux, Julien; Pellegrini, Nadia; Mourad, Haitham; Bertrand, Hervé; Domken, Marc-André; Van der Linden, Martial; Larøi, Frank

    2013-12-15

    Persons diagnosed with bipolar disorder often suffer from cognitive impairments. However, little is known concerning how these cognitive deficits impact their real world functioning. We developed a computerized real-life activity task, where participants are required to shop for a list of grocery store items. Twenty one individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder and 21 matched healthy controls were administered the computerized shopping task. Moreover, the patient group was assessed with a battery of cognitive tests and clinical scales. Performance on the shopping task significantly differentiated patients and healthy controls for two variables: Total time to complete the shopping task and Mean time spent to consult the shopping list. Moreover, in the patient group, performance on these variables from the shopping task correlated significantly with cognitive functioning (i.e. processing speed, verbal episodic memory, planning, cognitive flexibility, and inhibition) and with clinical variables including duration of illness and real world functioning. Finally, variables from the shopping task were found to significantly explain 41% of real world functioning of patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder. These findings suggest that the shopping task provides a good indication of real world functioning and cognitive functioning of persons diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Remodeling A School Shop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    Presents guidelines for remodeling a school shop combining major considerations of funds, program changes, class management, and flexibility, with the needs of wiring, painting, and placement of equipment. (Author)

  8. Course-Shopping in the Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William B.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    This study examines the course shopping behaviors of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across the nine campuses of the Los Angeles Community College District in spring 2001. The sample students are representative of the district. For the purpose of this analysis, the authors define course shopping as: (1) cyclic shopping, the…

  9. Beyond Promotion-Based Store Switching : Antecedents and Consequences of Systematic Multiple-Store Shopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbrechts, E.; Campo, K.; Nisol, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that single-purpose multiple store shopping is not only driven by opportunistic, promotion-based motivations, but may also be part of a longer term shopping planning process based on stable store characteristics.Starting from a utility-maximizing shopping behavior

  10. Beyond Promotion-Based Store Switching : Antecedents and Consequences of Systematic Multiple-Store Shopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbrechts, E.; Campo, K.; Nisol, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that single-purpose multiple store shopping is not only driven by opportunistic, promotion-based motivations, but may also be part of a longer term shopping planning process based on stable store characteristics.Starting from a utility-maximizing shopping behavior model

  11. Beyond Promotion-Based Store Switching : Antecedents and Consequences of Systematic Multiple-Store Shopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbrechts, E.; Campo, K.; Nisol, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that single-purpose multiple store shopping is not only driven by opportunistic, promotion-based motivations, but may also be part of a longer term shopping planning process based on stable store characteristics.Starting from a utility-maximizing shopping behavior model

  12. Riding in shopping carts and exposure to raw meat and poultry products: prevalence of, and factors associated with, this risk factor for salmonella and campylobacter infection in children younger than 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Mary E; Mahon, Barbara E; Zansky, Shelley M; Hurd, Sharon; Scallan, Elaine

    2010-06-01

    Riding in a shopping cart next to raw meat or poultry is a risk factor for Salmonella and Campylobacter infections in infants. To describe the frequency of, and factors associated with, this behavior, we surveyed parents of children aged younger than 3 years in Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network sites. We defined exposure as answering yes to one of a series of questions asking if packages of raw meat or poultry were near a child in a shopping cart, or if a child was in the cart basket at the same time as was raw meat or poultry. Among 1,273 respondents, 767 (60%) reported that their children visited a grocery store in the past week and rode in shopping carts. Among these children, 103 (13%) were exposed to raw products. Children who rode in the baskets were more likely to be exposed than were those who rode only in the seats (odds ratio [OR], 17.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11.0 to 28.9). In a multivariate model, riding in the basket (OR, 15.5; 95% CI, 9.2 to 26.1), income less than $55,000 (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.1), and Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.5) were associated with exposure. Our study shows that children can be exposed to raw meat and poultry products while riding in shopping carts. Parents should separate children from raw products and place children in the seats rather than in the baskets of the cart. Retailer use of leak-proof packaging, customer placement of product in a plastic bag and on the rack underneath the cart, use of hand sanitizers and wipes, and consumer education may also be helpful.

  13. New Digital Marketing Actors: Private Shopping Clubs and Their Advertising Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlım Tüzel Uraltaş

    2014-12-01

    In the first part of the study the concept of digital marketing and its historical background will be explained. In the second part online shopping behavior, online shopping training activities in Turkey and private shopping clubs will be examined.  The last part of the study will deal with the advertising practices of private shopping clubs. The study is essentially a literature review; thus, the resources are mostly secondary in nature.

  14. The Analysis of Consumers' Online Shopping Behavior Based on the Statistics%基于统计学的网络购物消费者行为分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马素萍; 高洪波

    2011-01-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the business model of online store and consumers'shopping behavior, based on statistical correlation analysis, regression analysis and other methods, and talk over the relationships between consumers'shopping behavior and the characteristics of the online store and products as well. We reach the condusion: the characteristics of the online store are significantly correlated with the characteristies of the products; the better the characteristics of the online store. the more frequent the online shopping behavior of consumers; the characteristics of the products don't directly affect consumer behavior. By Lhe statistical analysis, we hope to offer managers of the online store some considerable factors and suggestions.%本文针对网络商店经营模式与消费者购物行为,基于统计学的相关分析、回归分析等方法,探讨了网络商店特性、商品特性与消费者网络购物行为等之间的关系.得出了网络商店特性与商品特性有部分显著相关;网络商店特性愈佳,对消费者网络购物行为愈高;商品特性对于网络购买行为并无直接影响关系的结论.通过以上分析,以期达到为网络商店经营者提供一些值得考虑的因素和建议的目的.

  15. Consumers preferences of shopping centers in Bratislava (Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristína Bilková

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There have been changes in the shopping behavior and preferences of consumers in the post-communist countries caused by political changes after 1989. Slovakia is not an exception, and it has been observed a change not only at the consumers’ level but also in retail stores. A notable bearer of such changes was the construction of big shopping centers that were a new phenomenon in shopping. They quickly became popular and changed spatial and shopping patterns of consumers. The main aim of this study is to analyze and evaluate the shopping preferences of consumers based on the example of the capital city – Bratislava (at the level of urban districts. The database consists of results of a questionnaire survey carried out in 2011. Respondents were interviewed inside the shopping center. The partial aims focus on the analysis of consumers’ perceptions, the frequency of their shopping and the mode of transport used for shopping. One of the goals of this study is also to evaluate the perception of consumers in terms of the catchment areas of the chosen shopping center, as well as the perceptional classification of retail in the given area and the accessibility of stores.

  16. Analysing the maximum level of customer satisfaction in grocery stores: the influence of feature advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pilar Martínez Ruiz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available From the initial consideration of the store attributes that the marketing literature has identified as key in order that grocery retailers manage to design their differentiation strategies, this work identifies the main factors underlying the above mentioned attributes. The goal is to analyze which of these factors exert a bigger influence on the highest level of customer satisfaction. With this intention, we have examined a sample of 422 consumers who had carried out their purchase in different types of store formats in Spain, considering the influence of feature advertising on the clientele behavior. Interesting conclusions related to the aspects that most impact on the maximum level of customer satisfaction depending on the influence of feature advertising stem from this work.

  17. What is the effectiveness of obesity related interventions at retail grocery stores and supermarkets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Abdulfatah; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2016-01-01

    interventions have been carried out in retail grocery/supermarket settings as part of an effort to understand and influence consumption of healthful foods. The review’s key outcome variable is sale/purchase of healthy foods as a result of the interventions. This systematic review sheds light...... on the effectiveness of food store interventions intended to promote the consumption of healthy foods and the methodological quality of studies reporting them. Methods Systematic literature search spanning from 2003 to 2015 (inclusive both years), and confined to papers in the English language was conducted. Studies...... fulfilling search criteria were identified and critically appraised. Studies included in this review report health interventions at physical food stores including supermarkets and corner stores, and with outcome variable of adopting healthier food purchasing/consumption behavior. The methodological quality...

  18. Competition and Oligopoly: A Case of UK Grocery Retailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Lawler

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a model of Bertrand price competition with uncertainty as to the number of bidders. The auction models predict retail price dispersion as an observable feature of price discrimination. The implications of the auction models are tested using a logit model on primary data. Some simulations of the logit model further enrich and capture critical states of chain-store rivalry. The findings show that consumer characteristics define type of store choice and that an auction model of price competition with uncertainty is an appropriate way to model retail grocery competition.

  19. A Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience to Improve Pharmacy Students' Empathy and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To implement and assess the effectiveness of an exercise designed to develop pharmacy students' empathy toward patients regarding diabetes and obesity and encourage cultural and “economic” competence. Design Students in the Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience attended a nutrition and weight management lecture, monitored their own nutritional intake by maintaining an online nutrition and exercise journal, and grocery shopped based on an assigned patient scenario. Scenarios varied in terms of income, ethnicity, insurance coverage, family size, grocery store, and medication lists. Students completed written reflections and group discussions and completed pre- and post-assignment survey instruments. Assessment The activities improved student confidence levels regarding nutrition and weight-related patient counseling, and knowledge about general nutrition and weight management. The majority of students agreed that the activities improved their ability to empathize with overweight patients regarding the challenges of nutrition and lifestyle changes and enhanced their awareness of the impact that cultural and financial situations have on nutrition and lifestyle. Conclusion The Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience positively impacted the way pharmacy students view the challenges surrounding nutrition and healthy eating in patients with culturally and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds. PMID:19513175

  20. Comparison Shopping Agents and Czech Online Customers’ Shopping Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Pilik Michal; Klimek Petr; Jurickova Eva; Palka Premysl

    2016-01-01

    The internet has changed the lifestyles and shopping behaviours of customers. Online purchasing enables people to obtain information about products and services provided more effectively and easily, with the result that home shopping has become ordinary and usual. This paper presents part of a research focusing on online shopping customers’ behaviour in the Czech Republic. The article pertains to comparison shopping agents (CPAs), a tool which provides information to customers and helps find ...

  1. Research on Online Shopping Choice Behavior Based on Nested Logit Model%基于巢式Logit模型的网上购物选择行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡敏; 商滔

    2015-01-01

    基于Gumbel分布和多项Logit模型,提出建立顾客网上购物选择行为的巢式Logit模型,在SERVQUAL五维量表的基础上,设计了影响顾客购物选择行为的18个相关因素,同时将顾客购买行为分成共性部分和差异部分,采用极大似然法求解模型参数. 相比传统模型而言,巢式Logit模型具有更好的解释能力和稳定性,通过实例分析演示了模型的应用方法,为网上店铺优化服务质量提供了具体参考.%The nested Logit model of online shopping choice behavior is proposed based on Gumbel distribution and multinomial Logit model,and 18 related factors which affect customer's choice behavior are designed on the basis of five dimensional SERVQUAL scale.The shopping behavior is divided into common part and different part,maximum likelihood is used to solve the model parameters.Comparing to the traditional model,nested Logit model has better explanatory power and stability,through case study,the application of this model is demonstrated,which provide specific reference to optimize the quality of service for online stores.

  2. Can a virtual supermarket bring realism into the lab? Comparing shopping behavior using virtual and pictorial store representations to behavior in a physical store.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herpen, Erica; van den Broek, Eva; van Trijp, Hans C M; Yu, Tian

    2016-12-01

    Immersive virtual reality techniques present new opportunities for research into consumer behavior. The current study examines whether the increased realism of a virtual store compared to pictorial (2D) stimuli elicits consumer behavior that is more in line with behavior in a physical store. We examine the number, variety, and type of products selected, amount of money spent, and responses to price promotions and shelf display, in three product categories (fruit & vegetables, milk, and biscuits). We find that virtual reality elicits behavior that is more similar to behavior in the physical store compared to the picture condition for the number of products selected (Milk: Mstore = 1.19, Mvirtual = 1.53, Mpictures = 2.58) and amount of money spent (Milk: Mstore = 1.27, Mvirtual = 1.53, Mpictures = 2.60 Euro), and for the selection of products from different areas of the shelf, both vertically (purchases from top shelves, milk and biscuits: Pstore = 21.6%, Pvirtual = 33.4%, Ppictures = 50.0%) and horizontally (purchase from left shelf, biscuits: Pstore = 35.5%, Pvirtual = 53.3%, Ppictures = 66.7%). This indicates that virtual reality can improve realism in responses to shelf allocation. Virtual reality was not able to diminish other differences between lab and physical store: participants bought more products and spent more money (for biscuits and fruit & vegetables), bought more national brands, and responded more strongly to price promotions in both virtual reality and pictorial representations than in the physical store. Implications for the use of virtual reality in studies of consumer food choice behavior as well as for future improvement of virtual reality techniques are discussed.

  3. Fresh produce consumption and the association between frequency of food shopping, car access, and distance to supermarkets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustat, Jeanette; O'Malley, Keelia; Luckett, Brian G; Johnson, Carolyn C

    2015-01-01

    Fresh fruit and vegetables are important components of a healthy diet. Distance to a supermarket has been associated with the ability to access fresh produce. A randomly sampled telephone survey was conducted with the main shopper for 3000 households in New Orleans, Louisiana in 2011. Individuals were asked where and how often they shopped for groceries, frequency of consumption of a variety of foods, and whether they had access to a car. Bivariate models assessed the relationship between four outcomes: car access, distance to the store patronized by the respondent, number of monthly shopping trips, and daily servings of produce. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to distinguish direct and indirect effects. In bivariate models, car access was positively associated with number of shopping trips and produce consumption while distance was inversely associated with shopping trips. In SEM models, produce consumption was not associated with car access or distance, but to the number of monthly shopping trips. The frequency of shopping is associated with car access but a further distance deters it. Access to stores closer to the shopper may promote more frequent shopping and consumption of produce.

  4. Transport and sustainability - with special emphasis on grocery distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Kaj

    1998-12-31

    The reduction of the number of retail shops, in principle, provide for better planning opportunities regarding the distribution of commodities to the shops. But this, according to the study is more than offset by the longer distances the goods have to travel before reaching the shops. The report investigates the potentials for reduction of the energy demand and emission by means of technical improvements of vehicles. The assessments are based on fuel cycle considerations covering both the energy system (that is, the system providing the fuel to the vehicle) and the vehicle system (the system on board the vehicle transforming the fuel to useful work). In general, there are substantial potentials for improvements of the energy efficiency of the transportation means - and even greater potentials for CO{sub 2}-reductions. The reap the full potentials, it is probably necessary to break with the present technological development trend. (au) 274 refs.

  5. Demystifying vernacular shop houses and contemporary shop houses in Malaysia; a green-shop framework

    OpenAIRE

    Elnokaly, Amira; Wong, Jun Fui

    2015-01-01

    Vernacular shop houses in Malaysia have been thoroughly studied to understand their significance in environmental, cultural, economical and heritage values. UNESCO recognition in 2008 has further secured shop houses conservation works in Malaysia (UNESCO, 2008). However, contemporary shops in Malaysia do not share similar concerns of preservation and cultural significance. Popular view has perceived contemporary shop as lacking of both cultural and building performances standards. Thus, this ...

  6. No Talking Shops?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KATE WESTGARTH

    2010-01-01

    @@ Western commentators on China's National People's Congress(NPC) and Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference(CPPCC) are not always kind.Disparaging remarks about "rubber stamp organizations," "talking shops" and "showcases for photographs of ethnic minority costumes" tend to be the order of the day.

  7. One-stop shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, C

    1996-11-25

    The long-term-care industry's new mantras are "continuum of care" and "one-stop shopping." Companies are trying to please consumers who are clamoring for more senior-living options and managed-care organizations that want administratively simple contracting arrangements.

  8. Explaining Sunday shop policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dijkgraaf (Elbert); R.H.J.M. Gradus (Raymond)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractDutch municipalities have the right to decide on Sunday shop opening hours. Despite positive effects on economic growth and employment, many municipalities restrict Sunday trading in one way or another. Based on 2003 data we show that especially religious and political affiliation, regio

  9. Doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Gretchen L; Smith, Michael J; Abate, Marie A; Halverson, Joel

    2012-06-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a major health concern nationwide, with West Virginia having one of the highest prescription drug death rates in the United States. Studies are lacking that compare living subjects with persons who died from drug overdose for evidence of doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances. The study objectives were to compare deceased and living subjects in West Virginia for evidence of prior doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances and to identify factors associated with drug-related death. A secondary data study was conducted using controlled substance, Schedule II-IV, prescription data from the West Virginia Controlled Substance Monitoring Program and drug-related death data compiled by the Forensic Drug Database between July 2005 and December 2007. A case-control design compared deceased subjects 18 years and older whose death was drug related with living subjects for prior doctor and pharmacy shopping. Logistic regression identified factors related to the odds of drug-related death. A significantly greater proportion of deceased subjects were doctor shoppers (25.21% vs. 3.58%) and pharmacy shoppers (17.48% vs. 1.30%) than living subjects. Approximately 20.23% of doctor shoppers were also pharmacy shoppers, and 55.60% of pharmacy shoppers were doctor shoppers. Younger age, greater number of prescriptions dispensed, exposure to opioids and benzodiazepines, and doctor and pharmacy shopping were factors with greater odds of drug-related death. Doctor and pharmacy shopping involving controlled substances were identified, and shopping behavior was associated with drug-related death. Prescription monitoring programs may be useful in identifying potential shoppers at the point of care.

  10. An Empirical Investigation of the Impact of Online Product Presentation on Hedonic Web Shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Eric T. K.; Tan, Chee-Wee; Seo, Dongback

    2013-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of online shopping, consumers’ hedonic experience, when shopping online, is often limited due to static product images and uninspiring product description in textual form. To this end, this study endeavors to shed light on how contemporary and widely applied online product...... shopping could be induced through online product presentation that exhibits interactivity, vividness and social presence....... presentation formats influence consumers’ hedonic web shopping experience. Building on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), we advance a theoretical model that posits enjoyment and flow as positive indicators of consumers’ hedonic web shopping experience, which in turn affects their behavioral intents...

  11. Research on temporal and spatial decision-making process and influencing factors of residents' shopping behavior in medium-sized cities:A case study of Wuhu City in Anhui Province%中等城市居民购物行为时空决策过程及影响因素——以安徽省芜湖市为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦华富; 韩会然

    2013-01-01

    As human geographers have paid more and more attention to practical problems of human and society,the focuses of urban geography have transformed from macroscopic level such as researches on city system to microscopic level such as studies on shopping space,living space and commercial space.At present,China is in a transitional period in which cities' main functions are changing from production to consumption.With the development of shopping behaviors,the complexity and the transformation of shopping patterns as well as their deep influences on society,economy,institution,culture and so on,residents' shopping behaviors have become a focus of certain fields such as urban geography,urban sociology and urban economics.Based on the residents' shopping decision-making theory,the data from the interview and questionnaire survey on Wuhu residents' shopping behavior in 2011,and the nested Logit model on residents' shopping tour behavior,the paper analyzes the residents'decision-making process and its factors influencing the decision-making in the following four aspects:shopping travel mode,shopping starting time,shopping destination,and shopping transportation mode.The results are shown as follows.(1) The characteristics of residents' attributes such as the gender,monthly income and family companions have a significant effect on residents' decision-making of shopping travel mode.The residents who live in the central city and those who live relatively far away are more likely to have a multi-purpose shopping tour.The residents living in the central city prefer shopping at noon,and their travel distance mainly extends from 1-2 km,while the suburbanites go shopping mainly after 19:00 p.m.to avoid the rush hour and tend to choose the shopping space in the range of 2-5 km.(2) The male residents who have private cars are more inclined to go shopping in the evening,2.94 times as many as in the moming.They are more likely to have a long-distance shopping.Residents on and off duty

  12. 网购经验共享与冲动性购买行为关系研究--基于知识共享的视角%Research on the Relationship between Online Shopping Experience Sharing and Impulse Buying Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧; 郭东海

    2015-01-01

    近年来,中国互联网发展迅速、网络购物已成为时尚。相比传统购物模式,网购易使消费者产生冲动性。通过对有网购经验者共享意愿、共享态度、共享行为与冲动购买行为间的作用关系研究发现,网购经验共享对冲动购买行为有显著的正向影响。%In recent years, China's Internet has been developing rapidly, the network shopping has become a fashion. Compared with the traditional shopping mode, online shopping is easy to make consumer impulsivity. Through analyzing the relationship among online shopping experience sharing willingness, attitude, sharing behavior and impulse buying behavior, we found that online shopping experience sharing have significant positive influence on impulse buying behavior.

  13. Female Consumers Recreational Shopping Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbjot Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the core meaning of intrinsic shopping to understand their experimental aspects of recreational and leisure shopping. The study focus only on female shoppers of age group ranging from 25-30, and understand their mall experiences because this segment is newly transform into self dependent segment which have less social and familial liabilities and have enough enthusiasm to explore the world or their boundaries. The Grounded theory use for identification of recreational shopping themes which are (a seeking experiences and (b experimental shopping and each have respective sub themes. The themes are connected to the key idea that shoppers are motivated by their expectations and desires. The study uses social constructivism to find and understand the shopper meanings in real terms rather than imposing and judgment on them. The findings described the way people do recreational shopping and how shopping malls use as leisure space and become facilitators of recreational shopping activities. Females use malls to fulfill their recreational and leisure shopping experiences as this is the great way of enjoying shopping for females of small towns. In malls females not only enjoy product experiences but services experiences also which makes their shopping interesting. The way the female of this age category use malls help the marketers and retailers to understand this segment shopping patterns.

  14. 移动消费者购物影响因素研究%Research on the Influential Factors of Mobile Consumers' Shopping Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨路明; 李沁芸

    2016-01-01

    Mobile shopping has become a new way of life with the rapid development of mobile communication technology and 4G network technology.The use intention of users,as one of the key aspects of mobile shopping,is influenced by many factors. Therefore,study on the factors influencing the use intention of mobile shopping is particularly important.Starting with literature review of the previous research on mobile shopping,this paper aims to discuss the factors that could influence individual -consumers'acceptance of mobile shopping.Based on the theory research and empirical study,it constructs a new theoretical model about the acceptance and use of mobile shopping,by applying technology acceptance model,perceived risk theory and in-novation diffusion theory.Then,to verify the validity of the model and hypothesis,the paper conducts a survey and data analy-sis.At last,founded on our research findings as well as the actual situation of the domestic market,some development sugges-tions are put forward for e-commerce enterprises to better their businesses.%随着移动通信技术的迅猛发展及4G网络的应用,移动购物已经成为新的生活方式。作为一种新兴的商务模式,移动购物的用户使用行为会受到多方面因素的影响。因此,探讨移动购物消费者的使用意愿就显得尤为重要。本文回顾了移动购物的研究情况,以移动消费者为对象,采用理论与实证研究相结合的方法讨论移动消费者进行在线购物的影响因素。在相关理论的基础上整合技术接受模型、感知风险理论和创新扩散理论,提出了移动消费者购物影响因素的研究模型。并通过问卷调查和数据分析的方式对研究假设进行了论证,最后结合研究结论和国内市场的实际情况对移动电子商务企业如何更好地发展移动在线购物提出了意见。

  15. Possible Opioid Shopping and Its Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexander M; Weatherby, Lisa B; Cepeda, M Soledad; Bradford, Daniel; Yuan, Yingli

    2017-01-31

    We created an operational definition of possible opioid shopping in US commercial health insurance data and examined its correlates. The population consisted of 264,204 treatment courses in persons with a fill for an opioid or diuretic prescription in 2012 and a second within 18 months. We examined counts of prescribers and pharmacies and the numbers of fills and overlaps for ability to discriminate courses of opioids from diuretics, which were a negative control. The most discriminatory measure, indicating possible shopping behavior, was cross-tabulated against other prescriptions filled and diagnoses as found in insurance claims. The associations between claims characteristics and shopping behavior were assessed in a logistic regression. A definition that classified possible "moderate" or "extensive" shopping when a person obtained drug through at least three practices and at least three pharmacies over 18 months was highly discriminatory between opioid and diuretic treatment. Overlaps between fills and number of fills did not improve the discrimination. Data from insurance claims strongly predicted moderate-to-extensive levels of possible shopping (c=0.82). Prominent among 20 significant predictors were: state of residence; amount of opioid dispensed; self-payment; use of non-specialist prescribers; high use of anxiolytics, hypnotics, psychostimulants and antipsychotics; use of both immediate release (IR) and extended-release or long-acting (ER/LA) opioids. The use of three or more prescribing practices and three or more dispensing pharmacies over 18 months sharply discriminated courses of opioid treatment from courses of diuretics. This pattern of fills was additionally associated with the numbers of non-specialist and self-paid fills, the total MEQ dispensed and heavier use of drugs for anxiety, sleep, attention and psychosis.

  16. PERSEPSI MANFAAT DAN RISIKO DALAM PERILAKU PEMBELIAN KONSUMEN ONLINE SHOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilik Noor Yuliati

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available  This study was to analyze lifestyle, perceived risks, perceived benefits, online searching, evaluation of information, and consumer purchasing behavior in online shop. Online shop election conducted purposively, that was facebook, kaskus, and online shop community. The study included 145 consumers. Data analysis was performed by descriptive, different test, and regression test. The results showed that perceived risks, evaluation of information, and online shopping expenditure among groups that worked and didn’t work differ significantly. Consumers had lifestyle in moderate category, perceived risk in risk category, neutral perceived benefits, and low online searching. Perceived benefits was influenced by gender, age, occupation, income, and lifestyle, while the perceived risks was influenced by work and lifestyle. Online search influenced by gender, while evaluation of information was influenced by gender, perceived benefits, and perceived risks. Fashion product buying behavior was influenced by gender, age, occupation, lifestyle, perceived benefits, online searching, and evaluation of information.

  17. The Network Shopping Behavior Influence Factors of Empirical Research ---Based on the Perspective of Double Channel%网络购物行为影响因素实证研究--基于双渠道视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙贞杰; 刘遗志

    2013-01-01

    Online and offline dual-channel operation has become a major trend on changing of channels of traditional companies in the Internet era, more and more modern consumers become dual channel consumers and more and more businesses sell their products through traditional sales channels as well as 0nline selling. This article is based on an existing online shopping influencing factors literature, integrated multi-channel choice theory and the theory of customer value and build a dual-channel consumer online shopping behavior influencing factors model and corresponding assumptions. At the same time , taking Guilin University of Electronic Technology student consumers as the research object and dual channels as research perspection , we conduct the empirical analysis on influencing factors of consumer online shopping behavior. Studies obtain five drivers influencing factors of consumer online shopping and prove them have a significant positive impact on consumer online shopping choice behavior by empirical evidence. Finally, the studies explore the practical significance and inadequacy according to the conclusions for the empirical analysis and hope to supply corporate marketing decisions with some references with some corporate marketing decisions.%线上、线下双渠道运作已经成为互联网时代传统企业渠道变革的一大趋势,越来越多的现代消费者变成了双渠道消费者,越来越多的商家在利用传统销售渠道销售产品的同时也通过网络直销模式进行产品销售。本文基于现有网络购物影响因素文献,整合多渠道选择理论和顾客价值理论,构建了双渠道下消费者网络购物行为影响因素模型并提出相应假设。同时以桂林电子科技大学学生消费者为研究对象,以双渠道为研究视角,对消费者网络购物行为的影响因素进行了实证研究。研究得出了五个驱动消费者进行网络购物的影响因素并实证证明了其分

  18. Comparison Shopping Agents and Czech Online Customers’ Shopping Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilik Michal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The internet has changed the lifestyles and shopping behaviours of customers. Online purchasing enables people to obtain information about products and services provided more effectively and easily, with the result that home shopping has become ordinary and usual. This paper presents part of a research focusing on online shopping customers’ behaviour in the Czech Republic. The article pertains to comparison shopping agents (CPAs, a tool which provides information to customers and helps find the best offer. The research was conducted on the basis of an online questionnaire available on an internet web page. The main results confirmed a dependency between online purchasing and the use of shopping agents, which are very popular in the Czech Republic. Almost two-thirds of online shoppers use CPAs when they engage in internet shopping. The final part of the paper addresses references and customers’ reviews as an important factor for the selection of online retailer.

  19. CERN Shop Christmas Sale

    CERN Multimedia

    Visits & Exhibition Service/ETT-VE

    2001-01-01

    11-13.12.2001 Looking for Christmas present ideas? Come to the Reception Shop Special Stand in Meyrin, Main Building, ground floor, from Tuesday 11 to Thursday 13 December from 10.30 to 16.00. CERN Calendar 10.- CERN Sweat-shirts(M, L, XL) 30.- CERN T-shirt (M, L, XL) 20.- New CERN silk tie (2 colours) 35.- Fancy silk tie (blue, bordeau) 25.- Silk scarf (light blue, red, yellow) 35.- Swiss army knife with CERN logo 25.- CERN watch 25.- CERN baseball cap 15.- CERN briefcase 15.- Book 'Antimatter' (English) 35.- Book 'How the web was born' (English) 25.- The Search for Infinity (French, Italian, English, German) 40.-   If you miss this special occasion, the articles are also available at the Reception Shop in Building 33 from Monday to Saturday between 08.30 and 17.30 hrs.

  20. COULD BE ONLINE GROCERIES AN ALTERNATIVE FOR ROMANIAN FOOD RETAIL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius T. STANCIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The new technologies, competition, consumer convenience and the lack of time for shopping are some factors that have encouraged the Romanian online retail food market. On the food market identifying the viable direction of development and business continuity represents a major concern for economic operators. For a new business online commerce is the most affordable and the fastest way to enter the market. The domestic online retail food market is estimated to reach 6 million euros in 2014. Studies carried out by specialized companies have identified the Romanian consumers' appetite for food shopping on the Internet. Although Romania is only at the beginning in online food market as compared to its European neighbours, experiments in other domestic sectors demonstrate the possibility of surprises in this domain. The article proposes a short analysis of the Romanian online food retail market, tendencies and opportunities in this new domain for local commerce.

  1. COULD BE ONLINE GROCERIES AN ALTERNATIVE FOR ROMANIAN FOOD RETAIL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius T. STANCIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The new technologies, competition, consumer convenience and the lack of time for shopping are some factors that have encouraged the Romanian online retail food market. On the food market identifying the viable direction of development and business continuity represents a major concern for economic operators. For a new business online commerce is the most affordable and the fastest way to enter the market. The domestic online retail food market is estimated to reach 6 million euros in 2014. Studies carried out by specialized companies have identified the Romanian consumers' appetite for food shopping on the Internet. Although Romania is only at the beginning in online food market as compared to its European neighbours, experiments in other domestic sectors demonstrate the possibility of surprises in this domain. The article proposes a short analysis of the Romanian online food retail market, tendencies and opportunities in this new domain for local commerce.

  2. CERN SHOP CHRISTMAS SALE

    CERN Multimedia

    Visits & Exhibition Service

    2000-01-01

    Looking for Christmas present ideas? Come to the Reception Shop Special Stand in Meyrin, Main Building, ground floor, from Tuesday 12 to Thursday 14 December from 10.00 to 16.00.   Sweat-shirt col zippé, grey, blue, black (M, L, XL) 30.- Sweat-shirt col polo, grey, collar blue (M, L, XL) 30.- T-shirt, black, (M, L, XL) 15.- WWW T-shirt, white, bordeau (M, L, XL) 15.- CERN silk tie (3 colours) 33.- Fancy silk tie (blue, bordeau 25.- Silk scarf (blue, red, yellow) 35.- Swiss army knife with CERN logo 25.- New model of CERN watch 25.- New CERN baseball cap 10.- Antimatter (English/anglais) 30.- The Search for Infinity (French, Italian, English,) 35.- Auf der Suche nach dem Unendlichen 45.- If you miss this special occasion, the articles are also available at the Reception Shop in Building 33 from Monday to Saturday between 08.30 and 17.30 hrs (Shop will be closed at 12.00 on 22.12.).

  3. Behavior of the vegetable crops section in three types of food retail stores in Campo Grande, Brazil Desempenho da seção de hortaliças em equipamentos varejistas de alimentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario de O Lima-Filho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of the fresh fruits and vegetable produce section was evaluated, under the point of view of the consumer, in three types of food retail stores in Campo Grande, Brazilian southeast: a grocery store ("quitanda", a supermarket, and an open-air market. A quantitative-descriptive survey was conducted with 120 individuals, responsible for purchasing fresh fruit and vegetable produce for their homes. To accomplish that, twelve variables were investigated and adapted from the parameters used in the SERVQUAL model, in which the attributes of the retail outlet are pointed out, such as store hygiene and cleanliness and manner by which produce is displayed; employee training traits, such as courtesy and helpfulness; and quality, price range, and variety of the produce for sale. The results reveal that shopping for grocery is done weekly; 80% of the shoppers interviewed do their shopping in supermarkets and 94% do theirs in open-air markets. The open-air market had the best results in the attributes for which they were evaluated when compared with the grocery store and the supermarket. The study also points out that the older the shopper the more often he/she does grocery shopping.Neste estudo foi avaliado, sob o ponto de vista do consumidor, o desempenho da seção de hortaliças em três equipamentos varejistas de alimentos em Campo Grande(MS: uma mercearia (quitanda, um supermercado e uma feira-livre. Foi realizada uma pesquisa quantitativo-descritiva com 120 indivíduos, responsáveis pelas compras de hortaliças para suas residências. Para tanto, foram investigadas doze variáveis adaptadas das dimensões do modelo SERVQUAL, onde se destacam os atributos do equipamento varejista como higiene e limpeza da loja e exposição dos produtos; capacitação dos funcionários como atendimento e cortesia; e atributos do produto como qualidade, variedade e preço. Os resultados mostram que as compras de hortaliças são realizadas semanalmente

  4. Online Shopping: Advantages over the Offline Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Joshua Chang

    2003-01-01

    The advent of the Internet as a shopping medium has enabled shoppers to gain shopping benefits such as convenience and time-saving, better information, and price savings. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of the benefits of Internet shopping by identifying and discussing the advantages of Internet shopping over traditional storefront shopping.

  5. Online Shopping: Advantages over the Offline Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Joshua Chang

    2003-01-01

    The advent of the Internet as a shopping medium has enabled shoppers to gain shopping benefits such as convenience and time-saving, better information, and price savings. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of the benefits of Internet shopping by identifying and discussing the advantages of Internet shopping over traditional storefront shopping.

  6. Efficient Consumer Response (ECR: a survey of the Australian grocery industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Swatman

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient consumer response (ECR is a U.S. supply chain management strategy which attempts to address the inefficiencies which have led to excessive inventory and unnecessary costs at all levels within the grocery industry supply chain. This paper discusses the traditional grocery store format, the supermarket, and the ways in which inefficient business practices developed in the U.S. grocery supply chain; and discusses the major business activities needed for successful implementation of ECR. The paper then presents a brief summary of the results of a survey of ECR knowledge and usage within the Australian grocery industry, which is the initial phase of a long term research project whose main purpose is to evaluate ECR as it applies to that industry.

  7. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions: Social norms on grocery carts increase produce spending without increasing shopper budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin R. Payne

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Descriptive and provincial social norm messages (i.e., on grocery cart placards may be an overlooked tool to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability and increasing shopper budgets.

  8. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores--50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of grocery store buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  9. Identifying Consumer Preferences for Nutrition Information on Grocery Store Shelf Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua P. Berning; Chouinard, Hayley; Manning, Kenneth; Jill J. McCluskey; Sprott, David

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labels can potentially benefit consumers by increasing product knowledge and reducing search costs. However, the global increase in obesity rates leads one to question the effectiveness of current nutrition information formats. Alternative formats for providing nutrition information may be more effective. Shoppers at a major grocery chain participated in choice experiments designed to identify preferences for nutrition information provided on grocery store shelf labels. Shoppers dem...

  10. Examining Specialty Crop Price Relationships between Farmers Markets and Grocery Stores

    OpenAIRE

    Gunderson, Michael A.; Earl, Ashley N.

    2010-01-01

    Farmers markets across the state of Florida have been increasing in popularity over the past two years. Very little information is available regarding the price relationship between farmers markets and nearby grocery stores. Further investigation of this relationship is necessary and could yield vital infor­mation to support further understanding of pricing trends among these two sources. By obtaining prices from both farmers markets and grocery stores that are closest to each of the markets...

  11. The effects of geographical competition and demand on grocery price premium

    OpenAIRE

    Halme, Kari; Akpinar, Murat; Neuvonen, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Due to the duopolistic characteristics of the Finnish grocery retail trade proprietor-run stores operate as adaptive price setters on the market. This paper examined the effects of geographical competition and demand on proprietor-run grocery stores’ pricing in Finland’s most populated province –Uusimaa. The assumption is that the price premium of a proprietoroperated store compared to the nearest co-operative competitor reflects the characteristics of competition and demand. Hypotheses on th...

  12. AN empirical study on Inland Visitors' Behavioral while They are Shopping at Nyingchi%林芝地区国内游客购物行为实证研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵佩燕; 琼达; 王忠斌

    2011-01-01

    Based on the basic consumer purchase' s behavior model --" stimulus - response", Find out the development tactics of souvenir in Nyingchi, Such as increasing the local characterstics; Intensifying publicity ; raising the utility of sou- venir;stressing the quality of packaging for visitors. ; creating a sound shopping environment%文章以消费者购物行为基本模式——“刺激一反应”模式作为研究的理论基础,通过对林芝国内游客购物行为采用问卷调查的方式进行实证调查,得出从商品特色、商品质量、促销方式、购物环境等方面的提升来刺激消费者购物行为。

  13. Comparison of opioid doctor shopping for tapentadol and oxycodone: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Vo, Lien; Mastrogiovanni, Gregory; Yuan, Yingli

    2013-02-01

    Obtaining opioids from multiple prescribers, known as doctor shopping, is 1 example of opioid abuse and diversion. The dual mechanism of action of tapentadol could make tapentadol less likely to be abused than other opioids. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to compare the risk of shopping behavior between tapentadol immediate release (IR) and oxycodone IR. Subjects exposed to tapentadol or oxycodone with no recent opioid use were included and followed for 1 year. The primary outcome was the proportion of subjects who developed shopping behavior defined as subjects who had opioid prescriptions written by >1 prescriber with ≥1 day of overlap filled at ≥3 pharmacies. The opioids involved in the shopping episodes were assessed. A total of 112,821 subjects were exposed to oxycodone and 42,940 to tapentadol. Shopping behavior was seen in .8% of the subjects in the oxycodone group and in .2% of the subjects in the tapentadol group, for an adjusted odds ratio of 3.5 (95% confidence interval, 2.8 to 4.4). In the oxycodone group, 28.0% of the shopping events involved exclusively oxycodone, whereas in the tapentadol group, .6% of the shopping events involved exclusively tapentadol. Results suggest that the risk of shopping behavior is substantially lower with tapentadol than with oxycodone. The risk of opioid doctor shopping, ie, obtaining opioid prescriptions from multiple prescribers, is lower with tapentadol than with oxycodone. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Consumer's Online Shopping Influence Factors and Decision-Making Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiangbin; Dai, Shiliang

    Previous research on online consumer behavior has mostly been confined to the perceived risk which is used to explain those barriers for purchasing online. However, perceived benefit is another important factor which influences consumers’ decision when shopping online. As a result, an integrated consumer online shopping decision-making model is developed which contains three elements—Consumer, Product, and Web Site. This model proposed relative factors which influence the consumers’ intention during the online shopping progress, and divided them into two different dimensions—mentally level and material level. We tested those factors with surveys, from both online volunteers and offline paper surveys with more than 200 samples. With the help of SEM, the experimental results show that the proposed model and method can be used to analyze consumer’s online shopping decision-making process effectively.

  15. End-user Acceptance of Online Shopping Sites in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolar K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Online shopping sites have recently gained momentum in India. Since the ecommerce industry is in infancy state, customer (end user satisfaction with the online shopping is the prime concern because decreasing customer satisfaction leads to negative electronic word of mouth (eWOM which is very severe for the business. Through a dataset gathered from 127 online shopping customers in with respect to online shopping sites in India, this study investigates the role of website quality, information integrity and perceived behavioral control on customers’ online experience, which in turn influences usage and satisfaction. One of the key results is that the online customer experience has a larger influence on satisfaction rather than usage.

  16. What Happens When Parents and Children Go Grocery Shopping? An Observational Study of Latino Dyads in Southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Joanna; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Elder, John P.; Belch, George E.; Castro, Iana A.; Weibel, Nadir; Pickrel, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe parent-child interactions in "tiendas," limited assortment food stores catering to Latinos in the United States, and to examine the extent to which child involvement influenced these interactions and their purchase outcomes. Two confederates, one posing as a "tienda" employee and one…

  17. What Happens When Parents and Children Go Grocery Shopping? An Observational Study of Latino Dyads in Southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Joanna; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Elder, John P.; Belch, George E.; Castro, Iana A.; Weibel, Nadir; Pickrel, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe parent-child interactions in "tiendas," limited assortment food stores catering to Latinos in the United States, and to examine the extent to which child involvement influenced these interactions and their purchase outcomes. Two confederates, one posing as a "tienda" employee and one…

  18. Reception Shop Special Stand

    CERN Multimedia

    Education and Technology Transfer Unit/ETT-EC

    2004-01-01

    Friday 15.10.2004 CERN 50th Anniversary articles will be sold in the Main Building, ground floor on Friday 15th October from 10h00 to 16h00. T-shirt, (S, M, L, XL) 20.- K-way (M, L, XL) 20.- Silk tie (2 models) 30.- Einstein tie 45.- Umbrella 20.- Caran d'Ache pen 5.- 50th Anniversary Pen 5.- Kit of Cartoon Album & Crayons 10.- All the articles are also available at the Reception Shop in Building 33 from Monday to Saturday between 08.30 and 17.00 hrs. Education and Technology Transfer Unit/ETT-EC

  19. Machine shop basics

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rex

    2004-01-01

    Use the right tool the right wayHere, fully updated to include new machines and electronic/digital controls, is the ultimate guide to basic machine shop equipment and how to use it. Whether you're a professional machinist, an apprentice, a trade student, or a handy homeowner, this fully illustrated volume helps you define tools and use them properly and safely. It's packed with review questions for students, and loaded with answers you need on the job.Mark Richard Miller is a Professor and Chairman of the Industrial Technology Department at Texas A&M University in Kingsville, T

  20. Online Shopping Woes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Weili

    2011-01-01

    AS a frequent online shopper,Zhou Fangjie,a 28-year-old white-collar worker,was annoyed when she could not open Hanyidushe,an online shop selling Korean-style clothing on Taobao Mall.Her experience resulted from the online protest initiated by small vendors on Taobao Mall,China's largest business to consumer online platform.Thousands of small vendors started the protest against larger established vendors by discrediting them through False orders,forming an anti-Taobao Union and setting up a chat room to devise ways to disrupt operations on Taobao Mall.

  1. Product Searching with Shopping Bots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Using trial searches for three best-selling books, this study examined the search facilities offered by shopping bots, which support consumers with the product search and identification stage in e-shopping. Findings indicate that effectiveness of bots not only depends upon search facilities but also upon product coverage, and other added value…

  2. Product Searching with Shopping Bots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Using trial searches for three best-selling books, this study examined the search facilities offered by shopping bots, which support consumers with the product search and identification stage in e-shopping. Findings indicate that effectiveness of bots not only depends upon search facilities but also upon product coverage, and other added value…

  3. Muenster Karstadt shopping center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    Displaying its goods on an area of 16000 m/sup 2/ the five-story Karstadt shopping center is completed by a restaurant, an underground garage, administrative offices, personnel recreation rooms, and depot repair and treatment shops. Photographs showing the building, interior fittings, and supply systems, as well as plans and diagrams facilitate access to the building structure (ceilings, outer and inner walls) and building services systems. The figures and data presented refer to the structure and performance of heating systems (central units, district heating connections, pumped water heating systems), space heating (supply air-dependent control), decentralized ventilation systems (supply air/extracted air), large-scale refrigerating machinery (piston and turbo compressors), small-scale refrigerating machinery (cold storage rooms, refrigerators), sprinklers (3900 spray nozzles, water supply), sanitary systems (sewerage), power system (10 kV, transformers, 1.v. main distribution, emergency generating units, emergency lighting batteries), elevators (3 goods elevators, 2 passenger elevators), electric stairways (12 staggered escalators), and building services systems (telephone office, control center). (HWJ).

  4. Facilitators and Inhibitors of Supply Chain Innovation-prospects for Supply Chain Managment in the Irish Grocery Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Keegan, Joan; O'Callaghan, Edmund; Wilcox, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Supply chain management is one of the most significant strategic challenges currently facing the Irish grocery sector. The UK grocery market with its emphasis on composite deliveries via regional distribution centres is extremely sophisticated; the Irish grocery sector, however, is in the embryonic stage of implementing central distribution. The potential to develop innovative supply chain systems is mediated by both national logistic-related variables and company characteristics. In additio...

  5. Direct Marketing of Specialty Crops by Producers: A Price-Comparison between Farmers' Markets and Grocery Stores

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Jonathan Adam; Gunderson, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Oftentimes, prices at farmers' markets are much cheaper than those at grocery stores. However, little is known about the pricing relationship between farmers' markets and nearby grocery stores. Only by further analyzing this relationship can we gain a better understanding of these pricing trends. Although this trend is seemingly consistent, further research is necessary to test this assumption. Through the collection of prices at both locales, farmers' markets and grocery stores, producers as...

  6. Gender and age are associated with healthy food purchases via grocery voucher redemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin-Fanning, Frances; Gokun, Yevgeniya

    2014-01-01

    Grocery vouchers that specifically target foods associated with reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk result in increased consumption of those foods. In regions with disproportionately high CVD rates, there is little research concerning the impact of vouchers on purchases of risk-reducing foods when there are no restrictions placed on grocery voucher redemption. Since many food assistance programs place few restrictions on type of foods that can be purchased, identifying demographic factors associated with purchasing habits is a prerequisite to promoting healthy eating. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations of age, gender, education and income level with purchasing of healthful foods through the use of a grocery voucher in a rural food desert (poverty rate of ≥20% and ≥33% of residents living >16 km from a large grocery store) with high rates of chronic disease. The effectiveness of an intervention that included a media campaign, a $5 grocery voucher, local heart healthy food branding and a grocery store event was tested. Brief nutritional articles were published in both local newspapers during four consecutive weeks. These articles explained the physiological actions of healthy foods and listed a health-promoting recipe. During the fourth week of the media campaign, a voucher for a $5 grocery gift card redeemable at one of either community grocery stores was also printed in both local newspapers. In each store, foods that are known to be associated with a reduced risk of CVD were marked with a blue logo. Participants (N=311) completed a questionnaire that assessed demographics and usual servings of fruits, vegetables and grains. Participants received a $5 grocery card and a list of labelled foods. Returned grocery receipts were stapled to the questionnaires to analyse the relationship between demographics and food choices. Participants who bought at least one labelled food item were older (M=48.5, SD=14.7) than those who did not buy

  7. Managing the Shopping Center Ambience Attributes by Using Importance-Performance Analysis: The Case from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelica Marković

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined customers’ perceived importance and performance of shopping center ambience on the examples of the Mercator shopping center and Sad Novi Bazaar shopping center in Novi Sad, Serbia. The shopping center ambience was examined through exterior and interior attributes. It was found that a number of them are very important to customers and their shopping behavior. According to the present research, the most important exterior attributes are: address and location, parking availability, congestion and traffic, exterior display windows and entrances. The most important interior attributes are: cleanliness, temperature, merchandise, lighting, music, scents, absence of tobacco smoke, width of aisles and P.A. usage. The paper also provided information for two studied shopping centers with ambience attributes that performed well or not and everything was presented on the importance-performance grids, which can serve managers as guidelines for further development.

  8. A Strategic Planning for a College Student-Segment Shopping Mall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astri Anindya Sari

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the midst of shopping mall development today, an understanding of consumer behaviors and preferences is absolutely a must if we want to plan successfuly a shopping mall. This knowledge will provide input for strategic planning so that the concept offered for shopping mall development will meet the consumers’ demand and may win the market competition. This study explores the preferences of students in Bandung as one of the potential market segments of the shopping mall. Qualitative study was conducted to find out the reasons why students choose a particular shopping mall as their favorite place. It was found that the accessibility and design of the malls are important as they enhance student preferences. In addition facilities in a shopping mall which mainly attract college students segment are entertainment facilities and eating counters.

  9. Buying cannabis in 'coffee shops'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshouwer, Karin; Van Laar, Margriet; Vollebergh, Wilma A

    2011-03-01

    The key objective of Dutch cannabis policy is to prevent and limit the risks of cannabis consumption for users, their direct environment and society ('harm reduction'). This paper will focus on the tolerated sale of cannabis in 'coffee shops'. We give a brief overview of Dutch policy on coffee shops, its history and recent developments. Furthermore, we present epidemiological data that may be indicative of the effects of the coffee shop policy on cannabis and other drug use. Dutch coffee shop policy has become more restrictive in recent years and the number of coffee shops has decreased. Cannabis prevalence rates in the adult population are somewhat below the European average; the rate is relatively high among adolescents; and age of first use appears to be low. On a European level, the use of hard drugs in both the Dutch adult and adolescent population is average to low (except for ecstasy among adults). International comparisons do not suggest a strong, upward effect of the coffee shop system on levels of cannabis use, although prevalence rates among Dutch adolescents give rise to concern. Furthermore, the coffee shop system appears to be successful in separating the hard and soft drugs markets. Nevertheless, in recent years, issues concerning the involvement of organised crime and the public nuisance related to drug tourism have given rise to several restrictive measures on the local level and have sparked a political debate on the reform of Dutch drug policy. © 2011 Trimbos Institute.

  10. Turkish Coffee Shop

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A black and white copy of an original photograph showing Turkish men sitting outside a Turkish coffee shop, Cyprus - Μαυρόασπρο αντίγραφο από μια φωτογραφία που δείχνει Τούρκους άντρες να κάθονται έξω από ένα τούρκικο καφενεία στην Λευκωσία.

  11. Gold-decorated shopping centre; Golddekoriertes Shopping Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmannshofer, Robert

    2010-11-15

    In the autumn 2009, the German quality seal sustainable construction for commercial new buildings was introduced. Thus, owners and operators of retail real estate and shopping centres can make clear their commitment in the matter of sustainability. The Ernst-August-Galerie (Hanover, Federal Republic of Germany) developed and operated by ECE Projektmanagement GmbH and Co. KG (Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany) was a pilot project and also the first gold in one. With its around 150 shops, the Ernst-August-Galerie offers a supermarket, fashion outlets, a food court, service outlets and restaurants/cafes. The spacious and elegantly designed shopping mall with its piazzas and light-flooded rotundas exudes a Mediterranean air, making it a high-quality venue for shopping, strolling and leisure activities.

  12. Regularity in individual shopping trips: Implications for duration models in marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Bijwaard (Govert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMost models for purchase timing behavior of households do not take into account that many households have regular and non-shopping days. I propose a statistical model for purchase timing that exploits information on the shopping days of households. It delivers forecasts for the number of

  13. Regularity in individual shopping trips: implications for duration models in marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Most models for purchase-timing behavior of households do not take into account that many households have regular and non-shopping days. We propose a statistical model for purchase timing that exploits information on the shopping days of households. The model is formulated in a counting process fram

  14. An Empirical Investigation of the Impact of Online Product Presentation on Hedonic Web Shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Eric T. K.; Tan, Chee-Wee; Seo, Dongback

    2013-01-01

    presentation formats influence consumers’ hedonic web shopping experience. Building on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), we advance a theoretical model that posits enjoyment and flow as positive indicators of consumers’ hedonic web shopping experience, which in turn affects their behavioral intents...

  15. Regularity in individual shopping trips: implications for duration models in marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Most models for purchase-timing behavior of households do not take into account that many households have regular and non-shopping days. We propose a statistical model for purchase timing that exploits information on the shopping days of households. The model is formulated in a counting process fram

  16. Regularity in individual shopping trips: implications for duration models in marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Most models for purchase-timing behavior of households do not take into account that many households have regular and non-shopping days. We propose a statistical model for purchase timing that exploits information on the shopping days of households. The model is formulated in a counting process

  17. Process Waste Assessment - Paint Shop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1993-06-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Paint Shop, Building 913, Room 130. Special attention is given to waste streams generated by the spray painting process because it requires a number of steps for preparing, priming, and painting an object. Also, the spray paint booth covers the largest area in R-130. The largest and most costly waste stream to dispose of is {open_quote}Paint Shop waste{close_quotes} -- a combination of paint cans, rags, sticks, filters, and paper containers. These items are compacted in 55-gallon drums and disposed of as solid hazardous waste. Recommendations are made for minimizing waste in the Paint Shop. Paint Shop personnel are very aware of the need to minimize hazardous wastes and are continuously looking for opportunities to do so.

  18. The shop floor scheduling game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos, Jan; Slomp, Jannes

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the shop floor scheduling game is getting participants acquainted with: - developing robust planning and scheduling procedures; - accepting orders under uncertainty and competition; - using information from cost accounting in scheduling; - creating an adequate communication structure

  19. The Effect of Entry by Wal-Mart Supercenters on Retail Grocery Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Bobby J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. retail grocery industry shifted from an industry dominated by small grocers serving local markets to one characterized by large retailers present in international markets. Average retail grocery concentration as measured by CR4 increased from 19.9 in 1997 to 31.0 in 2002 (U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, 2000; 2005). Wal-Mart’s tremendous growth is the catalyst to this change, but little is known about Wal-Mart’s effect on market concentration. This analysis eva...

  20. THE EFFECT OF ENTRY BY WAL-MART SUPERCENTERS ON RETAIL GROCERY CONCENTRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Bobby J.; Dooley, Frank J.; Kim, Sounghun

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. retail grocery industry shifted from an industry dominated by small grocers serving local markets to one characterized by large retailers present in international markets. Average retail grocery concentration as measured by CR4 increased from 17.8 in 1982 to 43.0 in 1999 (U.S. Census Bureau, 1982; Trade Dimensions Marketing Guidebook, 2000). Wal-Mart's tremendous growth is the catalyst to this change. Although Wal-Mart has been studied from multiple perspectives, little is known abou...

  1. Teaching Grocery Store Purchasing Skills to Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using a Computer-Based Instruction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David L.; Morgan, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    This research evaluated effects of a multi-media computer-based instruction (CBI) program designed to teach grocery store purchasing skills to three high-school students with intellectual disabilities. A multiple baseline design across participants used measures of computer performance mastery and grocery store probes to evaluate the CBI. All…

  2. Research on Online Retailer’s Marketing Ethics,Shopping Experience and Consumer Behavioral Intention%在线零售商营销道德、购物体验与顾客行为倾向研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈鹏熠; 范秀成

    2016-01-01

    文章基于文献回顾、访谈和问卷调查,从在线购物体验视角分析了在线零售商营销道德对顾客行为倾向的影响机理。结果表明,在线零售商营销道德维度通过在线购物体验的中介作用对顾客行为倾向产生影响。其中,隐私保护、安全可靠、诚信经营、公平竞争对顾客的认知体验有积极影响,隐私保护、安全可靠、诚信经营、社会责任履行对顾客的情感体验有积极影响,隐私保护、安全可靠、诚信经营对顾客行为倾向有积极影响,认知体验对情感体验有积极影响,认知体验、情感体验对顾客行为倾向均有积极影响,但情感体验的影响更大。并且,认知体验和情感体验在在线零售商营销道德维度与顾客行为倾向之间发挥了一定程度的中介效应。%Based on literature review ,interview and questionnaire survey ,this paper analyzes the influencing mechanism of online retailer’ s marketing ethics on consumer behavioral intention from on the perspective of consumer’s online shopping experience .The results show that online retailer’s marketing ethics significantly affects consumer behavioral intention through the mediation effects of online shopping experience .Privacy pro‐tection ,safety‐reliability ,honest management ,and fair competition have positive effects on the consumer cog‐nitive experience ,and privacy protection ,safety‐reliability ,honest management ,and social responsibility ful‐fillment influence positively the affective experience ,and privacy protection ,safety‐reliability ,and honest man‐agement positively impact customer behavioral intention .Meanwhile ,cognitive experience positively impacts affective experience ,and affective experience has more positive impact on consumer behavioral intention than cognitive experience .In addition ,cognitive experience and affective experience play a certain degree of media‐tion effect between the

  3. A Research on Behavioral Characteristics of Consumers Leisure Shopping-Evidence from Tourists and Residents in Suzhou City%消费者休闲购物行为特征研究--以苏州游客和居民为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方玲梅

    2015-01-01

    文章以苏州游客和居民为研究对象,采用抽样调查获得基础数据,以受访者的休闲购物涉入为切入点,分析案例地居民和游客的休闲购物行为,进而探究休闲购物的总体特征,以期为国内休闲购物的良性发展及相关部门合理规划和布局休闲购物空间提供理论指导。研究发现:休闲购物存在多种情境中,与消费者的个人特质、动机、旅行的社会背景和目的地的特征显著相关;休闲购物涉入与满意度显著相关,是影响休闲购物满意度的重要因素;休闲购物是一种多面性多层次的消费活动,消费者在同一个或者不同场合休闲购物可能包含多个消费活动的方式;感知购物环境影响居民和游客的休闲购物行为和满意度。%This paper,based on tourists and residents in Suzhou city as the study object and gaining the basic data from the survey, takes participants’ leisure shopping involvement as the breakthrough point to analyze leisure shopping behavior of residents and visitors in Suzhou city. Furthermore,it carries out an analysis on the general characteristics of leisure shopping. The paper aims to provide theoretical guidelines for the healthy development of domestic leisure shopping and for the relevant departments to make reasonable planning and layout of leisure shopping space. The results show that:Leisure shopping exists in a variety of circumstances,which are dependent on individual characteristics,motivations,the social setting of trip and the features of the destination. Leisure shopping involvement is significantly associated with the degree of satisfaction,which has an important impact on the degree of satisfaction. Leisure shopping is a multi-faceted and multi-level consumption,con⁃sumers in the same or different shopping may contain multiple consumption activities. The perception of shopping environment has an impact on behavior and satisfaction of residents and

  4. Business Concept as a Relational Message: Supermarket vs Independent Grocery as Competitors for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Mikkola

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with competition for sustainability between two business concepts, the supermarket and the independent grocery, both selling local and organic food. The paper is based on Finnish case evidence with very oligopolistic retail structure and its empirical and the theoretical interest focuses on the nature of economic exchange relations of these business concepts. The study shows how the supermarket is driven by market and hierarchic as well as power relations, regarding both suppliers and consumers. The business concept includes weak choice editing and indicates ‘consumer versus producer via retailer’ set-up. The independent grocery is at its core a social and partnership based endeavour, entailing strong choice editing for sustainability through the ‘consumer cum producer via retailer’ set-up. However, the supermarket may include more local and organic food in its product range on market conditions, in need of customer management, while the grocery can expand by decentralized multiplication of its business concept. The grocery also adds a new market channel for family farmers enabling better use of local resources, thereby renewing the market. This study shows the importance of the business concept as a condition and limitation for further growth, and explains the business concept as a relational message for sustainability.

  5. Grocery Store Genetics: A PCR-Based Genetics Lab that Links Genotype to Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briju, Betsy J.; Wyatt, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often present Mendelian genetics and molecular biology separately. As a result, students often fail to connect the two topics in a tangible manner. We have adopted a simple experiment to help link these two important topics in a basic biology course, using red and white onions bought from a local grocery store. A lack of red coloration…

  6. Grocery Store Genetics: A PCR-Based Genetics Lab that Links Genotype to Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briju, Betsy J.; Wyatt, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often present Mendelian genetics and molecular biology separately. As a result, students often fail to connect the two topics in a tangible manner. We have adopted a simple experiment to help link these two important topics in a basic biology course, using red and white onions bought from a local grocery store. A lack of red coloration…

  7. Using health primes to reduce unhealthy snack purchases among overweight consumers in a grocery store

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papies, E. K.; Potjes, I.; Keesman, M.; Schwinghammer, S.; Van Koningsbruggen, G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective:Healthy-eating intentions of overweight individuals are often thwarted by the presence of attractive food temptations in grocery stores and the home environment. To support healthy-eating intentions, we tested the effectiveness of a simple health prime to reduce the purchases of energy-den

  8. Drivers and barriers of reverse logistics practices: A study of large grocery retailers in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Meyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reverse logistics (RL practices have previously been viewed as a cost drain, but have received greater attention from practitioners because of increasing competition and dwindling margins.Purpose: The purpose of this generic qualitative study was to uncover the main internal and external drivers and barriers of RL within major South African grocery retailers.Method: Eleven face-to-face, semi-structured interviews and one telephonic interview were conducted with participants from four large grocery retailers.Findings: Optimising profitability and cost reduction goals are the identified internal drivers, whereas the main external driver was to reduce the organisations’ environmental impact. A lack of information systems – such as enterprise resource planning systems or warehouse management system software – and infrastructure were revealed as the main internal barriers for organisations’ RL practices, whereas supplier non-compliance and transportation inefficiencies were the main external barriers exposed.Managerial implications: In order to optimise the efficiency of the reverse flow, managers are recommended to devote more capital to RL infrastructure, develop policies to manage supplier behaviour, focus on RL as a revenue generating stream as well as implement information systems to manage the entire reverse flow.Conclusion: All participating grocery retailers follow similar RL processes. Growth in RL practices as well as infrastructure to perform those practices is a future priority for all the reviewed grocery retailers. RL is no longer only a key cost driver, but also provides organisations with many additional opportunities.

  9. The Effect of Music on Store Shopping: Mediating Role of the Time Spent of Customer in Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyyed hamid khodadad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Competition issue in today’s market is not exclusively limited to manufacturing enterprises. Suppliers and especially big retailers are increasingly facing this challenging problem too. Regarding to the context of Iranian culture, big retailers are against very large number of small groceries that their successfully survival depends on how they operate intelligently. These kinds of retailers in order to attract customers and increase their shopping volume need to utilize new marketing methods to increase the amount of time spent in store and consequently increase the probability of shopping. One of these methods is playing music in store. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of music on customer shopping through the time spent by customer in store. The present study is a survey research in terms of method and an applied-developmental research. Rashtianshoppersof Rasht Big Stores are selected as statistical population. Results using path analysis approach reveals that the effect of music on customer shopping through the time spent in store is confirmed. On the other hand, there are numerous differences among customers with various demographic characteristics.

  10. Consumers' perceptions of vape shops in Southern California: an analysis of online Yelp reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Garcia, Robert; Cruz, Tess Boley; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Pentz, Mary Ann; Unger, Jennifer B

    2014-01-01

    E-cigarettes are sold at many different types of retail establishments. A new type of shop has emerged, the vape shop, which specializes in sales of varied types of e-cigarettes. Vape shops allow users to sample several types. There are no empirical research articles on vape shops. Information is needed on consumers' beliefs and behaviors about these shops, the range of products sold, marketing practices, and variation in shop characteristics by ethnic community and potential counter-marketing messages. This study is the first to investigate marketing characteristics of vape shops located in different ethnic neighborhoods in Los Angeles, by conducting a Yelp electronic search and content analysis of consumer reports on vape shops they have visited. The primary measure was Yelp reviews (N = 103 vape shops in the Los Angeles, California area), which were retrieved and content coded. We compared the attributes of vape shops representing four ethnic communities: African American, Hispanic/Latino, Korean, and White. Vape shop attributes listed as most important were the selection of flavors or hardware (95%), fair prices (92%), and unique flavors or hardware (89%). Important staff marketing attributes included being friendly (99%), helpful/patient/respectful (97%), and knowledgeable/professional (95%). Over one-half of the shops were rated as clean (52%) and relaxed (61%). Relatively few of the reviews mentioned quitting smoking (32%) or safety of e-cigarettes (15%). The selection of flavors and hardware appeared relatively important in Korean ethnic location vape shops. Yelp reviews may influence potential consumers. As such, the present study's focus on Yelp reviews addressed at least eight of the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products' priorities pertaining to marketing influences on consumer beliefs and behaviors. The findings suggest that there were several vape shop and product attributes that consumers considered important to disseminate to others through postings on

  11. Survey on supply and demand of medicinal plants in Lorestan province groceries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh Naderi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of activities related to medicinal plant industry lead to maintenance and progress (improvement of society health. Attention to situation of medicinal plants in groceries, diagnosis different species, Value of consumption and supplier regions as most important factors in medicinal plants forum can be used for programming and politics in medicinal industry in our country. So via proper scientific programming we can achieve to better culture of medicinal plants consumption and we can improve health parameters in lorestan province. Materials and methods The research was accomplished with Cross-Sectional study and questionary technique was used for data collection. The questionnaire consist of 3 parts were included questions related to socioeconomic trait, number of medicinal plant and medicinal properties. All of the groceries in the lorestan province were studied as statistical society. Sampling method was availability sample and samples size was 69 groceries. Results Results showed that the numbers of medicinal plants in groceries were about 336 species, mean of sold weight Was 128.48 kg. 94.5% and 5.5% of medicinal plants were supplied from out of Lorestan and Lorestan province respectively. Conclusion Existence of special plains and mountains plentiful running water, high storage of under round water and different Climate in the lorestan province cause a considerable diversity in this province. Whereas the results of this study showed that the most important suppliers of medicinal plants were located out of this province therefore programming in the case of these valuable sources of medicinal plants will be because higher preoccupation and existence of these crops in the groceries of lorestan province, even can export these to other countries.

  12. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions: Social norms on grocery carts increase produce spending without increasing shopper budgets☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Collin R.; Niculescu, Mihai; Just, David R.; Kelly, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We assessed the efficacy of an easy-to-implement shopper marketing nutrition intervention in a pilot and two additional studies to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability or increasing shopper budgets. Methods We created grocery cart placards that detailed the number of produce items purchased (i.e., descriptive norm) at particular stores (i.e., provincial norm). The effect of these placards on produce spending was assessed across 971,706 individual person grocery store transactions aggregated by day. The pilot study designated a baseline period (in both control and intervention store) followed by installation of grocery cart placards (in the intervention store) for two weeks. The pilot study was conducted in Texas in 2012. In two additional stores, we designated baseline periods followed by 28 days of the same grocery cart placard intervention as in the pilot. Additional interventions were conducted in New Mexico in 2013. Results The pilot study resulted in a significant difference between average produce spending per day per person across treatment periods (i.e., intervention versus same time period in control) (16%) and the difference between average produce spending per day per person across stores in the control periods (4%); Furthermore, the same intervention in two additional stores resulted in significant produce spending increases of 12.4% and 7.5% per day per person respectively. In all stores, total spending did not change. Conclusions Descriptive and provincial social norm messages (i.e., on grocery cart placards) may be an overlooked tool to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability and increasing shopper budgets. PMID:26844084

  13. Street Choice Logit Model for Visitors in Shopping Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Kawada

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose two models for predicting people’s activity. The first model is the pedestrian distribution prediction (or postdiction model by multiple regression analysis using space syntax indices of urban fabric and people distribution data obtained from a field survey. The second model is a street choice model for visitors using multinomial logit model. We performed a questionnaire survey on the field to investigate the strolling routes of 46 visitors and obtained a total of 1211 street choices in their routes. We proposed a utility function, sum of weighted space syntax indices, and other indices, and estimated the parameters for weights on the basis of maximum likelihood. These models consider both street networks, distance from destination, direction of the street choice and other spatial compositions (numbers of pedestrians, cars, shops, and elevation. The first model explains the characteristics of the street where many people tend to walk or stay. The second model explains the mechanism underlying the street choice of visitors and clarifies the differences in the weights of street choice parameters among the various attributes, such as gender, existence of destinations, number of people, etc. For all the attributes considered, the influences of DISTANCE and DIRECTION are strong. On the other hand, the influences of Int.V, SHOPS, CARS, ELEVATION, and WIDTH are different for each attribute. People with defined destinations tend to choose streets that “have more shops, and are wider and lower”. In contrast, people with undefined destinations tend to choose streets of high Int.V. The choice of males is affected by Int.V, SHOPS, WIDTH (positive and CARS (negative. Females prefer streets that have many shops, and couples tend to choose downhill streets. The behavior of individual persons is affected by all variables. The behavior of people visiting in groups is affected by SHOP and WIDTH (positive.

  14. Effects of placement point of background music on shopping website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chien-Jung; Chiang, Chia-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Consumer on-line behaviors are more important than ever due to highly growth of on-line shopping. The purposes of this study were to design placement methods of background music for shopping website and examine the effect on browsers' emotional and cognitive response. Three placement points of background music during the browsing, i.e. 2 min., 4 min., and 6 min. from the start of browsing were considered for entry points. Both browsing without music (no music) and browsing with constant music volume (full music) were treated as control groups. Participants' emotional state, approach-avoidance behavior intention, and action to adjust music volume were collected. Results showed that participants had a higher level of pleasure, arousal and approach behavior intention for the three placement points than for no music and full music. Most of the participants for full music (5/6) adjusted the background music. Only 16.7% (3/18) participants for other levels turn off the background music. The results indicate that playing background music after the start of browsing is benefit for on-line shopping atmosphere. It is inappropriate to place background music at the start of browsing shopping website. The marketer must manipulated placement methods of background music for a web store carefully.

  15. Retailing and Shopping on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    Internet advertising and commercial activity are increasing. This article examines challenges facing the retail industry on the Internet: location; comparison shopping; security, especially financial transactions; customer base and profile; nature of the shopping experience; and legal and marketplace controls. (PEN)

  16. Smart Shopping for Veggies and Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Newsroom Dietary Guidelines Communicator’s Guide 10 Tips: Smart Shopping for Veggies and Fruits You are here ... for Veggies and Fruits Print Share 10 Tips: Smart Shopping for Veggies and Fruits It is possible ...

  17. Apparel shopping orientation: Two decades of research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of. — Prof EM Visser. Department of Consumer Science: Food, Clothing, Housing ... Shopping orientations. Importance of store attributes. Patronage behaviour. Personal .... similar shopping orientation labels used by different researchers ...

  18. Online shopping: some advantages and shortcomings

    OpenAIRE

    Sammer, Aleksandra; Malkova, Yana

    2016-01-01

    As we live in the century of rapid development of information technologies, it is very difficult to meet people who haven't heard of online shopping. Hundreds of thousands of Internet users daily resort to services of virtual shops. Internet trade gains steam both in Russia, and all around the world. This paper overviews some advantages and shortcomings of online shopping over shopping malls. Time and money saving possibilities, wide range of goods, convenient delivery and method of payment, ...

  19. Lufthansa Center Sets Standard for Shopping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    IN Beijing, foreign tourists often dine at the Fangshan Restaurant, stay in the Palace Hotel and shop at the Lufthansa Center. The Lufthansa Friendship Shopping City is a newly built, luxurious complex that attracts wealthy Beijingers, international residents and tourists. The Lufthansa Shopping City is located in northeast Beijing. It covers over 22,000 square meters with five floors of shops and an underground supermarket. When you walk into the Lufthansa Center, you

  20. MARKETING STRATEGY OF CHOSEN COFFEE SHOP

    OpenAIRE

    Wirthová, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to make a marketing strategy of chosen coffee shop, which is situated in Slovakia. Therefore the analysis needed to achieve the given aim were analysis of macroenvironment in Slovakia, current trends in coffee drinking, coffee shop business (in Europe), competition in the town. Interviews with the owner of given coffee shop, owners of other successful coffee shops and the summarization of related theory, also contributed to the achievement of the aim. A partial aim wa...

  1. HOW GOOD IS A DENSE SHOP SCHEDULE?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礴; 俞文(鱼此)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study a class of simple and easy-to-construct shop schedules, known as dense schedules. We present tight bounds on the maximum deviation in makespan of dense flow-shop and job-shop schedules from their optimal ones. For dense open-shop schedules, we do the same for the special case of four machines and thus add a stronger supporting case for proving a standing conjecture.

  2. CERN Shop - Christmas Sale in Bldg. 33

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    Looking for Christmas present ideas? The CERN Shop will give the CERN card holders a special reduction of 10 % on all CERN Shop articles from Friday 11.12.2009 to Thursday 17.12.2009. Come to visit the CERN Shop at the Reception, Building 33. PH-EDU-PO

  3. Metric Conversion and the School Shop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Arthur A.

    1976-01-01

    Cost of metric conversion in school shops is examined, and the author categories all the shops in the school and gives useful information on which shops are the easiest to convert, which are most complicated, where resistance is most likely to be met, and where conversion is most urgent. The math department is seen as catalyst. (Editor/HD)

  4. CERN Shop - Christmas Sale in Bldg. 33

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    Looking for Christmas present ideas? The CERN Shop will give CERN card holders a special reduction of 10 % on all CERN Shop articles from Monday 13.12.2010 to Saturday 18.12.2010. Come and visit the CERN Shop in the Reception Building 33.

  5. 30 CFR 75.343 - Underground shops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground shops. 75.343 Section 75.343... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.343 Underground shops. (a) Underground...-3 through § 75.1107-16, or be enclosed in a noncombustible structure or area. (b) Underground shops...

  6. SHOP2: An HTN Planning System

    CERN Document Server

    Au, T C; Kuter, U; Murdock, J W; Nau, D S; Wu, D; Yaman, F; 10.1613/jair.1141

    2011-01-01

    The SHOP2 planning system received one of the awards for distinguished performance in the 2002 International Planning Competition. This paper describes the features of SHOP2 which enabled it to excel in the competition, especially those aspects of SHOP2 that deal with temporal and metric planning domains.

  7. Innovativeness and Variety of Internet Shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Brian F.; Neuendorf, Kimberly A.; Valdiserri, Colin M.

    2003-01-01

    This survey of 208 Internet users examined the factors underlying Internet usage and shopping. Data were gathered on Information shopping (IS) innovativeness, overall IS frequency, visit variety, purchase variety, network prevalence, education, age, gender, employment, extensiveness of Internet use, and non-shopping Internet applications. (MES)

  8. Innovativeness and Variety of Internet Shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Brian F.; Neuendorf, Kimberly A.; Valdiserri, Colin M.

    2003-01-01

    This survey of 208 Internet users examined the factors underlying Internet usage and shopping. Data were gathered on Information shopping (IS) innovativeness, overall IS frequency, visit variety, purchase variety, network prevalence, education, age, gender, employment, extensiveness of Internet use, and non-shopping Internet applications. (MES)

  9. CAN MONEY BUY CONVENIENCE: A STUDY ON INCOME AS A MOTIVATOR OF ONLINE SHOPPING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallabi Mishra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The fast and hectic life of professionals has created an essence of convenience and urgency in their activities and behavior. With the advent of technology and the swift internet era online activities are on a growing trend. This growing trend in online shopping has led to the consideration of this paper which aims to explore the role of individual income as a motivator of online shopping behavior. This study is descriptive in nature. It consists of primary survey of customers belonging to different individual income levels. The researcher has classified respondents on the basis of their individual income earned per annum into low, medium and high category. It investigates the influence of demographic factor income on shopping experiences of users of the major shopping websites of India. Data has been collected both from primary as well as secondary sources. The sampling technique used is convenience with a sample size of 755.The research results reveal that there is no significant effect of income on product categories purchased online. The effect of income on frequency of online shopping is not significant. There is no significant effect of income on payment mode in online shopping. Further there is no significant relationship between income and satisfaction in online shopping.The managers can benefit immensely from the results. Customers are offer driven in case of all items except necessary and emergency goods. The necessary items would sell even if there is no discount and offers on them. For other items offers and discounts influence the shopping behavior. The higher the offer the better the sale. Moreover to gain competitive advantage online marketers need to provide products and brands of higher value to customers. The cash on delivery facility should be applied to all product categories across the country so that every customer benefits from it. Care should be taken to manage reverse logistics as there should be a pick up facility from

  10. 大学生网购行为现状及其影响因素研究%Study on the current situation and its influencing factors of College Students' online shopping behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青

    2014-01-01

    随着网络的普遍应用,网购成了一种时尚潮流,越来越多的人们喜欢在网上购物,在这其中大学生成了主力军。研究通过调查问卷的方式,探究影响当代大学生网购的因素,意在了解当代大学生网购的情况,为更好地发展以大学生为主要消费群体的网购提供参考。%With the extensive use of the Internet, online shopping has become a fashion trend, more and more people like shopping on the Internet, in which the university become the main force. Research by questionnaire, explore the influencing factors of contemporary college students' online shopping, online shopping is to understand the situation of contemporary college students, to provide the reference for the better development of the students as the main consumer groups, online shopping.

  11. Effect of Consumer Behaviors on Word-of-Mouth Influence in Online Shopping Paradigm%基于网上购物情境的消费者行为对口碑影响力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙振权; 胡贝斌; 谢雪银

    2011-01-01

    There is exponential growth of the cyber economy, and Word-of-Month ( WOM) has more and more effect on consumers' purchase decision-making. As WOM is a consumer-dominated information channel, both the propagators and receivers of WOM have nothing to do with the marketers. However, WOM has great influence on the consumer purchasing in the online shopping paradigm. In this paper, consumer behaviors, such as attitude towards complaining and internet business as well as perceived risks, are analyzed. Furthermore, the relationship between these factors and influence of WOM is analyzed by active seeking of WOM in the internet. It shows that the actively seeking of WOM is the key factor that contributes to the influence.%随着网络经济的快速发展,口碑对消费者购买决策的影响越来越重要.口碑活动作为一种以消费者为主导的信息交流渠道,它的传播者和接收者并不受到商家的直接干预.通过研究消费者对抱怨的态度,对互联网商家的态度、感知风险,以及对口碑信息的主动搜寻,探讨这些因素与口碑影响力之间的关系.研究表明:对口碑信息的主动搜寻是各变量对口碑影响力造成影响的关键因素.

  12. English in the Garment Shops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Lorrie

    This text for limited-English-speaking workers in the garment industry consits of illustrated vocabulary words, grammar lessons, narratives or brief readings, and exercises on employment-related topics. The first section focuses on shop talk, including job-specific vocabulary, simple expressions and explanations, social language, seeking and…

  13. 'Regime shopping' across (blurring) boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwerzijl, M.S.; Evju, Stein

    2014-01-01

    This book chapter identifies and explores the (blurring) boundaries between the legal regimes for labour mobility across the EU. In the context of - what is sometimes called - 'regime shopping' a close look is taken into the law on freedom of movement within the EU. Several categories of transnation

  14. 'Regime shopping' across (blurring) boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwerzijl, M.S.; Evju, Stein

    2014-01-01

    This book chapter identifies and explores the (blurring) boundaries between the legal regimes for labour mobility across the EU. In the context of - what is sometimes called - 'regime shopping' a close look is taken into the law on freedom of movement within the EU. Several categories of

  15. Branding on the Shop Floor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Jonas, Louise Rygaard

    2010-01-01

    , a Danish supermarket chain. During the implementation of the “Best Butcher in Town”-project, Kvickly’s shop floor becomes an engineered servicescape where the norms of good salesmanship must be performed. By documenting the disloyal behaviour of butchers, we demonstrate that the affective commitment...

  16. Pawn Shop,Cash Cow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An expat in Beijing once wrote these words on his blog,"If you are anxious to exchange your valuables for cash,or want to collect some treasures in Beijing,you may visit Bao Rui Tong Pawn Shop which features agreeable environment,reliable credit,guaranteed quality and profes- sional service."That releases the com-

  17. Evaluation of a Technology for Teaching Complex Social Skills to Young Adults with Visual and Cognitive Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumpel, Thomas P.; Nativ-Ari-Am, Hagit

    2001-01-01

    Two multiple baseline designs were used to evaluate a two-stage model for training four young adults with visual and cognitive impairments to grocery shop. A task-analytical flow chart of the behavioral skills involved in grocery shopping was used to increase completed skill steps and the number of correct items purchased. (Contains references.)…

  18. Studying about the Consumer“Bounded Rationality”Behavior in Online Shopping%网购消费行为中的“有限理性”问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许振宇; 沈慧迪

    2014-01-01

    网购市场里的消费者,并不是像新古典经济学里描绘的“经济人”那样完全理性,而只是实现了一定程度的选择过程理性。根据我国网络购物市场的发展状况,探究影响我国网络购物用户“有限理性”实现程度的因素,主要有:不完全的商品信息、不稳定的商品质量、不同步的物流服务等。最后,对购物网站如何能够吸引更多网络消费者的光顾,提高消费者网购中的“有限理性”,提出了几点意见与建议。%In online shopping market ,the consumer is not the"economic man"w ho are as fully rational as the new classical economics depicts , w ho realized the selection process of a certain degree of rationality . According to the development of China's online shopping market ,it explores the main factors that impact “bounded rationality”of China's online shopping user ,concluding the incomplete information of the goods , and unstable product quality ,and no synchronization logistics service .It takes some countermeasures and suggestions about China's online shopping market , concluding commodity information management system ,and optimizing the network shopping after sale service responsibility and establishing the network shopping integrated operation system .

  19. Fast-food outlets and grocery stores near school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight in Finland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Hanne; Ervasti, Jenni; Oksanen, Tuula; Pentti, Jaana; Kouvonen, Anne; Halonen, Jaana I; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    .... However, the contribution of school neighbourhood environment is poorly understood. This study examined the association between proximity of a fast-food outlet or grocery store to school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight...

  20. Analyzing the Efficient Execution of In-Store Logistics Processes in Grocery Retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiner, Gerald; Teller, Christop; Kotzab, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we examine in-store logistics processes for handling dairy products, from the incoming dock to the shelves of supermarkets and hypermarkets. The efficient execution of the in-store logistics related to such fast-moving, sensitive, and essential items is challenging and crucial...... for grocery retailers' sales, profits, and image. In our empirical study, we survey in-store logistics processes in 202 grocery supermarkets and hypermarkets belonging to a major retail chain in central Europe. Using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) and simulation, we facilitate process benchmarking....... In particular, we identify ways of improving in-store logistics processes by showing the performance impacts of different managerial strategies and tactics. The DEA results indicate different efficiency levels for different store formats; the hybrid store format of the small hypermarket exhibits a comparatively...

  1. Electronic Commerce Readiness in Developing Countries: The Case of the Chinese Grocery Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kurnia, Sherah; Peng, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Currently, e-Commerce has been used within the industry to various degrees, with retailers leading the way in incorporating e-Commerce technologies into the majority of their daily operations. Some of the major retailers have already introduced transactional and interactive websites to facilitate B2C and B2B e-Commerce. However the majority of the businesses within the grocery industry possess only standalone internal computer networks and websites. The e-Commerce readiness of the Chinese gro...

  2. Analysis of the potential of virtual stores for german online grocery retailing

    OpenAIRE

    Thelen, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    Research Problem – The effects of digitalization had a huge impact on people’s everyday life. With increased use of internet, E-Commerce became hugely popular and pressurized classic brick and mortar retailers. However, the grocery market is one of the few markets without a remarkable share of online sales. Recently various players entered the small but promising market. Still, it is not foreseeable which player and which kind of sales approach will prevail and retailers are se...

  3. The Consumer Direct Services Revolution in Grocery Retailing: an exploratory investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Teller, C; Kotzab, H; Grant, D B

    2006-01-01

    Purpose - To provide empirical evidence and explanation of the phenomenon that providers of home delivery of groceries are still of minor importance in highly concentrated retail markets. Design/methodology/approach - Based on a critical literature review three propositions were set up. A web based survey was conducted with two prospective consumer groups for home delivery providers: time starved consumers and consumers with Internet affinity. A structural equation modeling analysis was appli...

  4. Behaviour and Environment - A Behavioral Study of no Use of Plastic Bags' Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Bragança de Matos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The perception of the environmental impact of current consumption patterns and the increasing centrality of this discourse in international environmentalism’s mainstream bring new perspectives and arguments concerning the consumerism of contemporary Western societies. From this perspective, the central question of this project was: “What is the intention of not using plastic bags?” Using as a theoretical reference the Planned Behavior Theory, which seeks to understand and predict human behavior in a general way from a reduced set of antecedent variables, we developed an intersectional survey consisting of 226 interviews. Data were processed by equations modeling and treated in Amos 16.0 software. The measurement model considered the mental constructions forming TCP. It was possible to identify as a major contribution of this study that the perceived behavioral control is the most influential factor on the intended not use of plastic bags, hindering the adoption of the behavior of not using plastic bags. Perhaps the fact that it is a settled habit, which involves several routine actions, such as the habit of going to the grocery store and have to plan in advance to take the alternative shopping bag or cart for packaging purchased products, or to count on ecological alternatives offered by commercial establishments, is a major and determining impediment for behavioral change.

  5. Cooking-related PM2.5 and acrolein measured in grocery stores and comparison with other retail types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, W R; Sidheswaran, M; Sullivan, D P; Cohn, S; Fisk, W J

    2016-06-01

    We measured particulate matter (PM), acrolein, and other indoor air contaminants in eight visits to grocery stores in California. Retail stores of other types (hardware, furniture, and apparel) were also sampled on additional visits. Based on tracer gas decay data, most stores had adequate ventilation according to minimum ventilation rate standards. Grocery stores had significantly higher concentrations of acrolein, fine and ultrafine PM, compared to other retail stores, likely attributable to cooking. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 and acrolein exceeded health guidelines in all tested grocery stores. Acrolein emission rates to indoors in grocery stores had a mean estimate about 30 times higher than in other retail store types. About 80% of the indoor PM2.5 measured in grocery stores was emitted indoors, compared to only 20% for the other retail store types. Calculations suggest a substantial increase in outdoor air ventilation rate by a factor of three from current level is needed to reduce indoor acrolein concentrations. Alternatively, acrolein emission to indoors needs to be reduced 70% by better capturing of cooking exhaust. To maintain indoor PM2.5 below the California annual ambient standard of 12 μg/m(3) , grocery stores need to use air filters with an efficiency rating higher than the MERV 8 air filters commonly used today.

  6. Modeling the Joint Choice Decisions on Urban Shopping Destination and Travel-to-Shop Mode: A Comparative Study of Different Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The joint choice of shopping destination and travel-to-shop mode in downtown area is described by making use of the cross-nested logit (CNL model structure that allows for potential interalternative correlation along the both choice dimensions. Meanwhile, the traditional multinomial logit (MNL model and nested logit (NL model are also formulated, respectively. This study uses the data collected in the downtown areas of Maryland-Washington, D.C. region, for shopping trips, considering household, individual, land use, and travel related characteristics. The results of the model reveal the significant influencing factors on joint choice travel behavior between shopping destination and travel mode. A comparison of the different models shows that the proposed CNL model structure offers significant improvements in capturing unobserved correlations between alternatives over MNL model and NL model. Moreover, a Monte Carlo simulation for a group of scenarios assuming that there is an increase in parking fees in downtown area is undertaken to examine the impact of a change in car travel cost on the joint choice of shopping destination and travel mode switching. The results are expected to give a better understanding on the shopping travel behavior.

  7. The use of reverse logistics for waste management in a Brazilian grocery retailer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Karina T S; Braga Junior, Sergio S

    2016-01-01

    Retail growth is a result of the diversification of departments with the intention to look to consumer's needs and level of demand. Pressed by consumers and by the law, the adoption of environmental preservation practices is becoming stronger among grocery retailers. The objective of this research was to analyse the practices of reverse logistics performed by a retailer and measure the amount of waste generated by each department. To reach the proposed goal, a field research study was conducted to directly observe a grocery retailer in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, for a period of 6 months and monitor the amounts of cardboard and plastic discarded by each department. Using the Wuppertal method, the first result observed was that the retailer stopped its monthly production of approximately 20 tonne of biotic and abiotic material, which influence global warming and degradation of the ozone layer. Another result observed with the implementation of reverse logistics, was that the general grocery department mostly used cardboard and plastic. This sector includes products such as food cupboard, drinks, household, health and beauty, and pet articles. The fresh fruit and vegetable department and the meat, chicken and frozen department were increasingly using less plastic and cardboard packaging, increasing the use of returnable and durable packaging and thus promoting sustainability.

  8. Impact of the world agricultural grocery markets on self-development of regional agrarian systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniamin Vasil'evich Drokin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the impact of foreign economic grocery relations on the state of self-development and self-regulation in the agrarian sector of the country and regions. A definition of the concept of «self-regulation of the agrarian sector in the region» is given. The characteristic of long-term trends in food independence is given. In this regard, the current state of food self-sufficiency in the regions of Russia on essential grocery is analyzed. It is concluded that the majority of regions are characterized by low levels of selfsufficiency in grocery. The main trends of Russian food exports in recent years are shown. The reasons for the sharp growth in grain exports are analyzed. The estimation of the possibilities for further increase of exports of these products in connection with the planned growth of consumption and production of staple food as predicted by the Russian government is made. In general, the authors believe that low levels of food self-sufficiency of the country may be not only at significant food imports, but also at low volumes of imports, coupled with the high volume of agricultural exports. Accordingly, in both cases the possibility of selfdevelopment of the regional agrarian scope is undermined because of the influence of external factors (low levels of food self-sufficiency in the country.

  9. The Development and Validation of the Online Shopping Addiction Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the development and validation of a scale to measure online shopping addiction. Inspired by previous theories and research on behavioral addiction, the Griffiths's widely accepted six-factor component model was referred to and an 18-item scale was constructed, with each component measured by three items. The results of exploratory factor analysis, based on Sample 1 (999 college students and confirmatory factor analysis, based on Sample 2 (854 college students showed the Griffiths's substantive six-factor structure underlay the online shopping addiction scale. Cronbach's alpha suggested that the resulting scale was highly reliable. Concurrent validity, based on Sample 3 (328 college students, was also satisfactory as indicated by correlations between the scale and measures of similar constructs. Finally, self-perceived online shopping addiction can be predicted to a relatively high degree. The present 18-item scale is a solid theory-based instrument to empirically measure online shopping addiction and can be used for understanding the phenomena among young adults.

  10. The Development and Validation of the Online Shopping Addiction Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Tian, Wei; Xin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    We report the development and validation of a scale to measure online shopping addiction. Inspired by previous theories and research on behavioral addiction, the Griffiths's widely accepted six-factor component model was referred to and an 18-item scale was constructed, with each component measured by three items. The results of exploratory factor analysis, based on Sample 1 (999 college students) and confirmatory factor analysis, based on Sample 2 (854 college students) showed the Griffiths's substantive six-factor structure underlay the online shopping addiction scale. Cronbach's alpha suggested that the resulting scale was highly reliable. Concurrent validity, based on Sample 3 (328 college students), was also satisfactory as indicated by correlations between the scale and measures of similar constructs. Finally, self-perceived online shopping addiction can be predicted to a relatively high degree. The present 18-item scale is a solid theory-based instrument to empirically measure online shopping addiction and can be used for understanding the phenomena among young adults.

  11. Food marketing targeting youth and families: what do we know about stores where moms actually shop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S; Rooney, Mary R

    2013-01-01

    Although efforts are underway to examine marketing that targets the youth and families in the retail food store environment, few studies have specifically focused on stores that families identify as their primary sites for food shopping. Between November 2011 and April 2012, we examined the frequency and types of marketing techniques of 114 packaged and nonpackaged items in 24 food stores that mothers of young children in Champaign County, IL, said they commonly frequented. Chi-square tests were used to determine whether significant differences existed between items with regard to marketing by store type, store food-assistance-program acceptance (i.e., WIC), and claims. Overall, stores accepting WIC and convenience stores had higher frequencies of marketing compared to non-WIC and grocery stores. Fruits and vegetables had the lowest frequency of any marketing claim, while salty snacks and soda had the highest frequency of marketing claims. Nutrition claims were the most common across all items, followed by taste, suggested use, fun, and convenience. Television tie-ins and cartoons were observed more often than movie tie-ins and giveaways. Our results suggest an opportunity to promote healthful items more efficiently by focusing efforts on stores where mothers actually shop.

  12. Food Marketing Targeting Youth and Families: What Do We Know about Stores Where Moms Actually Shop?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S. Grigsby-Toussaint

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although efforts are underway to examine marketing that targets the youth and families in the retail food store environment, few studies have specifically focused on stores that families identify as their primary sites for food shopping. Between November 2011 and April 2012, we examined the frequency and types of marketing techniques of 114 packaged and nonpackaged items in 24 food stores that mothers of young children in Champaign County, IL, said they commonly frequented. Chi-square tests were used to determine whether significant differences existed between items with regard to marketing by store type, store food-assistance-program acceptance (i.e., WIC, and claims. Overall, stores accepting WIC and convenience stores had higher frequencies of marketing compared to non-WIC and grocery stores. Fruits and vegetables had the lowest frequency of any marketing claim, while salty snacks and soda had the highest frequency of marketing claims. Nutrition claims were the most common across all items, followed by taste, suggested use, fun, and convenience. Television tie-ins and cartoons were observed more often than movie tie-ins and giveaways. Our results suggest an opportunity to promote healthful items more efficiently by focusing efforts on stores where mothers actually shop.

  13. Food Marketing Targeting Youth and Families: What Do We Know about Stores Where Moms Actually Shop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S.; Rooney, Mary R.

    2013-01-01

    Although efforts are underway to examine marketing that targets the youth and families in the retail food store environment, few studies have specifically focused on stores that families identify as their primary sites for food shopping. Between November 2011 and April 2012, we examined the frequency and types of marketing techniques of 114 packaged and nonpackaged items in 24 food stores that mothers of young children in Champaign County, IL, said they commonly frequented. Chi-square tests were used to determine whether significant differences existed between items with regard to marketing by store type, store food-assistance-program acceptance (i.e., WIC), and claims. Overall, stores accepting WIC and convenience stores had higher frequencies of marketing compared to non-WIC and grocery stores. Fruits and vegetables had the lowest frequency of any marketing claim, while salty snacks and soda had the highest frequency of marketing claims. Nutrition claims were the most common across all items, followed by taste, suggested use, fun, and convenience. Television tie-ins and cartoons were observed more often than movie tie-ins and giveaways. Our results suggest an opportunity to promote healthful items more efficiently by focusing efforts on stores where mothers actually shop. PMID:24163701

  14. Reference-based pricing: an evidence-based solution for lab services shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, L Doug; Bradley, Kent; Fu, Patricia Lin; Armata, Raegan; Parr, James B

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of reference-based pricing (RBP) on the percentage of lab services utilized by members that were at or below the reference price. Retrospective, quasi-experimental, matched, case-control pilot evaluation of an RBP benefit for lab services. The study group included employees of a multinational grocery chain covered by a national health insurance carrier and subject to RBP for lab services; it had access to an online lab shopping tool and was informed about the RBP benefit through employer communications. The reference group was covered by the same insurance carrier but not subject to RBP. The primary end point was lab compliance, defined as the percentage of lab claims with total charges at or below the reference price. Difference-in-difference regression estimation evaluated changes in lab compliance between the 2 groups. Higher compliance per lab claim was evident for the study group compared with the reference group (69% vs 57%; Ponline shopping tool was used by 7% of the matched-adjusted study group prior to obtaining lab services. Lab compliance was 76% for study group members using the online tool compared with 68% among nonusers who were subject to RBP (P<.01). RBP can promote cost-conscious selection of lab services. Access to facilities that offer services below the reference price and education about RBP improve compliance. Evaluation of the effect of RBP on higher-cost medical services, including radiology, outpatient specialty, and elective inpatient procedures, is needed.

  15. What is the effectiveness of obesity related interventions at retail grocery stores and supermarkets? -a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Abdulfatah; Jensen, Jørgen D

    2016-12-28

    The Prevalence of obesity and overweight has been increasing in many countries. Many factors have been identified as contributing to obesity including the food environment, especially the access, availability and affordability of healthy foods in grocery stores and supermarkets. Several interventions have been carried out in retail grocery/supermarket settings as part of an effort to understand and influence consumption of healthful foods. The review's key outcome variable is sale/purchase of healthy foods as a result of the interventions. This systematic review sheds light on the effectiveness of food store interventions intended to promote the consumption of healthy foods and the methodological quality of studies reporting them. Systematic literature search spanning from 2003 to 2015 (inclusive both years), and confined to papers in the English language was conducted. Studies fulfilling search criteria were identified and critically appraised. Studies included in this review report health interventions at physical food stores including supermarkets and corner stores, and with outcome variable of adopting healthier food purchasing/consumption behavior. The methodological quality of all included articles has been determined using a validated 16-item quality assessment tool (QATSDD). The literature search identified 1580 publications, of which 42 met the inclusion criteria. Most interventions used a combination of information (e.g. awareness raising through food labeling, promotions, campaigns, etc.) and increasing availability of healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables. Few used price interventions. The average quality score for all papers is 65.0%, or an overall medium methodological quality. Apart from few studies, most studies reported that store interventions were effective in promoting purchase of healthy foods. Given the diverse study settings and despite the challenges of methodological quality for some papers, we find efficacy of in-store healthy food

  16. SEE IT, LIKE IT, BUY IT! HEDONIC SHOPPING MOTIVATIONS AND IMPULSE BUYING

    OpenAIRE

    Kasim Tatić; Srđan Petrić; Merima Činjarević

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of six broad categories of hedonic shopping motivations(adventure,gratification,role, value, social, and idea shopping) and fashion consciousness on consumers’ impulse buying behavior. The online questionnaire wascreated using LimeSurvey, a web based questionnaire generator tool. An online questionnaire was directed to a sample of 500 individuals in Bosnia and Herzegovina, using nonprobability convenience sampling method. A total of 224 pa...

  17. Branding on the Shop Floor

    OpenAIRE

    Szilvia Gyimóthy; Louise Rygaard Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Service branding is a particular form of emotional management, where employees are regarded as adaptable media, who can be trained to convey corporate values while interacting with customers. This paper examines the identity work of butchers during the brand revitalisation campaign of Kvickly, a Danish supermarket chain. During the implementation of the “Best Butcher in Town”-project, Kvickly’s shop floor becomes an engineered servicescape where the norms of good salesmanship must be performe...

  18. Design of online shopping system

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yueyuan

    2011-01-01

    E-commerce is a kind of comprehensive activity of management automation, business information network and financial electronic technology. It is a kind of commercial activity accomplished through the information network in all kinds of business activities in the world. As a new marketing model, the emergence of online stores is an epoch-making revolution in the field of product circulation. The thesis focuses on a study of how to design a small online shopping system which is simple and f...

  19. Self-control predicts attentional bias assessed by online shopping-related Stroop in high online shopping addiction tendency college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhaocai; Zhao, Xiuxin; Li, Cancan

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of personality types (i.e., self-control, BAS/BIS) and online shopping addiction (OSA) behavior and to investigate whether high-OSA tendency individuals display attentional biases toward online shopping-related (OS-related) stimuli as well as the links between attentional bias and personality types. The study included 98 college students divided into three groups (i.e., high-, medium- and low-OSA) according to their OSA behavior. The personality types (i.e., self-control, BAS/BIS) and OSA behavior were investigated by questionnaires. The attentional bias was evaluated by the OS-related Stroop and dot-probe task (DPT) paradigms. OSA was positively predicted by time spent on online shopping per day and average consumption for online shopping monthly, and negatively by self-control. High-OSA individuals displayed significant attentional biases toward OS-related stimuli in the Stroop, but not DPT paradigm. Moreover, the attentional bias toward OSA-related stimuli in high-OSA individuals was negatively correlated with self-control. These findings demonstrated the critical role of self-control in OSA behavior and attentional bias to OS-related stimuli in high-OSA individuals, indicating that more importance should be attached to self-control for the clinical intervention of online shopping addiction in future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Buying addicition (compulsive shopping)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review examines the place of buying addiction in the classification of non-chemical addictions and other mental disorders, and risk factors for its occurrence. The data on the epidemiology of dependence (from 1% to 10% of the population in developed countries) is observed. The characteristics of neurobiology, clinical manifestations and features of addiction comorbidity are described. Modern approaches to therapy and correction are analyzed. It is concluded that buying addiction, of course, refers to the addictive disorders because of the similarity of their neurobiology, clinical manifestations, comorbidity, and approaches to therapy. Further studies should help to define its place in the classification of mental and behavioral disorders, as well as in the development of adequate and reasonable treatment approaches.

  1. 我国电子商务用户网上购物行为的影响因素及其演变:基于2006年与2009年数据的实证研究%Effect on Online Shopping Behavior of E-business Users: A n Empirical Study on 2006 and 2009 Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国鑫; 李一军; 李兵; 叶强

    2012-01-01

    网上购物近年来发展迅速。以美国为主的西方社会已经针对网络购物行为接受度开展了广泛研究,但是有关网络购物行为接受度的动态演变的研究还不充分。同时,由于存在文化的差异.相关研究成果尚须通过我国数据的验证才能得以确认。本研究基于技术接受度模型(TAM),在2006年和2009年两个时间点,以中国网民中最具代表性的高等院校大学生群体为调查对象,分别通过311份和319份有效样本数据。运用结构方程模型来分析消费者感知网上购物的有用性、易用性和安全性对其态度和意向的影响变化。该研究验证了网上购物接受模型在中国情境下的适用性,并为网上零售商提出了有针对性的营销建议。%Online shopping has been rapidly developing in China. Although researches that focus on online shopping consumer behavior have attracted wide attention from western academic research field, the dynamics of acceptance of online shopping behavior has not been studied in depth. Furthermore, due to cultural difference between China and other countries, previous research conclusions have to be validated in Chinese context. Based on Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), this paper collects data from 311 student samples in 2006 and 319 ones in 2009 in a university of China. With Structural Equation Modeling method, this research demonstrates how perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and perceived safety affect Chinese consumers' attitude and behavioral intention to online shopping and how the effect changes from year to year. The current paper aims to analyze purchasing attitude and behavioral intention of Chinese consumers and provide marketing suggestion for online retailer businesses.

  2. Determinants of Customer Satisfaction in Shopping Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Zeman, Matěj

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this Bachelor Thesis is to describe the regularities of customer behaviour, to describe the consumer decision process, to aim to the post-acquisition process and methods of its analysis and to apply the acquired knowledge to the analysis of the post-acquisition behaviour of the customers of the Czech telecommunication company Vodafone Czech Republic a. s.

  3. Spatial factors affecting wayfinding and orientation in a shopping mall

    OpenAIRE

    Doğu, Güler Ufuk

    1997-01-01

    Ankara : Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design and Institute of Fine Arts, Bilkent University, 1997. Includes bibliographical refences. The aim of this thesis is to study the main factors which affect the wayfinding and orientation of individuals in a shopping mall and explain how their behaviors are influenced by these factors. The spatial and individual factors and their properties are defined. Among the spatiaf factors, shape and dimensions, light and color, bu...

  4. CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS ONLINE SHOPPING

    OpenAIRE

    Nethra, S.; Dr. V. T. Dhanaraj

    2016-01-01

    The popularity of online shopping has caught the attention of many peoples. Many studies have been done in developed nations to know about the attitude and behaviour of consumers towards online shopping. The research is focused on consumer behaviour and attitude towards online shopping in Coimbatore district.  The study is based on primary data which has been collected by issuing questionnaire to 200 respondents residing in Coimbatore district by adopting convenient sampling method.  The stat...

  5. Passion and dependency in online shopping activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Chien; Yang, Hui-Wen

    2007-04-01

    This study examines the influence of harmonious passion (HP) and obsessive passion (OP) to online shopping dependency. The results show that both HP and OP might lead to online shopping dependency and online shoppers with OP are more dependent on online shopping activities. In addition, this study also found out that HP and OP could be denoted as a sequence of different intensities of passion, where HP might be a necessity of OP.

  6. The social dynamics of healthy food shopping and store choice in an urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannuscio, Carolyn C; Hillier, Amy; Karpyn, Allison; Glanz, Karen

    2014-12-01

    To respond to the high prevalence of obesity and its associated health consequences, recent food research and policy have focused on neighborhood food environments, especially the links between health and retail mix, proximity of food outlets, and types of foods available. In addition, the social environment exerts important influences on food-related behaviors, through mechanisms like role-modeling, social support, and social norms. This study examined the social dynamics of residents' health-related food-shopping behaviors in 2010-11 in urban Philadelphia, where we conducted 25 semi-structured resident interviews-the foundation for this paper-in addition to 514 structured interviews and a food environment audit. In interviews, participants demonstrated adaptability and resourcefulness in their food shopping; they chose to shop at stores that met a range of social needs. Those needs ranged from practical financial considerations, to fundamental issues of safety, to mundane concerns about convenience, and juggling multiple work and family responsibilities. The majority of participants were highly motivated to adapt their shopping patterns to accommodate personal financial constraints. In addition, they selectively shopped at stores frequented by people who shared their race/ethnicity, income and education, and they sought stores where they had positive interactions with personnel and proprietors. In deciding where to shop in this urban context, participants adapted their routines to avoid unsafe places and the threat of violence. Participants also discussed the importance of convenient stores that allowed for easy parking, accommodation of physical disabilities or special needs, and integration of food shopping into other daily activities like meeting children at school. Food research and policies should explicitly attend to the social dynamics that influence food-shopping behavior. In our social relationships, interactions, and responsibilities, there are

  7. At-Risk/Problematic Shopping and Gambling in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Sarah W; Mei, Songli; Pilver, Corey E; Steinberg, Marvin A; Rugle, Loreen J; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Hoff, Rani A; Potenza, Marc N

    2015-12-01

    Elevated levels of both pathological gambling (PG) and problem shopping (PS) have been reported among adolescents, and each is associated with a range of other negative health/functioning measures. However, relationships between PS and PG, particularly during adolescence, are not well understood. In this study, we explored the relationship between different levels of problem-gambling severity and health/functioning characteristics, gambling-related social experiences, gambling behaviors and motivations among adolescents with and without at-risk/problematic shopping (ARPS). Survey data from Connecticut high school students (n = 2,100) were analyzed using bivariate analyses and logistic regression modeling. Although at-risk/problematic gambling (ARPG) was not increased among adolescents with ARPS, adolescents with ARPG (vs non-gamblers) were more likely to report having experienced a growing tension or anxiety that could only be relieved by shopping and missing other obligations due to shopping. In comparison to the non-ARPS group, a smaller proportion of respondents in the ARPS group reported paid part-time employment, whereas a greater proportion of respondents reported excessive gambling by peers and feeling concerned over the gambling of a close family member. In general, similar associations between problem-gambling severity and measures of health/functioning and gambling-related behaviors and motivations were observed across ARPS and non-ARPS adolescents. However, associations were weaker among ARPS adolescents for several variables: engagement in extracurricular activities, alcohol and caffeine use and gambling for financial reasons. These findings suggest a complex relationship between problem-gambling severity and ARPS. They highlight the importance of considering co-occurring risk behaviors such as ARPS when treating adolescents with at-risk/problem gambling.

  8. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  9. Examine The Effect of Word-of-Mouth and Electronic Word-of-Mouth on Consumers' Perceived Risk in Taiwan: A Case Study on Online Shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hung-Miao

    2011-01-01

    Online shopping has become one of the most popular activities on the Internet in recent years. Due to the emergence of electronic commerce and the wide spread of the Internet, there is a new shopping channel for consumers to purchase products or services they need, that is, online shopping. In the past, researchers found that consumers had different online purchase behavior in terms of their demographics. However, the results of this thesis show that as time goes by, consumers become more ...

  10. The Portuguese plastic carrier bag tax: The effects on consumers' behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Graça; Balaia, Natacha; Pires, Ana

    2017-03-01

    Marine litter from lightweight plastic bags is a global problem that must be solved. A plastic bag tax was implemented in February 2015 to reduce the consumption of plastic grocery bags in Portugal and in turn reduce the potential contribution to marine litter. This study analyzes the effect of the plastic bag tax on consumer behavior to learn how it was received and determine the perceived effectiveness of the tax 4months after its implementation. In addition, the study assessed how proximity to coastal areas could influence behaviors and opinions. The results showed a 74% reduction of plastic bag consumption with a simultaneously 61% increase of reusable plastic bags after the tax was implemented. Because plastic bags were then reused for shopping instead of garbage bags, however, the consumption of garbage bags increased by 12%. Although reduction was achieved, the tax had no effect on the perception of marine litter or the impact of plastic bags on environment and health. The majority of respondents agree with the tax but view it as an extra revenue to the State. The distance to the coast had no meaningful influence on consumer behavior or on the perception of the tax. Although the tax was able to promote the reduction of plastics, the role of hypermarkets and supermarkets in providing alternatives through the distribution of reusable plastic bags was determinant to ensuring the reduction.

  11. 30 CFR 57.4761 - Underground shops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground shops. 57.4761 Section 57.4761... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Ventilation Control Measures § 57.4761 Underground shops. To confine or prevent the spread of...

  12. Shop Tools. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This shop tools manual is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids on servicing of automotive and off-the-road equipment. Materials provide basic information and illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. Sections describe the use of the following tools: screwdrivers, hammers,…

  13. The price may not be right: the value of comparison shopping for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sanjay; Sood, Neeraj; Terp, Sophie; Joyce, Geoffrey

    2017-07-01

    To measure variations in drug prices across and within zip codes that may reveal simple strategies to improve patients' access to prescribed medications. We compared drug prices at different types of pharmacies across and within local markets. In-store prices were compared with a Web-based service providing discount coupons for prescription medications. Prices were collected for 2 generic antibiotics because most patients have limited experience with them and are less likely to know the price ranges for them. Drug prices were obtained via telephone from 528 pharmacies in Los Angeles (LA) County, California, from July to August 2014. Online prices were collected from GoodRx, a popular Web-based service that aggregates available discounts and directly negotiates with retail outlets. Drug prices found at independent pharmacies and by using discount coupons available online were lower on average than at grocery, big-box, or chain drug stores for 2 widely prescribed antibiotics. The lowest-price prescription was offered at a grocery, big-box, or chain drug store in 6% of zip codes within the LA County area. Drug prices varied dramatically within a zip code, however, and were less expensive in lower-income areas. The average price difference within a zip code was $52 for levofloxacin and $17 for azithromycin. Price shopping for medications within a small geographic area can yield considerable cost savings for the uninsured and consumers in high-deductible health plans with high negotiated prices. Clinicians and patient advocates have an incentive to convey this information to patients to improve adherence to prescribed medicines and lower the financial burden of purchasing prescription drugs.

  14. State sales tax rates for soft drinks and snacks sold through grocery stores and vending machines, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F; Eidson, Shelby S; Bates, Hannalori; Kowalczyk, Shelly; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2008-07-01

    Junk food consumption is associated with rising obesity rates in the United States. While a "junk food" specific tax is a potential public health intervention, a majority of states already impose sales taxes on certain junk food and soft drinks. This study reviews the state sales tax variance for soft drinks and selected snack products sold through grocery stores and vending machines as of January 2007. Sales taxes vary by state, intended retail location (grocery store vs. vending machine), and product. Vended snacks and soft drinks are taxed at a higher rate than grocery items and other food products, generally, indicative of a "disfavored" tax status attributed to vended items. Soft drinks, candy, and gum are taxed at higher rates than are other items examined. Similar tax schemes in other countries and the potential implications of these findings relative to the relationship between price and consumption are discussed.

  15. The Influence of Network Shopping on College Students' Consumption Psychology and Behavior--Take students in ChangSha Commerce & Tourism College as an example%网络购物对大学生消费心理和行为的影响--以长沙商贸旅游职业技术学院学生为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文祁

    2016-01-01

    随着信息技术的广泛应用,越来越多的人们选择网络购物这一新兴的购物模式。而现代大学生群体,对新生事物具有良好的接受能力和应用能力,他们热衷通过网络世界来实现与外界的情感交往和信息交流,网络购物也势必会成为他们生活学习中选择的范围。本文通过对长沙商贸旅游职业技术学院学生网上消费情况的问卷调查,了解网络环境下大学生的消费心理、真实状况,对引导培养他们健康合理的消费行为具为重要的意义。%With the wide application of information technology, more and more people choose online shopping this new sho-pping mode. And modern college students, the novelty is well accepted and applied ability, they are keen on through the Inter-net to achieve and outside the emotional communication and information exchange, online shopping will for their lives and learning in the range. In this paper, the online consumption of Changsha commerce and Tourism Vocational and technical col-lege students in questionnaire survey, understand the network environment of college students consumption psychology and the real situation, to cultivate their healthy and reasonable consumption behavior is of great significance.

  16. Designing electronic shops, persuading consumers to buy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dormann, Claire

    2000-01-01

    the product, or social cause. The importance of emotions in the on-line shopping context is highlighted. Mechanisms found in visual persuasion showing ways of capturing the audience's attention and emotions are discussed. To illustrate these mechanisms, examples drawn from electronic shopping are considered......The purpose of this article is to show how to design persuasive and successful Web shops. An approach to commercial site design that draws on theories of visual persuasion is proposed. We focus on the role of emotion. Images in an ad are typically meant to create some emotional disposition toward....... To strengthen the discussion, an evaluation of shop home pages, situated within the perspective of visual persuasion is presented. This study has given some indications that viewers form distinctive emotional impressions from shop designs. Thus, by building on visual persuasion theories, we can learn how...

  17. Potential of Natural Ventilation in Shopping Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Alice; Friis, Kristina; Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV) in shop......The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV......) in shopping centres with focus on both the achieved IEQ and energy consumptions for air movement. By thermal building simulations it is found that there exists an interesting potential for hybrid ventilation of shopping centres, which can lead to great savings in the electrical energy consumptions...

  18. Effect of Single Setting versus Multiple Setting Training on Learning to Shop in a Department Store.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westling, David L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Fifteen students, age 13-21, with moderate to profound mental retardation received shopping skills training in either 1 or 3 department stores. A study of operational behaviors, social behaviors, number of settings in which criterion performance was achieved, and number of sessions required to achieve criterion found no significant differences…

  19. SHOPPING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安捷

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1.Can I help you?(What can I show you?)你要买点什么? 2.I'd like to see a pair of socks.给我一双袜子看看. 3.I should like some apples.我要买点苹果. 4.Mav I see that thermos bottle?我可以看看那个暖水瓶吗?

  20. Generation Y Attitudes towards Shopping: A Comparison of the Czech Republic and Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klapilova Krbova Petra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study focused on Generation Y (born between 1980 and 2000 behavior in two neighboring European countries, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. This article identifies and describes basic characteristics of this generation’s general behavior as well as defines specifics of their shopping behavior by examining their attitudes towards retailers, brands, sales and discount offers. The sample consisted of 380 respondents: 162 from Slovakia and 218 from the Czech Republic. Results of the analysis indicate that shopping is perceived as an entertaining and pleasurable leisure activity. A particular product is chosen before the shopping place. Approximately two-thirds of the respondents search for information online, but quite a large percentage prefer both offline searching and purchasing. Brands are considered to be the symbols and guarantors of quality, but also uselessly expensive. Finally, a positive attitude towards sales and discount offers was observed.

  1. Food safety issues and training methods for ready-to-eat foods in the grocery industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Margaret; Ghiselli, Richard

    2005-10-01

    As Americans have become more pressed for time, the use of convenient, simplified meals become a way of life. One aspect of this trend, known as Home Meal Replacement (IIMR), has increased in sales since its inception. Between 1999 and 2001, the average annual expenditure per consumer rose 5.6 pereent, and $958 per person per year was spent in 2002. Along with this growth, food safety risks may have increased. The study reported here examined efforts being undertaken by grocery and convenience stores to control the wholesomeness of INR food items. After a convenience sample of 500 grocery store executives was identified, a 32-item questionnaire was developed and mailed to the executives. The results indicate that the industry has taken food safety seriously with only 10 pereent reporting that they have no food safety training. The executives cited employee turnover as a major concern in food safety today, along with lack of food safety knowledge of the consumer and improper holding temperatures.

  2. An innovative approach to the development of consumer-oriented grocery products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Viktorovna Leyberova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the development of products with specified application properties based on the descriptor methods of analysis. Especially important is the development of specialized products, including confectionery products for people with celiac disease, taking into account the relatively high prevalence of this disease. In development of grocery products, the priority indicators of grocery quality are the organoleptic advantages of the product (attractive taste and flavour, nutritional value and safety. Studies have shown that main consumer preferences are: products of highest quality with natural flavour and texture, made according to traditional methods and of natural ingredients. The degree of satisfaction of human needs for food should be determined not only by the level of conformity of the actual commodity consumption (describing the quantitative parameters of consumption, but compliance with a number of subjective parameters that characterize the quality of food consumption. It is determined that by using an innovative approach to product development with prescribed consumer properties using generalized index of quality, it is possible to create products demanded by certain groups of consumers.

  3. Prevalence of Artificial Food Colors in Grocery Store Products Marketed to Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batada, Ameena; Jacobson, Michael F

    2016-10-01

    Artificial food colors (AFCs) in foods and beverages may be harmful to children. This study assesses the percentage of grocery store products marketed to children that contain AFCs, by category and company. The research team collected product and food-color information about 810 products in one grocery store in North Carolina in 2014. Overall, 350 products (43.2%) contained AFCs. The most common AFCs were Red 40 (29.8% of products), Blue 1 (24.2%), Yellow 5 (20.5%), and Yellow 6 (19.5%). Produce was the only category that did not have any AFCs. The highest percentage of products with AFCs was found in candies (96.3%), fruit-flavored snacks (94%), and drink mixes/powders (89.7%). Forty-one of the 66 companies marketed products containing AFCs. Given concerns about health effects of AFCs and high proportions of high-AFC categories, clinicians, parents, food companies, and the government can take steps to support children's healthy eating and development by reducing AFCs in children's diets. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, A.; Hale, E.; Leach, M.

    2011-03-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology and main results of two recently published Technical Support Documents. These reports explore the feasibility of designing general merchandise and grocery stores that use half the energy of a minimally code-compliant building, as measured on a whole-building basis. We used an optimization algorithm to trace out a minimum cost curve and identify designs that satisfy the 50% energy savings goal. We started from baseline building energy use and progressed to more energy-efficient designs by sequentially adding energy design measures (EDMs). Certain EDMs figured prominently in reaching the 50% energy savings goal for both building types: (1) reduced lighting power density; (2) optimized area fraction and construction of view glass or skylights, or both, as part of a daylighting system tuned to 46.5 fc (500 lux); (3) reduced infiltration with a main entrance vestibule or an envelope air barrier, or both; and (4) energy recovery ventilators, especially in humid and cold climates. In grocery stores, the most effective EDM, which was chosen for all climates, was replacing baseline medium-temperature refrigerated cases with high-efficiency models that have doors.

  5. Piloting an online grocery store simulation to assess children's food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Amy M; Harris, Jennifer L; Liu, Sai; Schwartz, Marlene B; Li, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Public health interventions must address poor diet among U.S. children, but research is needed to better understand factors influencing children's food choices. Using an online grocery store simulation, this research piloted a novel method to assess children's snack selection in a controlled but naturalistic laboratory setting, evaluate predictors of choice, and experimentally test whether promotions on food packages altered choices. Children (7-12 years, N = 61) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: promotions on healthy products; promotions on unhealthy products; and no promotions (control). They selected from a variety of healthy and unhealthy foods and beverages and rated all products on healthfulness and taste. Promotions on food packaging did not affect snack selection in this study, but findings supported our other hypothesis that perceived taste would be the strongest predictor of food choice. Children accurately rated product healthfulness, but these ratings did not predict healthy snack choices or taste ratings for healthy or unhealthy snacks. These results suggest that interventions to improve children's food choices should focus on increasing availability of healthy options and identifying opportunities to enhance children's liking of healthy options. However, nutrition education alone is unlikely to improve children's diets. Further testing is required, but the simulated online grocery store method shows potential for measuring children's food choices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Social marketing of condoms: selling protection and changing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, S

    1991-06-01

    Social marketing of condoms in Zaire began in 1987 and sales rose to 8 million in 1990, a notable change from the previous situation where about half a million condoms were distributed by government health clinics only. Social marketing is the use of for-profit sales and marketing techniques for public health problem.s When the Zaire National AIDS Committee initiated social marketing of condoms, with the assistance of Population Services International, they had the experience of successful Asian programs of the 1970s, and the political sanction resulting from the AIDS threat to back them up. Efforts were made to find just the right product name, "Prudence," logo, package, color and slogan by consumer research. Prudence implies responsible behavior, capturing both the AIDS and STD prevention and the family planning markets. Consumers like the package and associate it with quality, since most condoms sold before in Zaire had no special packaging. Distribution outlets include 7000 retail shops, groceries, pharmacies, hotel, social clubs, 300 bars and even Congo River barges which sex workers frequent. The price was set close to that of a pack of gum for 3, or that of a bottle of beer for a dozen. Promotion is limited by a government ban of advertising in mass media, so point of purchase materials, special offers and promotional items are being used. Prudence condoms are now being marketed in Cameroon and Burundi.

  7. Reduced food access due to a lack of money, inability to lift and lack of access to a car for food shopping: a multilevel study in Melbourne, Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Cate; Bentley, Rebecca; Thornton, Lukar; Kavanagh, Anne

    2011-06-01

    To describe associations between demographic and individual and area-level socio-economic variables and restricted household food access due to lack of money, inability to lift groceries and lack of access to a car to do food shopping. Multilevel study of three measures of restricted food access, i.e. running out of money to buy food, inability to lift groceries and lack of access to a car for food shopping. Multilevel logistic regression was conducted to examine the risk of each of these outcomes according to demographic and socio-economic variables. Random selection of households from fifty small areas in Melbourne, Australia, in 2003. The main food shoppers in each household (n 2564). A lack of money was significantly more likely among the young and in households with single adults. Difficulty lifting was more likely among the elderly and those born overseas. The youngest and highest age groups both reported reduced car access, as did those born overseas and single-adult households. All three factors were most likely among those with a lower individual or household socio-economic position. Increased levels of area disadvantage were independently associated with difficulty lifting and reduced car access. In Melbourne, households with lower individual socio-economic position and area disadvantage have restricted access to food because of a lack of money and/or having physical limitations due difficulty lifting or lack of access to a car for food shopping. Further research is required to explore the relationship between physical restrictions and food access.

  8. 国外消费者购物价值理论研究述评%A Research Review of Consumer Shopping Value Theory Abroad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈鹏熠

    2009-01-01

    购物价值是消费者在购物中感知到的多种价值组合,体现了消费者对购物体验的综合评价,反映了购物的功能性、享乐性和社会性意义.作为一种从消费者行为视角看待的价值概念,购物价值对零售企业的营销决策具有重要作用.%Shopping value is a value portfolio that is perceived by consumers in the process of shopping. It repre-sents that consumers evaluate synthetically shopping experience,and reflects functional,hedonic ,social meanings of shopping. As a kind of value concept treated from consumer behavior perspective, shopping value plays an im-portant role in marketing design-making of retail enterprises. This paper retrospects the research results and fron-tier questions of consumer shopping value under briek-and-motar store environment abroad, and reviews concrete-ly the theoretical connotation of different kinds of shopping value, the driving factors of shopping value, and the relationship between shopping value and retail outcomes. Finally, the research directions and marketing implica-tions of shopping value are discussed.

  9. 基于网络文化接触差异的大学生网络购物行为研究——以石河子大学为例%College students online shopping behavior research based on difference of the network cultural contact——Shihezi University college students as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宏伟; 曹向园

    2012-01-01

    通过对石河子大学商学院学生问卷调查,发现不同专业、年级、性别和民族学生具有较明显的网络文化接触差异,影响到其网络购物态度和行为选择。其影响表现为网购认知、心理顾虑、购物信息、兴趣偏好、时尚需求和群体性影响等方面。%Based on the Shihezi University Business College students questionnaire,found that different majors,grades,gender and ethnic students have obvious differences in network culture contact,and affect their online shopping attitude and behavior choice.The effect on performance for online cognitive,psychological concerns,shopping,fashion information,interest demand and group influence.

  10. Branding on the Shop Floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szilvia Gyimóthy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Service branding is a particular form of emotional management, where employees are regarded as adaptable media, who can be trained to convey corporate values while interacting with customers. This paper examines the identity work of butchers during the brand revitalisation campaign of Kvickly, a Danish supermarket chain. During the implementation of the “Best Butcher in Town”-project, Kvickly’s shop floor becomes an engineered servicescape where the norms of good salesmanship must be performed. By documenting the disloyal behaviour of butchers, we demonstrate that the affective commitment towards corporate brand values is closely related with self-enactment opportunities of occupational communities. Total service-orientation threatens butchers’ perception of autonomy and may therefore result in the emergence of resistant sub-cultures.

  11. Dermatoses among floral shop workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiboutot, D M; Hamory, B H; Marks, J G

    1990-01-01

    Concern about the increasing incidence of hand dermatitis in floral shop workers in the United States and its possible association to the plant Alstroemeria, a flower that has become popular since its introduction in 1981, prompted investigation of the prevalence and cause of hand dermatitis in a sample of floral workers. Fifty-seven floral workers were surveyed, and 15 (26%) reported hand dermatitis within the previous 12 months. Sixteen floral workers (eight with dermatitis) volunteered to be patch tested to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group Standard and Perfume Trays, a series of eight pesticides and 20 plant allergens. Of four of seven floral designers and arrangers who reported hand dermatitis, three reacted positively to patch tests to tuliposide A, the allergen in Alstroemeria. Patch test readings for all other plant extracts were negative. A positive reading for a test to one pesticide, difolatan (Captafol), was noted, the relevance of which is unknown.

  12. The Welfare Effects of Price Advertising with Basket Shopping: Structural Estimates from Supermarket Promotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Cixiu

    2015-01-01

    This paper empirically examines welfare effects of the informative price advertising in the supermarket retail industry, using structural estimation approaches and individual scanner data. Supermarket retailers use promotions (advertised price cuts) to announce sales as a competing instrument. Us...... as a means of business stealing. Finally, a counterfactual experiment of online shopping, in which transportation costs are removed, is found welfare-improving........ Using a spatial model that accounts for consumer shopping behavior and retailer pricing behavior, I structurally estimate consumer demand and the marginal costs of promotion, following the discrete choice literature and moment inequality approach. The simulation results numerically show that the private...

  13. The Welfare Effects of Price Advertising with Basket Shopping: Structural Estimates from Supermarket Promotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Cixiu

    2015-01-01

    This paper empirically examines welfare effects of the informative price advertising in the supermarket retail industry, using structural estimation approaches and individual scanner data. Supermarket retailers use promotions (advertised price cuts) to announce sales as a competing instrument. Us...... as a means of business stealing. Finally, a counterfactual experiment of online shopping, in which transportation costs are removed, is found welfare-improving........ Using a spatial model that accounts for consumer shopping behavior and retailer pricing behavior, I structurally estimate consumer demand and the marginal costs of promotion, following the discrete choice literature and moment inequality approach. The simulation results numerically show that the private...

  14. APPLYING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION TO JOB-SHOP SCHEDULING PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Weijun; Wu Zhiming; Zhang Wei; Yang Genke

    2004-01-01

    A new heuristic algorithm is proposed for the problem of finding the minimum makespan in the job-shop scheduling problem. The new algorithm is based on the principles of particle swarm optimization (PSO). PSO employs a collaborative population-based search, which is inspired by the social behavior of bird flocking. It combines local search (by self experience) and global search (by neighboring experience), possessing high search efficiency. Simulated annealing (SA) employs certain probability to avoid becoming trapped in a local optimum and the search process can be controlled by the cooling schedule. By reasonably combining these two different search algorithms, a general, fast and easily implemented hybrid optimization algorithm, named HPSO, is developed. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed PSO-based algorithm are demonstrated by applying it to some benchmark job-shop scheduling problems and comparing results with other algorithms in literature. Comparing results indicate that PSO-based algorithm is a viable and effective approach for the job-shop scheduling problem.

  15. The feasibility and utility of grocery receipt analyses for dietary assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Yan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To establish the feasibility and utility of a simple data collection methodology for dietary assessment. Design Using a cross-sectional design, trained data collectors approached adults (~20 – 40 years of age at local grocery stores and asked whether they would volunteer their grocery receipts and answer a few questions for a small stipend ($1. Methods The grocery data were divided into 3 categories: "fats, oils, and sweets," "processed foods," and "low-fat/low-calorie substitutions" as a percentage of the total food purchase price. The questions assessed the shopper's general eating habits (eg, fast-food consumption and a few demographic characteristics and health aspects (eg, perception of body size. Statistical Analyses Performed. Descriptive and analytic analyses using non-parametric tests were conducted in SAS. Results Forty-eight receipts and questionnaires were collected. Nearly every respondent reported eating fast food at least once per month; 27% ate out once or twice a day. Frequency of fast-food consumption was positively related to perceived body size of the respondent (p = 0.02. Overall, 30% of the food purchase price was for fats, oils, sweets, 10% was for processed foods, and almost 6% was for low-fat/low-calorie substitutions. Households where no one was perceived to be overweight spent a smaller proportion of their food budget on fats, oils, and sweets than did households where at least one person was perceived to be overweight (p = 0.10; household where the spouse was not perceived to be overweight spent less on fats, oils, and sweets (p = 0.02 and more on low-fat/low-calorie substitutions (p = 0.09 than did households where the spouse was perceived to be overweight; and, respondents who perceived themselves to be overweight spent more on processed foods than did respondents who did not perceive themselves to be overweight (p = 0.06. Conclusion This simple dietary assessment method, although global in

  16. Making working in retailing interesting: A study of human resource management practices in Danish grocery retail chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Buck, Nuka

    In this paper we investigate the human resource management practices of five Danish grocery retail chains from the perspective of both retailers and employees. We present an analytical framework for analysing the social and institutional context of Danish retailing and interpret our case study...

  17. Assessing Reliability and Validity of the "GroPromo" Audit Tool for Evaluation of Grocery Store Marketing and Promotional Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F.; Bromby, Erica; Glanz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate reliability and validity of a new tool for assessing the placement and promotional environment in grocery stores. Methods: Trained observers used the "GroPromo" instrument in 40 stores to code the placement of 7 products in 9 locations within a store, along with other promotional characteristics. To test construct validity,…

  18. Making working in retailing interesting: A study of human resource management practices in Danish grocery retail chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Buck, Nuka

    In this paper we investigate the human resource management practices of five Danish grocery retail chains from the perspective of both retailers and employees. We present an analytical framework for analysing the social and institutional context of Danish retailing and interpret our case study...

  19. FOOD-PURCHASING PATTERNS FOR HOME: A GROCERY STORE-INTERCEPT SURVEY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: To identify the most common frequency of food-purchasing patterns and relate this pattern to characteristics of individuals and families. Design: A customer-intercept survey was conducted in the greater Houston area, Texas, USA, in 2002. The frequency of food shopping at supermarkets, co...

  20. The 3D virtual environment online for real shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Nahla

    2015-01-01

    The development of information technology and Internet has led to rapidly progressed in e-commerce and online shopping, due to the convenience that they provide consumers. E-commerce and online shopping are still not able to fully replace onsite shopping. In contrast, conventional online shopping websites often cannot provide enough information about a product for the customer to make an informed decision before checkout. 3D virtual shopping environment show great potential for enhancing e-co...

  1. Dynamic Scheduling of Flexible Job Shops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAHID Ikramullah Butt; SUN Hou-fang

    2007-01-01

    Aim of this research is to minimize makespan in the flexible job shop environment by the use of genetic algorithms and scheduling rules.Software is developed using genetic algorithms and scheduling rules based on certain constraints such as non-preemption of jobs,recirculation,set up times,non-breakdown of machines etc.Purpose of the software is to develop a schedule for flexible job shop environment,which is a special case of job shop scheduling problem.Scheduling algorithm used in the software is verified and tested by using MT10 as benchmark problem,presented in the flexible job shop environment at the end.LEKIN(R) software results are also compared with results of the developed software by the use of MT10 benchmark problem to show that the latter is a practical software and can be used successfully at BIT Training Workshop.

  2. Risk factors of the upper limb disorders among cashiers in grocery retail industries: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhaidi, Muhammad Fareez Ahmad; Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Cashiers have been appointed as one of top ten occupations in developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) particularly on the upper limb. Many of the workers are still in high risk injury due to incorrect workstations and lack of employee education in basic biomechanical principles. Normally, cashiers are exposed in several risk factors such as awkward and static postures, repetition motion and forceful exertions. Thus, cashiers in supermarket are considered at risk from developing upper limb disorders (ULDs). This review evaluates selected papers that have studied risk factors of the upper limb disorders among cashiers in grocery retail industries. In addition, other studies from related industry were reviewed as applicable. In order to understand risk factors of the upper limb disorders among cashiers, it is recommended that future studies are needed in evaluating these risk factors among cashiers.

  3. Emolabeling effectively reduces the influence of ambiguous labeling on food packages among grocery store shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privitera, Gregory J; Brown, Caitlin J; Gillespie, James J

    2014-12-16

    Despite increased regulations and policy enforcement for nutrition labeling, ambiguous labels on food items can still have deleterious effects on consumer perceptions of health. The present study used a counterbalanced within-subjects design to test if emolabeling - the use of emoticons to convey health information (happy = healthy; sad = not healthy) - will reduce the effects of ambiguous labels on consumer perceptions of the healthfulness of a food item. 85 grocery store shoppers were shown nutrition labels for a low calorie (LC) and a high calorie (HC) food with/without emolabels, and with an ambiguous label that either implied the food was healthy or unhealthy. Results showed that emolabels reduced the effectiveness of ambiguous labels: consumers rated the LC food as healthier and the HC food as less healthy when emolabels were added. The results suggest that, if implemented, this image-based emolabeling system could possibly be an effective buffer against the use of ambiguous labeling by food manufacturers.

  4. SAFETY OF LIFE ACTIVITY AND ECOLOGICAL COMPATIBILITY IN THE GROCERY DEPARTMENT OF A BEET-SUGAR FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ageev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beet-sugar factory - is a large, well-equipped with modern technology, the company that operates in a continuous circuit. In the technological structure of a sugar factory there are three production divisions: beet processing department, juice purification house and grocery department. In the grocery department of a sugar factory dangerous and harmful factors may encounter while using equipment such as vacuum devices, centrifuges, and crystallizer tank, massecuite distributor, driers and classifiers sugar. The working area of the service of machinery may appear dangerous or harmful factors, which are divided into the following groups: physical, chemical, biological and physiological. To maintain microclimate parameters can be applied general ventilation, in which the replacement of the warm air to the cold going around the room volume. Heating in the grocery department in the production season is not carried out, since it is sufficient to heat generated by the equipment. In the grocery department uses natural and artificial lighting. In the sugar factory used the following measures to protect against vibration: perform detailed assembly, eliminate defects and looseness of individual parts; way to isolate the transmission of vibrations from the machine to the foundation apply vibration isolators. Widespread use of electrical installations in a sugar factory creates the risk of electric shock to persons. Causes of electrical shocks are often disadvantages of construction and installation of the equipment, its operation is wrong. During drying and transportation of sugar produced by static electricity. To remove the static electricity equipment grounded; also used the increase in humidity; air ionization. To reduce the consumption of fresh industrial water from reservoirs provides for the establishment of the system of working circuits cleaning and maximum reuse of industrial water. Thus, safety and environmental compliance in the grocery

  5. The interactive effects of affect and shopping goal on information search and product evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangyuan; Wyer, Robert S; Shen, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Although shoppers often want to evaluate products to make a purchase decision, they can also shop for enjoyment. In each case, the amount of time they spend on shopping and the number of options they consider can depend on the mood they happen to be in. We predicted that mood can signal whether the goal has been attained and when people should stop processing information. When people are primarily motivated to purchase a particular type of product, positive mood signals that they have done enough. Thus, they consider less information if they are happy than if they are unhappy. When people shop for enjoyment, however, positive mood signals that they are still having fun. Thus, they consider more information when they are happy than when they are not. Four experiments among university students (N = 827) examined these possibilities. Experiment 1 provided initial evidence for the interactive effects of mood and goals on search behavior and product evaluation. Other studies examined the implications of this conceptualization for different domains: (a) the relative impact of brand and attribute information on judgments (Experiment 2), (b) gender differences in shopping behavior (Experiment 3), and (c) the number of options that people review in an actual online shopping website (Experiment 4).

  6. Exploring "wine shops" as a venue for HIV prevention interventions in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaram, Sudha; Johnson, Sethulakshmi; Bentley, Margaret E; Srikrishnan, A K; Latkin, Carl A; Go, Vivian F; Solomon, Suniti; Celentano, David D

    2007-07-01

    Addressing male heterosexual risk is a high priority for HIV prevention efforts in India. Particularly in urban India, which draws men for employment opportunities, these efforts are gaining momentum with a focus on understanding possible risk facilitators such as alcohol use. However, little is known about venues where such efforts might be targeted. In this paper, we explore community-based alcohol outlets or "wine shops" in Chennai, India, as potential venues. We conducted ethnographic research with wine shop staff and clients to understand alcohol use and sexual behaviors. We then surveyed 118 wine shop patrons to quantify these risk behaviors and plan an appropriate intervention. Our results show that wine shops are a venue where social and sexual networks converge. Reports and observations of regular and heavy drinking were frequent. Over 50% of patrons surveyed reported three or more sexual partners in the past 3 months, and 71% of all patrons reported a history of exchanging sex for money. Condom use history was low overall but, in the adjusted analyses, was significantly higher (OR = 20.1) among those who reported that their most recent partner was a sex worker and lower (OR = 0.28) among those who reported they drank to feel disinhibited. The data suggest that wine shops may be an appropriate location to target men for HIV prevention interventions. We discuss how these findings helped design such an intervention in Chennai.

  7. SEE IT, LIKE IT, BUY IT! HEDONIC SHOPPING MOTIVATIONS AND IMPULSE BUYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasim Tatić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of six broad categories of hedonic shopping motivations(adventure,gratification,role, value, social, and idea shopping and fashion consciousness on consumers’ impulse buying behavior. The online questionnaire wascreated using LimeSurvey, a web based questionnaire generator tool. An online questionnaire was directed to a sample of 500 individuals in Bosnia and Herzegovina, using nonprobability convenience sampling method. A total of 224 participants completed the questionnaire, which corresponds to the response rate of 44.8 percent. The surveyinstrument used in this study was designed using scales that were already validated in the previous research. The results indicated that impulse buying behavior was significantly related to adventure,gratification, value and idea shopping motivations. Nevertheless, roleshopping, social shopping and fashion consciousness were found not significantly related to impulse buying behavior. The findings of this study can help retailers to gain a useful insight into theshopping motivations that trigger impulse buying behavior. A focus onadventure, entertainment, excitement and sales may be an effectiveretailing strategy to stimulate impulse buying behavior. There are some of limitations in this study worthy of improvement and leads for future studies. A more random sampling method, sampling from different geographic locations and replication of this study in the context of other product categories are necessary to ensure reliablegeneralizability.

  8. The Effects of Shopping Orientations, Consumer Innovativeness, Purchase Experience, and Gender on Intention to Shop for Fashion Products Online

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmala, Ratih Puspa; Dewi, Ike Janita

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, many fashion retailers or marketers use the power of internet to promote and sell their products. This research examines the effects of consumers’ shopping orientations (brand/fashion consciousness, shopping enjoyment, price consciousness, convenience/time consciousness, shopping confidence, in-home shopping tendency), consumer innovativeness, online purchase experience for fashion products, and gender on consumers’ intention to shop for fashion products online. Data were collected ...

  9. Towards an understanding of Internet-based problem shopping behaviour: The concept of online shopping addiction and its proposed predictors

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Susan; DHANDAYUDHAM, ARUN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Compulsive and addictive forms of consumption and buying behaviour have been researched in both business and medical literature. Shopping enabled via the Internet now introduces new features to the shopping experience that translate to positive benefits for the shopper. Evidence now suggests that this new shopping experience may lead to problematic online shopping behaviour. This paper provides a theoretical review of the literature relevant to online shopping addiction (OSA). Bas...

  10. Doctor shopping: a phenomenon of many themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2012-11-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments.

  11. Introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria into drug shops in Uganda: design and implementation of a cluster randomized trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, AK; Magnussen, P; Chandler, CI; Hansen, KS; S. Lal; Cundill, B; Lynch, CA; Clarke, SE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An intervention was designed to introduce rapid diagnostics tests for malaria (mRDTs) into registered drug shops in Uganda to encourage rational and appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). We conducted participatory training of drug shop vendors and implemented supporting interventions to orientate local communities (patients) and the public sector (health facility staff and district officials) to the behavioral changes in diagnosis, trea...

  12. VisitSense: Sensing Place Visit Patterns from Ambient Radio on Smartphones for Targeted Mobile Ads in Shopping Malls

    OpenAIRE

    Byoungjip Kim; Seungwoo Kang; Jin-Young Ha; Junehwa Song

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel smartphone framework called VisitSense that automatically detects and predicts a smartphone user’s place visits from ambient radio to enable behavioral targeting for mobile ads in large shopping malls. VisitSense enables mobile app developers to adopt visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising for shopping mall visitors in their apps. It also benefits mobile users by allowing them to receive highly relevant mobile ads that are aware of their place visit pattern...

  13. Generation Y Attitudes towards Shopping: A Comparison of the Czech Republic and Slovakia

    OpenAIRE

    Klapilova Krbova Petra

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study focused on Generation Y (born between 1980 and 2000) behavior in two neighboring European countries, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. This article identifies and describes basic characteristics of this generation’s general behavior as well as defines specifics of their shopping behavior by examining their attitudes towards retailers, brands, sales and discount offers. The sample consisted of 380 respondents: 162 from Slovakia and 218 from...

  14. Shopping Context and Consumers' Mental Representation of Complex Shopping Trip Decision Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); T.A. Arentze (Theo); H.J.P. Timmermans (Harry)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractDepending on the shopping context, consumers may develop different mental representations of complex shopping trip decision problems to help them interpret the decision situation that they face and evaluate alternative courses of action. To investigate these mental representations and h

  15. Shopping Context and Consumers' Mental Representation of Complex Shopping Trip Decision Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); T.A. Arentze (Theo); H.J.P. Timmermans (Harry)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractDepending on the shopping context, consumers may develop different mental representations of complex shopping trip decision problems to help them interpret the decision situation that they face and evaluate alternative courses of action. To investigate these mental representations and

  16. Shopping Context and Consumers' Mental Representation of Complex Shopping Trip Decision Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); T.A. Arentze (Theo); H.J.P. Timmermans (Harry)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractDepending on the shopping context, consumers may develop different mental representations of complex shopping trip decision problems to help them interpret the decision situation that they face and evaluate alternative courses of action. To investigate these mental representations and h

  17. Food shopping profiles and their association with dietary patterns: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanKim, Nicole A; Erickson, Darin J; Laska, Melissa N

    2015-07-01

    Food shopping is a complex behavior that consists of multiple dimensions. Little research has explored multiple dimensions of food shopping or examined how it relates to dietary intake. To identify patterns (or classes) of food shopping across four domains (fresh food purchasing, conscientious food shopping, food shopping locations, and food/beverage purchasing on or near campus) and explore how these patterns relate to dietary intake among college students. A cross-sectional online survey was administered. Students attending a public 4-year university and a 2-year community college in the Twin Cities (Minnesota) metropolitan area (N=1,201) participated in this study. Fast-food and soda consumption as well as meeting fruit and vegetable, fiber, added sugar, calcium, dairy, and fat recommendations. Crude and adjusted latent class models and adjusted logistic regression models were fit. An eight-class solution was identified: "traditional shopper" (14.9%), "fresh food and supermarket shopper" (14.1%), "convenience shopper" (18.8%), "conscientious convenience shopper" (13.8%), "conscientious, fresh food, convenience shopper" (11.8%), "conscientious fresh food shopper" (6.6%), "conscientious nonshopper" (10.2%), and "nonshopper" (9.8%). "Fresh food and supermarket shoppers" and "conscientious fresh food shoppers" had better dietary intake (for fast food, calcium, dairy, and added sugar), whereas "convenience shoppers" and "conscientious convenience shoppers," and "nonshoppers" had worse dietary intake (for soda, calcium, dairy, fiber, and fat) than "traditional shoppers." These findings highlight unique patterns in food shopping and associated dietary patterns that could inform tailoring of nutrition interventions for college students. Additional research is needed to understand modifiable contextual influences of healthy food shopping. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale: reliability and validity of a brief screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Cecilie S; Griffiths, Mark D; Pallesen, Ståle; Bilder, Robert M; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Although excessive and compulsive shopping has been increasingly placed within the behavioral addiction paradigm in recent years, items in existing screens arguably do not assess the core criteria and components of addiction. To date, assessment screens for shopping disorders have primarily been rooted within the impulse-control or obsessive-compulsive disorder paradigms. Furthermore, existing screens use the terms 'shopping,' 'buying,' and 'spending' interchangeably, and do not necessarily reflect contemporary shopping habits. Consequently, a new screening tool for assessing shopping addiction was developed. Initially, 28 items, four for each of seven addiction criteria (salience, mood modification, conflict, tolerance, withdrawal, relapse, and problems), were constructed. These items and validated scales (i.e., Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale, Mini-International Personality Item Pool, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) were then administered to 23,537 participants (M age = 35.8 years, SD age = 13.3). The highest loading item from each set of four pooled items reflecting the seven addiction criteria were retained in the final scale, The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale (BSAS). The factor structure of the BSAS was good (RMSEA = 0.064, CFI = 0.983, TLI = 0.973) and coefficient alpha was 0.87. The scores on the BSAS converged with scores on the Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale (CBMS; 0.80), and were positively correlated with extroversion and neuroticism, and negatively with conscientiousness, agreeableness, and intellect/imagination. The scores of the BSAS were positively associated with anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and inversely related to age. Females scored higher than males on the BSAS. The BSAS is the first scale to fully embed shopping addiction within an addiction paradigm. A recommended cutoff score for the new scale and future research directions are discussed.

  19. Vape shop retailers’ perceptions of their customers, products and services: A content analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jennifer Y.; Bluthenthal, Ricky; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Garcia, Robert; Garcia, Jocelyn; Unger, Jennifer; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Sussman, Steve Y.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The popularity of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has spurred the growth of vape shops, but little is known about the retailers who may play an important role in the introduction and dissemination of vape products. In this paper we examine how retailers profile their customers and their perceptions of vaping, and the services their shops provide. METHODS Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of retailers (n=77) located across southern California. Open-ended questions were coded and analyzed using a content analysis approach. RESULTS Three themes emerged from the content analysis: who vapes, why people vape, and the vape shop environment. Retailers profiled customers as friendly, health conscious, and interested in tobacco cessation or cessation maintenance. Retailers believed e-cigarettes were used recreationally or as products that help curb other addictive behaviors. While most retailers reported positive experiences with vaping, some reported potentially negative experiences including failed cessation attempts, dual use of e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes, and increased nicotine dependence. Retailers reported that they regularly answer questions about vaping and believe their shops function as social lounges that are tied to other recreational activities. CONCLUSIONS Retailers attach certain characteristics to their clientele, perceive certain health benefits associated with vaping, and seek to establish their shops as places that provide guidance on vape products as well as shops with a recreational aesthetic. As vape shops grow in popularity, additional research on, and regulation of, these retailers will be necessary. Education campaigns are needed to inform retailers of the benefits and consequences of vaping. PMID:28736758

  20. The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale: reliability and validity of a brief screening test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Cecilie S.; Griffiths, Mark D.; Pallesen, Ståle; Bilder, Robert M.; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Although excessive and compulsive shopping has been increasingly placed within the behavioral addiction paradigm in recent years, items in existing screens arguably do not assess the core criteria and components of addiction. To date, assessment screens for shopping disorders have primarily been rooted within the impulse-control or obsessive-compulsive disorder paradigms. Furthermore, existing screens use the terms ‘shopping,’ ‘buying,’ and ‘spending’ interchangeably, and do not necessarily reflect contemporary shopping habits. Consequently, a new screening tool for assessing shopping addiction was developed. Initially, 28 items, four for each of seven addiction criteria (salience, mood modification, conflict, tolerance, withdrawal, relapse, and problems), were constructed. These items and validated scales (i.e., Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale, Mini-International Personality Item Pool, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) were then administered to 23,537 participants (Mage = 35.8 years, SDage = 13.3). The highest loading item from each set of four pooled items reflecting the seven addiction criteria were retained in the final scale, The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale (BSAS). The factor structure of the BSAS was good (RMSEA = 0.064, CFI = 0.983, TLI = 0.973) and coefficient alpha was 0.87. The scores on the BSAS converged with scores on the Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale (CBMS; 0.80), and were positively correlated with extroversion and neuroticism, and negatively with conscientiousness, agreeableness, and intellect/imagination. The scores of the BSAS were positively associated with anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and inversely related to age. Females scored higher than males on the BSAS. The BSAS is the first scale to fully embed shopping addiction within an addiction paradigm. A recommended cutoff score for the new scale and future research directions are discussed. PMID:26441749

  1. Course Shopping in Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William E.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the course shopping behaviors among a sample of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across nine campuses of a large urban district. The sample was purposely designed as an analytic, rather than a random, sample that sought to obtain adequate numbers of students in course areas that were of theoretical and of…

  2. A research on consumer satisfaction and shopping patterns of households in the North Eastern Savo region

    OpenAIRE

    Taavitsainen, Ossi

    2015-01-01

    This Bachelor’s thesis deals with shopping patterns of consumers and their satisfaction with local supply of goods in the North Eastern Savo region in Finland. The thesis was conducted as a follow-up research to the original research made by a student of the University of Eastern Finland in 2009-2010. The theoretical part of the thesis consists of two main topics: purchase behavior of consumers and development of online shopping. The empirical part is based on a survey, conducted among consum...

  3. A Dynamic Job Shop Scheduling Method Based on Ant Colony Coordination System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Qiong; WU Li-hui; ZHANG Jie

    2009-01-01

    Due to the stubborn nature of dynamic job shop scheduling problem, a novel ant colony coordination mechanism is proposed in this paper to search for an optimal schedule in dynamic environment. In ant colony coordination mechanism, the dynamic .job shop is composed of several autonomous ants. These ants coordinate with each other by simulating the ant foraging behavior of spreading pheromone on the trails, by which they can make information available globally, and further more guide ants make optimal decisions. The proposed mechanism is tested by several instances and the results confirm the validity of it.

  4. 78 FR 68096 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; American...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... behaviors, food assistance participation, grocery and meal shopping, food preparation, and food sufficiency... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency: DOL-BLS. Title of...

  5. Assessment of Shopping Behavior: Automatic System for Behavioral Cues Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of public places (e.g. cities, schools, transit districts, and public buildings) are deploying CCTV surveillance systems to monitor and protect the people in those areas. Since events like the terrorist attack in Madrid and London, there has been a further increasing demand for

  6. Assessment of Shopping Behavior: Automatic System for Behavioral Cues Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of public places (e.g. cities, schools, transit districts, and public buildings) are deploying CCTV surveillance systems to monitor and protect the people in those areas. Since events like the terrorist attack in Madrid and London, there has been a further increasing demand for

  7. Motivation of Online Buyer Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Veronika Svatosová

    2013-01-01

    .... The subject matter of this article is an analysis of the features of online buyer behavior compared to the general regularities of buyer behavior, definition of the main motives of online shopping...

  8. Towards Corporate Shared Value in Retail Sector: A Comparative Study over Grocery and Banking Between Italy and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Candelo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The research investigates the extent to which Banking and Grocery retailers use Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in accordance to evolving consumers’ expectations and build a strategic model of Corporate Shared Value (CSV to strive for economic and social returns simultaneously. The paper adopts a qualitative approach, based on the comparative case study methodology by investigating a sample of twelve Banking and Grocery retailers in Italy and the UK. Differences and similarities in CSR as new strategic model among countries and retail sectors emerge, with UK companies from both the sectors showing the most formalized integration of CSR within their business strategy. The chance for both Italian and UK retail companies is to adopt the best practices emerging from the case studies to turn their CSR programs into a strategic business model of CSV that will allow a stronger retailer-consumer relationship based on social improvements and a reinforcement of their brand image.

  9. The Virtual Shopping Experience: using virtual presence to motivate online shopping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Chin

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Online shopping has thus far tended to be a niche business – highly successful in selling digital products such as shares, software and, increasingly, music and films, it has been less successful in persuading the purchasers of ‘traditional’ goods such as cars, clothes, toiletries, or household appliances to forsake their physical retailers and move into cyberspace. In this wide-ranging review paper we investigate the issue of the virtual experience – endeavouring to understand what is needed for a successful ‘shopping experience’ online and what the possible obstacles or pitfalls along the way might be. We initially introduce the concepts of virtual presence (the sense of ‘being there’ and virtual reality, discussing the possible roles both can play in providing a solution to the problem of effective online shopping. We then consider the Experience Economy, a concept which encapsulates many of the issues related to the problem of online shopping and which suggests ways in which online retailers can enhance the effectiveness of their sites by means of a virtual ‘experience’. Having set the scene for online shopping, we discuss eTailing today in terms of direct product experience and the opportunities which cyber-shopping offers to replicate this process. Finally, we identify some of the possibilities and problems of online shopping today, illustrating the current status of virtual presence in retailing with two micro-cases of success and failure.

  10. Matching Danish Shop Stewards' Service Demands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrbjerg, Steen Erik; Larsen, Trine Pernille

    for more flexibility in work organization at company level in order to meet the challenges of globalization. The level of negotiations moved from national and sector levels to work place level at the same time as the scope of issues to discuss has broadened, including local negotiations on issues like...... policies atypical work, special schemes for older workers, local wage systems etc. This development has increased the work load on Danish shop stewards; they are not only to guard the wages and working conditions stipulated in the sector agreements; shop stewards are also expected to negotiate...... these matters locally and on top of this negotiate all kinds of employment policies, work organisation, working hours etc. Based on two extensive shop stewards surveys undertaken in 1998 and 2010 respectively, the paper examines whether there exist a contradiction between a) the on-going decentralisation...

  11. Women who doctor shop for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-04-01

    Doctor shopping is a term used to describe a form of diversion of prescription drugs when patients visit numerous prescribers to obtain controlled drugs for illicit use. Gender differences exist in regard to prescription drug abuse and methods of diversion. The purpose of this phenomenological study guided by the existential philosophy of Merleau-Ponty was to understand the lived experience of female doctor shoppers. Interviews were conducted with 14 women, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Included in the findings are figural aspects of the participants' experience of doctor shopping related to the existential grounds of world, time, body, and others. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) feeding the addiction, (b) networking with addicts, (c) playing the system, and (d) baiting the doctors. The findings suggest several measures that nurses can take to reduce the incidence of doctor shopping and to provide better care for female doctor shoppers.

  12. Attitudinal Explanation on Virtual Shopping Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritzky Karina M.R. Brahmana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Virtual stores provide great efficiency in the retail value chain, and their existence has tremendously paved the way for electronic commerce. Understanding the intention of consumers to shop online in attitudinal perspective will provide important contribution to the area of e-commerce. This research proposes Task Technology Fit, Perceived Ease of Use (PEoU, and Perceived Usefulness (PU as the factors that drive consumers’ intention. The results from our survey study of 310 online consumers in Indonesia indicate that TTF affects PEoU and PU significantly. Our hierarchical model also reports that PEoU is the mediating effect on the relationship between TTF and Intention. The resulting model explains a large portion of the factors that lead a user’s behavioural intention to use a virtual shop. Keywords : Attitudinal, Task Technology Fit, Perceived Ease of Use, Perceived Usefulness, Retail, Virtual Shopping Intention

  13. English Shop Signs and Brand Names

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemaseh Bagheri Sanjareh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The present study tries to investigate the people’s attitude to the use of English words in TV commercials, brand-naming and shop signs in Iran and specifically in Tehran where due to the fact that it is the capital, more English might be used for the sake of foreigners. The widespread use of English shop signs and English brand names for recently produced goodsdrove the researchers to investigate peoples’ attitude as consumers from two aspects of age and education. To reach the research goal, a questionnaire was devised and distributed to 100 people at random selection probing their attitudes while considering two factors of age and education. The result of the research will mostly benefit sociolinguists and business marketers.

    Keywords: age, education, advertising, brand-naming, shop signs, globalization

  14. An analysis of Bronx-based online grocery store circulars for nutritional content of food and beverage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethan, Danna; Samuel, Lalitha; Basch, Corey H

    2013-06-01

    With the rising rates of diabetes and obesity in New York City's poorest communities, efforts to assist low-income residents in spending money to promote nutritious food consumption have increased. The objective of this study was to assess the extent to which Bronx-based grocery stores offered nutritious foods on sale through their weekly circulars. Over a 2-month period, we analyzed 2,311 food and beverage products placed on the first page of online circulars for fifteen Bronx-based grocery stores. For each circular, we recorded the number of starchy and non-starchy fruits and vegetables; for each product, total fiber and carbohydrate content per serving (in grams), whether the product was processed, and sale price were recorded. Total sugar content (in grams) was recorded for all sugar-sweetened beverages. Over 84 % of the products were processed, and almost 40 % had at least one carbohydrate choice (15 g) per food serving. Only 16.5 % of the products were fresh fruits and green leafy vegetables, and 1.4 % had fiber content of 5 or more grams per serving. Requiring the purchase of multiples of unhealthy products to receive the sale price was also noted. Almost three-quarters of the sugar-sweetened beverages were advertised with promotional sales compared to over half of the fresh fruits and only one-third of fresh vegetables. We identified no other studies that address nutritional content of foods found in grocery store circulars. More research is necessary to determine if purchasing nutritious products at grocery stores in low-income neighborhoods is influenced by sale prices.

  15. Fast-food outlets and grocery stores near school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Hanne; Ervasti, Jenni; Oksanen, Tuula; Pentti, Jaana; Kouvonen, Anne; Halonen, Jaana I; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2015-08-01

    Environmental factors may affect adolescents' eating habits and thereby body weight. However, the contribution of school neighbourhood environment is poorly understood. This study examined the association between proximity of a fast-food outlet or grocery store to school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight. Participants were 23 182 adolescents (mean age 15 years) who responded to a classroom survey in 181 lower secondary schools in Finland (2008-09). School location was linked to data on distance from school to the nearest fast-food outlet or grocery store (≤100 m, 101-500 m, >500 m) using global positioning system-coordinate databases. Outcomes were irregular eating habits (skipping breakfast, skipping free school lunch, skipping free school-provided snacks and not having family dinners), the accumulation of these habits and overweight, including obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2)). Thirteen percentage of the participants were overweight. Having a fast-food outlet or grocery store near school was associated with skipping often breakfast and free school lunch, and the accumulation of irregular eating habits. The proximity of a fast-food outlet or grocery store was associated with a 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval 1.03-1.52) risk of overweight among adolescent with a low socioeconomic status but not among those with higher socioeconomic status. This association was partly (12%) explained by the accumulation of irregular eating habits. Among adolescents from low socioeconomic background, the presence of fast-food retailers near schools is associated with accumulation of irregular eating habits and greater overweight. These findings suggest that obesogenic school neighbourhoods may contribute to social inequalities in overweight. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  16. Analisis Faktor-Faktor Yang Mempengaruhi Keputusan Konsumen Pada Pembelian Produk- Produk Online Shop (Studi Pada Mahasiswa-Mahasiswi Fakultas Ilmu Sosial Dan Ilmu Politik Universitas Sumatera Utara)

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Putri Eka

    2015-01-01

    This study was motivated by the development of technology and media marketing is a business Online. These developments are changing the behavior of people who originally shopped to traditional markets into online shopping so it is necessary to know the factors that influence the behavior of consumers to buy products online. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of prices, confidence, advertising, and product quality on purchasing decisions on products being sold on the online...

  17. "Seeing a doctor is just like having a date": a qualitative study on doctor shopping among overactive bladder patients in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Judy Yuen-Man

    2014-02-06

    Although having a regular primary care provider is noted to be beneficial to health, doctor shopping has been documented as a common treatment seeking behavior among chronically ill patients in different countries. However, little research has been conducted into the reasons behind doctor shopping behavior among patients with overactive bladder, and even less into how this behavior relates to these patients' illness and social experiences, perceptions, and cultural practices. Therefore, this study examines overactive bladder patients to investigate the reasons behind doctor shopping behavior. My study takes a qualitative approach, conducting 30 semi-structured individual interviews, with 30 overactive bladder patients in Hong Kong. My study found six primary themes that influenced doctor shopping behavior: lack of perceived need, convenience, work-provided medical insurance, unpleasant experiences with doctors, searching for a match doctor, and switching between biomedicine and traditional Chinese medicine. Besides the perceptual factors, participants' social environment, illness experiences, personal cultural preference, and cultural beliefs also intertwined to generate their doctor shopping behavior. Due to the low perceived need for a regular personal primary care physician, environmental factors such as time, locational convenience, and work-provided medical insurance became decisive in doctor shopping behavior. Patients' unpleasant illness experiences, stemming from a lack of understanding among many primary care doctors about overactive bladder, contributed to participants' sense of mismatch with these doctors, which induced them to shop for another doctor. Overactive bladder is a chronic bladder condition with very limited treatment outcome. Although patients with overactive bladder often require specialty urology treatment, it is usually beneficial for the patients to receive continuous, coordinated, comprehensive, and patient-centered support from their

  18. Consultation behaviour of doctor-shopping patients and factors that reduce shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Noda, Kazutaka; Tsukamoto, Tomoko; Takada, Toshihiko; Miyahara, Masahito; Funakoshi, Hiraku; Basugi, Ayako; Keira, Katsunori; Uehara, Takanori

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the subsequent behaviour of doctor-shopping patients (defined as those attending multiple hospitals for the same complaint) who consulted our department and factors related to cessation of doctor shopping. Patients who presented without referral to the Department of General Medicine at Chiba University Hospital in Japan (our department) completed a questionnaire at their first visit. A follow-up questionnaire was also sent to them in order to assess doctor shopping after 3 months. Then items in the questionnaires were investigated for significant differences between patients who continued or stopped doctor shopping. Logistic regression analysis was performed with items showing a significant difference between patients who stopped doctor shopping and those who continued it, in order to identify independent determinants of the cessation of shopping. A total of 978 patients who presented spontaneously to our department consented to this study, and 929 patients (95.0%) completed questionnaires correctly. Among them, 203 patients (21.9%) were identified as doctor shoppers. The follow-up survey was completed correctly by 138 patients (68.0%). Among them, 25 patients (18.1%) were found to have continued doctor shopping, which was a significantly lower rate than before (P shopping: 'confirmation of the diagnosis' (odds ratio: 8.12, 95% confidence interval: 1.46-45.26), and 'satisfaction with consultation' (odds ratio: 2.07, 95% confidence interval: 1.42-3.01). Doctor shopping decreased significantly after patients consulted our department, with 'confirmation of the diagnosis' and 'satisfaction with consultation' being identified as contributing factors. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The impact of science shops on university research and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hende, Merete; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    through the SCIPAS questionnaire sent out to science shops and through follow-up interviews with employees from nine different university-based science shops and one university researcher. Not all the cases call themselves science shops, but in the report the term 'science shop' will be used most...... of the time, when the cases are referred to in general. When the single case study is discussed the precise name is used. The interviews have in most cases been supplemented with written material about the science shops. The chosen science shops had indicated in the questionnaire that the science shop in one...... way or the other has had impact on university curricula and/or research. The analysis and the case studies have theoretically been based on literature on universities and education and research as institutions and a few articles about the impact of science shops on education and research. The analysis...

  20. The impact of science shops on university research and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hende, Merete; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    This report discusses the impact from university-based science shops on curricula and research. Experience from science shops show that besides assisting citizen groups, science shops can also contribute to the development of university curricula and research. This impact has been investigated...... through the SCIPAS questionnaire sent out to science shops and through follow-up interviews with employees from nine different university-based science shops and one university researcher. Not all the cases call themselves science shops, but in the report the term 'science shop' will be used most...... way or the other has had impact on university curricula and/or research. The analysis and the case studies have theoretically been based on literature on universities and education and research as institutions and a few articles about the impact of science shops on education and research. The analysis...

  1. Reducing Carbon Emissions from Shopping Trips: Evidence from China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jing Li; Pingyu Zhang; Kevin Lo; Meng Guo; Mark Wang

    2015-01-01

      With rising income and the emergence of modern shopping centers in urban China, shopping trips by private car becomes more and more common, leading to higher carbon emissions in the transport sector...

  2. Consumer Motivation On Internet Shopping An Exploratory Study on Consumer Motivation of Online Shopping in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Ghogar, Vandhana

    2010-01-01

    The growth of B2C shopping has soared massively over the last few years in Thailand. Although B2C has created an immense amount of new opportunities for Thai companies and businesses, questions still arise about why consumers are motivated to use the Internet as a medium to shop over conventional shopping. Due to the rapid increase in online stores, competition has also risen remarkably. Therefore it is imperative for all online businesses in Thailand to have an understanding of consumer moti...

  3. Location and function of hypermarkets and shopping centres in Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Lukić

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper deals with the spatial distribution, commercial structure and functions of newly built shopping centers and hypermarkets in Zagreb. Research has included mapping of all newly built shopping centers and hypermarkets, classification of their commercial and other functions according to numbers of business premises in them, and questionnaire survey conducted in three shopping centers on different locations in Zagreb. Questionnaire survey has been done in order to understand how visitors perceive shopping centers concerning their functions and urban location.

  4. Differences in food environment perceptions and spatial attributes of food shopping between residents of low and high food access areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohi, Inderbir; Bell, Bethany A; Liu, Jihong; Battersby, Sarah E; Liese, Angela D

    2014-01-01

    To explore potential differences in food shopping behaviors and healthy food availability perceptions between residents living in areas with low and high food access. A cross-sectional telephone survey to assess food shopping behaviors and perceptions. Data from an 8-county food environment field census used to define the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) healthier food retail tract and US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service food desert measure. A total of 968 residents in 8 South Carolina counties. Residents' food shopping behaviors and healthy food availability perceptions. Linear and logistic regression. Compared with residents in high food access areas, residents in low food access areas traveled farther to their primary food store (US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service: 8.8 vs 7.1 miles, P = .03; CDC: 9.2 vs 6.1 miles, P shopping miles per week (CDC: 28.0 vs 15.4 miles; P shopping access (P < .001). These findings lend support to ongoing community and policy interventions aimed at reducing food access disparities. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Working Memory Capacity and Domain Knowledge on Recall for Grocery Prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Douglas; Gardner, Michael K; Woltz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Hambrick and Engle (2002) proposed 3 models of how domain knowledge and working memory capacity may work together to influence episodic memory: a "rich-get-richer" model, a "building blocks" model, and a "compensatory" model. Their results supported the rich-get-richer model, although later work by Hambrick and Oswald (2005) found support for a building blocks model. We investigated the effects of domain knowledge and working memory on recall of studied grocery prices. Working memory was measured with 3 simple span tasks. A contrast of realistic versus fictitious foods in the episodic memory task served as our manipulation of domain knowledge, because participants could not have domain knowledge of fictitious food prices. There was a strong effect for domain knowledge (realistic food-price pairs were easier to remember) and a moderate effect for working memory capacity (higher working memory capacity produced better recall). Furthermore, the interaction between domain knowledge and working memory produced a small but significant interaction in 1 measure of price recall. This supported the compensatory model and stands in contrast to previous research.

  6. Musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic hazards among material handlers in grocery retail industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Zuhaidi, Muhammad Fareez Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    Grocery retail work can be physically demanding as material handler’s tasks involve manual lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing and pulling loads. The nature of this work puts them at a risk for serious low back pain, shoulder pain and other musculoskeletal injuries. This study was conducted by using two different types of tools which were Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) as a survey and Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) Checklist as a direct observation method. Among 46 males and 14 females material handlers were involved throughout this study. For NMQ, the highest body part trouble in the last 12 months was low back pain (88.3%), followed by upper back (68.3%), neck (55.3%) and shoulder (36.7%). While for WISHA Checklist, most of them experienced hazard level involving awkward posture and high hand force. From the research conducted, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and ergonomic risk factors (ERFs) do related as it showed that musculoskeletal disorders may arise if the workers ignored the safety in ergonomic hazards.

  7. Adoption of automatic identification systems by grocery retailersin the Johannesburg area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Darlington

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Retailers not only need the right data capture technology to meet the requirements of their applications, they must also decide on what the optimum technology is from the different symbologies that have been developed over the years. Automatic identification systems (AIS are a priority to decision makers as they attempt to obtain the best blend of equipment to ensure greater loss prevention and higher reliability in data capture. However there is a risk of having too simplistic a view of adopting AIS, since no one solution is applicable across an industry or business model. This problem is addressed through an exploratory, descriptive study, where the nature and value of AIS adoption by grocery retailers in the Johannesburg area is interrogated. Mixed empirical results indicate that, as retailers adopt AIS in order to improve their supply chain management systems, different types of applications are associated with various constraints and opportunities. Overall this study is in line with previous research that supports the notion that supply chain decisions are of a strategic nature even though efficient management of information is a day-to-day business operational decision.

  8. An epidemiological profile of cashiers holders carpal tunnel syndrome in a grocery store chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R; Barros, R; Campos, D; Lima, D; Barbosa, Geórgia

    2012-01-01

    Occupational diseases are those acquired in the work. Statistics show an increase number of cases, victims like typists, telephone's operators, cashiers and many others with varied levels of involvement. It is composed of disorders affecting the upper limbs being recognized by the Ministry of Social Welfare. Among these diseases stands out for its high occurrence Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). It has been considered a disease of the century, because its incidence has increased in 40.8% of repetitive stress disorders, with prevalence in females, and predominant age ranging from 25 to 40 years. It is characterized by pain and paresthesia in the first four fingers and wrists, and arm pain, weakness, numbness in the territory of the median nerve, preserving or not the palmar sensation and numbness in the median sensory distribution. This study aims to assess functional capacity and severity of symptoms presented by cashiers diagnosed with CTS. It is a descriptive and quantitative in nature. The population consists of 13 grocery store cashiers of both sexes, with a workload of 42 hours. We will be used as an instrument called the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. That purports to be an effective means of measuring the numbness and pain in hands and wrists. Exclusion criteria we consider the subjects who have other diseases associated with CTS. The collection is with the possibility of partial results to be entered in a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel for data analysis and subsequent discussion and correlation with the current literature.

  9. Online Sales Promotions of Grocery and Other FMCG Products in Chennai Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C.V.J. Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to reveal the online sales promotions of grocery and other FMCG products in Chennai entity along with the explosion of Internet users, Internet has been considered as the new channel for companies implementing their sales promotion activities. Online Sales promotions are generally looked at as tools that undermine the brand; yet a tool that is necessarily meant to speed up sales by attractive promos. Consumer online sales promotion in Chennai entity takes up a large share of the total marketing expenditure despite which it remains an area that still attracts attention as an essential component of the promotion mix meant to increase short term sales. It is therefore not surprising that most of the Chennai marketers resort to sales promotions to attract the competitor's market share. Consequently, this study seeks to offer insight into how popular Chennai online promotions (price-discount, coupon and free shipping influence consumer's quality perception and purchase intentions. Moreover, brand awareness was expected to moderate the relationship between promotion and consumer responses. Findings from this study will be able to provide useful knowledge for online sellers to choose appropriate sales promotion tools to successfully induce consumer's purchase intentions.

  10. New directions in the use of virtual reality for food shopping: marketing and education perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Barb

    2011-03-01

    Virtual reality is used in marketing research to shape food selection and purchase decisions. Could it be used to counteract the marketing of less-nutritious foods and teach healthier food selection? This article presents interviews with Raymond Burke, Ph.D., of Indiana University Bloomington, and Rachel Jones, M.P.H., of the University of Utah College of Health. Topics covered include new marketing research technologies, including virtual reality simulations; retailing and shopper behavior; and the use of virtual grocery stores to help students explore quality of diet and food/nutrient relationships. The interviewees discuss how the technologies they have developed fit into research and behavior change related to obesity and diabetes. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. Diffusion of subsidized ACTs in accredited drug shops in Tanzania: determinants of stocking and characteristics of early and late adopters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Peter S; Yadav, Prashant; Alphs, Sarah; Arkedis, Jean; Massaga, Julius; Sabot, Oliver; Cohen, Jessica L

    2013-12-18

    Many households in sub-Saharan Africa utilize the private sector as a primary source of treatment for malaria episodes. Expanding access to effective treatment in private drug shops may help reduce incidence of severe disease and mortality. This research leveraged a longitudinal survey of stocking of subsidized artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), an effective anti-malarial, in Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDOs) in two regions of Tanzania. This provided a unique opportunity to explore shop and market level determinants of product diffusion in a developing country retail market. 356 ADDOs in the Rukwa and Mtwara regions of Tanzania were surveyed at seven points between Feb 2011 and May 2012. Shop level audits were used to measure the availability of subsidized ACTs at each shop. Data on market and shop level factors were collected during the survey and also extracted from GIS layers. Regression and network based methodologies were used. Shops classified as early and late adopters, following Rogers' model of product diffusion, were compared. The Bass model of product diffusion was applied to determine whether shops stocked ACTs out of a need to imitate market competitors or a desire to satisfy customer needs. Following the introduction of a subsidy for ACTs, stocking increased from 12% to nearly 80% over the seven survey rounds. Stocking was influenced by higher numbers of proximal shops and clinics, larger customer traffic and the presence of a licensed pharmacist. Early adopters were characterized by a larger percentage of customers seeking care for malaria, a larger catchment and sourcing from specific wholesalers/suppliers. The Bass model of product diffusion indicated that shops were adopting products in response to competitor behavior, rather than customer demand. Decisions to stock new pharmaceutical products in Tanzanian ADDOs are influenced by a combination of factors related to both market competition and customer demand, but are particularly

  12. Sticking to core values : The case of the Body Shop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van de B.; Nijhof, A.H.J.; Jeurissen, R.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors detail the development of The Body Shop and the importance to it of the social projects it has undertaken. They then discuss the implications of The Body Shop's reorganization, brand repositioning and the L'Oréal takeover, and what the future might hold for The Body Shop

  13. Turning shopping habits of young consumers into green

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialkova, Svetlana; Bialkova, Svetlana; van 't Erve, Sanne; van Hoof, Joris Jasper; Pruyn, Adriaan T.H.; Bigné, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Consumers have strong shopping habits, and although being aware of sustainable issues, they hardly do green shopping. Therefore, a challenging question is: how to break the old shopping habits and turn those into green? The current study addresses this question looking at barriers and potential

  14. What drives people? Analyzing leisure-shopping trip decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ceunynck, T.; Kusumastuti, D.; Hannes, E.; Janssens, D.; Wets, G.

    2011-01-01

    Because of the strong increase in the number of leisure-shopping trips, a shift towards more sustainable leisure-shopping behaviour is desirable. This can be attained by having a better insight into people’s reasoning in choosing a transport mode and shopping location for this type of activities. Th

  15. What drives people? Analyzing leisure-shopping trip decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ceunynck, T.; Kusumastuti, Diana; Hannes, E.; Janssens, D.; Wets, G.

    2011-01-01

    Because of the strong increase in the number of leisure-shopping trips, a shift towards more sustainable leisure-shopping behaviour is desirable. This can be attained by having a better insight into people’s reasoning in choosing a transport mode and shopping location for this type of activities. Th

  16. Online versus Conventional Shopping: Consumers' Risk Perception and Regulatory Focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, Guda; Kerkhof, Peter; Fennis, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    In two experiments, the impact of shopping context on consumers' risk perceptions and regulatory focus was examined. We predicted that individuals perceive an online (vs. conventional) shopping environment as more risky and that an online shopping environment, by its risky nature, primes a

  17. Standardized Curriculum for Machine Tool Operation/Machine Shop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized vocational education course titles and core contents for two courses in Mississippi are provided: machine tool operation/machine shop I and II. The first course contains the following units: (1) orientation; (2) shop safety; (3) shop math; (4) measuring tools and instruments; (5) hand and bench tools; (6) blueprint reading; (7)…

  18. Turning shopping habits of young consumers into green

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialkova, Svetlana; Erve, van 't Sanne; Hoof, van Joris; Pruyn, Ad; Bigné, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Consumers have strong shopping habits, and although being aware of sustainable issues, they hardly do green shopping. Therefore, a challenging question is: how to break the old shopping habits and turn those into green? The current study addresses this question looking at barriers and potential stim

  19. Online versus Conventional Shopping: Consumers' Risk Perception and Regulatory Focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van Guda; Kerkhof, Peter; Fennis, Bob M.

    2007-01-01

    In two experiments, the impact of shopping context on consumers' risk perceptions and regulatory focus was examined. We predicted that individuals perceive an online (vs. conventional) shopping environment as more risky and that an online shopping environment, by its risky nature, primes a preventio

  20. Online versus Conventional Shopping: Consumers' Risk Perception and Regulatory Focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, Guda; Kerkhof, Peter; Fennis, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    In two experiments, the impact of shopping context on consumers' risk perceptions and regulatory focus was examined. We predicted that individuals perceive an online (vs. conventional) shopping environment as more risky and that an online shopping environment, by its risky nature, primes a preventio