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Sample records for graphite cathode rod

  1. Calculation of reactivity of control rods in graphite moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.

    1978-01-01

    A study about the method of calculation for the reactivity of control rods in graphite-moderated critical assemblies, is presented. The result of theoretical calculation, developed by super celles and Nordheim-Scalettar methods are compared with experimental results for the critical Assembly of General Atomic. The two methods are then applicable to reactivity calculation of the control rods of graphite moderated critical assemblies [pt

  2. Surface-reconstructed graphite nanofibers as a support for cathode catalysts of fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Du, Hongda; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu

    2011-04-07

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs), on which surface graphite edges were reconstructed into nano-loops, were explored as a cathode catalyst support for fuel cells. The high degree of graphitization, as well as the surface-reconstructed nano-loops that possess topological defects for uniform metal deposition, resulted in an improved performance of the GNF-supported Pt catalyst.

  3. Non-catalyzed cathodic oxygen reduction at graphite granules in microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freguia, Stefano; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan Zhiguo; Keller, Juerg

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen is the most sustainable electron acceptor currently available for microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. However, its high overpotential for reduction to water limits the current that can be produced. Several materials and catalysts have previously been investigated in order to facilitate oxygen reduction at the cathode surface. This study shows that significant stable currents can be delivered by using a non-catalyzed cathode made of granular graphite. Power outputs up to 21 W m -3 (cathode total volume) or 50 W m -3 (cathode liquid volume) were attained in a continuous MFC fed with acetate. These values are higher than those obtained in several other studies using catalyzed graphite in various forms. The presence of nanoscale pores on granular graphite provides a high surface area for oxygen reduction. The current generated with this cathode can sustain an anodic volume specific COD removal rate of 1.46 kg COD m -3 d -1 , which is higher than that of a conventional aerobic process. This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells can be operated efficiently using high surface graphite as cathode material. This implies that research on microbial fuel cell cathodes should not only focus on catalysts, but also on high surface area materials

  4. Non-catalyzed cathodic oxygen reduction at graphite granules in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Juerg [The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld (Australia). Advanced Wastewater Management Centre

    2007-12-01

    Oxygen is the most sustainable electron acceptor currently available for microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. However, its high overpotential for reduction to water limits the current that can be produced. Several materials and catalysts have previously been investigated in order to facilitate oxygen reduction at the cathode surface. This study shows that significant stable currents can be delivered by using a non-catalyzed cathode made of granular graphite. Power outputs up to 21 W m{sup -3} (cathode total volume) or 50 W m{sup -3} (cathode liquid volume) were attained in a continuous MFC fed with acetate. These values are higher than those obtained in several other studies using catalyzed graphite in various forms. The presence of nanoscale pores on granular graphite provides a high surface area for oxygen reduction. The current generated with this cathode can sustain an anodic volume specific COD removal rate of 1.46 kg{sub COD} m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, which is higher than that of a conventional aerobic process. This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells can be operated efficiently using high surface graphite as cathode material. This implies that research on microbial fuel cell cathodes should not only focus on catalysts, but also on high surface area materials. (author)

  5. Oxygen reduction kinetics on graphite cathodes in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, Ryan; Donovan, Conrad; Shim, Matthew; Babauta, Jerome; Nannapaneni, Srilekha; Schenk, James; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-12-28

    Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) have been used as renewable power sources for sensors in fresh and ocean waters. Organic compounds at the anode drive anodic reactions, while oxygen drives cathodic reactions. An understanding of oxygen reduction kinetics and the factors that determine graphite cathode performance is needed to predict cathodic current and potential losses, and eventually to estimate the power production of SMFCs. Our goals were to (1) experimentally quantify the dependence of oxygen reduction kinetics on temperature, electrode potential, and dissolved oxygen concentration for the graphite cathodes of SMFCs and (2) develop a mechanistic model. To accomplish this, we monitored current on polarized cathodes in river and ocean SMFCs. We found that (1) after oxygen reduction is initiated, the current density is linearly dependent on polarization potential for both SMFC types; (2) current density magnitude increases linearly with temperature in river SMFCs but remains constant with temperature in ocean SMFCs; (3) the standard heterogeneous rate constant controls the current density temperature dependence; (4) river and ocean SMFC graphite cathodes have large potential losses, estimated by the model to be 470 mV and 614 mV, respectively; and (5) the electrochemical potential available at the cathode is the primary factor controlling reduction kinetic rates. The mechanistic model based on thermodynamic and electrochemical principles successfully fit and predicted the data. The data, experimental system, and model can be used in future studies to guide SMFC design and deployment, assess SMFC current production, test cathode material performance, and predict cathode contamination.

  6. A nano-graphite cold cathode for an energy-efficient cathodoluminescent light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Obraztsov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of new types of light sources is necessary in order to meet the growing demands of consumers and to ensure an efficient use of energy. The cathodoluminescence process is still under-exploited for light generation because of the lack of cathodes suitable for the energy-efficient production of electron beams and appropriate phosphor materials. In this paper we propose a nano-graphite film material as a highly efficient cold cathode, which is able to produce high intensity electron beams without energy consumption. The nano-graphite film material was produced by using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Prototypes of cathodoluminescent lamp devices with a construction optimized for the usage of nano-graphite cold cathodes were developed, manufactured and tested. The results indicate prospective advantages of this type of lamp and the possibility to provide advanced power efficiency as well as enhanced spectral and other characteristics.

  7. Cathodic electrogenerated chemiluminescence of aromatic Tb(III) chelates at polystyrene-graphite composite electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, Kalle; Grönroos, Päivi; Tuomi, Sami; Kulmala, Sakari

    2017-01-01

    Tb(III) chelates exhibit intense hot electron-induced electrogenerated chemiluminescence during cathodic polarization of metal/polystyrene-graphite (M/PG) electrodes in fully aqueous solutions. The M/PG working electrode provides a sensitive means for the determination of aromatic Tb(III) chelates at nanomolar concentration levels with a linear log-log calibration curve spanning more than five orders of magnitude. The charge transport and other properties of these novel electrodes were studied by electrochemiluminescence measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The present composite electrodes can by utilized both under pulse polarization and DC polarization unlike oxide-coated metal electrodes which do not tolerate cathodic DC polarization. The present cost-effective electrodes could be utilized e.g. in immunoassays where polystyrene is extensively used as a solid phase for various bioaffinity assays by using electrochemiluminescent Tb(III) chelates or e.g. Ru(bpy) 3 2+ as labels. - Highlights: • Generation of hydrated electrons at Polystyrene-graphite electrodes. • The insulating polystyrene layer on the outer electrode surface seems necessary. • Hydrated electrons are able to produce chemiluminescence. • Strongest signal and lowest std. dev. achieved at same graphite weight fraction.

  8. Highly Graphitic Carbon Nanofibers Web as a Cathode Material for Lithium Oxygen Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungkyu Han

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The lithium oxygen battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high theoretical energy density and ability to use oxygen from air as a “fuel”. Although various carbonaceous materials have been widely used as a cathode material due to their high electronic conductivity and facial processability, previous studies mainly focused on the electrochemical properties associated with the materials (such as graphene and carbon nanotubes and the electrode configuration. Recent reports demonstrated that the polarization associated with cycling could be significantly increased by lithium carbonates generated from the reaction between the carbon cathode and an electrolyte, which indicates that the physicochemical properties of the carbon cathode could play an important role on the electrochemical performances. However, there is no systematic study to understand these phenomena. Here, we systematically explore the electrochemical properties of carbon nanofibers (CNF webs with different graphitization degree as a cathode for Li oxygen batteries. The physicochemical properties and electrochemical properties of CNF webs were carefully monitored before and after cycling. CNF webs are prepared at 1000, 1200 and 1400 °C. CNF web pyrolyzed at 1400 °C shows lowered polarization and improved cycle retention compared to those of CNF webs pyrolyzed at 1000 and 1200 °C.

  9. Graphitized Carbon: A Promising Stable Cathode Catalyst Support Material for Long Term PEMFC Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Paritosh Kumar; Regnet, Fabian; Jörissen, Ludwig

    2018-05-28

    Stability of cathode catalyst support material is one of the big challenges of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for long term applications. Traditional carbon black (CB) supports are not stable enough to prevent oxidation to CO₂ under fuel cell operating conditions. The feasibility of a graphitized carbon (GC) as a cathode catalyst support for low temperature PEMFC is investigated herein. GC and CB supported Pt electrocatalysts were prepared via an already developed polyol process. The physical characterization of the prepared catalysts was performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) analysis, and their electrochemical characterizations were conducted via cyclic voltammetry(CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE) and potential cycling, and eventually, the catalysts were processed using membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for single cell performance tests. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SEM) have been used as MEA diagonostic tools. GC showed superior stability over CB in acid electrolyte under potential conditions. Single cell MEA performance of the GC-supported catalyst is comparable with the CB-supported catalyst. A correlation of MEA performance of the supported catalysts of different Brunauer⁻Emmett⁻Teller (BET) surface areas with the ionomer content was also established. GC was identified as a promising candidate for catalyst support in terms of both of the stability and the performance of fuel cell.

  10. Chapter 3: Exponential experiments on graphite-moderated lattices fuelled with near-natural uranium metal rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Clarke, W.G.; Ashworth, F.P.O.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Exponential experiments have been carried out on graphite lattices fuelled by 1.2 in. diameter uranium metal rods at three near-natural U 235 compositions, 0.6 Co, 1.3 Co and 1.6 Co. The results, together with those already existing from earlier exponential or critical measurements on these and similar natural uranium rods, have been correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) and also with the modified form of this theory given in Vol.1, Ch. 7. (author)

  11. In situ synthesized Li2S@porous carbon cathode for graphite/Li2S full cells using ether-based electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ning; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; He, Fang; Ma, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A facile method is proposed to prepare lithium sulfide@porous carbon composites (Li 2 S@PC) by in-situ reaction of lithium sulfate (Li 2 SO 4 ) and the pyrolytic carbon from glucose. We assembled graphite-Li 2 S@PC full-cells using the obtained Li 2 S@PC composites as the cathode, graphite as the anode and DOL/DME with LiNO 3 additive as the electrolyte. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •A simple synthesis method was proposed to form Li 2 S@porous carbon composites. •Graphite-Li 2 S full-cells were constructed in DME-based electrolyte. •A novel method was proposed to activate the full cells. -- Abstract: Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have been recognized as one of the promising next-generation energy storage devices owing to their high energy density, low cost and eco-friendliness. As for cathode’s performance, the main challenges for developing highly-efficient and long-life Li-S batteries are to retard the polysulfides diffusion into electrolyte and the reaction with metallic lithium (Li). Especially, the safety issues, derived from metallic Li in anode, must be overcome. Herein, we fabricated lithium sulfide@porous carbon composites (Li 2 S@PC) by an in-situ reaction between the lithium sulfate (Li 2 SO 4 ) and the pyrolytic carbon from glucose. The nanosized Li 2 S particles were uniformly distributed in the carbon matrix, which not only significantly improve electronic conductivity of the electrode but also effectively trap the dissolved polysulfides. Furthermore, on the basis of the graphite’s electrochemical features in ether-based electrolyte, we assembled graphite-Li 2 S@PC full cells using the obtained Li 2 S@PC composites as the cathode, graphite as the anode and the DOL/DME with LiNO 3 additive as the electrolyte. A unique strategy was proposed to activate the full-cells in descending order using constant voltage and current to charge the cut-off voltage. This Li-S full cell exhibits stable cycling performance at 0.5 C over

  12. Ab initio study of the effects of thin CsI coatings on the work function of graphite cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Vasilios; Booske, John H.; Morgan, Dane

    2007-10-01

    Cesium-iodide (CsI)-coated graphite cathodes are promising electron sources for high power microwave generators, but the mechanism driving the improved emission is not well understood. Therefore, an ab initio modeling investigation on the effects of thin CsI coatings on graphite has been carried out. It is demonstrated that the CsI coatings reduce the work function of the system significantly through a mechanism of induced dipoles. The results suggest that work function modification is a major contribution to the improved emission seen when CsI coatings are applied to C.

  13. Copper Refinement from Anode to Cathode and then to Wire Rod: Effects of Impurities on Recrystallization Kinetics and Wire Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbert, Anne-Laure; Moya, Alice; Jil, Tomas; Andrieux, Michel; Ignat, Michel; Brisset, François; Baudin, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the traceability of copper from the anode to the cathode and then the wire rod has been studied in terms of impurity content, microstructure, texture, recrystallization kinetics, and ductility. These characterizations were obtained based on secondary ion mass spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, HV hardness, and electron backscattered diffraction. It is shown that the recrystallization was delayed by the total amount of impurities. From tensile tests performed on cold drawn and subsequently annealed wires for a given time, a simplified model has been developed to link tensile elongation to the chemical composition. This model allowed quantification of the contribution of some additional elements, present in small quantity, on the recrystallization kinetics. The proposed model adjusted for the cold-drawn wires was also validated on both the cathode and wire rod used for the study of traceability.

  14. Chemically modified graphite felt as an efficient cathode in electro-Fenton for p-nitrophenol degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Minghua; Hu, Zhongxin; Bi, Zhaoheng; Serrano, K. Groenen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemically modified graphite felt was prepared using ethanol and hydrazine hydrate as reagents. • Carbon nanoparticles with functional groups were deposited on the surface after modification. • The electrochemical activity for ORR and H 2 O 2 generation on the modified electrode was improved. • The cathode modification effictively improved the EF performance for pollutant degradation. - Abstract: A simple method with low-cost chemical reagents ethanol and hydrazine hydrate was used to modify graphite felt as the cathode for electro-Fenton (EF) application, using p-nitrophenol (p-Np) as the model pollutant. Characterized by scanning electron microscope, contact angle, Raman spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the morphology and surface physicochemical properties after modification were observed considerably changed. After modification, some nanoparticles and oxygen and nitrogen-containing functional groups appeared on the cathode surface, which greatly improved the surface hydrophilic property and the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. The effects led to the hydrogen peroxide accumulation on the modified cathode markedly increased to 175.8 mg L −1 , while that on the unmodified one was only 67.5 mg L −1 . p-Np of initial 50 mg L −1 could be completely removed by EF using the modified cathode, and the mineralization ratio reached 51.4%, more than 2 times of the pristine one. After 10 cycles, the mineralization ratio of the modified cathode was still above 45%, suggesting that the modification method can provide an effective approach to improve EF performance, and thus benefits to promote its environmental applications

  15. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  16. Theoretical calibration of grey and black control rods of gas-graphite power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovic, V.

    1964-01-01

    Full text: Calculation of calibration curve for particular control rod batches is of significant importance for safety and operation reasons. The procedure presented in this paper is based on the two following criteria: Constants of the lattice region with control rods are determined by supercell method. Effective multiplication constant of the core dependent on the insertion of control rods was determined by dividing the core onto two axial and radial zones. Calculation of the black control rods takes into account epithermal absorption. Thermal extrapolated length of the control rods was calculated by using Kushneriuk-McKey relation. The extrapolated length of the grey rods and the epithermal extrapolated length of the black rods were calculated by diffusion theory. Correlation procedure was used for calculation of epithermal extrapolated length. The complete mathematical procedure was programmed for calculations on the digital ZUSE-Z-23 and ELLIOTT-803-B computers

  17. Cathodic behaviours of a CrO sub 3 -graphite intercalation compound in non-aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, M.; Miura, T.; Kishi, T. (Keio University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1991-08-05

    CrO{sub 3}-graphite intercalation compound (GIC) specimen was prepared by solvent method using acetic acid as a solvent and potassium permanganate as a catalyst, and its cathodic behavior in a lithium cell was studied in non-aqueous solutions (1 mol/dm{sup 3} LiClO{sub 4} in propylene carbonate (PC) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)). Changes in electronic and layered lattice structures induced by cathodic reduction were measured by electron spin resonance method and X-ray diffraction one, respectively. As a result, electrochemical insertion of Li into CrO{sub 3}-GIC proceeded only in DMSO solution where reduction of Cr components was followed by that of graphite units. The amount of discharge electricity for CrO{sub 3}-GIC in DMSO solution was three times as large as that for graphite. Although the effect of non-aqueous solutions on the lithiation reaction was not yet clear fundamentally, it was expected that another electrolyte solutions are probably found out based on this experiments from which Li is inserted into CrO{sub 3}-GIC at higher discharge potentials. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Development of electrically heated rods with resistive element of graphite or carbon/carbon composites for simulating transients in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polidoro, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Thermo-hydraulic problems, in nuclear plants are normally analysed by the use of electrically heated rods. The direct or indirect heater rods are limited in their use because, for high temperatures and high heat flux, the heating element temperature approach its melting point. The use of platinum or tantalum is not economically viable. Graphite and carbon/carbon composites are alternative materials because they are good electrical conductors and have good mechanical properties at high temperatures. Graphite and carbon/carbon composites were used to make heating elements for testing by indirect heating. The swaging process used to reduce the cladding diameter prevented the fabrication of graphite heater rods. Carbon/carbon composite used to make heating elements gave good results up to a heat flux of 100 W/cm 2 . It is easy to verify that this value can be exceeded if the choice of the complementary materials for insulator and cladding improved. (author) [pt

  19. Biodegradation of phenol in batch and continuous flow microbial fuel cells with rod and granular graphite electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lyman; Nemati, Mehdi; Predicala, Bernardo

    2018-01-01

    Phenol biodegradation was evaluated in batch and continuous flow microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In batch-operated MFCs, biodegradation of 100-1000 mg L -1 phenol was four to six times faster when graphite granules were used instead of rods (3.5-4.8 mg L -1  h -1 vs 0.5-0.9 mg L -1  h -1 ). Similarly maximum phenol biodegradation rates in continuous MFCs with granular and single-rod electrodes were 11.5 and 0.8 mg L -1  h -1 , respectively. This superior performance was also evident in terms of electrochemical outputs, whereby continuous flow MFCs with granular graphite electrodes achieved maximum current and power densities (3444.4 mA m -3 and 777.8 mW m -3 ) that were markedly higher than those with single-rod electrodes (37.3 mA m -3 and 0.8 mW m -3 ). Addition of neutral red enhanced the electrochemical outputs to 5714.3 mA m -3 and 1428.6 mW m -3 . Using the data generated in the continuous flow MFC, biokinetic parameters including μ m , K S , Y and K e were determined as 0.03 h -1 , 24.2 mg L -1 , 0.25 mg cell (mg phenol) -1 and 3.7 × 10 -4  h -1 , respectively. Access to detailed kinetic information generated in MFC environmental conditions is critical in the design, operation and control of large-scale treatment systems utilizing MFC technology.

  20. Comparative analysis of turbulent effects on thermal plasma characteristics inside the plasma torches with rod- and well-type cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Min; Hong, Sang Hee

    2002-01-01

    The thermal plasma characteristics inside the two non-transferred plasma torches with rod-type cathode (RTC) and well-type cathode (WTC) are analysed in conjunction with turbulent effects on them in the atmospheric-pressure conditions. A control volume method and a modified semi-implicit pressure linked equations revised algorithm are used for solving the governing equations, i.e. conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy together with a current continuity equation for arc discharge. A cold flow analysis is introduced to find the cathode spot position in the WTC torch, and both the laminar and turbulent models are employed to gain a physical insight into the turbulent effects on the thermal plasma characteristics produced inside the two torches. The numerical analysis for an RTC torch shows that slightly different values of plasma temperature and velocity between the laminar and turbulent calculations occur and the radial temperature profiles are constricted at the axis with increasing the gas flow rate, and that the large turbulent viscosities appear mostly near the anode wall. These calculated results indicate that the turbulent effects on the thermal plasma characteristics are very weak in the whole discharge region inside the RTC torch. On the other hand, the calculated results of the two numerical simulations for a WTC torch present that the significantly different values of plasma characteristics between the two models appear in the whole torch region and the plasma temperatures decrease with increasing the gas flow rate because the relatively strong turbulent effects are prevailing in the entire interior region of the WTC torch. From the comparisons of plasma net powers calculated and measured in this work, the turbulent modelling turns out to provide the more accurately calculated results close to the measured ones compared with the laminar one, especially for the torch with WTC. This is because the turbulent effects are considerably strong in

  1. Fabrication of hybrid supercapacitor based on rod-like HKUST-1@polyaniline as cathode and reduced graphene oxide as anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Elnaz Abbasi; Moradi, Morteza; Borhani, Saeed; Bigdeli, Hadise; Hajati, Shaaker

    2018-05-01

    Rod-like HKUST-1 (MOF-199) was hydrothermally synthesized, and the electrochemical capacitance properties of this MOF composited with polyaniline (PANI) were studied. The electrode was characterized by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD), Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical performance of the HKUST-1 and PANI, as well as HKUST-1/PANI (HP) composite was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge. Pure HKUST-1 showed a low specific capacitance at a current density of 1 A/g, because of its poor conductivity. However, due to the high surface area (190 m2/g) of the rod-like HKUST-1, its composite with PANI led to an improvement in electrochemical performance. The specific capacitance of HP was achieved to be 270 F/g at the current density of 1 A/g, which is much higher than that of HKUST-1 (70 F/g) and PANI (227 F/g). An asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) was fabricated by using the HP as cathode and rGO nanosheets as anode. This ASC provided a maximum specific power of 7497 W/kg and a specific energy of 6.22 Wh/kg with a wide working potential of 1.5 V and 87% capacity retention after 2000 cycles. Two ASCs connected in series were applied, which without recharging, lightened green and red LEDs up for 3 and 5 min, respectively.

  2. Preparation of iron-deposited graphite surface for application as cathode material during electrochemical vat-dyeing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbu Kulandainathan, M.; Kiruthika, K.; Christopher, G.; Babu, K. Firoz; Muthukumaran, A.; Noel, M.

    2008-01-01

    Iron-deposited graphite surfaces were prepared, characterized and employed as cathode materials for electrochemical vat-dyeing process containing very low concentration of sodium dithionite. The electrodeposition, in presence of ammonium thiocyanate and gelatin or animal glue as binding additives, were found to give finer iron deposits for improved electrochemical dyeing application. The electrodeposits were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, electron-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods, before and after electrochemical dyeing process. The electrochemical activity of the iron-deposited graphite electrodes always stored in water seems to depend on the surface-bound Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ redox species. Vat dyes like C.I. Vat Violet 1, C.I. Vat Green 1 and C.I. Vat Blue 4 could be efficiently dyed employing these above electrode materials. The colour intensity and washing fastness of the dyed fabrics were found to be equal with conventionally dyed fabrics. The electrodes could also be reused for the dyeing process

  3. Metal-Embedded Porous Graphitic Carbon Fibers Fabricated from Bamboo Sticks as a Novel Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Zhong, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Xia, Yang; Wang, Donghuang; Zhou, Cheng'ao; Tang, Wangjia; Wang, Xiuli; Wu, J B; Tu, Jiangping

    2018-04-25

    Lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs) are deemed to be among the most prospective next-generation advanced high-energy batteries. Advanced cathode materials fabricated from biological carbon are becoming more popular due to their unique properties. Inspired by the fibrous structure of bamboo, herein we put forward a smart strategy to convert bamboo sticks for barbecue into uniform bamboo carbon fibers (BCF) via a simple hydrothermal treatment proceeded in alkaline solution. Then NiCl 2 is used to etch the fibers through a heat treatment to achieve Ni-embedded porous graphitic carbon fibers (PGCF/Ni) for LSBs. The designed PGCF/Ni/S electrode exhibits improved electrochemical performances including high initial capacity (1198 mAh g -1 at 0.2 C), prolonged cycling life (1030 mAh g -1 at 0.2 C after 200 cycles), and improved rate capability. The excellent properties are attributed to the synergistic effect of 3D porous graphitic carbon fibers with highly conductive Ni nanoparticles embedded.

  4. Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly design with graphite-moderating rods to reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin, E-mail: nzcho@kaist.ac.kr; Park, Hae Min; Jeong, Yong Hoon, E-mail: jeongyh@kaist.ac.kr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The graphite rod-inserted SFR fuel assembly is proposed to achieve low sodium void reactivity. • The neutronics/thermal-hydraulics analyses are performed for the proposed SFR cores. • The sodium void reactivity is improved about 960–1030 pcm compared to reference design. - Abstract: The concept of a graphite-moderating rod-inserted sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly is proposed in this study to achieve a low sodium void reactivity coefficient. Using this concept, two types of SFR cores are analyzed; the proposed SFR type 1 core has new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions while the proposed SFR type 2 core has a B{sub 4}C absorber sandwich in the middle of the active core region as well as new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions. For the proposed SFR core designs, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed using the DIF3D, REBUS3, and the MATRA-LMR codes. In the neutronics analysis, the sodium void reactivity coefficient is obtained in various void situations. The two types of proposed core designs reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient by about 960–1030 pcm compared to the reference design. However, the TRU enrichment for the proposed SFR core designs is increased. In the thermal hydraulic analysis, the temperature distributions are calculated for the two types of proposed core designs and the mass flow rate is optimized to satisfy the design constraints for the highest power generating assembly. The results of this study indicate that the proposed SFR assembly design concept, which adopts graphite-moderating rods which are inserted into the fuel assembly, can feasibly minimize the sodium void reactivity coefficient. Single TRU enrichment and an identical fuel slug diameter throughout the SFR core are also achieved because the radial power peak can be flattened by varying the number of moderating rods in each core region.

  5. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  6. Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters, and graphite fiber brush anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of brush anodes and glass fiber (GF1) separators, and plastic mesh supporters were used here for the first time to create a scalable microbial fuel cell architecture. Separators prevented short circuiting of closely-spaced electrodes, and cathode supporters were used to avoid water gaps between the separator and cathode that can reduce power production. The maximum power density with a separator and supporter and a single cathode was 75±1W/m3. Removing the separator decreased power by 8%. Adding a second cathode increased power to 154±1W/m3. Current was increased by connecting two MFCs connected in parallel. These results show that brush anodes, combined with a glass fiber separator and a plastic mesh supporter, produce a useful MFC architecture that is inherently scalable due to good insulation between the electrodes and a compact architecture. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Trapping of hydride forming elements within miniature electrothermal devices. Part 2. Investigation of collection of arsenic and selenium hydrides on a surface and in a cavity of a graphite rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docekal, Bohumil

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of arsenic and selenium hydrides with bare and modified graphite was investigated by atomic absorption spectrometry and by radiotracer technique using 75 Se radionuclide in a laboratory made brass cylindrical chamber equipped with a vertical quartz tube torch for supporting miniature hydrogen diffusion flame atomizer. Strong interaction was observed at elevated temperatures above 800 deg. C. In contrast to the very often-reported data for conventional graphite tube atomizers, this high temperature interaction was also accompanied by a pronounced trapping of analytes at elevated temperatures close to 1100-1200 deg. C when modified graphite was used. Comparing modifiers tested (Ir, Pt and Rh), iridium appeared the only useful permanent modifier. Among various graphite-rod traps designed, the most efficient trapping of analytes was achieved in a graphite cavity. The net selenium trapping efficiencies of approximately 53% and 70% were found by radiotracer technique for the iridium-treated graphite surface and the iridium-treated graphite cavity, respectively. In contrast to the molybdenum surface, bare graphite did not exhibit any significant trapping effect. Trapping isotherms obtained at different temperatures displayed non-linear course in the range up to the upper limit of the analytical relevance of 100 ng of an analyte, indicating a limited trapping capacity of the modified graphite surface and the same trapping mechanism at low and elevated temperatures applied (300-1300 deg. C). Radiography experiments with 75 Se radiotracer showed that a major part of selenium was collected within the small cavity of the graphite rod and that selenium was also deposited after the trapping and vaporization steps in the trap chamber and on the quartz tube wall of the burner. Complementary experiments performed with the conventional transversally heated graphite tube and with bare and thermally shielded injection capillaries for hydride introduction, showed that

  8. Graphitized nanodiamond supporting PtNi alloy as stable anodic and cathodic electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongjiao; Zang, Jianbing; Dong, Liang; Pan, Hong; Yuan, Yungang; Wang, Yanhui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The graphitized nanodiamond (GND) showed a higher oxidation-resistance than XC-72. • The PtNi/GND electrocatalytic exhibited greater stability than PtNi/XC-72. • The PtNi/GND had a better catalytic activity for MOR and ORR than Pt/GND. -- Abstract: Surface graphitized nanodiamond (GND) with a diamond core covered by a graphitic carbon shell was prepared by annealing ND at the temperature of 1300 °C in a vacuum of 10 −3 Pa. PtNi electrocatalysts were prepared by a microwave heating polyol method using the prepared GND as a support. The composition and morphology of the PtNi electrocatalysts supported on GND (PtNi/GND) were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectra. The results showed that nano-scaled PtNi alloy particles with an atomic ratio of approximately 1:1 were uniformly deposited on the GND through co-reduction process. The electrocatalytic activities of the PtNi/GND electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and linear sweep voltammetry. The PtNi/GND exhibited better electrocatalytic activities than the Pt/GND either for MOR and ORR. In comparison with traditional carbon support Vulcan XC-72, GND showed higher oxidation-resistance, and consequently led to greater stability for the PtNi/GND than PtNi/XC-72

  9. Electrochemical performance of LiV3O8 micro-rod at various calcination temperatures as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noerochim, Lukman; Ginanjar, Edith Setia; Susanti, Diah; Prihandoko, Bambang

    2018-04-01

    Lithium vanadium oxide (LiV3O8) has been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method followed by calcination via the reaction of Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and ammonium metavanade (NH4VO3). The precursors were heated at hydrothermal at 200 °C and then calcined at different calcination temperature in 400, 450, and 500 °C. The characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) is indicated that LiV3O8 micro-rod have been obtained by this method. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) result showed that redox reaction occur in potential range between 2.42 - 3.57 V for the reduction reaction and oxidation reaction in potential range between 2.01 V-3.69 V. The highest result was obtained for sample 450 °C with specific discharge capacity of 138 mA/g. The result showed that LiV3O8 has a promising candidate as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries.

  10. A glucose bio-battery prototype based on a GDH/poly(methylene blue) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Yuan; Nien, Po-Chin; Chen, Chien-Hsiao; Chen, Lin-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    A glucose bio-battery prototype independent of oxygen is proposed based on a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple. At the bioanode, a NADH electrocatalyst, poly(methylene blue) (PMB), which can be easily grown on the electrode (screen-printed carbon paste electrode, SPCE) by electrodeposition, is harnessed and engineered. We find that carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are capable of significantly increasing the deposition amount of PMB and thus enhancing the PMB's electrocatalysis of NADH oxidation and the glucose bio-battery's performance. The choice of the iodide/tri-iodide redox couple eliminates the dependence of oxygen for this bio-battery, thus enabling the bio-battery with a constant current-output feature similar to that of the solar cells. The present glucose bio-battery prototype can attain a maximum power density of 2.4 μW/cm(2) at 25 °C. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of overcharge on Li(Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2)O2/graphite lithium ion cells with poly(vinylidene fluoride) binder. III - Chemical changes in the cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareño, Javier; Dietz Rago, Nancy; Dogan, Fulya; Graczyk, Donald G.; Tsai, Yifen; Naik, Seema R.; Han, Sang-Don; Lee, Eungje; Du, Zhijia; Sheng, Yangping; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.; Steele, Leigh Anna; Lamb, Joshua; Spangler, Scott; Grosso, Christopher; Fenton, Kyle; Bloom, Ira

    2018-05-01

    1.5 Ah pouch cells based on Li(Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2)O2 cathodes and graphite anodes, both containing poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) binders, were systematically overcharged to 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, and 250% state of charge (SOC), at which point they vented. The cells were subsequently discharged to 0% SOC and disassembled under an inert atmosphere for characterization. A combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), 6Li SSNMR, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the NMC532 cathodes indicates the formation of a thin C- and O-rich cathode electrolyte interphase layer, progressive Li loss above 140% SOC, and retention of the bulk crystal structure at all states of charge.

  12. Research on an improved explosive emission cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozhi; Sun Jun; Shao Hao; Chen Changhua; Zhang Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a physical description of the cathode plasma process of an explosive emission cathode (EEC) and experimental results on a type of oil-immersed graphite EEC. It is believed that the generation of a cathode plasma is mainly dependent on the state of the cathode surface, and that adsorbed gases and dielectrics on the cathode surface play a leading role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Based on these ideas, a type of oil-immersed graphite EEC is proposed and fabricated. The experiments indicate that the oil-immersed cathodes have improved emissive properties and longer lifetimes.

  13. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  14. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  15. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  16. Inspection of steel poles; ultrasonic testing of anchor ground rods and cathodic reactions : Corrosion detection : an emerging problem in buried steel structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, A.K.; Randle, R.E.; Stewart, A.H. [EDM International Inc., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A typical inspection of steel utility poles routinely overlooks what is below ground, such as anchor rods, stub angles in lattice towers, and direct embedded steel poles. Stub angles are lap or butt spliced to the tower leg and extend several feet below ground line. A case study concerning stub angles (Oberst 1998) is discussed. An inspection of steel poles erected in 1929 revealed that 40 per cent of legs had complete loss of galvanizing, 10 per cent of legs had greater than 10 per cent loss of cross-section, and 2 per cent of legs had greater than 80 per cent loss of cross-section. All corrosion was found within one foot of ground line. A relatively new concept is direct embedded steel poles. An emerging problem concerns tree induced anchor rod corrosion. A corrosion technique for anchor rods was developed and has been commercially available for the past three years. Its effectiveness was verified at the Montana Power Company 500 kV Colstrip Project, where 3 anchor failures were detected in 1995 due to corrosion wastage. The rods are classified as being in good condition up to 10 per cent loss of cross-section, moderate corrosion for losses between 10 and 25 per cent, and excessive corrosion for losses greater than 25 per cent. The results obtained at the Montana Power Company indicated the technique was 98 per cent accurate. The authors discuss the capabilities and limitations of the technique. It was also applied for the Anchor Rod Inspection Project of the Georgia Power Company (GPC). The technique is evaluated in the laboratory, then optimized. Field prototypes are developed, followed by an evaluation at different test sites. figs.

  17. The Development of Materials for Application to Control Rod Systems in Graphite moderated Reactors; Mise au Point de Materiaux pour les Dispositifs de Controle a Barres, Utilbes dans les Reacteurs Ralentis au Graphite; Razrabotka materialov , primenyaemykh v sistemakh upravlyayushchikh sterzhnej v reaktorakh s grafitovym zamedlitelem; Perfeccionamiento de Materiales Aplicables a las Barras de Control en los Reactores Moderados por Grafito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, G. E.; Kempf, F. J. [Hanford Atomic Products Operation, General Electric Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1964-06-15

    Material problems associated with the control- and safety-rod systems for graphite moderated, tube-type reactors can be divided into two categories: control materials and operating-channel liner materials. The control materials, such as boron or gadolinium, can be integral with the rod sheath, as in the boron stainless steel used for safety rods. Another approach is the enclosure of a boron-containing sintered compact, such as B{sub 4}C-graphite or B{sub 4}C-aluminium, in a metallic sheath. Rods of the latter type are adaptable for control purposes because of the increased percentages of boron that can be included. Test and fabrication experience indicate that a wide range of satisfactory rod designs is possible with any of these materials. The rod operating channels in the reactor often require liners to protect the surrounding graphite moderator from rod-insertion impact loads and wear and to help maintain channel alignment. Abrasion- and impact resistant, high-strength, low cross-section materials that will operate uncooled are required for these liners. Pyrolytic graphite, pyrolytic graphite composites, aluminium oxide and silicon carbide have been tested for such applications. Physical and irradiation damage data indicate that some of these materials are suitable for lining rod-operating channels. (author) [French] Les problemes de materiaux lies aux dispositifs de controle a barres de reglage et de securite pour les reacteurs tubulaires ralentis au graphite sont doubles et concernent les materiaux absorbants d'une part et les materiaux de garnissage des canaux d'autre part. Les materiaux absorbants tels que le bore ou le gadolinium peuvent former un tout avec le materiau de gainage comme dans le cas ou les barres de securite sont en acier inoxydable au bore. Une autre technique consiste a enfermer un melange presse et fritte contenant du bore, tel que B4C-graphite ou B4C-aluminium, dans une gaine metallique. Les barres de ce dernier type peuvent etre adaptees

  18. In situ catalytic synthesis of high-graphitized carbon-coated LiFePO4 nanoplates for superior Li-ion battery cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhipeng; Fan, Yuqian; Shao, Guangjie; Wang, Guiling; Song, Jianjun; Liu, Tingting

    2015-02-04

    The low electronic conductivity and one-dimensional diffusion channel along the b axis for Li ions are two major obstacles to achieving high power density of LiFePO4 material. Coating carbon with excellent conductivity on the tailored LiFePO4 nanoparticles therefore plays an important role for efficient charge and mass transport within this material. We report here the in situ catalytic synthesis of high-graphitized carbon-coated LiFePO4 nanoplates with highly oriented (010) facets by introducing ferrocene as a catalyst during thermal treatment. The as-obtained material exhibits superior performances for Li-ion batteries at high rate (100 C) and low temperature (-20 °C), mainly because of fast electron transport through the graphitic carbon layer and efficient Li(+)-ion diffusion through the thin nanoplates.

  19. Hierarchically porous micro-rod lithium-rich cathode material Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2 for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Linjing; Borong, Wu.; Ning, Li.; Feng, Wu.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The hierarchically porous micro-rod Li 1.2 Ni 0.13 Mn 0.54 Co 0.13 O 2 material is prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. • This material exhibits good cycling performance. • It delivers discharge capacities of 280.7, 254.8, 232.3, 225.6, 201.7 and 172.7 mAh g −1 at 0.1 C, 0.2 C, 0.5 C, 1 C, 2 C and 5 C rates, respectively. • Excellent rate capability and cycleability are obtained attributed to the hierarchically porous micro-rod structure. - Abstract: Lithium-rich cathode material Li 1.2 Ni 0.13 Mn 0.54 Co 0.13 O 2 with hierarchically porous micro-rod structures has been synthesized using a facile hydrothermal method. The morphology and XRD patterns explain the formation mechanism of the sample. Micro-rod oxalates precursor with rough surface is formed during the hydrothermal reaction, and then the product with hierarchically porous structures constructed of nanoparticles is synthesized during the sintering process at high temperatures. The electrochemical performance results show that the as-prepared sample exhibits high capacities, good cycleability and outstanding rate capability. It delivers discharge capacities of 280.7, 254.8, 232.3, 225.6, 201.7 and 172.7 mAh g −1 at 0.1 C, 0.2 C, 0.5 C, 1 C, 2 C and 5 C rates, respectively. The cycle voltammograms indicate the good reversibility of the as-prepared Li 1.2 Ni 0.13 Mn 0.54 Co 0.13 O 2 material. The high onset temperature of the exothermal peak in the differential scanning calorimetry curve implies its good thermal stability. The good performance of the as-prepared material is endowed by its hierarchically porous structures

  20. Control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Kazuo; Shimoshige, Takanori; Nishimura, Akira

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: A control rod has been developed, which provided a plurality of through-holes in the vicinity of the sheath fitting position, in order to flatten burn-up, of fuel rods in positions confronting a control rod. Thereby to facilitate the manufacture of the control rods and prevent fuel rod failures. Constitution: A plurality of through-holes are formed in the vicinity of the sheath fitting position of a central support rod to which a sheath for the control rod is fitted. These through-holes are arranged in the axial direction of the central support rod. Accordingly, burn-up of fuel rods confronting the control rods can be reduced by through-holes and fuel rod failures can be prevented. (Yoshino, Y.)

  1. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  2. Atomization in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Peak-height method vs. integration method of measuring absorbance: carbon rod atomizer 63

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturgeon, R.E.; Chakrabarti, C.L.; Maines, I.S.; Bertels, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    Oscilloscopic traces of transient atomic absorption signals generated during continuous heating of a Carbon Rod Atomizer model 63 show features which are characteristic of the element being atomized. This research was undertaken to determine the significance and usefulness of the two analytically significant parameters, absorbance maximum and integrated absorbance. For measuring integrated absorbance, an electronic integrating control unit consisting of a timing circuit, a lock-in amplifier, and a digital voltmeter, which functions as a direct absorbance x second readout, has been designed, developed, and successfully tested. Oscilloscopic and recorder traces of the absorbance maximum and digital display of the integrated absorbance are simultaneously obtained. For the elements studied, Cd, Zn, Cu, Al, Sn, Mo, and V, the detection limits and the precision obtained are practically identical for both methods of measurements. The sensitivities by the integration method are about the same as, or less than, those obtained by the peak-height method, whereas the calibration curves by the former are generally linear over wider ranges of concentrations. (U.S.)

  3. Control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To realize effective utilization, cost reduction and weight reduction in neutron absorbing materials. Constitution: Residual amount of neutron absorbing material is averaged between the top end region and other regions of a control rod upon reaching to the control rod working life, by using a single kind of neutron absorbing material and increasing the amount of the neutron absorber material at the top end region of the control rod as compared with that in the other regions. Further, in a case of a control rod having control rod blades such as in a cross-like control rod, the amount of the neutron absorbing material is decreased in the middle portion than in the both end portions of the control rod blade along the transversal direction of the rod, so that the residual amount of the neutron absorbing material is balanced between the central region and both end regions upon reaching the working life of the control rod. (Yoshihara, H.)

  4. A Lithium-ion Battery Using Partially Lithiated Graphite Anode and Amphi-redox LiMn2O4 Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yuju; Noh, Hyun Kuk; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2017-11-01

    Delithiation followed by lithiation of Li + -occupied (n-type) tetrahedral sites of cubic LiMn 2 O 4 spinel (LMO) at ~4 [Formula: see text] (delivering ~100 mAh g LMO -1 ) has been used for energy storage by lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In this work, we utilized unoccupied (p-type) octahedral sites of LMO available for lithiation at ~3 [Formula: see text] (delivering additional ~100 mAh g LMO -1 ) that have never been used for LIBs in full-cell configuration. The whole capacity of amphi-redox LMO, including both oxidizable n-type and reducible p-type redox sites, at ~200 mAh g LMO -1 was realized by using the reactions both at 4 [Formula: see text] and 3 [Formula: see text]. Durable reversibility of the 3 V reaction was achieved by graphene-wrapping LMO nanoparticles (LMO@Gn). Prelithiated graphite (Li n C 6 , n < 1) was used as anodes to lithiate the unoccupied octahedral sites of LMO for the 3 V reaction.

  5. Control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Takao; Sugawara, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Yuichiro; Saito, Shozo; Fukumoto, Takashi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the weight and thereby obtain satisfactory operationability of control rods by combining absorbing nuclear chain type neutron absorbers and conventional type neutron absorbers in the axial direction of blades. Constitution: Neutron absorber rods and long life type neutron absorber rods are disposed in a tie rod and a sheath. The neutron absorber rod comprises a poison tube made of stainless steels and packed with B 4 C powder. The long life type neutron absorber rod is prepared by packing B-10 enriched boron carbide powder into a hafnium metal rod, hafnium pipe, europium and stainless made poison tube. Since the long life type absorber rod uses HF as the absorbing nuclear chain type neutron absorber, it absorbs neutrons to form new neutron absorbers to increase the nuclear life. (Yoshino, Y.)

  6. LiFePO4 nanoparticles enveloped in freestanding sandwich-like graphitized carbon sheets as enhanced remarkable lithium-ion battery cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Xiao; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Yu

    2016-04-15

    A novel nanostructure where LiFePO4 nanoparticles are enveloped in sandwich-like carbon sheets as an enhanced cathode in lithium-ion batteries has successfully been synthesized for the first time. Compared to previous carbon-based nanocomposites, the achieved sandwich-like LiFePO4 nanocomposites exhibit totally different architecture, in which LiFePO4 nanoparticles are tightly entrapped between two carbon layers, instead of being anchored on the carbon sheet surfaces. In other words, the achieved sandwich-like LiFePO4 nanocomposite carbon layers are actually freestanding and can be operated and separated from each other. This is a great breakthrough in the design and synthesis of carbon-based functional materials. The obtained sandwich-like LiFePO4 nanocomposites present excellent electrochemical performance, which is rationally ascribed to the superb and unique structure and architecture. Of particular note is that the freestanding sandwich-like LiFePO4 nanocomposites exhibit enhanced cyclability and rate capability. At a high current density of 0.1 A g(-1), a stable specific capacity of approximately 168.5 mAh g(-1) can be delivered over 1000 cycles, and when the charge-discharge rates increase to 0.6, 2, 5 and 10 A g(-1), the specific capacities still survive at 149, 129, 114 and 91 mAh g(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, the sandwiched nanocomposite demonstrates a significantly improved low-temperature electrochemical energy storage performance. With respect to the excellent Li storage performance, and facility and reliability of production, the freestanding sandwich-like LiFePO4 nanocomposites are reasonably believed to have a great potential for multiple electrochemical energy storage applications.

  7. Reagent-less amperometric glucose biosensor based on a graphite rod electrode layer-by-layer modified with 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione and glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausaite-Minkstimiene, Asta; Simanaityte, Ruta; Ramanaviciene, Almira; Glumbokaite, Laura; Ramanavicius, Arunas

    2017-08-15

    A reagent-less amperometric glucose biosensor operating in not-stirred sample solution was developed. A working electrode of the designed biosensor was based on a graphite rod (GR) electrode, which was modified with 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione (PD) and glucose oxidase (GOx). The PD and the GOx were layer-by-layer adsorbed on the GR electrode surface with subsequent drying followed by chemical cross-linking of the adsorbed GOx with glutaraldehyde (GA). Optimal preparation conditions of the working electrode (GR/PD/GOx) were achieved with 12.6μg and 0.24mg loading amount of PD and GOx, respectively and 25min lasting cross-linking of the GOx with GA. A current response to glucose of the GR/PD/GOx electrode was measured at +200mV potential vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Maximum current response was registered when the pH of the buffer solution was 6.0. The registered current response to glucose was linear in the concentration range of 0.1-76mmolL -1 (R 2 =0.9985) and a detection limit was 0.025mmolL -1 . The GR/PD/GOx electrode demonstrated good reproducibility and repeatability with the relative standard deviation of 6.2% and 1.8% (at 4.0mmolL -1 of glucose), respectively, high anti-interference ability to uric and ascorbic acids. It was highly selective to glucose and demonstrated good accuracy in the analysis of human serum samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Replacement rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes in an elongated replacement rod for use with fuel assemblies of the type having two end fittings connected by guide tubes with a plurality of rod and guide tube cell defining spacer grids containing rod support features and mixing vanes. The grids secured to the guide tubes in register between the end fittings at spaced intervals. The fuel rod comprising: an asymmetrically beveled tip; a shank portion having a straight centerline; and a permanently diverging portion between the tip and the shank portion

  9. Cathode power distribution system and method of using the same for power distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Koehl, Eugene R; Bailey, James L; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2014-11-11

    Embodiments include a cathode power distribution system and/or method of using the same for power distribution. The cathode power distribution system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly of the plurality of cathode assemblies includes a plurality of cathode rods. The system also includes a plurality of bus bars configured to distribute current to each of the plurality of cathode assemblies. The plurality of bus bars include a first bus bar configured to distribute the current to first ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies and a second bus bar configured to distribute the current to second ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies.

  10. Water rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Yokomizo, Osamu; Orii, Akihito.

    1992-01-01

    In a reactor core of a BWR type reactor, the area of a flow channel in a lower portion of a downcoming pipe for downwardly releasing steams present at the top portion in a water rod is increased. Further, a third coolant flow channel (an inner water rod) is disposed in an uprising having an exit opened near the inlet of the water rod and an inlet opened at the outside near the top portion of the water and having an increase flow channel area in the upper portion. The downcoming pipe in the water rod is filled with steams, and the void ratio is increased by so much as the flow channel area of the downcoming pipe is increased. Since the pressure difference between the inlet and the exit of the inner water rod is greater than the pressure difference between the inlet and the exit of the water rod, most of water flown into the inner water rod is discharged out of the exit in the form of water as it is. Since the area of the flow channel is increased in the portion of the inner water rod, void efficiency in the upper portion of the reactor core is decreased by so much. Since the void ratio is thus increased in the lower portion and the void efficiency is decreased in the upper portion of the reactor core, axial void distribution can be flattened. (N.H.)

  11. Seismic scrammability of HTTR control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiguchi, I.; Iyoku, T.; Ito, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Araki, T.; Katagiri, S.

    1990-01-01

    Scrammability tests on HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) control rods under seismic conditions have been carried out and seismic conditions influences on scram time as well as functional integrity were examined. A control rod drive located in a stand-pipe at the top of a reactor vessel, raises and lowers a pair of control rods by suspension cables. Each flexible control rod consists of 10 neutron absorber sections held together by a metal spine passing through the center. It falls into a hole in graphite blocks due to gravity at scram. In the tests, a full scale control rod drive and a pair of control rods were employed with a column of graphite blocks in which holes for rods were formed. Blocks misalignment and contact with the hole surface during earthquakes were considered as major causes of disturbance in scram time. Therefore, the following parameters were set up in the tests: excitation direction, combination or horizontal and vertical excitation, acceleration, frequency and block to block gaps. Main results obtained from tests are as follow. 1) Every scram time obtained under the design conditions was within 6 seconds. On the contrary, the scram times were 5.2 seconds when there were no vibration. Therefore, it was concluded that the seismic effects on scram time were not significant. 2) Scram time became longer with increase in both acceleration and horizontal excitation frequency, and control rods fell very smoothly without any jerkiness. This suggests that collision between control rods and hole surface is the main disturbing factor of falling motion. 3) Mechanical and functional integrity of control rod drive mechanism, control rods and graphite blocks was confirmed after 140 seismic scrammability tests. (author). 10 figs, 1 tab

  12. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  13. Nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  14. Electrochemical behaviour of rhenium-graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varypaev, V.N.; Krasikov, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of combination electrode from graphite with electrodeposited thin coating of electrolytic rhenium is studied. Solution of 0.5 m NaCl+0.04 m AlCl 3 served as an electrolite. Polarization galvanostatic curves of hydrogen evolution upon electrodes with conditional rhenium thickness of 3.5 and 0.35 μm, 35 and 3.5 nm are obtained. Possibility of preparation of rhenium-graphite cathode with extremely low rhenium consume, electro-chemical properties of which are simu-lar to purely rhenium cathode is shown. Such electrode is characterized with stable in time low cathode potential of hydrogen evolution in chloride electrolyte and during cathode polarization it is not affected by corrosion

  15. Control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Takao; Yoshimoto, Yuichiro; Sugawara, Satoshi; Fukumoto, Takashi; Endo, Zen-ichiro; Saito, Shozo; Shinpo, Katsutoshi; Nishimura, Akira; Ozawa, Michihiro

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a sufficient shutdown margin upon reactor shutdown, prevent sheath deformation without decreasing neutron absorbents and prevent impact shocks exerted to structural materials. Constitution: The control rod of the present invention comprises a neutron absorption region, a sheath deformation means attached to the side wall and means for restricting and supporting axial movement of the neutron absorbent rod. Then, the amount of absorptive nuclei chained absorbents in the lower region is reduced than that in the upper region. In this way, effective neutron absorbing performance can be obtained relative to the neutron importance distribution during reactor shutdown. In addition, since the operationability is improved by reducing the weight of the control rod and the absorptive nuclei chained neutron abosrbers are used, mechanical nuclear life of the control rod can be increased. Thus, it is possible to prevent the outward deformation of the sheath, as well as prevent collision between the neutron absorber rod and the structural material on the side of inserting the control rod generated upon reactor scram by a simple structure. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  17. Measurement of the fission ratio for several configurations of uranium oxide rod clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattenden, S.K.; Patterson, C.R.

    1962-02-01

    This report describes measurements of the fission ratio for a single fuel channel of oxide rod clusters in an essentially infinite block of graphite. The measurements were made using the 'catcher-foil' technique, the activities of the catcher foils being measured by β-counting. Results are given, for 37-rod; 18-rod; 7-rod and 3-rod clusters, and are compared with theoretical predictions. (author)

  18. Li- and Mn-Rich Cathode Materials: Challenges to Commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jianming [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Myeong, Seungjun [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Cho, Woongrae [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Yan, Pengfei [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xiao, Jie [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Cho, Jaephil [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Zhang, Ji-Guang [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-12-14

    The lithium- and manganese-rich (LMR) layered structure cathode exhibit one of the highest specific energy (~900 Wh kg-1) among all the cathode materials. However, the practical applications of LMR cathodes are still hindered by several significant challenges including voltage fade, large initial capacity loss, poor rate capability and limited cycle life. Herein, we review the recent progresses and understandings on the application of LMR cathode materials from practical point of view. Several key parameters of LMR cathodes that affect the LMR/graphite full cell operation are systematically analysed. These factors include the first cycle capacity loss, voltage fade, powder tap density, electrode density of LMR based cathode etc. New approaches to minimize the detrimental effect of these factors are highlighted in this work. We also provided the perspectives for the future research on LMR cathode materials, focusing on addressing the fundamental problems of LMR cathodes while always keeping practical considerations in mind.

  19. CONTROL ROD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.E.; Matras, S.

    1963-04-30

    This patent shows a method of making a fuel or control rod for a nuclear reactor. Fuel or control material is placed within a tube and plugs of porous metal wool are inserted at both ends. The metal wool is then compacted and the tube compressed around it as by swaging, thereby making the plugs liquid- impervious but gas-pervious. (AEC)

  20. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Shinji; Kajiwara, Koichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure the safety for the fuel rod failures by adapting plenum springs to function when small forces such as during transportation of fuel rods is exerted and not to function the resilient force when a relatively great force is exerted. Constitution: Between an upper end plug and a plenum spring in a fuel rod, is disposed an insertion member to the lower portion of which is mounted a pin. This pin is kept upright and causes the plenum spring to function resiliently to the pellets against the loads due to accelerations and mechanical vibrations exerted during transportation of the fuel rods. While on the other hand, if a compression force of a relatively high level is exerted to the plenum spring during reactor operation, the pin of the insertion member is buckled and the insertion member is inserted to the inside of the plenum spring, whereby the pellets are allowed to expand freely and the failures in the fuel elements can be prevented. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physical activity prior to surgery,  Length of the operation; anesthesia issues,  Reason for the choice of rod,  Time in the hospital,  Length of recovery time at home,  Pain management including control of muscle spasms,  The rehabilitation plan. ...

  2. Control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Isao; Masuoka, Ryuzo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent fuel element failures during power conditioning by removing liquid absorbents in poison tubes of control rods in a fast power up step and extracting control rods to slightly increase power in a medium power up step. Constitution: A plurality of poison tubes are disposed in a coaxial or plate-like arrangement and divided into a region capable of compensating the reactivity from the initial state at low temperature to 40% power operation and a region capable of compensating the reactivity in the power up above 40% power operation. Soluble poisons are used as absorbers in the poison tubes corresponding to above 40% power operation and they are adapted to be removed independently from the driving of control rods. The poison tubes filled with the soluble absorbers are responsible for the changes in the reactivity from the initial state at low temperature to the medium power region and the reactivity control is conducted by the elimination of liquid absorbers from the poison tubes. In the succeeding slight power up region above the medium power, power up is proceeding by extracting the control rods having remaining poison tubes filled with solid or liquid absorbers. (Seki, T.)

  3. Cold cathode diode X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Lanza, R.C.; Sohval, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    A cold cathode diode X-ray source for radiation imaging, especially computed tomography, comprises a rod-like anode and a generally cylindrical cathode, concentric with the anode. The spacing between anode and cathode is so chosen that the diode has an impedance in excess of 100 ohms. The anode may be of tungsten, or of carbon with a tungsten and carbon coating. An array of such diodes may be used with a closely packed array of detectors to produce images of rapidly moving body organs, such as the beating heart. (author)

  4. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  5. Control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Inoue, Kotaro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To flatten the power distribution in the reactor core without impairing neutron economy by disposing pins containing elements of lower atomic number in the central region of a shroud and loading pins containing depleted uranium in the periphery region thereof. Constitution: The shroud has a layer of pins containing depleted uranium in the peripheral region and a layer of pins containing elements of lower atomic number such as beryllium in the central region. Heat removal from those pins containing depleted uranium and elements of lower atomic number (neutron moderator) is effected by sodium flow outside of the cladding material. The control rod operation is conducted by inserting or extracting the central portion (pins containing elements of lower atomic number such as beryllium) inside of the stainless pipe. Upon extraction of the control rod, the moderator in the central region is removed whereby high speed neutrons are no more deccelerated and the absorption rate to the depleted uranium is decreased. This can flatten the power distribution in the reactore core with the disposition of a plurality of control rods at a better neutron economy as compared with the use of neutron absorber such as boron. (Seki, T.)

  6. Control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Takashi; Hirakawa, Hiromasa; Kawashima, Norio; Goto, Yasuyuki.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron absorbers are contained in a tubular member comprising, integrally a tubular portion and four corners disposed at the outer circumference of the tubular portion at every 90deg, to provide a neutron absorbing tube. A plurality of neutron absorbing tubes are arranged in parallel in the lateral direction, and adjacent corners are joined, into a blade to constitute a control rod. Such a control rod has a great structural strength, simple in the structure and relatively light in weight and can contain a great amount of neutron absorbers. Upon formation of the control rod by arranging the blades in a cross-like shape, at least a portion thereof is constituted with short neutron absorbing tubes shorter than the entire length of the blade, and gaps are formed at positions in adjacent in the axial direction. With such a constitution, there is no worry that a wing end of the blade collides against or be abraded with a fuel channel box or a fuel support. Even if fuel channels are vibrated upon scram of the reactor, such as occurrence of earthquakes, it can be inserted to the reactor easily. (N.H.)

  7. Optimization of a rod pinch diode radiography source at 2.3 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menge, P.R.; Johnson, D.L.; Maenchen, J.E.; Rovang, D.C.; Oliver, B.V.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Rod pinch diodes have shown considerable capability as high-brightness flash x-ray sources for penetrating dynamic radiography. The rod pinch diode uses a small diameter (0.4-2 mm) anode rod extended through a cathode aperture. When properly configured, the electron beam born off of the aperture edge can self-insulate and pinch onto the tip of the rod creating an intense, small x-ray source. Sandia's SABRE accelerator (2.3 MV, 40 Ω, 70 ns) has been utilized to optimize the source experimentally by maximizing the figure of merit (dose/spot diameter2) and minimizing the diode impedance droop. Many diode parameters have been examined including rod diameter, rod length, rod material, cathode aperture diameter, cathode thickness, power flow gap, vacuum quality, and severity of rod-cathode misalignment. The configuration producing the greatest figure of merit uses a 0.5 mm diameter gold rod, a 6 mm rod extension beyond the cathode aperture (diameter=8 mm), and a 10 cm power flow gap to produce up to 3.5 rad (filtered dose) at 1 m from a 0.85 mm x-ray on-axis spot (1.02 mm at 3 deg. off axis). The resultant survey of parameter space has elucidated several physics issues that are discussed

  8. Sucker rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rylov, B M; Kostur, I N; Shcheigiy, B I; Sukhanov, V S

    1983-01-01

    As an addendum to A.s. USSR patent No 769087, this particular sucker rod utilizes a differential piston spring that has been attached outside the body of the auxiliary pump. The pump cylinder is attached to the intake line of the main pump. The lower part of the auxiliary pump is equipped with vertical slits, while the differential piston is equipped with a perforated pusher and support under the spring; it can also be shifted as necessary with respect to the vertical slits.

  9. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemchinsky, V A; Raitses, Y

    2015-01-01

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement. (paper)

  10. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322-6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  11. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hajime; Ueda, Makoto

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure capable of measuring, in a non-destructive manner, the releasing amount of nuclear gaseous fission products from spent fuels easily and at a high accuracy. Constitution: In order to confirm the integrity and the design feasibility of a nuclear fuel rod, it is important to accurately determine the amount of gaseous nuclear fission products released from nuclear pellets. In a structure where a plurality of fuel pellets are charged in a fuel cladding tube and retained by an inconel spring, a hollow and no-sealed type spacer tube made of zirconium or the alloy thereof, for example, not containing iron, cobalt, nickel or manganese is formed between the spring and the upper end plug. In the fuel rod of such a structure, by disposing a gamma ray collimator and a gamma ray detector on the extension of the spacer pipe, the gamma rays from the gaseous nuclear fission products accumulated in the spacer pipe can be detected while avoiding the interference with the induction radioactivity from inconel. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. A experimental system for the checking of the absorption of E.C.A.G. graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raievski, V.; Vidal, R.

    1958-01-01

    A system is described for measuring the mean absorption cross section in thermal neutrons of graphite. This system consists of a graphite stack containing a Ra-Be source and a BF3 counter. A cavity in the stack receives the graphite to be studied or the graphite standard. By comparing the counting rates their absorption ratio can be deduced. The measurement is performed on graphite rods which have been machined before being placed in the pile. It provides the possibility of detecting over a batch of 1 ton of graphite, in a single measurement, a difference in absorption of 0.1 milli barn. (author) [fr

  13. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  14. TiO{sub 2} nanotubes as alternative cathode in microbial fuel cells: Effect of annealing treatment on its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahia, S. Ait Ali, E-mail: aay-soraya@yahoo.fr [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Regional Campus of International Excellence of “Campus Mare Nostrum”, Polytechnic University of Cartagena, Campus La Muralla, E-30202 Cartagena, Murcia (Spain); Laboratory of Physics and Chemical Materials (L.P.C.M.), University Mouloud MAMMERI, Tizi-Ouzou 1500 (Algeria); Hamadou, L., E-mail: lamhama@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Physics and Chemical Materials (L.P.C.M.), University Mouloud MAMMERI, Tizi-Ouzou 1500 (Algeria); Salar-García, M.J. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Regional Campus of International Excellence of “Campus Mare Nostrum”, Polytechnic University of Cartagena, Campus La Muralla, E-30202 Cartagena, Murcia (Spain); Kadri, A. [Laboratory of Physics and Chemical Materials (L.P.C.M.), University Mouloud MAMMERI, Tizi-Ouzou 1500 (Algeria); Ortiz-Martínez, V.M.; Hernández-Fernández, F.J. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Regional Campus of International Excellence of “Campus Mare Nostrum”, Polytechnic University of Cartagena, Campus La Muralla, E-30202 Cartagena, Murcia (Spain); Pérez de los Rios, A. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Benbrahim, N. [Laboratory of Physics and Chemical Materials (L.P.C.M.), University Mouloud MAMMERI, Tizi-Ouzou 1500 (Algeria)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • An alternative cathode using TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. • Determination of the structural, morphological and electronic characteristics of the cathode. • Effect of crystalline structure on MFCs performances. - Abstract: In the present work, amorphous and crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TiNT) were fabricated via anodization and characterized as an alternative cathode for Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). The morphology of TiNT is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline structure and chemical composition are examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The electrical conductivity characteristics were examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). MFCs based on the alternative cathodes were evaluated in terms of energy generation and wastewater treatment. The performances of the as-anodized nanotubes and TiNT annealed at 450 °C and at 550 °C were investigated in double-chamber MFCs with carbon rod and graphite granules as anode and polymer inclusion membrane based on ionic liquid as separator. Industrial wastewater was the source of carbon and inoculum for the experiments. The as grown amorphous nanotubes exhibited the best output power density of 15.16 mWm{sup −2}. The results reported here indicate that the specific surface area and the oxygen vacancies of the TiNT cathode can influence the MFCs performance together, because both factors play crucial role in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). As-anodized TiNT, due to its higher specific surface provide more active sites for electrode reactions. The final oxygen demand (COD) for all systems achieved a COD removal within the interval 54–71% after 10 days. This approved the suitability of MFCs for wastewater treatment.

  15. Study on flow-induced vibration of the fuel rod in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki

    1988-03-01

    This study was performed in order to investigate flow-induced vibration characteristics of a fuel rod in HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor) from both an experiment and a numerical simulation. Two kinds of fuel rods were used in this experiment: one was a graphite rod which simulated a specification of the HTTR's fuel rod and the other was an aluminum rod whose weight was a half of the graphite one. The experiment was carried out up to Re = 31000 using air at room temperature and pressure. Air flowed downstream in an annular passage which consisted of the fuel rod and the graphite channel. Numerical simulations by fluid and frequency equations were also carried out. Numerical and experimental results were then compared. The following conclusions were drived: (1) The fuel rod amplitudes increase with the flow rate and with a decrease of the fuel rod weight. (2) The fuel rod amplitudes are obtained by δ/De = 2.22 x 10 -10 Re 1.43 , 9000 ≤ Re ≤ 31000, where δ is a vibration amplitude, De is a hydraulic diameter and Reis Reynolds number. (3) The fuel rod frequencies shift from lower natural frequency to higher as the flow rate increases. (4) The flow-induced vibration behavior of the fuel rod can simulate well by simultaneous equations which used the turbulence model for fluid and the mass model for vibration of the fuel rod. (author)

  16. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  17. Gas-discharge sources with charged particle emission from the plasma of glow discharge with a hollow cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, A P

    2001-01-01

    One studied properties of a magnetron discharge with a cold hollow and uncooled rod cathodes. One demonstrated the dominant effect of thermoelectron emission of a rod cathode heated in a discharge on characteristics of discharge and on emission properties of a gas-discharge plasma and the possibility pf a smooth transition of glow discharge to diffusion mode of arc discharge combustion. Paper describes sources of ions and electrons with improved physical and generalized design and engineering parameters. One shows the promise of the electrode structure of a hollow cathode magnetron discharge to be used as a source, in particular, of the atomic hydrogen and of atom flow of a working rod cathode

  18. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  19. EFFECTS OF REACTOR CONDITIONS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas pr...

  20. MODELING THE ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A GRANULAR GRAPHITE-PACKED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive reactor model was developed for the electrolytic dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) at a granular-graphite cathode. The reactor model describes the dynamic processes of TCE dechlorination and adsorption, and the formation and dechlorination of all the major...

  1. Microbial fuel cells with an integrated spacer and separate anode and cathode modules

    KAUST Repository

    He, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Xiuping; Feng, Yujie; Logan, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    A new type of scalable MFC was developed based on using alternating graphite fiber brush array anode modules and dual cathode modules in order to simplify construction, operation, and maintenance of the electrodes. The modular MFC design was tested

  2. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the size of the reactor core upper mechanisms and the reactor container, as well as decrease the nuclear power plant construction costs in reactors using liquid metals as the coolants. Constitution: Isotope capturing devices comprising a plurality of pipes are disposed to the gas plenum portion of a nuclear fuel rod main body at the most downstream end in the flowing direction of the coolants. Each of the capturing devices is made of nickel, nickel alloys, stainless steel applied with nickel plating on the surface, nickel alloys applied with nickel plating on the surface or the like. Thus, radioactive nuclides incorporated in the coolants are surely captured by the capturing devices disposed at the most downstream end of the nuclear fuel main body as the coolants flow along the nuclear fuel main body. Accordingly, since discharging of radioactive nuclides to the intermediate fuel exchange system can be prevented, the maintenance or reparing work for the system can be facilitated. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirukawa, Koji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure the fuel safety by constituting a control rod with a plurality of poison bodies suspended in a cross-like section and shorter length poison bodies made movable and engageable in the gap between each of the above poison bodies thereby maintaining the function of the shorter length poison constant. Constitution: Cross-like supports are secured to the upper and lower parts of a driving shaft journaled in a sheath and poison bodies composed of neutron absorber poisons of a large thermal neutron absorption cross section and neutron absorber poison tubes for containing them are suspended from the supports. A movable cross-like support is mounted slidably at its base to the lower part of the driving shaft and poison bodies shorter than the above poison bodies and composed of neutron absorber poisons having a greater absorption cross section at the neutron energy region higher than thermal neutron region and neutron poison tubes for containing them are suspended to the movable support at the position capable of engaging in the gap between each of the poison bodies. (Kawakami, Y.)

  4. High-resolution TEM microscopy study of the creep behaviour of carbon-based cathode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwlyzwkj@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Nonferrous Metals Henan Province, Luoyang 471023 (China); Chen, Weijie [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471023 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Nonferrous Metals Henan Province, Luoyang 471023 (China); Gu, Wanduo [Collaborative Innovation Center of Nonferrous Metals Henan Province, Luoyang 471023 (China)

    2017-02-27

    Creep is in close relationship with the materials deterioration and deformation of the cathodes in aluminum reduction cells. The purpose of this work is to obtain the creep mechanism of the carbon cathode for aluminum electrolysis. A modified Rapoport equipment was used for measuring the creep strain of the semi-graphitic cathodes during aluminum electrolysis with CR=2.5 and at temperature of 945 ℃. The arrangement of carbon atom has been studied after hexagonal graphite converting into rhombohedral graphite during aluminum electrolysis by XRD and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The creep deformation of the carbon cathode has a close relationship with the mobile dislocation walls. These results will be helpful in controlling the cathode quality and its performance in aluminum reduction cells.

  5. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  6. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akira.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to monitor the coupling state between a control rod and a control rod drive. Constitution: After the completion of a control rod withdrawal, a coolant pressure is applied to a control rod drive being adjusted so as to raise only the control rod drive and, in a case where the coupling between the control rod drive and the control rod is detached, the former is elevated till it contacts the control rod and then stopped. The actual stopping position is detected by an actual position detection circuit and compared with a predetermined position stored in a predetermined position detection circuit. If both of the positions are not aligned with each other, it is judged by a judging circuit that the control rod and the control rod drives are not combined. (Sekiya, K.)

  7. PALLADIUM-FACILITATED ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF 2-CHLOROBIPHENYL USING A GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladium-assisted electrocatalytic dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-Cl BP) in aqueous solutions was conducted in a membrane-separated electrochemical reactor with granular-graphite packed electrodes. The dechlorination took place at a granular-graphite cathode while Pd was ...

  8. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  9. Control rod assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akio.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reliable insertion and drops of control rods, as well as insure a sufficient flow rate of coolants flowing through the control rods for attaining satisfactory cooling thereof to enable relexation of thermal stress resulted to rectifying mechanisms or the likes. Constitution: To the outer circumference of a control rod contained vertically movably within a control rod guide tube, resistive members are retractably provided in such a way as to project to close the gap between outer circumference of the control rod and the inner surface of the control rod guide tube upon engagement of a gripper of control rod drives, and retract upon release of the engagement of the gripper. Thus, since the resistive members project to provide a greater resistance to the coolants flowing between them and the control rod guide tube in the normal operation where the gripper is engaged to drive the control rod by the control rod drives, a major part of the coolant flowing into the control rod guide tube flows into the control rod. This enables to cool the control rod effectively and make the temperature distribution uniform for the coolant flowing from the upper end of the control rod guide tube to thereby attain the relaxation of the thermal stress resulted in the rectifying mechanisms or the likes. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. Control rod displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazato, S.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor including a core, cylindrical control rods, a single support means supporting the control rods from their upper ends in spaced apart positions and movable for displacing the control rods in their longitudinal direction between a first end position in which the control rods are fully inserted into the core and a second end position in which the control rods are retracted from the core, and guide means contacting discrete regions of the outer surface of each control rod at least when the control rods are in the vicinity of the second end position. The control rods are supported by the support means for longitudinal movement without rotation into and out of the core relative to the guide means to thereby cause the outer surface of the control rods to experience wear as a result of sliding contact with the guide means. The support means are so arranged with respect to the core and the guide means that it is incapable of rotation relative to the guide means. The improvement comprises displacement means being operatively coupled to a respective one of the control rods for periodically rotating the control rod in a single angular direction through an angle selected to change the locations on the outer surfaces of the control rods at which the control rods are contacted by the guide means during subsequent longitudinal movement of the control rods

  11. Graphite development for gas-cooled reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) graphite activities in the USA which currently include the following research and development tasks: coke examination; effects of irradiation; variability of physical properties (mechanical, thermal-physical, and fracture); fatigue behavior, oxidation behavior; NDE techniques; structural design criteria; and carbon-carbon composite control rod clad materials. These tasks support nuclear grade graphite manufacturing technology including nondestructive examination of billets and components. Moreover, data shall be furnished to support design and licensing of graphite components for the MHTGR

  12. Study on the vibrational scraping of uranium product from a solid cathode of electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Young Ho; Hwang, Sung Chan; Lee, Han Soo; Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput electrorefiner has been developed for commercialization use by enhancing the uranium recovery from the reduced metal which is produced from the oxide reduction process. It is necessary to scrap and effectively collect uranium dendrites from the surface of the solid cathode for high yield. When a steel electrode is used as the cathode in the electrorefining process, uranium is deposited and regularly stuck to the steel cathode during electrorefining. The sticking coefficient of a steel cathode is very high. In order to decrease the sticking coefficient of the steel cathode effectively, vibration mode was applied to the electrode in this study. Uranium dendrites were scraped and fell apart from the steel cathode by a vibration force. The vibrational scraping of the steel cathode was compared to the self-scraping of the graphite cathode. Effects of the applied current density and the vibration stroke on the scraping of the uranium dendrites were also investigated.

  13. Hollow Cathode Studies for the Next Generation Ion Engines in JAXA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Yasushi; Hayakawa, Yukio; Yoshida, Hideki; Miyazaki, Katsuhiro; Kitamura, Shoji; Kajiwara, Kenichi

    The current status of experimental studies of hollow cathodes for the next-generation ion engines in the Aerospace Research and Development Directorate, JAXA is described. One of the topics on the hollow cathode studies is a life test of a discharge cathode. The keeper disk, orifice plate, and cathode tube of this discharge cathode are made of "high density graphite," which possesses much higher tolerance to ion impingement compared with conventional metal materials. The life test had started in March 2006 and the cumulative operation time reached 15,600 hours in April 2008. No severe degradation has been found both in the operation voltages and electrodes so far, and the test is favorably in progress. In addition to the life test of the discharge cathode, some experiments for design optimization of neutralizer cathodes have been performed. A life test of the neutralizer cathode is being started in June 2008.

  14. Fort St. Vrain graphite site mechanical separation concept selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the alternatives to the disposal of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor spent nuclear fuel involves the separation of the fuel rods composed of compacts from the graphite fuel block assembly. After the separation of these two components, the empty graphite fuel blocks would be disposed of as a low level waste (provided the appropriate requirements are met) and the fuel compacts would be treated as high level waste material. This report deals with the mechanical separation aspects concerning physical disassembly of the FSV graphite fuel element into the empty graphite fuel blocks and fuel compacts. This report recommends that a drilling technique is the preferred choice for accessing the, fuel channel holes and that each hole is drilled separately. This report does not cover any techniques or methods to separate the triso fuel particles from the graphite matrix of the fuel compacts

  15. Characteristics of first loaded IG-110 graphite in HTTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Satoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2006-10-01

    IG-110 graphite is a fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade graphite with excellent resistivity on both irradiation and corrosion and with high strength. The IG-110 graphite is used for the graphite components of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) such as fuel and control rod guide blocks and support posts. In order to design and fabricate the graphite components in the HTTR, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (the Japan Atomic Energy Agency at present) had established the graphite structural design code and design data on the basis of former research results. After the design code establishment, the IG-110 graphite components were fabricated and loaded in the HTTR core. This report summarized the characteristics of the first loaded IG-110 graphite as basic data for surveillance test, measuring material characteristics changed by neutron irradiation and oxidation. By comparing the design data, it was shown that the first loaded IG-110 graphite had excellent strength properties and enough safety margins to the stress limits in the design code. (author)

  16. Control rod drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akira.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure the scram operation of a control rod by the reliable detection for the position of control rods. Constitution: A permanent magnet is provided to the lower portion of a connecting rod in engagement with a control rod and a tube having a plurality of lead switches arranged axially therein in a predetermined pitch is disposed outside of the control rod drives. When the control rod moves upwardly in the scram operation, the lead switches are closed successively upon passage of the permanent magnet to operate the electrical circuit provided by way of each of the lead switches. Thus, the position for the control rod during the scram can reliably be determined and the scram characteristic of the control rod can be recognized. (Furukawa, Y.)

  17. INFLUENCES OF PH AND CURRENT ON ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE AT A GRANULAR-GRAPHITE PACKED ELECTRODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrolytic dechlorination using a granular-graphite packed cathode is an alternative method for the remediation of chlorinated organic compounds. Its effectiveness under various conditions needs experimental investigation. Dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) was conducted...

  18. Spatial distribution of bacterial communities on volumetric and planar anodes in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vargas, Ignacio T.; Albert, Istvan U.; Regan, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrosequencing was used to characterize bacterial communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells across a volumetric (graphite fiber brush) and a planar (carbon cloth) anode, where different physical and chemical gradients would be expected

  19. A experimental system for the checking of the absorption of E.C.A.G. graphite; Empilement pour le controle du graphite E.C.A.G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raievski, V; Vidal, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    A system is described for measuring the mean absorption cross section in thermal neutrons of graphite. This system consists of a graphite stack containing a Ra-Be source and a BF3 counter. A cavity in the stack receives the graphite to be studied or the graphite standard. By comparing the counting rates their absorption ratio can be deduced. The measurement is performed on graphite rods which have been machined before being placed in the pile. It provides the possibility of detecting over a batch of 1 ton of graphite, in a single measurement, a difference in absorption of 0.1 milli barn. (author) [French] On decrit un dispositif permettant de mesurer la section efficace moyenne d'absorption en neutrons thermiques du graphite. Ce dispositif est constitue par un empilement de graphite contenant une source de Ra-Be et un compteur a BF3. Une cavite menagee dans l'empilement peut recevoir le graphite a etudier ou le graphite etalon. Par comparaison des taux de comptage, on en deduit leur rapport d'absorption. La mesure est effectuee sur des barres de graphite usinees avant leur mise en place dans la pile. Elle permet de deceler sur un lot de graphite de 1 tonne, en une seule mesure, une difference d'absorption de 0,1 millibarn. (auteur)

  20. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  1. Control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    A reactor core, one or more control rods, and a control rod drive are described for selectively inserting and withdrawing the one or more control rods into and from the reactor core, which consists of: a support structure secured beneath the reactor core; control rod positioning means supported by the support structure for movably supporting the control rod for movement between a lower position wherein the control rod is located substantially beneath the reactor core and an upper position wherein at least an upper portion of the control rod extends into the reactor core; transmission means; primary drive means connected with the control rod positioning means by the transmission means for positioning the control rod under normal operating conditions; emergency drive means for moving the control rod from the lower position to the upper position under emergency conditions, the emergency drive means including a weight movable between an upper and a lower position, means for movably supporting the weight, and means for transmitting gravitational force exerted on the weight to the control rod positioning means to move the control rod upwardly when the weight is pulled downwardly by gravity; the transmission means connecting the control rod positioning means with the emergency drive means so that the primary drive means effects movement of the weight and the control rod in opposite directions under normal conditions, thus providing counterbalancing to reduce the force required for upward movement of the control rod under normal conditions; and restraint means for restraining the fall of the weight under normal operating conditions and disengaging the primary drive means to release the weight under emergency conditions

  2. Fuel rod leak detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womack, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of the invention detects leaking fuel rods by means of a radiation detector that measures the concentration of xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) within each individual rod. A collimated detector that provides signals related to the energy of incident radiation is aligned with one of the ends of a fuel rod. A statistically significant sample of the gamma radiation (γ-rays) that characterize 133 Xe is accumulated through the detector. The data so accumulated indicates the presence of a concentration of 133 Xe appropriate to a sound fuel rod, or a significantly different concentration that reflects a leaking fuel rod

  3. Joule heat generation in thermionic cathodes of high-pressure arc discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M. S.; Cunha, M. D. [Departamento de Fisica, CCCEE, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Municipio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2013-02-14

    The nonlinear surface heating model of plasma-cathode interaction in high-pressure arcs is extended to take into account the Joule effect inside the cathode body. Calculation results are given for different modes of current transfer to tungsten cathodes of different configurations in argon plasmas of atmospheric or higher pressures. Special attention is paid to analysis of energy balances of the cathode and the near-cathode plasma layer. In all the cases, the variation of potential inside the cathode is much smaller than the near-cathode voltage drop. However, this variation can be comparable to the volt equivalent of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode and then the Joule effect is essential. Such is the case of the diffuse and mixed modes on rod cathodes at high currents, where the Joule heating causes a dramatic change of thermal and electrical regimes of the cathode. The Joule heating has virtually no effect over characteristics of spots on rod and infinite planar cathodes.

  4. The use of graphite for the reduction of void reactivity in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B.J.; Kim, B.G.; Sim, K-S.

    1995-01-01

    Coolant void reactivity can be reduced by using burnable poison in CANDU reactors. The use of graphite in the fuel bundle is introduced to reduce coolant void reactivity by adding an appropriate amount of burnable poison in the central rod. This study shows that sufficiently low void reactivity which in controllable by Reactor Regulating System (RRS) can be achieved by using graphite used fuel with slightly enriched uranium. Zero void reactivity can be also obtained by using graphite used fuel with a large central rod. A new fuel bundle with graphite rods can substantially reduce the void reactivity with less burnup penalty compared to previously proposed low void reactivity fuel with depleted uranium. (author)

  5. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste

  6. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms at the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste

  7. Fission reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Tomoo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a control rod in a PWR type reactor. A control rod has an inner cladding tube and an outer cladding tube disposed coaxially, and a water draining hole is formed at the inside of the inner cladding tube. Neutron absorbers are filled in an annular gap between the outer cladding tube and the inner cladding tube. The water draining hole opens at the lower end thereof to the top end of the control rod and at the upper end thereof to the side of the upper end plug of the control rod. If the control rod is dropped to a control rod guide thimble for reactor scram, coolants from the control rod guide thimble are flown from the lower end of the water draining hole and discharged from the upper end passing through the water draining hole. In this way, water from the control rod guide thimble is removed easily when the control rod is dropped. Further, the discharging amount of water itself is reduced by the provision of the water draining hole. Accordingly, sufficient control rod dropping speed can be attained. (I.N.)

  8. Design of active-neutron fuel rod scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.

    1996-01-01

    An active-neutron fuel rod scanner has been designed for the assay of fissile materials in mixed oxide fuel rods. A 252 Cf source is located at the center of the scanner very near the through hole for the fuel rods. Spontaneous fission neutrons from the californium are moderated and induce fissions within the passing fuel rod. The rod continues past a combined gamma-ray and neutron shield where delayed gamma rays above 1 MeV are detected. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP to design the scanner and review optimum materials and geometries. An inhomogeneous beryllium, graphite, and polyethylene moderator has been designed that uses source neutrons much more efficiently than assay systems using polyethylene moderators. Layers of borated polyethylene and tungsten are used to shield the detectors. Large NaI(Tl) detectors were selected to measure the delayed gamma rays. The enrichment zones of a thermal reactor fuel pin could be measured to within 1% counting statistics for practical rod speeds. Applications of the rod scanner include accountability of fissile material for safeguards applications, quality control of the fissile content in a fuel rod, and the verification of reactivity potential for mixed oxide fuels. (orig.)

  9. Safety rod driving device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Kiyonobu; Kurosaki, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly insert safety rods for a criticality experiment device into a reactor core container to stop the criticality reaction thereby prevent reactivity accidents. Constitution: A cylinder device having a safety rod as a cylinder rod attached with a piston at one end is constituted. The piston is elevated by pressurized air and attracted and fixed by an electromagnet which is a stationary device disposed at the upper portion of the cylinder. If the current supply to the electromagnet is disconnected, the safety rod constituting the cylinder rod is fallen together with the piston to the lower portion of the cylinder. Since the cylinder rod driving device has neither electrical motor nor driving screw as in the conventional device, necessary space can be reduced and the weight is decreased. In addition, since the inside of the nuclear reactor can easily be shielded completely from the external atmosphere, leakage of radioactive materials can be prevented. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. TAPIR, Thermal Analysis of HTGR with Graphite Sleeve Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weicht, U.; Mueller, W.

    1983-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: Thermal analysis of a reactor core containing internally and/or externally gas cooled prismatic fuel elements of various geometries, rating, power distribution, and material properties. 2 - Method of solution: A fuel element in this programme is regarded as a sector of a fuelled annulus with graphite sleeves of any shape on either side and optional annular gaps between fuel and graphite and/or within the graphite. It may have any centre angle and the fuelled annulus may become a solid cylindrical rod. Heat generation in the fuel is assumed to be uniform over the cross section and peripheral heat flux into adjacent sectors is ignored. Fuel elements and coolant channels are treated separately, then linked together to fit a specified pattern. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of: 50 fuel elements; 50 cooled channels; 25 fuel geometries; 25 coolant channel geometries; 10 axial power distributions; 10 graphite conductivities

  11. Status of rod consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1985-04-01

    Two of the factors that need to be taken into account with rod consolidation are (1) the effects on rods from their removal from the fuel assembly and (2) the effects on rods as a result of the consolidation process. Potential components of both factors are described in the report. Discussed under (1) are scratches on the fuel rod surfaces, rod breakage, crud, extended burnup, and possible cladding embrittlement due to hydrogen injection at BWRs. Discussed under (2) are the increased water temperature (less than 10 0 C) because of closer packing of the rods, formation of crevices between rods in the close-packed mode, contact with dissimilar metals, and the potential for rapid heating of fuel rods following the loss of water from a spent fuel storage pool. Another factor that plays an important role in rod consolidation is the cost of disposal of the nonfuel-bearing components of the fuel assembly. Also, the dose rate from the components - especially Inconel spacer grids - can affect the handling procedures. Several licensing issues that exist are described. A list of recommendations is provided. 98 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Raw materials for reflector graphite (for reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, G.; Mindermann, D.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing concept for the core components of German high temperature reactor (HTR) types of graphite was previously entirely directed to the use of German tar coke (St coke). As the plants for producing this material no longer complied technically with the current environmental protection requirements, one had to assume that they would soon be shut down. To prevent bottlenecks in the erection of future HTR plants, alternative cokes produced by modern processes by Japanese manufacturers were checked for their suitability for the manufacture of reactor graphite. This report describes the investigations carried out on these materials from the safe delayed coking process. The project work, apart from analysis of the main data of the candidate coke considered, included the processing of the raw materials into directly and secondarily extruded graphite rods on the laboratory scale, including characterisation. As the results show, the material data achieved with the previous raw material can be reproduced with Japanese St coke. The tar coke LPC-A from the Nippon Steel Chemical Co., Ltd was decided on as the new standard coke for manufacturing reflector graphite. (orig.) With 15 tabs., 2 figs [de

  13. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  14. Graphite Recycling from Spent Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermel, Sergej; Evertz, Marco; Kasnatscheew, Johannes; Qi, Xin; Grützke, Martin; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2016-12-20

    The present work reports on challenges in utilization of spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs)-an increasingly important aspect associated with a significantly rising demand for electric vehicles (EVs). In this context, the feasibility of anode recycling in combination with three different electrolyte extraction concepts is investigated. The first method is based on a thermal treatment of graphite without electrolyte recovery. The second method additionally utilizes a subcritical carbon-dioxide (subcritical CO 2 )-assisted electrolyte extraction prior to thermal treatment. And the final investigated approach uses supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2 ) as extractant, subsequently followed by the thermal treatment. It is demonstrated that the best performance of recycled graphite anodes can be achieved when electrolyte extraction is performed using subcritical CO 2 . Comparative studies reveal that, in the best case, the electrochemical performance of recycled graphite exceeds the benchmark consisting of a newly synthesized graphite anode. As essential efforts towards electrolyte extraction and cathode recycling have been made in the past, the electrochemical behavior of recycled graphite, demonstrating the best performance, is investigated in combination with a recycled LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 cathode. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  16. Control rod shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Higashigawa, Yuichi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a control rod terminating system in a BWR type nuclear power plant, which stops an induction electric motor as rapidly as possible to terminate the control rods. Namely, the control rod stopping system controls reactor power by inserting/withdrawing control rods into a reactor by driving them by the induction electric motor. The system is provided with a control device for controlling the control rods and a control device for controlling the braking device. The control device outputs a braking operation signal for actuating the braking device during operation of the control rods to stop the operation of the control rods. Further, the braking device has at least two kinds of breaks, namely, a first and a second brakes. The two kinds of brakes are actuated by receiving the brake operation signals at different timings. The brake device is used also for keeping the control rods after the stopping. Even if a stopping torque of each of the breaks is small, different two kinds of brakes are operated at different timings thereby capable of obtaining a large stopping torque as a total. (I.S.)

  17. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatsugi, Masao.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To secure the reactor operation safety by the provision of a fluid pressure detecting section for control rod driving fluid and a control rod interlock at the midway of the flow pass for supplying driving fluid to the control rod drives. Constitution: Between a driving line and a direction control valve are provided a pressure detecting portion, an alarm generating device, and a control rod inhibition interlock. The driving fluid from a driving fluid source is discharged by way of a pump and a manual valve into the reactor in which the control rods and reactor fuels are contained. In addition, when the direction control valve is switched and the control rods are inserted and extracted by the control rod drives, the pressure in the driving line is always detected by the pressure detection section, whereby if abnormal pressure is resulted, the alarm generating device is actuated to warn the abnormality and the control rod inhibition interlock is actuated to lock the direction control valve thereby secure the safety operation of the reactor. (Seki, T.)

  18. Why Rods and Cocci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacteria exhibit a wide variety of shapes but the commonly studied species of bacteria are generally either spherical in shape which are called cocci (singular coccus) or have a cylindrical shape and are called rods or bacilli (singular bacillus). In reality rods and cocci are the ends of a continuum. Sonle of the cocci are.

  19. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonuki, Koji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the driving speed of control rods at rapid insertion with an elongate control rod and an extension pipe while ensuring sufficient buffering performance in a short buffering distance, by providing a plurality of buffers to an extension pipe between a control rod drive source and a control rod in LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: First, second and third buffers are respectively provided to an acceleration piston, an extension pipe and a control rod respectively and the insertion positions for each of the buffers are displaced orderly from above to below. Upon disconnection of energizing current for an electromagnet, the acceleration piston, the extension pipe and the control rod are rapidly inserted in one body. The first, second and third buffers are respectively actuated at each of their falling strokes upon rapid insertion respectively, and the acceleration piston, the extension pipe and the control rod receive the deceleration effect in the order correspondingly. Although the compression force is applied to the control rod only near the stroke end, it does not cause deformation. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Failed fuel rod detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Katsuya; Matsuda, Yasuhiko

    1984-05-02

    The purpose of the project is to enable failed fuel rod detection simply with no requirement for dismantling the fuel assembly. A gamma-ray detection section is arranged so as to attend on the optional fuel rods in the fuel assembly. The fuel assembly is adapted such that a gamma-ray shielding plate is detachably inserted into optional gaps of the fuel rods or, alternatively, the fuel assembly can detachably be inserted to the gamma-ray shielding plate. In this way, amount of gaseous fission products accumulated in all of the plenum portions in the fuel rods as the object of the measurement can be determined without dismantling the fuel assembly. Accordingly, by comparing the amounts of the gaseous fission products, the failed fuel rod can be detected.

  1. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  2. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  3. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  4. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  5. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  6. Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: → Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. → The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. → A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. → The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

  7. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroyasu.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable rapid control in a simple circuit by providing a motor control device having an electric capacity capable of simultaneously driving all of the control rods rapidly only in the inserting direction as well as a motor controlling device capable of fine control for the insertion and extraction at usual operation. Constitution: The control rod drives comprise a first motor control device capable of finely controlling the control rods both in inserting and extracting directions, a second motor control device capable of rapidly driving the control rods only in the inserting direction, and a first motor switching circuit and a second motor switching circuit switched by switches. Upon issue of a rapid insertion instruction for the control rods, the second motor switching circuit is closed by the switch and the second motor control circuit and driving motors are connected. Thus, each of the control rod driving motors is driven at a high speed in the inserting direction to rapidly insert all of the control rods. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. Multiple fuel rod gripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus is described for gripping an array of rods comprising: (a) gripping members grippingly engageable with the rods, each of which has a hollow portion terminating in an open end for receiving the end of one of the rods; (b) a closing means for causing the hollow portion of each of the gripping members to apply substantially the same gripping force onto the end of its respective rod, including (i) a locking plate having a plurality of tapered holes registrable with the array of rods, wherein the exterior of each of the gripping members is tapered and nested within one of the tapered holes, (ii) a withdrawing means having a hydraulic plunger operatively connected to each of the gripping members for applying a substantially identical withdrawing force on each of the gripping members, whereby the hollow portion of each of the gripping members applies substantially the same gripping force on its respective rod, and (c) means for detecting whether each of the gripping members has grippingly engaged its respective rod

  9. Fuel rod technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezold, H.; Romeiser, H.J.

    1979-07-01

    By extensive mechanization and automation of the fuel rod production, also at increasing production numbers, an efficient production shall be secured, simultaneously corresponding to the high quality standard of the fuel rods. The works done up to now concentrated on the lay out of a rough concept for a mechanized production course. Detail-studies were made for the problems of fuel rod humidity, filling and resistance welding. Further promotion of this project and thus further report will be stopped, since the main point of these works is the production technique. (orig.) [de

  10. Control rod testing apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaunt, R.R.; Ashman, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod testing apparatus is described comprising: a first guide means having a vertical cylindrical opening for grossly guiding a control rod; a second guide means having a vertical cylindrical opening for grossly guiding a control rod. The first and second guide means are supported at axially spaced locations with the openings coaxial; and a substantially cylindrical subassembly having a vertical cylindrical opening therethrough. The subassembly is trapped coaxial with and between the first and second guide means, and the subassembly radially floats with respect to the first and second guide means

  11. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  12. The experimental development and performance test of the pneumatic control-rod drive for the THTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.; Boehlo, D.; Heim, H.; Kleine-Tebbe, A.

    1976-01-01

    Reactor control and shutdown of the THTR is accomplished by two independent systems, the first consisting of 36 absorber rods penetrating the graphite reflector region surrounding the core, the second consisting of 42 absorber rods that insert directly into the pebble bed core. This paper describes the design development and testing of the pneumatic rod drives used for movement of the 42 core control rods. The core control rods have two functions: the first, for reactor safety purposes, provides for adequate safe shutdown of the reactor under cold conditions; the second, for operational purposes, provides for compensation of slow changes in reactivity. The safety and operational functions for each absorber rod are respectively carried out by a long-stroke-piston pneumatic drive and by a stepping-piston pneumatic drive, both of these independent, helium-driven drives being incorporated in the rod drive unit for each control rod. To study the performance of the rod drive, a complete prototype control rod and rod drive unit was built and tested under simulated reactor operational conditions. Operational experience under helium temperatures and pressures was gained and the drives were tested under stress and simulated accident conditions. The reliability of this system has been demonstrated to licensing authorities and to the customer. The programme will be completed with the commissioning tests of drives for the THTR-300 reactor. (author)

  13. Comparison of analytical possibilities of inversion voltammetry of tellurium with cathodic and anodic potential scanning taking layer-by-layer analysis of GaAs-Te films as example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplin, A.A.; Portnyagina, Eh.O.; Gridaev, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    Possibility of application in analytical purposes of the process of tellurium precipitation electrosolution from the surfaces of graphite and mercury-graphite electrodes at the cathode scanning of the potential is shown. As a result of comparison of direct and inversion scanning with cathodic and anodic scanning of the potential, variants of voltammetric method of tellurium determination in artificial solutions and, taking the developed method of layer-by-layer analysis of the GaAsTe films as an example, advantage of mercury-graphite electrode with cathodic scanning as compared to graphite electrode with cathode scanning of the potential is shown. Reproducibility of the GaAs film analysis results according to anodic and cathodic tellurium peaks is satisfactory. Maximum deviation from the results of analysis of oxidation peaks and tellurium peduction does not exceed 15 rel. %. Thus, for tellurium concentrations, exceeding 5x10 -6 g-ion/l, both anodic and cathodic scanning of the potential can be used, though error in tellurium determination according to cathodic peaks is 1.5-2.0 times higher. At tellurium amounts lower 5x10 -6 g-ion/l the determination should be carried out according to the peaks of tellurium anodic oxidation from the surface of graphite electrode or according to the peaks of tellurium cathodic reduction from the surface of mercury-graphite electrode

  14. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs

  15. Burnable poison rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsume, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the effect of water elimination and the effect of burn-up residue boron, thereby reduce the effect of burnable poison rods as the neutron poisons at the final stage of reactor core lifetime. Constitution: In a burnable poison rod according to the present invention, a hollow burnable poison material is filled in an external fuel can, an inner fuel can mounted with a carbon rod is inserted to the hollow portion of the burnable poison material and helium gases are charged in the outer fuel can. In such a burnable poison rod, the reactivity worths after the burning are reduced to one-half as compared with the conventional case. Accordingly, since the effect of the burnable poison as the neutron poisons is reduced at the final stage of the reactor core of lifetime, the excess reactivity of the reactor core is increased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  17. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  18. Utilization of carbon/carbon composites in nuclear simulation fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polidoro, H.A.; Otani, S.; Rezende, M.C.; Ferreira, S.R.; Otani, C.

    1988-01-01

    Thermo-hydraulic problems, in nuclear plants are normally analysed by using electrically heated rods. Carbon/carbon composites were used to make heating elements for testing by indirect heating up to a heat flux of 100 W/cm 2 . It is easy to verify that this value can be exceed if the choice of the complementary materials for insulator and cladding were improved. The swaging process used to reduce the cladding diameter prevented the fabrication of graphite heater rods. (author) [pt

  19. Control rod driving mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooshima, Yoshio.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To perform reliable scram operation, even if abnormality should occur in a system instructing scram operation in FBR type reactors. Constitution: An aluminum alloy member to be melt at a predetermined temperature (about 600sup(o)C) is disposed to a connection part between a control rod and a driving mechanism, whereby the control rod is detached from the driving mechanism and gravitationally fallen to the reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  20. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroyasu; Kawamura, Atsuo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce pellet-clad mechanical interactions, as well as improve the fuel safety. Constitution: In the rod drive of a bwr type reactor, an electric motor operated upon intermittent input such as of pulse signals is connected to a control rod. A resolver for converting the rotational angle of the motor to electric signals is connected to the rotational shaft of the motor and the phase difference between the output signal from the resolver and a reference signal is adapted to detect by a comparator. Based on the detection result, the controller is actuated to control a motor for control rod drive so that fine control for the movement of the control rod is made possible. This can reduce the moving distance of the control rod, decrease the thermal stress applied to the control rod and decrease the pellet clad mechanical interaction failures due to thermal expansion between the cladding tube and the pellets caused by abrupt changes in the generated power. (Furukawa, Y.)

  1. Control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Tetsuro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a simple and economical control rod drive using a control circuit requiring no pulse circuit. Constitution: Control rods in a BWR type reactor are driven by hydraulic pressure and inserted or withdrawn in the direction of applying the hydraulic pressure. The direction of the hydraulic pressure is controlled by a direction control valve. Since the driving for the control rod is extremely important in view of the operation, a self diagnosis function is disposed for rapid inspection of possible abnormality. In the present invention, two driving contacts are disposed each by one between the both ends of a solenoid valve of the direction control valve for driving the control rod and the driving power source, and diagnosis is conducted by alternately operating them. Therefore, since it is only necessary that the control circuit issues a driving instruction only to one of the two driving contacts, the pulse circuit is no more required. Further, since the control rod driving is conducted upon alignment of the two driving instructions, the reliability of the control rod drive can be improved. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Method of inserting fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimoto, Shuji; Imoo, Makoto; Tsuchida, Kenji.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of inserting a fuel rod upon automatic assembling, automatic dismantling and reassembling of a fuel assembly in a light water moderated reactor, as well as a device and components used therefor. That is, a fuel rod is inserted reliably to an aimed point of insertion by surrounding the periphery of the fuel rod to be inserted with guide rods, and thereby suppressing the movement of the fuel rod during insertion. Alternatively, a fuel rod is inserted reliably to a point of insertion by inserting guide rods at the periphery of the point of insertion for the fuel rod to be inserted thereby surrounding the point of insertion with the guide rods or fuel rods. By utilizing fuel rods already present in the fuel assembly as the guide rods described above, the fuel rod can be inserted reliably to the point of insertion with no additional devices. Dummy fuel rods are previously inserted in a fuel assembly which are then utilized as the above-mentioned guide rods to accurately insert the fuel rod to the point of insertion. (I.S.)

  3. A Physically-Based Equivalent Circuit Model for the Impedance of a LiFePO4/Graphite 26650 Cylindrical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scipioni, Roberto; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Graves, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    In this work an Equivalent Circuit Model (ECM) is developed and used to model impedance spectra measured on a commercial 26650 LiFePO4/Graphite cylindrical cell. The ECM is based on measurements and modeling of impedance spectra recorded separately on cathode (LiFePO4) and anode (Graphite) samples...

  4. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  5. Control rod velocity limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Carruth, J.C.; Dixon, R.C.; Spencer, S.S.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a velocity control arrangement for a reciprocable, vertically oriented control rod for use in a nuclear reactor in a fluid medium, the control rod including a drive hub secured to and extending from one end therefrom. The control device comprises: a toroidally shaped control member spaced from and coaxially positioned around the hub and secured thereto by a plurality of spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the toroidal member spaced therefrom in coaxial position. The side of the control member toward the control rod has a smooth generally conical surface. The side of the control member away from the control rod is formed with a concave surface constituting a single annular groove. The device also comprises inner and outer annular vanes radially spaced from one another and spaced from the side of the control member away from the control rod and positioned coaxially around and spaced from the hub and secured thereto by spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the vanes. The vanes are angled toward the control member, the outer edge of the inner vane being closer to the control member and the inner edge of the outer vane being closer to the control member. When the control rod moves in the fluid in the direction toward the drive hub the vanes direct a flow of fluid turbulence which provides greater resistance to movement of the control rod in the direction toward the drive hub than in the other direction

  6. Characterization of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode by addition of graphene for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honggowiranto, Wagiyo, E-mail: wagiyo@batan.go.id; Kartini, Evvy, E-mail: kartini@batan.go.id [Center for Science and Technology Advanced Materials, National Nuclear Energy Agency Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The improvement of LiFePO{sub 4} (LFP) cathode performance has been performed by addition of Graphene (LFP+Graphene). The cathode was prepared from the active material with 5 wt % graphene and 10 wt % polyvinylidene fluoride in an n-methyl pyrrolidone solvent. Another cathode material used only 5% artificial graphite for comparison (LFP+Graphite). The crystal structure, microstructure, electronic conductivity, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of the cathodes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and Impedance spectroscopy, respectively. Two half cell coin batteries were assembled using a lithium metal as an anode and LiPf{sub 6} as an electrolyte, and two cathodes (LFP+Graphene) and (LFP+Graphite). Charge discharge performance of battery was characterized by Battery analyser (BTS 8). The electronic conductivity of cathode with grapheme increased of about one order magnitude compared with the only cathode with graphite, namely from 1.97E-7S/cm (LFP+Graphite) to 1.92E-6S/cm (LFP+Graphene). The charge-discharge capacity after 10{sup th} cycles of LiFePO{sub 4} with graphene decreased of about 0.68% from 114.3 mAh/g to113.1 mAh/g, while LFP with graphite decreased of about 2.84% from 110.2 mAh/g to 107.1 mAh, at 0.1C-rates. It could be concluded that the addition of graphene has increased the ionic conductivity, and improved performance of the LFP lithium ion battery, such as higher capacity and better efficiency.

  7. Solvents effects on electrochemical characteristics of graphite fluoride-lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobuatsu, W.; Hidekazu, T.; Rika, H.; Tsuyoshi, N.

    1982-11-01

    A study was made of the electrochemical characteristics of graphite fluoride-lithium batteries in various non-aqueous solvents. Two types of graphite fluorides (C/sub 2/F) /SUB n/ and (CF) /SUB n/ were used as cathode materials. The discharge characteristics of graphite fluorides were better in dimethylsulfoxide, ..gamma..-butyrolactone, propylene carbonate and sulfolane in that order. The relation between electrod potential of graphite fluoride and solvation energy of lithium ion with each solvent indicates that solvated lithium ion is intercalated into graphite fluoride layers by the electrode reaction. Both the difference in the overpotentials and in the rates of OCV recovery among these solvents further supports the proposed reaction mechanism.

  8. A High Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitor with Both Electrodes Prepared from Sri Lanka Graphite Ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Changzhen; Yu, Xiaoliang; Liang, Qinghua; Lv, Ruitao; Gai, Guosheng; Shen, Wanci; Kang, Feiyu; Huang, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-14

    The natural Sri Lanka graphite (vein graphite) is widely-used as anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), due to its high crystallinity and low cost. In this work, graphitic porous carbon (GPC) and high-purity vein graphite (PVG) were prepared from Sri Lanka graphite ore by KOH activation, and high temperature purification, respectively. Furthermore, a lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is fabricated with GPC as cathode, and PVG as anode. The assembled GPC//PVG LIC shows a notable electrochemical performance with a maximum energy density of 86 W·h·kg -1 at 150 W·kg -1 , and 48 W·h·kg -1 at a high-power density of 7.4 kW·kg -1 . This high-performance LIC based on PVG and GPC is believed to be promising for practical applications, due to its low-cost raw materials and industrially feasible production.

  9. Potassium-Based Dual Ion Battery with Dual-Graphite Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ling; Liu, Qian; Chen, Suhua; Lin, Kairui; Xu, Zhi; Lu, Bingan

    2017-08-01

    A potassium ion battery has potential applications for large scale electric energy storage systems due to the abundance and low cost of potassium resources. Dual graphite batteries, with graphite as both anode and cathode, eliminate the use of transition metal compounds and greatly lower the overall cost. Herein, combining the merits of the potassium ion battery and dual graphite battery, a potassium-based dual ion battery with dual-graphite electrode is developed. It delivers a reversible capacity of 62 mA h g -1 and medium discharge voltage of ≈3.96 V. The intercalation/deintercalation mechanism of K + and PF 6 - into/from graphite is proposed and discussed in detail, with various characterizations to support. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Characterisation of Plasma Filled Rod Pinch electron beam diode operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The plasma filled rod pinch diode (aka PFRP) offers a small radiographic spot size and a high brightness source. It operates in a very similar to plasma opening switches and dense plasma focus devices - with a plasma prefill, supplied via a number of simple coaxial plasma guns, being snowploughed along a thin rod cathode, before detaching at the end. The aim of this study is to model the PFRP and understand the factors that affect its performance, potentially improving future output. Given the dependence on the PFRP on the prefill, we are making detailed measurements of the density (1015-1018 cm-3), velocity, ionisation and temperature of the plasma emitted from a plasma gun/set of plasma guns. This will then be used to provide initial conditions to the Gorgon 3D MHD code, and the dynamics of the entire rod pinch process studied.

  11. Cation-substituted spinel oxide and oxyfluoride cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Choi, Wonchang

    2010-05-18

    The present invention includes compositions and methods of making cation-substituted and fluorine-substituted spinel cathode compositions by firing a LiMn2-y-zLiyMzO4 oxide with NH4HF2 at low temperatures of between about 300 and 700.degree. C. for 2 to 8 hours and a .eta. of more than 0 and less than about 0.50, mixed two-phase compositions consisting of a spinel cathode and a layered oxide cathode, and coupling them with unmodified or surface modified graphite anodes in lithium ion cells.

  12. Control rod housing alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.C.; Deaver, G.A.; Punches, J.R.; Singleton, G.E.; Erbes, J.G.; Offer, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a process for measuring the vertical alignment between a hole in a core plate and the top of a corresponding control rod drive housing within a boiling water reactor. It comprises: providing an alignment apparatus. The alignment apparatus including a lower end for fitting to the top of the control rod drive housing; an upper end for fitting to the aperture in the core plate, and a leveling means attached to the alignment apparatus to read out the difference in angularity with respect to gravity, and alignment pin registering means for registering to the alignment pin on the core plate; lowering the alignment device on a depending support through a lattice position in the top guide through the hole in the core plate down into registered contact with the top of the control rod drive housing; registering the upper end to the sides of the hole in the core plate; registering the alignment pin registering means to an alignment pin on the core plate to impart to the alignment device the required angularity; and reading out the angle of the control rod drive housing with respect to the hole in the core plate through the leveling devices whereby the angularity of the top of the control rod drive housing with respect to the hole in the core plate can be determined

  13. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  14. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Hiromitsu.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To drive control rods at an optimum safety speed corresponding to the reactor core output. Constitution: The reactor power is detected by a neutron detector and the output signal is applied to a process computer. The process computer issues a signal representing the reactor core output, which is converted through a function generator into a signal representing the safety speed of control rods. The converted signal is further supplied to a V/F converter and converted into a pulse signal. The pulse signal is inputted to a step motor driving circuit, which actuates a step motor to operate the control rods always at a safety speed corresponding to the reactor core power. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Hydraulically centered control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlacher, W.R.; Sampson, W.T.; Schukei, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A control rod suspended to reciprocate in a guide tube of a nuclear fuel assembly has a hydraulic bearing formed at its lower tip. The bearing includes a plurality of discrete pockets on its outer surface into which a flow of liquid is continuously provided. In one embodiment the flow is induced by the pressure head in a downward facing chamber at the end of the bearing. In another embodiment the flow originates outside the guide tube. In both embodiments the flow into the pockets produces pressure differences across the bearing which counteract forces tending to drive the rod against the guide tube wall. Thus contact of the rod against the guide tube is avoided

  17. Control rod control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiji, Takehiko; Obara, Kohei; Yanagihashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device suitable for switching of electric motors for driving each of control rods in a nuclear reactor. Namely, in a control rod controlling device, a plurality of previously allotted electric motors connected in parallel as groups, and electric motors of any selected group are driven. In this case, a voltage of not driving predetermined selected electric motors is at first applied. In this state an electric current supplied to the circuit of predetermined electric motors is detected. Whether integration or failure of a power source and the circuit of the predetermined electric motors are normal or not is judged by the detected electric current supplied. After they are judged normal, the electric motors are driven by a regular voltage. With such procedures, whether the selected circuit is normal or not can be accurately confirmed previously. Since the electric motors are not driven just at the selected time, the control rods are not operated erroneously. (I.S.)

  18. Sucker rod motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzalov, N N; Radzhabov, N A

    1983-01-01

    The motor consists of rollers mounted on the wellmouth and connected by a flexible rink. Reciprocating mechanism is in the form of a horizontal non-mobile single-side operation cylinder, inside which a plunger and rod are mounted. The working housing of the hydrocylinder is connected to a gas-hydr aulic batter, and when running is connected via plunger to the high pressure source; running in reverse it is connected with a safety valve and automatic control unit. The unit is equipped with a reducer and a mechanical transformer consisting of screw and nut, and which is shutoff with a single-side lining. The plunger rod consists of an auger-like unit. The high pressure source is provided by the injection line of the sucker rod that has been equipped with a reverse valve.

  19. Burnable poison rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsume, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the reactor core lifetime by decreasing the effect of neutron absorption of burnable poison rods by using material with less neutron absorbing effect. Constitution: Stainless steels used so far as the coating material for burnable poison rods have relatively great absorption in the thermal neutral region and are not preferred in view of the neutron economy. Burnable poison rods having fuel can made of zirconium alloy shows absorption the thermal neutron region lower by one digit than that of stainless steels but they shows absorption in the resonance region and the cost is higher. In view of the above, the fuel can of the burnable poison material is made of aluminum or aluminu alloy. This can reduce the neutron absorbing effect by stainless steel fuel can and effectively utilize neutrons that have been wastefully absorbed and consumed in stainless steels. (Takahashi, M.)

  20. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  1. Graphite reactor physics; Physique des piles a graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Noc, B [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The study of graphite-natural uranium power reactor physics, undertaken ten years ago when the Marcoule piles were built, has continued to keep in step with the development of this type of pile. From 1960 onwards the critical facility Marius has been available for a systematic study of the properties of lattices as a function of their pitch, of fuel geometry and of the diameter of cooling channels. This study has covered a very wide field: lattice pitch varying from 19 to 38 cm. uranium rods and tubes of cross-sections from 6 to 35 cm{sup 2}, channels with diameters between 70 and 140 mm. The lattice calculation methods could thus be checked and where necessary adapted. The running of the Marcoule piles and the experiments carried out on them during the last few years have supplied valuable information on the overall evolution of the neutronic properties of the fuel as a function of irradiation. More detailed experiments have also been performed in Marius with plutonium-containing fuels (irradiated or synthetic fuels), and will be undertaken at the beginning of 1965 at high temperature in the critical facility Cesar, which is just being completed at Cadarache. Spent fuel analyses complement these results and help in their interpretation. The thermalization and spectra theories developed in France can thus be verified over the whole valid temperature range. The efficiency of control rods as a function of their dimensions, the materials of which they are made and the lattices surrounding them has been measured in Marius, and the results compared with calculation on the one hand and with the measurements carried out in EDF 1 on the other. Studies on the control proper of graphite piles were concerned essentially with the risks of spatial instability and the means of detecting and controlling them, and with flux distortions caused by the control rods. (authors) [French] Entreprise il y a dix ans a l'occasion de la construction des piles de Marcoule, l'etude de la

  2. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  3. Direct regeneration of recycled cathode material mixture from scrapped LiFePO4 batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelei; Zhang, Jin; Song, Dawei; Song, Jishun; Zhang, Lianqi

    2017-03-01

    A new green recycling process (named as direct regeneration process) of cathode material mixture from scrapped LiFePO4 batteries is designed for the first time. Through this direct regeneration process, high purity cathode material mixture (LiFePO4 + acetylene black), anode material mixture (graphite + acetylene black) and other by-products (shell, Al foil, Cu foil and electrolyte solvent, etc.) are recycled from scrapped LiFePO4 batteries with high yield. Subsequently, recycled cathode material mixture without acid leaching is further directly regenerated with Li2CO3. Direct regeneration procedure of recycled cathode material mixture from 600 to 800 °C is investigated in detail. Cathode material mixture regenerated at 650 °C display excellent physical, chemical and electrochemical performances, which meet the reuse requirement for middle-end Li-ion batteries. The results indicate the green direct regeneration process with low-cost and high added-value is feasible.

  4. Flow in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, G.; Mayer, G.

    2005-01-01

    For power upgrading VVER-440 reactors we need to know exactly how the temperature measured by the thermocouples is related to the average outlet temperature of the fuel assemblies. Accordingly, detailed knowledge on mixing process in the rod bundles and in the fuel assembly head have great importance. Here we study the hydrodynamics of rod bundles based on the results of direct numerical and large eddy simulation of flows in subchannels. It is shown that secondary flow and flow pulsation phenomena can be observed using both methodologies. Some consequences of these observations are briefly discussed. (author)

  5. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  6. Device for coupling a control rod and control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To obtain simple and reliable coupling between a control rod and control rod drive by equipping the lower end of the control rod with an extension provided with lateral protuberances and forming the upper end of an index tube with a recess provided with lateral holes. Structure: The tapering central extension of the control rod is inserted into the recess by lowering the control rod, and then it is further inserted by causing frictional movement of the inclined surfaces of lateral protuberances in frictional contact with guide surfaces. When the lateral protuberances are brought into contact with a stepped portion, the control rod is rotated to fit the lateral protuberances into the lateral holes. In this way, the control rod is coupled to the index tube of the control rod drive. (Yoshino, Y.)

  7. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  8. Material and Energy Flows in the Production of Cathode and Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; James, Christine [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Dept.; Gaines, Linda G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Gallagher, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2014-09-30

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model has been expanded to include four new cathode materials that can be used in the analysis of battery-powered vehicles: lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide (LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2 [NMC]), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4 [LFP]), lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2 [LCO]), and an advanced lithium cathode (0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.44Co0.25Mn0.31O2 [LMR-NMC]). In GREET, these cathode materials are incorporated into batteries with graphite anodes. In the case of the LMR-NMC cathode, the anode is either graphite or a graphite-silicon blend. This report documents the material and energy flows of producing each of these cathode and anode materials from raw material extraction through the preparation stage. For some cathode materials, we considered solid state and hydrothermal preparation methods. Further, we used Argonne National Laboratory’s Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model to determine battery composition (e.g., masses of cathode, anode, electrolyte, housing materials) when different cathode materials were used in the battery. Our analysis concluded that cobalt- and nickel-containing compounds are the most energy intensive to produce.

  9. Material and Energy Flows in the Production of Cathode and Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); James, Christine [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Gaines, Linda [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gallagher, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dai, Qiang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kelly, Jarod C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model has been expanded to include four new cathode materials that can be used in the analysis of battery-powered vehicles: lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide (LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2 [NMC]), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4 [LFP]), lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2 [LCO]), and an advanced lithium cathode (0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.44Co0.25Mn0.31O2 [LMR-NMC]). In GREET, these cathode materials are incorporated into batteries with graphite anodes. In the case of the LMR-NMC cathode, the anode is either graphite or a graphite-silicon blend. Lithium metal is also an emerging anode material. This report documents the material and energy flows of producing each of these cathode and anode materials from raw material extraction through the preparation stage. For some cathode materials, we considered solid state and hydrothermal preparation methods. Further, we used Argonne National Laboratory’s Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model to determine battery composition (e.g., masses of cathode, anode, electrolyte, housing materials) when different cathode materials were used in the battery. Our analysis concluded that cobalt- and nickel-containing compounds are the most energy intensive to produce.

  10. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  11. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  12. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikakura, Hiroaki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to direct disconnection of control rods upon abnormal temperature rise in the reactor thereby improve the reliability for the disconnecting operation in control rod drives for FBR type reactors upon emergency. Constitution: A diaphragm is disposed to the upper opening of a sealing vessel inserted to the hollow portion of an electromagnet and a rod is secured to the central position of the upper surface. A spring contacts are attached by way of an insulator to the inner surface at the lower portion of an extension pipe and connected with cables for supplying electric power sources respectively to a magnet. If the temperature in the reactor abnormally rises, liquid metals in the sealing vessel are expanded tending to extend the bellows downwardly. However, since they are attracted by the electromagnet, the thermal expansion of the liquid metals exert on the diaphragm prior to the bellows. Thus, the switch between the spring contacts is made open to attain the deenergized state to thereby disconnect the control rod and shutdown the neclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Control rod drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsuyuki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To restrict the reduction in performance due to stress corrosion cracks by making use of condensate produced in a turbine steam condenser. Structure: Water produced in a turbine steam condenser is forced into a condensed water desalting unit by low pressure condensate pump. The condensate is purified and then forced by a high pressure condensate pump into a feedwater heater for heating before it is returned to the reactor by a feedwater pump. Part of the condensate issuing from the condensate desalting unit is branched from the remaining portion at a point upstream the pump and is withdrawn into a control rod drive water pump after passing through a motordriven bypass valve, an orifice and a condenser water level control valve, is pressurized in the control rod drive water desalting unit and supplied to a control rod drive water pressure system. The control rod is vertically moved by the valve operation of the water pressure system. Since water of high oxygen concentration does not enter during normal operation, it is possible to prevent the stress cracking of the stainless steel apparatus. (Nakamura, S.)

  14. Trunnion Rod Microcrack Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Richard W. Haskins, Joseph A. Padula , and John E. Hite BACKGROUND: Post-tensioned rods are used to anchor spillway gates and transfer the forces...email: James.A.Evans@usace.army.mil). This technical note should be cited as follows: Evans, J. A., Haskins, R. W., Padula , J. A., and Hite, J. E. 2013

  15. Cathode materials review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  16. Cathode materials review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO 2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research

  17. Cathode materials review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  18. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  19. Rod-pinch diode operation at 2 to 4 MV for high resolution pulsed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, F.C.; Commisso, R.J.; Allen, R.J.; Mosher, D.; Swanekamp, S.B.; Cooperstein, G.; Bayol, F.; Charre, P.; Garrigues, A.; Gonzales, C.; Pompier, F.; Vezinet, R.

    2002-01-01

    The rod-pinch diode is operated successfully at peak voltages of 2.4-4.4 MV for peak electrical currents of 55-135 kA delivered to the diode. At 4 MV, tungsten anode rods of 1 or 2 mm diam produce on-axis doses at 1 m of 16 rad(Si) or 20 rad(Si), respectively. The on-axis source diameter based on the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the line-spread function (LSF) is 0.9±0.1 mm for a 1 mm diam rod and 1.4±0.1 mm for a 2 mm diam rod, independent of voltage. The LANL source diameter, determined from the modulation transfer function of the LSF, is nearly twice the FWHM. The measured rod-pinch current is reproduced with a diode model that includes ions and accounts for anode and cathode plasma expansion

  20. Activated graphene as a cathode material for Li-ion hybrid supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Meryl D; Murali, Shanthi; Quarles, Neil; Zhu, Yanwu; Potts, Jeffrey R; Zhu, Xianjun; Ha, Hyung-Wook; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2012-03-14

    Chemically activated graphene ('activated microwave expanded graphite oxide', a-MEGO) was used as a cathode material for Li-ion hybrid supercapacitors. The performance of a-MEGO was first verified with Li-ion electrolyte in a symmetrical supercapacitor cell. Hybrid supercapacitors were then constructed with a-MEGO as the cathode and with either graphite or Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) (LTO) for the anode materials. The results show that the activated graphene material works well in a symmetrical cell with the Li-ion electrolyte with specific capacitances as high as 182 F g(-1). In a full a-MEGO/graphite hybrid cell, specific capacitances as high as 266 F g(-1) for the active materials at operating potentials of 4 V yielded gravimetric energy densities for a packaged cell of 53.2 W h kg(-1).

  1. Graphene Oxide from Carbon Rod Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, F.; Prasasti, B. L. W.; Mudjijono, M.

    2018-03-01

    Carbon rods extracted from Zn-C primary battery waste was used as raw material for graphene oxide (GO) synthesis. The synthesis used a modified Hummers method by providing potassium permanganate-sulfuric acid as the oxidizing agent. XRD analysis confirms a significant change between the graphite waste pattern and the produced graphene oxide pattern. A major peak at 2θ 27 ° which present in the graphite waste pattern is disappeared after it converts to the product, as well as a broad peak under 25 ° referring the presence of amorphous carbon. A broad peak at low angle of 12.02 ° dominantly present in the prepared GO pattern as a characteristic peak of GO. Meanwhile, some small peaks at 2θ of 17.76 °, 28.58 °, and 37.28 ° confirming the presence of manganese oxide which was used as oxidizing agent. A sharp peak at 1700 – 1500 cm-1 in the FT-IR spectrum indicates the presence of –C=O group, and at 1600 cm-1 refers to –C=C group. It confirms that this research has produced the targeted GO. Even though, the purity is need to be enhanced by removing the rest of oxidizing agent that still exist in the material.

  2. Electrochemistry and safety of Li 4Ti 5O 12 and graphite anodes paired with LiMn 2O 4 for hybrid electric vehicle Li-ion battery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belharouak, Ilias; Koenig, Gary M.; Amine, K.

    A promising anode material for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) is Li 4Ti 5O 12 (LTO). LTO intercalates lithium at a voltage of ∼1.5 V relative to lithium metal, and thus this material has a lower energy compared to a graphite anode for a given cathode material. However, LTO has promising safety and cycle life characteristics relative to graphite anodes. Herein, we describe electrochemical and safety characterizations of LTO and graphite anodes paired with LiMn 2O 4 cathodes in pouch cells. The LTO anode outperformed graphite with regards to capacity retention on extended cycling, pulsing impedance, and calendar life and was found to be more stable to thermal abuse from analysis of gases generated at elevated temperatures and calorimetric data. The safety, calendar life, and pulsing performance of LTO make it an attractive alternative to graphite for high power automotive applications, in particular when paired with LiMn 2O 4 cathode materials.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of LiFePO4/C cathode materials by sol-gel method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuxin; Yin, Hengbo; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Hong

    2014-09-01

    The carbon coated LiFePO4 cathode materials (LiFePO4/C) were successfully synthesized by sol-gel method with glucose, citric acid and PEG-4000 as dispersant and carbon source, respectively. The microstructure and grain size of LiFePO4/C composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the carbon source and calcination temperature had important effect on the graphitization degree of carbon; the carbon decomposed by citric acid had higher graphitization degree; with calcination temperature rising, the graphitization degree of carbon increased and the particles size increased. The graphitization degree and grain size were very important for improving the electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 cathode materials, according to the experimental results, the sample LFP-700 (LFP-C) which was synthesized with citric acid as dispersant at 700 degree C had lower polarization and larger discharge capacity.

  4. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  5. Analysis of irradiation temperature in fuel rods of OGL-1 fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Minato, Kazuo; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Iwamoto, Kazumi

    1984-10-01

    Irradiation temperature in the fuel rods of 5th OGL-1 fuel assembly was analysed by the system composed by STPDSP2 and TRUMP codes. As the measured input-data, following parameters were allowed for; circumferential heating distribution around the fuel rod, which was measured in the JMTR critical assembly, axial heating distribution through the fuel rod, ratio of peak heatings of three fuel rods, and pre- and post-irradiation outer radii of the fuel compacts and inner radii of the graphite sleeves, which had been measured in PIE of the 5th OGL-1 fuel assembly. In computation the axial distributions of helium coolant temperature through the fuel rod and the heating value of each fuel rod were, firstly, calculated as input data for TRUMP. The TRUMP calculation yielded the temperatures which were fitted in those measured by all of the thermo-couples installed in the fuel rods, by adjusting only the value of the surface heat transfer coefficient, and consequently, the temperatures in all portions of the fuel rod were obtained. The apparent heat transfer coefficient changed to 60% of the initial values in the middle period of irradiation. For this reduction it was deduced that shoot had covered the surface of the fuel rod during irradiation, which was confirmed in PIE. Beside it, several things were found in this analysis. (author)

  6. Morphoelastic rods. Part I: A single growing elastic rod

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, D.E.

    2013-02-01

    A theory for the dynamics and statics of growing elastic rods is presented. First, a single growing rod is considered and the formalism of three-dimensional multiplicative decomposition of morphoelasticity is used to describe the bulk growth of Kirchhoff elastic rods. Possible constitutive laws for growth are discussed and analysed. Second, a rod constrained or glued to a rigid substrate is considered, with the mismatch between the attachment site and the growing rod inducing stress. This stress can eventually lead to instability, bifurcation, and buckling. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Control rod cluster with removable rods for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denizou, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    For each removable control rod, the open end section of the sleeve has a certain length of reduced diameter with openings in its wall. The top end of the rod is joined to an extension tube that surrounds the shaft over part of its lenght. This extension tube fits over the reduced part of the sleeve when the shaft is screwed into the bore of the sleeve. Rotation of the rod in the sleeve is prevented by deforming the extension tube locally in the openings of the end part of the sleeve. The rod is dismantled by exerting a torque on it using a gripping area near the end of the rod [fr

  8. Morphoelastic rods. Part I: A single growing elastic rod

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, D.E.; Lessinnes, T.; Goriely, A.

    2013-01-01

    A theory for the dynamics and statics of growing elastic rods is presented. First, a single growing rod is considered and the formalism of three-dimensional multiplicative decomposition of morphoelasticity is used to describe the bulk growth of Kirchhoff elastic rods. Possible constitutive laws for growth are discussed and analysed. Second, a rod constrained or glued to a rigid substrate is considered, with the mismatch between the attachment site and the growing rod inducing stress. This stress can eventually lead to instability, bifurcation, and buckling. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  10. Control rod drive shaft latch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorp, A.G. II.

    1976-01-01

    A latch mechanism is operated by differential pressure on a piston to engage the drive shaft for a control rod in a nuclear reactor, thereby preventing the control rod from being ejected from the reactor in case of failure of the control rod drive mechanism housing which is subjected to the internal pressure in the reactor vessel. 6 claims, 4 drawing figures

  11. Control rod calibration including the rod coupling effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilard, R.; Nelson, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    In a reactor containing more than one control rod, which includes all reactors licensed in the United States, there will be a 'coupling' or 'shadowing' of control rod flux at the location of a control rod as a result of the flux depression caused by another control rod. It was decided to investigate this phenomenon further, and eventually to put calibration table data or formulae in a small computer in the control room, so once could insert the positions of the three control rods and receive the excess reactivity without referring to separate tables. For this to be accomplished, a 'three control- rod reactivity function' would be used which would include the flux coupling between the rods. The function is design and measured data was fitted into it to determine the calibration constants. The input data for fitting the trial functions consisted of 254 data points, each consisting of the position of the reg, shim, and transient rods, and the total excess reactivity. (About 200 of these points were 'critical balance points', that is the rod positions for which reactor was critical, and the remainder were determined by positive period measurements.) Although this may be unrealistic from a physical viewpoint, the function derived gave a very accurate recalculation of the input data, and thus would faithfully give the excess reactivity for any possible combination of the locations of the three control rods. The next step, incorporation of the three-rod function into the minicomputer, will be pursued in the summer and fall of 1984

  12. Filtered cathodic arc source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45 degree to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures

  13. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  14. Sputtering graphite coating to improve the elevated-temperature cycling ability of the LiMn2O4 electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiexi; Zhang, Qiaobao; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Guo, Huajun; Xu, Daguo; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-08-14

    To improve the cycle performance of LiMn2O4 at elevated temperature, a graphite layer is introduced to directly cover the surface of a commercial LiMn2O4-based electrode via room-temperature DC magnetron sputtering. The as-modified cathodes display improved capacity retention as compared to the bare LiMn2O4 cathode (BLMO) at 55 °C. When sputtering graphite for 30 min, the sample shows the best cycling performance at 55 °C, maintaining 96.2% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Reasons with respect to the graphite layer for improving the elevated-temperature performance of LiMn2O4 are systematically investigated via the methods of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the graphite coated LiMn2O4 cathode has much less increased electrode polarization and electrochemical impedance than BLMO during the elevated-temperature cycling process. Furthermore, the graphite layer is able to alleviate the severe dissolution of manganese ions into the electrolyte and mitigate the morphological and structural degradation of LiMn2O4 during cycling. A model for the electrochemical kinetics process is also suggested for explaining the roles of the graphite layer in suppressing the Mn dissolution.

  15. Fuel rod fixing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    This is a reusable system for fixing a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support. An interlock cap is fixed to the fuel rod and an interlock strip is fixed to the support. The interlock cap has two opposed fingers, which are shaped so that a base is formed with a body part. The interlock strip has an extension, which is shaped so that this is rigidly fixed to the body part of the base. The fingers of the interlock cap are elastic in bending. To fix it, the interlock cap is pushed longitudinally on to the interlock strip, which causes the extension to bend the fingers open in order to engage with the body part of the base. To remove it, the procedure is reversed. (orig.) [de

  16. Control rod drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatsugi, Masao; Goto, Mikihiko.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a control rod drive mechanism using water as an operating source, which prevents a phenomenon for forming two-layers of water in the neighbourhood of a return nozzle in a reactor to limit formation of excessive thermal stress to improve a safety. Constitution: In the control rod drive mechanism of the present invention, a heating device is installed in the neighbourhood of a pressure container for a reactor. This heating device is provided to heat return water in the reactor to a level equal to the temperature of reactor water thereby preventing a phenomenon for forming two-layers of water in the reactor. This limits formation of thermal stress in the return nozzle in the reactor. Accordingly, it is possible to minimize damages in the return nozzle portion and yet a possibility of failure in reactor water. (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Fuel rod attachment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member or vice versa. The locking cap has two opposing fingers and shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed. In an alternative embodiment, the cap is rigid and the strip is transversely resiliently compressible. (author)

  18. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Toshikatsu.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To protect bellows against failures due to negative pressure to prevent the loss of pressure balance caused by the expansion of the bellows upon scram. Constitution: An expansion pipe connected to the control rod drive is driven along a guide pipe to insert a control rod into the reactor core. Expansible bellows are provided at the step between the expansion pipe and the guide pipe. Further, a plurality of bore holes or slits are formed on the side wall of the guide pipe corresponding to the expansion portion of the bellows. In such an arrangement, when the expansion pipe falls rapidly and the bellows are expanded upon scram, the volume between each of the pipes of the bellows and the guide pipe is increased to produce a negative pressure, but the effect of the negative pressure on the bellows can be eliminated by the flowing-in of coolants corresponding to that pressure through the bore holes or the slits. (Furukawa, Y.)

  19. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors; Reactores de moderador solido controlados por desplazamiento espectral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala Ruiz, F

    1984-07-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs.

  20. Nuclear fuel rod loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, H.B.; Macivergan, R.; Mckenzie, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus incorporating a microprocessor control is provided for automatically loading nuclear fuel pellets into fuel rods commonly used in nuclear reactor cores. The apparatus comprises a split ''v'' trough for assembling segments of fuel pellets in rows and a shuttle to receive the fuel pellets from the split ''v'' trough when the two sides of the split ''v'' trough are opened. The pellets are weighed while in the shuttle, and the shuttle then moves the pellets into alignment with a fuel rod. A guide bushing is provided to assist the transfer of the pellets into the fuel rod. A rod carousel which holds a plurality of fuel rods presents the proper rod to the guide bushing at the appropriate stage in the loading sequence. The bushing advances to engage the fuel rod, and the shuttle advances to engage the guide bushing. The pellets are then loaded into the fuel rod by a motor operated push rod. The guide bushing includes a photocell utilized in conjunction with the push rod to measure the length of the row of fuel pellets inserted in the fuel rod

  1. Control rod withdrawal monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisuya, Mitsuo.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the power ramp even if a plurality of control rods are subjected to withdrawal operation at a time, by reducing the reactivity applied to the reactor. Constitution: The control rod withdrawal monitoring device is adapted to monitor and control the withdrawal of the control rods depending on the reactor power and the monitoring region thereof is divided into a control rod group monitoring region a transition region and a control group monitoring not interfere region. In a case if the distance between a plurality of control rods for which the withdrawal positions are selected is less than a limiting value, the coordinate for the control rods, distance between the control rods and that the control rod distance is shorter are displayed on a display panel, and the withdrawal for the control rods are blocked. Accordingly, even if a plurality of control rods are subjected successively to the withdrawal operation contrary to the control rod withdrawal sequence upon high power operation of the reactor, the power ramp can be prevented. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Rod drive and latching mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronesi, L.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Hydraulic drive and latching mechanisms for driving reactivity control mechanisms in nuclear reactors are described. Preferably, the pressurized reactor coolant is utilized to raise the drive rod into contact with and to pivot the latching mechanism so as to allow the drive rod to pass the latching mechanism. The pressure in the housing may then be equalized which allows the drive rod to move downwardly into contact with the latching mechanism but to hold the shaft in a raised position with respect to the reactor core. Once again, the reactor coolant pressure may be utilized to raise the drive rod and thus pivot the latching mechanism so that the drive rod passes above the latching mechanism. Again, the mechanism pressure can be equalized which allows the drive rod to fall and pass by the latching mechanism so that the drive rod approaches the reactor core. (author)

  3. Preparation and characterization of copper-graphite composites by electrical explosion of wire in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, T N; Gul, W H; Bac, L H; Kim, J C

    2014-11-01

    Copper-graphite nanocomposites containing 5 vol.% graphite were prepared by a powder metallurgy route using an electrical wire explosion (EEW) in liquid method and spark plasma sintering (SPS) process. Graphite rods with a 0.3 mm diameter and copper wire with a 0.2 mm diameter were used as raw materials for EEWin liquid. To compare, a pure copper and copper-graphite mixture was also prepared. The fabricated graphite was in the form of a nanosheet, onto which copper particles were coated. Sintering was performed at 900 degrees C at a heating rate of 30 degrees C/min for 10 min and under a pressure of 70 MPa. The density of the sintered composite samples was measured by the Archimedes method. A wear test was performed by a ball-on-disc tribometer under dry conditions at room temperature in air. The presence of graphite effectively reduced the wear of composites. The copper-graphite nanocomposites prepared by EEW had lower wear rates than pure copper material and simple mixed copper-graphite.

  4. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  5. Efficient and Stable Carbon-coated Nickel Foam Cathodes for the Electro-Fenton Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Shuqin; Wu, Mingmei; Liu, Yuhui; Zhu, Qiping; Tsiakaras, Panagiotis; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon-coated nickel foam (C@NF) was prepared by cycle coating carbon process. • Ni leaching can be effectively controlled at C@NF4 (4 cycle coating times) cathode. • C@NF4 exhibits excellent electro-Fenton performance with desirable stability. • C@NF4 exhibits low energy consumption for DMP degradation. - Abstract: Carbon-coated nickel foam (C@NF) electrodes are prepared via a simple and effective method, hydrothermal-carbonization cycle coating process, characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and employed as the electro-Fenton (E-Fenton) cathode for degrading dimethyl phthalate (DMP) in aqueous solution. For the sake of comparison, nickel foam (NF) electrode and the conventional E-Fenton cathode (graphite gas diffusion electrode (GDE)) are also tested and compared. Experimental results indicate that nickel leaching can be effectively controlled at C@NF4 cathode (4 times cycle coating process), having great significance for promoting the application of NF in E-Fenton system. Moreover, C@NF4 cathode still presents excellent and effective performance on DMP degradation. DMP can be completely degraded within 2 h at −0.5 V and the total organic carbon (TOC) removal reaches as high as 82.1 %, which is almost 3 times as high as that at graphite GDE. Futhermore, the current efficiency for H 2 O 2 generation at C@NF4 is enhanced by 12 times compared to that at NF, and consequently the energy consumption during DMP degradation at C@NF4 is obvious lower than that at both NF cathode and graphite GDE. From the obtained results it can be deduced that C@NF4 is promising to be an attractive alternative E-Fenton cathode for removing organic pollutants in wastewater

  6. Critical experiments on enriched uranium graphite moderated cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Kurokawa, Ryosuke

    1978-07-01

    A variety of 20 % enriched uranium loaded and graphite-moderated cores consisting of the different lattice cells in a wide range of the carbon to uranium atomic ratio have been built at Semi-Homogeneous Critical Experimental Assembly (SHE) to perform the critical experiments systematically. In the present report, the experimental results for homogeneously or heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and for simulation core of the experimental reactor for a multi-purpose high temperature reactor are filed so as to be utilized for evaluating the accuracy of core design calculation for the experimental reactor. The filed experimental data are composed of critical masses of uranium, kinetic parameters, reactivity worths of the experimental control rods and power distributions in the cores with those rods. Theoretical analyses are made for the experimental data by adopting a simple ''homogenized cylindrical core model'' using the nuclear data of ENDF/B-III, which treats the neutron behaviour after smearing the lattice cell structure. It is made clear from a comparison between the measurement and the calculation that the group constants and fundamental methods of calculations, based on this theoretical model, are valid for the homogeneously fuel loaded cores, but not for both of the heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and the core for simulation of the experimental reactor. Then, it is pointed out that consideration to semi-homogeneous property of the lattice cells for reactor neutrons is essential for high temperature graphite-moderated reactors using dispersion fuel elements of graphite and uranium. (author)

  7. Electrocoagulation mechanism of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) on a zinc anode: Influence of cathodes and anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujuan; Lin, Hui; Jin, Fangyuan; Niu, Junfeng; Zhao, Jinbo; Bi, Ying; Li, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of cathode materials and anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-), and CO3(2-)/HCO3(-)) on perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) removal in electrocoagulation process using zinc anode. The results indicated that the hydroxide flocs generated in-situ in the electrocoagulation process using the stainless steel rod as cathode were more effective than those using aluminum rod as cathode for the removal of PFOA after 20min of electrocoagulation at a current density of 0.5mAcm(-2). Hydroxide flocs generated in-situ in the electrocoagulation in the presence of Cl(-)/NO3(-) could effectively remove PFOA from aqueous solution with the removal ratios of 99.7%/98.1% and 98.9%/97.3% using stainless steel rod and aluminum rod as cathode, respectively. However, the PFOA removal ratios were 96.2%/4.1% and 7.4%/4.6% using stainless steel rod and aluminum rod as cathode, respectively, in the presence of SO4(2-) and CO3(2-)/HCO3(-). The different removal ratios of PFOA during the electrocoagulation process were primarily due to the fact that the hydroxide flocs generated in-situ were different in the presence of diverse cathodes and anions. We firstly demonstrated that Zn0.70Al0.30(OH)2(CO3)0.15·xH2O and ZnO generated in-situ in the electrocoagulation process (except for CO3(2-)/HCO3(-)) using zinc anode and aluminum/stainless steel rod cathode governed the sorption of PFOA. The adsorbent hydroxide flocs in-situ generated in the presence of Cl(-) could effectively remove PFOA from aqueous solution containing CO3(2-)/HCO3(-) anion at the initial hydroxide flocs concentration of 2000mgL(-1). These results provided an effective and alternative method to remove PFOA from aqueous solution containing CO3(2-)/HCO3(-) anion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of

  9. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  10. LiFePO4/polymer/natural graphite: low cost Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghib, K.; Striebel, K.; Guerfi, A.; Shim, J.; Armand, M.; Gauthier, M

    2004-01-01

    The aging and performance of natural graphite/PEO-based gel electrolyte/LiFePO 4 cells are reported. The gel polymer electrolytes were produced by electron-beam irradiation and then soaked in a liquid electrolyte. The natural graphite anode in gel electrolyte containing LiBF4-EC/GBL exhibited high reversible capacity (345 mAh/g) and high coulombic efficiency (91%). The LiFePO 4 cathode in the same gel-polymer exhibited a reversible capacity of 160 mAh/g and 93% coulombic efficiency. Better performance was obtained at high-rate discharge with 6% carbon additive in the cathode, however the graphite anode performance suffers at high rate. The Li-ion gel polymer battery shows a capacity fade of 13% after 180 cycles and has poor performance at low temperature due to low diffusion of the lithium to the graphite in the GBL system. The LiFePO 4 /gel/Li system has an excellent rate capacity. LiFePO 4 cathode material is suitable for HEV application

  11. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  12. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  13. Determination of technetium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.H.; Ballou, N.E.

    1978-01-01

    A detection limit of 6 x 10 -11 g has been achieved for measurement of technetium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A commercially available, demountable, hollow cathode lamp was used and both argon and neon were used as fill gases for the lamp. The range of applicability of the method, when the unresolved 2614.23 to 2615.87 A doublet is used for analysis, is from 60 pg to at least 3 ng of technetium per aliquot analyzed. 3 figures, 1 table

  14. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  15. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  16. Cone rod dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Christian P

    2007-01-01

    Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs) (prevalence 1/40,000) are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP), also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs) resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7). Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far). The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs), CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs), and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs). It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is always advised. Currently

  17. Cone rod dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  18. Nuclear reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, H.; Mindnich, F.R.

    1973-01-01

    The fuel rod consists of a can with at least one end cap and a plenum spring between this cap and the fuel. To prevent the hazard that a eutectic mixture is formed during welding of the end cap, a thermal insulation is added between the end cap and plenum spring. It consists of a comical extension of the end cap with a terminal disc against which the spring is supported. The end cap, the extension, and the disc may be formed by one or several pieces. If the disc is separated from the other parts it may be manufactured from chrome steel or VA steel. (DG) [de

  19. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  20. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  1. Fuel rod pellet loading head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, T.E.

    1975-01-01

    An assembly for loading nuclear fuel pellets into a fuel rod comprising a loading head for feeding pellets into the open end of the rod is described. The pellets rest in a perforated substantially V-shaped seat through which air may be drawn for removal of chips and dust. The rod is held in place in an adjustable notched locator which permits alignment with the pellets

  2. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    A four-step infiltration method has been developed to infiltrate La0.75Sr0.25MnO3+δ (LSM25) nanoparticles into porous structures (YSZ or LSM-YSZ backbones). The pore size distribution in the backbones is obtained either by using PMMA and/or graphites as pore formers or by leaching treatment of sa...... of samples with Ni remained in the YSZ structure at high temperatures. All impregnated backbones, presented Rs comparable to a standard screen printed cathode, which proves that LSM nanoparticles forms a pathway for electron conduction....

  3. Carbon dust formation in a cold plasma from cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michau, A.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.; Benedic, F.; Pegourie, B.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are produced in argon glow plasmas where carbon is introduced by sputtering of a graphite cathode. A scaling law of growth is reported on as a function of the discharge time. Two successive stages of growth of concomitant agglomeration and carbon deposition are observed, followed by a final stage of growth by carbon deposition. A model of formation of molecular precursors by coagulation of neutral clusters on the one hand and of neutral-negative clusters on the other hand is presented, based on formation enthalpy and cluster geometry.

  4. Carbon dust formation in a cold plasma from cathode sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michau, A.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.; Bénédic, F.; Pégourié, B.

    2009-06-01

    Nanoparticles are produced in argon glow plasmas where carbon is introduced by sputtering of a graphite cathode. A scaling law of growth is reported on as a function of the discharge time. Two successive stages of growth of concomitant agglomeration and carbon deposition are observed, followed by a final stage of growth by carbon deposition. A model of formation of molecular precursors by coagulation of neutral clusters on the one hand and of neutral-negative clusters on the other hand is presented, based on formation enthalpy and cluster geometry.

  5. Control-rod driving mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodoi, Takashi.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent falling of control rods due to malfunction. Constitution: The device of the present invention has a scram function in particular, and uses principally a fluid pressure as a scram accelerating means. The control rod is held by upper and lower holding devices, which are connected by a connecting mechanism. This connecting mechanism is designed to be detachable only at the lower limit of driving stroke of the control rod so that there occurs no erroneous scram resulting from careless disconnection of the connecting mechanism. Further, scramming operation due to own weight of the scram operating portion such as control rod driving shaft may be effected to increase freedom. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Integrated control rod monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Katsuhiro

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device in which an entire control rod driving time measuring device and a control rod position support device in a reactor building and a central control chamber are integrated systematically to save hardwares such as a signal input/output device and signal cables between boards. Namely, (1) functions of the entire control rod driving time measuring device for monitoring control rods which control the reactor power and a control rod position indication device are integrated into one identical system. Then, the entire devices can be made compact by the integration of the functions. (2) The functions of the entire control rod driving time measuring device and the control rod position indication device are integrated in a central operation board and a board in the site. Then, the place for the installation of them can be used in common in any of the cases. (3) The functions of the entire control rod driving time measuring device and the control rod position indication device are integrated to one identical system to save hardware to be used. Then, signal input/output devices and drift branching panel boards in the site and the central operation board can be saved, and cables for connecting both of the boards is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  7. Reconstitutable control rod spider assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallenberger, J.M.; Ferian, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    A reconstitutable control rod/spider assembly includes a hollow connecting finger of the spider having a pair of opposing flat segments formed on the interior thereof and engaging a pair of opposing flat sectors formed on the exterior of a stem extending form the upper end of control rod. The stem also has an externally-threaded portion engaging a nut and a pilot aligning portion for the nut. The nut has a radially flexible and expandable thread-defining element captured in its bore. The segments and sectors allow the rod to be removed and reattached after turning through 180 0 to allow more even wear on the rod. (author)

  8. Air cathode structure manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  9. Interactions of alkali metals and electrolyte with cathode carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naas, Tyke

    1997-12-31

    The Hall-Heroult process for electrolytic reduction of alumina has been the only commercial process for production of primary aluminium. The process runs at high temperature and it is important to minimize the energy consumption. To save energy it is desirable to reduce the operating temperature. This can be achieved by adding suitable additives such as LiF or KF to the cryolitic electrolyte. This may conflict with the objective of extending the lifetime of the cathode linings of the cell as much as possible. The thesis investigates this possibility and the nature of the interactions involved. It supports the hypothesis that LiF-additions to the Hall-Heroult cell electrolyte is beneficial to the carbon cathode performance because the diminished sodium activity reduces the sodium induced stresses during the initial period of electrolysis. The use of KF as an additive is more dangerous, but the results indicate that additions up to 5% KF may be tolerated in acidic melts with semigraphitic or graphitic cathodes with little risk of cathode problems. 153 refs., 94 figs., 30 tabs.

  10. Nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Toyoji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To remove failures caused from combination of fuel-cladding interactions, hydrogen absorptions, stress corrosions or the likes by setting the quantity ratio of uranium or uranium and plutonium relative to oxygen to a specific range in fuel pellets and forming a specific size of a through hole at the center of the pellets. Constitution: In a fuel rods of a structure wherein fuel pellets prepared by compacting and sintering uranium dioxide, or oxide mixture consisting of oxides of plutonium and uranium are sealed with a zirconium metal can, the ratio of uranium or uranium and plutonium to oxygen is specified as 1 : 2.01 - 1 : 2.05 in the can and a passing hole of a size in the range of 15 - 30% of the outer diameter of the fuel pellet is formed at the center of the pellet. This increases the oxygen partial pressure in the fuel rod, oxidizes and forms a protection layer on the inner surface of the can to control the hydrogen absorption and stress corrosion. Locallized stress due to fuel cladding interaction (PCMI) can also be moderated. (Horiuchi, T.)

  11. Cathode ray tube screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockayne, B.; Robbins, D.J.; Glasper, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An improved cathode ray tube screen is described which consists of a single- or a poly-crystalline slice of a material such as yttrium aluminium garnet in which dopants such as Tb 3 + , Eu 3 + , Ce 3 + or Tm 3 + are ion implanted to different depths or in different areas of the screen. Annealing the screen removes lattice damage caused by the ion implanting and assists the diffusion of the dopant into the crystal. (U.K.)

  12. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrade, H.O.

    1989-01-01

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  13. Cathode ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A cathode ray tube comprises two electron lens means in combination to crossover the electron beam at a second crossover between the two electron lens means with one of the two lens means having a variable voltage applied thereto to control the location of the beam crossover in order to focus the beam onto a display screen at any location away from the screen center. (Auth.)

  14. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  15. Improved graphite matrix for coated-particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, D.H.; Davidson, K.V.

    1978-10-01

    An experimental process was developed to incorporate coated fuel particles in an extruded graphite matrix. This structure, containing 41 vol% particles, had a high matrix density, >1.6 g/cm 3 , and a matrix conductivity three to four times that of a pitch-injected fuel rod at 1775 K. Experiments were conducted to determine the uniformity of particle loadings in extrusions. Irradiation specimens were supplied for five tests in the High-Fluence Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  16. Fuel rod simulator effects in flooding experiments single rod tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, M.

    1984-09-01

    The influence of a gas filled gap between cladding and pellet on the quenching behavior of a PWR fuel rod during the reflood phase of a LOCA has been investigated. Flooding experiments were conducted with a short length electrically heated single fuel rod simulator surrounded by glass housing. The gap of 0.05 mm width between the Zircaloy cladding and the internal Al 2 O 3 pellets of the rod was filled either wit helium or with argon to vary the radial heat resistance across the gap. This report presents some typical data and an evaluation of the reflood behavior of the fuel rod simulator used. The results show that the quench front propagates faster for increasing heat resistance in the gap between cladding and heat source of the rod. (orig.) [de

  17. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  18. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  19. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  20. Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-08-01

    Catalysts and catalyst binders are significant portions of the cost of microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. Many materials have been tested as aqueous cathodes, but air-cathodes are needed to avoid energy demands for water aeration. Packed-bed air-cathodes were constructed without expensive binders or diffusion layers using four inexpensive carbon-based materials. Cathodes made from activated carbon produced the largest maximum power density of 676±93mW/m2, followed by semi-coke (376±47mW/m2), graphite (122±14mW/m2) and carbon felt (60±43mW/m2). Increasing the mass of activated carbon and semi-coke from 5 to ≥15g significantly reduced power generation because of a reduction in oxygen transfer due to a thicker water layer in the cathode (~3 or ~6cm). These results indicate that a thin packed layer of activated carbon or semi-coke can be used to make inexpensive air-cathodes for MFCs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Digital control rod blocking monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funayama, Yoshio.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention system is used for monitoring of a power region of a reactor, and used for monitoring of simultaneous withdrawal of a plurality of control rods without increasing the size or complicating the system. Namely, the system processes signals from a neutron flux detectors at the periphery of control rods controlled for withdrawal. As a result of the processing, the digital monitoring system generates an alarm when the reactor power at the periphery of the control rods fluctuates exceeding an allowable range. In the system, a control rod information forming means prepares frame data comprising front data, positions of the control rods to be withdrawn, frame numbers and completion data. A serial data transmitting means transmits the frame data successively as repeating frame data rows. A control rod information receiving means takes up the frame data of each of control rods to be withdrawn from the transmitted frame data rows. Since the system of the present invention can monitor the withdrawal of a plurality of control rods simultaneously without increasing the size or complicating the system, cost can be saved and the maintenance can be improved. (I.S.)

  2. Cuisenaire Rods Go to College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Phyllis; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents examples of questions and answers arising from a hands-on and exploratory approach to discrete mathematics using cuisenaire rods. Combinatorial questions about trains formed of cuisenaire rods provide the setting for discovering numerical patterns by experimentation and organizing the results using induction and successive differences.…

  3. Control rod experiments in Racine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanculescu, A.; Humbert, G.

    1981-09-01

    A survey of the control-rod experiments planned within the joint CEA/CNEN-DeBeNe critical experiment RACINE is given. The applicability to both heterogeneous and homogeneous large power LMFBR-cores is discussed. Finally, the most significant results of the provisional design calculations performed on behalf of the RACINE control-rod programme are presented

  4. An investigation of energy balances in palladium cathode electrolysis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, G. R.; Dolan, T. J.; Henriksen, G. L.

    1990-09-01

    A series of experiments was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate mechanisms that may contribute to energy flows in electrolysis cells like those of Fleischmann and Pons. Ordinary water (H2O), heavy water (D2O), and a mixture of the two were used in the INEL experiments. Cathodes used include a 51-μm Pd foil and 1-mm diameter extruded wire Pd rods in straight and coiled configurations. Energy balances in these experiments revealed no significant net gain or net loss of energy. Cell overpotential curves were fit well with a Tafel equation, with parameters dependent on electrode configuration, electrolyte composition, and temperature. Water evaporation and interactions of hydrogen isotopes with the Pd cathode were evaluated and found not to be significant to energy balances. No ionizing radiation, tritium production, or other evidence of fusion reactions was observed in the INEL experiments.

  5. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furumitsu, Yutaka.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability of a device for driving an LMFBR type reactor control rod by providing a buffer unit having a stationary electromagnetic coil and a movable electromagnetic coil in the device to thereby avord impact stress at scram time and to simplify the structure of the buffer unit. Constitution: A non-contact type buffer unit is constructed with a stationary electromagnetic coil, a cable for the stationary coil, a movable electromagnetic coil, a spring cable for the movable coil, and a backup coil spring or the like. Force produced at scram time is delivered without impact by the attracting or repelling force between the stationary coil and the movable coil of the buffer unit. Accordingly, since the buffer unit is of a non-contact type, there is no mechanical impact and thus no large impact stress, and as it has simple configuration, the reliability is improved and the maintenance can be conducted more easily. (Yoshihara, H.)

  6. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  7. Depression cathode structure for cathode ray tubes having surface smoothness and method for producing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rychlewski, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    Depression cathode structures for cathode ray tubes are produced by dispensing liquid cathode material into the depression of a metallic supporting substrate, removing excess cathode material by passing a doctor blade across the substrate surface and over the depression, and drying the cathode layer to a substantially immobile state. The cathode layer may optionally be further shaped prior to substantially complete drying thereof

  8. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  9. Experimental research on time-resolved evolution of cathode plasma expansion velocity in a long pulsed magnetically insulated coaxial diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Ge, Xingjun; Gao, Jingming

    2018-02-01

    Unlike planar diodes, separate research of the axial and radial plasma expansion velocities is difficult for magnetically insulated coaxial diodes. Time-resolved electrical diagnostic which is based on the voltage-ampere characteristics has been employed to study the temporal evolution of the axial and radial cathode plasma expansion velocities in a long pulsed magnetically insulated coaxial diode. Different from a planar diode with a "U" shaped profile of temporal velocity evolution, the temporal evolution trend of the axial expansion velocity is proved to be a "V" shaped profile. Apart from the suppression on the radial expansion velocity, the strong magnetic field is also conducive to slowing down the axial expansion velocity. Compared with the ordinary graphite cathode, the carbon velvet and graphite composite cathode showed superior characteristics as judged by the low plasma expansion velocity and long-term electrical stability as a promising result for applications where long-pulsed and reliable operation at high power is required.

  10. Chapter 5: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. II: Correlation of results with the method of Syrett (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    The results are given of exponential experiments on graphite moderated systems with fuel elements consisting of single rods and tubes of natural uranium metal. A correlation is given with the method of calculation proposed by Syrett (1961) and new consistent values of neutron yield and effective resonance integral are derived. (author)

  11. Electrocoagulation of whey acids: anode and cathode materials, electroactive area and polarization curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Prieto Garcia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anode (Al and Fe and cathode (graphite and Ti/RuO2 materials have been tested for electrocoagulation (EC and purification of the acid whey. The electroactive areas (EA of electrodes were calculated by the double layer capacitance method. Experiments were performed by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and polarization experiments. Among cathodic materials, the Ti/RuO2 electrode showed higher EA (2167 cm2 than graphite (1560 cm2. The Fe anode was found more stable than Al with greater charge transfer carried out in less time. Correlation of these results with those obtained during preliminary tests confirmed high removals (79 % in 8 h. For the Al electrode, 24 h were required to achieve efficiency of 49 %.

  12. Control rod position detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Haruo; Ogiwara, Sakae.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention is used in a back-up shut down system of an LMFBR type reactor which is easy for maintenance, has high reliability and can recognize the position of control rods accurately. Namely, a permanent magnet is disposed to a control rod extension tube connected to the lower portion of the control rod. The detector guide tube is disposed in the vicinity of the control rod extension tube. A detector having a detection coil is inserted into a detector tube. With such constitution, the control rod can be detected at one position using the following method. (1) the movement of the magnetic field of the permanent magnet is detected by the detection coil. (2) a plurality of grooves are formed on the control rod extension tube, and the movement of the grooves is detected. In addition, the detection coil is inserted into the detector guide tube, and the signals from the detection coil are inputted to a signal processing circuit disposed at the outside of the reactor vessel using an MI cable to enable the maintenance of the detector. Further, if the detector comprises a detection coil and an excitation coil, the position of a dropped control rod can be recognized at a plurality of points. (I.S.)

  13. Control rod position control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubukata, Shinji.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a control rod position control device which stores data such as of position signals and driving control rod instruction before and after occurrence of abnormality in control for the control rod position for controlling reactor power and utilized the data effectively for investigating the cause of abnormality. Namely, a plurality of individual control devices have an operation mismatching detection circuit for outputting signals when difference is caused between a driving instruction given to the control rod position control device and the control rod driving means and signals from a detection means for detecting an actual moving amount. A general control device collectively controls the individual control devices. In addition, there is also disposed a position storing circuit for storing position signals at least before and after the occurrence of the control rod operation mismatching. With such procedures, the cause of the abnormality can be determined based on the position signals before and after the occurrence of control rod mismatching operation stored in the position storing circuit. Accordingly, the abnormality cause can be determined to conduct restoration in an early stage. (I.S.)

  14. Status of rod consolidation, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    It is estimated that the spent fuel storage pools at some domestic light-water reactors will run out of space before 2003, the year that the US Department of Energy currently predicts it will have a repository available. Of the methods being studied to alleviate the problem, rod consolidation is one of the leading candidates for achieving more efficient use of existing space in spent fuel storage pools. Rod consolidation involves mechanically removing all the fuel rods from the fuel assembly hardware (i.e., the structural components) and placing the fuel rods in a close-packed array in a canister without space grids. A typical goal of rod consolidation systems is to insert the fuel rods from two fuel assemblies into a canister that has the same exterior dimensions as one standard fuel assembly (i.e., to achieve a consolidation or compaction ratio of 2:1) and to compact the nonfuel-bearing structural components from those two fuel assemblies by a factor of 10 to 20. This report provides an overview of the current status of rod consolidation in the United States and a small amount of information on related activities in other countries. 85 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Inspecting method for fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Kogure, Sumio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To precisely detect the response of flaw in clad tube and submerged fuel pellets from a relationship between the surface of fuel rod and internal signal. Constitution: Ultrasonic reflected waves from the surface of fuel rods and the interior are detected and either one of fuel rod or ultrasonic flaw detecting contact is rotated to thereby precisely detect the response of the flaw of clad tube and submerged fuel pellets from a relationship between said surface and the interior. It will be noted that the ultrasonic flaw detecting contact used is of the line-focus type, the incident angle of ultrasonic wave from the ultrasonic flaw detecting contact relative to the fuel rod is the angle of skew, that is, the ultrasonic flaw detecting contact is not perpendicular to a center axis of the fuel rod but is slightly displace. That is, the use of the aforesaid contact may facilitate discrimination between the surface flaw of the fuel rod and the response of submergence, and in addition, the employment of the aforesaid incident angle makes it hard to receive reflected waves from the surface of the fuel rod which is great in terms of energy to facilitate discrimination of waves responsive to submergence. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Electrochemical Performance of a New Modified Graphite-Epoxy Electrode for Covalent Immobilization of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Balbin-Tamayo, Abel I; Riso, Laura S; Esteva-Guas, Ana Margarita; Mardini-Farias, Pércio Augusto; Pérez-Gramatges, Aurora

    2017-01-01

    A new epoxy conducting composite material prepared from epoxy resin, graphite and benzoic acid was developed and used for the manufacture of electrodes, which were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The dependence of peak-to-peak potential, peak anodic current, and the anodic peak/cathodic peak current ratio with scan rate were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry taking into account the Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) standard redox sys...

  17. HTGR fuel rods: carbon-carbon composites designed for high weight and low strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of the process for fabricating fuel rods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) by injection and carbonization of a thermoplastic matrix that bonds close-packed beds of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles together is reviewed for the fresh-fuel cycle, and a variant process involving a thermosetting matrix that would allow free-standing carbonization of refabricated fuel is discussed. Previous attempts to fabricate such injection-bonded fuel rods from undiluted thermosetting binders filled with powdered graphite were unsuccessful, because of damage to coatings on fuel particles that resulted from strong particle-to-matrix bonding in conjunction with large matrix shrinkage on carbonization and subsequent irradiation. These problems have now been overcome through the use of a diluted thermosetting matrix with a low-char-yield additive (fugitive), which produces a more porous char similar to that from the pitch-based thermoplastic used in fabrication of fresh fuel. A 1-to-1 dilution of resin with fugitive produced the optimum binder for injection and carbonization, where the fired matrix in such rods contained about 20 wt% binder char and 80 wt% powdered graphite. Thermosetting fuel rods diluted with various amounts of fugitive to give binder chars that range from 12 to 48 wt% of the fired matrix have been subjected to irradiation screening tests, and rods with no more than 32 wt% binder char appear to perform about as well under irradiation as do pitch-based rods. However, particle damage does begin to occur in those lightly diluted rods in which the less-stable binder char constitutes more than 32 wt% of the fired matrix. (author)

  18. Spacers for fuel rod clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    The proposition deals with the fixing of nuclear fuel element rods in a grid which consists of a number of crossed Zy-plates which form cells. The rectangular cells have projections which serve as spacers for the fuel rods. According to the invention there are additional butt straps which can be moved in such a way that insertion and extraction of the fuel rods can be done without obstruction and they can be spring-loaded hold in their final position. (UWI) [de

  19. Nanostructured lanthanum manganate composite cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    that the (La1-xSrx)(y)MnO3 +/-delta (LSM) composite cathodes consist of a network of homogenously distributed LSM, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and pores. The individual grain size of LSM or YSZ is approximately 100 nm. The degree of contact between cathode and electrolyte is 39% on average. (c) 2005...

  20. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  1. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latunde-Dada, S; Cheesman, C; Day, D; Harrison, W; Price, S

    2011-01-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms -1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  2. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  3. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  4. Nuclear reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Izzo, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a vertically oriented bottom entry control rod from a nuclear reactor: a frame including an elongated central spine of cruciform cross section connected between an upper support member and a lower support member both of cruciform shape having four laterally extending arms. The arms are in alignment with the arms of the lower support member and each aligned upper and lower support members has a sheath extending between; absorber plates of neutron absorber material, different from the material of the frame, one of the absorber plates is positioned within a sheath beneath each of the arms; attachment means suspends the absorber plates from the arms of the upper support member within a sheath; elongated absorber members positioned within a sheath between each of the suspended absorber plates and an arm of the lower support member; and joint means between the upper ends of the absorber members and the lower ends of the suspended absorber plates for minimizing gaps; the sheath means encloses the suspended absorber plates and the absorber members extending between aligned arms of the upper and lower support members and secured

  5. Control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    In the control rod drive for a BWR type reactor, etc., according to this invention, the lower limit flow rate is set so as to keep the restriction for stability upon spectral shift operation. The setting condition for keeping the restriction is the lowest pump speed and the lower limit for the automatic control of the flow rate, which are considered to be important in view of the stablility from the actual power state. In view of the above, it is possible to keep the reactor core stably even in a case where such a transient phenomenon occurs that the recycling flow rate has to be run back to the lowest pump speed during spectral shift opeeration or in a case where the load demand is reduced and the flow rate is decreased by an automatic mode as in night operation. Accordingly, in the case of conducting the spectral shift operation according to this invention, the operation region capable of keeping the reactor core state stably during operation can be extended. (I.S.)

  6. Control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watando, Kosaku; Tanaka, Yuzo; Mizumura, Yasuhiro; Hosono, Kazuya.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a simple and compact construction of an apparatus for driving a drive shaft inside with a magnetic force from the outside of the primary system water side. Structure: The weight of a plunger provided with an attraction plate is supported by a plunger lift spring means so as to provide a buffer action at the time of momentary movement while also permitting the load on lift coil to be constituted solely by the load on the drive shaft. In addition, by arranging the attraction plate and lift coil so that they face each other with a small gap there-between, it is made possible to reduce the size and permit efficient utilization of the attracting force. Because of the small size, cooling can be simply carried out. Further, since there is no mechanical penetration portion, there is no possibility of leakage of the primary system water. Furthermore, concentration of load on a latch pin is prevented by arranging so that with a structure the load of the control rod to be directly beared through the scrum latch. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Enhancing substrate utilization and power production of a microbial fuel cell with nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel as cathode catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Gábor Márk; Lóránt, Bálint; Lóka, Máté; Nagy, Balázs; László, Krisztina

    2017-07-01

    Catalytic efficiency of a nitrogen-doped, mesoporous carbon aerogel cathode catalyst was investigated in a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) applying graphite felt as base material for cathode and anode, utilizing peptone as carbon source. This mesoporous carbon aerogel containing catalyst layer on the cathode increased the maximum power density normalized to the anode volume to 2.7 times higher compared to the maximum power density obtained applying graphite felt cathode without the catalyst layer. At high (2 and 3) cathode/anode volume ratios, maximum power density exceeded 40 W m -3 . At the same time, current density and specific substrate utilization rate increased by 58% resulting in 31.9 A m -3 and 18.8 g COD m -3  h -1 , respectively (normalized to anode volume). Besides the increase of the power and the rate of biodegradation, the investigated catalyst decreased the internal resistance from the range of 450-600 to 350-370 Ω. Although Pt/C catalyst proved to be more efficient, a considerable decrease in the material costs might be achieved by substituting it with nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel in MFCs. Such cathode still displays enhanced catalytic effect.

  8. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

    2015-11-17

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES.

  9. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  10. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  11. Comparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis.

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2014-02-18

    In methanogenic microbial electrolysis cells (MMCs), CO2 is reduced to methane using a methanogenic biofilm on the cathode by either direct electron transfer or evolved hydrogen. To optimize methane generation, we examined several cathode materials: plain graphite blocks, graphite blocks coated with carbon black or carbon black containing metals (platinum, stainless steel or nickel) or insoluble minerals (ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide), and carbon fiber brushes. Assuming a stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen (abiotic):methane (biotic) of 4:1, methane production with platinum could be explained solely by hydrogen production. For most other materials, however, abiotic hydrogen production rates were insufficient to explain methane production. At -600 mV, platinum on carbon black had the highest abiotic hydrogen gas formation rate (1600 ± 200 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)) and the highest biotic methane production rate (250 ± 90 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)). At -550 mV, plain graphite (76 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)) performed similarly to platinum (73 nmol cm(-3) d(-1)). Coulombic recoveries, based on the measured current and evolved gas, were initially greater than 100% for all materials except platinum, suggesting that cathodic corrosion also contributed to electromethanogenic gas production.

  12. Characterization of Ignalina NPP RBMK Reactors Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Levinskas, R.; Milcius, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the investigations of the initial physical properties of graphite used in production of graphite bricks of Ignalina NPP. These graphite bricks are used as nuclear moderator and major core structural components. Graphite bulk density is calculated by mensuration, pore volumes are measured by investigation of helium gas penetration in graphite pore network, the Young's modulus is determined using an ultrasonic time of flight method, the coefficient of thermal expansion is determined using a Netzsch dilatometer 402C, the fractured and machined graphite surfaces are studied using SEM, impurities are investigated qualitatively by EDAX, the degree of graphitization of the material is tested using X-ray diffraction. (author)

  13. Means for driving control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Haruo; Sasaki, Masayoshi.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To enable wire rope to be readily removed from guide pulleys for the inspection or replacement of control rods. Structure: A pair of guide pulleys disposed to oppose each other are provided on their periphery with respective notches which are arranged in a staggered fashion. In this way, the rope is made to be removed from the notches for inspection of the control rod or for other purposes. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Segmented fuel and moderator rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a continuous segmented fuel and moderator rod for use with a water cooled and moderated nuclear fuel assembly. The rod comprises: a lower fuel region containing a column of nuclear fuel; a moderator region, disposed axially above the fuel region. The moderator region has means for admitting and passing the water moderator therethrough for moderating an upper portion of the nuclear fuel assembly. The moderator region is separated from the fuel region by a water tight separator

  15. Electropolymerization of 3-aminophenol on carbon graphite surface: Electric and morphologic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Diego L.; Afonso, Andre S.; Vieira, Sabrina N.; Ferreira, Lucas F.; Goncalves, Rafael A.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.; Madurro, Joao M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the formation of electropolymerized films derived from 3-aminophenol on graphite electrode by cyclic voltammetry, prepared in different pH conditions. With increase of pH values, a shift of the oxidation potential of 3-aminophenol to more cathodic potentials was observed. 3-Aminophenol electrooxidation, in acid and basic media, yielded polymeric films onto graphite surface. In ferrocyanide/ferricyanide solution, the polymer produced in acid medium showed higher electron transfer efficiency. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and FT-IR were used to investigate some properties of the graphite electrode modified with poly(3-aminophenol). Scanning electron microscopy showed that the morphology of the films is strongly dependent on the pH of the electropolymerization medium. FT-IR spectra of polymer films produced for either acid or basic media suggest that the monomer is polymerized by NH 2 group

  16. Electropolymerization of 3-aminophenol on carbon graphite surface: Electric and morphologic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Diego L.; Afonso, Andre S.; Vieira, Sabrina N.; Ferreira, Lucas F. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlandia, Av. Joao Naves de Avila 2121, 38400-902 Uberlandia (Brazil); Goncalves, Rafael A. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Uberlandia, Av. Joao Naves de Avila 2121, 38400-902 Uberlandia (Brazil); Brito-Madurro, Ana G. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlandia, Av. Joao Naves de Avila 2121, 38400-902 Uberlandia (Brazil); Madurro, Joao M. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Uberlandia, Av. Joao Naves de Avila 2121, 38400-902 Uberlandia (Brazil)], E-mail: jmadurro@ufu.br

    2008-02-15

    This paper reports the formation of electropolymerized films derived from 3-aminophenol on graphite electrode by cyclic voltammetry, prepared in different pH conditions. With increase of pH values, a shift of the oxidation potential of 3-aminophenol to more cathodic potentials was observed. 3-Aminophenol electrooxidation, in acid and basic media, yielded polymeric films onto graphite surface. In ferrocyanide/ferricyanide solution, the polymer produced in acid medium showed higher electron transfer efficiency. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and FT-IR were used to investigate some properties of the graphite electrode modified with poly(3-aminophenol). Scanning electron microscopy showed that the morphology of the films is strongly dependent on the pH of the electropolymerization medium. FT-IR spectra of polymer films produced for either acid or basic media suggest that the monomer is polymerized by NH{sub 2} group.

  17. Graphite materials testing in the ATR for lifetime management of Magnox reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on their graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment. (author)

  18. Graphite Materials Testing in the ATR for Lifetime Management of Magnox Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on the ir graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment

  19. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  20. Mesostructure of graphite composite and its lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Generally, the review relies, on the original results and concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear p...

  1. Fabrication of internally instrumented reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutz, J.D.; Meservey, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures are outlined for fabricating internally instrumented reactor fuel rods while maintaining the original quality assurance level of the rods. Instrumented fuel rods described contain fuel centerline thermocouples, ultrasonic thermometers, and pressure tubes for internal rod gas pressure measurements. Descriptions of the thermocouples and ultrasonic thermometers are also contained

  2. Ultrathin Graphite Foam: A Three-Dimensional Conductive Network for Battery Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, HX; Zhang, LL; Pettes, MT; Li, HF; Chen, SS; Shi, L; Piner, R; Ruoff, RS

    2012-05-01

    We report the use of free-standing, lightweight, and highly conductive ultrathin graphite foam (UGF), loaded with lithium iron phosphate (LFP), as a cathode in a lithium ion battery. At a high charge/discharge current density of 1280 mA g(-1), the specific capacity of the LFP loaded on UGF was 70 mAh g(-1), while LFP loaded on Al foil failed. Accounting for the total mass of the electrode, the maximum specific capacity of the UGF/LFP cathode was 23% higher than that of the Al/LFP cathode and 170% higher than that of the Ni-foam/LFP cathode. Using UGF, both a higher rate capability and specific capacity can be achieved simultaneously, owing to its conductive (similar to 1.3 x 10(5) S m(-1) at room temperature) and three-dimensional lightweight (similar to 9.5 mg cm(-3)) graphitic structure. Meanwhile, UGF presents excellent electrochemical stability comparing to that of Al and Ni foils, which are generally used as conductive substrates in lithium ion batteries. Moreover, preparation of the UGF electrode was facile, cost-effective, and compatible with various electrochemically active materials.

  3. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  4. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  5. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  6. Oxidation parameters of nuclear graphite for HTGR air-ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.S.; No, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate chemical behaviors of the graphite during an air-ingress accident in HTGR, the kinetic tests on nuclear graphite IG-110 were performed in chemical reaction dominant regime. In the present experiment, inlet gas flow rate ranged between 8 and 18 SLPM, graphite temperatures and oxygen mole fraction ranged from 540 to 630degC and from 3 to 30% respectively. The test section was made of a quartz tube having 75 mm diameter and 750 mm length and the test specimen machined to the size of 21 mm diameter and 30 mm length was supported at the center of it by the alumina rod. The 15 kW induction heater was installed around the outside of test section to heat the specimen and its temperature was measured by 2 infrared thermometers. The oxidation rate was calculated from the gas concentration analysis between inlet and outlet using NDIR (non-dispersive infrared) gas analyzer. As a result the activation energy (Ea) and the order of reaction (n) were determined within 95% confidence level and the qualitative characteristics of the two parameters were also widely investigated by experimental and analytical methods. (author)

  7. Freestanding graphene/MnO2 cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyma Özcan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Different polymorphs of MnO2 (α-, β-, and γ- were produced by microwave hydrothermal synthesis, and graphene oxide (GO nanosheets were prepared by oxidation of graphite using a modified Hummers’ method. Freestanding graphene/MnO2 cathodes were manufactured through a vacuum filtration process. The structure of the graphene/MnO2 nanocomposites was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies of freestanding cathodes were investigated by scanning electron microcopy (SEM. The charge–discharge profile of the cathodes was tested between 1.5 V and 4.5 V at a constant current of 0.1 mA cm−2 using CR2016 coin cells. The initial specific capacity of graphene/α-, β-, and γ-MnO2 freestanding cathodes was found to be 321 mAhg−1, 198 mAhg−1, and 251 mAhg−1, respectively. Finally, the graphene/α-MnO2 cathode displayed the best cycling performance due to the low charge transfer resistance and higher electrochemical reaction behavior. Graphene/α-MnO2 freestanding cathodes exhibited a specific capacity of 229 mAhg−1 after 200 cycles with 72% capacity retention.

  8. Marine microbial fuel cell: Use of stainless steel electrodes as anode and cathode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, C.; Basseguy, R.; Etcheverry, L.; Bergel, A. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, CNRS-INPT, Toulouse Cedex (France); Mollica, A. [CNR-ISMAR, Genoa (Italy); Feron, D. [SCCME, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-12-01

    Numerous biocorrosion studies have stated that biofilms formed in aerobic seawater induce an efficient catalysis of the oxygen reduction on stainless steels. This property was implemented here for the first time in a marine microbial fuel cell (MFC). A prototype was designed with a stainless steel anode embedded in marine sediments coupled to a stainless steel cathode in the overlying seawater. Recording current/potential curves during the progress of the experiment confirmed that the cathode progressively acquired effective catalytic properties. The maximal power density produced of 4 mW m{sup -2} was lower than those reported previously with marine MFC using graphite electrodes. Decoupling anode and cathode showed that the cathode suffered practical problems related to implementation in the sea, which may found easy technical solutions. A laboratory fuel cell based on the same principle demonstrated that the biofilm-covered stainless steel cathode was able to supply current density up to 140 mA m{sup -2} at +0.05 V versus Ag/AgCl. The power density of 23 mW m{sup -2} was in this case limited by the anode. These first tests presented the biofilm-covered stainless steel cathodes as very promising candidates to be implemented in marine MFC. The suitability of stainless steel as anode has to be further investigated. (author)

  9. Comparative study on experiments and simulation of blended cathode active materials for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appiah, Williams Agyei; Park, Joonam; Van Khue, Luu; Lee, Yunju; Choi, Jaecheol; Ryou, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Yong Min

    2016-01-01

    We simulate the electrochemical properties of Li-ion cells consisting of a blended cathode composed of LiMn 2 O 4 and LiNi 0.6 Co 0.2 Mn 0.2 O 2 and an artificial graphite anode using the Li-ion battery model available in COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS 4.4 along with a capacity fade model. The discharge profiles of the pure and blended cathodes at various current rates obtained through simulations and experimental results are well matched. By combining two capacity fade models available in literature, namely the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) growth model and the Mn 2+ dissolution model, the cycling performance of the pure LiMn 2 O 4 cells at 25 °C are successfully simulated and found to be in a good agreement with the experimental results. The blended cathode exhibits better capacity retention than the pure LiMn 2 O 4 during cycling. We also observed that at high powers, the gravimetric energy density of the LiMn 2 O 4 cathode exceeds that of the LiNi 0.6 Co 0.2 Mn 0.2 O 2 cathode; the reverse effect is seen at low powers. Further, we were able to easily modulate the energy and power densities of the blended cathode system by changing the blend ratio in our simulation model.

  10. Electron emission from pseudospark cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The pseudospark cathode has the remarkable property of macroscopically homogeneous electron emission at very high current density (>1 kA/cm 2 ) over a large area (some cm 2 ). The model of electron emission presented here is based on the assumption that the pseudospark microscopically utilizes explosive arc processes, as distinct from earlier models of ''anomalous emission in superdense glow discharges.'' Explosive emission similar to vacuum are cathode spots occurs rapidly when the field strength is sufficiently high. The plasma remains macroscopically homogeneous since the virtual plasma anode adapts to the cathode morphology so that the current is carried by a large number of homogeneously distributed cathode spots which are similar to ''type 1'' and ''type 2'' spots of vacuum arc discharges. The net cathode erosion is greatly reduced relative to ''spark gap-type'' emission. At very high current levels, a transition to highly erosive spot types occurs, and this ''arcing'' leads to a significant reduction in device lifetime. Assuming vacuum-arc-like cathode spots, the observed current density and time constants can be easily explained. The observed cathode erosion rate and pattern, recent fast-camera data, laser-induced fluorescence, and spectroscopic measurements support this approach. A new hypothesis is presented explaining current quenching at relatively low currents. From the point of view of electron emission, the ''superdense glow'' or ''superemissive phase'' of pseudosparks represents an arc and not a glow discharge even if no filamentation or ''arcing'' is observed

  11. The BWR Hybrid 4 control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, H.; Fuchs, H.P.; Lippert, H.J.; Dambietz, W.

    1988-01-01

    The service life of BWR control rods designed in the past has been unsatisfactory. The main reason was irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of B 4 C rods caused by external swelling of the B 4 C powder. By this reason KWU developed an improved BWR control rod (Hybrid 4 control rod) with extended service life and increased control rod worth. It also allows the procedure for replacing and rearranging fuel assemblies to be considerably simplified. A complete set of Hydbrid 4 control rods is expected to last throughout the service life of a plant (assumption: ca. 40 years) if an appropriate control rod reshuffling management program is used. (orig.)

  12. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  14. Radioactive lightning rods waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, Roberto; Dellamano, Jose C.; Hiromoto, Goro

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In this paper, we present alternative processes that could be adopted for the management of radioactive waste that arises from the replacement of lightning rods with attached Americium-241 sources. Lightning protectors, with Americium-241 sources attached to the air terminals, were manufactured in Brazil until 1989, when the regulatory authority overthrew the license for fabrication, commerce, and installation of radioactive lightning rods. It is estimated that, during the license period, about 75,000 such devices were set up in public, commercial and industrial buildings, including houses and schools. However, the policy of CNEN in regard to the replacement of the installed radioactive rods, has been to leave the decision to municipal governments under local building regulations, requiring only that the replaced rods be sent immediately to one of its research institutes to be treated as radioactive waste. As a consequence, the program of replacement proceeds in a low pace and until now only about twenty thousand rods have reached the waste treatment facilities The process of management that was adopted is based primarily on the assumption that the Am-241 sources will be disposed of as radioactive sealed sources, probably in a deep borehole repository. The process can be described broadly by the following steps: a) Receive and put the lightning rods in initial storage; b) Disassemble the rods and pull out the sources; c) Decontaminate and release the metal parts to metal recycling; d) Store the sources in intermediate storage; e) Package the sources in final disposal packages; and f) Send the sources for final disposal. Up to now, the disassembled devices gave rise to about 90,000 sources which are kept in storage while the design of the final disposal package is in progress. (author)

  15. Simulation of leaking fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozer, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of failed fuel rods includes several complex phenomena. The cladding failure initiates the release of fission product from the fuel and in case of large defect even urania grains can be released into the coolant. In steady state conditions an equilibrium - diffusion type - release is expected. During transients the release is driven by a convective type leaching mechanism. There are very few experimental data on leaking WWER fuel rods. For this reason the activity measurements at the nuclear power plants provide very important information. The evaluation of measured data can help in the estimation of failed fuel rod characteristics and the prediction of transient release dynamics in power plant transients. The paper deals with the simulation of leaking fuel rods under steady state and transient conditions and describes the following new results: 1) A new algorithm has been developed for the simulation of leaking fuel rods under steady state conditions and the specific parameters of the model for the Paks NPP has been determined; 2) The steady state model has been applied to calculation of leaking fuel characteristics using iodine and noble gas activity measurement data; 3) A new computational method has been developed for the simulation of leaking fuel rods under transient conditions and the specific parameters for the Paks NPP has been determined; 4) The transient model has been applied to the simulation of shutdown process at the Paks NPP and for the prediction of the time and magnitude of 123 I activity peak; 5) Using Paks NPP data a conservative value has been determined for the upper limit of the 123 I release from failed fuel rods during transients

  16. The Third ATLAS ROD Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Poggioli, L.

    A new-style Workshop After two successful ATLAS ROD Workshops dedicated to the ROD hardware and held at the Geneva University in 1998 and in 2000, a new style Workshop took place at LAPP in Annecy on November 14-15, 2002. This time the Workshop was fully dedicated to the ROD-TDAQ integration and software in view of the near future integration activities of the final RODs for the detector assembly and commissioning. More precisely, the aim of this workshop was to get from the sub-detectors the parameters needed for T-DAQ, as well as status and plans from ROD builders. On the other hand, what was decided and assumed had to be stated (like EB decisions and URDs), and also support plans. The Workshop gathered about 70 participants from all ATLAS sub-detectors and the T-DAQ community. The quite dense agenda allowed nevertheless for many lively discussions, and for a dinner in the old town of Annecy. The Sessions The Workshop was organized in five main sessions: Assumptions and recommendations Sub-de...

  17. Determination of vanadium in sea water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a tube coated with pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Tokuo; Sakai, Kaoru

    1981-01-01

    The trace amount of vanadium in sea water was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a tube coated with pyrolytic graphite. To correct the background absorption, a deuterium lamp with a higher-brilliant thermal cathode was used. The sensitivity for vanadium increased 10 -- 20 fold by the use of the tube coated with pyrolytic graphite, and the utility lifetime of the tube was greatly extended. Vanadium(V) - 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) complexes were extracted into chloroform as an ion-pair with benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium (Zephiramine) cation alternatively. The sample of sea water, which was made to 0.1 N in sulfuric acid and 0.1% in hydrogen peroxide, was loaded onto the column of Dowex 1-X 4 resin (SO 4 2- -form). Vanadium was then eluted from the resin with 1 N sulfuric acid-0.1% hydrogen peroxide or 1 N hydrochloric acid-0.1% hydrogen peroxide evaporated to dry. After dissolution of the elute in 0.2 N nitric acid, vanadium was extracted. Secondly, the sample of sea water was adjusted to pH 5.0, and loaded onto the column of Chelex-100 resin. Vanadium was eluted from the resin with 2 N ammonia. The above two methods took much time, but the coprecipitation method was not so and recommended for the determination of vanadium in sea water. Vanadium was coprecipitated with iron(III) hydroxide-hydrous titanium(IV) oxide at pH 6.0. The precipitate was digested with nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide. The solution was diluted to 50 ml with water. The resulting solutions were employed to determine the vanadium concentration by the graphite furnace atomic absorption measurement. The trace amounts of vanadium in various kinds of the coastal sea water were determined by the coprecipitation method. (author)

  18. Measuring device for control rod driving time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Hanabusa, Masatoshi.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention concerns a measuring device for control driving time having a function capable of measuring a selected control rod driving time and measuring an entire control rod driving time simultaneously. A calculation means and a store means for the selected rod control rod driving time, and a calculation means and a store means for the entire control rod driving time are disposed individually. Each of them measures the driving time and stores the data independent of each other based on a selected control rod insert ion signal and an entire control rod insertion signal. Even if insertion of selected and entire control rods overlaps, each of the control rod driving times can be measured reliably to provide an advantageous effect capable of more accurately conducting safety evaluation for the nuclear reactor based on the result of the measurement. (N.H.)

  19. Control rod drive for vertical movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suskov, I.I.; Gorjunov, V.S.; Zajcev, B.I.; Derevjankin, N.E.; Petrov, V.A.; Istomin, S.D.; Kovalencik, D.I.; Archipov, E.A.; Serebrjakov, V.I.; Kacalin, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The control of the rod repositioning gear unit and the control unit of the profile grab of the control rod drive for the alkali metal-cooled fast breeder reactor is achieved by an electromotor being arranged outside the hermetic drive casing. The guide tube is directly repositioned by the rod repositioning gear unit. Coupling control of the drive with the control rod is done in the lower operative position of the control rod and that because of the interaction of the tie rod arranged on the spring-mounted control rod with the induction transmitter for the lower position of the control rod. In the transfer position the rod is fixed within the guide tube. (orig.)

  20. Maximum/minimum asymmetric rod detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huston, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a system for determining the relative position of each control rod within a control rod group in a nuclear reactor. The control rod group having at least three control rods therein. It comprises: means for producing a signal representative of a position of each control rod within the control rod group in the nuclear reactor; means for establishing a signal representative of the highest position of a control rod in the control rod group in the nuclear reactor; means for establishing a signal representative of the lowest position of a control rod in the control rod group in the nuclear reactor; means for determining a difference between the signal representative of the position of the highest control rod and the signal representative of the position of the lowest control rod; means for establishing a predetermined limit for the difference between the signal representative of the position of the highest control rod and the signal representative of the position of the lowest control rod; and means for comparing the difference between the signals with the predetermined limit. The comparing means producing an output signal when the difference between the signals exceeds the predetermined limit

  1. Refabricated and instrumented fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, K.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel for power reactors capabilities evaluation is strongly based on the intimate knowledge of its behaviour under irradiation. This knowledge can be acquired from refabricated and instrumented fuel rods irradiated at different levels in commercial reactors. This paper presents the development and qualification of a new technique called RECTO related to a double-instrumented rod re-fabrication process developed by CEA/LECA hot laboratory facility at CADARACHE. The technique development includes manufacturing of the properly dimensioned cavity in the fuel pellet stack to house the thermocouple and the use of a newly designed pressure transducer. An analytic irradiation of such a double-instrumented fuel rod will be performed in OSIRIS test reactor starting October 2004. (Author)

  2. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 2 discusses the following topics: Fuel Rod Extraction System Test Results and Analysis Reports and Clamping Table Test Results and Analysis Reports

  3. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 1 of Volume IV, discusses: Process overview functional descriptions; Control system descriptions; Support system descriptions; Maintenance system descriptions; and Process equipment descriptions

  4. Reactor control rod supporting structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tokuzo; Miyata, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable stable reactor core control even in extremely great vertical earthquakes, as well as under normal operation conditions in FBR type reactors. Constitution: Since a mechanism for converting the rotational movement of a control rod into vertical movement is placed at the upper portion of the reactor core at high temperature, the mechanism should cause fusion or like other danger after the elapse of a long period of time. In view of the above, the conversion mechanism is disposed to the lower portion of the reactor core at a lower temperature region. Further, the connection between the control rod and the control rod drive can be separated upon great vertical earthquakes. (Seki, T.)

  5. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  6. Lifting device for drilling rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzivilovich, L L; Laptev, A G; Lipkovich, V A

    1982-01-01

    A lifter is proposed for drilling rods including a spacer stand with rotating bracket, boom with by-pass rollers, spacing and lifting hydrocylinders with rods and flexible tie mechanism. In order to improve labor productivity by improving maneuverability and to increase the maintenance zone, the lifter is equipped with a hydrocylinder of advance and a cross piece which is installed with the possibility of forward and rotational movement on the stand, and in which by means of the hydrocylinder of advance a boom is attached. Within the indicated boom there is a branch of the flexible tie mechanism with end attached with the possibility of regulation over the length on a rotating bracket, while the rod of the lifting hydrocylinder is connected to the cross piece.

  7. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 4 of Volume IV, discusses: Off-normal operating and recovery procedures; Emergency response procedures; Troubleshooting procedures; and Preventive maintenance procedures

  8. Study of a DC gas discharge with a copper cathode in a water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazmeev, G. Kh.; Timerkaev, B. A.; Tazmeev, Kh. K.

    2017-07-01

    A dc gas discharge between copper electrodes in the current range of 5-20 A was studied experimentally. The discharge gap length was varied within 45-70 mm. The cathode was a 10-mm-diameter rod placed in the water flowing out from a dielectric tube. Three discharge configurations differing in the position of the cathode upper end with respect to the water surface were considered: (i) above water; (ii) flush with the water surface, and (iii) under water. The electric and optical characteristics of the discharge in the second configuration were studied in more detail. It is established that the discharge properties are similar to those of an electric arc. Considerable cathode erosion was observed in the third configuration. It is revealed that fine-dispersed copper grains form in the course of erosion.

  9. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  10. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  11. Porous (Swiss-Cheese Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Abrahamson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous graphite was prepared without the use of template by rapidly heating the carbonization products from mixtures of anthracene, fluorene, and pyrene with a CO2 laser. Rapid CO2 laser heating at a rate of 1.8 × 106 °C/s vaporizes out the fluorene-pyrene derived pitch while annealing the anthracene coke. The resulting structure is that of graphite with 100 nm spherical pores. The graphitizablity of the porous material is the same as pure anthracene coke. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfaces between graphitic layers and the pore walls are unimpeded. Traditional furnace annealing does not result in the porous structure as the heating rates are too slow to vaporize out the pitch, thereby illustrating the advantage of fast thermal processing. The resultant porous graphite was prelithiated and used as an anode in lithium ion capacitors. The porous graphite when lithiated had a specific capacity of 200 mAh/g at 100 mA/g. The assembled lithium ion capacitor demonstrated an energy density as high as 75 Wh/kg when cycled between 2.2 V and 4.2 V.

  12. Cadmium safety rod thermal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.K.; Iyer, N.C.; Peacock, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal testing of cadmium safety rods was conducted as part of a program to define the response of Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor core components to a hypothetical LOCA leading to a drained reactor tank. The safety rods are present in the reactor core only during shutdown and are not used as a control mechanism during operation; thus, their response to the conditions predicted for the LOCA is only of interest to the extent that it could impact the progression of the accident. This document provides a description of this testing

  13. Control rod housing alignment apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.C.; Deaver, G.A.; Punches, J.R.; Singleton, G.E.; Erbes, J.G.; Offer, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses an alignment device for precisely locating the position of the top of a control rod drive housing from an overlying and corresponding hole and alignment pin in a core plate within a boiling water nuclear reactor. It includes a shaft, the shaft having a length sufficient to extend from the vicinity of the top of the control rod drive housing up to and through the hole in the core plate; means for registering the top of the shaft to the hole in the core plate, the registering means including means for registering with an alignment pin in the core plate adjacent the hole

  14. Control rod guide tube assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly including sleeves telescoped over end portions of control rod guide tubes which bear against internal shoulders of the sleeves. Upper ends of the sleeves protrude beyond a control rod guide tube spider and are locked in place by means of a resilient cellular lattice or lock that is seated in mating grooves in the outer surfaces of the sleeves. A grapple is provided for disengaging the entire lock structure spider and associated washers, springs and a grill from the end of the fuel assembly in order to enable these components to be removed and subsequently replaced on the fuel assembly after inspection and repair. (UK)

  15. Improvements in or relating to methods of and apparatus for coating wire, rod or strip material by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for coating wire, rod or strip material comprising first subjecting the material to electron bombardment in a glow discharge to heat and activate the surface and then subjecting it to sputtering by use of a soft cathode discharge. The apparatus comprises a low pressure gas chamber through which the material is passed, and containing a glow discharge electron gun having a tubular cathode shaped so that the material can be passed axially through it, and an anode surrounding the cathode. The cathode is formed in two parts, the first part at one end, being made of material of low sputtering yield, and the second part being formed at least partially of the required coating material. The first part of the cathode may be of stainless steel or Al. The two parts of the cathode are electrically isolated with means provided for applying a lower negative potential, with respect to the anode, to the second part compared with the first part. The voltage applied to the second part may be controlled so as to control the sputtering rate. The gas pressure in the chamber is also controllable. The coating material may be arranged as inserts in the fixed cathode structure or as segments around the surface to be coated, and may be composed of Pb, Zn or Cu. (U.K.)

  16. The Hitrex Programme: unperturbed HTR lattice and control rod measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beynon, A J; Nunn, D L

    1972-06-15

    Reactivity, power distributions, plutonium production and fast neutron graphite damage are being studied at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (BNL) on the HTR 'Hitrex' reactor under cold clean conditions. Rod interactions, important in assessing local criticality hazards, are receiving special attention in the measurements. The proposals for the first two series of measurements on Hitrex are discussed in this note, Hitrex 1a being the unperturbed reactor, and Hitrex 1b the same fuel array but with a number of different control absorber loadings in it. Common to both series will be cross pin, cross block and cross core measurements of power rating, thermal spectrum and damage dose distributions, so that these will be known as functions of the fuel, reflector and absorber environment.

  17. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  18. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  19. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  20. Preliminary scoping study of some neutronic aspects of new shim safety rods for a typical 5 MW research reactor by Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoushtari, M.K.; Kakavand, T. [Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, P.O. BOX 1415, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaforian, H. [Faculty of Science and Technology of Marine, P.O. BOX 212 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiai, S.M. Sadat [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTR), Nuclear Science Research, A.E.O.I. P.O. BOX 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sadatkiai@yahoo.com

    2009-02-15

    A Monte Carlo simulation of a typical 5 MW research reactor (TRR) was carried out using MCNP4C code. The geometry of the reactor core was modeled including the details of all fuel elements, control rods, all irradiation channels, graphite reflectors, reactor pool and thermal column. The model predicted neutron flux distributions within the core, control rod (CR) worth, core reactivity ({rho}), shutdown margin, and some kinetic parameters when the control rod insert or withdraw. This study was carried out to reduce blockage probability of shim safety rod (SSR)s of the TRR. Two introduced more blackness SSRs were chosen and made thinner in a way adequate blackness, in comparison to the present rods, achieved.

  1. Flow resistance in rod assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsun, A.S.; Sokolova, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    The general form of relation between the resistance force and the velocity vector, resistance tensor structure and possible types of anisotropy in the flow thorough such structures as rod or tube assemblies are under discussion. Some questions of experimental determination of volumetric resistance force tensor are also under consideration. (author)

  2. Nuclear fuel rod loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, H.B.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear fuel loading apparatus, incorporating a microprocessor control unit, is described which automatically loads nuclear fuel pellets into dual fuel rods with a minimum of manual involvement and in a manner and sequence to ensure quality control and accuracy. (U.K.)

  3. Control rod driving hydraulic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Hiroshi.

    1993-01-01

    In a control rod driving hydraulic device for an improved BWR type reactor, a bypass pipeline is disposed being branched from a scram pipeline, and a control orifice and a throttle valve are interposed to the bypass pipeline for restricting pressure. Upon occurrence of scram, about 1/2 of water quantity flowing from an accumulator of a hydraulic control unit to the lower surface of a piston of control rod drives by way of a scram pipeline is controlled by the restricting orifice and the throttle valve, by which the water is discharged to a pump suction pipeline or other pipelines by way of the bypass pipeline. With such procedures, a function capable of simultaneously conducting scram for two control rod drives can be attained by one hydraulic control unit. Further, an excessive peak pressure generated by a water hammer phenomenon in the scram pipeline or the control rod drives upon occurrence of scram can be reduced. Deformation and failure due to the excessive peak pressure can be prevented, as well as vibrations and degradation of performance of relevant portions can be prevented. (N.H.)

  4. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  5. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  6. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  7. Electron emission mechanism of carbon fiber cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lie; Li Limin; Wen Jianchun; Wan Hong

    2005-01-01

    Models of electron emission mechanism are established concerning metal and carbon fiber cathodes. Correctness of the electron emission mechanism was proved according to micro-photos and electron scanning photos of cathodes respectively. The experimental results and analysis show that the surface flashover induces the electron emission of carbon fiber cathode and there are electron emission phenomena from the top of the carbon and also from its side surface. In addition, compared with the case of the stainless steel cathode, the plasma expansion velocity for the carbon fiber cathode is slower and the pulse duration of output microwave can be widened by using the carbon fiber cathode. (authors)

  8. Inspection system for Zircaloy clad fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancey, M.E.; Porter, E.H.; Hansen, H.R.

    1975-10-01

    A description is presented of the design, development, and performance of a remote scanning system for nondestructive examination of fuel rods. Characteristics that are examined include microcracking of fuel rod cladding, fuel-cladding interaction, cladding thickness, fuel rod diameter variation, and fuel rod bowing. Microcracking of both the inner and outer fuel rod surfaces and variations in wall thickness are detected by using a pulsed eddy current technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Fuel rod diameter variation and fuel rod bowing are detected by using two linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) and a signal conditioning system. The system's mechanical features include variable scanning speeds, a precision indexing system, and a servomechanism to maintain proper probe alignment. Initial results indicate that the system is a very useful mechanism for characterizing irradiated fuel rods

  9. Control rods in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.

    1982-08-01

    This physics assessment is based on roughly 300 control rod worth measurements in ZPPR from 1972 to 1981. All ZPPR assemblies simulated mixed-oxide LMFBRs, representing sizes of 350, 700, and 900 MWe. Control rod worth measurements included single rods, various combinations of rods, and Ta and Eu rods. Additional measurements studied variations in B 4 C enrichment, rod interaction effects, variations in rod geometry, neutron streaming in sodium-filled channels, and axial worth profiles. Analyses were done with design-equivalent methods, using ENDF/B Version IV data. Some computations for the sensitivities to approximations in the methods have been included. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments have allowed the status of control rod physics in the US to be clearly defined

  10. Duke Power Company's control rod wear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, D.C.; Kitlan, M.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recent examinations performed at several foreign and domestic pressurized water reactors have identified significant control rod cladding wear, leading to the conclusion that previously believed control rod lifetimes are not attainable. To monitor control rod performance and reduce safety concerns associated with wear, Duke Power Company has developed a comprehensive control rod wear program for Ag-In-Cd and boron carbide (B 4 C) rods at the McGuire and Catawba nuclear stations. Duke Power currently uses the Westinghouse 17 x 17 Ag-In-Cd control rod design at McGuire Unit 1 and the Westinghouse 17 x 17 hybrid B 4 C control rod design with a Ag-In-Cd tip at McGuire Unit 2 and Catawba Units 1 and 2. The designs are similar, with the exception of the absorber material and clad thickness. There are 53 control rods per unit

  11. Maintaining a critical spectra within Monteburns for a gas-cooled reactor array by way of control rod manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adigun, Babatunde J.; Fensin, Michael L.; Galloway, Jack D.; Trellue, Holly R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Tested here are 4 methods for estimating critical rod position, in Monteburns, of a reactor fuel array. • Inverse multiplication methods better predict critical rod position at the cost of more iterations. • A polynomial fit technique can predict most plutonium isotopics to within 5%. - Abstract: This burnup study examined the effect of a predicted critical control rod position on the nuclide predictability of several axial and radial locations within a 4 × 4 graphite moderated gas cooled reactor fuel cluster geometry. To achieve this, a control rod position estimator (CRPE) tool was developed within the framework of the linkage code Monteburns between the transport code MCNP and depletion code CINDER90, and four methodologies were proposed within the tool for maintaining criticality. Two of the proposed methods used an inverse multiplication approach – where the amount of fissile material in a set configuration is slowly altered until criticality is attained – in estimating the critical control rod position. Another method carried out several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions, then used a linear fit to estimate the critical rod position. The final method used a second-order polynomial fit of several MCNP criticality calculations at different control rod positions to guess the critical rod position. The results showed that consistency in prediction of power densities as well as uranium and plutonium isotopics was mutual among methods within the CRPE tool that predicted critical position consistently well. While the CRPE tool is currently limited to manipulating a single control rod, future work could be geared toward implementing additional criticality search methodologies along with additional features.

  12. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  13. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  14. NMR studies on graphite-methanol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akkad, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times for protons of methanol on graphite have been studied. The perpendicular and the transversal magnetization as a function of temperature were measured. The results show that the presence of graphite slowed down the methanol movement compared with that in the pure alcohol, and that the methanol molecules are attached to the graphite surface via methyl groups. (author)

  15. Heat treatment of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G. [and others

    1997-02-01

    Amorphous hard carbon films of varying sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fractions have been deposited on Si using filtered cathodic are deposition with pulsed biasing. The films were heat treated in air up to 550 C. Raman investigation and nanoindentation were performed to study the modification of the films caused by the heat treatment. It was found that films containing a high sp{sup 3} fraction sustain their hardness for temperatures at least up to 400 C, their structure for temperatures up to 500 C, and show a low thickness loss during heat treatment. Films containing at low sp{sup 3} fraction graphitize during the heat treatment, show changes in structure and hardness, and a considerable thickness loss.

  16. Process and apparatus for controlling control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebelin, B.; Couture, R.

    1987-01-01

    This process and apparatus is characterized by 2 methods, for examination of cluster of nuclear control rods. Foucault current analyzer which examines fraction by fraction all the control rods. This examination is made by rotation of the cluster. Doubtful rods are then analysed by ultrasonic probe [fr

  17. Fuel followed control rod installation at AFRRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Mark; Owens, Chris; Forsbacka, Matt

    1992-01-01

    Fuel Followed Control Rods (FFCRs) were installed at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute's 1 MW TRIGA Reactor. The procedures for obtaining, shipping, and installing the FFCRs is described. As part of the FFCR installation, the transient rod drive was relocated. Core performance due to the addition of the fuel followed control rods is discussed. (author)

  18. Solitary waves on nonlinear elastic rods. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Lomdahl, P. S.

    1987-01-01

    In continuation of an earlier study of propagation of solitary waves on nonlinear elastic rods, numerical investigations of blowup, reflection, and fission at continuous and discontinuous variation of the cross section for the rod and reflection at the end of the rod are presented. The results ar...... are compared with predictions of conservation theorems for energy and momentum....

  19. ELECTRIC FIELD MEASUREMENT IN ROD-DISCONTINUED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-30

    Jun 30, 2014 ... the electrogeometrical model using a laboratory experimental rod-plane air gap arrangement with a lightning conductor (Franklin rod or horizontal conductor). The stepped leader could be represented by the rod electrode under a negative lightning impulse voltage having a level leading to breakdown with ...

  20. Testing device for control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1992-01-01

    A testing device for control rod drives comprises a logic measuring means for measuring an output signal from a control rod drive logic generation circuit, a control means for judging the operation state of a control rod and a man machine interface means for outputting the result of the judgement. A driving instruction outputted from the control rod operation device is always monitored by the control means, and if the operation instruction is stopped, a testing signal is outputted to the control rod control device to simulate a control rod operation. In this case, the output signal of the control rod drive logic generation circuit is held in a control rod drive memory means and intaken into a logic analysis means for measurement and an abnormality is judged by the control means. The stopping of the control rod drive instruction is monitored and the operation abnormality of the control rod is judged, to mitigate the burden of an operator. Further, the operation of the control rod drive logic generation circuit can be confirmed even during a nuclear plant operation by holding the control rod drive instruction thereby enabling to improve maintenance efficiency. (N.H.)

  1. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod is a device used during the loop colostomy procedure. A loop of colon is surgically brought out through...

  2. Spider and burnable poison rod combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, G.T.; Schluderberg, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    An improved design of burnable poison rods and associated spiders used in fuel assemblies of pressurized water power reactor cores, is described. The rods are joined to the spider arms in a manner which is proof against the reactor core environment and yet allows the removal of the rods from the spider simply, swiftly and delicately. (U.K.)

  3. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  4. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P.M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC 6 and YbC 6 in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition

  5. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  6. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  7. The calculation of methane profiles in AGR graphite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Harper, A.

    1981-07-01

    The MEDIC model has been extended in order that it may be applied to experiments carried out in the Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) to measure graphite radiolytic oxidation rates in thick specimens. Three aspects are covered: (a) the extension of the analysis of conventional WAGR nest assemblies to two dimensions rather than the infinite cylinder situation used in current assessments; (b) the examination of the effect of possible paths in WAGR nests; and (c) application of the model to the more complex geometry associated with WAGR inverted nest and rod type assemblies. It is demonstrated that only small errors are introduced into the analysis of WAGR nest data by making the assumption of infinite cylinder geometry. The effect of leakage paths within the nest assembly is also shown to be probably unimportant. (author)

  8. Self-Assembly of Rod-Coil Block Copolymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jenekhe, S

    1999-01-01

    ... the self-assembly of new rod-coil diblock, rod- coil-rod triblock, and coil-rod-coil triblock copolymers from solution and the resulting discrete and periodic mesostmctares with sizes in the 100...

  9. Technetium electrodeposition from aqueous formate solutions at graphite electrode: electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslennikov, A.; Peretroukhine, V.; Masson, M.; Lecomte, M.

    1999-01-01

    Recovery of technetium from aqueous formate buffer solutions of ionic strength μ = 1.0 was studied in the pH interval from 1.6 to 7.5 at graphite cathode in an electrolytic cell with separated compartments was studied, using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and inverse stripping voltammetry (ISV) techniques. It has been shown that Tc electrodeposition process becomes possible at the potentials of graphite cathode E cath. 1/2 = -0.72±0.02 V/SCE and was pH independent in the interval pH = 3.46-7.32. Mechanism of electrodeposition, including Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) reduction in the solution followed by Tc(IV) hydrolysis at the electrode surface with formation of hydrated Tc oxide cathodic deposit has been proposed. The further precision of the Tc(VII) electrochemical reduction mechanism in formate buffer media and optimization of the electrodeposition process seems to be possible using additional analytical facilities except electrochemical methods. (orig.)

  10. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  11. Corrosion of Graphite Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    cathodic protection of G/AI MMCs resulted in overprotection 13. Overprotection resulted from a local increase in pH near cathodic sites during...34Cathodic Overprotection of SiC/6061-T6 and G/6061- T6 Aluminum Alloy Metal Matrix Composites," Scripta Metallurgica, 22 (1988) 413-418. 14. R

  12. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1965-01-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m 3 and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m 2 /g (graphite particles about 1 μ), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m 2 /g (all the particles less than 0.3 μ). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [fr

  13. Plasma Deposition of Oxide-Coated Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umstattd, Ryan

    1998-01-01

    ...; such cathodes may also have applicability for lower current density continuous wave devices. This novel approach to manufacturing an oxide cathode eliminates the binders that may subsequently (and unpredictably...

  14. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  15. Production of thin carbon stripper foils using heated-substrates in a cathodic arc deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, A.R.; Lobanov, N.; Elliman, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.; Rode, A.; Weisser, D.C.; Turkentine, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetime of carbon stripper foil can have a marked impact on the successful running of a beam line. Standard techniques for production of carbon stripper foils include evaporation of carbon (ec) and laser-pulsed ablation (Ipa). Recent work by a using Ipa has been successful in substantially increasing the lifetime of a very thin foil. The suspected mechanism for the increased lifetime of the foil is that the amorphous carbon foil is density-matched to that of graphite (around 2.26g/cc). In this work, we attempt to reproduce this result by producing carbon stripper foils with a mass-density similar to graphite using a cathodic arc deposition system. The cathodic arc is well known for the production of tetrahedral amorphous carbon: a high density, high stress form of carbon with over 90% sp 3 -like bonds; to reduce the density of the carbon and promote more graphitic structure, a high bias was initially attempted but this proved unsuccessful. Another method is to use a heated-substrate holder to reduce compressive stress within the deposited film. The performance of the density-matched carbon stripper foils and the implications for future production of high-quality carbon stripper foils in our laboratory will be discussed. (authors)

  16. Influence of Crucible Support Rod on the Growth Rate and Temperature Gradient in a Bridgman Growth of Tin Crystal

    OpenAIRE

    IMASHIMIZU, Yuji; MIURA, Koji; KAMATA, Masaki; WATANABE, Jiro

    2003-01-01

    Bridgman growth of tincrystal was carried out in a graphite crucible that was fixed on a quartz support rod or a copper one. The growth rate and axial temperature distribution were examined by recording the temperature variation with time at each of four prescribed positions in the solid-liquidsystem during solidification, l) Actual growth rate of crystal increased with progress of solidification while the furnace elevated at a constant rate, but the tendency was different depending on the ty...

  17. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  18. Snubber assembly for a control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A snubber cartridge assembly is mounted to the nozzle of a control rod drive mechanism to insure that the snubber assembly will be located within the liquid filled section of a nuclear reactor vessel whenever the control rod drive is assembled thereto. The snubber assembly includes a piston mounted proximate to the control rod connecting end of the control rod drive leadscrew to allow the piston to travel within the liquid filled snubber cartridge and controllably exhaust liquid therefrom during a ''scram'' condition. The snubber cartridge provides three separate areas of increasing resistance to piston travel to insure a speedy but safe ''scram'' of the control rod into the reactor

  19. Individual nuclear fuel rod weighing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogg, J. L.; Howell, C. A.; Smith, J. H.; Vining, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    An individual nuclear fuel rod weighing system for rods carried on a tray which moves along a materials handling conveyor. At a first tray position on the conveyor, a lifting device raises the rods off the tray and places them on an overhead ramp. A loading mechanism conveys the rods singly from the overhead ramp onto an overhead scale for individual weighing. When the tray is at a second position on the conveyor, a transfer apparatus transports each weighed rod from the scale back onto the tray

  20. Individual nuclear fuel rod weighing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogg, J.L.; Smith, J.H.; Vining, G.E.; Howell, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    An individual nuclear fuel rod weighing system for rods carried on a tray which moves along a materials handling conveyor is discussed. At a first tray position on the conveyor, a lifting device raises the rods off the tray and places them on an overhead ramp. A loading mechanism conveys the rods singly from the overhead ramp onto an overhead scale for individual weighing. When the tray is at a second position on the conveyor, a transfer apparatus transports each weighed rod from the scale back onto the tray

  1. Automated nuclear fuel rod pattern loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, D.V.; Nyland, T.W.; Byers, J.W.; Haley, D.E. Jr.; Cioffi, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for loading fuel rods in a desired pattern. It comprises: a carousel having a plurality of movable gondolas for stocking thereon fuel rods of known enrichments; an elongated magazine defining a matrix of elongated slots being open at their forward ends for receiving fuel rods; a workstation defining a fuel rod feed path; and a holder and indexing mechanism for movably supporting the magazine and being actuatable for moving the magazine along X-Y axes to successively align one at a time selected ones of the slots with the feed path for loading in the magazine the successive fuel rods in a desired enrichment pattern

  2. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  3. Snubber assembly for a control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A snubber cartridge assembly is described which is mounted to the nozzle of a control rod drive mechanism to insure that it will be located within the liquid filled section of a nuclear reactor vessel whenever the control rod drive is assembled thereto. The snubber assembly includes a piston-mounted proximate to the control rod connecting end of the control rod drive leadscrew to allow the piston to travel within the liquid filled snubber cartridge and controllable exhaust the liquid during a 'scram' condition. The snubber cartridge provides three separate areas of increasing resistance to piston travel to insure a speedy but safe 'scram' of the control rod into the reactor

  4. Rod cluster having improved vane configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shockling, L.A.; Francis, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a pressurized water reactor vessel, the vessel defining a predetermined axial direction of the flow of coolant therewithin and having plural spider assemblies supporting, for vertical movement within the vessel, respective clusters of rods in spaced, parallel axial relationship, parallel to the predetermined axial direction of coolant flow, and a rod guide for each spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The rod guide having horizontally oriented support plates therewithin, each plate having an interior opening for accommodating axial movement therethrough of the spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The opening defining plural radially extending channels and corresponding parallel interior wall surfaces of the support plate

  5. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  6. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 1 discusses the following topics: the background of the project; test program description; summary of tests and test results; problem evaluation; functional requirements confirmation; recommendations; and completed test documentation for tests performed in Phase 3

  7. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 9 discusses the following topics: Integrated System Normal Operations Test Results and Analysis Report; Integrated System Off-Normal Operations Test Results and Analysis Report; and Integrated System Maintenance Operations Test Results and Analysis Report

  8. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 8 discusses Control System SOT Tests Results and Analysis Report. This is a continuation of Book 7

  9. Prototypical Rod Construction Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 3 discusses the following topics: Downender Test Results and Analysis Report; NFBC Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report; Fuel Assembly Handling Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; and Fuel Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report

  10. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles A [Albuquerque, NM; Trowbridge, Frank R [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-10

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.

  11. Monitoring device for withdrawing control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashigawa, Yuichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the sensitivity and the responsivity to an equivalent extent to those in the case where local power range monitors are densely arranged near each of the control rods, with no actual but pseudo increase of the number of local power range monitors. Constitution: The monitor arrangement is patterned by utilizing the symmetricity of the reactor core and stored in a monitor designating device. The symmetricity of control rods to be selected and withdrawn by an operator is judged by a control rod symmetry monitoring device, while the symmetricity of the withdrawn control rods is judged by a control rod withdrawal state monitoring device. Then, only when both of the devices judge the symmetricity, the control rods are subjected to gang driving by the control rod drive mechanisms. In this way, monitoring at a high sensitivity and responsivity is enabled with no increase for the number of monitors. (Yoshino, Y.)

  12. Rope wind-up type control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Teruaki; Watanabe, Shigeru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To hold a control rod at a certain position even if the sealed cover of the rod drive mechanism should fail. Constitution: A plurality of friction plates, engaging wheels and a threaded shaft are provided to the wind-up drum for winding up a rope which moves the control rod up and down. While the control rod is adapted to drop by its own weight upon insertion, it is adapted to stop at a predetermined position exactly with no shocks by gradually increasing braking force by the sliding friction caused from the friction plates or the like. A ratch mechanism is provided to the upper portion of the control rod so that the top of the ratch piece may automatically engage the guide passage wall of the control rod upon uncontrolled running of the control rod to prevent further uncontrolled running thereof. (Ikeda, J.)

  13. Hollow rods for the oil producing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalimova, L M; Elyasheva, M A

    1970-01-01

    Hollow sucker rods have several advantages over conventional ones. The hollow rods actuate the well pump and at the same time conduct produced fluids to surface. When paraffin deposition occurs, it can be minimized by injecting steam, hot oil or hot water into the hollow rod. Other chemicals, such as demulsifiers, scale inhibitors, corrosion inhibitors, etc., can also be placed in the well through the hollow rods. This reduces cost of preventive treatments, reduces number of workovers, increases oil production, and reduces cost of oil. Because the internal area of the rod is small, the passing liquids have a high velocity and thereby carry sand and dirt out of the well. This reduces pump wear between the piston and the plunger. Specifications of hollow rods, their operating characteristics, and results obtained with such rods under various circumstances are described.

  14. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  15. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Control-rod scram device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yoshiro; Saito, Koji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement for the nitrogen gas system in a scram device and enable safety and reliable shutdown of a water-cooled reactor power plant. Constitution: A piston and a spring are contained within a hydraulic vessel, and the piston is driven by the energy stored in the spring so as to supply hydraulic water to control mechanisms. During usual reactor operation, a scram valve is closed and a high water pressure of about 130 kg/cm 2 is applied to the water filled in the vessel through a check valve. Upon occurrence of abnormal conditions and generation of scram signals, the scram valve is opened to supply the water filled in the vessel through the scram valve to the control rod drive mechanisms. When the water pressure in the vessel is decreased, since the piston is urged upwardly by the energy stored in the spring, the water filled in the vessel is intermitently supplied to the control rod drive mechanisms. Thus, control rods can be inserted into the nuclear reactor to shutdown the same. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report

  18. Advanced cathode materials for high-power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, K.; Liu, J.; Belharouak, I.; Kang, S.-H.; Bloom, I.; Vissers, D.; Henriksen, G.

    In our efforts to develop low cost high-power Li-ion batteries with excellent safety, as well as long cycle and calendar life, lithium manganese oxide spinel and layered lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials were investigated. Our studies with the graphite/LiPF 6/spinel cells indicated a very significant degradation of capacity with cycling at 55 °C. This degradation was caused by the reduction of manganese ions on the graphite surface which resulted in a significant increase of the charge-transfer impedance at the anode/electrolyte interface. To improve the stability of the spinel, we investigated an alternative salt that would not generate HF acid that may attack the spinel. The alternative salt we selected for this work was lithium bisoxalatoborate, LiB(C 2O 4) 2 ("LiBoB"). In this case, the graphite/LiBoB/spinel Li-ion cells exhibited much improved cycle/calendar life at 55 °C and better abuse tolerance, as well as excellent power. A second system based on LiNi 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 layered material was also investigated and its performance was compared to commercial LiNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2. Cells based on LiNi 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3O 2 showed lower power fade and better thermal safety than the LiNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2-based commercial cells under similar test conditions. Li-ion cells based on the material with excess lithium (Li 1.1Ni 1/3Co 1/3Mn 1/3O 2) exhibited excellent power performance that exceeded the FreedomCAR requirements.

  19. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kage, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 442, Nov (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * cast iron * graphite structure * pearlite content Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2016

  20. The impact of new cathode materials relative to baseline performance of microbial fuel cells all with the same architecture and solution chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Wulin

    2017-04-21

    Differences in microbial fuel cell (MFC) architectures, materials, and solution chemistries, have previously hindered direct comparisons of improvements in power production due to new cathode materials. However, one common reactor design has now been used in many different laboratories around the world under similar operating conditions based on using: a graphite fiber brush anode, a platinum cathode catalyst, a single-chamber cube-shaped (4-cm) MFC with a 3-cm diameter anolyte chamber, 50 mM phosphate buffer, and an acetate fuel. Analysis of several publications over 10 years from a single laboratory showed that even under such identical operational conditions, maximum power densities varied by 15%, with an average of 1.36 ± 0.20 W m–2 (n=24), normalized to cathode projected area (34 W m–3 liquid volume). In other laboratories, maximum power was significantly less, with an average of 1.03 ± 0.46 W m–2 (n=11), despite identical conditions. One likely reason for the differences in power is cathode age. Power production with Pt catalyst cathodes significantly declined after one month of operation or more to 0.87 ± 0.31 W m–2 (n=18) based on studies where cathode aging was examined, while in many studies the age of the cathode was not reported. Using these studies as a performance baseline, we review the claims of improvements in power generation due to new anode or cathode materials, or changes in solution conductivities and substrates.

  1. Application of 3D coupled code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX for RBMK-1000 transients after graphite block modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samokhin, Aleksei [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SEC NRS), Moscow (Russian Federation); Zilly, Matias [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This work describes the application and the results of transient calculations for the RBMK-1000 with the coupled code system ATHLET 2.2A-QUABOX/CUBBOX which was developed in GRS. Within these studies the planned modernization of the graphite blocks of the RBMK-1000 reactor is taken into account. During the long-term operation of the uranium-graphite reactors RBMK-1000, a change of physical and mechanical properties of the reactor graphite blocks is observed due to the impact of radiation and temperature effects. These have led to a deformation of the reactor graphite columns and, as a result, a deformation of the control and protection system (CPS) and of fuel channels. Potentially, this deformation can lead to problems affecting the smooth movement of the control rods in the CPS channels and problems during the loading and unloading of fuel assemblies. The present paper analyzes two reactivity insertion transients, each taking into account three graphite removal scenarios. The presented work is directly connected with the modernization program of the RBMK- 1000 reactors and has an important contribution to the assessment of the safety-relevant parameters after the modification of the core graphite blocks.

  2. Study of nanometric thin pyrolytic carbon films for explosive electron emission cathode in high-voltage planar diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baryshevsky, Vladimir; Belous, Nikolai; Gurinovich, Alexandra; Gurnevich, Evgeny [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, Polina, E-mail: polina.kuzhir@gmail.com [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Prospekt, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Maksimenko, Sergey [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Prospekt, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Molchanov, Pavel; Shuba, Mikhail [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Roddatis, Vladimir [CIC energiGUNE, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Minano, Alava (Spain); Institut für Materialphysik of Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri [Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, Joensuu FI-80101 (Finland)

    2015-04-30

    We report on an experimental study of explosive electron emission properties of cathode made by nanometric thin pyrolytic carbon (PyC) films (2–150 nm) deposited on Cu substrate via methane-based chemical vapor deposition. High current density at level of 300 A/cm{sup 2} in 5 · 10{sup −5} Pa vacuum has been observed together with very stable explosive emission from the planar cathode. The Raman spectroscopy investigation proves that the PyC films remain the same after seven shots. According to the optical image analysis of the cathode before and after one and seven shots, we conclude that the most unusual and interesting feature of using the PyC films/Cu cathode for explosive emission is that the PyC layer on the top of the copper target prevents its evaporation and oxidation, which leads to higher emission stability compared to conventional graphitic/Cu cathodes, and therefore results in longer working life. - Highlights: • Explosive electron emission from pyrolytic carbon (PyC) cathode is reported. • We observe high current density, 300 A/cm{sup 2}, and stable emission parameters. • PyC integrity ensures a high application potential for high current electronics.

  3. Experimental determination of thermal conductivity and gap conductance of fuel rod for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Teruo; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi

    1985-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of fuel compacts and the gap conductance between the fuel compact and the graphite sleeve in fuel rods for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) were measured by the center heating method. These measurements were made as functions of volume percent particle loading and temperature for thermal conductivity and as functions of gap distance and gas composition for gap conductance. The thermal conductivity of fuel compacts decreases with increasing temperature and with increasing particle loading. The gap conductance increases with increasing temperature and decrease with increasing gap distance. A good gap conductance was observed with helium fill gas. It was seen that the gap conductance was dependent on the thermal conductivity of fill gas and conductance by radiation and could be neglected the conductance through solid-solid contact points of fuel compact and graphite sleeve. (author)

  4. Graphite moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a 252 Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the 252 Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  5. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  6. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  7. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  8. Automated nuclear fuel rod pattern loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, D.V.; Nylund, T.W.; Byers, J.W.; Haley, D.E. Jr.; Cioffi, J.V.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for loading fuel rods in a desired pattern. It comprises providing a supply of fuel rods of known enrichments; providing a magazine defining a matrix of elongated slots open at their forward ends for receiving fuel rods; defining a fuel rod feed path; receiving successively one at a time along the feed path fuel rods selected from the supply thereof; verifying successively one at a time along the feed path the identity of the selected fuel rods, the verifying including blocking passage of each selected fuel rod along the feed path until the identity of each selected fuel rod is confirmed as correct; feeding to the magazine successively one at a time along the feed path the selective and verified fuel rods; and supporting and moving the magazine along X-Y axes to successively align one at a time selected ones of the slots with the feed path for loading in the magazine the successive fuel rods in a desired enrichment pattern

  9. Vibrational characteristics and wear of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmugar, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel rod wear, due to vibration, is a continuing concern in the design of liquid-cooled reactors. In my report, the methodology and models that are used to predict fuel rod vibrational response and vibratory wear, in a light water reactor environment, are discussed. This methodology is being followed at present in the design of Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel. Fuel rod vibrations are expressed as the normal bending modes, and sources of rod vibration are examined with special emphasis on flow-induced mechanisms in the stable flow region. In a typical Westinghouse PWR fuel assembly design, each fuel rod is supported at multiple locations along the rod axis by a square-shaped 'grid cell'. For a fuel rod /grid support system, the development of small oscillatory motions, due to fluid flow at the rod/grid interface, results in material wear. A theoretical wear mode is developed using the Archard Theory of Adhesive Wear as the basis. Without question certainty, fretting wear becomes a serious problem if it progresses to the stage where the fuel cladding is penetrated and fuel is exposed to the coolant. Westinghouse fuel is designed to minimize fretting wear by limiting the relative motion between the fuel rod and its supports. The wear producing motion between the fuel rod and its supports occurs when the vibration amplitude exceeds the slippage threshold amplitude

  10. Synopsis of Cathode No.4 Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature

  11. Electron transfer at boron-doped diamond electrodes modified by graphitic micro-domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahe, E.; Devilliers, D. [Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France). Electrochemistry Lab.; Comninellis, C. [Lausanne Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne (Switzerland). Groupe de Genie Electrochimique

    2006-07-01

    Boron-doped (BDD) electrodes have been used in electrolysis procedures for the last 10 years. The mechanical stability of the electrode, its large electrochemical window and its low capacitive current place this new electrode material as an alternative for replacing more costly or toxic materials such as mercury. However, the ferri/ferrocyanide system of boron-doped electrodes has shown contradictory results in the literature. This study proposed a cathodic pre-treatment which relied on the presence of residual graphitic domains formed during the preparation of the BDD film. An experiment was conducted in which the doping procedure was used to control the amount of graphitic phase on the electrode with highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) grafted on the BDD surface. Surface characterization with Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was then carried out using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The electroanalytical determination of the amount of graphitic micro-domains was described and a pulse procedure was proposed which obtained a reproducible surface state. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  12. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  13. Thermal performance of annular-coated and sphere-pac LWR fuel rod designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Hsieh, K.A.; Barner, J.O.; Freshley, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    Two FCI-resistant UO 2 fuel rod designs are being compared to a reference design in irradiation tests in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) as part of the DOE-sponsored Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP). The primary fuel design (annular-coated-pressurized) incorporates annular pellets, a graphite coating on the inner surface of the Zircaloy cladding, and pressurized helium fill gas. Also being investigated is an 87% smear density sphere-pac design with pressurized helium fill gas. The solid pellet (reference) and annular-coated designs described had helium fill gas at approx. 100 kPa and the sphere-pac rods were pressurized at approx. 455 kPa

  14. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  15. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  16. Beam brightness from a relativistic, field-emission diode with a velvet covered cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekefi, G.; Shefer, R.E.; Tasker, S.C.

    1985-08-01

    The beam emittance and brightness from a mildly relativistic (200 to 400 kV) high current density (0.5 to 3.5kA/cm 2 ) planar, field emission diode provided with a velvet covered cathode have been studied experimentally as a function of the applied electric field (100 to 600kV/cm). Transverse beam spreading has been measured using a conventional pinhole arrangement followed by a fluorescent screen and open shutter camera. Good turn-on, and a high normalized beam brightness (B/sub n/ = 300kA/cm 2 -rad 2 ) have been observed. The results are compared with those obtained with a graphite cathode. 11 refs., 6 figs

  17. Study of Stable Cathodes and Electrolytes for High Specific Density Lithium-Air Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lugo, Dionne M.; Wu, James; Bennett, William; Ming, Yu; Zhu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Future NASA missions require high specific energy battery technologies, greater than 400 Wh/kg. Current NASA missions are using "state-of-the-art" (SOA) Li-ion batteries (LIB), which consist of a metal oxide cathode, a graphite anode and an organic electrolyte. NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the physical and electrochemical properties of the anode-electrolyte interface for ionic liquid based Li-air batteries. The voltage-time profiles for Pyr13FSI and Pyr14TFSI ionic liquids electrolytes studies on symmetric cells show low over-potentials and no dendritic lithium morphology. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicate that these ionic liquids have a wide electrochemical window. As a continuation of this work, sp2 carbon cathode and these low flammability electrolytes were paired and the physical and electrochemical properties were studied in a Li-air battery system under an oxygen environment.

  18. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  19. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  20. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  1. Control rod for a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natori, Hisahide.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To change arrangement and density of each layer of neutron absorber in the control rod and to render rotation by each layer possible, whereby the neutron absorber may be rotated to readily flatten power distribution. Structure: Neutron absorbers such as boron and carbide are filled into stainless steel pipes, which are peripherally arranged in a multi-layer fashion. Arrangement and density of the neutron absorber by each layer are changed and rotation by each layer is made possible, whereby surface area of the absorber or the like is changed to flatten power distribution. (Furukawa, Y.)

  2. Accident-tolerant control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Sawabe, Takashi; Ogata, Takanari

    2013-01-01

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) and hafnium (Hf) metal are used for the neutron absorber materials of control rods in BWRs, and silver-indium-cadmium (Ag-In-Cd) alloy is used in PWRs. These materials are clad with stainless steel. The eutectic point of B 4 C and iron (Fe) is about 1150 deg. C and the melting point of Ag-In-Cd alloy is about 800 deg. C, which are lower than the temperature of zircaloy - steam reaction increases rapidly (∼1200 deg. C). Accordingly, it is possible that the control rods melt and collapse before the reactor core is significantly damaged in the case of severe accidents. Since the neutron absorber would be separated from the fuels, there is a risk of re-criticality, when pure water or seawater is injected for emergency cooling. In order to ensure sub-criticality and extend options of emergency cooling in the course of severe accidents, a concept of accident-tolerant control rod (ACT) has been derived. ACT utilises a new absorber material having the following properties: - higher neutron absorption than current control rod; - higher melting or eutectic temperature than 1200 deg. C where rapid zircaloy oxidation occurs; - high miscibility with molten fuel materials. The candidate of a new absorber material for ATC includes gadolinia (Gd 2 O 3 ), samaria (Sm 2 O 3 ), europia (Eu 2 O 3 ), dysprosia (Dy 2 O 3 ), hafnia (HfO 2 ). The melting point of these materials and the liquefaction temperature with Fe are higher than the rapid zircaloy oxidation temperature. ACT will not collapse before the core melt-down. After the core melt-down, the absorber material will be mixed with molten fuel material. The current absorber materials, such as B 4 C, Hf and Ag-In-Cd, are charged at the tip of ATC in which the neutron flux is high, and a new absorber material is charged in the low-flux region. This design could minimise the degradation of a new absorber material by the neutron absorption and the influence of ATC deployment on reactor control procedure. As a

  3. Development of a control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In the period under review, the computer codes required for transients calculation have been completed, as well as the programs for modelling and testing the hot-gas temperature control by means of combined core rod and reflector rod operation. The specification of requirements to be fulfilled by the rod drive computer and the neutron flux measuring system has been done relying essentially on the data obtained by the transients calculations performed and the resulting informations on operating conditions. The work for optimization of the core rod drive with regard to rod driving speeds and the 'three-point switch' with hysteresis for controlled, automatic core rod operation has been concentrating on the case of specified, normal operation of the reactor. (orig./DG) [de

  4. THE EFFECT OF GROUP IIIA TO VIA ELEMENTS AND THEIR OXIDES ON GRAPHITE OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakszawski, J F; Parker, W E

    1963-06-15

    The effect of group IIIA to VIA elements and oxides on graphite oxidation was determined. Additives were molded with spectroscopically pure graphite powder. The concentration was maintained constant at 0.1 mole percent based on the element. The rate of reaction with 1 atm of air was measured at 700 and 800 deg C. Air flow rate from 2000 to 3000 cc/min had no effect on the oxidation rate of the pure graphite at 700, 750, and 800 deg C indicating that reaction was not occurring in Zone III. The calculated Ea of 54 kcal/mole suggested reaction in Zone I. Visual inspection of the rods after reaction substantiated this conclusion. The reaction was first order with respect to oxygen partial pressure at 700 and 800 deg C. B, B/sub 2/O/sub 5/, P, and P/sub 2/ O/sub 6/ inhibited the oxid ation of graphite at 700 and 800 deg C while the other elements and oxides catalyzed the reaction to various degrees. The reaction remained kinetically of the first order when inhibited. A systematic variation in reaction rates appears to follow the diagonals of the periodic relationship of the element from the upper left to the lower right. These variations can be correlated with average ionization energy or electron affinity. (auth)

  5. Dynamics of graphite flake on a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K.; Tsuda, D.; Kaneta, Y.; Harada, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Sasaki, N.

    2006-11-01

    One-directional motion, where graphite flakes are driven by a nanotip on an octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) liquid surface, is presented. A transition from quasiperiodic to chaotic motions occurs in the dynamics of a graphite flake when its velocity is increased. The dynamics of graphite flakes pulled by the nanotip on an OMCTS liquid surface can be treated as that of a nanobody on a liquid.

  6. Sealing nuclear graphite with pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shanglei; Xu, Li; Li, Li; Bai, Shuo; Yang, Xinmei; Zhou, Xingtai

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings were deposited on IG-110 nuclear graphite by thermal decomposition of methane at ∼1830 °C. The PyC coatings are anisotropic and airtight enough to protect IG-110 nuclear graphite against the permeation of molten fluoride salts and the diffusion of gases. The investigations indicate that the sealing nuclear graphite with PyC coating is a promising method for its application in Molten Salt Reactor (MSR)

  7. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  8. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  9. Production of nuclear graphite in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L.; Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H.

    1955-01-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [fr

  10. AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger

    2017-08-22

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam. An energy conversion device utilizes heat energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a heat energy consuming function. A device for heating a fluid and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  11. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  12. Structural analysis of polycrystalline (graphitized) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, M.M.; Kravchik, A.E.; Osmakov, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Specific features of the structure of polycrystal carbon materials (CM), characterized by high enough degree of structural perfection and different genesis are analyzed. From the viewpoint of fine and supercrystallite structure analysis of the most characteristic groups of graphitized CM: artificial graphites, and natural graphites, as well, has been carried out. It is ascertained that in paracrystal CM a monolayer of hexagonally-bound carbon atoms is the basic element of the structure, and in graphitized CM - a microlayer. The importance of the evaluation of the degree of three-dimensional ordering of the microlayer is shown

  13. Principle design and data of graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Oku, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled reactor with prismatic fuel elements of hexagonal blocks. The reactor internal structures of the HTTR are mainly made up of graphite components. As well known, the graphite is a brittle material and there were no available design criteria for brittle materials. Therefore, JAERI had to develop the design criteria taking account of the brittle fracture behavior. In this paper, concept and key specification of the developed graphite design criteria is described, and also an outline of the quality control specified in the design criteria is mentioned

  14. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  15. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  16. Expandable device for a nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesinski, L.T.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear fuel rod and a device for use within the rod cladding to maintain the axial position of the fuel pellets stacked one atop another within the cladding are described. The device is initially of a smaller external cross-section than the fuel rod cladding internal cross-section so as to accommodate loading into the rod at preselected locations. During power operation the device responds to a rise in temperature, so as to permanently maintain its position and restrain any axial motion of the fuel pellets

  17. Control rod selecting and driving device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Hideo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To simultaneously drive a predetermined number of control rods in a predetermined mode by the control of addresses for predetermined number of control rods and read or write of driving codified data to and from the memory by way of a memory controller. Constitution: The system comprises a control rod information selection device for selecting predetermined control rods from a plurality of control rods disposed in a reactor and outputting information for driving them in a predetermined mode, a control rod information output device for codifying the information outputted from the above device and outputting the addresses to the predetermined control rods and driving mode coded data, and a driving device for driving said predetermined control rods in a predetermined mode in accordance with the codified data outputted from the above device, said control rod infromation output device comprising a memory device capable of storing a predetermined number of the codified data and a memory control device for storing the predetermined number of data into the above memory device at a predetermined timing while successively outputting the thus stored predetermined number of data at a predetermined timing. (Seki, T.)

  18. Nuclear fuel rod end plug weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, M. A.; Patrick, S. S.; Rice, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for testing TIG (tungsten inert gas) welds of end plugs on a sealed nuclear reactor fuel rod. An X-ray fluorescent spectrograph testing unit detects tungsten inclusion weld defects in the top end plug's seal weld. Separate ultrasonic weld inspection system testing units test the top end plug's seal and girth welds and test the bottom end plug's girth weld for penetration, porosity and wall thinning defects. The nuclear fuel rod is automatically moved into and out from each testing unit and is automatically transported between the testing units by rod handling devices. A controller supervises the operation of the testing units and the rod handling devices

  19. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  20. Absorber rod drive for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acher, H.

    1985-01-01

    The invention concerns a further addition to the invention of DE 33 42 830 A1. The free contact of the hollow piston with the nut due to hydraulic pressure is replaced by a hydraulic or spring attachment. The pressure system required to produce the hydraulic pressure is therefore omitted, and the electrical power required for driving the pump or the mass flow is also omitted. The absorber rod slotted along its longitudinal axis is replaced by an absorber rod, in the longitudinal axis of which a hollow piston is connected together with the absorber rod. This makes the absorber rod more stable, and assembly is simplified. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Acoustic loading effects on oscillating rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study of the interaction between an infinite acoustic medium and a cluster of circular rods is described. The acoustic field due to oscillating rods and the acoustic loading on the rods are first solved in a closed form. The acoustic loading is then used as a forcing function for rod responses, and the acousto-elastic couplings are solved simultaneously. Numerical examples are presented for several cases to illustrate the effects of various system parameters on the acoustic reaction force coefficients. The effect of the acoustic loading on the coupled eigenfrequencies are discussed

  2. Growth and Morphology of Rod Eutectics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing Teng; Shan Liu; R. Trivedi

    2008-03-17

    The formation of rod eutectic microstructure is investigated systematically in a succinonitrile-camphor alloy of eutectic composition by using the directional solidification technique. A new rod eutectic configuration is observed in which the rods form with elliptical cylindrical shape. Two different orientations of the ellipse are observed that differ by a 90{sup o} rotation such that the major and the minor axes are interchanged. Critical experiments in thin samples, where a single layer of rods forms, show that the spacing and orientation of the elliptic rods are governed by the growth rate and the sample thickness. In thicker samples, multi layers of rods form with circular cross-section and the scaling law between the spacing and velocity predicted by the Jackson and Hunt model is validated. A theoretical model is developed for a two-dimensional array of elliptical rods that are arranged in a hexagonal or a square array, and the results are shown to be consistent with the experimental observations. The model of elliptic rods is also shown to reduce to that for the circular rod eutectic when the lengths of the two axes are equal, and to the lamellar eutectic model when one of the axes is much larger than the other one.

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    The invention involves a technique to quickly, inexpensively and rigidly attach a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. The invention also allows for the repeated non-destructive removal and replacement of the fuel rod. The proposed fuel rod and support member attachment and removal system consists of a locking cap fastened to the fuel rod and a locking strip fastened to the support member or vice versa. The locking cap has two or more opposing fingers shaped to form a socket. The fingers spring back when moved apart and released. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion

  4. Electrolysis of acidic sodium chloride solution with a graphite anode. I. Graphite electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.J.J.; Hoogland, J.G.

    1969-01-01

    A graphite anode evolving Cl from a chloride soln. is slowly oxidized to CO and CO2. This oxidn. causes a change in the characteristics of the electrode in aging, comprising a change of the nature of the graphite surface and an increase of the surface area. It appears that a new graphite electrode

  5. Dry rod consolidation technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, T.L.; Schoonen, D.H.; Fisher, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is funding a Program to consolidate commercial spent fuel for testing in dry storage casks and to develop technology that will be fed into other OCRWM Programs, e.g., Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Program. The Program is being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the Operating Contractor, EGandG Idaho, Inc. Hardware and software have been designed and fabricated for installation in a hot cell adjacent to the Test Area North (TAN) Hot Shop Facility. This equipment will be used to perform dry consolidation of commercial spent fuel from the Virginia Power (VP) Cooperative Agreement Spent Fuel Storage Cask (SPSC) Demonstration Program and assemblies that had previously been stored at the Engine Maintenance and Disassembly (EMAD) facility in Nevada. Consolidation will be accomplished by individual, horizontal rod pulling. A computerized semi-automatic control system with operator involvement will be utilized to conduct consolidation operations. Special features have been incorporated in the design to allow crud collection and measurement of rod pulling forces. During consolidation operations, data will be taken to characterize this technology. Still photo, video tape, and other documentation will be generated to make developed information available to interested parties. Cold checkout of the hardware and software will complete in September of 1986. Following installation in the hot cell, consolidation operations will begin in January 1987. Resulting consolidated fuel will be utilized in the VP Cooperative Agreement SFSC Program

  6. Attracting electromagnet for control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Sasaki, Kotaro.

    1989-01-01

    Non-magnetic material plates with inherent resistivity of greater than 20 μΩ-cm and thickness of less than 3 mm are used for the end plates of attracting electromagnets for closed type control rods. By using such control rod attracting electromagnets, the scram releasing time can be shortened than usual. Since the armature attracting side of the electromagnet has to be sealed by a non-magnetic plate, a bronze plate of about 5 mm thickness has been used so far. Accordingly, non-magnetic plate is inserted to the electromagnet attracting face to increase air source length for improving to shorten the scram releasing time. This method, however, worsens the attracting property on one hand to require a great magnetomotive force. For overcoming these drawbacks, in the present invention, the material for tightly closing end plates in an electromagnet is changed from bronze plate to non-magnetic stainless steel SUS 303 or non-magnetic Monel metal and, in addition, the plate thickness is reduced to less than 5 mm thereby maintaining the attracting property and shortening the scram releasing time. (K.M.)

  7. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 5 discusses the following topics: Lower Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report; NFBC Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Robotic Bridge Transporter Test Results and Analysis Report; RM-10A Remotec Manipulator Test Results and Analysis Report; and Manipulator Transporter Test Results and Analysis Report

  8. An automatic regulating control system for a graphite moderated reactor using digital techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Goncalves Junior, J. de.

    1989-01-01

    The work propose an automatic regulating control system for a graphite moderated reactor using digital techniques. The system uses a microcomputer to monitor the power and the period, to run the control algorithm, and to generate electronic signals to excite the motor, which moves vertically the control rod banks. A nuclear reactor simulator was developed to test the control system. The simulator consists of a software based on the point kinetic equations and implanted in an analogical computer. The results show that this control system has a good performance and versatility. In addition, the simulator is capable of reproducing with accuracy the behavior of a nuclear reactor. (author)

  9. Use of Both Anode and Cathode Reactions in Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillas, Enric; Sirés, Ignasi; Cabot, Pere LluíS.

    Here, we describe the fundamentals, laboratory experiments, and environmental applications of indirect electrooxidation methods based on H2O2 electrogeneration such as electro-Fenton, photoelectro-Fenton and peroxicoagulation for the treatment of acidic wastewaters containing toxic and recalcitrant organics. These methods are electrochemical advanced oxidation processes that can be used in divided and undivided electrolytic cells in which pollutants are oxidized by hydroxyl radical (•OH) produced from anode and/or cathode reactions. H2O2 is generated from the two-electron reduction of O2 at reticulated vitreous carbon, graphite, carbon-felt, and O2-diffusion cathodes. The most usual method is electro-Fenton where Fe2 + added to the wastewater reacts with electrogenerated H2O2 to yield •OH and Fe3 + from Fenton's reaction. An advantage of this technique is that Fe2 + is continuously regenerated from cathodic reduction of Fe3 +. The characteristics of different electro-Fenton systems where pollutants are simultaneously destroyed by •OH formed in the medium from Fenton's reaction and at the anode surface from water oxidation are explained. The effect of the anode [Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD)] and cathode (carbon-felt or O2-diffusion) on the degradation rate of persistent industrial by-products, herbicides, pharmaceuticals, dyes, etc. is examined. Initial pollutants react much more rapidly with •OH formed in the medium and their degradation sequences are discussed from aromatic intermediates and finally short aliphatic acids are detected. The synergetic positive catalytic effect of Cu2 + on the electro-Fenton process is evidenced. The photoelectro-Fenton method involves the irradiation of the wastewater with UVA light that rapidly photodecomposes complexes of Fe3 + with final carboxylic acids enhancing total decontamination. The peroxicoagulation method uses a sacrificial Fe anode that is continuously oxidized to Fe2 + and organics are either mineralized

  10. Hydrogen storage in graphitic nanofibres

    OpenAIRE

    McCaldin, Simon Roger

    2007-01-01

    There is huge need to develop an alternative to hydrocarbons fuel, which does not produce CO2 or contribute to global warming - 'the hydrogen economy' is such an alternative, however the storage of hydrogen is the key technical barrier that must be overcome. The potential of graphitic nanofibres (GNFs) to be used as materials to allow the solid-state storage of hydrogen has thus been investigated. This has been conducted with a view to further developing the understanding of the mechanism(s) ...

  11. Irradiation test HT-31: high-temperature irradiation behavior of LASL-made extruded fuel rods and LASL-made coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.; Reiswig, R.D.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1977-04-01

    Three LASL-made extruded graphite and coated particle fuel rods have been irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Fluence Isotope Reactor test HT-31. Test conditions were about 9 x 10 21 nvt(E > .18 MeV) at 1250 0 C. The graphite matrix showed little or no effect of the irradiation. LASL-made ZrC containing coated particles with ZrC coats and ZrC-doped pyrolytic carbon coats showed no observable effects of the irradiation

  12. Electron beam generation form a superemissive cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.-Y.; Liou, R.-L.; Kirkman-Amemiya, G.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of electron beams produced by a superemissive cathode in the Back-Lighted Thyratron (BLT) and the pseudospark is presented. This work is motivated by experiments demonstrating very high current densities (≥10 kA/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 ) from the pseudospark and BLT cathode. This high-density current is produced by field-enhanced thermionic emission from the ion beam-heated surface of a molybdenum cathode. This work reports the use of this cathode as a beam source, and is to be distinguished from previous work reporting hollow cathode-produced electron beams. An electron beam of more than 260 A Peak current has been produced with 15 kV applied voltage. An efficiency of ∼10% is estimated. These experimental results encourage further investigation of the super-emissive cathode as an intense electron beam source for applications including accelerator technology

  13. Reflective article having a sacrificial cathodic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Buchanan, Michael J.; Scott, Matthew S.; Rearick, Brian K.; Medwick, Paul A.; McCamy, James W.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention relates to reflective articles, such as solar mirrors, that include a sacrificial cathodic layer. The reflective article, more particularly includes a substrate, such as glass, having a multi-layered coating thereon that includes a lead-free sacrificial cathodic layer. The sacrificial cathodic layer includes at least one transition metal, such as a particulate transition metal, which can be in the form of flakes (e.g., zinc flakes). The sacrificial cathodic layer can include an inorganic matrix formed from one or more organo-titanates. Alternatively, the sacrificial cathodic layer can include an organic polymer matrix (e.g., a crosslinked organic polymer matrix formed from an organic polymer and an aminoplast crosslinking agent). The reflective article also includes an outer organic polymer coating, that can be electrodeposited over the sacrificial cathodic layer.

  14. Mixed graphite cast iron for automotive exhaust component applications

    OpenAIRE

    De-lin Li

    2017-01-01

    Both spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron are used in the automotive industry. A recently proposed mixed graphite iron exhibits a microstructure between the conventional spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron. Evaluation results clearly indicate the suitability and benefits of mixed graphite iron for exhaust component applications with respect to casting, machining, mechanical, thermophysical, oxidation, and thermal fatigue properties. A new ASTM standard speci...

  15. Nuclear graphite waste management. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the seminar was to bring together the specialists dealing with various aspects of radioactive graphite waste management to exchange and review information on the decommissioning, characterisation, processing and disposal of irradiated graphite from reactor cores and other graphite waste associated with reactor operation. The seminar covered radioactive graphite characterisation, the effect of irradiation on graphite components, Wigner energy, radioactive graphite waste treatment, conditioning, interim storage and long term disposal options. Individual papers presented at the seminar were indexed separately

  16. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/23/15 - 04/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction...Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith

  17. Hollow cathode for positive ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, D.E.; Kim, J.; Tsai, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    Development to incorporate hollow cathodes into high power ion sources for neutral beam injection systems is being pursued. Hollow tube LaB 6 -type cathodes, similar to a UCLA design, have been constructed and tested in several ORNL ion source configurations. Results of testing include arc discharge parameters of >1000 and 500 amps for 0.5 and 10 second pulse lengths, respectively. Details of cathode construction and additional performance results are discussed

  18. Analysis of Wigner energy release process in graphite stack of shut-down uranium-graphite reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bespala, E. V.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Data, which finding during thermal differential analysis of sampled irradiated graphite are presented. Results of computational modeling of Winger energy release process from irradiated graphite staking are demonstrated. It's shown, that spontaneous combustion of graphite possible only in adiabatic case.

  19. Cold cathode arc model in mercury discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.M.; Byszewski, W.W.; Budinger, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Voltage/current characteristics measured during the starting of metal halide lamps indicate a low voltage discharge when condensates (mainly mercury) are localized on the electrodes. In this case, even with a cold cathode which does not emit electrons, the current is very high and voltage across the lamp drops to about 15 to 20 V. This type of discharge is similar to the cold cathode mercury vapor arc found in mercury pool rectifiers. The cathode sheath in the mercury vapor arc is characterized by very small cathode spot size, on the order of 10 -c cm 2 , very high current density of about 10 6 A/cm 2 and very low cathode fall of approximately 10 volts. The discharge is modified and generalized to describe the cathode phenomena in the cold cathode mercury vapor arc. The sensitivity of calculated discharge parameters with respect to such modifications were examined. Results show that the cathode fall voltage remains fairly constant (7-8 volts) with large fractional variations of metastable mercury atoms bombarding the cathode. This result compares very well with experimental waveforms when anode fall and plasma voltage approximations are incorporated

  20. Two-beam virtual cathode accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.

    1992-01-01

    A proposed method to control the motion of a virtual cathode is investigated. Applications to collective ion acceleration and microwave generation are indicated. If two counterstreaming relativistic electron beams of current I are injected into a drift tube of space-charge-limiting current I L = 2I, it is shown that one beam can induce a moving virtual cathode in the other beam. By dynamically varying the current injected into the drift tube region, the virtual cathode can undergo controlled motion. For short drift tubes, the virtual cathodes on each end are strongly-coupled and undergo coherent large-amplitude spatial oscillations within the drift tube

  1. Mixed graphite cast iron for automotive exhaust component applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-lin Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Both spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron are used in the automotive industry. A recently proposed mixed graphite iron exhibits a microstructure between the conventional spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron. Evaluation results clearly indicate the suitability and benefits of mixed graphite iron for exhaust component applications with respect to casting, machining, mechanical, thermophysical, oxidation, and thermal fatigue properties. A new ASTM standard specification (A1095 has been created for compacted, mixed, and spheroidal graphite silicon-molybdenum iron castings. This paper attempts to outline the latest progress in mixed graphite iron published.

  2. Self-contact for rods on cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der G.H.M.; Peletier, M.A.; Planqué, R.

    2006-01-01

    We study self-contact phenomena in elastic rods that are constrained to lie on a cylinder. By choosing a particular set of variables to describe the rod centerline the variational setting is made particularly simple: the strain energy is a second-order functional of a single scalar variable, and the

  3. Self-contact for rods on cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H.M. van der Heijden; M.A. Peletier (Mark); R. Planqué (Robert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe study self-contact phenomena in elastic rods that are constrained to lie on a cylinder. By choosing a particular set of variables to describe the rod centerline the variational setting is made particularly simple: the strain energy is a second-order functional of a single scalar

  4. Self-contact for rods on cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der G.H.M.; Peletier, M.A.; Planqué, R.

    2004-01-01

    We study self-contact phenomena in elastic rods that are constrained to lie on a cylinder. By choosing a particular set of variables to describe the rod centerline the variational setting is made particularly simple: the strain energy is a second-order functional of a single scalar variable, and the

  5. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  6. Pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.T.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    The fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 and the structural finite element program SAP-IV are applied in a pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology. The applied calculation procedure allows to dimension the fuel rod components and characterize its internal pressure. (author) [pt

  7. Spider and burnable poison rod combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of an improved design of burnable poison rods and their associated spiders used in the fuel assemblies of pressurized water power reactor cores which allows the rods to be installed and removed more quickly, simply and gently than in previously described systems. (U.K.)

  8. Method of inspecting control rod drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomomi; Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro; Hasegawa, Hidenobu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct inspection for control rod drives and fuel handling operations in parallel without taking out the entire fuel, while maintaining the reactor in a subcritical state. Method: Control rod drives are inspected through the release of connection between control rods and control rod drives, detachment and dismantling of control rod drives, etc. In this case, structural materials having neutron absorbing power equal to or greater than the control rods are inserted into the gap after taking out fuels. Since the structural materials have neutron absorbing portion, subcriticality is maintained by the neutron absorbing effect. Accordingly, there is no requirement for taking out all of the fuels, thereby enabling to check the control rod drives and conduct handling for the fuels in parallel. As a result, the number of days required for the inspection can be shortened and it is possible to improve the working efficiency for the decomposition, inspection, etc. of the control rod drives and, thus, improve the operation efficiency of the nuclear power plant thereby attaining the predetermined purpose. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Methodology of characterization of radioactive graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Lara, E.; Magro, E.; Gascon, J. L.; Leganes, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the dismantling of Vandellos I, ENRESA has promoted the precise knowledge of the inventory of irradiated graphite (graphite-i) through establishing methodologies for radiological characterization of the vector of radionuclides of interest and their correlations as the primary means of characterization strategy to establish the safer management of this material in its life cycle. (Author)

  10. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux...

  11. Inhibition of oxidation in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.; Windes, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off-normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high-temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off-normal design basis event where an oxidising atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high-temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postulated air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B 4 C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. The proposed addition of B 4 C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimise B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed. (authors)

  12. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1989-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particularly in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metallic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite used in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapor pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  13. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particulary in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metalic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite and in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapour pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. (author)

  14. Tire containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A tire, tire lining or inner tube, containing a polymer composite, made of at least one rubber and/or at least one elastomer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g.

  15. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  16. Control rod guide tube assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    An improved fuel assembly is described as consisting of a sleeve that engages one end of a control rod guide tube essentially fixing the guide tube to one of the fuel assembly end structures. The end of the sleeve protrudes above the surface of the end fitting. The outer surface of the sleeve has a peripheral groove that engages the resilient sides of a cellular grid or lattice shaped lock. This lock fixes the sleeve in position between the various elements that comprise the end fitting, thereby eliminating a profusion of costly and potentially troublesome nuts, threaded studs and the like that are frequently employed in the fuel assemblies that are presently in use

  17. Thermal behavior simulation of a nuclear fuel rod through an eletrically heated rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R. de C.F. de.

    1984-01-01

    In thermalhydraulic loops the nuclear industry often uses electrically heated rods to simulate power transients, which occur in nuclear fuel rods. The development and design of a electrically heated rod, by supplying the dimensions and materials which should be used in order to yeld the same temperature and heat flux at the surfaces of the nuclear rod and the electrically heated rod are presented. To a given nuclear transient this equality was obtained by fitting the linear power through the lumped parameters technique. (Author) [pt

  18. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  19. Nuclear reactor with scrammable part length rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, F.

    1979-01-01

    A new part length rod is provided. It may be used to control xenon induced power oscillations but to contribute to shutdown reactivity when a rapid shutdown of the reactor is required. The part length rod consists of a control rod with three regions. The lower control region is a longer weaker active portion separated from an upper stronger shorter poison section by an intermediate section which is a relative non-absorber of neutrons. The combination of the longer weaker control section with the upper high worth poison section permits the part length rod of this to be scrammed into the core when a reactor shutdown is required but also permits the control rod to be used as a tool to control power distribution in both the axial and radial directions during normal operation

  20. Control rod for HTGR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogi, Haruyoshi; Saito, Yuji; Fukamichi, Kenjiro.

    1990-01-01

    Upon dropping control rod elements into the reactor core, impact shocks are applied to wire ropes or spines to possibly deteriorate the integrity of the control rods. In view of the above in the present invention, shock absorbers such as springs or bellows are disposed between a wire rope and a spine in a HTGR type reactor control rod comprising a plurality of control rod elements connected axially by means of a spine that penetrates the central portion thereof, and is suspended at the upper end thereof by a wire rope. Impact shocks of about 5 kg are applied to the wire rope and the spine and, since they can be reduced by the shock absorbers, the control rod integrity can be maintained and the reactor safety can be improved. (T.M.)

  1. Detection device for control rod interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Noboru.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the mechanical interference or friction between a control rod and a channel box automatically, simply and rapidly. Constitution: A signal from a gate circuit and a signal from a comparison mechanism are inputted into an AND circuit if a control rod has not been displaced by a predetermined distance within a prescribed time Δt after the output of an insertion or withdrawal signal for the control rod, by which a control-rod-interference signal is outputted from the AND circuit. Accordingly, the interference between the control rod and the channel box can be detected automatically, easily and rapidly. Furthermore, by properly adjusting the prescribed time Δt set by the gate circuit, the degree of the interference can also be detected, whereby the safety and the reliability of the reactor can be improved significantly. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. RODMOD: a code for control rod positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.

    1978-11-01

    The report documents a computer code which has been implemented to position control rods according to a prescribed schedule during the calculation of a reactor history. Control rods may be represented explicitly with or without internal black absorber conditions in selected energy groups, or fractional insertion may be done, or both, in a problem. There is provision for control rod follower, movement of materials through a series of zones in a closed loop, and shutdown rod insertion and subsequent removal to allow the reactor history calculation to be continued. This code is incorporated in the system containing the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics and the BURNER exposure codes for routine use. The implemented automated procedures cause the prescribed control rod insertion schedule to be applied without the access of additional user input data during the calculation of a reactor operating history

  3. Vortex Noise from Rotating Cylindrical Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, E Z; Deming, A F

    1935-01-01

    A series of round rods of the some diameter were rotated individually about the mid-point of each rod. Vortices are shed from the rods when in motion, giving rise to the emission of sound. With the rotating system placed in the open air, the distribution of sound in space, the acoustical power output, and the spectral distribution have been studied. The frequency of emission of vortices from any point on the rod is given by the formula von Karman. From the spectrum estimates are made of the distribution of acoustical power along the rod, the amount of air concerned in sound production, the "equivalent size" of the vortices, and the acoustical energy content for each vortex.

  4. Microcomputer system for controlling fuel rod length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, E.R.; Bouldin, D.W.; Bolfing, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    A system is being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to automatically measure and control the length of fuel rods for use in a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The system utilizes an LSI-11 microcomputer for monitoring fuel rod length and for adjusting the primary factor affecting length. Preliminary results indicate that the automated system can maintain fuel rod length within the specified limits of 1.940 +- 0.040 in. This system provides quality control documentation and eliminates the dependence of the current fuel rod molding process on manual length control. In addition, the microcomputer system is compatible with planned efforts to extend control to fuel rod fissile and fertile material contents

  5. Methane generated from graphite--tritium interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    When hydrogen isotopes are separated by cryogenic distillation, as little as 1 ppM of methane will eventually plug the still as frost accumulates on the column packings. Elemental carbon exposed to tritium generates methane spontaneously, and yet some dry transfer pumps, otherwise compatible with tritium, convey the gas with graphite rotors. This study was to determine the methane production rate for graphite in tritium. A pump manufacturer supplied graphite samples that we exposed to tritium gas at 0.8 atm. After 137 days we measured a methane synthesis rate of 6 ng/h per cm 2 of graphite exposed. At this rate methane might grow to a concentration of 0.01 ppM when pure tritium is transferred once through a typical graphite--rotor transfer pump. Such a low methane level will not cause column blockage, even if the cryogenic still is operated continuously for many years

  6. Chemical sputtering of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, N.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Y.V.

    1976-01-01

    In a study of the sputtering coefficient S for the sputtering of graphite by 10-keV H + ions as a function of the graphite temperature during the bombardment, it is found that at T> or =750degreeC the coefficient S is independent of the target temperature and has an anomalously high value, S=0.085 atom/ion. The high rate of sputtering of graphite by atomic hydrogen ions is shown to be due to chemical sputtering of the graphite, resulting primarily in the formation of CH 4 molecules. At T=1100degreeC, S falls off by a factor of about 3. A model for the chemical sputtering of graphite is proposed

  7. Graphite selection for the FMIT test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-06-01

    This document provides the basis for procuring a grade of graphite, at minimum cost, having minimum dimensional changes at low irradiation temperatures (nominal range 90 to 140 0 C). In light of those constraints, the author concludes that the most feasible approach is to attempt to reproduce a grade of graphite (TSGBF) which has exhibited a high degree of dimensional stability during low-temperature irradiations and on which irradiation-induced changes in other physical properties have been measured. The effects of differences in raw materials, especially coke morphology, and processing conditions, primarily graphitization temperture are briefly reviewed in terms of the practicality of producing a new grade of graphite with physical properties and irradiation-induced changes which would be very similar to those of TSGBF graphite. The production history and physical properties of TSGBF are also reviewed; no attempt is made, to project changes in dimensions or physical properties under the projected irradiation conditions

  8. Electrocatalytic activity of Pd-loaded Ti/TiO2 nanotubes cathode for TCE reduction in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenjing; Yuan, Songhu; Mao, Xuhui; Hu, Wei; Liao, Peng; Tong, Man; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2013-07-01

    A novel cathode, Pd loaded Ti/TiO2 nanotubes (Pd-Ti/TiO2NTs), is synthesized for the electrocatalytic reduction of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater. Pd nanoparticles are successfully loaded on TiO2 nanotubes which grow on Ti plate via anodization. Using Pd-Ti/TiO2NTs as the cathode in an undivided electrolytic cell, TCE is efficiently and quantitatively transformed to ethane. Under conditions of 100 mA and pH 7, the removal efficiency of TCE (21 mg/L) is up to 91% within 120 min, following pseudo-first-order kinetics with the rate constant of 0.019 min(-1). Reduction rates increase from 0.007 to 0.019 min(-1) with increasing the current from 20 to 100 mA, slightly decrease in the presence of 10 mM chloride or bicarbonate, and decline with increasing the concentrations of sulfite or sulfide. O2 generated at the anode slightly influences TCE reduction. At low currents, TCE is mainly reduced by direct electron transfer on the Pd-Ti/TiO2NT cathode. However, the contribution of Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination, an indirect reduction mechanism, becomes significant with increasing the current. Compared with other common cathodes, i.e., Ti-based mixed metal oxides, graphite and Pd/Ti, Pd-Ti/TiO2NTs cathode shows superior performance for TCE reduction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Claudia; Vargas, Ignacio T.; Bruns, Mary Ann; Regan, John M.

    2017-01-01

    The limited database of acidophilic or acidotolerant electrochemically active microorganisms prevents advancements on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated under low pH. In this study, three MFCs were used to enrich cathodic biofilms using acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments as inoculum. Linear sweep voltammetry showed cathodic current plateaus of 5.5 (± 0.7) mA at about − 170 mV vs Ag/AgCl and 8.5 (± 0.9) mA between − 500 mV to − 450 mV vs Ag/AgCl for biofilms developed on small graphite fiber brushes. After gamma irradiation, biocathodes exhibited a decrease in current density approaching that of abiotic controls. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed six-fold lower charge transfer resistance with viable biofilm. Pyrosequencing data showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the biofilms. Acidithiobacillus representatives were enriched in some biocathodes, supporting the potential importance of these known iron and sulfur oxidizers as cathodic biocatalysts. Other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs identified included Sulfobacillus and Leptospirillum species. The presence of chemoautotrophs was consistent with functional capabilities predicted by PICRUSt related to carbon fixation pathways in prokaryotic microorganisms. Acidophilic or acidotolerant heterotrophs were also abundant; however, their contribution to cathodic performance is unknown. This study directs subsequent research efforts to particular groups of AMD-associated bacteria that are electrochemically active on cathodes.

  10. Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Claudia

    2017-08-03

    The limited database of acidophilic or acidotolerant electrochemically active microorganisms prevents advancements on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated under low pH. In this study, three MFCs were used to enrich cathodic biofilms using acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments as inoculum. Linear sweep voltammetry showed cathodic current plateaus of 5.5 (± 0.7) mA at about − 170 mV vs Ag/AgCl and 8.5 (± 0.9) mA between − 500 mV to − 450 mV vs Ag/AgCl for biofilms developed on small graphite fiber brushes. After gamma irradiation, biocathodes exhibited a decrease in current density approaching that of abiotic controls. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed six-fold lower charge transfer resistance with viable biofilm. Pyrosequencing data showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the biofilms. Acidithiobacillus representatives were enriched in some biocathodes, supporting the potential importance of these known iron and sulfur oxidizers as cathodic biocatalysts. Other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs identified included Sulfobacillus and Leptospirillum species. The presence of chemoautotrophs was consistent with functional capabilities predicted by PICRUSt related to carbon fixation pathways in prokaryotic microorganisms. Acidophilic or acidotolerant heterotrophs were also abundant; however, their contribution to cathodic performance is unknown. This study directs subsequent research efforts to particular groups of AMD-associated bacteria that are electrochemically active on cathodes.

  11. Cathode materials: A personal perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, ETC 9.102, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States)

    2007-12-06

    A thermodynamically stable rechargeable battery has a voltage limited by the window of the electrolyte. An aqueous electrolyte has a window of 1.2 eV, which prevents achieving the high energy density desired for many applications. A non-aqueous electrolyte with a window of 5 eV requires Li{sup +} rather than H{sup +} as the working ion. Early experiments with Li{sub x}TiS{sub 2} cathodes showed competitive capacity and rate capability, but problems with a lithium anode made the voltage of a safe cell based on a sulfide cathode too low to be competitive with a nickel/metal-hydride battery. Transition-metal oxides can give voltages of 4.5 V versus Li{sup +}/Li{sup 0}. However, the challenge with oxides has been to obtain a competitive capacity and rate capability while retaining a high voltage with low-cost, environmentally friendly cathode materials. Comparisons will be made between layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2}, spinels Li{sub 1-x}[M{sub 2}]O{sub 4}, and olivines Li{sub 1-x}MPO{sub 4} having 0 < x < 1. Although higher capacities can be obtained with layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2} compounds, which have enabled the wireless revolution, their metastability makes them unlikely to be used in power applications. The spinel and olivine framework structures have been shown to be capable of charge/discharge rates of over 10C with a suitable temperature range for plug-in hybrid vehicles. (author)

  12. Fundamental aspects of cathodic sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, R.

    1979-01-01

    The main fundamental aspects and problems of cathodic sputtering used mainly for thin film deposition and sputter etching are discussed. Among many types of known sputtering techniques the radiofrequency /RF/ diode sputtering is the most universal one and is used for deposition of metals, alloys, metallic compounds, semiconductors and insulators. It seems that nowadays the largest number of working sputtering systems is of diode type. Sometimes also the dc or rf triode sputtering systems are used. The problems in these processes are practically equivalent and comparable with the problems in the diode method and therefore our discussion will be, in most cases applicable for both, the diode and triode methods

  13. Cathode-follower power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, S.; Puglisi, M.

    1983-01-01

    In circular accelerators and particularly in storage rings it is essential that the total impedance, as seen by the beam, be kept below some critical value. A model of the accelerating system was built using a single-ended cathode-follower amplifier driving a ferrite-loaded cavity. The system operated at 234.5 kHz with a peak output voltage of +-10 kV on the gap. The dynamic output impedance, as measured on the gap, was < 15 ohms

  14. Graphite paper-based bipolar electrode electrochemiluminescence sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ding, Shou-Nian

    2017-08-15

    In this work, aiming at the construction of a disposable, wireless, low-cost and sensitive system for bioassay, we report a closed bipolar electrode electrochemiluminescence (BPE-ECL) sensing platform based on graphite paper as BPE for the first time. Graphite paper is qualified as BPE due to its unique properties such as excellent electrical conductivity, uniform composition and ease of use. This simple BPE-ECL device was applied to the quantitative analysis of oxidant (H 2 O 2 ) and biomarker (CEA) respectively, according to the principle of BPE sensing-charge balance. For the H 2 O 2 analysis, Pt NPs were electrodeposited onto the cathode through a bipolar electrodeposition approach to promote the sensing performance. As a result, this BPE-ECL device exhibited a wide linear range of 0.001-15mM with a low detection limit of 0.5µM (S/N=3) for H 2 O 2 determination. For the determination of CEA, chitosan-multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CS-MWCNTs) were employed to supply a hydrophilic interface for immobilizing primary antibody (Ab 1 ); and Au@Pt nanostructures were conjugated with secondary antibody (Ab 2 ) as catalysts for H 2 O 2 reduction. Under the optimal conditions, the BPE-ECL immunodevice showed a wide linear range of 0.01-60ngmL -1 with a detection limit of 5.0pgmL -1 for CEA. Furthermore, it also displayed satisfactory selectivity, excellent stability and good reproducibility. The developed method opened a new avenue to clinical bioassay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  16. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  17. Fabrication Of Control Rod System Of The RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudirdjo, Hari; Setyono; Prasetya, Hendra

    2001-01-01

    Eight units of control rod mechanical system of RSG-GAS has been fabricated. The control rod mechanical system of RSG-GAS consist of guide tube and lifting rod. Complete construction of the control rod mechanical system of RSG-GAS are guide tube, lifting rod, absorber, and absorber casing. The eight units of the control rod mechanical system of RSG-GAS has been fabricated according to the mechanical engineering design

  18. Electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor and its in-situ trapping in gold-covered graphite tube atomizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerveny, Vaclav; Rychlovsky, Petr; Netolicka, Jarmila; Sima, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The combination of more efficient flow-through electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation with its in-situ trapping in a graphite tube atomizer is described. This coupled technique has been optimized to attain the maximum sensitivity for Hg determination and to minimize the limits of detection and determination. A laboratory constructed thin-layer flow-through cell with a platinum cathode served as the cold vapor generator. Various cathode arrangements with different active surface areas were tested. Automated sampling equipment for the graphite atomizer with an untreated fused silica capillary was used for the introduction of the mercury vapor. The inner surface of the graphite tube was covered with a gold foil placed against the sampling hole. The results attained for the electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation (an absolute limit of detection of 80 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion) were compared with the traditional vapor generation using NaBH 4 as the reducing agent (an absolute limit of detection of 124 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion). The repeatability at the 5 ng ml -1 level was better than 4.1% (RSD) for electrochemical mercury vapor generation and better than 5.6% for the chemical cold vapor generation. The proposed method was applied to the determination the of Hg contents in a certified reference material and in spiked river water samples

  19. Cathodic hydrogen charging of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagopoulos, C.N.; Georgiou, E.P.; Chaliampalias, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Incorporation of hydrogen into zinc and formation of zinc hydrides. •Investigation of surface residual stresses due to hydrogen diffusion. •Effect of hydrogen diffusion and hydride formation on mechanical properties of Zn. •Hydrogen embrittlement phenomena in zinc. -- Abstract: The effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on the structural and mechanical characteristics of zinc was investigated. Hardening of the surface layers of zinc, due to hydrogen incorporation and possible formation of ZnH 2 , was observed. In addition, the residual stresses brought about by the incorporation of hydrogen atoms into the metallic matrix, were calculated by analyzing the obtained X-ray diffraction patterns. Tensile testing of the as-received and hydrogen charged specimens revealed that the ductility of zinc decreased significantly with increasing hydrogen charging time, for a constant value of charging current density, and with increasing charging current density, for a constant value of charging time. However, the ultimate tensile strength of this material was slightly affected by the hydrogen charging procedure. The cathodically charged zinc exhibited brittle transgranular fracture at the surface layers and ductile intergranular fracture at the deeper layers of the material

  20. Ion source with plasma cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabe, E.

    1987-01-01

    A long lifetime ion source with plasma cathode has been developed for use in ion implantation. In this ion source, a plasma of a nonreactive working gas serves as a cathode in place of a thermionic tungsten filament used in the Freeman ion source. In an applied magnetic field, the plasma is convergent, i.e., filamentlike; in zero magnetic field, it turns divergent and spraylike. In the latter case, the plasma exhibits a remarkable ability when the working gas has an ionization potential larger than the feed gas. By any combination of a working gas of either argon or neon and a feed gas of AsF 5 or PF 5 , the lifetime of this ion source was found to be more than 90 h with an extraction voltage of 40 kV and the corresponding ion current density 20 mA/cm 2 . Mass spectrometry results show that this ion source has an ability of generating a considerable amount of As + and P + ions from AsF 5 and PF 5 , and hence will be useful for realizing a fully cryopumped ion implanter system. This ion source is also eminently suitable for use in oxygen ion production

  1. Electrocatalytic properties of N-doped graphite felt in electro-Fenton process and degradation mechanism of levofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaocheng; Yang, Danxing; Zhou, Yaoyu; Zhang, Jiachao; Luo, Lin; Meng, Sijun; Chen, Song; Tan, Mengjiao; Li, Zhicheng; Tang, Lin

    2017-09-01

    The degradation of antibiotic levofloxacin was investigated by dimensionally stable anode as well as modified cathode using low-cost chemical reagents of hydrazine hydrate and ethanol for electro-Fenton in an undivided cell at pH 3.0 under room temperature. Comparison of unmodified and modified cathode was performed. The apparent rate constant of levofloxacin decay was found to be 0.2883 min -1 for graphite felt-10 with the best performance at 200 mA, which is lower than graphite felt at 400 mA. The optimum modified cathode showed a significant improvement of complete mineralization of levofloxacin, reaching a 92% TOC removal at 200 mA for 480 min higher than unmodified one at twice the current. Surface physicochemical properties and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope, contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electrochemical characterization of hydrogen evolution reaction was adopted to clarify a possible pathway for the higher mineralization of levofloxacin, indicating a potential pilot-scale study to the pollution with the similar structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pipelines cathodic protection design methodologies for impressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several inadequate designs of cathodically polarized offshore and onshore pipelines have been reported in Nigeria owing to design complexity and application of the cathodic protection system. The present study focused on critical and detailed approach in impressed current and sacrificial anode design calculation ...

  3. Estimation of irradiated control rod worth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Antonopoulos-Domis, M.

    2009-01-01

    When depleted control rods are planned to be used in new core configurations, their worth has to be accurately predicted in order to deduce key design and safety parameters such as the available shutdown margin. In this work a methodology is suggested for the derivation of the distributed absorbing capacity of a depleted rod, useful in the case that the level of detail that is known about the irradiation history of the control rod does not allow an accurate calculation of the absorber's burnup. The suggested methodology is based on measurements of the rod's worth carried out in the former core configuration and on corresponding calculations based on the original (before first irradiation) absorber concentration. The methodology is formulated for the general case of the multi-group theory; it is successfully tested for the one-group approximation, for a depleted control rod of the Greek Research Reactor, containing five neutron absorbers. The computations reproduce satisfactorily the irradiated rod worth measurements, practically eliminating the discrepancy of the total rod worth, compared to the computations based on the nominal absorber densities.

  4. Nondestructive assay of HTGR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.

    1974-01-01

    Performance characteristics of three different radioactive source NDA systems are compared for the assay of HTGR fuel rods and stacks of rods. These systems include the fast neutron Sb-Be assay system, the 252 Cf ''Shuffler,'' and the thermal neutron PAPAS assay system. Studies have been made to determinethe perturbation on the measurements from particle size, kernel Th/U ratio, thorium content, and hydrogen content. In addition to the total 235 U determination, the pellet-to-pellet or rod-to-rod uniformity of HTGR fuel rod stacks has been measured by counting the delayed gamma rays with a NaI through-hole in the PAPAS system. These measurements showed that rod substitutions can be detected easily in a fuel stack, and that detailed information is available on the loading variations in a uniform stack. Using a 1.0 mg 252 Cf source, assay rates of 2 to 4 rods/s are possible, thus facilitating measurement of 100 percent of a plant's throughput. (U.S.)

  5. Control Rod Malfunction at the NRAD Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas L. Maddock

    2010-05-01

    The neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a training, research, and isotope (TRIGA) reactor located at the INL. The reactor is normally shut down by the insertion of three control rods that drop into the core when power is removed from electromagnets. During a routine shutdown, indicator lights on the console showed that one of the control rods was not inserted. It was initially thought that the indicator lights were in error because of a limit switch that was out of adjustment. Through further testing, it was determined that the control rod did not drop when the scram switch was initially pressed. The control rod anomaly led to a six month shutdown of the reactor and an in depth investigation of the reactor protective system. The investigation looked into: scram switch operation, console modifications, and control rod drive mechanisms. A number of latent issues were discovered and corrected during the investigation. The cause of the control rod malfunction was found to be a buildup of corrosion in the control rod drive mechanism. The investigation resulted in modifications to equipment, changes to both operation and maintenance procedures, and additional training. No reoccurrences of the problem have been observed since corrective actions were implemented.

  6. French LMFBR's control rods experience and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, G.; Guigon, A.; Verset, L.

    1983-06-01

    Since the last ten years, the French program has been, first of all, directed to the setting up, and then the development of, at once, the Phenix control rods, and next, the Super-Phenix ones. The vented pin design, with porous plug and sodium bonding, which allows the choices of large diameters, has been taken, since the Rapsodie experience was decisive. The absorber material is sintered, 10 B enriched, boron carbide. The can is made of 316 type stainless steel, stabilised, or not, with titanium. The experience gained in Phenix up to now is important, and deals with about six loads of control rods. Results confirm the validity of the design of the absorber pins. Some difficulties has been encountered for the guiding devices, due to the swelling of the steel. They have required design and material improvements. Such difficulties are discarded by a new design of the bearing, for the Super-Phenix control rods. The other parts of these rods, from the Primary Shut-Down System, are strictly derived from Phenix. The design of the rods from the Secondary Shut-Down System is rather different, but it's not the case for the design of the absorber pins: in many a way, they are derived from Phenix pins and from Rapsodie control rods. Both types of rods irradiation tests are in progress in Phenix [fr

  7. High-yield production of hydrophobins RodA and RodB from Aspergillus fumigatus in Pichia pastoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mona Højgaard; Borodina, Irina; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    A as well as rRodB were able to convert a glass surface from hydrophilic to hydrophobic similar to native RodA, but only rRodB was able to decrease the hydrophobicity of a Teflon-like surface to the same extent as native RodA, while rRodA showed this ability to a lesser extent. Recombinant RodA and native...

  8. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  9. Control rod housing alignment and repair apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.C.; Deaver, G.A.; Punches, J.R.; Singleton, G.E.; Erbes, J.G.; Offer, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a welding a repair device for precisely locating and welding the position of the top of a control rod drive housing attached from a stub tube from a corresponding aperture and alignment pin in a core plate within a boiling water nuclear reactor, the welding and repair device. It comprises: a shaft, the shaft extending from the vicinity of the top of the control rod drive housing up to and through the aperture in the core plate; means for registering to the aperture and the alignment pin on the core plate; a fixture attached to the bottom end of the shaft for mating to the top of the control rod drive housing in precise mating relationship; the fixture attached to the bottom end of the shaft whereby the fixture, when mated to the control rod drove housing and the registering means when registered to the alignment pin and aperture on the core plate imparts to the shaft, and angularity between the top of the control rod drive housing and the hole in the core plate; a hollow cylinder, the cylinder mounted for depending and sealed support with respect to the shaft above, about and below the control rod drive housing top; the cylinder depending down below the control rod drive housing to an elevation below the top of the sub tube; a rotating welding apparatus with a welding head for dispensing weldment mounted for rotation with respect to the shaft; the welding head disposed at the juncture between the side of the control rod drive housing and the stub tube; and means for flooding the cylinder with gas whereby the cylinder may be lowered. flooded in a gas environment and effect a weld between the top of the stub tube and the control rod drive housing

  10. Control rod housing alignment and repair method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.C.; Deaver, G.A.; Punches, J.R.; Singleton, G.E.; Erbes, J.G.; Offer, H.P.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for underwater welding of a control rod drive housing inserted through a stub tube to maintain requisite alignment and elevation of the top of the control rod drive housing to an overlying and corresponding aperture in a core plate as measured by an alignment device which determines the relative elevation and angularity with respect to the aperture. It comprises providing a welding cylinder dependent from the alignment device such that the elevation of the top of the welding cylinder is in a fixed relationship to the alignment device and is gas-proof; pressurizing the welding cylinder with inert welding gas sufficient to maintain the interior of the welding cylinder dry; lowering the welding cylinder through the aperture in the core plate by depending the cylinder with respect to the alignment device, the lowering including lowering through and adjusting the elevation relationship of the welding cylinder to the alignment device such that when the alignment device is in position to measure the elevation and angularity of the new control rod drive housing, the lower distal end of the welding cylinder extends below the upper periphery of the stub where welding is to occur; inserting a new control rod drive housing through the stub tube and positioning the control rod drive housing to a predetermined relationship to the anticipated final position of the control rod drive housing; providing welding implements transversely rotatably mounted interior of the welding cylinder relative to the alignment device such that the welding implements may be accurately positioned for dispensing weldment around the periphery of the top of the stub tube and at the side of the control rod drive housing; measuring the elevation and angularity of the control rod drive housing; and dispensing weldment along the top of the stub tube and at the side of the control rod drive housing

  11. Low cost sic coated erosion resistant graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, M.F.; Nicholls, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of materials with unique and improved properties using low cost processes is essential to increase performance and reduce cost of the solid rocket motors. Specifically advancements are needed for boost phase nozzle. As these motors operate at very high pressure and temperatures, the nozzle must survive high thermal stresses with minimal erosion to maintain performance. Currently three material choices are being exploited; which are refractory metals, graphite and carbon-carbon composites. Of these three materials graphite is the most attractive choice because of its low cost, light weight, and easy forming. However graphite is prone to erosion, both chemical and mechanical, which may affect the ballistic conditions and mechanical properties of the nozzle. To minimize this erosion high density graphite is usually preferred; which is again very expensive. Another technique used to minimize the erosion is Pyrolytic Graphite (PG) coating inside the nozzle. However PG coating is prone to cracking and spallation along with very cumbersome deposition process. Another possible methodology to avoid this erosion is to convert the inside surface of the rocket nozzle to Silicon Carbide (SiC), which is very erosion resistant and have much better thermal stability compared to graphite and even PG. Due to its functionally gradient nature such a layer will be very adherent and resistant to spallation. The current research is focused on synthesizing, characterizing and oxidation testing of such a converted SiC layer on commercial grade graphite. (author)

  12. Model of dopant action in oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Gaertner, Georg

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes an electrochemical model, which largely explains the formation of Ba in the oxide cathode at activation and normal operation. In a non-doped oxide cathode electrolysis of BaO is, besides the exchange reaction from the activators in the cathode nickel, an important source of Ba. By doping with rare earth oxides the conductivity of the oxide layer increases, which implies that the potential difference during current drawing over the oxide layer becomes lower and electrolysis of BaO is suppressed. This implies that the part of the electronic conductivity of the (Ba,Sr)O layer induced by the dopants also controls the sensitivity for poisoning: the higher the dopant level, the larger the sensitivity for poisoning. Furthermore, the suppression of electrolysis during normal operation largely explains why doped oxide cathodes have a better life performance than non-doped cathodes. Finally a hypothesis on the enhancement of sintering upon doping is presented

  13. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  14. Chitosan/graphene oxide biocomposite film from pencil rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, S.; Sari, J. N.; Bulan, R.; Piliang, A.; Amaturrahim, S. A.; Hutapea, Y. A.

    2018-03-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) has been succesfully synthesized using Hummber method from graphite powder of pencil rod. The excellent solubility of graphene oxide (GO)in water imparts its feasibilty as new filler for reinforcement hydrophilic biopolymers. In this research, the biocomposite film was fabricated from chitosan/graphene oxide. The characteristics of graphene oxide were investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results of the XRD showed graphene structur in 2θ, appeared at 9.0715°with interlayer spacing was about 9.74063Å. Preparation films with several variations of chitosan/graphene oxide was done by casting method and characterized by mechanical and morphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the tensile test in the film show that the film CS/GO (85: 15)% has the optimum Young’s modulus size of 2.9 GPa compared to other variations of CS / GO film. Morphological analysis film CS/GO (85:15)% by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), the obtained biocomposites film showed fine dispersion of GO in the CS matrix and could mix each other homogeneously.

  15. Gas cooled high temperature reactor with a heap of pebble shaped fuel elements and absorber rods which can be driven directly into the heap of pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.; Schmitt, H.; Schoening, J.; Weicht, U.

    1980-01-01

    The absorber rod for the graphite moderated, helium cooled reactor is cylindrical and has a tip in the shape of the frustrum of a cone. It consists of three coaxially arranged sleeve tubes made of steel, the inner and centre sleeve tubes surrounding the absorber part (B4C) so as to be gastight. The inner sleeve tube represents the supporting tube and is cooled by cold gas, as is the annular gap between the centre and outer sleeve tube. (RW) [de

  16. Apparatus for handling control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, A.; Watanabe, M.; Yoshida, T.; Sugaya, Z.; Saito, T.; Ishii, Y.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for handling control rod drives (CRD's) attached by detachable fixing means to housings mounted in a reactor pressure vessel and each coupled to one of control rods inserted in the reactor pressure vessel is described. The apparatus for handling the CRD's comprise cylindrical housing means, uncoupling means mounted in the housing means for uncoupling each of the control rods from the respective CRD, means mounted on the housing means for effecting attaching and detaching of the fixing means, means for supporting the housing means, and means for moving the support means longitudinally of the CRD

  17. Depletion calculations of adjuster rods in Darlington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, B.; Tsang, K., E-mail: benoit.arsenault@amecfw.com, E-mail: kwok.tsang@amecfw.com [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the simulation methodology and reactivity worth calculated for aged adjuster rods in the Darlington core. ORIGEN-S IST was applied to simulate the isotope transmutation process of the stainless steel and titanium adjusters. The compositions were used in DRAGON-IST to calculate the change in incremental properties of aged adjusters. Pre-simulations of the reactivity worth of the stainless steel and titanium adjusters in Darlington were performed using RFSP-IST and the results showed that the titanium adjuster rods exhibit faster reactivity-worth drop than that of stainless steel rods. (author)

  18. Recent Progress in Graphite Intercalation Compounds for Rechargeable Metal (Li, Na, K, Al)-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiantie; Dou, Yuhai; Wei, Zengxi; Ma, Jianmin; Deng, Yonghong; Li, Yutao; Liu, Huakun; Dou, Shixue

    2017-10-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with higher energy density are very necessary to meet the increasing demand for devices with better performance. With the commercial success of lithiated graphite, other graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) have also been intensively reported, not only for LIBs, but also for other metal (Na, K, Al) ion batteries. In this Progress Report, we briefly review the application of GICs as anodes and cathodes in metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries. After a brief introduction on the development history of GICs, the electrochemistry of cationic GICs and anionic GICs is summarized. We further briefly summarize the use of cationic GICs and anionic GICs in alkali ion batteries and the use of anionic GICs in aluminium-ion batteries. Finally, we reach some conclusions on the drawbacks, major progress, emerging challenges, and some perspectives on the development of GICs for metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries. Further development of GICs for metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries is not only a strong supplement to the commercialized success of lithiated-graphite for LIBs, but also an effective strategy to develop diverse high-energy batteries for stationary energy storage in the future.

  19. Channel uranium-graphite reactor mounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polushkin, K.K.; Kuznetsov, A.G.; Zheleznyakov, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    According to theoretical principles of general engineering technology the engineering experience of construction-mounting works at the NPP with channel uranium-graphite reactors is systematized. Main parameters and structural features of the 1000 MW channel uranium-graphite reactors are considered. The succession of mounting operations, premounting equipment and pipelines preparation and mounting works technique are described. The most efficient methods of fitting, welding and machining of reactor elements are recommended. Main problems of technical control service are discussed. A typical netted diagram of main equipment of channel uranium-graphite reactors mounting is given

  20. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without