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Sample records for graphite plate exposed

  1. Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S.S.; Allain, J.P.; Hassanein, A.; Hendricks, M.R.; Nieto-Perez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium as a plasma-facing component has many attractive features in fusion devices. We investigated chemical properties of the lithiated graphite surfaces during deposition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. In this study we try to address some of the known issues during lithium deposition, viz., the chemical state of lithium on graphite substrate, oxide layer formation mechanisms, Li passivation effects over time, and chemical change during exposure of the sample to ambient air. X-ray photoelectron studies indicate changes in the chemical composition with various thickness of lithium on graphite during deposition. An oxide layer formation is noticed during lithium deposition even though all the experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum. The metal oxide is immediately transformed into carbonate when the deposited sample is exposed to air.

  2. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  3. Method of producing exfoliated graphite composite compositions for fuel cell flow field plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-04-08

    A method of producing an electrically conductive composite composition, which is particularly useful for fuel cell bipolar plate applications. The method comprises: (a) providing a supply of expandable graphite powder; (b) providing a supply of a non-expandable powder component comprising a binder or matrix material; (c) blending the expandable graphite with the non-expandable powder component to form a powder mixture wherein the non-expandable powder component is in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the powder mixture; (d) exposing the powder mixture to a temperature sufficient for exfoliating the expandable graphite to obtain a compressible mixture comprising expanded graphite worms and the non-expandable component; (e) compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi to about 50,000 psi in predetermined directions into predetermined forms of cohered graphite composite compact; and (f) treating the so-formed cohered graphite composite to activate the binder or matrix material thereby promoting adhesion within the compact to produce the desired composite composition. Preferably, the non-expandable powder component further comprises an isotropy-promoting agent such as non-expandable graphite particles. Further preferably, step (e) comprises compressing the mixture in at least two directions. The method leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

  4. Erosion of graphite surface exposed to hot supersonic hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, O. P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical model based on laminar boundary layer flow equations was developed to predict the erosion rate of a graphite (AGCarb-101) surface exposed to a hot supersonic stream of hydrogen gas. The supersonic flow in the nozzle outside the boundary layer formed over the surface of the specimen was determined by assuming one-dimensional isentropic conditions. An overall surface reaction rate expression based on experimental studies was used to describe the interaction of hydrogen with graphite. A satisfactory agreement was found between the results of the computation, and the available experimental data. Some shortcomings of the model and further possible improvements are discussed.

  5. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  6. Preparation of graphite dispersed copper composite on copper plate with CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Muizz, M. N. A.; Hisyamudin, M. N. N.; Nishiyama, K.; Sasano, J.; Izaki, M.

    2018-01-01

    It was tried in this work to prepare the graphite dispersed copper composite locally on a copper plate with a CO2 laser. The objectives of this study were to clear whether copper graphite composite was prepared on a copper plate and how the composite was prepared. The carbon content at the laser spot decreased with the laser irradiation time. This mainly resulted from the elimination by the laser trapping. The carbon content at the outside of the laser spot increased with time. Both the laser ablation and the laser trapping did not act on the graphite particles at the outside of the laser spot. Because the copper at the outside of the laser spot melted by the heat conduction from the laser spot, the particles were fixed by the wetting. However, the graphite particles were half-floated on the copper plate. The Vickers hardness decreased with an increase with laser irradiation time because of annealing.

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance field-modulation eddy-current analysis of silver-plated graphite resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mett, Richard R.; Anderson, James R.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2005-09-01

    Magnetic field modulation is often introduced into a cylindrical TE011 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) cavity through silver plating over a nonconductive substrate. The plating thickness must be many times the skin depth of the rf and smaller than the skin depth of the modulation. We derive a parameter that quantifies the modulation field penetration and find that it also depends on resonator dimensions. Design criteria based on this parameter are presented graphically. This parameter is then used to predict the behavior of eddy currents in substrates of moderate conductivity, such as graphite. The conductivity of the graphite permits improved plating uniformity and permits use of electric discharge machining (EDM) techniques to make the resonator. EDM offers precision tolerances of 0.005 mm and is suitable for small, complicated shapes that are difficult to machine by other methods. Analytic predictions of the modulation penetration are compared with the results of finite-element simulations. Simulated magnetic field modulation uniformity and penetration are shown for several elemental coils and structures including the plated graphite TE011 cavity. Fabrication and experimental testing of the structure are discussed. Spatial inhomogeneity of the modulation phase is also investigated by computer simulation. We find that the modulation phase is uniform to within 1% over the TE011 cavity. Structures of lower symmetry have increased phase nonuniformity.

  8. Thermal shock fracture of graphite armor plate under the heat load of plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Tomoyoshi; Seki, Masahiro; Ohmori, Junji

    1989-01-01

    Experiments on the thermal shock brittle fracture of graphite plates were performed. Thermal loading which simulated a plasma disruption was produced by an electron beam facility. Pre-cracks produced on the surface propagated to the inside of the specimen even if the thermal stress on the surface was compressive. Two mechanisms are possible to produce tensile stress around the crack tip under thermal shock conditions. Temperature, thermal stress, and the stress intensity factor for the specimen were analyzed based on the finite element method for various heating conditions. The trend of experimental results under the asymmetric heating agrees qualitatively with the analytical results. This phenomenon is important for the design of plasma facing components made of graphite. Establishment of a lifetime prediction procedure including fatigue, fatigue crack growth, and brittle fracture is needed for graphite armors. (orig.)

  9. Atomic friction at exposed and buried graphite step edges: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Martini, Ashlie, E-mail: amartini@ucmerced.edu [School of Engineering, University of California Merced, 5200 N. Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States)

    2015-06-08

    The surfaces of layered materials such as graphite exhibit step edges that affect friction. Step edges can be exposed, where the step occurs at the outmost layer, or buried, where the step is underneath another layer of material. Here, we study friction at exposed and buried step edges on graphite using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and complementary molecular dynamics simulations of the AFM tip apex. Exposed and buried steps exhibit distinct friction behavior, and the friction on either step is affected by the direction of sliding, i.e., moving up or down the step, and the bluntness of the tip. These trends are analyzing in terms of the trajectory of the AFM tip as it moves over the step, which is a convolution of the topography of the surface and the tip shape.

  10. Atomic friction at exposed and buried graphite step edges: Experiments and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-01-01

    The surfaces of layered materials such as graphite exhibit step edges that affect friction. Step edges can be exposed, where the step occurs at the outmost layer, or buried, where the step is underneath another layer of material. Here, we study friction at exposed and buried step edges on graphite using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and complementary molecular dynamics simulations of the AFM tip apex. Exposed and buried steps exhibit distinct friction behavior, and the friction on either step is affected by the direction of sliding, i.e., moving up or down the step, and the bluntness of the tip. These trends are analyzing in terms of the trajectory of the AFM tip as it moves over the step, which is a convolution of the topography of the surface and the tip shape

  11. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  12. In-situ electric resistance measurements and annealing effects of graphite exposed to swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Pellemoine, Frederique; Tomut, Marilena; Avilov, Mikhail; Bender, Markus; Boulesteix, Marine; Krause, Markus; Mittig, Wolfgang; Schein, Mike; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina

    2013-01-01

    To study the suitability of using graphite as material for high-power targets for rare isotope production at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) in the USA and at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Germany, thin foils of polycrystalline graphite were exposed to 8.6-MeV/u Au ions reaching a maximum fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Foil irradiation temperatures of up to 1800 °C were obtained by ohmic heating. In-situ monitoring of the electrical resistance of the graphite foils during and after irradiation provided information on beam-induced radiation damage. The rate of electrical resistance increase as a function of fluence was found to decrease with increasing irradiation temperature, indicating a more efficient annealing of the irradiation-produced defects. This is corroborated by the observation that graphite foils irradiated at temperatures below about 800 °C showed cracks and pronounced deformations, which did not appear on the samples irradiated at higher temperatures

  13. In-situ electric resistance measurements and annealing effects of graphite exposed to swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Sandrina [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Pellemoine, Frederique, E-mail: pellemoi@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Tomut, Marilena [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); National Institute for Materials Physics (NIMP), Bucharest (Romania); Avilov, Mikhail [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bender, Markus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Boulesteix, Marine [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Krause, Markus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität, Darmstadt (Germany); Mittig, Wolfgang [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Schein, Mike [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Severin, Daniel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Trautmann, Christina [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    To study the suitability of using graphite as material for high-power targets for rare isotope production at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) in the USA and at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Germany, thin foils of polycrystalline graphite were exposed to 8.6-MeV/u Au ions reaching a maximum fluence of 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Foil irradiation temperatures of up to 1800 °C were obtained by ohmic heating. In-situ monitoring of the electrical resistance of the graphite foils during and after irradiation provided information on beam-induced radiation damage. The rate of electrical resistance increase as a function of fluence was found to decrease with increasing irradiation temperature, indicating a more efficient annealing of the irradiation-produced defects. This is corroborated by the observation that graphite foils irradiated at temperatures below about 800 °C showed cracks and pronounced deformations, which did not appear on the samples irradiated at higher temperatures.

  14. PEM fuel cells with injection moulded bipolar plates of highly filled graphite compounds; PEM-Brennstoffzellen mit spritzgegossenen Bipolarplatten aus hochgefuelltem Graphit-Compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuz, Can

    2008-04-11

    This work concerns with the injection moulding of highly filled graphite compounds to bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells in a power output range between 100 - 500 Watts. A particular focus is laid on the combination of the three multidisciplinary scopes like material development, production technology and component development / design. The results of the work are specified by the process-oriented characterisation of the developed and manufactured bipolar plates as well as their application in a functioning fuel cell. (orig.)

  15. Transformation of graphite by tectonic and hydrothermal processes in an active plate boundary fault zone, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Matina; Toy, Virginia; Timms, Nicholas; Halfpenny, Angela; Menzies, Catriona; Craw, Dave; Rooney, Jeremy; Giorgetti, Carolina

    2017-04-01

    Graphite is a material with one of the lowest frictional strengths, with coefficient of friction of 0.1 and thus in natural fault zones it may act as a natural solid lubricant. Graphitization, or the transformation of organic matter (carbonaceous material, or CM) into crystalline graphite, is induced by compositional and structural changes during diagenesis and metamorphism. The supposed irreversible nature of this process has allowed the degree of graphite crystallinity to be calibrated as an indicator of the peak temperatures reached during progressive metamorphism. We examine processes of graphite emplacement and deformation in the Alpine Fault Zone, New Zealand's active continental tectonic plate boundary. Raman spectrometry indicates that graphite in the distal, amphibolite-facies Alpine Schist, which experienced peak metamorphic temperatures up to 640 ◦C, is highly crystalline and occurs mainly along grain boundaries within quartzo-feldspathic domains. The subsequent mylonitisation in the Alpine Fault Zone resulted in progressive reworking of CM under lower temperature conditions (500◦C-600◦C) in a structurally controlled environment, resulting in spatial clustering in lower-strain protomylonites, and further foliation-alignment in higher-strain mylonites. Subsequent brittle deformation of the mylonitised schists resulted in cataclasites that contain over three-fold increase in the abundance of graphite than mylonites. Furthermore, cataclasites contain graphite with two different habits: highly-crystalline, foliated forms that are inherited mylonitic graphite; and lower-crystallinity, less mature patches of finer-grained graphite. The observed graphite enrichment and the occurrence of poorly-organised graphite in the Alpine Fault cataclasites could result from: i) hydrothermal precipitation from carbon-supersaturated fluids; and/or ii) mechanical degradation by structural disordering of mylonitic graphite combined with strain-induced graphite

  16. On plate graphite supported sample processing for simultaneous lipid and protein identification by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Sabbatini, Luigia; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous identification of lipids and proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) after direct on-plate processing of micro-samples supported on colloidal graphite is demonstrated. Taking advantages of large surface area and thermal conductivity, graphite provided an ideal substrate for on-plate proteolysis and lipid extraction. Indeed proteins could be efficiently digested on-plate within 15 min, providing sequence coverages comparable to those obtained by conventional in-solution overnight digestion. Interestingly, detection of hydrophilic phosphorylated peptides could be easily achieved without any further enrichment step. Furthermore, lipids could be simultaneously extracted/identified without any additional treatment/processing step as demonstrated for model complex samples such as milk and egg. The present approach is simple, efficient, of large applicability and offers great promise for protein and lipid identification in very small samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of formation temperature on properties of graphite/stannum composite for bipolar plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selamat, Mohd Zulkefli; Yusuf, Muhammad Yusri Md; Wer, Tio Kok; Sahadan, Siti Norbaya; Malingam, Sivakumar Dhar; Mohamad, Noraiham

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar plates are key components in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. They carry current away from the cell and withstand the clamping force of the stack assembly. Therefore, PEM fuel cell bipolar plates must have high electrical conductivity and adequate mechanical strength, in addition to being light weight and low cost in terms of both applicable materials and production methods. In this research, the raw materials used to fabricate the high performance bipolar plate are Graphite (Gr), Stannum (Sn) and Polypropylene (PP). All materials used was in powder form and Gr and Sn act as fillers and the PP acts as binder. The ratio of fillers (Gr/Sn) and binder (PP) was fixed at 80:20. For the multi-conductive filler, small amount of Sn, which is 10 up to 20wt% (from the total weight of fillers 80%) have been added into Gr/Sn/PP composite. The fillers were mixed by using the ball mill machine. The second stage of mixing process between the mixer of fillers and binder is also carried out by using ball mill machine before the compaction process by the hot press machine. The effect of formation temperatures (160°C-170°C) on the properties of Gr/Sn/PP composite had been studied in detail, especially the electrical conductivity, bulk density, hardness and microstructure analysis of Gr/Sn/PP composite. The result shows that there are significant improvement in the electrical conductivity and bulk density, which are exceeding the US-DoE target with the maximum value of 265.35 S/cm and 1.682g/cm"3 respectively.

  18. Effect of formation temperature on properties of graphite/stannum composite for bipolar plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selamat, Mohd Zulkefli, E-mail: azulkeflis@utem.edu.my; Yusuf, Muhammad Yusri Md, E-mail: yusri.cheras@gmail.com; Wer, Tio Kok, E-mail: to91@hotmail.my; Sahadan, Siti Norbaya, E-mail: norbaya@utem.edu.my; Malingam, Sivakumar Dhar, E-mail: sivakumard@utem.edu.my; Mohamad, Noraiham, E-mail: noraiham@utem.edu.my [Centre of Advanced Research on Energy (CARe), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, UniversitiTeknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia)

    2016-03-29

    Bipolar plates are key components in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. They carry current away from the cell and withstand the clamping force of the stack assembly. Therefore, PEM fuel cell bipolar plates must have high electrical conductivity and adequate mechanical strength, in addition to being light weight and low cost in terms of both applicable materials and production methods. In this research, the raw materials used to fabricate the high performance bipolar plate are Graphite (Gr), Stannum (Sn) and Polypropylene (PP). All materials used was in powder form and Gr and Sn act as fillers and the PP acts as binder. The ratio of fillers (Gr/Sn) and binder (PP) was fixed at 80:20. For the multi-conductive filler, small amount of Sn, which is 10 up to 20wt% (from the total weight of fillers 80%) have been added into Gr/Sn/PP composite. The fillers were mixed by using the ball mill machine. The second stage of mixing process between the mixer of fillers and binder is also carried out by using ball mill machine before the compaction process by the hot press machine. The effect of formation temperatures (160°C-170°C) on the properties of Gr/Sn/PP composite had been studied in detail, especially the electrical conductivity, bulk density, hardness and microstructure analysis of Gr/Sn/PP composite. The result shows that there are significant improvement in the electrical conductivity and bulk density, which are exceeding the US-DoE target with the maximum value of 265.35 S/cm and 1.682g/cm{sup 3} respectively.

  19. Preparation and magnetic properties of polymer magnetic composites based on acrylate resin filled with nickel plating graphite nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yi, E-mail: zhangyi520love@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Qi Shuhua; Zhang Fan; Yang Yongqing; Duan Guochen [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-11-01

    Nickel plating graphite nanosheets (Ni/GNs) were prepared by electroless plating method using graphite nanosheets (GNs). Then a novel polymer magnetic composites based on acrylate pressure-sensitive adhesive (acrylate PSA) filled with Ni/GNs were fabricated by solution blend method. The Ni/GNs and acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). All results showed that relatively uniform and compact Ni layer is successfully coated onto GNs under the given conditions, furthermore, Ni/GNs are homogeneously dispersed in acrylate PSA. The VSM results showed that the saturation magnetization of acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites increases with an increasing content of Ni/GNs while the coercivity decreases with an increasing content of Ni/GNs. When the content of GNs is 20 wt%, acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites exhibites good mechanical properties.

  20. Preparation and magnetic properties of polymer magnetic composites based on acrylate resin filled with nickel plating graphite nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yi; Qi Shuhua; Zhang Fan; Yang Yongqing; Duan Guochen

    2011-01-01

    Nickel plating graphite nanosheets (Ni/GNs) were prepared by electroless plating method using graphite nanosheets (GNs). Then a novel polymer magnetic composites based on acrylate pressure-sensitive adhesive (acrylate PSA) filled with Ni/GNs were fabricated by solution blend method. The Ni/GNs and acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). All results showed that relatively uniform and compact Ni layer is successfully coated onto GNs under the given conditions, furthermore, Ni/GNs are homogeneously dispersed in acrylate PSA. The VSM results showed that the saturation magnetization of acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites increases with an increasing content of Ni/GNs while the coercivity decreases with an increasing content of Ni/GNs. When the content of GNs is 20 wt%, acrylate PSA/Ni/GNs composites exhibites good mechanical properties.

  1. Environmental Monitoring Of Microbiological Laboratory: Expose Plate Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahaya Talib; Othman Mahmud; Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Asmah Mohibat; Muhamad Syazwan Zulkifli

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of microorganism is important and conducted regularly on environment of microbiological laboratory at Medical Technology Division. Its objective is to ensure the quality of working environment is maintained according to microbial contamination, consequently to assure the quality of microbiological tests. This paper presents report of environmental monitoring since year 2007. The test involved was bacterial colony counts after the growth media was exposed to air at identified location. (author)

  2. Scattering of Lamb waves by cracks in a composite graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, Robert; Datta, Subhendu K.; Shah, Arvind

    1990-01-01

    Recent investigations of space construction techniques have explored the used of composite materials in the construction of space stations and platforms. These composites offer superior strength to weight ratio and are thermally stable. For example, a composite material being considered is laminates of graphite fibers in an epoxy matrix. The overall effective elastic constants of such a medium can be calculated from fiber and matrix properties by using an effective modulus theory as shown in Datta, el. al. The investigation of propagation and scattering of elastic waves in composite materials is necessary in order to develop an ability to characterize cracks and predict the reliability of composite structures. The objective of this investigation is the characterization of a surface breaking crack by ultrasonic techniques. In particular, the use of Lamb waves for this purpose is studied here. The Lamb waves travel through the plate, encountering a crack, and scatter. Of interest is the modeling of the scattered wave in terms of the Lamb wave modes. The direct problem of propagation and scattering of Lamb waves by a surface breaking crack has been analyzed. This would permit an experimentalist to characterize the crack by comparing the measured response to the analytical model. The plate is assumed to be infinite in the x and y directions with a constant thickness in the z direction. The top and bottom surfaces are traction free. Solving the governing wave equations and using the stress-free boundary conditions results in the dispersion equation. This equation yields the guided modes in the homogeneous plate. The theoretical model is a hybrid method that combines analytical and finite elements techniques to describe the scattered displacements. A finite region containing the defects is discretized by finite elements. Outside the local region, the far field solution is expressed as a Fourier summation of the guided modes obtained from the dispersion equation

  3. Trapping and detrapping of hydrogen in graphite materials exposed to hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumi, Hisao; Iseki, Michio; Shikama, Tatsuo.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of hydrogen solubility have been performed for several unirradiated and neutron-irradiated graphite (and CFC) samples at temperatures between 973 and 1323 K under a ∼10 kPa hydrogen atmosphere. The hydrogen dissolution process has been studied and it is discussed here. The values of hydrogen solubility vary substantially among the samples up to about a factor of 16. A strong correlation has been observed between the values of hydrogen solubility and the degrees of graphitization determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The relation can be extended even for the neutron irradiated samples. Hydrogen dissolution into graphite can be explained with the trapping of hydrogen at defect sites (e.g. dangling carbon bonds) considering an equilibrium reaction between hydrogen molecules and the trapping sites. The migration of hydrogen in graphite is speculated to result from a sequence of detrapping and retrapping events with high energy activation processes. (author)

  4. Buckling and postbuckling behavior of square compression-loaded graphite-epoxy plates with circular cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for unidirectional (0, 10)(sub s) and (90,10)(sub s) plates, ((0/90)(sub 5)(sub s)) plates, and for aluminum plates. Results are also presented for ((+/- theta)(sub 6)(sub s)) angle-ply plates for values of theta = 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The results indicate that the change in axial stiffness of a plate at buckling is strongly dependent upon cutout size and plate orthotropy. The presence of a cutout gives rise to an internal load distribution that changes, sometimes dramatically, as a function of cutout size coupled with the plate orthotropy. In the buckled state, the role of orthotropy becomes more significant since bending in addition to membrane orthotropy is present. Most of the plates with cutouts exhibited less postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout, and the postbuckling stiffness decreased with increasing cutout size. However, some of the highly orthotropic plates with cutouts exhibited more postbuckling stiffness than the corresponding plate without a cutout. These results suggest the possibility of tailoring the cutout size and the stacking sequence of a composite plate to optimize postbuckling stiffness. It was found that plates with large radius cutouts do exhibit some postbuckling strength. The results also indicate that a cutout can influence modal interaction in a plate. Specifically, results are presented that show a plate with a relatively small cutout buckling at a higher load than the corresponding plate without a cutout, due to modal interaction. Other results are presented that indicate the presence of nonlinear prebuckling deformations, due to material nonlinearity, in the angle-ply plates with theta = 45 and 60 degrees. The nonlinear prebuckling deformations are more pronounced in the plates with theta = 45 degrees and become even more pronounced as the cutout size increases. Results are also presented that show how load-path eccentricity due to improper machining of the test specimens

  5. Parametric Study of Cantilever Plates Exposed to Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Harsha, A.; Rizwan, M.; Kuldeep, S.; Giridhara Prasad, A.; Akhil, J.; Nagaraja, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    Analysis of hypersonic flows associated with re-entry vehicles has gained a lot of significance due to the advancements in Aerospace Engineering. An area that is studied extensively by researchers is the simultaneous reduction aerodynamic drag and aero heating in re-entry vehicles. Out of the many strategies being studied, the use of aerospikes at the stagnation point of the vehicle is found to give favourable results. The structural stability of the aerospike becomes important as it is exposed to very high pressures and temperatures. Keeping this in view, the deflection and vibration of an inclined cantilever plate in hypersonic flow is carried out using ANSYS. Steady state pressure distribution obtained from Fluent is applied as load to the transient structural module for analysis. After due validation of the methods, the effects of parameters like flow Mach number, plate inclination and plate thickness on the deflection and vibration are studied.

  6. Experimental investigations of sandwich panels using high performance concrete thin plates exposed to fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulin, Thomas; Hodicky, Kamil; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2015-01-01

    Structural sandwich panels using thin high performance concrete (HPC) plates offer a possibility to address the modern environmental challenges faced by the construction industry. Fire resistance is a major necessity in structures using HPC. This paper presents experimental studies at elevated...... temperatures for panels with 30 mm thick plates stiffened by structural ribs, thick insulation layers, and steel shear connecting systems. Parametric variation assessing the role of each component of the sandwich structure was performed on unloaded specimens of reduced size. Full size walls were tested...... with load. Tests were performed in standard furnaces, following the conditions of REI certification tests. Unloaded specimens successfully passed tests. Loaded specimens met the R and I requirements, failing E due to sustained flaming of the insulation. They exhibited multiple cracking of their exposed...

  7. Effects of resin content and preparing conditions on the properties of polyphenylene sulfide resin/graphite composite for bipolar plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Li-gang; Li, Ai-ju; Yin, Qiang [Key Laboratory for Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Shandong Key Laboratory of Engineering Ceramics, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang, Wei-qiang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Lin, Heng; Zhao, Yi-bo [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2008-03-15

    In the paper, a kind of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) resin/graphite (G) composite for bipolar plate was prepared by using the PPS resin as adhesive and simple hot pressing. The influences of the resin content, the molding temperature and holding time on the conductivity and the bending strength of the PPS/G composite bipolar plate were investigated firstly and then the optimum content and the preparing conditions of the composite were obtained. The experimental results show that the electrical conductivity decreases and the bending strength reveals a serrated variation with increase in PPS resin content; when the holding time is certain, the conductivity decreases and the bending strength increases with the molding temperature increasing. The experimental results further show that the effect of the holding time on the properties of the composite is different at different molding temperatures. The PPS/G composite with 20% PPS resin content has electrical conductivity of 118.9 S cm{sup -1} and bending strength of 52.4 MPa when it molded at 380 C for 30 min, and has electrical conductivity of 105 S cm{sup -1}, bending strength of 55.7 MPa when it molded at 390 C for 30 min. The properties of the composites can meet the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE). (author)

  8. Effect of graphite addition into mill scale waste as a potential bipolar plates material of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaerudini, D. S.; Prakoso, G. B.; Insiyanda, D. R.; Widodo, H.; Destyorini, F.; Indayaningsih, N.

    2018-03-01

    Bipolar plates (BPP) is a vital component of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), which supplies fuel and oxidant to reactive sites, remove reaction products, collects produced current and provide mechanical support for the cells in the stack. This work concerns the utilization of mill scale, a by-product of iron and steel formed during the hot rolling of steel, as a potential material for use as BPP in PEMFC. On the other hand, mill scale is considered a very rich in iron source having characteristic required such as for current collector in BPP and would significantly contribute to lower the overall cost of PEMFC based fuel cell systems. In this study, the iron reach source of mill scale powder, after sieving of 150 mesh, was mechanically alloyed with the carbon source containing 5, 10, and 15 wt.% graphite using a shaker mill for 3 h. The mixed powders were then pressed at 300 MPa and sintered at 900 °C for 1 h under inert gas atmosphere. The structural changes of powder particles during mechanical alloying and after sintering were studied by X-ray diffractometry, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness measurement. The details of the presence of iron, carbon, and iron carbide (Fe-C) as the products of reactions as well as sufficient mechanical strength of the sintered materials were presented in this report.

  9. Energy response of an imaging plate exposed to standard beta sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.L.; Li, H.; Mitch, M.; Tolk, N.; Duggan, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    Imaging plates (IPs) are a reusable media, which when exposed to ionizing radiation, store a latent image that can be read out with a red laser as photostimulated luminescence (PSL). They are widely used as a substitute for X-ray films for diagnostic studies. In diagnostic radiology this technology is known as computed radiography. In this work, the energy response of a commercial IP to beta-particle reference radiation fields used for calibrations at the National Institute of Standards and Technology was investigated. The absorbed dose in the active storage phosphor layer was calculated following the scaling procedure for depth dose for high Z materials with reference to water. It was found that the beta particles from Pm-147 and Kr-85 gave 68% and 24% higher PSL responses than that induced by Sr-90, respectively, which was caused by the different PSL detection efficiencies. In addition, normalized response curves of the IPs as a function of depth in polystyrene were measured and compared with the data measured using extrapolation chamber techniques. The difference between both sets of data resulted from the continuous energy change as the beta particle travels across the material, which leads to a different PSL response

  10. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  11. Elevated Frequencies of Micronuclei and other Nuclear Abnormalities of Chrome Plating Workers Occupationally Exposed to Hexavalent Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha, S; Kripa, SK; Shibily, P; Shyn, J

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to assess the potential cytogenetic damage associated with occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium by using micronuclei (MN) as a biomarker. Methods This was a cross-sectional study and all participants were males. Both the exposed and control individuals were selected from Coimbatore, Southern India. Exfoliated buccal cells from 44 chrome plating work...

  12. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  13. Burnthrough Modeling of Marine Grade Aluminum Alloy Structural Plates Exposed to Fire

    OpenAIRE

    Rippe, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    Current fire induced burnthrough models of aluminum typically rely solely on temperature thresholds and cannot accurately capture either the occurrence or the time to burnthrough. This research experimentally explores the fire induced burnthrough phenomenon of AA6061-T651 plates under multiple sized exposures and introduces a new burnthrough model based on the near melting creep rupture properties of the material. Fire experiments to induce burnthrough on aluminum plates were conducted us...

  14. 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopic study on surface products of thin iron plates exposed to ambient atmosphere as a means of environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Motoyuki; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    1993-01-01

    Conversion electron and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy were applied to the analysis of thin iron plates exposed to the ambient atmosphere. The degree of corrosion of the iron plates was classified into three categories according to the kind and thickness of rust evaluated by Moessbauer spectra. The severe corrosion took place in seaside and roadside areas. The medium corrosion was observed in urban areas, and the weak corrosion occurred in suburban and mountainous areas. This fact implies that the surface products of iron plates can successfully reflect the ambient atmosphere to which the plates were exposed. (orig.)

  15. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  16. Elevated Frequencies of Micronuclei and other Nuclear Abnormalities of Chrome Plating Workers Occupationally Exposed to Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, S; Kripa, S K; Shibily, P; Shyn, J

    2011-01-01

    Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to assess the potential cytogenetic damage associated with occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium by using micronuclei (MN) as a biomarker. This was a cross-sectional study and all participants were males. Both the exposed and control individuals were selected from Coimbatore, Southern India. Exfoliated buccal cells from 44 chrome plating workers and 40 age and sex matched control subjects were examined for MN frequency and nuclear abnormalities (NA) other than micronuclei, such as binucleates, broken eggs, karyorrhexis, karyolysis and pyknosis. Results showed statistically significant difference between chrome plating workers and control groups. MN and NA frequencies in chrome plating workers were significantly higher than those in control groups (p chrome plating workers are under risk of significant cytogenetic damage. Therefore, there is a need to educate those who work with heavy metals about the potential hazard of occupational exposure and the importance of using protective measures.

  17. Direct synthesis of graphitic mesoporous carbon from green phenolic resins exposed to subsequent UV and IR laser irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopronyi, Mihai; Sima, Felix; Vaulot, Cyril; Delmotte, Luc; Bahouka, Armel; Matei Ghimbeu, Camelia

    2016-01-01

    The design of mesoporous carbon materials with controlled textural and structural features by rapid, cost-effective and eco-friendly means is highly demanded for many fields of applications. We report herein on the fast and tailored synthesis of mesoporous carbon by UV and IR laser assisted irradiations of a solution consisting of green phenolic resins and surfactant agent. By tailoring the UV laser parameters such as energy, pulse repetition rate or exposure time carbon materials with different pore size, architecture and wall thickness were obtained. By increasing irradiation dose, the mesopore size diminishes in the favor of wall thickness while the morphology shifts from worm-like to an ordered hexagonal one. This was related to the intensification of phenolic resin cross-linking which induces the reduction of H-bonding with the template as highlighted by 13C and 1H NMR. In addition, mesoporous carbon with graphitic structure was obtained by IR laser irradiation at room temperature and in very short time periods compared to the classical long thermal treatment at very high temperatures. Therefore, the carbon texture and structure can be tuned only by playing with laser parameters, without extra chemicals, as usually required. PMID:28000781

  18. Estimate of thermal fatigue lifetime for the INCONEL 625lCF plate while exposed to concentrated solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas-Morín, A.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A system for testing the thermal cycling of materials and components has been developed and installed at the DISTAL-I parabolic dish facility located at the Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA in Spain. This system allows us to perform abrupt heating/cooling tests by exposing central solar receiver materials to concentrated solar radiation. These tests are performed to simulate both the normal and critical operational conditions of the central solar receiver. The thermal fatigue life for the INCONEL 625LCF® plate when subjected to concentrated solar radiation has been estimated with this system. We have also developed a numerical model that evaluates the thermal behavior of the plate material; additionally, the model yields the tensile-compressive stresses on the plate, which allow the estimation of the Stress-Life (S-N fatigue curves. These curves show that the lifetime of the plate is within the High Cycle Fatigue (HCF region at the operational temperatures of both 650 °C and 900 °C.

    En el concentrador solar de disco parabólico DISTAL-I, situado en la Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA, en España, se ha instalado un sistema para pruebas de ciclado térmico de materiales. Este sistema permite realizar pruebas abruptas de calentamiento y enfriamiento, en materiales para receptores solares de torre central, al exponerlos a radiación solar concentrada. Estas pruebas se realizan para simular las condiciones de operación de un receptor solar, las condiciones críticas y las condiciones normales. Con este sistema se ha estimado el tiempo de vida bajo fatiga térmica, en una placa de INCONEL 626LCF®, cuando es sometida a radiación solar concentrada. Asimismo, hemos desarrollado un modelo numérico que evalúa el desarrollo térmico en el material de la placa: adicionalmente, el modelo obtiene los esfuerzos de tensión-compresión en la placa, los cuales permiten la estimaciónde las curvas de fatiga vidaesfuerzo (S-N. Estas curvas

  19. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  20. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  1. The impact force acting on a flat plate exposed normally to a rarefied plasma plume issuing from an annular or circular nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xi, E-mail: cx-dem@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-08-11

    With the indirect thrust measurement of electric thrusters working at a low vacuum chamber pressure as the research background, this paper analyses the impact force acting on a flat plate exposed normally to a rarefied plasma plume issuing from a thruster with an annular or circular exit section for the free-molecule flow regime (at large Knudsen numbers). The constraint relation proposed by Cai and Boyd (2007 J. Spacecr. Rockets 44 619, 1326) about the velocity components of gas particles leaving a location on the nozzle exit section and arriving at a given spatial point outside the nozzle has been employed here to derive the analytical expressions for calculating the impact force. Sample calculation results show that if the flat plate is sufficiently large, the impact force acting on the flat plate calculated for the case without accounting for gas particle reflection at the plate surface agrees well with the axial momentum flux calculated at the thruster exit or the theoretical thrust force of the studied thruster, while accounting for the contribution of gas particles reflected from the plate surface to the impact force production may significantly increase the calculated impact force acting on the flat plate. For a Hall-effect thruster in which the thrust force is dominantly produced by the ions with high directional kinetic energy and the ions are not directly reflected from the plate surface, the contribution to the impact force production of atom species and of gas particles reflected from the plate surface is negligibly small and thus the measured axial impact force acting on a sufficiently large plate can well represent the thrust force of the thruster. On the other hand, if the contribution of the gas particles reflected from the plate surface to the impact force production cannot be neglected (e.g. for the electric thrusters with comparatively low thruster exit temperatures), appreciable error would appear in the indirect thrust measurement.

  2. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  3. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  4. Fabrication and electrical resistivity of Mo-doped VO2 thin films coated on graphite conductive plates by a sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, W.; Jung, H.M.; Um, S. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). School of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Vanadium oxides (VO2) can be used in optical devices, thermochromic smart windows and sensors. This paper reported on a study in which vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) powder was prepared and mixed with Molybdenum Oxides (MoO3) to form Mo-doped and -undoped VO2 thin films by a sol-gel method on graphite conductive substrates. The micro-structure and chemical compositions of the Mo-doped and -undoped VO2 thin films was investigated using X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in electrical resistivity were measured as a function of the stoichiometric compositions between vanadium and molybdenum. In this study. Mo-doped and -undoped VO2 thin films showed the typical metal to insulator transition (MIT), where temperature range could be adjusted by modifying the dopant atomic ratio. The through-plane substrate structure of the Mo-doped layer influences the electrical resistivity of the graphite substrate. As the amount of the molybdenum increases, the electrical resistivity of the graphite conductive substrate decreases in the lower temperature range below the freezing point of water. The experimental results showed that if carefully controlled, thermal dissipation of VO2 thin films can be used as a self-heating source to melt frozen water with the electrical current flowing through the graphite substrate. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) and its thermal contact resistance with fuel cell gas diffusion layers: Effect of compression, PTFE, micro porous layer (MPL), BPP out-of-flatness and cyclic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza; Djilali, Ned; Bahrami, Majid

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on measurements of thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) as a function of temperature and its thermal contact resistance (TCR) with treated and untreated gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The thermal conductivity of the BPP decreases with temperature and its thermal contact resistance with GDLs, which has been overlooked in the literature, is found to be dominant over a relatively wide range of compression. The effects of PTFE loading, micro porous layer (MPL), compression, and BPP out-of-flatness are also investigated experimentally. It is found that high PTFE loadings, MPL and even small BPP out-of-flatness increase the BPP-GDL thermal contact resistance dramatically. The paper also presents the effect of cyclic load on the total resistance of a GDL-BPP assembly, which sheds light on the behavior of these materials under operating conditions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  6. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  7. Urinary N-acetyl-beta -D-glucosaminidase and its isoenzymes A & B in workers exposed to cadmium at cadmium plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan BK

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The present study was carried out to determine the effect of cadmium exposure on Urinary N-acetyl-beta -D-glucosaminidase and its isoenzymes A and B in workers exposed at cadmium plating. Methods 50 subjects using cadmium during cadmium plating formed the study group. An equal number of age-sex matched subjects working in administrative section formed the control group. Urinary cadmium levels were determined by using a flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Urinary N-acetyl-beta -D-glucosaminidase and its isoenzymes A and B were determined by using spectrophotmetric method. Results A significant increase of urinary total N-acetyl-beta -D-glucosaminidase and its isoenzymes A and B profiles were noted in study as compared to controls. The levels of urinary N-acetyl-beta -D-glucosaminidase and its isoenzymes A and B profiles were positively and significantly correlated with cadmium levels in urine. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effect of urinary cadmium or life style confounding factors (age, BMI, smoking and alcohol consumption on urinary N-acetyl-beta -D-glucosaminidase and its isoenzymes A and B. The analysis showed that the study subjects who had urine cadmium levels greater than 5 μg/g of creatinine, work duration >15 years, smoking and body mass index variables were significantly associated with urinary total N-acetyl-beta -D-glucosaminidase but not on isoenzymes A&B. Conclusion The results presented in this study shows that the increased levels of urinary N-acetyl-beta -D-glucosaminidase observed in cadmium-exposed workers could be used as biomarkers for suggesting preventive measure.

  8. Methane generated from graphite--tritium interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    When hydrogen isotopes are separated by cryogenic distillation, as little as 1 ppM of methane will eventually plug the still as frost accumulates on the column packings. Elemental carbon exposed to tritium generates methane spontaneously, and yet some dry transfer pumps, otherwise compatible with tritium, convey the gas with graphite rotors. This study was to determine the methane production rate for graphite in tritium. A pump manufacturer supplied graphite samples that we exposed to tritium gas at 0.8 atm. After 137 days we measured a methane synthesis rate of 6 ng/h per cm 2 of graphite exposed. At this rate methane might grow to a concentration of 0.01 ppM when pure tritium is transferred once through a typical graphite--rotor transfer pump. Such a low methane level will not cause column blockage, even if the cryogenic still is operated continuously for many years

  9. Feasibility study for an engineering concept of a stainless steel/copper divertor plate protected by W-5 Re alloy or graphite armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renda, V.; Federici, G.; Papa, L.

    1988-01-01

    The latest Joint Research Centre (JRC)-Ispra proposal is presented to support the design of a divertor concept that has long been considered the most crucial component of the plasma impurity control system for the Next Europen Torus (NET) tokamak fusion reactor. Because of the harsh tokamak environment, the divertor panel is the plasma facing component that suffers the most severe loading conditions, such as high thermal stresses, thermal fatigue, severe erosion rates and neutron damage. An analysis of a new divertor panel concept has evolved from the previous studies carried out at JRC-Ispra. The materials considered in this study are AISI 316 stainless steel for the cooling tubes, pure copper for the heat sink, and W-5 Re alloy or graphite for the protective armor. The panel is cooled by pressurized water circulation in U-tubes. A preliminary thermo-hydraulic analysis has been carried out to evaluate a set of reference parameters, such as optimum coolant velocity, maximum outlet water temperature, convective heat exchange coefficient, and the expected pressure drops in the channels. Thermal and mechanical calculations, performed by using the finite element technique, showed encouraging results about the engineering feasibility of the pressure boundary of the divertor for loading conditions similar to those of NET double null, assumed as the reference mainframe

  10. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  11. AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger

    2017-08-22

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam. An energy conversion device utilizes heat energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a heat energy consuming function. A device for heating a fluid and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  12. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1989-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particularly in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metallic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite used in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapor pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  13. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particulary in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metalic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite and in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapour pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. (author)

  14. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  15. Co3O4 nanocrystals with exposed low-surface-energy planes anchored on chemically integrated graphitic carbon nitride-modified nitrogen-doped graphene: A high-performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyao; Fu, Yongsheng; Wang, Xin

    2018-05-01

    A facile strategy to synthesize a composite composed of cubic Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on chemically integrated g-C3N4-modified N-graphene (CN-NG) as an advanced anode material for high-performance lithium-ion batteries is reported. It is found that the morphology of the Co3O4 nanocrystals contains blunt-edge nanocubes with well-demarcated boundaries and numerous exposed low-index (1 1 1) crystallographic facets. These planes can be directly involved in the electrochemical reactions, providing rapid Li-ion transport channels for charging and discharging and thus enhancing the round-trip diffusion efficiency. On the other hand, the CN-NG support displays unusual textural features, such as superior structural stability, accessible active sites, and good electrical conductivity. The experimental results reveal that the chemical and electronic coupling of graphitic carbon nitride and nitrogen-doped graphene synergistically facilitate the anchoring of Co3O4 nanocrystals and prevents their migration. The resulting Co3O4/CN-NG composite exhibits a high specific reversible capacity of up to 1096 mAh g-1 with excellent cycling stability and rate capability. We believe that such a hybrid carbon support could open a new path for applications in electrocatalysis, sensors, supercapacitors, etc., in the near future.

  16. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  17. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  18. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  19. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latunde-Dada, S; Cheesman, C; Day, D; Harrison, W; Price, S

    2011-01-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms -1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  20. Determination of thermal neutrons diffusion length in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Fite, J.

    1959-01-01

    The diffusion length of thermal neutrons in graphite using the less possible quantity of material has been determined. The proceeding used was the measurement in a graphite pile which has a punctual source of rapid neutrons inside surrounded by a reflector medium (paraffin or water). The measurement was done in the following conditions: a) introducing an aluminium plate between both materials. b) Introducing a cadmium plate between both materials. (Author) 91 refs

  1. An analytical erosion model for divertor plates and limiter experiments in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Akiyama, R.; Arimoto, H.; Idei, H.; Iguchi, H.; Kaneko, O.; Kohmoto, T.; Kubo, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Morita, S.; Motojima, O.; Nishimura, K.; Okamura, S.; Takahasi, C.; Takita, Y.; Yamada, I.; Matsunami, N.; Rice, J.; Yamada, H.; Shoji, T.; Ueda, M.

    1992-01-01

    A self-consistent analytical solution for net erosion of a divertor plate which is set perpendicular to magnetic field lines is presented. The primary flux profile of hydrogen and impurities except redepositing particles is externally given as well as the return ratio of sputtered atoms to the plate. In the direction along the divertor trace, all conditions are uniform. The ionization mean free path is assumed constant to simplify equations. The analytical solution is compared with net erosion experiments carried out in compact helical system (CHS) by exposing a graphite target to a neutral beam heated plasma column introduced perpendicularly to the target along the magnetic field lines through a 2 cm slit opend on a graphite limiter. After exposure to 98 discharges, the target surface is analyzed with Rutherford backscattering method. Deposition profiles of Ti and O impurities are very well explained with the analytical predictions. (orig.)

  2. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  3. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  4. Tensile properties of irradiated and fatigue exposed stainless steel DIN X 6 CrNi 1811 (similar to AISI type 304) plate and welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, M.I. de; Schaaf, B. van der; Elen, J.D.

    1979-10-01

    Test specimens of plate metal and welded joints of stainless steel DIN 1.4948, which is similar to AISI type 304, have been irradiated at 723 K and 823 K up to fluences of 1.10 23 n.m -2 and 5.10 24 n.m -2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These are representative conditions for the SNR-300 reactor vessel and inner components after 16 years of operation. High-rate (depsilon/dt = 1 s -1 ) tensile tests were performed after fatigue exposure up to various fractions of fatigue life (D) ranging from 5% to 95% at the same temperatures as the nominal temperatures of the irradiation series

  5. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  6. On the ''memory'' effect and its relation to the mechanism of formation of mercury-graphite electrode in inversion voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejman, E.Ya.; Petrova, L.G.; Dolgopolova, G.M.; Ignatov, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous discharge ionization of lead-copper and cadmium-copper systems on the surface of mercury-plated graphite and graphite electrodes has been studied. A model is suggested of the preparation process of a mercury-plated graphite electrode obtained in simultaneous electroposition of mercury and elements determined as microimpurities. Processes, which occur on the electrode during relaxation time between electrolysis beginning and formation of the mercury phase, may be probable reasons for mutual effects of elements of the mercury-plated graphite electrode

  7. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  8. Analysis of graphite gasification by water vapor at different conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaowei, Luo; Xiaoyu, Yu; Suyuan, Yu; Jean-Charles, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite was gasified at different conversions. • The reaction temperature influences on the dimensionless the reaction rate. • The thickness or radius influence on the dimensionless reaction rate. - Abstract: The gasification rate of porous solids varies with the conversions with the rate increasing to a maximum and then decreasing. Many graphite gasification experiments have illustrated that the maximum gasification rates occur at different conversions for different temperatures and sample geometries. Thus, the gasification rate is related to the conversion, temperature and geometry of the graphite. The influences of those factors were studied for the graphite gasification by water vapor. A theoretical analysis was done on the basis of several logical assumptions. The influence of temperatures on the reaction rate was investigated for plate-like and cylindrical graphite. The effects of thickness for a plate-like graphite sample and of radius for a cylindrical sample on the reaction rate were also studied theoretically. The results reveal that the maximum dimensionless reaction rate decreases with reaction temperature. The plate thickness or the cylinder radius also affects the maximum dimensionless reaction rate

  9. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  10. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  11. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  12. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  13. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  14. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  15. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  16. Structural strength of core graphite bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Futakawa, M.

    1987-01-01

    A HTR core consists of fuel, hot plenum, reflector and thermal barrier blocks. Each graphite block is supported by three thin cylindrical graphite bars called support post. Static and dynamic core loads are transmitted by the support posts to the thermal barrier blocks and a support plate. These posts are in contact with the blocks through hemispherical post seats to absorb the relative displacement caused by seismic force and the difference of thermal expansion of materials at the time of the start-up and shutdown of a reactor. The mixed fracture criterion of principal stress and modified Mohr-Coulomb's theory as well as the fracture criterion of principal stress based on elastic stress analysis was discussed in connection with the application to HTR graphite components. The buckling fracture of a support post was taken in consideration as one of the fracture modes. The effect that the length/diameter ratio of a post, small rotation and the curvature of post ends and seats exerted on the fracture strength was studied by using IG-110 graphite. Contacting stress analysis was carried out by using the structural analysis code 'COSMOS-7'. The experimental method, the analysis of buckling strength and the results are reported. The fracture of a support post is caused by the mixed mode of bending deformation, split fracture and shearing fracture. (Kako, I.)

  17. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  18. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  19. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  20. Lipid peroxidation in workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y L; Chen, C Y; Sheu, J Y; Chuang, I C; Pan, J H; Lin, T H

    1999-02-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to hexavalent chromium induces lipid peroxidation in human. This study involved 25 chrome-plating factory workers and a reference group of 28 control subjects. The whole-blood and urinary chromium concentrations were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Malondialdehyde (MDA), the product of lipid peroxidation, was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the activities of protective enzymes were measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. In the chrome-plating workers, the mean concentrations of chromium in blood and urine were 5.98 microg/L and 5.25 microg/g creatinine, respectively; the mean concentrations of MDA in blood and urine were 1.7 micromol/L and 2.24 micromol/g creatinine. The concentrations of both chromium and MDA in blood and urine were significantly higher in the chromium-exposed workers. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT) were not markedly different between control and exposed workers. Data suggest that MDA may be used as a biomarker for occupational chromium exposure. Antioxidant enzymic activities are not a suitable marker for chromium exposure.

  1. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  2. Highly conductive composites for fuel cell flow field plates and bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bor Z; Zhamu, Aruna; Song, Lulu

    2014-10-21

    This invention provides a fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate having flow channels on faces of the plate, comprising an electrically conductive polymer composite. The composite is composed of (A) at least 50% by weight of a conductive filler, comprising at least 5% by weight reinforcement fibers, expanded graphite platelets, graphitic nano-fibers, and/or carbon nano-tubes; (B) polymer matrix material at 1 to 49.9% by weight; and (C) a polymer binder at 0.1 to 10% by weight; wherein the sum of the conductive filler weight %, polymer matrix weight % and polymer binder weight % equals 100% and the bulk electrical conductivity of the flow field or bipolar plate is at least 100 S/cm. The invention also provides a continuous process for cost-effective mass production of the conductive composite-based flow field or bipolar plate.

  3. Plating laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seamster, A.G.; Weitkamp, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The lead plating of the prototype resonator has been conducted entirely in the plating laboratory at SUNY Stony Brook. Because of the considerable cost and inconvenience in transporting personnel and materials to and from Stony Brook, it is clearly impractical to plate all the resonators there. Furthermore, the high-beta resonator cannot be accommodated at Stony Brook without modifying the set up there. Consequently the authors are constructing a plating lab in-house

  4. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  5. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  6. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  7. Heat insulating plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, J.A.F.

    1976-10-28

    Micro-porous insulation plates are dealt with, for example, how they are used in the insulation of heat storage devices. Since one side of such plates is exposed to a temperature of over 700/sup 0/C, a shrinkage of the glass texture of the covering can occur, which can exceed the shrinkage of the inner micro-porous material, so that cracks and splits in the high temperature side of the covering can come about. The task of the invention is to design the plate in such a way as to prevent this from happening. For this purpose the plate is provided, according to invention specifications, with flutes, waves, ribs, waffle or grid patterns and the covering is set into the recesses originating from this.

  8. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  9. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  10. Heat analysis of the magnetic limiter plate for JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Shimizu, Masatsugu; Ohta, Mitsuru

    1977-03-01

    Heat analysis has been made of the magnetic limiter plate for JT-60. Test materials of the magnetic limiter plate are molybdenum, graphite, pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide. It is assumed in calculation of the heat analysis that 10MW is deposited on the 2 cm wide surface of the magnetic limiter plate in about 10 sec. The magnetic limiter plate of pyrolytic graphite is a stack of pyrolytic graphite sheets, heat input is in the deposition plane to take advantage of the large heat conductivity along this plane. Pyrolytic graphite is the best in terms of temperature rise. The temperature of molybdenum and graphite rise up to 1800 0 C and 620 0 C, respectively, in an deposition of 10 MWx10sec. Silicon carbide is not suitable for the magnetic limiter plate. Because the plasma of the JT-60 discharges every 10 min, the average heat flux decreases to 17 w/cm 2 during the each interval. When the magnetic limiter plate has the above heat inflow, a maximum of above 1000 0 C occurs at the edge far from the joint to the thick ring of the vacuum vessel. To reduce heat load of the magnetic limiter plate, an alternating current (2 -- 5Hz) is superposed on the magnetic limiter coil current. The intersection of separatrix line and magnetic limiter plate then moves cyclically more than 10 cm. Concerning temperature distribution of the multi-groove magnetic limiter plate, its dimensions are determined by the limitation in vapor pressure to prevent the impurity inflow. (auth.)

  11. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  12. Infrared signal generation from AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando

    2018-02-27

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam to produce light. An energy conversion device utilizes light energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a light energy consuming function. A device for producing light and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  13. Determination of thermal neutrons diffusion length in graphite; Determinacion de la Longitud de Difusion de los Neutrones Termicos en Grafito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Fite, J

    1959-07-01

    The diffusion length of thermal neutrons in graphite using the less possible quantity of material has been determined. The proceeding used was the measurement in a graphite pile which has a punctual source of rapid neutrons inside surrounded by a reflector medium (paraffin or water). The measurement was done in the following conditions: a) introducing an aluminium plate between both materials. b) Introducing a cadmium plate between both materials. (Author) 91 refs.

  14. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  15. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  16. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  17. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  18. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  19. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  20. Alternative bipolar plates design and manufacturing for PEM fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Chang Chuan; Norhamidi Muhamad; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    Bipolar plates is one of the important components in fuel cell stack, it comprise up to 80% of the stack volume. Traditionally, these plates have been fabricated from graphite, owing to its chemical nobility, and high electrical and thermal conductivity; but these plates are brittle and relatively thick. Therefore increasing the stack volume and size. Alternatives to graphite are carbon-carbon composite, carbon-polymer composite and metal (aluminum, stainless steel, titanium and nickel based alloy). The use of coated and uncoated metal bipolar plates has received attention recently due to the simplicity of plate manufacturing. The thin nature of the metal substrate allows for smaller stack design with reduced weight. Lightweight coated metals as alternative to graphite plate is being developed. Beside the traditional method of machining and slurry molding, metal foam for bipolar plates fabrication seems to be a good alternative. The plates will be produced with titanium powder by Powder Metallurgy method using space holders technique to produce the meal foam flow-field. This work intends to facilitate the materials and manufacturing process requirements to produce cost effective foamed bipolar plates for fuel cell

  1. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  2. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  3. Corrosion behavior of a positive graphite electrode in vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huijun; Xu Qian; Yan Chuanwei; Qiao Yonglian

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The overpotential for gas evolution on positive graphite electrode decreases due to the functional groups of COOH and C=O introduced on the surface of graphite electrode during corrosion process, which can self-catalyze the oxidation of carbon atoms therefore, accelerates corrosion process. Highlights: → Initial potential for gas evolution is higher than 1.60 V vs SCE. → Factors affecting the graphite corrosion are investigated. → Functional groups of COOH and C=O introduced during corrosion process. → The groups can self-catalyze the oxidation of carbon atoms. - Abstract: The graphite plate is easily suffered from corosion because of CO 2 evolution when it acts as the positive electrode for vanadium redox flow battery. The aim is to obtain the initial potential for gas evolution on a positive graphite electrode in 2 mol dm -3 H 2 SO 4 + 2 mol dm -3 VOSO 4 solution. The effects of polarization potential, operating temperature and polarization time on extent of graphite corrosion are investigated by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic techniques. The surface characteristics of graphite electrode before and after corrosion are examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that the gas begins to evolve on the graphite electrode when the anodic polarization potential is higher than 1.60 V vs saturated calomel electrode at 20 deg. C. The CO 2 evolution on the graphite electrode can lead to intergranular corrosion of the graphite when the polarization potential reaches 1.75 V. In addition, the functional groups of COOH and C=O introduced on the surface of graphite electrode during corrosion can catalyze the formation of CO 2 , therefore, accelerates the corrosion rate of graphite electrode.

  4. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  5. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  6. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  7. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  8. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  9. Thermomechanical behavior of graphite and coating materials subjected to a high heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioki, K.; Yamada, M.; Nishikawa, M.; Uchikawa, T.; Onozuka, M.; Yamao, H.

    1987-07-01

    This study has been performed for the development of limiter and divertor plates. Their thermal and thermomechanical behavior were examined in heat load experiments with an electron beam facility, and were compared with analysis results. Graphite was proven to have a high thermal shock resistance. Its erosion thickness and thermal contact conductance were also studied. Copper alloy with coating and graphite brazed to metal were tested, and their feasibility was demonstrated for use as limiter and divertor plates of an advanced-type concept.

  10. Thermomechanical behavior of graphite and coating materials subjected to a high heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioki, K.; Yamada, M.; Nishikawa, M.; Uchikawa, T.; Onozuka, M.; Yamao, H.

    1987-01-01

    This study has been performed for the development of limiter and divertor plates. Their thermal and thermomechanical behavior were examined in heat load experiments with an electron beam facility, and were compared with analysis results. Graphite was proven to have a high thermal shock resistance. Its erosion thickness and thermal contact conductance were also studied. Copper alloy with coating and graphite brazed to metal were tested, and their feasibility was demonstrated for use as limiter and divertor plates of an advanced-type concept. (orig.)

  11. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  12. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  13. Effect of airborne contaminants on the wettability of supported graphene and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiting; Wang, Yongjin; Kozbial, Andrew; Shenoy, Ganesh; Zhou, Feng; McGinley, Rebecca; Ireland, Patrick; Morganstein, Brittni; Kunkel, Alyssa; Surwade, Sumedh P.; Li, Lei; Liu, Haitao

    2013-10-01

    It is generally accepted that supported graphene is hydrophobic and that its water contact angle is similar to that of graphite. Here, we show that the water contact angles of freshly prepared supported graphene and graphite surfaces increase when they are exposed to ambient air. By using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we demonstrate that airborne hydrocarbons adsorb on graphitic surfaces, and that a concurrent decrease in the water contact angle occurs when these contaminants are partially removed by both thermal annealing and controlled ultraviolet-O3 treatment. Our findings indicate that graphitic surfaces are more hydrophilic than previously believed, and suggest that previously reported data on the wettability of graphitic surfaces may have been affected by unintentional hydrocarbon contamination from ambient air.

  14. Effect of airborne contaminants on the wettability of supported graphene and graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiting; Wang, Yongjin; Kozbial, Andrew; Shenoy, Ganesh; Zhou, Feng; McGinley, Rebecca; Ireland, Patrick; Morganstein, Brittni; Kunkel, Alyssa; Surwade, Sumedh P; Li, Lei; Liu, Haitao

    2013-10-01

    It is generally accepted that supported graphene is hydrophobic and that its water contact angle is similar to that of graphite. Here, we show that the water contact angles of freshly prepared supported graphene and graphite surfaces increase when they are exposed to ambient air. By using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we demonstrate that airborne hydrocarbons adsorb on graphitic surfaces, and that a concurrent decrease in the water contact angle occurs when these contaminants are partially removed by both thermal annealing and controlled ultraviolet-O3 treatment. Our findings indicate that graphitic surfaces are more hydrophilic than previously believed, and suggest that previously reported data on the wettability of graphitic surfaces may have been affected by unintentional hydrocarbon contamination from ambient air.

  15. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  16. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  17. Control of water absorption by purification of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, J.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Uckan, T.

    1988-01-01

    It is well known that graphite can absorb large quantities of water, which can represent an abundant source of oxygen impurities in fusion plasmas if the corresponding components are not properly outgassed. We have outgassed various fusion-relevant graphites (e.g., POCO AXF-5Q) for 1.5 h at 1500/degree/C to release absorbed water and have subsequently exposed the samples to air for various periods of time. Re-absorption of water during the air exposure was estimated by measuring the amount of water produced in subsequent outgassing runs. The results show that the amount of water re-absorbed increases by a factor of approximately 10 within 8 h compared to the sample in the outgassed state but with no air exposure. The water content of the 'as received' material is reached after approximately 30 days. Re-absorption of water was significantly reduced by purification of the investigated graphite samples. This purification process, which consists of heating the sample at 2800/degree/C for 30 min in an argon atmosphere, reduces the levels of trace impurities which can be responsible for catalytic surface reactions on the internal surfaces of the graphite. After exposing an outgassed sample to an electron cyclotron heated plasma followed by 1 h air exposure, the amount of water desorbed was observed to increase by a factor of 6. Data will be presented to correlate this effect with trace impurities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Characterization of Ignalina NPP RBMK Reactors Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Levinskas, R.; Milcius, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the investigations of the initial physical properties of graphite used in production of graphite bricks of Ignalina NPP. These graphite bricks are used as nuclear moderator and major core structural components. Graphite bulk density is calculated by mensuration, pore volumes are measured by investigation of helium gas penetration in graphite pore network, the Young's modulus is determined using an ultrasonic time of flight method, the coefficient of thermal expansion is determined using a Netzsch dilatometer 402C, the fractured and machined graphite surfaces are studied using SEM, impurities are investigated qualitatively by EDAX, the degree of graphitization of the material is tested using X-ray diffraction. (author)

  19. Observation of non-uniform erosion and deposition phenomena on graphite after plasma exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Grote, H.; Schneider, W.; Wienhold, P.; Seggern, J. von

    1999-01-01

    The modifications of fine grain isotropic graphite surfaces after plasma exposure have been investigated using surface analysis techniques with high spatial resolution in area and depth. The samples are graphite target tiles of ASDEX-upgrade and coated graphite collector samples exposed for special erosion/deposition experiments in the divertor plasma of ASDEX-upgrade or in the scrape-off plasma of TEXTOR-94. In addition, a graphite sample was exposed to a low temperature, clean deuterium plasma to study the modifications of the surface morphology during plasma exposure. The results give clear indications of non-uniform erosion and deposition processes. The change of the surface morphology during these processes is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  1. Mesostructure of graphite composite and its lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Generally, the review relies, on the original results and concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear p...

  2. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  3. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  4. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  5. Graphite Foam Heat Exchangers for Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, J.W.

    2004-06-07

    Improved thermal management is needed to increase the power density of electronic and more effectively cool electronic enclosures that are envisioned in future aircraft, spacecraft and surface ships. Typically, heat exchanger cores must increase in size to more effectively dissipate increased heat loads, this would be impossible in many cases, thus improved heat exchanger cores will be required. In this Phase I investigation, MRi aimed to demonstrate improved thermal management using graphite foam (Gr-foam) core heat exchangers. The proposed design was to combine Gr-foams from POCO with MRi's innovative low temperature, active metal joining process (S-Bond{trademark}) to bond Gr-foam to aluminum, copper and aluminum/SiC composite faceplates. The results were very favorable, so a Phase II SBIR with the MDA was initiated. This had primarily 5 tasks: (1) bonding, (2) thermal modeling, (3) cooling chip scale packages, (4) evaporative cooling techniques and (5) IGBT cold plate development. The bonding tests showed that the ''reflow'' technique with S-Bond{reg_sign}-220 resulted in the best and most consistent bond. Then, thermal modeling was used to design different chip scale packages and IGBT cold plates. These designs were used to fabricate many finned graphite foam heat sinks specifically for two standard type IC packages, the 423 and 478 pin chips. These results demonstrated several advantages with the foam. First, the heat sinks with the foam were lighter than the copper/aluminum sinks used as standards. The sinks for the 423 design made from foam were not as good as the standard sinks. However, the sinks made from foam for the 478 pin chips were better than the standard heat sinks used today. However, this improvement was marginal (in the 10-20% better regime). However, another important note was that the epoxy bonding technique resulted in heat sinks with similar results as that with the S-bond{reg_sign}, slightly worse than the S

  6. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  7. Beryllium and graphite performance in ITER during a disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Ehst, D.A.; Gahl, J.

    1993-09-01

    Plasma disruptions are considered one of the most limiting factors for successful operation of magnetic fusion reactors. During a disruption, a sharp, rapid release of energy strikes components such as the divertor or limiter plates. Severe surface erosion and melting of these components may then occur. The amount of material eroded from both ablation and melting is important to the reactor design and component lifetime. The anticipated performance of both beryllium and graphite as plasma-facing materials during such abnormal events is analyzed and compared. Recent experimental data obtained with both plasma guns and electron beams are carefully evaluated and compared to results of analytical modeling, including vapor shielding effect. Initial results from plasma gun experiments indicate that the Be erosion rate is about five times larger than that for a graphite material under the same disruption conditions. Key differences between simulation experiments and reactor disruption on the net erosion rate, and consequently on the lifetime of the divertor plate, are discussed in detail. The advantages and disadvantages of Be over graphite as a divertor plasma-facing material are discussed

  8. Beryllium and graphite performance in ITER during a disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Ehst, D.A.; Gahl, J.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma disruptions are considered one of the most limiting factors for successful operation of magnetic fusion reactors. During a disruption, a sharp, rapid release of energy strikes components such as the divertor or limiter plates. Severe surface erosion and melting of these components may then occur. The amount of material eroded from both ablation and melting is important to the reactor design and component lifetime. The anticipated performance of both beryllium and graphite as plasma-facing materials during such abnormal events is analyzed and compared. Recent experimental data obtained with both plasma guns and electron beams are carefully evaluated and compared to results of analytical modeling, including vapor shielding effect. Initial results from plasma gun experiments indicate that the Be erosion rate is about five times larger than that for a graphite material under the same disruption conditions. Key differences between simulation experiments and reactor disruption on the net erosion rate, and consequently on the lifetime of the divertor plate, are discussed in detail. The advantages and disadvantages of Be over graphite as a divertor plasma-facing material are discussed. ((orig.))

  9. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A K; Ghosh, J; Choudhary, K K; Ghosh, S K

    2016-01-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m 2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS. (paper)

  10. Hierarchically porous graphene in natural graphitic globules from silicate magmatic rocks

    OpenAIRE

    PONOMARCHUK V.A.; TITOV A.T.; MOROZ T.N.; PYRYAEV A.N.; PONOMARCHUK A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally-occurring nanostructured graphites from silicate magmatic rocks, which are rare, were characterized using electron microscope and X-ray spectroscopy. This graphite consists of porous carbon, nanographite layers, microand nanotubes. The porous carbon is classified as macroporous matter with a small amount of mezopores. Evidence for the unusual properties of porous carbon are given: nanographite layers are created at the exposed surface of sample and the nanotubes occurs in the bulk o...

  11. Plate tectonics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.

    's continental drift theory was later disproved, it was one of the first times that the idea of crustal movement had been introduced to the scientific community; and it has laid the groundwork for the development of modern plate tectonics. In the early... of the structure of the atom was to physical sciences and the theory of evolution was to the life sciences. Tectonics is the study of the forces within the Earth that give rise to continents, ocean basins, mountain ranges, earthquake belts and other large-scale...

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate Share Create Your Plate ! Share: Seven Simple Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective ... foods within each food category. Try these seven steps to get started: Using your dinner plate, put ...

  13. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  14. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  15. Porous (Swiss-Cheese Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Abrahamson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous graphite was prepared without the use of template by rapidly heating the carbonization products from mixtures of anthracene, fluorene, and pyrene with a CO2 laser. Rapid CO2 laser heating at a rate of 1.8 × 106 °C/s vaporizes out the fluorene-pyrene derived pitch while annealing the anthracene coke. The resulting structure is that of graphite with 100 nm spherical pores. The graphitizablity of the porous material is the same as pure anthracene coke. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfaces between graphitic layers and the pore walls are unimpeded. Traditional furnace annealing does not result in the porous structure as the heating rates are too slow to vaporize out the pitch, thereby illustrating the advantage of fast thermal processing. The resultant porous graphite was prelithiated and used as an anode in lithium ion capacitors. The porous graphite when lithiated had a specific capacity of 200 mAh/g at 100 mA/g. The assembled lithium ion capacitor demonstrated an energy density as high as 75 Wh/kg when cycled between 2.2 V and 4.2 V.

  16. Graphite curtain vacuum outgassing and heat transfer. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fivel, H.J.; Lang, G.P.; Kipp, H.W.

    1976-12-01

    Thermal conductivity of a bundle of high conductivity graphite fibers (T-50) was measured as a function of temperature, density and fiber orientation at pressures of 10 -4 to 10 -5 torr. All 3 variables had a significant influence on thermal conductivity. The highest conductivity fiber bundle tested had a conductivity significantly less than dense, bulk nuclear grade graphite. The incorporation of heat pipes into a graphite spectral shaper will permit a 2-fold thicker shaper. Heat pipes not only increase the transport of heat within the spectral shaper but can increase heat transfer at the shaper-first wall interface and potentially serve as a means of attaching shaper modules to the first wall. A heat pipe using a liquid metal working fluid was fabricated and tested in magnetic fields of 1 and 2 Tesla. Liquid metal heat pipes can be used in a magnetic field of at least up to 2 Tesla. Much more work needs to be done to establish the capabilities for high performance heat pipes when used in magnetic fields. Four different types of graphite fibers were exposed in EBR-II to a neutron fluence of 3.5 x 10 21 cm -2 EFF at 470 0 C. Large axial shrinkages of 6.6 to 8.6% resulted

  17. The Formation of Graphite Whiskers in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Kimura, Yuki; Lucas, Christopher; Ferguson, Frank; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that carbonaceous grains are efficiently destroyed in the interstellar medium and must either reform in situ at very low pressures and temperatures or in an alternative environment more conducive to grain growth. Graphite whiskers have been discovered associated with high-temperature phases in meteorites such as calcium aluminum inclusions and chondrules, and it has been suggested that the expulsion of such material from proto stellar nebulae could significantly affect the optical properties of the average interstellar grain population. We have experimentally studied the potential for Fischer-Tropsch and Haber-Bosch type reactions to produce organic materials in protostellar systems from the abundant H2, CO, and N2 reacting on the surfaces of available silicate grains. When graphite grains are repeatedly exposed to H2, CO, and N2 at 875 K abundant graphite whiskers are observed to form on or from the surfaces of the graphite grains. In a dense, turbulent nebula, such extended whiskers are very likely to be broken off, and fragments could be ejected either in polar jets or by photon pressure after transport to the outer reaches of the nebula.

  18. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  19. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  20. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  1. Exposing diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Kamilla; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    professionals´ meetings with patients and relatives. In the paper we draw data from focus group discussions with interdisciplinary groups of health care professionals working in the area of care for older people. The video narratives used to initiate discussions are developed through ethnographic fieldwork...... in the homes of older people and in pedagogical institutions targeting older people. In the paper we look at the potentials and challenges in working with ethnographic video narratives as a pedagogical tool. Our findings indicate that the use of video narratives has the potential to expose the diversity...... focus on their own professional discipline and its tasks 2) stimulates collaborative learning when they discuss their different interpretations of the ethnographic video narratives and achieve a deeper understanding of each other’s work and their clients’ lifeworlds, which might lead to a better...

  2. Some aspects of nuclear graphite production in France; Etude generale sur les graphites nucleaires produits en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueron, J; Hering, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Legendre, A [Pechiney, 75 - Paris (France)

    1958-07-01

    1) Manufacturing: A summary and results on the CEA-Pechiney purification process are given. Variations in the preparation of green pastes and their effects on graphitized material are described. 2) Physical and mechanical properties: Results are given on: - Statistics of dimensional variatior products having square cross-section. - Statistical variation of thermal expansion coefficients and of electrical conductivity. - Density of normals to carbon layer planes and their connexion with thermal expansion. - Stress-strain cycles and conclusions drawn therefrom. - Mechanical resistance and gas permeability of items for supporting fuel elements. 3) Behaviour under radiation: Alteration under radiation of French graphites irradiated either in G1 pile or in experimental piles, and thermal annealing of those alterations, are given. (author)Fren. [French] 1) Fabrication: On resume le procede d'epuration CEA-PECHINEY, ainsi que diverses modalites de preparation des pates et on expose les resultats obtenus. 2) Proprietes physiques et mecaniques: On indique le resultat d'etudes sur: - la statistique des dimensions de produits a section carree. - celle des variations des coefficients de dilatation thermique et de la conductibilite electrique. - la densite des normales aux plans graphitiques et leur connexion avec la dilatation thermique. - la compression mecanique du graphite. - la solidite mecanique et la permeabilite aux gaz de pieces destinees a supporter des cartouches de combustible. 3) Tenue sous rayonnement: Modification sous rayonnement des graphites fran is irradies soit dans la pile G1, soit dans des piles experimentales, et guerison thermique de ces modifications. (auteur)

  3. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  4. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  5. Failure of composite plates under static biaxial planar loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waas, Anthony M.; Khamseh, Amir R.

    1992-01-01

    The project involved detailed investigations into the failure mechanisms in composite plates as a function of hole size (holes centrally located in the plates) under static loading. There were two phases to the project, the first dealing with uniaxial loads along the fiber direction, and the second dealing with coplanar biaxial loading. Results for the uniaxial tests have been reported and published previously, thus this report will place emphasis on the second phase of the project, namely the biaxial tests. The composite plates used in the biaxial loading experiments, as well as the uniaxial, were composed of a single ply unidirectional graphite/epoxy prepreg sandwiched between two layers of transparent thermoplastic. This setup enabled us to examine the failure initiation and propagation modes nondestructively, during the test. Currently, similar tests and analysis of results are in progress for graphite/epoxy cruciform shaped flat laminates. The results obtained from these tests will be available at a later time.

  6. Thermophysical properties and microstructure of graphite flake/copper composites processed by electroless copper coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qian; He, Xin-Bo; Ren, Shu-Bin; Zhang, Chen; Ting-Ting, Liu; Qu, Xuan-Hui, E-mail: quxh@ustb.edu.cn

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • GF–copper composites were fabricated using a sparking plasma sintering, which involves coating GF with copper, using electroless plating technique. • The oriented graphite flake distributed homogeneously in matrix. • With the increase of flake graphite from 44 to 71 vol.%, the basal plane thermal conductivity of composites increases from 445 to 565 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} and the thermal expansion of composites decreases from 8.1 to 5.0. • The obtained composites are suitable for electronic packaging materials. -- Abstract: This study focuses on the fabrication of thermal management material for power electronics applications using graphite flake reinforced copper composites. The manufacturing route involved electroless plating of copper on the graphite flake and further spark plasma sintering of composite powders. The relative density of the composites with 44–71 vol.% flakes achieved up to 98%. Measured thermal conductivities and coefficients of thermal expansion of composites ranged from 455–565 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 8 to 5 ppm K{sup −1}, respectively. Obtained graphite flake–copper composites exhibit excellent thermophysical properties to meet the heat dispersion and matching requirements of power electronic devices to the packaging materials.

  7. Thermophysical properties and microstructure of graphite flake/copper composites processed by electroless copper coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qian; He, Xin-Bo; Ren, Shu-Bin; Zhang, Chen; Ting-Ting, Liu; Qu, Xuan-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • GF–copper composites were fabricated using a sparking plasma sintering, which involves coating GF with copper, using electroless plating technique. • The oriented graphite flake distributed homogeneously in matrix. • With the increase of flake graphite from 44 to 71 vol.%, the basal plane thermal conductivity of composites increases from 445 to 565 W m −1 K −1 and the thermal expansion of composites decreases from 8.1 to 5.0. • The obtained composites are suitable for electronic packaging materials. -- Abstract: This study focuses on the fabrication of thermal management material for power electronics applications using graphite flake reinforced copper composites. The manufacturing route involved electroless plating of copper on the graphite flake and further spark plasma sintering of composite powders. The relative density of the composites with 44–71 vol.% flakes achieved up to 98%. Measured thermal conductivities and coefficients of thermal expansion of composites ranged from 455–565 W m −1 K −1 and 8 to 5 ppm K −1 , respectively. Obtained graphite flake–copper composites exhibit excellent thermophysical properties to meet the heat dispersion and matching requirements of power electronic devices to the packaging materials

  8. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  9. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  10. NMR studies on graphite-methanol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akkad, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times for protons of methanol on graphite have been studied. The perpendicular and the transversal magnetization as a function of temperature were measured. The results show that the presence of graphite slowed down the methanol movement compared with that in the pure alcohol, and that the methanol molecules are attached to the graphite surface via methyl groups. (author)

  11. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  12. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  13. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P.M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC 6 and YbC 6 in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition

  14. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  15. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  16. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  17. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1965-01-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m 3 and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m 2 /g (graphite particles about 1 μ), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m 2 /g (all the particles less than 0.3 μ). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [fr

  18. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  19. Near-field thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials: Graphite and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2013-11-18

    The near-field radiative heat transfer for two hyperbolic metamaterials, namely, graphite and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), is investigated. Graphite is a naturally existing uniaxial medium, while CNT arrays can be modeled as an effective anisotropic medium. Different hyperbolic modes can be separately supported by these materials in certain infrared regions, resulting in a strong enhancement in near-field heat transfer. It is predicted that the heat flux between two CNT arrays can exceed that between SiC plates at any vacuum gap distance and is about 10 times higher with a 10 nm gap.

  20. Influence of the section size and holding time on the graphite parameters of ductile iron production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bockus

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was conducted to establish the conditions required to produce a desirable structure of the castings of various section sizes. This investigation was focused on the study of the influence of cooling rate or section size and holding time on graphite parameters of the ductile iron. Plates having thickness between 3 and 50mm were cast in sand molds using the same melt. The present investigation has shown that the section size of ductile iron castings and holding time had strong effect on the graphite parameters of the castings.

  1. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  2. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  3. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kage, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 442, Nov (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * cast iron * graphite structure * pearlite content Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2016

  5. Graphite moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a 252 Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the 252 Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  6. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  7. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  8. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  9. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  10. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  11. Synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride by reaction of melamine and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dante, Roberto C.; Martin-Ramos, Pablo; Correa-Guimaraes, Adriana; Martin-Gil, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Graphitic carbon nitrides by CVD of melamine and uric acid on alumina. → The building blocks of carbon nitrides are heptazine nuclei. → Composite particles with alumina core and carbon nitride coating. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitrides were synthesized starting from melamine and uric acid. Uric acid was chosen because it thermally decomposes, and reacts with melamine by condensation at temperatures in the range of 400-600 deg. C. The reagents were mixed with alumina and subsequently the samples were treated in an oven under nitrogen flux. Alumina favored the deposition of the graphitic carbon nitrides layers on the exposed surface. This method can be assimilated to an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Infrared (IR) spectra, as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, are in accordance with the formation of a graphitic carbon nitride with a structure based on heptazine blocks. These carbon nitrides exhibit poor crystallinity and a nanometric texture, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The thermal degradation of the graphitic carbon nitride occurs through cyano group formation, and involves the bridging tertiary nitrogen and the bonded carbon, which belongs to the heptazine ring, causing the ring opening and the consequent network destruction as inferred by connecting the IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. This seems to be an easy and promising route to synthesize graphitic carbon nitrides. Our final material is a composite made of an alumina core covered by carbon nitride layers.

  12. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  13. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  14. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  15. Study of the oxidation process of disperse Fe-C containing waste in order to obtain graphite intercalation compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Володимир Олександрович Маслов

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Graphite processing into intercalation compounds followed by thermoshock heating is known in literature. The result is an ultra-light dispersed graphite (thermographenit used in lots of industries. Graphite intercalation compounds are formed as a result of the introduction of atomic and molecular layers of different chemical particles between the layers of graphite plates. The object of this work is to obtain a new material by intercalation of graphite followed by thermoshock heating, which could be used for products protecting biological and technical facilities from electromagnetic and thermal radiation. In the present work the parameters of oxidation and of graphite thermoshock expansion in order to obtain graphite intercalation compounds and thermographenit were investigated. The experiments were performed under laboratory non-isothermal conditions. Graphite GAK-2 obtained from metallurgical wastes was used. First the fraction of +0,16 mm with the ash content of 0,3% was extracted by scattering. The oxidation of graphite was carried out by potassium bichromate dissolved in concentrated sulphuric acid. The original sample of graphite was mixed with finely grounded potassium bichromate. Then this mass was poured over with 98% concentrated sulphuric acid when being actively stirred and kept. Then the capacitance for oxidation was filled with distilled water. Decantation was carried out until pH=7 in the waste water was got. Separation of the oxidized graphite from the main mass of water was carried out by means of a suction filter until pH=7 was got. Experiments were performed at different ratios of potassium bichromate, sulphuric acid and graphite. The optimum ratio of the components (sulphuric acid : (dichromate of potash : (graphite = 2,8 : 0,15 : 1 was found. The oxidation time was 4–5 minutes. The oxidized graphite turned into thermographenit with bulk density of 2,7–9,5 kg/m3.upon subsequent heating up to 1000oC within the regime of

  16. High-temperature solid electrolyte interphases (SEI) in graphite electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F.; Sayed, Farheen N.; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal fragility of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is a major source of performance decay in graphite anodes, and efforts to overcome the issues offered by extreme environments to Li-ion batteries have had limited success. Here, we demonstrate that the SEI can be extensively reinforced by carrying the formation cycles at elevated temperatures. Under these conditions, decomposition of the ionic liquid present in the electrolyte favored the formation of a thicker and more protective layer. Cells in which the solid electrolyte interphase was cast at 90 °C were significantly less prone to self-discharge when exposed to high temperature, with no obvious damages to the formed SEI. This additional resilience was accomplished at the expense of rate capability, as charge transfer became growingly inefficient in these systems. At slower rates, however, cells that underwent SEI formation at 90 °C presented superior performances, as a result of improved Li+ transport through the SEI, and optimal wetting of graphite by the electrolyte. This work analyzes different graphite hosts and ionic liquids, showing that this effect is more pervasive than anticipated, and offering the unique perspective that, for certain systems, temperature can actually be an asset for passivation.

  17. Sintering behavior and thermal conductivity of nickel-coated graphite flake/copper composites fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Chen, Jian-hao; Ren, Shu-bin; He, Xin-bo; Qu, Xuan-hui

    2018-04-01

    Nickel-coated graphite flakes/copper (GN/Cu) composites were fabricated by spark plasma sintering with the surface of graphite flakes (GFs) being modified by Ni-P electroless plating. The effects of the phase transition of the amorphous Ni-P plating and of Ni diffusion into the Cu matrix on the densification behavior, interfacial microstructure, and thermal conductivity (TC) of the GN/Cu composites were systematically investigated. The introduction of Ni-P electroless plating efficiently reduced the densification temperature of uncoated GF/Cu composites from 850 to 650°C and slightly increased the TC of the X-Y basal plane of the GF/Cu composites with 20vol%-30vol% graphite flakes. However, when the graphite flake content was greater than 30vol%, the TC of the GF/Cu composites decreased with the introduction of Ni-P plating as a result of the combined effect of the improved heat-transfer interface with the transition layer, P generated at the interface, and the diffusion of Ni into the matrix. Given the effect of the Ni content on the TC of the Cu matrix and on the interface thermal resistance, a modified effective medium approximation model was used to predict the TC of the prepared GF/Cu composites.

  18. Dynamics of graphite flake on a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K.; Tsuda, D.; Kaneta, Y.; Harada, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Sasaki, N.

    2006-11-01

    One-directional motion, where graphite flakes are driven by a nanotip on an octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) liquid surface, is presented. A transition from quasiperiodic to chaotic motions occurs in the dynamics of a graphite flake when its velocity is increased. The dynamics of graphite flakes pulled by the nanotip on an OMCTS liquid surface can be treated as that of a nanobody on a liquid.

  19. Sealing nuclear graphite with pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shanglei; Xu, Li; Li, Li; Bai, Shuo; Yang, Xinmei; Zhou, Xingtai

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings were deposited on IG-110 nuclear graphite by thermal decomposition of methane at ∼1830 °C. The PyC coatings are anisotropic and airtight enough to protect IG-110 nuclear graphite against the permeation of molten fluoride salts and the diffusion of gases. The investigations indicate that the sealing nuclear graphite with PyC coating is a promising method for its application in Molten Salt Reactor (MSR)

  20. Controlled synthesis of graphitic carbon-encapsulated α-Fe2O3 nanocomposite via low-temperature catalytic graphitization of biomass and its lithium storage property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Feng; Huang, Rong; Mu, Daobin; Wu, Borong; Chen, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Facile synthesis of graphitic carbon/α-Fe 2 O 3 nano-sized anode composite. • In situ low temperature catalytic graphitization of biomass material. • Onion-like graphitic carbon layers conformally encapsulating around α-Fe 2 O 3 core. • High lithium storage properties, especially, outstanding cycle performance. - Abstract: A delicate structure of graphitic carbon-encapsulated α-Fe 2 O 3 nanocomposite is in situ constructed via “Absorption–Catalytic graphitization–Oxidation” strategy, taking use of biomass matter of degreasing cotton as carbon precursor and solution reservoir. With the assistance of the catalytic graphitization effect of iron core, onion-like graphitic carbon (GC) shell is made directly from the biomass at low temperature (650 °C). The nanosized α-Fe 2 O 3 particles would effectively mitigate volumetric strain and shorten Li + transport path during charge/discharge process. The graphitic carbon shells may promote charge transfer and protect active particles from directly exposing to electrolyte to maintain interfacial stability. As a result, the as-prepared α-Fe 2 O 3 @GC composite displays an outstanding cycle performance with a reversible capacity of 1070 mA h g −1 after 430 cycles at 0.2C, as well as a good rate capability of ∼ 950 mA h g −1 after 100 cycles at 1C and ∼ 850 mA h g −1 even up to 200 cycles at a 2C rate.

  1. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  2. Production of nuclear graphite in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L.; Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H.

    1955-01-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [fr

  3. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  4. Structural analysis of polycrystalline (graphitized) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, M.M.; Kravchik, A.E.; Osmakov, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Specific features of the structure of polycrystal carbon materials (CM), characterized by high enough degree of structural perfection and different genesis are analyzed. From the viewpoint of fine and supercrystallite structure analysis of the most characteristic groups of graphitized CM: artificial graphites, and natural graphites, as well, has been carried out. It is ascertained that in paracrystal CM a monolayer of hexagonally-bound carbon atoms is the basic element of the structure, and in graphitized CM - a microlayer. The importance of the evaluation of the degree of three-dimensional ordering of the microlayer is shown

  5. Principle design and data of graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Oku, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled reactor with prismatic fuel elements of hexagonal blocks. The reactor internal structures of the HTTR are mainly made up of graphite components. As well known, the graphite is a brittle material and there were no available design criteria for brittle materials. Therefore, JAERI had to develop the design criteria taking account of the brittle fracture behavior. In this paper, concept and key specification of the developed graphite design criteria is described, and also an outline of the quality control specified in the design criteria is mentioned

  6. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  7. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  8. Electrolysis of acidic sodium chloride solution with a graphite anode. I. Graphite electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.J.J.; Hoogland, J.G.

    1969-01-01

    A graphite anode evolving Cl from a chloride soln. is slowly oxidized to CO and CO2. This oxidn. causes a change in the characteristics of the electrode in aging, comprising a change of the nature of the graphite surface and an increase of the surface area. It appears that a new graphite electrode

  9. Ni-based amorphous alloy-coating for bipolar plate of PEM fuel cell by electrochemical plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, S; Kim, S C; Inoue, A

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the Ni-Cr-P amorphous alloy-coated bipolar plates were produced by electro-plating on the Cu base plates with a flow field. The power generation tests of a single fuel cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates were conducted at 353 K. It was found that the single fuel cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates showed excellent I-V performance as well as that with the carbon graphite bipolar plates. It was also found that the single cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates showed better I-V performance than that with the Ni-P amorphous alloy-coated bipolar plates. Furthermore, the long-time operation test was conducted for 440 h with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates at the constant current density of 200 mA·cm −2 . As a result, it was found that the cell voltage gradually decreased at the beginning of the measurement before 300 h and then the voltage was kept constant after 300 h.

  10. Radiation shielding plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Torakichi; Sugawara, Takeo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the weight and stabilize the configuration of a radiation shielding plate which is used in close contact with an object to be irradiated with radiation rays. Constitution: The radiation shielding plate comprises a substrate made of lead glass and a metallic lead coating on the surface of the substrate by means of plating, vapor deposition or the like. Apertures for permeating radiation rays are formed to the radiation shielding plate. Since the shielding plate is based on a lead glass plate, a sufficient mechanical strength can be obtained with a thinner structure as compared with the conventional plate made of metallic lead. Accordingly, if the shielding plate is disposed on a soft object to be irradiated with radiation rays, the object and the plate itself less deform to obtain a radiation irradiation pattern with distinct edges. (Moriyama, K.)

  11. Hydrogen storage in graphitic nanofibres

    OpenAIRE

    McCaldin, Simon Roger

    2007-01-01

    There is huge need to develop an alternative to hydrocarbons fuel, which does not produce CO2 or contribute to global warming - 'the hydrogen economy' is such an alternative, however the storage of hydrogen is the key technical barrier that must be overcome. The potential of graphitic nanofibres (GNFs) to be used as materials to allow the solid-state storage of hydrogen has thus been investigated. This has been conducted with a view to further developing the understanding of the mechanism(s) ...

  12. Tritium distribution on plasma facing graphite tiles of JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Sugiyama, K.; Masaki, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Tobita, K.; Miya, N.

    2003-01-01

    Tritium distributions on the graphite divertor tiles, the dome units and the baffle plates of JT-60U were successfully measured. Poloidally, the highest tritium level was found at the dome top tiles and the outer baffle plates, where the plasma did not hit directly. On the other hand, although the toroidal tritium profiles on each tiles appeared uniform, detailed profiles in full toroidal direction clearly showed a periodic variation corresponding to the position of the magnetic field coils, indicating the ripple loss of high energy tritons as suggested by the OFMC code. Finally, the temperature increase owing to the plasma heat load was found to release the once retained tritium. (author)

  13. Analytical and numerical study of graphite IG110 parts in advanced reactor under high temperature and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jinling, E-mail: Jinling_Gao@yeah.net; Yao, Wenjuan, E-mail: wj_yao@yeah.net; Ma, Yudong

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: An analytical model and a numerical procedure are developed to study the mechanical response of IG-110 graphite bricks in HTGR subjected to high temperature and irradiation. The calculation results show great accordance with each other. Rational suggestions on the calculation and design of the IG-110 graphite structure are proposed based on the sensitivity analyses including temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson’s ratio. - Highlights: • Analytical solution of stress and displacement of IG-110 graphite components in HTGR. • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Parameters analysis of mechanical response of graphite components during the whole life of the reflector. - Abstract: Structural design of nuclear power plant project is an important sub-discipline of civil engineering. Especially after appearance of the fourth generation advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor, structural mechanics in reactor technology becomes a popular subject in structural engineering. As basic ingredients of reflector in reactor, graphite bricks are subjected to high temperature and irradiation and the stress field of graphite structures determines integrity of reflector and makes a great difference to safety of whole structure. In this paper, based on assumptions of elasticity, side reflector is regarded approximately as a straight cylinder structure and primary creep strain is ignored. An analytical study on stress of IG110 graphite parts is present. Meanwhile, a finite element procedure for calculating stresses in the IG110 graphite structure exposed in the high temperature and irradiation is developed. Subsequently, numerical solution of stress in IG110 graphite structure is obtained. Analytical solution agrees well with numerical solution, which indicates that analytical derivation is accurate. Finally, influence of temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson

  14. Mixed graphite cast iron for automotive exhaust component applications

    OpenAIRE

    De-lin Li

    2017-01-01

    Both spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron are used in the automotive industry. A recently proposed mixed graphite iron exhibits a microstructure between the conventional spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron. Evaluation results clearly indicate the suitability and benefits of mixed graphite iron for exhaust component applications with respect to casting, machining, mechanical, thermophysical, oxidation, and thermal fatigue properties. A new ASTM standard speci...

  15. Nuclear graphite waste management. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the seminar was to bring together the specialists dealing with various aspects of radioactive graphite waste management to exchange and review information on the decommissioning, characterisation, processing and disposal of irradiated graphite from reactor cores and other graphite waste associated with reactor operation. The seminar covered radioactive graphite characterisation, the effect of irradiation on graphite components, Wigner energy, radioactive graphite waste treatment, conditioning, interim storage and long term disposal options. Individual papers presented at the seminar were indexed separately

  16. Reprocessing of nonoptimally exposed holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, G.S.; Robertson, C.E.; Tamashiro, F.M.

    1980-01-01

    Two reprocessing techniques have been investigated that are capable of correcting the effects of nonoptimum optical density of photographic amplitude holograms recorded on Agfa-Gevaert type 10E75 plates. In some cases a reprocessed hologram will exhibit a diffraction efficiency even higher than that obtainable from a hologram exposed and processed to the optimum density. The SNR of the reprocessed holograms is much higher than that of the same holograms belached with cupric bromide. In some cases the SNR approaches the optimum value for a properly exposed amplitude hologram. Subjective image quality and resolution of reprocessed hologram reconstructins appear to be no different than for normal single-development holograms. Repeated reprocessing is feasible and in some cases desirable as a means of increasing diffraction efficiency

  17. Analysis of Wigner energy release process in graphite stack of shut-down uranium-graphite reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bespala, E. V.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Data, which finding during thermal differential analysis of sampled irradiated graphite are presented. Results of computational modeling of Winger energy release process from irradiated graphite staking are demonstrated. It's shown, that spontaneous combustion of graphite possible only in adiabatic case.

  18. Baking process of thin plate carbonaceous compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Shimada, Toyokazu

    1987-06-27

    As a production process of a thin plate carbonaceous compact for separator of phosphoric acid fuel cell, there is a process to knead carbonaceous powder and thermosetting resin solution, to form and harden the kneaded material and then to bake, carbonize and graphitize it. However in this baking and carbonization treatment, many thin plate compacts are set in a compiled manner within a heating furnace and receive a heat treatment from their circumference. Since the above compacts to be heated tend generally to be heated from their peripheries, their baked conditions are not homogeneous easily causing the formation of cracks, etc.. As a process to heat and bake homogeneously by removing the above problematical points, this invention offers a process to set in a heating furnace a laminate consisting of the lamination of thin plate carbonaceous compacts and the heat resistant soaking plates which hold the upper and lower ends of the above lamination, to fill the upper and under peripheries of the laminate above with high heat conductive packing material and its side periphery with low heat conductive packing material respectively and to heat and sinter it. In addition, the invention specifies the high and low heat conductive packing materials respectively. (1 fig, 2 tabs)

  19. Mixed graphite cast iron for automotive exhaust component applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-lin Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Both spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron are used in the automotive industry. A recently proposed mixed graphite iron exhibits a microstructure between the conventional spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron. Evaluation results clearly indicate the suitability and benefits of mixed graphite iron for exhaust component applications with respect to casting, machining, mechanical, thermophysical, oxidation, and thermal fatigue properties. A new ASTM standard specification (A1095 has been created for compacted, mixed, and spheroidal graphite silicon-molybdenum iron castings. This paper attempts to outline the latest progress in mixed graphite iron published.

  20. Methodology of characterization of radioactive graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Lara, E.; Magro, E.; Gascon, J. L.; Leganes, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the dismantling of Vandellos I, ENRESA has promoted the precise knowledge of the inventory of irradiated graphite (graphite-i) through establishing methodologies for radiological characterization of the vector of radionuclides of interest and their correlations as the primary means of characterization strategy to establish the safer management of this material in its life cycle. (Author)

  1. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux...

  2. Inhibition of oxidation in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.; Windes, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off-normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high-temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off-normal design basis event where an oxidising atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high-temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postulated air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B 4 C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. The proposed addition of B 4 C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimise B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed. (authors)

  3. Tire containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A tire, tire lining or inner tube, containing a polymer composite, made of at least one rubber and/or at least one elastomer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g.

  4. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  5. Highly conductive, multi-layer composite precursor composition to fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bor Z [Centerville, OH; Zhamu, Aruna [Centerville, OH; Guo, Jiusheng [Centerville, OH

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides a moldable, multiple-layer composite composition, which is a precursor to an electrically conductive composite flow field plate or bipolar plate. In one preferred embodiment, the composition comprises a plurality of conductive sheets and a plurality of mixture layers of a curable resin and conductive fillers, wherein (A) each conductive sheet is attached to at least one resin-filler mixture layer; (B) at least one of the conductive sheets comprises flexible graphite; and (C) at least one resin-filler mixture layer comprises a thermosetting resin and conductive fillers with the fillers being present in a sufficient quantity to render the resulting flow field plate or bipolar plate electrically conductive with a conductivity no less than 100 S/cm and thickness-direction areal conductivity no less than 200 S/cm.sup.2.

  6. Chemical sputtering of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, N.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Y.V.

    1976-01-01

    In a study of the sputtering coefficient S for the sputtering of graphite by 10-keV H + ions as a function of the graphite temperature during the bombardment, it is found that at T> or =750degreeC the coefficient S is independent of the target temperature and has an anomalously high value, S=0.085 atom/ion. The high rate of sputtering of graphite by atomic hydrogen ions is shown to be due to chemical sputtering of the graphite, resulting primarily in the formation of CH 4 molecules. At T=1100degreeC, S falls off by a factor of about 3. A model for the chemical sputtering of graphite is proposed

  7. Graphite selection for the FMIT test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-06-01

    This document provides the basis for procuring a grade of graphite, at minimum cost, having minimum dimensional changes at low irradiation temperatures (nominal range 90 to 140 0 C). In light of those constraints, the author concludes that the most feasible approach is to attempt to reproduce a grade of graphite (TSGBF) which has exhibited a high degree of dimensional stability during low-temperature irradiations and on which irradiation-induced changes in other physical properties have been measured. The effects of differences in raw materials, especially coke morphology, and processing conditions, primarily graphitization temperture are briefly reviewed in terms of the practicality of producing a new grade of graphite with physical properties and irradiation-induced changes which would be very similar to those of TSGBF graphite. The production history and physical properties of TSGBF are also reviewed; no attempt is made, to project changes in dimensions or physical properties under the projected irradiation conditions

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... foods you want, but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger portions of non-starchy ... plate. Then on one side, cut it again so you will have three sections on your plate. ...

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the differences in types of vegetables. When creating your plate at home, remember that half of ... effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods ...

  10. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And ... Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and ...

  11. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with ... Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy ...

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  13. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  14. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  15. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  16. Paper microzone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Emanuel; Phillips, Scott T; Vella, Sarah J; Martinez, Andres W; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes 96- and 384-microzone plates fabricated in paper as alternatives to conventional multiwell plates fabricated in molded polymers. Paper-based plates are functionally related to plastic well plates, but they offer new capabilities. For example, paper-microzone plates are thin (approximately 180 microm), require small volumes of sample (5 microL per zone), and can be manufactured from inexpensive materials ($0.05 per plate). The paper-based plates are fabricated by patterning sheets of paper, using photolithography, into hydrophilic zones surrounded by hydrophobic polymeric barriers. This photolithography used an inexpensive formulation photoresist that allows rapid (approximately 15 min) prototyping of paper-based plates. These plates are compatible with conventional microplate readers for quantitative absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The limit of detection per zone loaded for fluorescence was 125 fmol for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and this level corresponds to 0.02 the quantity of analyte per well used to achieve comparable signal-to-noise in a 96-well plastic plate (using a solution of 25 nM labeled protein). The limits of detection for absorbance on paper was approximately 50 pmol per zone for both Coomassie Brilliant Blue and Amaranth dyes; these values were 0.4 that required for the plastic plate. Demonstration of quantitative colorimetric correlations using a scanner or camera to image the zones and to measure the intensity of color, makes it possible to conduct assays without a microplate reader.

  17. Electron transfer kinetics on natural crystals of MoS2 and graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velický, Matěj; Bissett, Mark A; Toth, Peter S; Patten, Hollie V; Worrall, Stephen D; Rodgers, Andrew N J; Hill, Ernie W; Kinloch, Ian A; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Georgiou, Thanasis; Britnell, Liam; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2015-07-21

    Here, we evaluate the electrochemical performance of sparsely studied natural crystals of molybdenite and graphite, which have increasingly been used for fabrication of next generation monolayer molybdenum disulphide and graphene energy storage devices. Heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics of several redox mediators, including Fe(CN)6(3-/4-), Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) and IrCl6(2-/3-) are determined using voltammetry in a micro-droplet cell. The kinetics on both materials are studied as a function of surface defectiveness, surface ageing, applied potential and illumination. We find that the basal planes of both natural MoS2 and graphite show significant electroactivity, but a large decrease in electron transfer kinetics is observed on atmosphere-aged surfaces in comparison to in situ freshly cleaved surfaces of both materials. This is attributed to surface oxidation and adsorption of airborne contaminants at the surface exposed to an ambient environment. In contrast to semimetallic graphite, the electrode kinetics on semiconducting MoS2 are strongly dependent on the surface illumination and applied potential. Furthermore, while visibly present defects/cracks do not significantly affect the response of graphite, the kinetics on MoS2 systematically accelerate with small increase in disorder. These findings have direct implications for use of MoS2 and graphene/graphite as electrode materials in electrochemistry-related applications.

  18. Low cost sic coated erosion resistant graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, M.F.; Nicholls, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of materials with unique and improved properties using low cost processes is essential to increase performance and reduce cost of the solid rocket motors. Specifically advancements are needed for boost phase nozzle. As these motors operate at very high pressure and temperatures, the nozzle must survive high thermal stresses with minimal erosion to maintain performance. Currently three material choices are being exploited; which are refractory metals, graphite and carbon-carbon composites. Of these three materials graphite is the most attractive choice because of its low cost, light weight, and easy forming. However graphite is prone to erosion, both chemical and mechanical, which may affect the ballistic conditions and mechanical properties of the nozzle. To minimize this erosion high density graphite is usually preferred; which is again very expensive. Another technique used to minimize the erosion is Pyrolytic Graphite (PG) coating inside the nozzle. However PG coating is prone to cracking and spallation along with very cumbersome deposition process. Another possible methodology to avoid this erosion is to convert the inside surface of the rocket nozzle to Silicon Carbide (SiC), which is very erosion resistant and have much better thermal stability compared to graphite and even PG. Due to its functionally gradient nature such a layer will be very adherent and resistant to spallation. The current research is focused on synthesizing, characterizing and oxidation testing of such a converted SiC layer on commercial grade graphite. (author)

  19. Channel uranium-graphite reactor mounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polushkin, K.K.; Kuznetsov, A.G.; Zheleznyakov, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    According to theoretical principles of general engineering technology the engineering experience of construction-mounting works at the NPP with channel uranium-graphite reactors is systematized. Main parameters and structural features of the 1000 MW channel uranium-graphite reactors are considered. The succession of mounting operations, premounting equipment and pipelines preparation and mounting works technique are described. The most efficient methods of fitting, welding and machining of reactor elements are recommended. Main problems of technical control service are discussed. A typical netted diagram of main equipment of channel uranium-graphite reactors mounting is given

  20. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  1. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  3. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  4. Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids by electrochemical exfoliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Ming; Lai, Wei-Hao [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-14

    Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids are obtained by electrochemical exfoliation with hydrophobic graphite electrodes. Such counterintuitive characteristics are caused by partial oxidation and investigated by examining both graphite electrodes and exfoliated particles after electrolysis. The extent of surface oxidation can be explored through contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, electrical sheet resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta-potential analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-visible, and Raman spectroscopy. The degree of wettability of the graphite anode can be altered by the electrolytic current and time. The water contact angle declines generally with increasing the electrolytic current or time. After a sufficient time, the graphite anode becomes superhydrophilic and its hydrophobicity can be recovered by peeling with adhesive tape. This consequence reveals that the anodic graphite is oxidized by oxygen bubbles but the oxidation just occurs at the outer layers of the graphite sheet. Moreover, the characteristics of oxidation revealed by UV peak shift, peak ratio between D and G bands, and negative zeta-potential indicate the presence of graphite oxide on the outer shell of the exfoliated colloids. However, thermogravimetric analysis for the extent of decomposition of oxygen functional groups verifies that the amount of oxygen groups is significantly less than that of graphite oxide prepared via Hummer method. The structure of this partially oxidized graphite may consist of a graphite core covered with an oxidized shell. The properties of the exfoliated colloids are also influenced by pH of the electrolytic solution. As pH is increased, the extent of oxidation descends and the thickness of oxidized shell decreases. Those results reveal that the degree of oxidation of exfoliated nanoparticles can be manipulated simply by controlling pH.

  5. Performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Department of Applied Chemistry, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The effect of negative to positive electrode materials' weight ratio on the electrochemical performance of both activated carbon (AC)/AC and AC/graphite capacitors has been investigated, especially in the terms of capacity and cycle-ability. The limited capacity charge mode has been proposed to improve the cycle performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite. (author)

  6. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an radioactive waste processing of graphite from graphite moderated nuclear reactors at its decommissioning is discussed. Methods of processing of irradiated graphite are presented. It can be concluded that advanced methods for graphite radioactive waste handling are available nowadays. Implementation of these methods will allow to enhance environmental safety of nuclear power that will benefit its progress in the future

  7. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  8. Synthesis of graphene nanoplatelets from peroxosulfate graphite intercalation compounds

    OpenAIRE

    MELEZHYK A.V.; TKACHEV A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite compound obtained by cold expansion of graphite intercalated with peroxodisulfuric acid was shown to allow the creation of graphene nanoplatelets with thickness of about 5-10 nm. The resulting graphene material contained surface oxide groups. The expanded graphite intercalation compound was exfoliated by ultrasound much easier than thermally expanded graphite. A mechanism for the cleavage of graphite to graphene nanoplatelets is proposed. It include...

  9. Graphite reactor physics; Physique des piles a graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Noc, B [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The study of graphite-natural uranium power reactor physics, undertaken ten years ago when the Marcoule piles were built, has continued to keep in step with the development of this type of pile. From 1960 onwards the critical facility Marius has been available for a systematic study of the properties of lattices as a function of their pitch, of fuel geometry and of the diameter of cooling channels. This study has covered a very wide field: lattice pitch varying from 19 to 38 cm. uranium rods and tubes of cross-sections from 6 to 35 cm{sup 2}, channels with diameters between 70 and 140 mm. The lattice calculation methods could thus be checked and where necessary adapted. The running of the Marcoule piles and the experiments carried out on them during the last few years have supplied valuable information on the overall evolution of the neutronic properties of the fuel as a function of irradiation. More detailed experiments have also been performed in Marius with plutonium-containing fuels (irradiated or synthetic fuels), and will be undertaken at the beginning of 1965 at high temperature in the critical facility Cesar, which is just being completed at Cadarache. Spent fuel analyses complement these results and help in their interpretation. The thermalization and spectra theories developed in France can thus be verified over the whole valid temperature range. The efficiency of control rods as a function of their dimensions, the materials of which they are made and the lattices surrounding them has been measured in Marius, and the results compared with calculation on the one hand and with the measurements carried out in EDF 1 on the other. Studies on the control proper of graphite piles were concerned essentially with the risks of spatial instability and the means of detecting and controlling them, and with flux distortions caused by the control rods. (authors) [French] Entreprise il y a dix ans a l'occasion de la construction des piles de Marcoule, l'etude de la

  10. Seismic research on graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Shigang; Sun Libin; Zhang Zhengming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reactors with graphite core structure include production reactor, water-cooled graphite reactor, gas-cooled reactor, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and so on. Multi-body graphite core structure has nonlinear response under seismic excitation, which is different from the response of general civil structure, metal connection structure or bolted structure. Purpose: In order to provide references for the designing and construction of HTR-PM. This paper reviews the history of reactor seismic research evaluation from certain countries, and summarizes the research methods and research results. Methods: By comparing the methods adopted in different gas-cooled reactor cores, inspiration for our own HTR seismic research was achieved. Results and Conclusions: In this paper, the research ideas of graphite core seismic during the process of designing, constructing and operating HTR-10 are expounded. Also the project progress of HTR-PM and the research on side reflection with the theory of similarity is introduced. (authors)

  11. Review: BNL Tokamak graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The BNL minimum activity graphite blanket designs are reviewed, and three are discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a 30 cm or thicker graphite screen. Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy, which is then radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma. (Auth.)

  12. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report

  13. Optical motion control of maglev graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Abe, Jiro

    2012-12-26

    Graphite has been known as a typical diamagnetic material and can be levitated in the strong magnetic field. Here we show that the magnetically levitating pyrolytic graphite can be moved in the arbitrary place by simple photoirradiation. It is notable that the optical motion control system described in this paper requires only NdFeB permanent magnets and light source. The optical movement is driven by photothermally induced changes in the magnetic susceptibility of the graphite. Moreover, we demonstrate that light energy can be converted into rotational kinetic energy by means of the photothermal property. We find that the levitating graphite disk rotates at over 200 rpm under the sunlight, making it possible to develop a new class of light energy conversion system.

  14. Study on graphite samples for nuclear usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.M.; Silva Roseira, M. da

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The graphite, due to its properties (mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, high-temperature stability, machinability etc.) have many industrial applications, and consequently, an important strategic value. In the nuclear area, it has been used as moderator and reflector of neutrons in the fission process of uranium. The graphite can be produced from many types of carbonaceous materials by a variety of process dominated by the manufactures. This is the reason why there are in the world market a lot of graphite types with different physical and mechanical properties. The present investigation studies some physical characteristics of the graphite samples destined to use in a nuclear reactor. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  15. Collective modes in superconducting rhombohedral graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppila, Ville [O.V. Lounasmaa Laboratory, Aalto University (Finland); Hyart, Timo; Heikkilae, Tero [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2015-07-01

    Recently it was realized that coupling particles with a Dirac dispersion (such as electrons in graphene) can lead to a topologically protected state with flat band dispersion. Such a state could support superconductivity with unusually high critical temperatures. Perhaps the most promising way to realize such coupling in real materials is in the surface of rhombohedrally stacked graphite. We consider collective excitations (i.e. the Higgs modes) in surface superconducting rhombohedral graphite. We find two amplitude and two phase modes corresponding to the two surfaces of the graphite where the superconductivity lives. We calculate the dispersion of these modes. We also derive the Ginzburg-Landau theory for this material. We show that in superconducting rhombohedral graphite, the collective modes, unlike in conventional BCS superconductors, give a large contribution to thermodynamic properties of the material.

  16. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction...

  17. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  18. Vapour pressure of caesium over nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Pummery, F.C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The vapour pressure of caesium over a fine-grained isotropic moulded gilsocarbon nuclear graphite intended for use in the manufacture of fuel tubes for the high temperature reactor has been determined as a function of temperature and concentration by means of the Knudsen effusion technique. The concentration range 0 to 10 μg caesium/g graphite was investigated and it was concluded that a Langmuir adsorption situation exists under these conditions. (author)

  19. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayasse, J.-B.

    1977-01-01

    The graphite elastic constants C 33 and C 44 , reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated [fr

  20. Energy evaluations, graphite corrosion in Bugey I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Fiche, C.

    1967-01-01

    Bugey I presents a problem of radiolytic corrosion of the graphite by the CO 2 under pressure at high temperature. This report aims to evaluate the energy transferred to the gas by a Bugey I core cell, in normal operating conditions. The water, the carbon oxides and the hydrogen formed quantities are deduced as the consumed graphite and methane. Experimental studies are realized in parallel to validate the presented results. (A.L.B.)

  1. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  2. Effects of ultraviolet and electron radiations on graphite-reinforced polysulfone and epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.

    1984-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms have been investigated for graphite/polysulfone and graphite/epoxy laminates exposed to ultraviolet and high-energy electron radiations in vacuum up to 960 equivalent sun hours and 10 9 rads, respectively. Based on GC and combined GC/MS analysis of volatile by-products evolved during irradiation, several free radical mechanisms of composite degradation have been identified. All the composite materials evaluated have shown high electron radiation stability and relatively low ultraviolet stability as indicated by low G values and high quantum yields for gas formation. Mechanical property measurements of irradiated samples did not reveal significant changes, with the possible exception of UV exposed polysulfone laminates. Hydrogen and methane have been identified as the main byproducts of irradiation, along with unexpectedly high levels of CO and CO 2 . Initial G values for methane relative to hydrogen formation are higher in the presence of isopropylidene linkages, which occur in bisphenol-A resins

  3. Comparison of the tribology performance of nano-diesel soot and graphite particles as lubricant additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zu-chuan; Cai, Zhen-bing; Peng, Jin-fang; Zhu, Min-hao

    2016-01-01

    The tribology behavior of exhaust diesel soot as a lubricant additive was investigated and then compared with that of a selection of commercial nano-graphite particles. Specifically, 0.01 wt% particles were dispersed in PAO4 oil with 1 wt% sorbitan monooleate (Span 80) as a dispersing agent, and wear tests based on the ball against plate mode were conducted at various temperatures. Different analytical techniques (e.g. transmission electron, scanning electron and infrared microscopy; energy dispersive x-ray and Raman spectroscopy; and charge measurement) were employed to characterize the chemistry and morphology of the additives and their tribology performance. The oil containing only 0.01 wt% diesel soot clearly improved wear resistance over 60 °C. In particular, at 100 °C the wear rate decreased by approximately 90% compared to the function of base oil. In the same test conditions, diesel soot exhibited better anti-wear performance than nano-graphite at high temperatures. The potential measure showed that the nano-graphite had positive charge and the diesel soot had negative charge. Electrochemical action may play an important role in the lubricant mechanisms of diesel soot and graphite as oil additives. (paper)

  4. Possible room temperature superconductivity in conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Kawashima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistances of conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface have been investigated at room temperatures. Ring current in a ring-shaped container into which n-octane-soaked thin graphite flakes were compressed did not decay for 50 days at room temperature. After two HOPG plates were immersed into n-heptane and n-octane at room temperature, changes in resistances of the two samples were measured by four terminal technique. The measurement showed that the resistances of these samples decrease to less than the smallest resistance that can be measured with a high resolution digital voltmeter (0.1μV. The observation of persistent currents in the ring-shaped container suggests that the HOPG plates immersed in n-heptane and n-octane really entered zero-resistance state at room temperature. These results suggest that room temperature superconductor may be obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface.

  5. In situ formation of graphene layers on graphite surfaces for efficient anodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiahuan; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Cai, Xixi; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-09-15

    Graphene can be used to improve the performance of the anode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) due to its good biocompatibility, high electrical conductivity and large surface area. However, the chemical production and modification of the graphene on the anode are environmentally hazardous because of the use of various harmful chemicals. This study reports a novel method based on the electrochemical exfoliation of a graphite plate (GP) for the in situ formation of graphene layers on the surface of a graphite electrode. When the resultant graphene-layer-based graphite plate electrode (GL/GP) was used as an anode in an MFC, a maximum power density of 0.67 ± 0.034 W/m(2) was achieved. This value corresponds to 1.72-, 1.56- and 1.26-times the maximum power densities of the original GP, exfoliated-graphene-modified GP (EG/GP) and chemically-reduced-graphene-modified GP (rGO/GP) anodes, respectively. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the high performance of the GL/GP anode was attributable to its macroporous structure, improved electron transfer and high electrochemical capacitance. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis technique for the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based electrodes for use in microbial energy harvesting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart- ...

  7. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday ... Carbohydrates Types of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate Counting Make Your Carbs ...

  8. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  9. Nickel-plating for active metal dissolution resistance in molten fluoride salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Luke [Department of Engineering Physics, 1500 Engineering Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sridharan, Kumar, E-mail: kumar@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, 1500 Engineering Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd [Department of Engineering Physics, 1500 Engineering Drive, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Ni electroplating of Incoloy-800H was investigated with the goal of mitigating Cr dissolution from this alloy into molten 46.5%LiF-11.5%NaF-42%KF eutectic salt, commonly referred to as FLiNaK. Tests were conducted in graphite crucibles at a molten salt temperature of 850 deg. C. The crucible material graphite accelerates the corrosion process due to the large activity difference between the graphite and the alloy. For the purposes of providing a baseline for this study, un-plated Incoloy-800H and a nearly pure Ni-alloy, Ni-201 were also tested. Results indicate that Ni-plating has the potential to significantly improve the corrosion resistance of Incoloy-800H in molten fluoride salts. Diffusion of Cr from the alloy through the Ni-plating does occur and if the Ni-plating is thin enough this Cr eventually dissolves into the molten salt. The post-corrosion test microstructure of the Ni-plating, particularly void formation was also observed to depend on the plating thickness. Diffusion anneals in a helium environment of Ni-plated Incoloy-800H and an Fe-Ni-Cr model alloy were also investigated to understand Cr diffusion through the Ni-plating. Further enhancements in the efficacy of the Ni-plating as a protective barrier against Cr dissolution from the alloy into molten fluoride salts can be achieved by thermally forming a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier film on the surface of the alloy prior to Ni electroplating.

  10. Investigation of tungsten coatings on graphite and CFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, R; Maier, H; Gauthier, E; Greuner, H; Hirai, T; Hopf, Ch; Likonen, J; Maddaluno, G; Matthews, G F; Mitteau, R; Philipps, V; Piazza, G; Ruset, C

    2007-01-01

    In the frame of JET's ITER-like wall (ILW) project tungsten coatings on carbon fibre reinforced carbon substrates will be used in the divertor and highly loaded areas in the main chamber. Fourteen different types of samples were produced by physical or chemical vapour deposition and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) with coating thickness of 4, 10 and 200 μm. Similarly, three different VPS W coatings (200 μm) on two different graphite substrates, were produced for use at the strike-point regions of ASDEX Upgrade. All coatings were subjected to thermal screening and thermal cycling tests in the ion beam facility GLADIS. Additionally, the coatings intended for the ILW project were exposed to edge localized mode (ELM)-like thermal loads in the electron beam facility JUDITH. A general failure mode with the CFC substrate is crack formation upon cool-down, whereas the coatings on graphite do not show any crack formation. Additionally, metallographic investigations, x-ray diffraction measurements, adhesion testing as well as measurements on the contents of light impurities were performed

  11. Buildings exposed to fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The 24 lectures presented to the colloquium cover the following subject fields: (1) Behaviour of structural components exposed to fire; (2) Behaviour of building materials exposed to fire; (3) Thermal processes; (4) Safety related, theoretical studies. (PW) [de

  12. Tabletop Tectonics: Diverse Mountain Ranges Using Flour and Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D. M.

    2006-12-01

    It has been recognized for some time that the frontal deformation zones where plates converge (foreland fold- and-thrust belts on continents and accretionary wedges at subduction zones) involve shortening over a decoupling layer, or decollement. A simple but successful way of explaining many aspects of their behavior is called the critical Coulomb wedge model, which regards these contractional wedges as analogous to the wedge-shaped mass of soil accreted in front of a bulldozer, or the wedge of snow that piles up in front of a snow plow. The shape and deformation history of the accreted wedge of soil or snow will depend upon the frictional strength of the material being plowed up and the surface over which it is being plowed. The same is true of `bulldozer' wedges consisting of many km thick piles of sediment at convergent plate margins. Using flour (or powdered milk), sandpaper, graphite, transparency sheets, and athletic field marker chalk, manipulated with sieves, brushes, pastry bags and blocks and sheets of wood, it is possible to demonstrate a wide variety of processes and tectonic styles observed at convergent plate boundaries. Model fold-and-thrust belts that behave like natural examples with a decollement that is strong (e.g., in rock without high pore fluid pressure) or weak (e.g., in a salt horizon or with elevated pore fluid pressure) can be generated simply by placing wither sandpaper or graphite beneath the flour that is pushed across the tabletop using a block of wood (the strong basement and hiterland rocks behind the fold-thrust belt). Depending upon the strength of the decollement, the cross-sectional taper of the deforming wedge will be thin or broad, the internal deformation mild or intense, and the structures either close to symmetric or strongly forward-vergent, just as at the analogous natural fold-thrust belts. Including a horizontal sheet of wood or Plexiglas in front of the pushing block allows generation of an accretionary wedge, outer

  13. Production of nuclear graphite in France; Production de graphite nucleaire en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, P; Mondet, L [Societe Pechiney, 74 - Chedde (France); Arragon, Ph; Cornuault, P; Gueron, J; Hering, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [French] Le graphite destine a la construction des reacteurs est obtenu par le procede usuel: confection d'une pate a partir de coke de petrole et de brai, cuisson de cette pate (au four electrique) puis graphitation du produit cuit, egalement par chauffage electrique. L'usage du transport pneumatique et le controle des conditions cuisson et de graphitation ont permit d'augmenter la production de graphite nucleaire ainsi que de mieux controler ses proprietes physiques et mecaniques et de reduire au minimum les souillures accidentelles. (M.B.)

  14. Temperature distribution in graphite during annealing in air cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, C.R. de.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the evaluation temperature distributions in graphite during annealing operation in graphite. Moderated an-cooled reactors, is presented. One single channel and one dimension for air and graphite were considered. A numerical method based on finite control volumes was used for partioning the mathematical equations. The problem solution involves the use of unsteady equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for air, and energy conservation for graphite. The source term was considered as stored energy release during annealing for describing energy conservation in the graphite. The coupling of energy conservation equations in air and graphite is performed by the heat transfer term betwen air and graphite. The results agree with experimental data. A sensitivity analysis shown that the termal conductivity of graphite and the maximum inlet channel temperature have great effect on the maximum temperature reached in graphite during the annealing. (author)

  15. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a ...

  16. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart- ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods ...

  18. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ready, you can try new foods within each food category. Try these seven steps to get started: Using your dinner plate, put a line down the middle of the plate. Then on one side, cut it ... and starchy foods. See this list of grains and starchy foods . ...

  19. Graphite-based detectors of alkali metals for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalandarishvili, A.G.; Kuchukhidze, V.A.; Sordiya, T.D.; Shartava, Sh.Sh.; Stepennov, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The coolants most commonly used in today's fast reactors are alkali metals or their alloys. A major problem in nuclear plant design is leakproofing of the liquid-metal cooling system, and many leak detection methods and safety specifications have been developed as a result. Whatever the safety standards adopted for nuclear plants in different countries, they all rely on the basic fact that control of the contamination and radiation hazards involved requires reliable monitoring equipment. Results are presented of trials with some leak detectors for the alkali-metal circuits of nuclear reactors. The principal component affecting the detector performance is the sensing element. In the detectors graphite was employed, whose laminar structure enables it to absorb efficiently alkali-metal vapors at high temperatures (320--500 K). This produces a continuous series of alkali-metal-graphite solid solutions with distinct electrical, thermal, and other physical properties. The principle of operation of the detectors resides in the characteristic reactions of the metal-graphite system. One detector type uses the change of electrical conductivity of the graphite-film sensor when it is exposed to alkali-metal vapor. In order to minimize the effect of temperature on the resistance the authors prepared composite layers of graphite intercalated with a donor impurity (cesium or barium), and a graphite-nickel material. The addition of a small percentage of cesium, barium, or nickel produces a material whose temperature coefficient of resistance is nearly zero. Used as a sensing element, such a material can eliminate the need for thermostatic control of the detector

  20. Towards stacked zone plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, S; Rehbein, S; Guttman, P; Heim, S; Schneider, G

    2009-01-01

    Fresnel zone plates are the key optical elements for soft and hard x-ray microscopy. For short exposure times and minimum radiation load of the specimen the diffraction efficiency of the zone plate objectives has to be maximized. As the efficiency strongly depends on the height of the diffracting zone structures the achievable aspect ratio of the nanostructures determines these limits. To reach aspect ratios ≥ 20:1 for high efficient optics we propose to superimpose zone plates on top of each other. With this multiplication approach the final aspect ratio is only limited by the number of stacked zone plate layers. For the stack process several nanostructuring process steps have to be developed and/or improved. Our results show for the first time two layers of zone plates stacked on top of each other.

  1. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept

  2. EEL Calculations and Measurements of Graphite and Graphitic-CNx Core-Losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepujak, A; Bangert, U; Harvey, A J; Blank, V D; Kulnitskiy, B A; Batov, D V

    2006-01-01

    Core EEL spectra of MWCNTs (multi-wall carbon nanotubes) grown in a nitrogen atmosphere were acquired utilising a dedicated STEM equipped with a Gatan Enfina system. Splitting of the carbon K-edge π* resonance into two peaks provided evidence of two nondegenerate carbon bonding states. In order to confirm the presence of a CN x bonding state, a full-potential linearised augmented plane-wave method was utilised to simulate core EEL spectra of graphite and graphitic-CN x compounds. The simulations confirmed splitting of the carbon K-edge π* resonance in graphitic-CN x materials, with the pristine graphite π* resonance remaining unsplit. The simulations also confirmed the increasing degree of amorphicity with higher concentrations (25%) of substitutional nitrogen in graphite

  3. Removal of 14C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the chemical form of 14 C in irradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approximately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 14 C, with a half-life of 5730 years.

  4. Examination of Surface Deposits on Oldbury Reactor Core Graphite to Determine the Concentration and Distribution of 14C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Payne

    Full Text Available Pile Grade A graphite was used as a moderator and reflector material in the first generation of UK Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to examine the concentration and distribution of long lived radioisotopes, such as 14C, to aid in understanding their behaviour in a geological disposal facility. A selection of irradiated graphite samples from Oldbury reactor one were examined where it was observed that Raman spectroscopy can distinguish between underlying graphite and a surface deposit found on exposed channel wall surfaces. The concentration of 14C in this deposit was examined by sequentially oxidising the graphite samples in air at low temperatures (450°C and 600°C to remove the deposit and then the underlying graphite. The gases produced were captured in a series of bubbler solutions that were analysed using liquid scintillation counting. It was observed that the surface deposit was relatively enriched with 14C, with samples originating lower in the reactor exhibiting a higher concentration of 14C. Oxidation at 600°C showed that the remaining graphite material consisted of two fractions of 14C, a surface associated fraction and a graphite lattice associated fraction. The results presented correlate well with previous studies on irradiated graphite that suggest there are up to three fractions of 14C; a readily releasable fraction (corresponding to that removed by oxidation at 450°C in this study, a slowly releasable fraction (removed early at 600°C in this study, and an unreleasable fraction (removed later at 600°C in this study.

  5. Migration of phthalates on culture plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohnert Hansen, Juliana; Boas, Malene; Møller Brorson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    -well culture plates are typically used to study phthalates in cell cultures. In a pilot study, we observed evidence of phthalate migration in 24-well culture plates. As this has not previously been described, we investigated the phenomenon in more detail. Primary human thyroid epithelial cell cultures (n = 8...... cultures) were exposed to either di-ethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) or di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Measurement of phthalate metabolites by mass spectrometry demonstrated that the short-branched DEP was able to migrate to adjacent wells when added...... to cell culture plates. DnBP also seemed to be able to migrate, unlike the long-branched DEHP or the monoester MnBP which did not seem to have this ability. High background levels of phthalate metabolites were also observed, which might compromise results from low dose phthalate studies. In conclusion...

  6. Behavior of Equipment Support Beam Joint Directly Connected to A Steel-plate Concrete(SC) Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. S.; Kwon, K. J.

    2008-01-01

    To decrease the time for building nuclear power plants, a modular construction method, 'Steel-plate Concrete(SC)', has been investigated for over a decade. To construct a SC wall, a pair of steel plates are placed in parallel similar to a form-work in conventional reinforced concrete (RC) structures, and concrete is filled between the steel plates. Instead of removing the steel plates after the concrete has cured, the steel plates serve as components of the structural member. The exposed steel plate of SC structures serves as the base plate for the equipment support, and the headed studs welded to the steel plates are used as anchor bolts. Then, a support beam can be directly welded to the surface of the steel plate in any preferred position. In this study, we discuss the behavior and evaluation method of the equipment support joint directly connected to exposed steel plate of SC wall

  7. Gas transport in graphitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, E.

    1995-02-01

    The characterization of the gas transport properties of porous solids is of interest in several fields of science and technology. Many catalysts, adsorbents, soils, graphites and carbons are porous. The gas transport through most porous solids can be well described by the dusty gas model invented by Evans, Watson and Mason. This model includes all modes of gas tranport under steady-state conditions, which are Knudsen diffusion, combined Knudsen/continuum diffusion and continuum diffusion, both for gas pairs with equal and different molecular weights. In the absence of a pressure difference gas transport in a pore system can be described by the combined Knudsen/continuum diffusion coefficient D 1 for component 1 in the pores, the Knudsen diffusion coefficient D 1K in the pores, and the continuum diffusion coefficient D 12 for a binary mixture in the pores. The resistance to stationary continuum diffusion of the pores is characterized by a geometrical factor (ε/τ) 12 = (ε/τ)D 12 , were D 12 is the continuum diffusion coefficient for a binary mixture in free space. The Wicke-Kallenbach method was often used to measure D 1 as function of pressure. D 12 and D 1K can be derived from a plot 1/D 1 νs P, and ε/τcan be calculated since D 12 is known. D 1K and the volume of dead end pores can be derived from transient measurements of the diffusional flux at low pressures. From D 1K the expression (ε/τ c ) anti l por may be calculated, which characterizes the pore system for molecular diffusion, where collisions with the pore walls are predominant. (orig.)

  8. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  9. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  10. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  11. In-situ observation of the chemical erosion of graphite in the scrape-off-layer of TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Vietzke, E.; Erdweg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A sniffer probe system has been used to investigate the chemical erosion during interaction of the TEXTOR scrape-off plasma with a pyrolytic graphite plate at temperatures up to 1400 0 C. Floating potential conditions as well as 200 V bias has been applied at plasma ion fluxes of about 10 18 ions/cm 2 sec. Methane formation was found to be 8x10 -3 CH 4 /H and 1.5x10 -2 CD 4 /D + for room temperature graphite and floating potential increasing by a factor of two at temperature around 500 0 C. Biasing the graphite decreases the methane yield at room temperature and increase it in the maximum temperature range. CO formation due to chemical interaction of oxygen ions with the graphite reaches ratios between 3 and 6x10 -2 CO/D(H) near the limiter edge under normal TEXTOR scrape-off conditions and exceeds the chemical hydro-(deutero-)carbon formation significantly. The results are discussed in view of the present status of hydro-(deutero-)carbon formation on graphite and carbon impurity observations made in fusion experiments. (orig.)

  12. Hydrogen adsorption on and solubility in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashenko, S.L.; Wampler, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental data on adsorption and solubility of hydrogen isotopes in graphite over a wide range of temperatures and pressures are reviewed. Langmuir adsorption isotherms are proposed for the hydrogen-graphite interaction. The entropy and enthalpy of adsorption are estimated, allowing for effects of relaxation of dangling sp 2 bonds. Three kinds of traps are proposed: edge carbon atoms of interstitial loops with an adsorption enthalpy relative to H 2 gas of -4.4 eV/H 2 (unrelaxed, Trap 1), edge carbon atoms at grain surfaces with an adsorption enthalpy of -2.3 eV/H 2 (relaxed, Trap 2), and basal plane adsorption sites with an enthalpy of +2.43 eV/H 2 (Trap 3). The adsorption capacity of different types of graphite depends on the concentration of traps which depends on the crystalline microstructure of the material. The number of potential sites for the 'true solubility' (Trap 3) is assumed to be about one site per carbon atom in all types of graphite, but the endothermic character of this solubility leads to a negligible H inventory compared to the concentration of hydrogen in type 1 and type 2 traps for temperatures and gas pressures used in the experiments. Irradiation with neutrons or carbon atoms increases the concentration of type 1 and type 2 traps from about 20 and 200 appm respectively for unirradiated (POCO AXF-5Q) graphite to about 1500 and 5000 appm, respectively, at damage levels above 1 dpa. (orig.)

  13. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  14. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  15. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  16. Dislocation density and graphitization of diamond crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantea, C.; Voronin, G.A.; Zerda, T.W.; Gubicza, J.; Ungar, T.

    2002-01-01

    Two sets of diamond specimens compressed at 2 GPa at temperatures varying between 1060 K and 1760 K were prepared; one in which graphitization was promoted by the presence of water and another in which graphitization of diamond was practically absent. X-ray diffraction peak profiles of both sets were analyzed for the microstructure by using the modified Williamson-Hall method and by fitting the Fourier coefficients of the measured profiles by theoretical functions for crystallite size and lattice strain. The procedures determined mean size and size distribution of crystallites as well as the density and the character of the dislocations. The same experimental conditions resulted in different microstructures for the two sets of samples. They were explained in terms of hydrostatic conditions present in the graphitized samples

  17. Capacitive behavior of highly-oxidized graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Mateusz; Mianowski, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Capacitive behavior of a highly-oxidized graphite is presented in this paper. The graphite oxide was synthesized using an oxidizing mixture of potassium chlorate and concentrated fuming nitric acid. As-oxidized graphite was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed with respect to the oxygen content and the species of oxygen-containing groups. Electrochemical measurements were performed in a two-electrode symmetric cell using KOH electrolyte. It was shown that prolonged oxidation causes an increase in the oxygen content while the interlayer distance remains constant. Specific capacitance increased with oxygen content in the electrode as a result of pseudo-capacitive effects, from 0.47 to 0.54 F/g for a scan rate of 20 mV/s and 0.67 to 1.15 F/g for a scan rate of 5 mV/s. Better cyclability was observed for the electrode with a higher oxygen amount.

  18. Reduced graphite oxide in supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Belén; Vretenár, Viliam; Kotrusz, Peter; Hulman, Martin; Centeno, Teresa A

    2015-05-15

    The current energy needs have put the focus on highly efficient energy storage systems such as supercapacitors. At present, much attention focuses on graphene-like materials as promising supercapacitor electrodes. Here we show that reduced graphite oxide offers a very interesting potential. Materials obtained by oxidation of natural graphite and subsequent sonication and reduction by hydrazine achieve specific capacitances as high as 170 F/g in H2SO4 and 84F/g in (C2H5)4NBF4/acetonitrile. Although the particle size of the raw graphite has no significant effect on the physico-chemical characteristics of the reduced materials, that exfoliated from smaller particles (materials may suffer from a drop in their specific surface area upon fabrication of electrodes with features of the existing commercial devices. This should be taken into account for a reliable interpretation of their performance in supercapacitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Graphite core design in UK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    The cores in the first power producing Magnox reactors in the UK were designed with only a limited amount of information available regarding the anisotropic dimensional change behaviour of Pile Grade graphite. As more information was gained it was necessary to make modifications to the design, some minor, some major. As the cores being built became larger, and with the switch to the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) with its much higher power density, additional problems had to be overcome such as increased dimensional change and radiolytic oxidation by the carbon dioxide coolant. For the AGRs a more isotropic graphite was required, with a lower initial open pore volume and higher strength. Gilsocarbon graphite was developed and was selected for all the AGRs built in the UK. Methane bearing coolants are used to limit radiolytic oxidation. (author). 5 figs

  20. Sensing capabilities of graphite based MR elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, T F; Li, W H; Deng, Y M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents both experimental and theoretical investigations of the sensing capabilities of graphite based magnetorheological elastomers (MREs). In this study, eight MRE samples with varying graphite weight fractions were fabricated and their resistance under different magnetic fields and external loadings were measured with a multi-meter. With an increment of graphite weight fraction, the resistance of MRE sample decreases steadily. Higher magnetic fields result in a resistance increase. Based on an ideal assumption of a perfect chain structure, a mathematical model was developed to investigate the relationship between the MRE resistance with external loading. In this model, the current flowing through the chain structure consists of both a tunnel current and a conductivity current, both of which depend on external loadings. The modelling parameters have been identified and reconstructed from comparison with experimental results. The comparison indicates that both experimental results and modelling predictions agree favourably well

  1. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter....

  2. Graphite based Schottky diodes formed semiconducting substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Todd; Tongay, Sefaattin; Hebard, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the formation of semimetal graphite/semiconductor Schottky barriers where the semiconductor is either silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs) or 4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC). The fabrication can be as easy as allowing a dab of graphite paint to air dry on any one of the investigated semiconductors. Near room temperature, the forward-bias diode characteristics are well described by thermionic emission, and the extracted barrier heights, which are confirmed by capacitance voltage measurements, roughly follow the Schottky-Mott relation. Since the outermost layer of the graphite electrode is a single graphene sheet, we expect that graphene/semiconductor barriers will manifest similar behavior.

  3. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.

    2012-05-01

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  5. Electrostatic Manipulation of Graphene On Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, Carlos; Rubio-Verdu, Carmen; Saenz-Arce, Giovanni; Martinez-Asencio, Jesús; Milan, David C.; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan J.; Caturla, Maria Jose

    2015-03-01

    Here we report the use of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) under ambient and vacuum conditions to study the controlled exfoliation of the last layer of a graphite surface when an electrostatic force is applied from a STM tip. In this work we have focused on the study of two parameters: the applied voltage needed to compensate the graphite interlayer attractive force and the one needed to break atomic bonds to produce folded structures. Additionally, we have studied the influence of edge structure in the breaking geometry. Independently of the edge orientation the graphite layer is found to tear through the zig-zag direction and the lifled layer shows a zig-zag folding direction. Molecular Dinamics simulations and DFT calculations have been performed to understand our results, showing a strong correlation with the experiments. Comunidad Valenciana through Prometeo project.

  6. THE EFFECT OF APPLIED STRESS ON THE GRAPHITIZATION OF PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg, R H; Crooks, D D; Fenn, Jr, R W; Hammond, M L

    1963-06-15

    Metallographic and x-ray diffraction studies were made of the effect of applied stress at high temperature on the structure of pyrolytic graphite (PG). The dominant factor was whether the PG was above or below its graphitization temperature, which, in turn, was not strongly dependent on applied stress. Below the graphitization temperature, the PG showed a high proportion of disordered layers (0.9), a fairly large mean tilt angle (20 deg ) and a small crystailite size (La --150 A). Fracture occurred at low stress and strain and the materiai exhibited a high apparent Young's modulus ( approximates 4 x 10/sup 6/ psi). Above the graphitization temperature, graphitization was considerably enhanced by strain up to about 8%. The disorder parameter was decreased from a zero strain value of 0.3 to 0.l5 with strain, the mean tilt angle was decreased to 4 deg , and a fivefold increase in crystallite size occurred. When the strainenhanced graphitization was complete, the material exhibited a low apparent modulus ( approximates 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ psi) and large plastic strains (>100%) for a constant stress ( approximates 55 ksi). Graphitization was shown to be a spontaneous process that is promoted by breaking cross-links thermally, and the process is furthered by chemical attack and plastic strain. (auth)

  7. Fabrication of carbon-polymer composite bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by compression moulding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, M.A.; Ahmed, R.; Saleem, A.; Din, R.U.

    2009-01-01

    Fuel cells are considered as one of the most important technologies to address the future energy and environmental pollution problems. These are the most promising power sources for road transportation and portable devices. A fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy. A fuel cell stack consists of bipolar plates and membrane electrode assemblies (MEA). The bipolar plate is by weight, volume and cost one of the most significant components of a fuel cell stack. Major functions of bipolar plates are to separate oxidant and fuel gas, provide flow channels, conduct electricity and provide heat transfer. Bipolar plates can be made from various materials including graphite, metals, carbon / carbon and carbon/ polymer composites. Materials for carbon-polymer composites are relatively inexpensive, less corrosive, strong and channels can be formed by means of a moulding process. Carbon-polymer composites are of two type i.e; thermosetting and thermoplastic. For thermosetting composite a bulk molding compound (BMC) was prepared by adding graphite, vinyl ester resin, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide and cobalt naphthalate. The BMC was thoroughly mixed, poured into a die mould of a bipolar plate with channels and hot pressed at a specific temperature and pressure. A bipolar plate was formed according to the die mould. Design of the mould is also discussed. Conducting polymers were also added to BMC to increase the conductivity of bipolar plates. Particle size of the graphite has also a significant effect on the conductivity of the bipolar plates. Thermoplastic composites were also prepared using polypropylene and graphite.

  8. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With ... been easier. It can be a challenge to manage portion control wherever you are. Now, our best- ...

  10. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a- ...

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    Full Text Available ... Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

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    Full Text Available ... Children and Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ...

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    Full Text Available ... these seven steps to get started: Using your dinner plate, put a line down the middle of ... Fitness Food Recipes Planning Meals What Can I Eat Weight Loss Fitness In My Community Calendar of ...

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    Full Text Available ... Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ...

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  1. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... 800-342-2383) Give by Mail Close ... your plate with more non-starchy veggies and smaller portions of starchy foods and protein—no special tools or counting required! You can ...

  4. Humvee Armor Plate Drilling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    When drilling holes in hard steel plate used in up-armor kits for Humvee light trucks, the Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama, requested the assistance of the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM...

  5. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Easy Advocacy Checklists for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ...

  6. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ... Complications Health Insurance For Parents & Kids Know Your Rights We Can Help Enroll in the Living WIth ...

  7. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ... today and help fund grants supporting next generation scientists. Donate Today We Can Help - we-can-help. ...

  8. Graphite crystals grown within electromagnetically levitated metallic droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Shaahin; Kalaantari, Haamun; Mojgani, Sasan; Abbaschian, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Various graphite morphologies were observed to grow within the electromagnetically levitated nickel–carbon melts, including primary flakes and spheres, curved surface graphite and eutectic flakes, as well as engulfed and entrapped particles. As the supersaturated metallic solutions were cooled within the electromagnetic (EM) levitation coil, the primary graphite flakes and spheres formed and accumulated near the periphery of the droplet due to EM circulation. The primary graphite islands, moreover, nucleated and grew on the droplet surface which eventually formed a macroscopic curved graphite crystal covering the entire liquid. Upon further cooling, the liquid surrounding the primary graphite went under a coupled eutectic reaction while the liquid in the center formed a divorced eutectic due to EM mixing. This brought about the formation of graphite fine flakes and agglomerated particles close to the surface and in the center of the droplet, respectively. The graphite morphologies, growth mechanisms, defects, irregularities and growth instabilities were interpreted with detailed optical and scanning electron microscopies.

  9. Expansion and exfoliation of graphite to form graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Shashikan P.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene production methods are described based on subjecting non- covalent graphite intercalated compounds, such as graphite bisulfate, to expansion conditions such as shocks of heat and/or microwaves followed by turbulence-assisted exfoliation

  10. A 2-D nucleation-growth model of spheroidal graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, Jacques; Bourdie, Jacques; Castro-Román, Manuel Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of recent experimental investigations, in particular by transmission electron microscopy, suggests spheroidal graphite grows by 2-D nucleation of new graphite layers at the outer surface of the nodules. These layers spread over the surface along the prismatic direction of graphite which is the energetically preferred growth direction of graphite when the apparent growth direction of the nodules is along the basal direction of graphite. 2-D nucleation-growth models first developed for precipitation of pure substances are then adapted to graphite growth from the liquid in spheroidal graphite cast irons. Lateral extension of the new graphite layers is controlled by carbon diffusion in the liquid. This allows describing quantitatively previous experimental results giving strong support to this approach.

  11. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  12. Thermal Properties of G-348 Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental measurements have been obtained in the INL Graphite Characterization Laboratory to deduce the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for G-348 isotropic graphite, which has been used by City College of New York in thermal experiments related to gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, mass, volume and thermal expansion were converted to thermal conductivity in accordance with ASTM Standard Practice C781-08 (R-2014). Data are tabulated and a preliminary correlation for the thermal conductivity is presented as a function of temperature from laboratory temperature to 1000C.

  13. London forces in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Poperenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with terrace steps was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy with high spatial resolution. Spots with positive and negative charges were found in the vicinity of the steps. Values of the charges depended both on the microscope needle scan velocity and on its motion direction. The observed effect was theoretically explained with account of London forces that arise between the needle tip and the graphite surface. In this scheme, a terrace step works as a nanoscale diode for surface electric currents.

  14. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  15. Chemical atomization of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, I.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.

    A simple model of the mechanism of chemical atomization is given, on whose basis a decrease in chemical atomization is qualitatively predicted for high temperatures. Mass spectrometric investigations of the atomization products cited, which found CH 4 and CH 3 molecules during the irradiation of graphite and H + ions thereby confirmed the presence of chemical atomization. A relationship of S and temperature of graphite T during irradiation was obtained which showed a decrease in the coefficient of atomization of a high temperature. (U.S.)

  16. The electrochemical properties of graphite and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeager, E.; Gupta, S.; Molla, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon and graphite are often used as supports for electrocatalysts, but also have an electrocatalytic function in such electrode reactions as O 2 reduction in alkaline electrolytes, Cl 2 generation in brine and SOCl 2 reduction in lithium-thionyl chloride batteries. These catalytic functions involve specific chemical functional groups bound to the carbon and graphite surfaces. The factors controlling O 2 reduction with various types of carbon electrodes of both low and high surface area are reviewed. Of particular importance is the role of hydrogen peroxide. The role of the functionality of the carbon in the electrocatalysis will be discussed

  17. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackstone, R [Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). Joint Nuclear Research Center

    1977-03-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted.

  18. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behavior compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted

  19. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted. (Auth.)

  20. Electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shazly, O.; El-Wahidy, E.F.; Elanany, N.; Saad, N.A.

    1992-06-01

    The electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite flakes, obtained from the graphite schists of Wadi Bent, Eastern Desert, were measured. The flakes were ground and compressed into pellets. The standard four probe dc method was used to measure the temperature dependence of the electric resistivity from room temperature down to 12 K. The transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance were measured in the low magnetic field range at temperatures 300 K, 77 K and 12 K. The transverse magnetoresistance data was used to estimate the average mobility, assuming a simple two-band model. (author). 20 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  1. Direct reading spectrochemical analysis of nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca Adell, M.; Becerro Ruiz, E.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1964-01-01

    A description is given about the application of a direct-reading spectrometer the Quantometer, to the determination of boron. calcium, iron, titanium and vanadium in nuclear grade graphite. for boron the powdered sample is mixed with 1% cupric fluoride and excited in a 10-amperes direct current arc and graphite electrodes with a crater 7 mm wide and 10 mm deep. For the other elements a smaller crater has been used and dilution with a number of matrices has been investigated; the best results are achieved by employing 25% cupric fluoride. The sensitivity limit for boron is 0,15 ppm. (Author) 21 refs

  2. Graphite target for the spiral project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J.; Loiselet, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author)

  3. Monte Carlo calculation of standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results of calculation of neutron flux space and energy distribution in the standard graphite block (SGB) obtained by the MCNP TM code. VMCCS nuclear data library, based on the ENDF / B-VI release 4 evaluation file, is used. MCNP model of the SGB considers detailed material, geometric and spectral properties of the neutron source, source carrier, graphite moderator medium, aluminium foil holders and proximate surrounding of SGB Geometric model is organised to provide the simplest homogeneous volume cells in order to obtain the maximum acceleration of neutron history tracking (author)

  4. Maskless, parallel patterning with zone-plate array lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D. J. D.; Gil, Dario; Menon, Rajesh; Mondol, Mark K.; Smith, Henry I.; Anderson, Erik H.

    1999-01-01

    Zone-plate array lithography (ZPAL) is a maskless lithography scheme that uses an array of shuttered zone plates to print arbitrary patterns on a substrate. An experimental ultraviolet ZPAL system has been constructed and used to simultaneously expose nine different patterns with a 3x3 array of zone plates in a quasidot-matrix fashion. We present exposed patterns, describe the system design and construction, and discuss issues essential to a functional ZPAL system. We also discuss another ZPAL system which operates with 4.5 nm x radiation from a point source. We present simulations which show that, with our existing x-ray zone plates and this system, we should be able to achieve 55 nm resolution. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society

  5. BAO Plate Archive Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Andreasyan, H. R.; Azatyan, N. M.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Samsonyan, A. L.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Harutyunyan, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    We present the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO) Plate Archive Project that is aimed at digitization, extraction and analysis of archival data and building an electronic database and interactive sky map. BAO Plate Archive consists of 37,500 photographic plates and films, obtained with 2.6m telescope, 1m and 0.5m Schmidt telescopes and other smaller ones during 1947-1991. The famous Markarian Survey (or the First Byurakan Survey, FBS) 2000 plates were digitized in 2002-2005 and the Digitized FBS (DFBS, www.aras.am/Dfbs/dfbs.html) was created. New science projects have been conducted based on this low-dispersion spectroscopic material. Several other smaller digitization projects have been carried out as well, such as part of Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) plates, photographic chain plates in Coma, where the blazar ON 231 is located and 2.6m film spectra of FBS Blue Stellar Objects. However, most of the plates and films are not digitized. In 2015, we have started a project on the whole BAO Plate Archive digitization, creation of electronic database and its scientific usage. Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) database will accommodate all new data. The project runs in collaboration with the Armenian Institute of Informatics and Automation Problems (IIAP) and will continues during 4 years in 2015-2018. The final result will be an Electronic Database and online Interactive Sky map to be used for further research projects. ArVO will provide all standards and tools for efficient usage of the scientific output and its integration in international databases.

  6. Neutron imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1995-01-01

    Imaging plates have been used in the field of medical diagnosis since long ago, but their usefulness was verified as the two-dimensional detector for analyzing the X-ray crystalline structure of high bio molecules like protein, and they have contributed to the remarkable progress in this field. The great contribution is due to the excellent features, such as the detection efficiency of about 100%, the positional resolution smaller than 0.2 mm, the dynamic range of five digits, and the area of several hundreds mm square. The neutron imaging plates have not yet obtained the sufficient results. It was planned to construct the neutron diffractometer for biological matters, and to put imaging plate neutron detectors (IP-ND) to practical use as the detector. The research on the development of IP-NDs was carried out, and the IPp-NDs having the performance comparable with that for X-ray were able to be produced. Imaging plates are the integral type two-dimensional radiation detector using photostimulated luminescence matters, and their principle is explained. As to neutron imaging plates, the converter, neutron detection efficiency and the flight of secondary particles in photo-stimulated luminescence matters are described. As for the present state of development of neutron imaging plates, the IP-NDs made for trial, the dynamic range, the positional resolution, the detection efficiency and the kinds of converters, and the application of IP-NDs are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Stacks with TiN/titanium as the bipolar plate for PEMFCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Zhijun; Zhang, Dongming; Wang, Zaiyi

    2012-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is a potential alternative for the internal combustion engine. But many problems, such as metallic bipolar plate instead of graphite bipolar plate to decrease the cost, should be solved before its application. Based on the previous results that single cell with TiN/Ti as bipolar plates shows high performance and enough long-time durability, the progress on the stacks with TiN/Ti as bipolar plates is reported in this manuscript. Till now seldom report is focused on stacks because of the complicated processing technique, especially for that with TiN/Ti as bipolar plate. The flow field in the plate is punched from titanium deformation, and two plates are welded by laser welding to form one piece of bipolar plate. The adopted processing techniques for stacks with TiN/Ti as bipolar plate exhibit advantage and feasibility in industry. The power density by weight for the stack is as high as 1353 W kg −1 , although it still has space to be improved. Next work should be focused on the design of flow channel parameters and flow field type based on plastic deformation of metal materials. -- Highlights: ► The progress on the stacks with TiN/Ti as bipolar plates is reported. ► The adopted processing techniques exhibit feasibility in industry. ► The power density by weight for the stack is as high as 1353 W kg −1 .

  8. STS Observations of Landau Levels at Graphite Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Niimi, Y.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements were made on surfaces of two different kinds of graphite samples, Kish graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), at very low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. We observed a series of peaks in the tunnel spectra, which grow with increasing field, both at positive and negative bias voltages. These are associated with Landau quantization of the quasi two-dimensional electrons and holes in graphite in magnetic fields perpendicular...

  9. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  10. Development of Integrally Molded Bipolar Plates for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsun Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available All-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs are potential energy storage systems for renewable power sources because of their flexible design, deep discharge capacity, quick response time, and long cycle life. To minimize the energy loss due to the shunt current, in a traditional design, a flow field is machined on two electrically insulated frames with a graphite plate in between. A traditional bipolar plate (BP of a VRB consists of many components, and thus, the assembly process is time consuming. In this study, an integrally molded BP is designed and fabricated to minimize the manufacturing cost. First, the effects of the mold design and injection parameters on frame formability were analyzed by simulation. Second, a new graphite plate design for integral molding was proposed, and finally, two integrally molded BPs were fabricated and compared. Results show that gate position significantly affects air traps and the maximum volume shrinkage occurs at the corners of a BP. The volume shrinkage can be reduced using a large graphite plate embedded within the frame.

  11. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  12. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  13. Oxidation behavior of IG and NBG nuclear graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woong-Ki; Kim, Byung-Joo [Jeonju Institute of Machinery and Carbon Composites Palbokdong-2ga, 817, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Seon; Chi, Se-Hwan [Dept. of Nuclear Hydrogen Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.k [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha Univ., 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Water contact angles on nuclear graphite before and after oxidation treatments: the pictures show the contact angles obtained under deionized water on oxidation-treated and untreated nuclear graphite. The water contact angles are decreased after oxidation due to the increase in the hydrophilic. Display Omitted Research highlights: The average pore size of graphites shows an increase after the oxidation treatments. They also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. - Abstract: This work studies the oxidation-induced characteristics of four nuclear graphites (NBG-17, NBG-25, IG-110, and IG-430). The oxidation characteristics of the nuclear graphites were measured at 600 {sup o}C. The surface properties of the oxidation graphites were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle methods. The N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherm characteristics, including the specific surface area and micropore volume, were investigated by means of BET and t-plot methods. The experimental results show an increase in the average pore size of graphites; they also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. For example the surface area of NBG-17 increases slightly whereas the surface area of IG-110 increases significantly. This result confirms that the original surface state of each graphite is unique.

  14. Influence of irradiation on high-strength graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu.S.; Grebennik, V.N.; Kalyagina, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    To ensure efficiency of the graphite elements of the construction of the masonry of reactors, the graphite must possess high radiation stability, strength, and heat resistance. In this connection, the physical properties of graphites based on uncalcined petroleum coke with a binder - high-temperature hard coal pitch - the amount of which reaches 40% are considered in this paper

  15. Porous graphite electrodes for rechargeable ion-transfer batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, P; Scheifele, W; Haas, O [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The influence of preparation pressure and pore-forming additives on the properties of graphite-based, Li{sup +}-intercalating electrodes for ion-transfer batteries have been investigated. The electrochemical performance of graphite electrodes could be improved by adjusting the porosity. Specific charge of >300 Ah/kg (with respect to the graphite mass) could be achieved. (author) 4 figs., 2 refs.

  16. Spherical cauliflower-like carbon dust formed by interaction between deuterium plasma and graphite target and its internal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, N. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)], E-mail: ohno@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Yoshimi, M. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tokitani, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Takamura, S. [Department of Electronics, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan); Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Simulated experiments to produce carbon dust particles with cauliflower structure have been performed in a liner plasma device, NAGDIS-II by exposing high density deuterium plasma to a graphite sample (IG-430U). Formation of carbon dust depends on the surface temperature and the incident ion energy. At a surface temperature 600-700 K, a lot of isolated spherical dust particles are observed on the graphite target. The internal structure of an isolated dust particle was observed with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) in detail. FIB analysis clearly shows there exist honey-combed cell structure with thin carbon walls in the dust particle and the dust particle grows from the graphite surface. TEM image also shows that the dust particle is made of amorphous carbon with crystallized grains with diameters of 10-50 nm.

  17. A review of the behaviour of graphite under the conditions appropriate for protection of the first wall of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birch, M.; Brocklehurst, J.E.

    1987-12-01

    The material used as a first wall protection in fusion reactor systems will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from the fusion reaction and suffer surface bombardment by other energetic particles in the plasma. Graphite is a potential candidate for the first wall material. Calculations are performed of the damaging power of 14 MeV neutrons so that existing graphite irradiation data can be utilised. Such data at high irradiation temperatures are reviewed for a wide range of graphite types, characterised by specific examples, and the application of the data to design calculations is discussed. The erosion/corrosion effect of the plasma at the graphite surface is also considered. Limitations in the state of knowledge are identified, and particular areas of further work are recommended. (author)

  18. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, A. R. S. S.; Piana, Francesco; Mičušík, M.; Pionteck, J.; Banerjee, S.; Voit, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 182, 1 October (2016), s. 237-245 ISSN 0254-0584 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphite oxide * surface modification * conductive nanoparticles Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.084, year: 2016

  19. Development of new bi-polar plates based on electrically conductive filled polymers for PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jousse, F.; Salas, J.F.; Giroud, F. [C.E.A., Le Ripault, Monts (France); Icard, B.; Laurent, J.Y.; Serre Combe, P.

    2000-07-01

    In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell technology, the bi-polar plates are dedicated to: the current collection, the separation and distribution of gas (hydrogen and oxygen) at the cathode and the anode. To achieve these functions, bi-polar plate materials must satisfy the following properties: high conductivity (higher than 10 S/cm), high chemical resistance to acid and water, very low permeability to hydrogen (permeability < Pe{sup H2}{sub Nafion} (20 C) = 7.10{sup -17} m{sup 2}/Pa/s). Traditionally bi-polar plates have been designed with stainless steel or graphite. However, the cost of these plates are incompatible to transport applications, principally because of the gas channel machining step. Recently, we have noticed the work of T.M. Besmann [1] on the manufacturing of bi-polar plates based on carbon fibres and phenolic resin, processed by pyrolisis and densification on surface by a chemical vapour infiltration process. However, this kind of process seems too expensive and complex for the needs of the road electric transportation industry. Organic composites based on conductive chemical resistant fillers and processed by molding could be an alternative solution. Bi-polar plates requirements can be achieved by controlling and optimising experimental parameters such as the nature and morphology of fillers, the resin characteristics, and the process conditions. To avoid corrosion of the composite material, and then, the contamination of the cell, we have selected non metallic fillers, based on graphite or carbon black. (orig.)

  20. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  1. Polyphase diffusion of fission products in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannert, V.

    1989-05-01

    The report attempts to give an introduction into the subject of fission product transport in nuclear graphite and results in an extended proposal of a transport-model. Beginning with a rough description of the graphite in question, an idea about the physical transport-phenomena in graphite is developed. Some of the basic experimental methods, especially techniques of porosimetry, determination of sorption-isotherms and of course several transport-experiments, are briefly described and their results are discussed. Some of the most frequent transport models are introduced and assessed with the criteria emphasized in this report. An extended model is proposed including the following main ideas: The transport of the fission-products is regarded as a two-phase-diffusion process through the open pores of the graphite. The two phases are: surface-diffusion and gas-diffusion. A time-dependent coupling of the two diffusion-phases by sorption-isotherms and a concentration-dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient, also related to the physical behaviour of the sorption-isotherms, are the basic properties of the proposed model. (orig./HP) [de

  2. US graphite reactor D ampersand D experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE)

  3. Analysis of a T-10 graphite limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Laux, M.; Lingertat, J.; Pech, P.; Reiner, H.D.; Strusny, H.; Wolff, H.

    1981-01-01

    Parts of a T-10 graphite limiter used during ohmic heated discharges have been investigated. Erosion and deposition phenomena have been studied by morphological and elemental surface analysis methods. From the results estimates of the plasma parameters near the limiter surface have been made. (orig.)

  4. Raw materials for reflector graphite (for reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, G.; Mindermann, D.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing concept for the core components of German high temperature reactor (HTR) types of graphite was previously entirely directed to the use of German tar coke (St coke). As the plants for producing this material no longer complied technically with the current environmental protection requirements, one had to assume that they would soon be shut down. To prevent bottlenecks in the erection of future HTR plants, alternative cokes produced by modern processes by Japanese manufacturers were checked for their suitability for the manufacture of reactor graphite. This report describes the investigations carried out on these materials from the safe delayed coking process. The project work, apart from analysis of the main data of the candidate coke considered, included the processing of the raw materials into directly and secondarily extruded graphite rods on the laboratory scale, including characterisation. As the results show, the material data achieved with the previous raw material can be reproduced with Japanese St coke. The tar coke LPC-A from the Nippon Steel Chemical Co., Ltd was decided on as the new standard coke for manufacturing reflector graphite. (orig.) With 15 tabs., 2 figs [de

  5. Formation of dislocation dipoles in irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwase, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a dislocation dipole accumulation model to explain the irradiation-induced amorphization of graphite. However, the structure of dislocation dipole in the hexagonal networks is still an open question at the atomic-level. In this paper, we propose a possible formation process of the dislocation dipole

  6. Functional interface of polymer modified graphite anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaba, S.; Ozeki, T.; Okushi, K. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    Graphite electrodes were modified by polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Their electrochemical properties were examined in 1 mol dm{sup -3} LiClO{sub 4} ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solutions as an anode of lithium ion batteries. Generally, lithium ions hardly intercalate into graphite in the PC electrolyte due to a decomposition of the PC electrolyte at ca. 0.8 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}, and it results in the exfoliation of the graphene layers. However, the modified graphite electrodes with PAA, PMA, and PVA demonstrated the stable charge-discharge performance due to the reversible lithium intercalation not only in the EC:DMC but also in the PC electrolytes since the electrolyte decomposition and co-intercalation of solvent were successfully suppressed by the polymer modification. It is thought that these improvements were attributed to the interfacial function of the polymer layer on the graphite which interacted with the solvated lithium ions at the electrode interface. (author)

  7. Functional interface of polymer modified graphite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaba, S.; Ozeki, T.; Okushi, K.

    Graphite electrodes were modified by polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Their electrochemical properties were examined in 1 mol dm -3 LiClO 4 ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solutions as an anode of lithium ion batteries. Generally, lithium ions hardly intercalate into graphite in the PC electrolyte due to a decomposition of the PC electrolyte at ca. 0.8 V vs. Li/Li +, and it results in the exfoliation of the graphene layers. However, the modified graphite electrodes with PAA, PMA, and PVA demonstrated the stable charge-discharge performance due to the reversible lithium intercalation not only in the EC:DMC but also in the PC electrolytes since the electrolyte decomposition and co-intercalation of solvent were successfully suppressed by the polymer modification. It is thought that these improvements were attributed to the interfacial function of the polymer layer on the graphite which interacted with the solvated lithium ions at the electrode interface.

  8. Removal of iron from impure graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

    1979-01-01

    Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I 2 at 900 0 C. With addition of H 2 , the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl 2 . I 2 has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr

  9. Thermoexpanded graphite modification by titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semko, L.S.; Gorbik, P.P.; Chujko, O.O.; Kruchek, Ya.Yi.; Dzyubenko, L.S.; Orans'ka, O.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    A method of the synthesis of thermoexpanded graphite (TEG) powders coated by titanium dioxide is developed. The conversion of n-buthylorthotitanate into TiO 2 on the TEG surface is investigated. The optimal parameters of the synthesis and the structure of titanium dioxide clusters on the TEG surface are determined

  10. GRAPHITIZED STEELS IN MACHINE-BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Akimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that graphitized steels in some cases due to its intermediate disposition by structure and characteristics among low-carbon steels and cast irons, can provide the necessary combination of characteristics of construction material and consequently to increase safety and durability of details of metallurgical and machinebuilding industry machines.

  11. Evaluating Picture Quality of Image Plates in Digital CR Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Byung Joon [Dept. of Radiological Tecnology, Choonhae College of Health Science, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ji Tae Jeong [Dept. of Radiological Science, Kaya University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Lab effectively supplemented the effects of outside radiation on image plates in the process of image acquisition of CR (computed radiography) systems and conducted for effective utilization in the case of clinical application. For this, Lab classified the storage places and time periods of image plates and compared and analyzed the differences between small dark spots. Lab also assessed the concentration distribution within the boundaries of images. Lab compared and measured the number of dark spots in a light room and a dark room depending on the storage places of image plates and found that dark spots slightly increased in an image plate when stored in a light room on the first and second days. Dark spots increased in proportion to the length of time stored. In the case of the image plate stored in a dark room, the number of dark spots remarkably decreased. With regard to picture quality as related to the location of image plates, the damage to picture quality could be reduced by locating regions of interest in the center. With regard to differences in sharpness following changes in the thickness of subjects, fewer scatter rays occurred and sharpness improved by reducing the thickness of subjects as much as possible. To get medical images of excellent quality, image plates should be managed effectively and it is desirable to keep images plates in dark iron plate boxes and not to expose them to outside radiation for a long time.

  12. Evaluating Picture Quality of Image Plates in Digital CR Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Byung Joon; Ji Tae Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Lab effectively supplemented the effects of outside radiation on image plates in the process of image acquisition of CR (computed radiography) systems and conducted for effective utilization in the case of clinical application. For this, Lab classified the storage places and time periods of image plates and compared and analyzed the differences between small dark spots. Lab also assessed the concentration distribution within the boundaries of images. Lab compared and measured the number of dark spots in a light room and a dark room depending on the storage places of image plates and found that dark spots slightly increased in an image plate when stored in a light room on the first and second days. Dark spots increased in proportion to the length of time stored. In the case of the image plate stored in a dark room, the number of dark spots remarkably decreased. With regard to picture quality as related to the location of image plates, the damage to picture quality could be reduced by locating regions of interest in the center. With regard to differences in sharpness following changes in the thickness of subjects, fewer scatter rays occurred and sharpness improved by reducing the thickness of subjects as much as possible. To get medical images of excellent quality, image plates should be managed effectively and it is desirable to keep images plates in dark iron plate boxes and not to expose them to outside radiation for a long time.

  13. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  14. Acceptance test for graphite components and construction status of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, T.; Ishihara, M.; Maruyama, S.; Shiozawa, S.; Tsuji, N.; Miki, T.

    1996-01-01

    In March, 1991, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started to constructed the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) which is a 30-MW(thermal) helium gas-cooled reactor with a core composed of prismatic graphite blocks piled on the core support graphite structures. Two types of graphite materials are used in the HTTR. One is the garde IG-110, isotropic fine grain graphite, another is the grade PGX, medium-to-fine grained molded graphite. These materials were selected on the basis of the appropriate properties required by the HTTR reactor design. Industry-wide standards for an acceptance test of graphite materials used as main components of a nuclear reactor had not been established. The acceptance standard for graphite components of the HTTR, therefore, was drafted by JAERI and reviewed by specialists outside JAERI. The acceptance standard consists of the material testing, non-destructive examination such as the ultrasonic and eddy current testings, dimensional and visual inspections and assembly test. Ultrasonic and eddy current testings are applied to graphite logs to detect an internal flaw and to graphite components to detect a surface flaw, respectively. The assembly test is performed at the works, prior to their installation in the reactor pressure vessel, to examine fabricating precision of each component and alignment of piled-up structures. The graphite components of the HTTR had been tested on the basis of the acceptance standard. It was confirmed that the graphite manufacturing process was well controlled and high quality graphite components were provided to the HTTR. All graphite components except for the fuel graphite blocks are to be installed in the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR in September 1995. The paper describes the construction status of the HTTR focusing on the graphite components. The acceptance test results are also presented in this paper. (author). Figs

  15. Quantifying microstructural dynamics and electrochemical activity of graphite and silicon-graphite lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Eller, Jens; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Schmidt, Volker; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-09-01

    Despite numerous studies presenting advances in tomographic imaging and analysis of lithium ion batteries, graphite-based anodes have received little attention. Weak X-ray attenuation of graphite and, as a result, poor contrast between graphite and the other carbon-based components in an electrode pore space renders data analysis challenging. Here we demonstrate operando tomography of weakly attenuating electrodes during electrochemical (de)lithiation. We use propagation-based phase contrast tomography to facilitate the differentiation between weakly attenuating materials and apply digital volume correlation to capture the dynamics of the electrodes during operation. After validating that we can quantify the local electrochemical activity and microstructural changes throughout graphite electrodes, we apply our technique to graphite-silicon composite electrodes. We show that microstructural changes that occur during (de)lithiation of a pure graphite electrode are of the same order of magnitude as spatial inhomogeneities within it, while strain in composite electrodes is locally pronounced and introduces significant microstructural changes.

  16. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  17. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  18. Cadmium plating replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  19. Evaluation of thermal shock strengths for graphite materials using a laser irradiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Young Shin; Kim, Duck Hoi; Park, No Seok; Suh, Jeong; Kim, Jeng O.; Il Moon, Soon

    2004-01-01

    Thermal shock is a physical phenomenon that occurs during the exposure to rapidly high temperature and pressure changes or during quenching of a material. The rocket nozzle throat is exposed to combustion gas of high temperature. Therefore, it is important to select suitable materials having the appropriate thermal shock resistance and to evaluate these materials for rocket nozzle design. The material of this study is ATJ graphite, which is the candidate material for rocket nozzle throat. This study presents an experimental method to evaluate the thermal shock resistance and thermal shock fracture toughness of ATJ graphite using laser irradiation. In particular, thermal shock resistance tests are conducted with changes of specimen thickness, with laser source irradiated at the center of the specimen. Temperature distributions on the specimen surface are detected using type K and C thermocouples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to observe the thermal cracks on specimen surface

  20. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  1. Graphite waste incineration in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiroy, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    French gas-cooled reactors belonging to the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Electricite de France (EDF), Hifrensa (Spain), etc., commissioned between the 1950s and 1970s, have generated large quantities of graphite wastes, mainly in the form of spent fuel sleeves. Furthermore, some of these reactors scheduled for dismantling in the near future (such as the G2 and G3 reactors at Marcoule) have cores consisting of graphite blocks. Consequently, a fraction of the contaminated graphite, amounting to 6000 t in France for example, must be processed in the coming years. For this processing, incineration using a circulating fluidized bed combustor has been selected as a possible solution and validated. However, the first operation to be performed involves recovering this graphite waste, and particularly, first of all, the spent fuel sleeves that were stored in silos during the years of reactor operation. Subsequent to the final shutdown of the Spanish gas-cooled reactor unit, Vandellos 1, the operating utility Hifrensa awarded contracts to a Framatome Iberica SA/ENSA consortium for removing, sorting, and prepackaging of the waste stored in three silos on the Vandellos site, essentially graphite sleeves. On the other hand, a program to validate the Framatome fluidized bed incineration process was carried out using a prototype incinerator installed at Le Creusot, France. The validation program included 22 twelve-hour tests and one 120-hour test. Particular attention was paid to the safety aspects of this project. During the performance of the validation program, a preliminary safety assessment was carried out. An impact assessment was performed with the help of the French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety, taking into account the preliminary spectra supplied by the CEA and EDF, and the activities of the radionuclides susceptible of being released into the atmosphere during the incineration. (author). 4 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  2. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  3. Balanced improvement of high performance concrete material properties with modified graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, Amirpasha

    of exposure to chloride solutions, pointing at the benefits of nanoplatelets towards enhancement of concrete resistance to chloride ion diffusion. It was also found that the intensity of Thaumasite, a key species marking sulfate attack on cement hydrates, was lowered with the addition of graphite nanoplatelets in concrete exposed to sulfate solutions. Experimental evaluations were conducted on scaled-up production of concrete nanocomposite in precast concrete plants. Full-scale reinforced concrete pipes and beams were produced using concrete nanocomposites. Durability and structural tests indicated that the use of graphite nanoplatelets, alone or in combination with synthetic (PVA) fibers, produced significant gains in the durability characteristics, and also benefited the structural performance of precast reinforced concrete products. The material and scaled-up structural investigations conducted in the project concluded that lower-cost graphite nanomaterials (e.g., graphite nanoplatelets) offer significant potentials as multi-functional additives capable of enhancing the barrier, durability and mechanical performance of concrete materials. The benefits of graphite nanomaterials tend to be more pronounced in higher-performance concrete materials.

  4. Bending and stretching of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, E H; Hemp, W S

    1964-01-01

    The Bending and Stretching of Plates deals with elastic plate theory, particularly on small- and large-deflexion theory. Small-deflexion theory concerns derivation of basic equations, rectangular plates, plates of various shapes, plates whose boundaries are amenable to conformal transformation, plates with variable rigidity, and approximate methods. Large-deflexion theory includes general equations and some exact solutions, approximate methods in large-deflexion theory, asymptotic large-deflexion theories for very thin plates. Asymptotic theories covers membrane theory, tension field theory, a

  5. Frictional characteristics of silicon graphite lubricated with water at high pressure and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Eun Hyun; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Jong In

    2001-01-01

    Experimental frictional and wear characteristics of silicon graphite materials is studied in this paper. Those specimens are lubricated with high temperature and highly pressurized water to simulate the same operating condition for the journal bearing and the thrust bearing on the main coolant pump bearing in the newly developing nuclear reactor named SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). Operating condition of the bearings is realized by the tribometer and the autoclave. Friction coefficient and wear loss are analyzed to choose the best silicon graphite material. Pin on plate test specimens are used and coned disk springs are used to control the applied force on the specimens. Wear loss and wear width are measured by a precision balance and a micrometer. The friction force is measured by the strain gauge which can be used under high temperature and high pressure. Three kinds of silicon graphite materials are examined and compared with each other, and each material shows similar but different results on frictional and wear characteristics

  6. Determination of boron in graphite by a wet oxidation decomposition/curcumin photometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo; Toida, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    The wet oxidation decomposition of graphite materials has been studied for the accurate determination of boron using a curcumin photometric method. A graphite sample of 0.5 g was completely decomposed with a mixture of 5 ml of sulfuric acid, 3 ml of perchloric acid, 0.5 ml of nitric acid and 5 ml of phosphoric acid in a silica 100 ml Erlenmeyer flask fitted with an air condenser at 200degC. Any excess of perchloric and nitric acids in the solution was removed by heating on a hot plate at 150degC. Boron was distilled with methanol, and then recovered in 10 ml of 0.2 M sodium hydroxide. The solution was evaporated to dryness. To the residue were added curcumin-acetic acid and sulfuric-acetic acid. The mixture was diluted with ethanol, and the absorbance at 555 nm was measured. The addition of 5 ml of phosphoric acid proved to be effective to prevent any volatilization loss of boron during decomposition of the graphite sample and evaporation of the resulting solution. The relative standard deviation was 4-8% for samples with 2 μg g -1 levels of boron. The results on CRMs JAERI-G5 and G6 were in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  7. Method of manufacturing a graphite coated fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Koichi; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the close bondability and homogeneity of a graphite coating formed at the inner surface of a fuel can. Method: A coating containing graphite dispersed in a volatile organic solvent is used and a graphite coating is formed to the inner surface of a fuel can by way of a plunger method. After applying graphite coating, an inert gas is caused to flow at a certain flow rate to the inside of the fuel can horizontally rotaged so that gassification and evaporation of the volatile organic solvent contained in the graphite coating may be promoted. Since drying of the graphite coating coated to the inner surface of the fuel can thus be controlled, a graphite coating with satisfactory close bondability and homogeneity can be formed. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. GRAPHITIZATION OF METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE WESTERN KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic-Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in the study area are metacarbonate, metachert, metapelite, metasandstone and metaconglomerate. Graphite layers are 1cm to 2m thick, extend laterally for tens of meters and are intercalated with metasedimentary rocks. Generally, the graphite is black in color, with a well developed cleavage which is concordant with the cleavage of the host rocks. In addition, the crystal and flake graphites formed in metasedimentary rocks are mostly aligned parallel to the cleavage planes. These metamorphic rocks are subjected to shearing and granulation providing structural control for the development of graphite. It was probably this phenomenon that first led to emphasize the relationship between graphite and metasedimentary rocks. Graphite mineralization has been controlled by bedding, microfractures and granulations. Briefly, the metamorphism has converted carbonaceous matter into graphite .

  9. Hydrophilization of graphite using plasma above/in a solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shuhei; Kawahara, Kazuma; Takeuchi, Nozomi

    2018-01-01

    A hydrophilization method for graphite is required for applications such as conductive ink. In typical chemical oxidation methods for graphite have the problems of producing many defects in graphite and a large environmental impact. In recent years, the plasma treatment has attracted attention because of the high quality of the treated samples and the low environmental impact. In this study, we proposed an above-solution plasma treatment with a high contact probability of graphite and plasma since graphite accumulates on the solution surface due to its hydrophobicity, which we compared with a so-called solution plasma treatment. Graphite was hydrophilized via reactions with OH radicals generated by the plasma. It was confirmed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were modified to the graphite and the dispersibility was improved. The above-solution plasma achieved more energy-efficient hydrophilization than the solution plasma and it was possible to enhance the dispersibility by increasing the plasma-solution contact area.

  10. Crystallization degree change of expanded graphite by milling and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qunwei; Wu Jihuai; Sun Hui; Fang Shijun

    2009-01-01

    Expanded graphite was ball milled with a planetary mill in air atmosphere, and subsequently thermal annealed. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in the milling initial stage (less than 12 h), the crystallization degree of the expanded graphite declined gradually, but after milling more than 16 h, a recrystallization of the expanded graphite toke place, and ordered nanoscale expanded graphite was formed gradually. In the annealing initial stage, the non-crystallization of the graphite occurred, but, beyond an annealing time, recrystallizations of the graphite arise. Higher annealing temperature supported the recrystallization. The milled and annealed expanded graphite still preserved the crystalline structure as raw material and hold high thermal stability.

  11. Plating on Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.; Jones, A.

    1979-03-01

    Zircaloy-2 is a difficult alloy to coat with an adherent electroplate because it easily forms a tenacious oxide film in air and aqueous solutions. Procedures reported in the literature and those developed at SLL for surmounting this problem were investigated. The best results were obtained when specimens were first etched in either an ammonium bifluoride/sulfuric acid or an ammonium bifluoride solution, plated, and then heated at 700 0 C for 1 hour in a constrained condition. Machining threads in the Zircaloy-2 for the purpose of providing sites for mechanical interlocking of the plating also proved satisfactory

  12. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  13. Hydrodynamics of a flexible plate between pitching rigid plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junyoung; Kim, Daegyoum

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of a flexible plate have been studied as a model problem in swimming and flying of animals and fluid-structure interaction of plants and flags. Motivated by fish schooling and an array of sea grasses, we investigate the dynamics of a flexible plate closely placed between two pitching rigid plates. In most studies on passive deformation of the flexible plate, the plate is immersed in a uniform flow or a wavy flow. However, in this study, the flexible plate experiences periodic deformation by the oscillatory flow generated by the prescribed pitching motion of the rigid plates. In our model, the pitching axes of the rigid plates and the clamping position of the flexible plate are aligned on the same line. The flexible plate shows various responses depending on length and pitching frequency of rigid plates, thickness of a flexible plate, and free-stream velocity. To find the effect of each variable on the response of the flexible plate, amplitude of a trailing edge and modal contribution of a flapping motion are compared, and flow structure around the flexible plate is examined.

  14. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  15. Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids in bainite during graphitization annealing of a medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.X.; Wei, B.Q.; Li, D.D.; He, K.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in bainite during graphitization annealing at 680 °C of Jominy-quenched bars of an Al-Si bearing medium carbon (0.4C wt%) steel has been studied and compared with that in martensite by using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the graphitization process in bainite is different from that in martensite in many aspects such as the initial carbon state, the behavior of cementite, the nucleation-growth feature and kinetics of formation of graphite spheroids during graphitization annealing, and the shape, size and distribution of these graphite spheroids. The fact that the graphitization in bainite can produce more homogeneous graphite spheroids with more spherical shape and finer size in a shorter annealing time without the help of preexisting coring particles implies that bainite should be a better starting structure than martensite for making graphitic steel. - Highlights: • This article presents a microstructural characterization of formation of graphite spheroids in bainite. • Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids formed in bainite and martensite are compared. • Bainite should be a better starting structure for making graphitic steel as results show.

  16. Erosion of pyrolytic graphite and Ti-doped graphite due to high flux irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Yusuke; Ohashi, Junpei; Ueda, Yoshio; Isobe, Michiro; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    The erosion of pyrolytic graphite and titanium doped graphite RG-Ti above 1,780 K was investigated by 5 keV Ar beam irradiation with the flux from 4x10 19 to 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . The total erosion yields were significantly reduced with the flux. This reduction would be attributed to the reduction of RES (radiation enhanced sublimation) yield, which was observed in the case of isotropic graphite with the flux dependence of RES yield of φ -0.26 (φ: flux) obtained in our previous work. The yield of pyrolytic graphite was roughly 30% higher than that of isotropic graphite below the flux of 10 20 m -2 ·s -1 whereas each yield approached to very close value at the highest flux of 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . This result indicated that the effect of graphite structure on the RES yield, which was apparent in the low flux region, would disappear in the high flux region probably due to the disordering of crystal structure. In the case of irradiation to RG-Ti at 1,780 K, the surface undulations evolved with a mean height of about 3 μm at 1.2x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 , while at higher flux of 8.0x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 they were unrecognizable. These phenomena can be explained by the reduction of RES of graphite parts excluding TiC grains. (author)

  17. Graphitic carbon in a nanostructured titanium oxycarbide thin film to improve implant osseointegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanoni, R.; Ioannidu, C.A.; Mazzola, L.; Politi, L.; Misiano, C.; Longo, G.; Falconieri, M.; Scandurra, R.

    2015-01-01

    A nanostructured coating layer on titanium implants, able to improve their integration into bones and to protect against the harsh conditions of body fluids, was obtained by Ion Plating Plasma Assisted, a method suitable for industrial applications. A titanium carbide target was attached under vacuum to a magnetron sputtering source powered with a direct current in the 500–1100 W range, and a 100 W radio frequency was applied to the sample holder. The samples produced at 900 W gave the best biological response in terms of overexpression of some genes of proteins involved in bone turnover. We report the characterization of a reference and of an implant sample, both obtained at 900 W. Different micro/nanoscopic techniques evidenced the morphology of the substrates, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to disclose the surface composition. The layer is a 500 nm thick hard nanostructure, composed of 60% graphitic carbon clustered with 15% TiC and 25% Ti oxides. - Highlights: • Nanostructured TiC protective layers were produced on Ti samples for prostheses. • Ion Plating Plasma-Assisted Deposition from TiC targets was used on Ti samples. • A model of the surface layer has been drawn from XPS, Raman, AFM, FIB/SEM, TEM. • The layer is mainly composed of graphitic carbon in addition to TiC and Ti oxides

  18. Graphitic carbon in a nanostructured titanium oxycarbide thin film to improve implant osseointegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, R., E-mail: robertino.zanoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’ p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Ioannidu, C.A.; Mazzola, L.; Politi, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Misiano, C. [Romana Film Sottili, Anzio, Rome (Italy); Longo, G. [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, SB IPSB LPMV, BSP 409 (Cubotron UNIL), R.te de la Sorge, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Falconieri, M. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Scandurra, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    A nanostructured coating layer on titanium implants, able to improve their integration into bones and to protect against the harsh conditions of body fluids, was obtained by Ion Plating Plasma Assisted, a method suitable for industrial applications. A titanium carbide target was attached under vacuum to a magnetron sputtering source powered with a direct current in the 500–1100 W range, and a 100 W radio frequency was applied to the sample holder. The samples produced at 900 W gave the best biological response in terms of overexpression of some genes of proteins involved in bone turnover. We report the characterization of a reference and of an implant sample, both obtained at 900 W. Different micro/nanoscopic techniques evidenced the morphology of the substrates, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to disclose the surface composition. The layer is a 500 nm thick hard nanostructure, composed of 60% graphitic carbon clustered with 15% TiC and 25% Ti oxides. - Highlights: • Nanostructured TiC protective layers were produced on Ti samples for prostheses. • Ion Plating Plasma-Assisted Deposition from TiC targets was used on Ti samples. • A model of the surface layer has been drawn from XPS, Raman, AFM, FIB/SEM, TEM. • The layer is mainly composed of graphitic carbon in addition to TiC and Ti oxides.

  19. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... meal-planning, . In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a-future-without-diabetes-2.html A Future ...

  20. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tool is not to scale because of the differences in types of vegetables. When creating your plate ... function (data) { $('#survey-errors').remove(); $('.survey-form .form-group .survey-alert-wrap').remove(); if (data.submitSurveyResponse.success == ' ...

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a-future-without-diabetes-2.html A Future Without Diabetes Donate towards research today and your gift will be matched. Donate ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals > Create Your Plate Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create ... Type 2 Education Series Hear audio clips and full recordings of past Q&A events at your ...

  3. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ Are ... Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten ...

  4. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the ... effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ...

  5. Microchannel plate photodetectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majka, R.

    1977-01-01

    A review is given the status of development work on photodetectors using microchannel plates (MCP) as the electron gain element. Projections are made and opinions are presented on what might be available in the next few years. Several uses for these devices at ISABELLE are mentioned

  6. Parallel plate detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardes, D.; Volkov, P.

    1981-01-01

    A 5x3cm 2 (timing only) and a 15x5cm 2 (timing and position) parallel plate avalanche counters (PPAC) are considered. The theory of operation and timing resolution is given. The measurement set-up and the curves of experimental results illustrate the possibilities of the two counters [fr

  7. Flat plate collector. Solarflachkollektor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, N

    1979-03-29

    The invention refers to a flat solar collector with an absorber plate, which is arranged on a support and is covered by a transparent window, between which and the plate there is an air space. The previously known structures of this type had the disadvantage that the thermal expansion of the enclosed air caused considerable difficulties. The purpose of the invention is therefore to create a collector, which can be used on the modular system, retains its properties and is safe in spite of the great temperature variations. According to the invention this problem is solved by providing a compensating space in the collector, which is separated by a diaphragm from the airspace between the plate and the covering window. The airspace therefore remains sealed against the atmosphere, so that no dirt, corrosion of the inside and no condensation can reduce the efficiency of the collector. A rise in pressure due to an increase in temperature is immediately reduced by expansion of the diaphragm, which enters the compensation space. In order to increase the pressure in the airspace above the plate for increases in temperature, the compensation space is connected to the atmosphere. The diaphragm can be mirrored on the side towards the absorber, which makes the diaphragm into an insulating element, as it reflects radiated heat from the absorber.

  8. Electrochemical behaviour of rhenium-graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varypaev, V.N.; Krasikov, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of combination electrode from graphite with electrodeposited thin coating of electrolytic rhenium is studied. Solution of 0.5 m NaCl+0.04 m AlCl 3 served as an electrolite. Polarization galvanostatic curves of hydrogen evolution upon electrodes with conditional rhenium thickness of 3.5 and 0.35 μm, 35 and 3.5 nm are obtained. Possibility of preparation of rhenium-graphite cathode with extremely low rhenium consume, electro-chemical properties of which are simu-lar to purely rhenium cathode is shown. Such electrode is characterized with stable in time low cathode potential of hydrogen evolution in chloride electrolyte and during cathode polarization it is not affected by corrosion

  9. Graphite moderated {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a {sup 252}Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the {sup 252}Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  10. Magnetic response of certain curved graphitic geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Davids, P.S.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-particle energy spectra associated with some members of buckyfamily (curved graphitic geometries), in particular C 50 , C 60 , C 70 and related fullerenes as well as coaxial helical microtubules of graphite, are obtained analytically within the mean-field approximation. These energy spectra are then used to calculate various response functions. Specifically, we calculate the specific heat, magnetization and magnetic susceptibility in the presence of an external magnetic field at low temperatures. For a single microtubule an extra peak superimposed on the first de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation in magnetic susceptibility is found in the 50--170 Tesla range depending on the radius which is possibly accessible in special (explosive flux compression) experiments. Finally, we point to important potential applications of these novel mesoscopic structures in nanotechnology

  11. Imaging of tritium implanted into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Causey, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The extensive use of graphite in plasma-facing surfaces of tokamaks such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, which has planned tritium discharges, makes two-dimensional tritium detection techniques important in helping to determine torus tritium inventories. We have performed experiments in which highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were first tritium implanted with fluences of ∼10 16 T/cm 2 at energies approx. 0 C resulted in no discernible motion of tritium along the basal plane, but did show that significant desorption of the implanted tritium occurred. The current results indicate that tritium in quantities of 10 12 T/cm 2 in tritiated components could be readily detected by imaging at lower magnifications

  12. Preparation of nanoporous carbons from graphite nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung-Joo [Department of Green Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, PO Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-14

    In this study we manufactured highly porous graphite nanofibres (GNFs) by physical activation in order to develop promising energy storage materials. The activation was performed at activation temperatures in the range of 800-1050 deg. C. The pore structures of the porous GNFs were analysed using N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. After the activation, the porous GNFs showed a decrease in diameter and scratches on their surfaces, resulting from surface oxidation and the opening of the graphitic layers, respectively. It was found that the specific surface area of the porous GNFs prepared at 1050 deg. C was more than 2000 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} without loss of their fibre shape or serious increase in electrical resistivity. This result indicates that porous GNFs prepared under optimal conditions can have a much higher specific surface area and are promising materials for energy storage technologies.

  13. Spectroscopical determination of impurities in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.; Tognini, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for the direct determination of B, Cd, Si, Hg, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Ni, Al, Mo, Ti, Sr, Na, Zn, and As in nuclear grade graphite is described. A 9:1 ratio of graphite to copper difluoride is used in the preparation of samples and standards. The excitation is carried out in a d-c at 10 amperes. The copper fluoride used as spectrographic buffer serves to increase the volatilization rate of the impurities and to diminish the differences in the nature of the analytical and calibration samples. The relative standard deviations for the determination of the 16 trace elements, except Sr, Fe, Cd, Al and Si, are in the range of 8 - 20% in their appropriate calibration levels. For the latter five elements they are approximately 20-40%

  14. Effect of total pressure on graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, R.D.; Hoot, C.G.

    1983-04-01

    Graphite corrosion in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is calculated using two key assumptions: (1) the kinetic, catalysis, and transport characteristics of graphite determined by bench-scale tests apply to large components at reactor conditions and (2) the effects of high pressure and turbulent flow are predictable. To better understand the differences between laboratory tests and reactor conditions, a high-pressure test loop (HPTL) has been constructed and used to perform tests at reactor temperature, pressure, and flow conditions. The HPTL is intended to determine the functional dependence of oxidation rate and characteristics on total pressure and gas velocity and to compare the oxidation results with calculations using models and codes developed for the reactor

  15. Corrosion of metal bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Renato A. [Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), 09210-170 Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Mara Cristina L.; Ett, Gerhard; Ett, Volkmar [Electrocell Ind. Com. Equip. Elet. LTDA, Centro de Inovacao, Empreendedorismo e Tecnologia (CIETEC), 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    PEM fuel cells are of prime interest in transportation applications due to their relatively high efficiency and low pollutant emissions. Bipolar plates are the key components of these devices as they account for significant fractions of their weight and cost. Metallic materials have advantages over graphite-based ones because of their higher mechanical strength and better electrical conductivity. However, corrosion resistance is a major concern that remains to be solved as metals may develop oxide layers that increase electrical resistivity, thus lowering the fuel cell efficiency. This paper aims to present the main results found in recent literature about the corrosion performance of metallic bipolar plates. (author)

  16. Plastic strain caused by contraction of pores in polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Yoda, Shinichi; Konishi, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of porosity on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of four isotropic polycrystalline graphites were studied. The pore size distributions of the graphites were measured using a conventional mercury penetration technique. The average pore radius of ISO-88 graphite was about one-tenth of that of ISEM-1, IG-11 or IG-15 graphites. Young's modulus of the graphites decreased with increasing porosity. The stress-strain curve of each graphite was measured in its lateral and axial directions. Young's modulus of graphite decreased with increasing load. The plastic strain at a given compressive load was calculated from the stress-strain curve and the initial gradient of the unloading curve at the load. The ratio of lateral plastic strain to axial plastic strain for the graphites was less than 0.5, indicating that the volume of the graphites decreased during compressive loading. By assuming that the volume change was caused by contraction of pores, plastic strain associated with contraction of pores was calculated from the axial plastic strain and lateral plastic strain by slips along the basal planes. The plastic strain increased with increasing axial plastic strain and porosity of graphite. (author)

  17. Effect of graphite reflector on activation of fusion breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young-Ouk; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The graphite reflector concept has been applied in the design of the Korea HCCR TBM for ITER and this concept is also a candidate design option for Korea Demo. • In the graphite reflector, C-14, B-11 and Be-10 are produced after an irradiation. Impurities in both case of beryllium and graphite is dominant in the shutdown dose after an irradiation. • Based on the evaluation, the graphite reflector is a good alternative of the beryllium multiplier in the view of induced activity and shutdown dose. But C-14 produced in the graphite reflector should be considered carefully in the view of radwaste management. - Abstract: Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. In this paper, activity analysis was performed and the effect of graphite reflector in the view of activation was compared to the beryllium multiplier. As a result, it is expected that using the graphite reflector instead of the beryllium multiplier decreases total activity very effectively. But the graphite reflector produces C-14 about 17.2 times than the beryllium multiplier. Therefore, C-14 produced in the graphite reflector is expected as a significant nuclide in the view of radwaste management.

  18. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan [Nano Science and Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), PO Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-26

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F{sub 2g} vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond.

  19. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F 2g vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond

  20. Graphite-graphite oxide composite electrode for vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenyue; Liu Jianguo; Yan Chuanwei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new composite electrode is designed for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). → The graphite oxide (GO) is used as electrode reactions catalyst. → The excellent electrode activity is attributed to the oxygen-containing groups attached on the GO surface. → A catalytic mechanism of the GO towards the redox reactions is presumed. - Abstract: A graphite/graphite oxide (GO) composite electrode for vanadium redox battery (VRB) was prepared successfully in this paper. The materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area was measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. The redox reactions of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ were studied with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicated that the electrochemical performances of the electrode were improved greatly when 3 wt% GO was added into graphite electrode. The redox peak currents of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ couples on the composite electrode were increased nearly twice as large as that on the graphite electrode, and the charge transfer resistances of the redox pairs on the composite electrode are also reduced. The enhanced electrochemical activity could be ascribed to the presence of plentiful oxygen functional groups on the basal planes and sheet edges of the GO and large specific surface areas introduced by the GO.

  1. Determining the future for irradiated graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Wickham, A.J.; Hacker, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, proposals have been made for the long-term treatment of radioactive graphite waste which have ranged from sea dumping through incineration to land-based disposal, sometimes preceded by a variable period of 'safe storage' within the original reactor containment. Nuclear regulators are challenging the proposed length of 'safe storage' on the basis that essential knowledge may be lost. More recently, political constraints have further complicated the issue by eliminating disposal at sea and imposing a 'near-zero release' philosophy, while public opinion is opposed to land-based disposal and has induced a continual drive towards minimizing radioactivity release to the environment from disposal. This paper proposes that, despite various international agreements, it is time to review technically all options for disposal of irradiated graphite waste as a framework for the eventual decision-making process. It is recognized that the socio-economic and political pressures are high and therefore, given that all currently identified options satisfy the present safety limits, the need to minimize the objective risk is shown to be a minor need in comparison to the public's want of demonstrable control, responsiveness and ability to reverse/change the disposal options in the future. Further, it is shown that the eventual decision-making process for a post-dismantling option for graphite waste must optimize the beneficial attributes of subjective risk experienced by the general public. In addition, in advocating and preferred option to the general public, it is recommended that the industry should communicate at a level commensurate with the public understanding and initiate a process of facilitation which enables the public to arrive at their own solution and constituting a social exchange. Otherwise it is concluded that if the indecision over disposal options is allowed to continue then, by default, graphite will remain in long-term supervised storage. (author)

  2. Graphite-to-Graphene: Total Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzaglo, Matat; Bar, Ilan Pri; Varenik, Maxim; Shunak, Liran; Pevzner, Svetlana; Regev, Oren

    2017-02-01

    The rush to develop graphene applications mandates mass production of graphene sheets. However, the currently available complex and expensive production technologies are limiting the graphene commercialization. The addition of a protective diluent to graphite during ball-milling is demonstrated to result in a game-changer yield (>90%) of defect-free graphene, whose size is controlled by the milling energy and the diluent type. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Electron oxidation of graphite by fluorospecies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    The fluoride-ion affinity (A/sub F - /) of phosphorus pentafluoride was determined to be 100 kcal/mole from the heats of reaction of the Lewis bases SF 4 and ClO 2 F with PF 5 near room temperature. The fluoride-ion affinity of boron trifluoride was determined to be 92 kcal/mole from the heat of reaction of ClO 2 F with BF 3 . The crystal structure of ClO 2 BF 4 was determined and a precise lattice energy was calculated from this structure and used to determined A/sub F - /. Both PF 5 and BF 3 were found to react with graphite in the presence of fluorine gas to yield a variety of non-stoichiometric compounds. The fluoride-ion affinity of silicon tetrafluoride is not known, but it does not react with graphite and F 2 except at high pressures. These and previous results suggested a threshold in oxidizing power of intercalating species below which the oxidative intercalation reaction would not occur. The reduction of C/sub x/PF 6 by PF 3 proved that the reaction is thermodynamically controlled to some extent. The displacement of PF 5 in C/sub x/PF 6 by BF 3 (with a smaller A/sub F - /) suggested that two BF 3 molecules may have a larger fluoride-ion affinity than one PF 5 and that B 2 F 7 - may be a stable anion in graphite. Conductivity studies of PF/sub x/ and BF/sub y/ salts showed that a large drop in conductivity when the reaction reaches first stage is due in the most part to direct fluorination of carbon in graphite

  4. Temperature dependence of phonons in pyrolitic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockhouse, B.N.; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Dispersion curves for longitudinal and transverse phonons propagating along and near the c-axis in pyrolitic graphite at temperatures between 4 0 K and 1500 0 C have been measured by neutron spectroscopy. The observed frequencies decrease markedly with increasing temperature (except for the transverse optical ''rippling'' modes in the hexagonal planes). The neutron groups show interesting asymmetrical broadening ascribed to interference between one phonon and many phonon processes

  5. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  6. High thermoelectric performance of graphite nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Van-Truong; Saint-Martin, Jérôme; Dollfus, Philippe; Volz, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs) have been demonstrated to be a promising material for hydrogen storage and heat management in electronic devices. Here, by means of first-principles and transport simulations, we show that GNFs can also be an excellent material for thermoelectric applications thanks to the interlayer weak van der Waals interaction that induces low thermal conductance and a step-like shape in the electronic transmission with mini-gaps, which are necessary ingredients to achieve high ...

  7. Increase of the density of commercial graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, H.; Meyerstein, D.

    1977-12-01

    The increase of the density of commercial graphite of the type ATJ by polymerization of an impregnated monomer, followed by pyrolysis, is described. The monomer which was either styrene or acrylonitrile, was irradiated by a 60 Co source and pyrolized in a standard vacuum system. The irradiation dose for the polymerization of the monomer was determined. Suggestions for the establishment of the optimum conditions are offered

  8. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  9. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  10. Stress wave calculations in composite plates using the fast Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    The protection of composite turbine fan blades against impact forces has prompted the study of dynamic stresses in composites due to transient loads. The mathematical model treats the laminated plate as an equivalent anisotropic material. The use of Mindlin's approximate theory of crystal plates results in five two-dimensional stress waves. Three of the waves are flexural and two involve in-plane extensional strains. The initial value problem due to a transient distributed transverse force on the plate is solved using Laplace and Fourier transforms. A fast computer program for inverting the two-dimensional Fourier transform is used. Stress contours for various stresses and times after application of load are obtained for a graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composite plate. Results indicate that the points of maximum stress travel along the fiber directions.

  11. Spectroscopic measurement of target plate erosion in the ASDEX Upgrade divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filed, A R; Garcia-Rosales, C; Lieder, G; Pitcher, C S; Radtke, R [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); ASDEX Upgrade Team

    1996-02-01

    The erosion of the graphite divertor plates in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak is measured spectroscopically. Spatial profiles of the D{sup 0} and C{sup +} influxes across the outer target plate are determined from measured absolute line intensities. Plasma parameters (n{sub e}, T{sub e}) at the target, which are required to determine the appropriate photon emission efficiencies for these lines, are obtained from an in-vessel reciprocating Langmuir probe above the target plate. Yields for the erosion of the graphite by the incident D{sup +} flux are determined from the ratio of the measured C{sup +} to D{sup 0} fluxes. Over a range of moderate densities the measured yields of {<=} 4% are explicable in terms of physical sputtering alone. Chemical sputtering by low energy Franck-Condon neutrals probably contributes, however, to the total erosion. At higher densities detachment of the plasma from the targets occurs owing to formation of a MARFE near the X point. Under these conditions localized physical sputtering of the targets ceases. The impurity level (Z{sub eff}) is, however, maintained following detachment, indicating a corresponding maintenance of carbon influx, perhaps due to chemical erosion of the total graphite surface and/or an improvement in particle confinement in the detached state. (author). 26 refs, 14 figs, 1 tab.

  12. Steel shear strength of anchors with stand-off base plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Sign and signal structures are often connected to concrete foundations through a stand-off annular base plate with a double-nut anchor bolt connection, which leaves exposed anchor bolt lengths below leveling nuts used in these connections. Cantilever...

  13. ATLAS barrel hadron tile calorimeter: spacers plates mass production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artikov, A.M.; Budagov, Yu.A.; Khubua, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this article we expose the main problems of the mass production of the so-called 'spacer plates' for the ATLAS Barrel Hadron Tile Calorimeter. We describe all practical solutions of these problems. Particularly we present the measurement procedures and calculation schemes we used for the spacers dimensions determination. The results of the calculations are presented

  14. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on thermal conductivity of the graphite/aluminum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C.; Chen, D.; Zhang, X.B. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Z., E-mail: zhe.chen@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhong, S.Y.; Wu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ji, G. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59655 (France); Wang, H.W. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Various graphite fillers, such as graphite particles, graphite fibers, graphite flakes and porous graphite blocks, have been successfully incorporated into an Al alloy by squeeze casting in order to fabricate graphite/Al composites with enhanced thermal conductivity (TC). Microstructural characterization by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy has revealed a tightly-adhered, clean and Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}-free interface between the graphite fillers and the Al matrix in all the as-fabricated composites. Taking the microstructural features into account, we generalized the corresponding predictive models for the TCs of these composites with the effective medium approximation and the Maxwell mean-field scheme, which both show good agreement with the experimental data. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on the TCs of the composites were further discussed. - Highlights: • The thermal enhancement of various graphite fillers with different topology structures. • Predictive models for the thermal conductivity of different topology structures. • Oriented flakes alignment has the high potentials for thermal enhancement.

  15. The utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture for irradiated graphite incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, G.; Perotin, J.P.; Charlot, P.

    1992-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the interest of the utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture in the incineration of irradiated graphite. The aqueous phase comes in the form of a three-dimensional system that traps pressurized oxygen, the pulverulent solid being dispersed at the liquid/gas interfaces. These three-phasic formulations give the following advantages: reduction of the apparent viscosity of the mixture in comparison with a solid/liquid mixture at the same solid concentration; reduction of the solid/liquid interactions; self-pulverizability. thus promoting reduction of the flame length utilization of conventional burners; reduction of the flue gas flow rate; complete thermal destruction of graphite. (author)

  16. Highly conductive thermoplastic composite blends suitable for injection molding of bipolar plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mighri, F.; Huneault, M.A.; Champagne, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at developing highly conductive, lightweight, and low-cost bipolar plates for use in proton exchange membranes (PEM) fuel cells. Injection and compression molding of highly filled polypropylene, PP, and polyphenylene sulfide, PPS, based blends were used as a mean for mass production of bipolar plates. Loadings up to 60-wt% in the form of graphite, conductive carbon black and carbon fibers were investigated. The developed formulations have a combination of properties and processability suitable for bipolar plate manufacturing, such as good chemical resistance, sufficient fluidity, and good electrical and thermal conductivity. Electrical resistivities around 0.15 and 0.09 Ohm-cm were respectively achieved for the PP and PPS-based blends, respectively. Two bipolar plate designs were successfully fabricated by molding the gas flow channels over aluminum plates to form a metallic/polymer composite plate, or simply by direct injection molding of the conductive polymer composite. For the first design, overall plate resistivities of 0.2 and 0.1 Ohm-cm were respectively attained using PP and PPS based blends as conductive skin. A lower volume resistivity of around 0.06 Ohm-cm was attained for the second injected plate design with PPS based blend. (author)

  17. CarbonNanoTubes (CNT) in bipolar plates for PEM fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundler, M.; Derieth, T.; Beckhaus, P.; Heinzel, A. [centre for fuel cell technology ZBT GmbH (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Using standard mass production techniques for the fabrication of fuel cell components, such as bipolar plates, is a main issue for the commercialisation of PEM fuel cell systems. Bipolar plates contribute significantly to the cost structure of PEM stacks. In an upcoming fuel cell market a large number of bipolar plates with specific high-quality standards will be needed. At the Centre for Fuel Cell Technology (ZBT) together with the University of Duisburg-Essen fuel cell stacks based on injection moulded bipolar plates have been developed and demonstrated successfully [1]. This paper focuses on the interactions between carbon filling materials (graphite, carbon black and carbon nanotubes (CNT)) in compound based bipolar plates and especially the potential of CNTs, which were used in bipolar plates for the first time. The entire value added chain based on the feedstock, the compounding and injection moulding process, the component bipolar plate, up to the operation of a PEM single fuel cell stack with CNT-based bipolar plates is disclosed. (orig.)

  18. Corrosion resistance characteristics of stamped and hydroformed proton exchange membrane fuel cell metallic bipolar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundar, F. [NSF I/UCRC Center for Precision Forming (CPF), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology (Turkey); Dur, Ender; Koc, M. [NSF I/UCRC Center for Precision Forming (CPF), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Mahabunphachai, S. [NSF I/UCRC Center for Precision Forming (CPF), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Pathumthani (Thailand)

    2010-06-01

    Metallic bipolar plates have several advantages over bipolar plates made from graphite and composites due to their high conductivity, low material and production costs. Moreover, thin bipolar plates are possible with metallic alloys, and hence low fuel cell stack volume and mass are. Among existing fabrication methods for metallic bipolar plates, stamping and hydroforming are seen as prominent approaches for mass production scales. In this study, the effects of important process parameters of these manufacturing processes on the corrosion resistance of metallic bipolar plates made of SS304 were investigated. Specifically, the effects of punch speed, pressure rate, stamping force and hydroforming pressure were studied as they were considered to inevitably affect the bipolar plate micro-channel dimensions, surface topography, and hence the corrosion resistance. Corrosion resistance under real fuel cell conditions was examined using both potentiodynamic and potentiostatic experiments. The majority of the results exhibited a reduction in the corrosion resistance for both stamped and hydroformed plates when compared with non-deformed blank plates of SS304. In addition, it was observed that there exist an optimal process window for punch speed in stamping and the pressure rate in hydroforming to achieve improved corrosion resistance at a faster production rate. (author)

  19. Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Haack

    2009-04-08

    This project was focused upon developing a unique material technology for use in PEM fuel cell bipolar plates. The carbon/carbon composite material developed in this program is uniquely suited for use in fuel cell systems, as it is lightweight, highly conductive and corrosion resistant. The project further focused upon developing the manufacturing methodology to cost-effectively produce this material for use in commercial fuel cell systems. United Technology Fuel Cells Corp., a leading fuel cell developer was a subcontractor to the project was interested in the performance and low-cost potential of the material. The accomplishments of the program included the development and testing of a low-cost, fully molded, net-shape carbon-carbon bipolar plate. The process to cost-effectively manufacture these carbon-carbon bipolar plates was focused on extensively in this program. Key areas for cost-reduction that received attention in this program was net-shape molding of the detailed flow structures according to end-user design. Correlations between feature detail and process parameters were formed so that mold tooling could be accurately designed to meet a variety of flow field dimensions. A cost model was developed that predicted the cost of manufacture for the product in near-term volumes and long-term volumes (10+ million units per year). Because the roduct uses lowcost raw materials in quantities that are less than competitive tech, it was found that the cost of the product in high volume can be less than with other plate echnologies, and can meet the DOE goal of $4/kW for transportation applications. The excellent performance of the all-carbon plate in net shape was verified in fuel cell testing. Performance equivalent to much higher cost, fully machined graphite plates was found.

  20. 77 FR 51581 - Request for a License To Export Nuclear Grade Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Request for a License To Export Nuclear Grade Graphite Pursuant to... 27, 2012, graphite for of nuclear grade graphite to the XMAT424, 11006032. nuclear end use. graphite. Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics in China to test various types of nuclear grade graphite material in...

  1. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santha Kumar, Arunjunai Raja Shankar [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Piana, Francesco [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Mičušík, Matej [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 41, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pionteck, Jürgen, E-mail: pionteck@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Banerjee, Susanta [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Voit, Brigitte [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Heavily oxidized and ordered graphene nanoplatelets were produced from natural graphite by oxidation using a mixture of phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate (Marcano's method). The atomic percentage of oxygen in the graphite oxide produced was more than 30% confirmed by XPS studies. The graphite oxide produced had intact basal planes and remains in a layered structure with interlayer distance of 0.8 nm, analyzed by WAXS. The graphite oxide was treated with 4,4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to produce grafted isocyanate functionalization. Introduction of these bulky functional groups widens the interlayer distance to 1.3 nm. In addition, two reduction methods, namely benzyl alcohol mediated reduction and thermal reduction were carried out on isocyanate modified and unmodified graphite oxides and compared to each other. The decrease in the oxygen content and the sp{sup 3} defect-repair were studied with XPS and RAMAN spectroscopy. Compared to the thermal reduction process, which is connected with large material loss, the benzyl alcohol mediated reduction process is highly effective in defect repair. This resulted in an increase of conductivity of at least 9 orders of magnitude compared to the graphite oxide. - Highlights: • Preparation of GO by Marcano's method results in defined interlayer spacing. • Treatment of GO with diisocyanate widens the interlayer spacing to 1.3 nm. • Chemical reduction of GO with benzyl alcohol is effective in defect repair. • Electrical conductivity increases by 9 orders of magnitude during chemical reduction. • The isocyanate functionalization is stable under chemical reducing conditions.

  2. Determination of Cl-36 in Irradiated Reactor Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.-F.; Schumann, D.; Stowasser, T.; Hartmann, E.; Kramer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Two of the three research reactors at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the reactors DIORIT and PROTEUS, contained reactor graphite. Whereas the former research reactor DIORIT has been dismantled completely the PROTEUS is subject to a future decommissioning. In case of the DIORIT the reactor graphite was conditioned applying a procedure developed at PSI. In this case the 36 Cl content had to be determined after the conditioning. The result is reported in this paper. The radionuclide inventory including 36 Cl of the graphite used in PROTEUS was measured and the results are reported in here. It has been proven that the graphite from PROTEUS has a radionuclide inventory near the detection limits. All determined radionuclide activities are far below the Swiss exemptions limits. The graphite from PROTEUS therefore poses no radioactive waste. In contrast, the 36 Cl content of graphite from DIORIT is well above the exemption limits. (author)

  3. Calculated bond properties of K adsorbed on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjortstam, O.; Wills, J.M.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the chemical bond of K adsorbed on a graphite(0001) surface have been studied for different coverages, by means of a full-potential slab method. Specific modifications of the Hamiltonian are performed in order to make it possible to study K on graphite in the disperse phase (dilute limit). It is found that K forms a metallic state when covering a graphite surface with a (2x2) coverage. For a (3x3) coverage as well as in the disperse phase K is found to form an ionic bond with graphite. It is shown that in the disperse phase, the hybridization between the K 4s level and graphite is weak. Our findings are consistent with recent experiments. Furthermore the cohesive energies of K adsorption on graphite are found to be larger in the (2x2) coverage compared to the (3x3) coverage. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  4. Plate Full of Color

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Plate Full of Color teaches the value of eating a variety of colorful and healthy foods.

  5. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.E.J.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  6. Physics experiments in graphite lattices (1962); Experiences sur les reseaux a graphite (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A review is made of the various experimental methods used to determine the physics of graphite, natural uranium lattices: integral lattice experiments; both absolute and differential, effective cross section measurements, both by activation methods and by analysis of irradiated fuels, fine structure measurements. A number of experimental results are also given. (authors) [French] On decrit les differentes methodes experimentales utilisees pour determiner les parametres physiques de reseaux a uranium-graphite. Il s'agit d'experiences globales: mesures absolues et relatives de laplaciens, mesures de sections efficaces effectives par activation et par analyses de combustibles irradies, mesures de structures fines. Un certain nombre de resultats experimentaux sont communiques. (auteurs)

  7. Mode II interlaminar fracture of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, L. A.; Gillespie, J. W.; Trethewey, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The end notched flexure (ENF) specimen is employed in an investigation of the interlaminar fracture toughness in Mode II (skew symmetric shear) loading of unidirectional graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites. Important experimental parameters such as the influence of precracking and the data reduction scheme for the Mode II toughness are discussed. Nonlinear load-deflection response is significant for the tough thermoplastic resin composite but is also present for the brittle thermoset composite. The observed nonlinearities, which are highly rate dependent, are attributed to a combination of slow stable crack growth preceding unstable crack growth and material inelastic behavior in the process zone around the crack tip.

  8. Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen Doped Graphene Oxide from Graphite Flakes and Powders: A Comparison of Their Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokwana, Kholiswa; Ray, Sekhar C; Khenfouch, Mohammad; Kuvarega, Alex T; Mamba, Bhekie B; Mhlanga, Sabelo D; Nxumalo, Edward N

    2018-08-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxide (NGO) nanosheets were prepared via a facile one-pot modified Hummer's approach at low temperatures using graphite powder and flakes as starting materials in the presence of a nitrogen precursor. It was found that the morphology, structure, composition and surface chemistry of the NGO nanosheets depended on the nature of the graphite precursor used. GO nanosheets doped with nitrogen atoms exhibited a unique structure with few thin layers and wrinkled sheets, high porosity and structural defects. NGO sheets made from graphite powder (NGOp) exhibited excellent thermal stability and remarkably high surface area (up to 240.53 m2 ·g-1) compared to NGO sheets made from graphite flakes (NGOf) which degraded at low temperatures and had an average surface area of 24.70 m2 ·g-1. NGOf sheets had a size range of 850 to 2200 nm while NGOp sheets demonstrated obviously small sizes (460-1600 nm) even when exposed to different pH conditions. The NGO nanosheets exhibited negatively charged surfaces in a wide pH range (1 to 12) and were found to be stable above pH 6. In addition, graphite flakes were found to be more suitable for the production of NGO as they produced high N-doping levels (0.65 to 1.29 at.%) compared to graphite powders (0.30 to 0.35 at.%). This study further demonstrates that by adjusting the amount of N source in the host GO, one can tailor its thermal stability, surface morphology, surface chemistry and surface area.

  9. Effect of plate shapes in orifice plate type flowmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    The study of unusual plate shapes in orifice plate type flowmeters is presented, with a view to providing data for the substitution of the plate with one centered circular orifice in those applications where its use is not possible. For this purpose, six pairs of plates with different forms, with and without chamfered edges, were made and tested in a closed water loop. Results show that, generally, the use of chamfers improves the results and, in the case of perforated and slotlike orificed plates, the narrow-ness of the fluid passage tends to make unnecessary its use. (Author) [pt

  10. Plate removal following orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Mhairi; Langford, Richard Julian; Bhanji, Adam; Farr, David

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study are to determine the removal rates of orthognathic plates used during orthognathic surgery at James Cook University Hospital and describe the reasons for plate removal. 202 consecutive orthognathic cases were identified between July 2004 and July 2012. Demographics and procedure details were collected for these patients. Patients from this group who returned to theatre for plate removal between July 2004 and November 2012 were identified and their notes were analysed for data including reason for plate removal, age, smoking status, sex and time to plate removal. 3.2% of plates were removed with proportionally more plates removed from the mandible than the maxilla. 10.4% of patients required removal of one or more plate. Most plates were removed within the first post-operative year. The commonest reasons for plate removal were plate exposure and infection. The plate removal rates in our study are comparable to those seen in the literature. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Plate Tearing by a Cone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with steady-state plate tearing by a cone. This is a scenario where a cone is forced through a ductile metal plate with a constant lateral tip penetration in a motion in the plane of the plate. The considered process could be an idealisaton of the damage, which...... as for the out-of-plane reaction force....

  12. Normal and abnormal growth plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Madewell, J.E.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Skeletal growth is a dynamic process. A knowledge of the structure and function of the normal growth plate is essential in order to understand the pathophysiology of abnormal skeletal growth in various diseases. In this well-illustrated article, the authors provide a radiographic classification of abnormal growth plates and discuss mechanisms that lead to growth plate abnormalities

  13. Change in properties of graphite on stake of Obninsk NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgul'ev, Yu.S.; Gundorov, V.V.; Kalyagina, I.P.; Belinskaya, N.T.; Dolgov, V.V.; Komissarov, O.V.; Stuzhnev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of testing the graphite from the AM-1 reactor masonry at the Obninsk NPP for its operation period are discussed. It is shown that the masonry graphite state after 42 years of the reactor operation remains satisfactory in the most cells inspected. Separate cells requiring a repair resulted from oxidation are characterized by strength decreased by several times. The laws of radiation changes in graphite properties are analyzed. The conclusion on possibility of the further masonry operation is drawn

  14. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  15. Huge magnetoresistance effect of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Youwei; Wang Zhiming; Ni Gang; Xing Dingyu; Xu Qingyu

    2004-01-01

    Graphite is a quasi-two-dimensional semimetal. However, for usual graphite the magnetoresistance is not so high due to its small crystal size and no preferred orientation. Huge positive magnetoresistance up to 85300% at 4.2 K and 4950% at 300 K under 8.15 T magnetic field was found in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The mechanism of huge positive magnetoresistance is not only due to ordinary magnetoresistance but also due to magnetic-field-driven semimetal-insulator transition

  16. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Wareing

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  17. Surface coating of graphite pebbles for Korean HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngmin [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Young-Hoon, E-mail: yunh2@dsu.ac.kr [Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on graphite pebbles for neutron reflector. • Dense and fine-grained surface morphologies of the SiC coatings were observed. • Oxidation resistance of the CVR-SiC-coated graphite pebbles was improved. - Abstract: The new concept of the recently modified Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is to adopt a graphite reflector in the form of a pebble bed. A protective SiC coating is applied to the graphite pebbles to prohibit their reaction with steam or air as well as dust generation during TBM operation. In this research, the chemical vapor reaction (CVR) method was applied to fabricate SiC-coated graphite pebbles in a silica source. Relatively dense CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on the graphite pebbles through the reduction of the graphite phase with SiO gas that was simply created from the silica source at 1850 °C (2 h). The microstructural features, XRD patterns, pore-size distribution and oxidation behavior of the SiC-coated graphite pebbles were investigated. To develop the practical process, which will be applied for mass production hereafter, a novel alternative method was applied to form the layer of SiC coating on the graphite pebbles over the silica source.

  18. Characteristics of first loaded IG-110 graphite in HTTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Satoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2006-10-01

    IG-110 graphite is a fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade graphite with excellent resistivity on both irradiation and corrosion and with high strength. The IG-110 graphite is used for the graphite components of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) such as fuel and control rod guide blocks and support posts. In order to design and fabricate the graphite components in the HTTR, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (the Japan Atomic Energy Agency at present) had established the graphite structural design code and design data on the basis of former research results. After the design code establishment, the IG-110 graphite components were fabricated and loaded in the HTTR core. This report summarized the characteristics of the first loaded IG-110 graphite as basic data for surveillance test, measuring material characteristics changed by neutron irradiation and oxidation. By comparing the design data, it was shown that the first loaded IG-110 graphite had excellent strength properties and enough safety margins to the stress limits in the design code. (author)

  19. Dependence of strength on particle size in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.P.; Kennedy, C.R.

    The strength to particle size relationship for specially fabricated graphites has been demonstrated and rationalized using fracture mechanics. In the past, similar studies have yielded empirical data using only commercially available material. Thus, experimental verification of these relationships has been difficult. However, the graphites of this study were fabricated by controlling the particle size ranges for a series of isotropic graphites. All graphites that were evaluated had a constant 1.85 g/cm 3 density. Thus, particle size was the only variable. This study also considered the particle size effect on other physical properties; coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), electrical resistivity, fracture strain, and Young's modulus

  20. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. A study on wear behaviour of Al/6101/graphite composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep Sharma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The current research work scrutinizes aluminium alloy 6101-graphite composites for their mechanical and tribological behaviour in dry sliding environments. The orthodox liquid casting technique had been used for the manufacturing of composite materials and imperilled to T6 heat treatment. The content of reinforcement particles was taken as 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 wt.% of graphite to ascertain it is prospective as self-lubricating reinforcement in sliding wear environments. Hardness, tensile strength and flexural strength of cast Al6101 metal matrix and manufactured composites were evaluated. Hardness, tensile strength and flexural strength decreases with increasing volume fraction of graphite reinforcement as compared to cast Al6101 metal matrix. Wear tests were performed on pin on disc apparatus to assess the tribological behaviour of composites and to determine the optimum volume fraction of graphite for its minimum wear rate. Wear rate reduces with increase in graphite volume fraction and minimum wear rate was attained at 4 wt.% graphite. The wear was found to decrease with increase in sliding distance. The average co-efficient of friction also reduces with graphite addition and its minimum value was found to be at 4 wt.% graphite. The worn surfaces of wear specimens were studied through scanning electron microscopy. The occurrence of 4 wt.% of graphite reinforcement in the composites can reveal loftier wear possessions as compared to cast Al6101 metal matrix.

  2. Preparation of in-house graphite reference material for boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Swain, Kallola K.; Manisha, V.; Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja P.; Remya Devi, P.S.; Ghosh, M.; Verma, R.

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is extensively used in nuclear technology. Boron concentration in graphite is one of the important parameters that decide its acceptability for nuclear applications. Reliable analytical methods are essential for the determination of boron in graphite at concentration about 5 mg kg -1 . Reference materials are used for validation of existing analytical methods and developing new methodologies. In view of the importance of determination of boron in graphite and unavailability of graphite reference material, an In-house graphite reference material was prepared in Analytical Chemistry Division. Graphite source material was procured, processed to obtain powder of ≤ 75 μm (200 mesh) and bottled. Procedures were developed for the determination of boron in graphite using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques. Homogeneity testing was carried out on the bottled units and boron content along with the combined and expanded uncertainties were established. The assigned boron concentration in the In-house graphite reference material is (7.3±0.46) mg kg -1 . (author)

  3. Effect of gamma radiation on graphite - PTFE dry lubrication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sachin; Tyagi, Mukti; Seshadri, Geetha; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar; Varshney, Lalit

    2017-12-01

    An effect of gamma radiation on lubrication behavior of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system has been studied using (TR-TW-30L) tribometer with thrust washer attachment in plane contact. Different compositions of graphite and PTFE were prepared and irradiated by gamma rays. Gamma radiation exposure significantly improves the tribological properties indicated by decrease in coefficient of friction and wear properties of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system. SEM and XRD analysis confirm the physico-chemical modification of graphite-PTFE on gamma radiation exposure leading to a novel dry lubrication system with good slip and anti friction properties.

  4. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs.

  5. Release enhancement of tritium from graphite by addition of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Masakatsu; Masaki, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release behavior of tritium from graphite was studied in pure He and He + H 2 atmosphere. The release from powdered graphite was significantly enhanced in hydrogen environment. Apparent diffusion coefficients of tritium in graphite also became much higher in an atmosphere containing hydrogen than values obtained in pure helium atmosphere. A careful investigation of the release processes resulted in the conclusion that the most important process of tritium behaviour in graphite was diffusion, but the desorption process of tritium from the surface played a significant role. The enhancement of the desorption process was controlled by atomic hydrogen. (orig.)

  6. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareing, Alan; Abrahamsen-Mills, Liam; Fowler, Linda; Jarvis, Richard; Banford, Anthony William [National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Grave, Michael [Doosan Babcock, Gateshead (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, Martin [National Nuclear Laboratory, Gloucestershire (United Kingdom); Norris, Simon [Radioactive Waste Management Limited, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  7. Forming gas treatment of lithium ion battery anode graphite powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contescu, Cristian Ion; Gallego, Nidia C; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer, III, Harry M; Payzant, Edward Andrew; Wood, III, David L; Yoon, Sang Young

    2014-09-16

    The invention provides a method of making a battery anode in which a quantity of graphite powder is provided. The temperature of the graphite powder is raised from a starting temperature to a first temperature between 1000 and 2000.degree. C. during a first heating period. The graphite powder is then cooled to a final temperature during a cool down period. The graphite powder is contacted with a forming gas during at least one of the first heating period and the cool down period. The forming gas includes H.sub.2 and an inert gas.

  8. Floatability study of graphite ore from southeast Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florena, Fenfen Fenda; Syarifuddin, Fahmi; Hanam, Eko Sulistio; Trisko, Nici; Kustiyanto, Eko; Enilisiana, Rianto, Anton; Arinton, Ghenadi

    2016-02-01

    Graphite ore obtained from Kolaka Regency, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia have been succesfully investigated for beneficiation by froth flotation technique. Preliminary study have been done to determine the minerals types, fixed carbon content and liberation size of the graphite. Graphite is naturally floatable due to its hydrophobic property. Some suitable reagents are usually added to increase effectiveness of recovery. In this article, enrichment of graphite by froth flotation was studied by investigating the effect of reagents concentrations, rotation speed and particle size on the carbon grade and recovery of the concentrate. The carbon grade increased from 3.00% to 60.00% at the optimum flotation conditions.

  9. Surface coating of graphite pebbles for Korean HCCR TBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngmin; Yun, Young-Hoon; Park, Yi-Hyun; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on graphite pebbles for neutron reflector. • Dense and fine-grained surface morphologies of the SiC coatings were observed. • Oxidation resistance of the CVR-SiC-coated graphite pebbles was improved. - Abstract: The new concept of the recently modified Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is to adopt a graphite reflector in the form of a pebble bed. A protective SiC coating is applied to the graphite pebbles to prohibit their reaction with steam or air as well as dust generation during TBM operation. In this research, the chemical vapor reaction (CVR) method was applied to fabricate SiC-coated graphite pebbles in a silica source. Relatively dense CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on the graphite pebbles through the reduction of the graphite phase with SiO gas that was simply created from the silica source at 1850 °C (2 h). The microstructural features, XRD patterns, pore-size distribution and oxidation behavior of the SiC-coated graphite pebbles were investigated. To develop the practical process, which will be applied for mass production hereafter, a novel alternative method was applied to form the layer of SiC coating on the graphite pebbles over the silica source

  10. Graphite structure and its relation to mechanical engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.; Kelly, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    The inhomogeneous nature of polycrystalline graphite requires property measurements to be made over dimensions large enough to average the local variations in the structure. This is particularly true for mechanical integrity, and experimental data are presented which illustrate the importance of the real aggregate structure of graphite and the difficulties of interpreting strength data from different tests. The classical statistical treatments do not hold generally, and the problem of defining a failure criterion for graphite is discussed. It is suggested that the stress conditions in graphite components might be classified in terms of the dimensions and stress gradients related to the characteristic flaw size of the material as determined experimentally. (author)

  11. Final report on graphite irradiation test OG-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Beavan, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of dimensional, thermal expansivity, thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and tensile strength measurements on specimens of nuclear graphites irradiated in capsule OG-2. About half the irradiation space was allocated to H-451 near-isotropic petroleum-coke-based graphite or its subsized prototype grade H-429. Most of these specimens had been previously irradiated. Virgin specimens of another near-isotropic graphite, grade TS-1240, were irradiated. Some previously irradiated specimens of needle-coke-based H-327 graphite and pitch-coke-based P 3 JHAN were also included

  12. Study of uranium plating measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jufang; Wen Zhongwei; Wang Mei; Wang Dalun; Liu Rong; Jiang Li; Lu Xinxin

    2007-06-01

    In neutron physics experiments, the measurement for plate-thickness of uranium can directly affect uncertainties of experiment results. To measure the plate-thickness of transform target (enriched uranium plating and depleted uranium plating), the back to back ionization chamber, small solid angle device and Au-Si surface barrier semi-conductor, were used in the experiment study. Also, the uncertainties in the experiment were analyzed. Because the inhomo-geneous of uranium lay of plate can quantitively affect the result, the homogeneity of uranium lay is checked, the experiment result reflects the homogeneity of uranium lay is good. (authors)

  13. Fuel cell end plate structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1991-04-23

    The end plates (16) of a fuel cell stack (12) are formed of a thin membrane. Pressure plates (20) exert compressive load through insulation layers (22, 26) to the membrane. Electrical contact between the end plates (16) and electrodes (50, 58) is maintained without deleterious making and breaking of electrical contacts during thermal transients. The thin end plate (16) under compressive load will not distort with a temperature difference across its thickness. Pressure plate (20) experiences a low thermal transient because it is insulated from the cell. The impact on the end plate of any slight deflection created in the pressure plate by temperature difference is minimized by the resilient pressure pad, in the form of insulation, therebetween.

  14. Characterization of un-irradiated and irradiated reactor graphite; Karakterizacija neozracenog i ozracenog reaktorskog grafita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This report contains three parts: characterization of Yugoslav nuclear graphite development of methods and obtained results, characterization of un-irradiated and irradiated domestic nuclear graphite; calculation of electrical conductivity changes due to vacancies in the graphite crystal lattice.

  15. Carbon-14 in neutron-irradiated graphite for graphite-moderated reactors. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Matsuo, Hideto [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The graphite moderated gas cooled reactor operated by the Japan Atomic Power Company was stopped its commercial operation on March 1998, and the decommissioning process has been started. Graphite material is often used as the moderator and the reflector materials in the core of the gas cooled reactor. During the operation, a long life nuclide of {sup 14}C is generated in the graphite by several transmutation reactions. Separation of {sup 14}C isotope and the development of the separation method have been recognized to be critical issues for the decommissioning of the reactor core. To understand the current methodologies for the carbon isotope separation, literature on the subject was surveyed. Also, those on the physical and chemical behavior of {sup 14}C were surveyed. This is because the larger part of the nuclides in the graphite is produced from {sup 14}N by (n,p) reaction, and the location of them in the material tends to be different from those of the other carbon atoms. This report summarizes the result of survey on the open literature about the behavior of {sup 14}C and the separation methods, including the list of the literature on these subjects. (author)

  16. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, J; Theuwissen, K; Laffont, L; Véron, M

    2016-01-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions. (paper)

  17. Bioinspired photonic nanoarchitectures from graphitic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaska, I.; Dobrik, G.; Nemes-Incze, P.; Kertesz, K.; Horvath, E.; Mark, G.I.; Jaszi, T.; Neumann, P.; Horvath, Z.E.; Biro, L.P., E-mail: biro@mfa.kfki.h

    2011-04-01

    Bioinspired, regular, rectangular (with periodicities of 600 nm and 700 nm), and random (with average characteristic distances of 600 nm and 750 nm) two dimensional (2D) photonic nanoarchitectures of 60 nm thickness were produced in graphite by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) nanomachining and subsequent controlled oxidation. The color of the nanoarchitectures was modified by the conformal deposition of 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The regular patterns generate iridescent colors, while the random ones exhibit a remarkably constant color with the variation of the illumination and viewing conditions.

  18. Bioinspired photonic nanoarchitectures from graphitic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaska, I.; Dobrik, G.; Nemes-Incze, P.; Kertesz, K.; Horvath, E.; Mark, G.I.; Jaszi, T.; Neumann, P.; Horvath, Z.E.; Biro, L.P.

    2011-01-01

    Bioinspired, regular, rectangular (with periodicities of 600 nm and 700 nm), and random (with average characteristic distances of 600 nm and 750 nm) two dimensional (2D) photonic nanoarchitectures of 60 nm thickness were produced in graphite by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) nanomachining and subsequent controlled oxidation. The color of the nanoarchitectures was modified by the conformal deposition of 90 nm Al 2 O 3 . The regular patterns generate iridescent colors, while the random ones exhibit a remarkably constant color with the variation of the illumination and viewing conditions.

  19. [Conventional plate osteosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaue, K

    2010-02-01

    Consolidation of bone is an essential clinical problem when treating fractures, fixing osteotomies and fusing joints. In most cases, the means of fixation are plates and screws. The goal is functional postoperative therapy by moving the adjacent joints and thus avoiding the deleterious disadvantages of long-lasting articular immobilization. Pre-operative planning, surgical approach, a good understanding of the precise mechanics of the structure and the biological answer for the various tissues are prerequisites of successful osteosynthesis. The choice of implants and the application of their versatility, as well as their adaptation to individual cases are the key to good results.

  20. Plate Full of Color

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-04

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Plate Full of Color teaches the value of eating a variety of colorful and healthy foods.  Created: 8/4/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2008.

  1. Characterization of Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Polypropylene-Based Composites for Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates and Development of Educational Tools in Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Gaxiola, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this project we developed conductive thermoplastic resins by adding varying amounts of three different carbon fillers: carbon black (CB), synthetic graphite (SG) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) to a polypropylene matrix for application as fuel cell bipolar plates. This component of fuel cells provides mechanical support to the stack,…

  2. Magnetic order in graphite: Experimental evidence, intrinsic and extrinsic difficulties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquinazi, P.; Barzola-Quiquia, J.; Spemann, D.; Rothermel, M.; Ohldag, H.; Garcia, N.; Setzer, A.; Butz, T.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss recently obtained data using different experimental methods including magnetoresistance measurements that indicate the existence of metal-free high-temperature magnetic order in graphite. Intrinsic as well as extrinsic difficulties to trigger magnetic order by irradiation of graphite are discussed in view of recently published theoretical work.

  3. Modeling the pinning of Au and Ni clusters on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, R.; Nock, C.; Kenny, S.D.; Belbruno, J.J.; Di Vece, M.; Paloma, S.; Palmer, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    The pinning of size-selected AuN and NiN clusters on graphite, for N=7–100, is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations and the results are compared to experiment and previous work with Ag clusters. Ab initio calculations of the binding of the metal adatom and dimers on a graphite

  4. Design of the Graphite Reflectors in Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Haeng; Cho, Yeong Garp; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Graphite is often used as one of reflector materials for research reactors because of its low neutron absorption cross-section, good moderating properties, and relatively low and stable price. In addition, graphite has excellent properties at high temperatures, so it is widely used as a core material in high temperature reactors. However, its material characteristics such as strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, dimensional change, and thermal conductivity sensitively depend on neutron fluence, temperature, and its manufacturing process. In addition, the Wigner energy and the treatment of the graphite waste such as C-14 should also be considered. For the design of the graphite reflectors, it is therefore essential to understand the material characteristics of chosen graphite materials at given conditions. Especially, the dimensional changes and the thermal conductivity are very important factors to design the nuclear components using graphite as a nonstructural material. Hence, in this study, the material characteristics of graphite are investigated via some experiments in literature. Improving design methods for graphite reflectors in research reactors are then suggested to minimize the problems, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are also discussed

  5. The role of graphite morphology and matrix structure on low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Thermal cycling resistance; graphite morphology; grey cast iron; austempered ductile iron; compacted/vermicular graphite iron; matrix decompo- sition. 1. Introduction. When a material is subjected to a temperature gradient, it tends to expand differentially. During this process, thermal stresses are induced. The source of ...

  6. USE OF GRANULAR GRAPHITE FOR ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granular graphite is a potential electrode material for the electrochemical remediation of refractory chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, the use of granular graphite can complicate the experimental results. On one hand, up to 99% of TCE was re...

  7. Automotive body panel containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Adamson, Douglas (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An automotive body panel containing a polymer composite formed of at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g.

  8. Development of synthetic graphite resistive elements for sintering furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, C.; Rezende, Mirabel C.; Polidoro, H.A.; Otani, S.

    1987-01-01

    The synthetic graphites have been produced using lignin coke, natural graphite and phenolic resin. The bulk density, porosity, flexural strength and eletrical resistivity measurements have been performed on specimens at about 2400 0 C. The performance of these materials, as heating elements, was evaluated in a sintering furnace prototype. This paper reports the fabrication process and the experimental results. (Author) [pt

  9. Measurement of the specific heat capacity of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D.T.; Roger, P

    2006-01-15

    With the objective of implementing graphite calorimetry at the BIPM to measure absorbed dose, an experimental assembly has recently been constructed to measure the specific heat capacity of graphite. A status description of the apparatus and results from the first measurements are given. The outcome is discussed and the experimental uncertainty is reviewed. (authors)

  10. Computer Package for Graphite Total Cross-Section Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Fathalla, M.

    2008-01-01

    An additive formula is given which allows calculating the contribution of the total neut.>neutron transmission through crystalline graphite. The formula takes into account the graphite form of poly or pyrolytic crystals and its parameters. Computer package Graphite has been designed in order to provide the required calculations in the neutron energy range from 0.1 MeV to 10 eV. The package includes three codes: PCG (Polycrystalline Graphite), PG (Pyrolytic Graphite) and HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) for calculating neutron transmission through fine graphite powder (polycrystalline), neutron transmission and removal coefficient of PG crystal in terms of its mosaic spread for neutrons incident along its c-axis and the transmission of neutrons incident on HOPG crystal at different angles, respectively. For comparison of the experimental neutron transmission data with the calculated values, the program takes into consideration the effect of both wavelength and neutron beam divergence in either 2 constant wavelength spread mode (δλ=constant) or constant wavelength resolution mode (δλ/λ=constant). In order to check the validity for application of computer package Graphite in cross-section calculations, a comparison between calculated values with the available experimental data were carried out. An overall agreement is indicated with an accuracy sufficient for determine the neutron transmission characteristics

  11. Measurements of anomalous neutron transport in bulk graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.; Smith, G.A.; Vogelaar, B.; Howell, C.R.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Tornow, W.

    2003-01-01

    The neutron absorption of bulk granular graphite has been measured in a classical exponential diffusion experiment. Our first measurements of April 2002 implementing both exponential decay and pulsed die-away experiments and using the TUNL pulsed accelerator at Duke University as a neutron source indicated a capture cross section for graphite a striking factor of three lower than the measured value for carbon of 3.4 millibarns. Therefore a new exponential experiment with an improved geometry enabling greater accuracy has been performed giving an apparent cross section for carbon in the form of bulk granular graphite of less than 0.5 millibarns. This result confirms our first result and is also consistent with less than one part per million of boron in our graphite. The bulk density of the graphite is 1.02 compared with the actual particle density of 1.60 indicating a packing fraction of 0.64 or a void fraction of 0.36. We suspect that the apparent suppression of absorption in bulk graphite may be associated with the strong coherent diffraction of neutrons that dominates neutron transport in graphite. Coherent diffraction has never been taken into account in graphite reactor design and no neutron transport code including general use codes such as MCNP incorporate diffraction effects even though diffraction dominates many practical thermal neutron transport problems. (orig.)

  12. Structural and Kinetic Properties of Graphite Intercalation Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-29

    The exfoliation of graphite-FeCl 3NH has been used for making blankets for the extinction of metal fires [12). In addition. exfoliated graphite is...FeCl3-oH3 has been used (Aerotech GCma, 0.5 MHz wideband) equipped with for making blankets for the extinction of metal fires (3). In addition

  13. Graphite-based extinguishants for liquid metal fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.M.; Gardener, N.J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Effective extinguishants for liquid alkali metal fires must be provided for all LMFBRs. Traditional sodium salt based extinguishants have disadvantages. An intercalation compound of graphite was identified as a possible alternative. Following successful tests on fires of up to 25 m 2 area the graphite based extinguishant has been introduced by the UKAEA at Dounreay. (author)

  14. Technical development of graphite waste treatment in NUPEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saishu, S.; Inoue, T.

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, Tokai Power Station, which is a Gas Cooled Reactor and uses graphite as moderator, ceased operation at the end of March in 1998 and it is planned to transfer to decommissioning stage. In this decommissioning stage it is very important to be able to treat and dispose the graphite waste in order to carry out the decommissioning safely and economically. NUPEC has been developing the graphite treatment and disposal technology since 1997 and we introduce the outline of the technical development. For the technology on high density packing into disposal container, the high density packing method and the assessment method on nuclide leaching characteristics were developed, and the cementing test for graphite powder by using Tokai spare graphite was performed and the hydrophobic characteristics between graphite and cement was grasped and the accelerator candidature for affinity was selected. From the view point of economical treatment, the incinerating technology was selected as candidature, and the methods for incinerating graphite and treating off gas are developed. The method of collecting C-14 in off gas was selected for reducing the off gas radiation level. The applicability of actual graphite treatment technology was considered from the view point of safety, economics and preparation of technical standard; the technical theme appeared, the developing planning items were established, and the detailed and actual scale tests will be carried out according to the planning. (author)

  15. Measurement of the specific heat capacity of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D.T.; Roger, P.

    2006-01-01

    With the objective of implementing graphite calorimetry at the BIPM to measure absorbed dose, an experimental assembly has recently been constructed to measure the specific heat capacity of graphite. A status description of the apparatus and results from the first measurements are given. The outcome is discussed and the experimental uncertainty is reviewed. (authors)

  16. A TEM Study on the Microstructure of Fine Flaky Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Horsewell, Andy

    In this investigation the microstructure of the graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. Based on this information, growth models for the platelets in the fine graphite flakes in cast iron are considered. Detailed crystallographic analysis...... of the defects observed such as multiple twin boundaries and possible spiral growth configurations are required...

  17. Linear expansion of products out of thermal splitting graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishina, E.A.; Kurnevich, G.I.

    1994-01-01

    Linear expansion of thermally split graphite in the form of foil and pressed items of different density was studied. It is ascertained that the extreme character of temperature dependence of linear expansion factor of pressed samples of thermally split graphite is determined by the formation of closed pores containing air in the course of their production. 3 refs., 2 figs

  18. Measurements of anomalous neutron transport in bulk graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, C.D.; Smith, G.A. [ADNA Corp., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, B. [Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Howell, C.R.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Tornow, W. [Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The neutron absorption of bulk granular graphite has been measured in a classical exponential diffusion experiment. Our first measurements of April 2002 implementing both exponential decay and pulsed die-away experiments and using the TUNL pulsed accelerator at Duke University as a neutron source indicated a capture cross section for graphite a striking factor of three lower than the measured value for carbon of 3.4 millibarns. Therefore a new exponential experiment with an improved geometry enabling greater accuracy has been performed giving an apparent cross section for carbon in the form of bulk granular graphite of less than 0.5 millibarns. This result confirms our first result and is also consistent with less than one part per million of boron in our graphite. The bulk density of the graphite is 1.02 compared with the actual particle density of 1.60 indicating a packing fraction of 0.64 or a void fraction of 0.36. We suspect that the apparent suppression of absorption in bulk graphite may be associated with the strong coherent diffraction of neutrons that dominates neutron transport in graphite. Coherent diffraction has never been taken into account in graphite reactor design and no neutron transport code including general use codes such as MCNP incorporate diffraction effects even though diffraction dominates many practical thermal neutron transport problems. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of ac conductivity behaviour of graphite filled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of epoxy resin having different amounts of graphite particles have been prepared by solution casting method. Temperature dependence of dielectric constant, tan and a.c. conductivity was measured in the frequency range, 1–20 kHz, temperature range, 40–180°C for 0.99, 1.96 and 2.91 wt% graphite filled ...

  20. Neutron transmission through pyrolytic graphite crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M. [Reactor Physics Department NRC, Reactor Physics Division, Nuclear Research Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); Habib, N. [Reactor Physics Department NRC, Reactor Physics Division, Nuclear Research Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt)]. E-mail: nadiahabib15@yahoo.com; Fathaalla, M. [Reactor Physics Department NRC, Reactor Physics Division, Nuclear Research Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt)

    2006-05-15

    Calculation of the total cross-section, neutron transmission and removal coefficient of pyrolytic graphite (PG) for thermal neutron energies were carried out using an additive formula. The formula takes into account the variation of thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections in terms of PG temperature and mosaic spread for neutron energies in the range 1 meV to 1 eV. A computer code PG has been developed which allow calculations for the graphite in its hexagonal close-packed structure, when its c-direction is parallel with incident neutron beam (parallel orientation). The calculated total neutron cross-sections for PG in parallel orientation at different mosaic spreads were compared with the measured values. An overall agreement is indicated between the formula fits and experimental data at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of PG crystals as second-order neutron filter is detailed in terms of mosaic spread, optimum thickness and temperature. The calculated removal coefficients of PG crystals show that such crystals are high efficiency second-order filter within neutron energy intervals (4-7 meV) and (10-15 meV)

  1. Multiscale modeling of polyisoprene on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Yogendra Narayan; Brayton, Alexander; Doxastakis, Manolis; Burkhart, Craig; Papakonstantopoulos, George J.

    2014-01-01

    The local dynamics and the conformational properties of polyisoprene next to a smooth graphite surface constructed by graphene layers are studied by a multiscale methodology. First, fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of oligomers next to the surface are performed. Subsequently, Monte Carlo simulations of a systematically derived coarse-grained model generate numerous uncorrelated structures for polymer systems. A new reverse backmapping strategy is presented that reintroduces atomistic detail. Finally, multiple extensive fully atomistic simulations with large systems of long macromolecules are employed to examine local dynamics in proximity to graphite. Polyisoprene repeat units arrange close to a parallel configuration with chains exhibiting a distribution of contact lengths. Efficient Monte Carlo algorithms with the coarse-grain model are capable of sampling these distributions for any molecular weight in quantitative agreement with predictions from atomistic models. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations with well-equilibrated systems at all length-scales support an increased dynamic heterogeneity that is emerging from both intermolecular interactions with the flat surface and intramolecular cooperativity. This study provides a detailed comprehensive picture of polyisoprene on a flat surface and consists of an effort to characterize such systems in atomistic detail

  2. High thermoelectric performance of graphite nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van-Truong; Saint-Martin, Jérôme; Dollfus, Philippe; Volz, Sebastian

    2018-02-22

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs) have been demonstrated to be a promising material for hydrogen storage and heat management in electronic devices. Here, by means of first-principles and transport simulations, we show that GNFs can also be an excellent material for thermoelectric applications thanks to the interlayer weak van der Waals interaction that induces low thermal conductance and a step-like shape in the electronic transmission with mini-gaps, which are necessary ingredients to achieve high thermoelectric performance. This study unveils that the platelet form of GNFs in which graphite layers are perpendicular to the fiber axis can exhibit outstanding thermoelectric properties with a figure of merit ZT reaching 3.55 in a 0.5 nm diameter fiber and 1.1 in a 1.1 nm diameter one. Interestingly, by introducing 14 C isotope doping, ZT can even be enhanced up to more than 5, and more than 8 if we include the effect of finite phonon mean free path, which demonstrates the amazing thermoelectric potential of GNFs.

  3. Plating on difficult-to-plate metals: what's new

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesner, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the changes since 1970 in procedures for plating on such materials as titanium, molybdenum, silicon, aluminum, and gallium arsenide are summarized. While basic procedures for plating some of these materials were developed as many as 30 to 40 years ago, changes in the end uses of the plated products have necessitated new plating processes. In some cases, vacuum techniques - such as ion bombardment, ion implantation, and vacuum metallization - have been introduced to improve the adhesion of electrodeposits. In other cases, these techniques have been used to deposit materials upon which electrodeposits are required

  4. Evaluation of the significance of inverse oxidation for HTGR graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.; Heiser, J. III; Sastre, C.

    1983-01-01

    The inverse oxidation refers to a higher mass loss inside the graphite than the outside. In 1980, Wichner et al reported this phenomenon (referred to as inside/out corrosion) observed in some H451 graphites, and offered an explanation that a catalyst (almost certainly Fe) is activated by the progressively increasing reducing conditions found in the graphite interior. Recently, Morgan and Thomas (1982) investigated this phenomenon is PGX graphites, and agreed on the existing mechanism to explain this pheomenon. They also called for attention to the possibility that this phenomenon may occur under HTGR (High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor) operating conditions. The purpose of this paper is to confirm the above mentioned explanation for this phenomenon and to evaluate the significance of this effect for HTGR graphites under realistic reactor conditions

  5. Structures and Performance of Graphene/Polyimide Composite Graphite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry-wet spinning process was used to gain graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers, then graphene/polyimide composite carbon and graphite fibers were obtained through carbonized and graphitized. Different graphene oxide contents of the composite carbon and graphite fibers were measured by thermal gravimetric analysis, Raman, mechanical properties, electrical properties,SEM and so on. The results show that when the GO content is 0.3%(mass fraction,the same below, the thermal property of the graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers is the best. The mechanical and electrical properties are obriously improved by the addition of GO, graphitization degree also increases. When the composite carbon fibers are treated at 2800℃, GO content increases to 2.0%, the thermal conductivity of the composite graphite fibers reaches 435.57W·m-1·K-1 and cross-section structures of carbon fibers are more compact.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of TiB2 on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, H.O.; Randich, E.; Mattox, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation of the coating of graphite with TiB 2 by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using the hydrogen reduction of BCl 3 and TiCl 4 at 925 0 C and 1 atm. Reasonable matching of the thermal expansion of TiB 2 and graphite was necessary to eliminate cracking. A suitable graphite was POCO DFP-1. Adhesion was improved by having a slightly rough graphite surface. Heat treatment at 2000 0 C and above resulted in a certain degree of diffusion. No melting or solid phases other than TiB 2 and graphite were detected up to 2400 0 C. The coatings showed no failure when repeatedly submitted to an electron beam pulse of 2 KW/cm 2 for 0.8 sec

  7. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  8. Effect of Graphite on the Properties of Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda jabber Braihi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber-graphite composites (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 pphr graphite were prepared on a laboratory two-roll mill. Swelling measurements were used to evaluate the impacts of graphite on the properties of natural rubber. Swelling results showed that the volume fraction of natural rubber in the swollen gel, the interaction parameter, and the cross-link density decreased by increasing graphite loadings, while the average molecular weight of natural rubber between cross-links increased. Vulcanization results showed that only scorch time parameter increased with increasing graphite loadings, while other parameters (Max. torque, Min. torque, cure rate and cure rate index decreased. Both thermal and AC conductivities increased.

  9. Variation of the properties of siliconized graphite during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Y.S.; Chugunova, T.K.; Pikulik, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluate the radiation-induced property changes in siliconized graphite of the industrial grades SG-P and SG-M. The authors simultaneously tested the reference (control) specimens of graphite that are used as the base for obtaining the SG-M siliconized graphite by impregnating with silicon. The suggested scheme (model) atributes the dimensional changes of the siliconized graphite specimens to the effect of the quantitative ratio of the carbide phase and carbon under different conditions of irradiation. If silicon is insufficient for the formation of a dense skeleton, graphite plays a devisive role, and it may be assumed that at an irradiation temperature greater than 600 K, the material shrinks. The presence of isolated carbide inclusions also affects the physicomechanical properties (including the anitfriction properties)

  10. Graphitization of diamond with a metallic coating on ferritic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Stenio Cavalier; Oliveira, Hellen Cristine Prata de; Filgueira, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    Iron is a strong catalyst of graphitization of diamonds. This graphitization occurs mainly during the processing of composites - conventional sintering or hot pressing, and during cutting operations. Aiming to avoid or minimize this deleterious effect, there is increasing use of diamond coated with metallic materials in the production of diamond tools processed via powder metallurgy. This work studies the influence of Fe on diamond graphitization diamond-coated Ti after mixing of Fe-diamonds, hot pressing parameters were performed with 3 minutes/35MPa/900 deg C - this is the condition of pressing hot used in industry for production of diamond tools. Microstructural features were observed by SEM, diffusion of Fe in diamond was studied by EDS. Graphitization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe not activate graphitization on the diamond under the conditions of hot pressing. (author)

  11. Fort St. Vrain graphite site mechanical separation concept selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the alternatives to the disposal of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor spent nuclear fuel involves the separation of the fuel rods composed of compacts from the graphite fuel block assembly. After the separation of these two components, the empty graphite fuel blocks would be disposed of as a low level waste (provided the appropriate requirements are met) and the fuel compacts would be treated as high level waste material. This report deals with the mechanical separation aspects concerning physical disassembly of the FSV graphite fuel element into the empty graphite fuel blocks and fuel compacts. This report recommends that a drilling technique is the preferred choice for accessing the, fuel channel holes and that each hole is drilled separately. This report does not cover any techniques or methods to separate the triso fuel particles from the graphite matrix of the fuel compacts

  12. Impermeable Graphite: A New Development for Embedding Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fachinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Irradiated graphite has to be handled as radioactive waste after the operational period of the reactor. However, the waste management of irradiated graphite e.g. from the Spanish Vandellos reactor shows, that waste management of even low contaminated graphite could be expensive and requires special retrieval, treatment and disposal technologies for safe long term storage as low or medium radioactive waste. FNAG has developed an impermeable graphite matrix (IGM) as nuclear waste embedding material. This IGM provides a long term stable enclosure of radioactive waste and can reuse irradiated graphite as feedstock material. Therefore, no additional disposal volume is required if e.g. concrete waste packages were replaced by IGM waste packages. The variability of IGM as embedding has been summarized in the following paper usable for metal scraps, ion exchange resins or debris from buildings. Furthermore the main physical, chemical and structural properties are described. (author)

  13. Plate Tearing by a Cone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1998-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with steady-state plate tearing by a cone. This is a scenario where a cone is forced through a ductile metal plate with a constant lateral tip penetration in a motion in the plane of the plate. The considered process could be an idealisation of the damage, which...... as for the out-of-plane reaction force. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Bipolar Plates for PEM Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lædre, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Summary of thesis: The Bipolar Plate (BPP) is an important component in both Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) and Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolyzers (PEMWEs). Bipolar plate material and processing constitutes for a large fraction of the cost and weight of a PEM cell stack. The main tasks for the bipolar plates in both systems are to separate single cell in a stack, conduct current between single cells and remove heat from active areas. In addition, the BPPs distribu...

  15. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin

  16. Reviewing metallic PEMFC bipolar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Turner, J.A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-08-15

    A bipolar plate is one of the most important components in a polymer exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack and has multiple functions. Metallic bipolar plate candidates have advantages over composite rivals in excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, good mechanical strength, high chemical stability, very wide alloy choices, low cost and, most importantly, existing pathways for high-volume, high-speed mass production. The challenges with metallic bipolar plates are the higher contact resistance and possible corrosion products, which may contaminate the membrane electrode assembly. This review evaluates the candidate metallic and coating materials for bipolar plates and gives the perspective of the research trends. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Lateral stiffness and vibration characteristics of composite plated RC shear walls with variable fibres spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meftah, S.A.; Yeghnem, R.; Tounsi, A.; Adda Bedia, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a finite element model for static and free vibration analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls structures strengthened with thin composite plates having variable fibres spacing is presented. An efficient analysis method that can be used regardless to the sizes and location of the bonded plates is proposed in this study. In the numerical formulation, the adherents and the adhesives are all modelled as shear wall elements, using the mixed finite element method. Several test problems are examined to demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method. Numerical results are obtained for six nonuniform distributions of E-glass, graphite and boron fibres in epoxy matrices. The fibre redistributions of the bonded plates are seen to increase the frequencies modes and reduce substantially the lateral displacements

  18. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  19. Graphite content and isotopic fractionation between calcite-graphite pairs in metasediments from the Mgama Hills, Southern Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneth, J.D.; Schidlowski, M.; Sarbas, B.; Goerg, U.; Amstutz, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    Amphibolite-grade metasediments from the Mgama Hills region, Kenya, contain conspicuous quantities of graphite, most probably derived from organic progenitor materials,. The highest graphite contents are found in schists whereas calcite marbles intercalated in the sequence contain relatively low amounts. The graphitic constituents are consistently enriched in 13 C relative to common sedimentary organic material, with the highest isotopic ratios in graphite from the marbles. Carbon isotope fractionations between calcite and graphite mostly vary between 3.3 and 7.1 per mille, which comes close to both empirically recorded and thermodynamically calculated fractionations in the temperature range of the upper amphibolite facies. However, larger values occasionally encountered in the marbles suggest that complete isotopic equilibrium is not always attained in amphibolite-facies metamorphism. (author)

  20. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Because of its high strength and stability at very high temperature, as well as very low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, graphite has been widely used as a structural material in Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR). Recently, many countries are developing the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) because of the potentials of hydrogen production, as well as its safety and viable economics. In VHTR, helium gas serves as the primary coolant. Graphite will be used as a reflector, moderator and core structural materials. The life time of graphite is determined from dimensional changes due to neutron irradiation, which closely relates to the changes of crystal structure. The changes of both lattice parameter and crystallite size can be easily measured by X-ray diffraction method. However, due to high cost and long time of neutron irradiation test, ion irradiation test is being performed instead in KAERI. Therefore, it is essential to develop the technique for measurement of ion irradiation damage of nuclear graphite. Fracture toughness of nuclear grade graphite is one of the key properties in the design and development of VHTR. It is important not only to evaluate the various properties of candidate graphite but also to assess the integrity of nuclear grade graphite during operation. Although fracture toughness tests on graphite have been performed in many laboratories, there have been wide variations in values of the calculated fracture toughness, due to the differences in the geometry of specimens and test conditions. Hence, standard test method for nuclear graphite is required to obtain the reliable fracture toughness values. Crack growth behavior of nuclear grade graphite shows rising R-curve which means the increase in crack growth resistance as the crack length increases. Crack bridging and microcracking have been proposed to be the dominant mechanisms of rising R-curve behavior. In this paper, the technique to measure the changes of crystallite size and