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Sample records for glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen

  1. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

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    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  2. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia

  3. Nitrogen uptake and assimilation in proliferating embryogenic cultures of Norway spruce-Investigating the specific role of glutamine.

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    Johanna Carlsson

    Full Text Available Somatic embryogenesis is an in vitro system employed for plant propagation and the study of embryo development. Nitrogen is essential for plant growth and development and, hence, the production of healthy embryos during somatic embryogenesis. Glutamine has been shown to increase plant biomass in many in vitro applications, including somatic embryogenesis. However, several aspects of nitrogen nutrition during somatic embryogenesis remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the uptake and assimilation of nitrogen in Norway spruce pro-embryogenic masses to elucidate some of these aspects. In our study, addition of glutamine had a more positive effect on growth than inorganic nitrogen. The nitrogen uptake appeared to be regulated, with a strong preference for glutamine; 67% of the assimilated nitrogen in the free amino acid pool originated from glutamine-nitrogen. Glutamine addition also relieved the apparently limited metabolism (as evidenced by the low concentration of free amino acids of pro-embryogenic masses grown on inorganic nitrogen only. The unusually high alanine concentration in the presence of glutamine, suggests that alanine biosynthesis was involved in alleviating these constraints. These findings inspire further studies of nitrogen nutrition during the somatic embryogenesis process; identifying the mechanism(s that govern glutamine enhancement of pro-embryogenic masses growth is especially important in this regard.

  4. Nitrogen metabolism in actinorhizal nodules of Alnus glutinosa: expression of glutamine synthetase and acetylornithine transaminase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, C.; Ribeiro, A.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Jing, Y.; Kammen, van A.; Bisseling, T.; Pawlowski, K.

    1996-01-01

    Two nodule cDNA clones representing genes involved in Alnus glutinosa nitrogen metabolism were analysed. ag11 encoded glutamine synthetase (GS), the enzyme responsible for ammonium assimilation, while ag118 encoded acetylornithine transaminase (AOTA), an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of

  5. Deletion of Type I glutamine synthetase deregulates nitrogen metabolism and increases ethanol production in Clostridium thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydzak, Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division, BioEnergy Science Center; Garcia, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division, BioEnergy Science Center; Stevenson, David M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Bacteriology; Sladek, Margaret [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division, BioEnergy Science Center; Klingeman, Dawn M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division, BioEnergy Science Center; Holwerda, Evert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering; Amador-Noguez, Daniel [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Bacteriology; Brown, Steven D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division, BioEnergy Science Center; Guss, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division, BioEnergy Science Center

    2017-05-01

    Clostridium thermocellum rapidly deconstructs cellulose and ferments resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol and other products, and is thus a promising platform organism for the development of cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. And while recent metabolic engineering strategies have targeted eliminating canonical fermentation products (acetate, lactate, formate, and H2), C. thermocellum also secretes amino acids, which has limited ethanol yields in engineered strains to approximately 70% of the theoretical maximum. To decrease amino acid secretion, we attempted to reduce ammonium assimilation by deleting the Type I glutamine synthetase (glnA) in C. thermocellum. Deletion of glnA reduced levels of secreted valine and total amino acids by 53% and 44% respectively, and increased ethanol yields by 53%. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes encoding the RNF-complex were more highly expressed in ΔglnA and may have a role in improving NADH-availability for ethanol production. While a significant up-regulation of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and urea uptake suggested that deletion of glnA induces a nitrogen starvation response, metabolomic analysis showed an increase in intracellular glutamine and α-ketoglutarate levels indicative of nitrogen-rich conditions. Here, we propose that deletion of glnA causes deregulation of nitrogen metabolism, leading to overexpression of nitrogen metabolism genes and, in turn, elevated glutamine/α-ketoglutarate levels. Here we demonstrate that perturbation of nitrogen assimilation is a promising strategy to redirect flux from the production of nitrogenous compounds toward biofuels in C. thermocellum.

  6. Glutamine nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen supplied as a nitrogen source is not converted into nitrate nitrogen of plant tissues of hydroponically grown pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-J; Wu, L-H; Tao, Q-N; Miller, D D; Welch, R M

    2009-03-01

    Many vegetables, especially leafy vegetables, accumulate NO(-) (3)-N in their edible portions. High nitrate levels in vegetables constitute a health hazard, such as cancers and blue baby syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine if (1) ammonium nitrogen (NH(+) (4)-N) and glutamine-nitrogen (Gln-N) absorbed by plant roots is converted into nitrate-nitrogen of pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.) tissues, and (2) if nitrate-nitrogen (NO(-) (3)-N) accumulation and concentration of pak-choi tissues linearly increase with increasing NO(-) (3)-N supply when grown in nutrient solution. In experiment 1, 4 different nitrogen treatments (no nitrogen, NH(+) (4)-N, Gln-N, and NO(-) (3)-N) with equal total N concentrations in treatments with added N were applied under sterile nutrient medium culture conditions. In experiment 2, 5 concentrations of N (from 0 to 48 mM), supplied as NO(-) (3)-N in the nutrient solution, were tested. The results showed that Gln-N and NH(+) (4)-N added to the nutrient media were not converted into nitrate-nitrogen of plant tissues. Also, NO(-) (3)-N accumulation in the pak-choi tissues was the highest when plants were supplied 24 mM NO(-) (3)-N in the media. The NO(-) (3)-N concentration in plant tissues was quadratically correlated to the NO(-) (3)-N concentration supplied in the nutrient solution.

  7. Differential contribution of the proline and glutamine pathways to glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation in yeast lacking glutamate dehydrogenase.

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    Sieg, Alex G; Trotter, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymes play a pivotal role in glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation. It has been proposed that, in GDH-deficient yeast, either the proline utilization (PUT) or the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) pathway serves as the alternative pathway for glutamate production and nitrogen assimilation to the exclusion of the other. Using a gdh-null mutant (gdh1Δ2Δ3Δ), this ambiguity was addressed using a combination of growth studies and pathway-specific enzyme assays on a variety of nitrogen sources (ammonia, glutamine, proline and urea). The GDH-null mutant was viable on all nitrogen sources tested, confirming that alternate pathways for nitrogen assimilation exist in the gdh-null strain. Enzyme assays point to GS/GOGAT as the primary alternative pathway on the preferred nitrogen sources ammonia and glutamine, whereas growth on proline required both the PUT and GS/GOGAT pathways. In contrast, growth on glucose-urea media elicited a decrease in GOGAT activity along with an increase in activity of the PUT pathway specific enzyme Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH). Together, these results suggest the alternative pathway for nitrogen assimilation in strains lacking the preferred GDH-dependent route is nitrogen source dependent and that neither GS/GOGAT nor PUT serves as the sole compensatory pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase are regulated in response to nitrogen availability in Myocbacterium smegmatis

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    van Helden Paul

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assimilation of nitrogen is an essential process in all prokaryotes, yet a relatively limited amount of information is available on nitrogen metabolism in the mycobacteria. The physiological role and pathogenic properties of glutamine synthetase (GS have been extensively investigated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, little is known about this enzyme in other mycobacterial species, or the role of an additional nitrogen assimilatory pathway via glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, in the mycobacteria as a whole. We investigated specific enzyme activity and transcription of GS and as well as both possible isoforms of GDH (NAD+- and NADP+-specific GDH under varying conditions of nitrogen availability in Mycobacterium smegmatis as a model for the mycobacteria. Results It was found that the specific activity of the aminating NADP+-GDH reaction and the deaminating NAD+-GDH reaction did not change appreciably in response to nitrogen availability. However, GS activity as well as the deaminating NADP+-GDH and aminating NAD+-GDH reactions were indeed significantly altered in response to exogenous nitrogen concentrations. Transcription of genes encoding for GS and the GDH isoforms were also found to be regulated under our experimental conditions. Conclusions The physiological role and regulation of GS in M. smegmatis was similar to that which has been described for other mycobacteria, however, in our study the regulation of both NADP+- and NAD+-GDH specific activity in M. smegmatis appeared to be different to that of other Actinomycetales. It was found that NAD+-GDH played an important role in nitrogen assimilation rather than glutamate catabolism as was previously thought, and is it's activity appeared to be regulated in response to nitrogen availability. Transcription of the genes encoding for NAD+-GDH enzymes seem to be regulated in M. smegmatis under the conditions tested and may contribute to the changes in enzyme activity

  9. The role of glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen metabolism in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

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    Viljoen, Albertus J; Kirsten, Catriona J; Baker, Bienyameen; van Helden, Paul D; Wiid, Ian J F

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the regulation of intracellular glutamate levels could play an important role in the ability of pathogenic slow-growing mycobacteria to grow in vivo. However, little is known about the in vitro requirement for the enzymes which catalyse glutamate production and degradation in the slow-growing mycobacteria, namely; glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), respectively. We report that allelic replacement of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG gltBD-operon encoding for the large (gltB) and small (gltD) subunits of GOGAT with a hygromycin resistance cassette resulted in glutamate auxotrophy and that deletion of the GDH encoding-gene (gdh) led to a marked growth deficiency in the presence of L-glutamate as a sole nitrogen source as well as reduction in growth when cultured in an excess of L-asparagine.

  10. Changes in polyamines, inorganic ions and glutamine synthetase activity in response to nitrogen availability and form in red spruce (Picea rubens)

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    Michelle J. Serapiglia; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed effects of nitrogen availability and form on growth rates, concentrations of polyamines and inorganic ions and glutamine synthetase activity in in-vitro-cultured red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cells. Growth rates, concentrations of polyamines and glutamine synthetase activity declined when either the amount of nitrate or the total amount...

  11. Functional specialization of one copy of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase in ureide production from symbiotically fixed nitrogen in Phaseolus vulgaris.

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    Coleto, Inmaculada; Trenas, Almudena T; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Pineda, Manuel; Alamillo, Josefa M

    2016-08-01

    Purines are essential molecules formed in a highly regulated pathway in all organisms. In tropical legumes, the nitrogen fixed in the nodules is used to generate ureides through the oxidation of de novo synthesized purines. Glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PRAT) catalyses the first committed step of de novo purine synthesis. In Phaseolus vulgaris there are three genes coding for PRAT. The three full-length sequences, which are intron-less genes, were cloned, and their expression levels were determined under conditions that affect the synthesis of purines. One of the three genes, PvPRAT3, is highly expressed in nodules and protein amount and enzymatic activity in these tissues correlate with nitrogen fixation activity. Inhibition of PvPRAT3 gene expression by RNAi-silencing and subsequent metabolomic analysis of the transformed roots shows that PvPRAT3 is essential for the synthesis of ureides in P. vulgaris nodules. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A Critical Role of Glutamine and Asparagine γ-Nitrogen in Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Cancer Cells Hijacked by an Oncogenic Virus

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    Ying Zhu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available While glutamine is a nonessential amino acid that can be synthesized from glucose, some cancer cells primarily depend on glutamine for their growth, proliferation, and survival. Numerous types of cancer also depend on asparagine for cell proliferation. The underlying mechanisms of the glutamine and asparagine requirement in cancer cells in different contexts remain unclear. In this study, we show that the oncogenic virus Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV accelerates the glutamine metabolism of glucose-independent proliferation of cancer cells by upregulating the expression of numerous critical enzymes, including glutaminase 2 (GLS2, glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1, and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2 (GOT2, to support cell proliferation. Surprisingly, cell crisis is rescued only completely by supplementation with asparagine but minimally by supplementation with α-ketoglutarate, aspartate, or glutamate upon glutamine deprivation, implying an essential role of γ-nitrogen in glutamine and asparagine for cell proliferation. Specifically, glutamine and asparagine provide the critical γ-nitrogen for purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis, as knockdown of four rate-limiting enzymes in the pathways, including carbamoylphosphate synthetase 2 (CAD, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PPAT, and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetases 1 and 2 (PRPS1 and PRPS2, respectively, suppresses cell proliferation. These findings indicate that glutamine and asparagine are shunted to the biosynthesis of nucleotides and nonessential amino acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle to support the anabolic proliferation of KSHV-transformed cells. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus hijacks a metabolic pathway for cell proliferation and imply potential therapeutic applications in specific types of cancer that depend on this pathway.

  13. [15N]NMR Determination of Asparagine and Glutamine Nitrogen Utilization for Synthesis of Storage Protein in Developing Cotyledons of Soybean in Culture

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    Skokut, Thomas A.; Varner, Joseph E.; Schaefer, Jacob; Stejskal, Edward O.; McKay, Robert A.

    1982-01-01

    Solid-state [15N]NMR was used to measure the use of the amide and amino nitrogens of glutamine and asparagine for synthesis of storage protein in cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv. Elf) in culture. No major discrimination in the incorporation of the amide or amino nitrogens of glutamine into protein is apparent, but the same nitrogens of asparagine are used with a degree of specificity. During the first seven days in culture with asparagine as the sole nitrogen source, the amino nitrogen donates approximately twice as much nitrogen to protein as does the amide nitrogen. The use of the amide nitrogen increases with longer periods of culture. The reduced use of the amide nitrogen was confirmed by its early appearance as ammonium in the culture medium. The amide nitrogen of asparagine was found at all times to be an essential precursor for protein because of its appearance in protein in residues whose nitrogens were not supplied by the amino nitrogen. In addition, methionine sulfoximine inhibited growth completely on asparagine, indicating that some ammonium assimilation is essential for storage protein synthesis. These results indicate that in a developing cotyledon, a transaminase reaction is of major importance in the utilization of asparagine for synthesis of storage protein and that, at least in the early stages of cotyledon development, reduced activities of ammonium-assimilating enzymes in the cotyledon tissue or in other tissues of the seed or pod may be a limiting factor in the use of asparagine-amide nitrogen. PMID:16662198

  14. Nitrogen Control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa : A Role for Glutamine in the Regulation of the Synthesis of NADP-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase, Urease and Histidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1981-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the formation of urease, histidase and some other enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation is repressed by ammonia in the growth medium. The key metabolite in this process appears to be glutamine or a product derived from it, since ammonia and glutamate did not repress

  15. Fate of glutamate carbon and nitrogen in isolated guinea-pig kidney-cortex tubules. Evidence for involvement of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamine sythesis from glutamate.

    OpenAIRE

    Baverel, G; Genoux, C; Forissier, M; Pellet, M

    1980-01-01

    1. The pathways and the fate of glutamate carbon and nitrogen were investigated in isolated guinea-pig kidney-cortex tubules. 2. At low glutamate concentration (1 mM), the glutamate carbon skeleton was either completely oxidized or converted into glutamine. At high glutamate concentration (5 mM), glucose, lactate and alanine were additional products of glutamate metabolism. 3. At neither concentration of glutamate was there accumulation of ammonia. 4. Nitrogen-balance calculations and the rel...

  16. Glutamine and Its Effects on the Intestine

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    Paul E Hardy

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine, an amino acid, is the principal energy substrate for small intestinal cells. It also acts as a nitrogen carrier through its amide nitrogen. Arterial glutamine is supported by net synthesis in skeletal muscle. Glutamine is rapidly metabolized by the intestine, whether supplied from the lumen or from the arterial circulation. Intestinal uptake of glutamine increases after trauma and operative stress. The consumption of glutamine by the gut may in large part be dependent on mucosal glutaminase activity and on enterocyte glutamine transport. Glutaminc has been shown to improve gut morphology and outcome in animal models of encerocolitis. It may play a similar role in aiding repair of human intestinal injury in persons with sufficient glutamine in their diet compared to those who arc glutamine deficient. Glutamine may have a positive effect on the immune function of the intestinal mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue. Glutamine is not currently available in nutritional preparations for routine clinical use, yet it has recently been shown to benefit maintenance of nitrogen balance in humans. Due to the instability and low solubility of glutamine, dipeptides have been studied. L-alanyl-L-glutamine seems to be the most promising glutamine precursor for parenteral use in humans, as it is safe and rapidly hydrolyzed in vivo to release free glutamine. The exact role of glutamine as a therapeutic agent to promote intetitinal well-being has yet to be determined. However, preliminary evidence suggests that glutaminc will be helpful in a variety of clinical scenarios.

  17. Mid-Season Leaf Glutamine Predicts End-Season Maize Grain Yield and Nitrogen Content in Response to Nitrogen Fertilization under Field Conditions

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    Travis Goron

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available After uptake in cereal crops, nitrogen (N is rapidly assimilated into glutamine (Gln and other amino acids for transport to sinks. Therefore Gln has potential as an improved indicator of soil N availability compared to plant N demand. Gln has primarily been assayed to understand basic plant physiology, rather than to measure plant/soil-N under field conditions. It was hypothesized that leaf Gln at early-to-mid season could report the N application rate and predict end-season grain yield in field-grown maize. A three-year maize field experiment was conducted with N application rates ranging from 30 to 218 kg ha−1. Relative leaf Gln was assayed from leaf disk tissue using a whole-cell biosensor for Gln (GlnLux at the V3-V14 growth stages. SPAD (Soil Plant Analysis Development and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index measurements were also performed. When sampled at V6 or later, GlnLux glutamine output consistently correlated with the N application rate, end-season yield, and grain N content. Yield correlation outperformed GreenSeekerTM NDVI, and was equivalent to SPAD chlorophyll, indicating the potential for yield prediction. Additionally, depleting soil N via overplanting increased GlnLux resolution to the earlier V5 stage. The results of the study are discussed in the context of luxury N consumption, leaf N remobilization, senescence, and grain fill. The potential and challenges of leaf Gln and GlnLux for the study of crop N physiology, and future N management are also discussed.

  18. Functions of Glutamine Synthetase Isoforms in the Nitrogen Metabolism of Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Miao

    Nitrogen is one of the major plant nutrients limiting crop production worldwide. In many parts of the world the availability of N fertilizers is limited, whereas in other parts of the world too much N fertilizer is applied, leading to serious negative environmental consequences. The use of N...... but primary root development during seed germination was reduced in the presence of external N. Gln1;2 promoter-GFP construct showed that Gln1;2 expression was localized to the vascular cells of roots, petals, and stamens. A novel compensatory interaction between Gln1;1 and Gln1;2 was shown since shoot Gln1...

  19. Functions of Glutamine Synthetase Isoforms in the Nitrogen Metabolism of Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Miao

    fertilizers accordingly needs to be optimized in order to make agriculture more sustainable. One pathway to achieve such optimization is to improve plant N use efficiency (NUE) by developing new crop genotypes with improved yield per unit of N fertilizer applied. For this purpose, more and better knowledge......Nitrogen is one of the major plant nutrients limiting crop production worldwide. In many parts of the world the availability of N fertilizers is limited, whereas in other parts of the world too much N fertilizer is applied, leading to serious negative environmental consequences. The use of N...... about bottlenecks in plant N assimilation is needed. Based on a reverse genetics strategy embracing characterization of knockout mutants in the model plant species Arabidopsis, the results obtained in this PhD study have provided new information about the specific roles of two genes Gln1;1 and Gln1...

  20. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase

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    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie; Eriksson, Ulf Dennis; Møller, Inge Skrumsager

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude...

  1. Glutamine Synthetases GLN1;2 and GLN2 in Relation to Arabidopsis Growth Response to Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Varying Nitrogen Forms

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    Vurrakula, Swathi

    Carbon and nitrogen are the most abundant elements in plants, together making up around 40-50% and 2-6% of dry matter respectively. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to double by the end of this century, increasing carbon fixation by C3 plants like Arabidopsis and, hence, their carbon...... of the complicated interactions between nitrogen and carbon, pointing towards the need for a deeper understanding of the same.......Carbon and nitrogen are the most abundant elements in plants, together making up around 40-50% and 2-6% of dry matter respectively. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to double by the end of this century, increasing carbon fixation by C3 plants like Arabidopsis and, hence, their carbon...... content while diluting nitrogen concentrations. Such a reduction in nitrogen concentration will affect plant response to stress and seed/grain yield. Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the central nitrogen-assimilatory enzyme, performing primary and secondary nitrogen assimilation, in response to environmental...

  2. The Stable Level of Glutamine synthetase 2 Plays an Important Role in Rice Growth and in Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolic Balance

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    Bao, Aili; Zhao, Zhuqing; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase 2 (GS2) is a key enzyme involved in the ammonium metabolism in plant leaves. In our previous study, we obtained GS2-cosuppressed plants, which displayed a normal growth phenotype at the seedling stage, while at the tillering stage they showed a chlorosis phenotype. In this study, to investigate the chlorosis mechanism, we systematically analyzed the plant growth, carbon-nitrogen metabolism and gene expressions between the GS2-cosuppressed rice and wild-type plants. The results revealed that the GS2-cosuppressed plants exhibited a poor plant growth phenotype and a poor nitrogen transport ability, which led to nitrogen accumulation and a decline in the carbon/nitrogen ratio in the stems. Interestingly, there was a higher concentration of soluble proteins and a lower concentration of carbohydrates in the GS2-cosuppressed plants at the seedling stage, while a contrasting result was displayed at the tillering stage. The analysis of the metabolic profile showed a significant increase of sugars and organic acids. Additionally, gene expression patterns were different in root and leaf of GS2-cosuppressed plants between the seedling and tillering stage. These results indicated the important role of a stable level of GS2 transcription during normal rice development and the importance of the carbon-nitrogen metabolic balance in rice growth. PMID:26053400

  3. Parenteral glutamine dipeptide supplementation does not ameliorate chemotherapy-induced toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaanen, H. C.; van der Lelie, H.; Timmer, J. G.; Fürst, P.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    Glutamine-supplemented total parenteral nutrition (TPN) improved the nitrogen balance in catabolic situations. In animal studies, parenteral glutamine supplementation appeared to maintain gut integrity. This study was performed to evaluate the possible positive effects of glutamine supplementation

  4. Chloroplast Glutamine Synthetase, the Key Regulator of Nitrogen Metabolism in Wheat, Performs Its Role by Fine Regulation of Enzyme Activity via Negative Cooperativity of Its Subunits

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    Edit Németh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is of central interest as the main route of ammonia assimilation in plants, and as a connection point between the organic and inorganic worlds. Even though GS activity is critical for producing high yields of crop plants, the autoregulation of substrate consumption of wheat GS remained unknown until now. Here we show kinetic evidence, that the chloroplast localized GS isoform (GS2 of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Jubilejnaja-50 takes place at the carbon-nitrogen metabolic branch point, where it is a mediator, and its enzymatic activity is regulated in a negatively cooperative allosteric manner. We have discovered that GS2 activity is described by a tetraphasic kinetic curve in response to increasing levels of glutamate supply. We constructed a model that explains the kinetic properties of glutamate consumption and this unique allosteric behavior. We also studied the subunit composition of both wheat leaf GS isoenzymes by a combination of two dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein blotting. Both leaf isozymes have homogeneous subunit composition. Glutamate is both a substrate, and an allosteric regulator of the biosynthetic reaction. We have concluded on the basis of our results and previous reports, that wheat GS2 is probably a homooctamer, and that it processes its substrate in a well-regulated, concentration dependent way, as a result of its negatively cooperative, allosteric activity. Thus, GS2 has a central role as a regulator between the nitrogen and the carbon cycles via maintaining glutamine-glutamate pool in the chloroplast on the level of substrates, in addition to its function in ammonia assimilation.

  5. fHANT-AC genes of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor are not repressed by l-glutamine allowing simultaneous utilization of nitrate and organic nitrogen sources.

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    Kemppainen, Minna J; Alvarez Crespo, Maria C; Pardo, Alejandro G

    2010-08-01

    In boreal and temperate forest ectomycorrhizal fungi play a crucial role in nitrogen cycling by assimilating nitrogenous compounds from soil and transferring them to tree hosts. The expression profile of fHANT-AC genes, nitrate transporter (Lbnrt), nitrate reductase (Lbnr) and nitrite reductase (Lbnir), responsible for nitrate utilization in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor, was studied on variable N regimens. The three genes were shown to be under a common regulation: repressed in the presence of ammonium while growth on nitrate resulted in high transcripts accumulation. The presence of nitrate was shown not to be indispensable for activation of Laccaria fHANT-AC as also N starvation and growth on urea and l-asparagine resulted in high transcript levels. Equally high expression of Laccaria fHANT-AC genes was detected in mycelia grown on variable concentrations of l-glutamine. This finding shows that in L. bicolor N metabolite repression of fHANT-AC is not signalled via l-glutamine like described in ascomycetes. The expression patterns of Lbnrt and Lbnir were also studied in an Lbnr RNA-silenced Laccaria strain. No differences were observed on the N source regulation or the degree of transcript accumulation of these genes, indicating that the presence of high nitrate reductase activity is not a core regulator of L. bicolor fHANT-AC expression. The simultaneous utilization of nitrate and organic N sources, already suggested by high transcript levels of Laccaria fHANT-AC genes on organic N, was supported by the increase of culture medium pH as a result of nitrate transporter activity. The possible ecological and evolutionary significance of the herein reported high regulatory flexibility of Laccaria nitrate utilization pathway for ectomycorrizal fungi and the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is discussed. © 2009 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    fertilizer requirement. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) has been a major topic in plant nitrogen research for decades due to its central role in plant N metabolism. The cytosolic version of this enzyme (GS1) plays an important role in relation to primary N assimilation as well as in relation to N...

  7. A Biosensor-Based Leaf Punch Assay for Glutamine Correlates to Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation Measurements in Legumes to Permit Rapid Screening of Rhizobia Inoculants under Controlled Conditions.

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    Thilakarathna, Malinda S; Moroz, Nicholas; Raizada, Manish N

    2017-01-01

    Legumes are protein sources for billions of humans and livestock. These traits are enabled by symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF), whereby root nodule-inhabiting rhizobia bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen (N) into usable N. Unfortunately, SNF rates in legume crops suffer from undiagnosed incompatible/suboptimal interactions between crop varieties and rhizobia strains. There are opportunities to test much large numbers of rhizobia strains if cost/labor-effective diagnostic tests become available which may especially benefit researchers in developing countries. Inside root nodules, fixed N from rhizobia is assimilated into amino acids including glutamine (Gln) for export to shoots as the major fraction (amide-exporting legumes) or as the minor fraction (ureide-exporting legumes). Here, we have developed a new leaf punch based technique to screen rhizobia inoculants for SNF activity following inoculation of both amide exporting and ureide exporting legumes. The assay is based on measuring Gln output using the GlnLux biosensor, which consists of Escherichia coli cells auxotrophic for Gln and expressing a constitutive lux operon. Subsistence farmer varieties of an amide exporter (lentil) and two ureide exporters (cowpea and soybean) were inoculated with different strains of rhizobia under controlled conditions, then extracts of single leaf punches were incubated with GlnLux cells, and light-output was measured using a 96-well luminometer. In the absence of external N and under controlled conditions, the results from the leaf punch assay correlated with 15 N-based measurements, shoot N percentage, and shoot total fixed N in all three crops. The technology is rapid, inexpensive, high-throughput, requires minimum technical expertise and very little tissue, and hence is relatively non-destructive. We compared and contrasted the benefits and limitations of this novel diagnostic assay to methods.

  8. A Biosensor-Based Leaf Punch Assay for Glutamine Correlates to Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation Measurements in Legumes to Permit Rapid Screening of Rhizobia Inoculants under Controlled Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinda S. Thilakarathna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Legumes are protein sources for billions of humans and livestock. These traits are enabled by symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF, whereby root nodule-inhabiting rhizobia bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen (N into usable N. Unfortunately, SNF rates in legume crops suffer from undiagnosed incompatible/suboptimal interactions between crop varieties and rhizobia strains. There are opportunities to test much large numbers of rhizobia strains if cost/labor-effective diagnostic tests become available which may especially benefit researchers in developing countries. Inside root nodules, fixed N from rhizobia is assimilated into amino acids including glutamine (Gln for export to shoots as the major fraction (amide-exporting legumes or as the minor fraction (ureide-exporting legumes. Here, we have developed a new leaf punch based technique to screen rhizobia inoculants for SNF activity following inoculation of both amide exporting and ureide exporting legumes. The assay is based on measuring Gln output using the GlnLux biosensor, which consists of Escherichia coli cells auxotrophic for Gln and expressing a constitutive lux operon. Subsistence farmer varieties of an amide exporter (lentil and two ureide exporters (cowpea and soybean were inoculated with different strains of rhizobia under controlled conditions, then extracts of single leaf punches were incubated with GlnLux cells, and light-output was measured using a 96-well luminometer. In the absence of external N and under controlled conditions, the results from the leaf punch assay correlated with 15N-based measurements, shoot N percentage, and shoot total fixed N in all three crops. The technology is rapid, inexpensive, high-throughput, requires minimum technical expertise and very little tissue, and hence is relatively non-destructive. We compared and contrasted the benefits and limitations of this novel diagnostic assay to methods.

  9. Feedback inhibition of ammonium (methylammonium) ion transport in Escherichia coli by glutamine and glutamine analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, A.; Hong, J.S.; Barnes, E.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    When cultured with glutamate or glutamine as the nitrogen source, Escherichia coli expresses a specific ammonium (methylammonium) transport system. Over 95% of the methylammonium transport activity in washed cells was blocked by incubation with 100 μM L-glutamine in the presence of chloramphenicol (100 μg/ml). The inhibition of transport by L-glutamine was noncompetitive with respect to the [ 14 C]methylammonium substrate. D-Glutamine had no significant effect. The glutamine analogs γ-L-glutamyl hydroxamate and γ-L-glutamyl hydrazide were also noncompetitive inhibitors of methylammonium transport, suggesting that glutamine metabolism is not required. The role of the intracellular glutamine pool in the regulation of ammonium transport was investigated by using mutants carrying defects in the operon of glnP, the gene for the glutamine transporter. The glnP mutants had normal rates of methylammonium transport but were refractory to glutamine inhibition. Glycylglycine, a noncompetitive inhibitor of methylammonium uptake in wild-type cells, was equipotent in blocking transport in glnP mutants. Although ammonium transport is also subject to repression by growth of E. coli in the presence of ammonia, this phenomenon is unrelated to glutamine inhibition

  10. Accumulated Expression Level of Cytosolic Glutamine Synthetase 1 Gene (OsGS1;1 or OsGS1;2) Alter Plant Development and the Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolic Status in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Aili; Zhao, Zhuqing; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining an appropriate balance of carbon to nitrogen metabolism is essential for rice growth and yield. Glutamine synthetase is a key enzyme for ammonium assimilation. In this study, we systematically analyzed the growth phenotype, carbon-nitrogen metabolic status and gene expression profiles in GS1;1-, GS1;2-overexpressing rice and wildtype plants. Our results revealed that the GS1;1-, GS1;2-overexpressing plants exhibited a poor plant growth phenotype and yield and decreased carbon/nitrogen ratio in the stem caused by the accumulation of nitrogen in the stem. In addition, the leaf SPAD value and photosynthetic parameters, soluble proteins and carbohydrates varied greatly in the GS1;1-, GS1;2-overexpressing plants. Furthermore, metabolite profile and gene expression analysis demonstrated significant changes in individual sugars, organic acids and free amino acids, and gene expression patterns in GS1;1-, GS1;2-overexpressing plants, which also indicated the distinct roles that these two GS1 genes played in rice nitrogen metabolism, particularly when sufficient nitrogen was applied in the environment. Thus, the unbalanced carbon-nitrogen metabolic status and poor ability of nitrogen transportation from stem to leaf in GS1;1-, GS1;2-overexpressing plants may explain the poor growth and yield. PMID:24743556

  11. Growth factors regulate glutamine synthetase activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khaled

    2012-07-10

    Jul 10, 2012 ... affected by growth medium, carbon source, nitrogen source and sodium chloride. LB supplemented with 7% glycerol ... Abbreviations: GS, Glutamine synthetase; MSM, minimal salt medium; NB, nutrient broth medium; NF, ... glutamate and ammonia, which in turn, cells are supplied with ammonia, and their ...

  12. Role of glutamine in cobinamide biosynthesis in Propionibacterium shermanii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, A.A.; Pushkin, A.V.; Belozerova, E.V.; Bykhovskii, V.Ya.

    1987-01-10

    The role of glutamine as a possible donor of amide groups in the biosynthesis of vitamin B/sub 12/ was investigated. In the incubation of P. shermanii cells preliminarily exhausted with respect to nitrogen on media containing ammonium sulfate or asparagine, the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine suppressed the formation of cobinamide (factor B) from the monoamide of cobiric acid (by 75 and 59%, respectively). At the same time, the inhibitor did not affect cobinamide synthesis on a medium with glutamine. The amide group of glutamine, labeled with /sup 13/N, was used for the amidation of corrinoids four times as efficiently as the amine group. It was concluded that a glutamine-dependent synthetase, which catalyzes the amidation of cobiric acids with the formation of cobinamide, functions in cells of propionic acid bacteria.

  13. Glutamine Synthetases GLN1;2 and GLN2 in Relation to Arabidopsis Growth Response to Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Varying Nitrogen Forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vurrakula, Swathi

    cues and adjusting it to the plant internal status. The two major types of GS include cytosolic GS1 (five isoforms in Arabidopsis, GLN1;1 to GLN1;5) and a single chloroplastic GS2. GS draws its substrates from carbon skeletons to synthesize amino acids. Thus, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms are closely...

  14. Glutamine and glutamate as vital metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newsholme P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is widely accepted as the primary nutrient for the maintenance and promotion of cell function. This metabolite leads to production of ATP, NADPH and precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules such as nucleic acids and phospholipids. We propose that, in addition to glucose, the 5-carbon amino acids glutamine and glutamate should be considered to be equally important for maintenance and promotion of cell function. The functions of glutamine/glutamate are many, i.e., they are substrates for protein synthesis, anabolic precursors for muscle growth, they regulate acid-base balance in the kidney, they are substrates for ureagenesis in the liver and for hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis, they act as an oxidative fuel for the intestine and cells of the immune system, provide inter-organ nitrogen transport, and act as precursors of neurotransmitter synthesis, of nucleotide and nucleic acid synthesis and of glutathione production. Many of these functions are interrelated with glucose metabolism. The specialized aspects of glutamine/glutamate metabolism of different glutamine-utilizing cells are discussed in the context of glucose requirements and cell function.

  15. Glutamine alimentation in catabolic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, P G; Nijveldt, R J; Houdijk, A P; Meijer, S; van Leeuwen, P A

    2001-09-01

    Glutamine should be reclassified as a conditionally essential amino acid in the catabolic state because the body's glutamine expenditures exceed synthesis and low glutamine levels in plasma are associated with poor clinical outcome. After severe stress, several amino acids are mobilized from muscle tissue to supply energy and substrate to the host. Glutamine is one of the most important amino acids that provide this function. Glutamine acts as the preferred respiratory fuel for lymphocytes, hepatocytes and intestinal mucosal cells and is metabolized in the gut to citrulline, ammonium and other amino acids. Low concentrations of glutamine in plasma reflect reduced stores in muscle and this reduced availability of glutamine in the catabolic state seems to correlate with increased morbidity and mortality. Adding glutamine to the nutrition of clinical patients, enterally or parenterally, may reduce morbidity. Several excellent clinical trials have been performed to prove efficacy and feasibility of the use of glutamine supplementation in parenteral and enteral nutrition. The increased intake of glutamine has resulted in lower septic morbidity in certain critically ill patient populations. This review will focus on the efficacy and the importance of glutamine supplementation in diverse catabolic states.

  16. [Methionine sulfoximine and phosphinothricin--glutamine synthetase inhibitors and activators and their herbicidal activity (A review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneeva, Z G; Solov'eva, N A; Sidel'nikova, L I

    2003-01-01

    Derivatives of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) and phosphinothrycin (PPT), which are analogues of glutamate, exhibit selective herbicidal activity. This effect is accounted for by impairments of nitrogen metabolism, resulting from inhibition of its key enzyme in plants, glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2). Inhibition of the enzyme causes ammoniac nitrogen to accumulate and terminates the synthesis of glutamine. Changes in the content of these two metabolites (excess ammonium and glutamine deficiency) act in a concert to cause plant death. However, low concentrations of MSO, PPT, and their metabolites produce an opposite effect: glutamine synthetase is activated, with concomitant stimulation of plant growth and productivity. The mechanisms whereby MSO and PPT affect glutamine synthetase activity are discussed in the context of nitrogen metabolism in plants.

  17. Plasma glutamine is a minor precursor for the synthesis of citrulline: A multispecies study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutamine is considered the main precursor for citrulline synthesis in many species, including humans. The transfer of 15N from 2[15N]-glutamine to citrulline has been used as evidence for this precursor-product relationship. However, work in mice has shown that nitrogen and carbon tracers follow di...

  18. Glutamate production from ammonia via glutamate dehydrogenase 2 activity supports cancer cell proliferation under glutamine depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yukiko; Nakayama, Yasumune; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Irino, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Cancer cells rapidly consume glutamine as a carbon and nitrogen source to support proliferation, but the cell number continues to increase exponentially after glutamine is nearly depleted from the medium. In contrast, cell proliferation rates are strongly depressed when cells are cultured in glutamine-free medium. How cancer cells survive in response to nutrient limitation and cellular stress remains poorly understood. In addition, rapid glutamine catabolism yields ammonia, which is a potentially toxic metabolite that is secreted into the extracellular space. Here, we show that ammonia can be utilized for glutamate production, leading to cell proliferation under glutamine-depleted conditions. This proliferation requires glutamate dehydrogenase 2, which synthesizes glutamate from ammonia and α-ketoglutarate and is expressed in MCF7 and T47D cells. Our findings provide insight into how cancer cells survive under glutamine deprivation conditions and thus contribute to elucidating the mechanisms of tumor growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Glutamine Synthetase: Localization Dictates Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Castegna

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of glutamine by condensing ammonium to glutamate. In the circulatory system, glutamine carries ammonia from muscle and brain to the kidney and liver. In brain reduction of GS activity has been suggested as a mechanism mediating neurotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders. In cancer, the delicate balance between glutamine synthesis and catabolism is a critical event. In vitro evidence, confirmed in vivo in some cases, suggests that reduced GS activity in cancer cells associates with a more invasive and aggressive phenotype. However, GS is known to be highly expressed in cells of the tumor microenvironment, such as fibroblasts, adipocytes and immune cells, and their ability to synthesize glutamine is responsible for the acquisition of protumoral phenotypes. This has opened a new window into the complex scenario of the tumor microenvironment, in which the balance of glutamine consumption versus glutamine synthesis influences cellular function. Since GS expression responds to glutamine starvation, a lower glutamine synthesizing power due to the absence of GS in cancer cells might apply a metabolic pressure on stromal cells. This event might push stroma towards a GS-high/protumoral phenotype. When referred to stromal cells, GS expression might acquire a ‘bad’ significance to the point that GS inhibition might be considered a conceivable strategy against cancer metastasis.

  20. Transport of glutamine into the xylem of sunflower (Helianthus annuus).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Findenegg, G.R.; Plaisier, W.; Posthumus, M.A.; Melger, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants were grown on nutrient solution with ammonium nitrogen. After 12 days of growth the ammonium in the nutrient solution was labeled with N (99%). Three hours later glutamine-N in the xylem exudate was labeled for 56% as shown by GC-MS; this percentage increased

  1. Glutamine versus ammonia utilization in the NAD synthetase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS. Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS

  2. Prolonged continuous intravenous infusion of the dipeptide L-alanine- L-glutamine significantly increases plasma glutamine and alanine without elevating brain glutamate in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nägeli, Mirjam; Fasshauer, Mario; Sommerfeld, Jutta; Fendel, Angela; Brandi, Giovanna; Stover, John F

    2014-07-02

    Low plasma glutamine levels are associated with worse clinical outcome. Intravenous glutamine infusion dose- dependently increases plasma glutamine levels, thereby correcting hypoglutaminemia. Glutamine may be transformed to glutamate which might limit its application at a higher dose in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). To date, the optimal glutamine dose required to normalize plasma glutamine levels without increasing plasma and cerebral glutamate has not yet been defined. Changes in plasma and cerebral glutamine, alanine, and glutamate as well as indirect signs of metabolic impairment reflected by increased intracranial pressure (ICP), lactate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, electroencephalogram (EEG) activity were determined before, during, and after continuous intravenous infusion of 0.75 g L-alanine-L-glutamine which was given either for 24 hours (group 1, n = 6) or 5 days (group 2, n = 6) in addition to regular enteral nutrition. Lab values including nitrogen balance, urea and ammonia were determined daily. Continuous L-alanine-L-glutamine infusion significantly increased plasma and cerebral glutamine as well as alanine levels, being mostly sustained during the 5 day infusion phase (plasma glutamine: from 295 ± 62 to 500 ± 145 μmol/ l; brain glutamine: from 183 ± 188 to 549 ± 120 μmol/ l; plasma alanine: from 327 ± 91 to 622 ± 182 μmol/ l; brain alanine: from 48 ± 55 to 89 ± 129 μmol/ l; p alanine-L-glutamine infusion (0.75 g/ kg/ d up to 5 days) increased plasma and brain glutamine and alanine levels. This was not associated with elevated glutamate or signs of potential glutamate-mediated cerebral injury. The increased nitrogen load should be considered in patients with renal and hepatic dysfunction. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02130674. Registered 5 April 2014.

  3. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  4. Partitioning of glutamine synthesised by the isolated perfused human placenta between the maternal and fetal circulations☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, P.E.L.; Cleal, J.K.; Lofthouse, E.M.; Goss, V.; Koster, G.; Postle, A.; Jackson, J.M.; Hanson, M.A.; Jackson, A.A.; Lewis, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Placental glutamine synthesis has been demonstrated in animals and is thought to increase the availability of this metabolically important amino acid to the fetus. Glutamine is of fundamental importance for cellular replication, cellular function and inter-organ nitrogen transfer. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of glutamate/glutamine metabolism by the isolated perfused human placenta in the provision of glutamine to the fetus. Methods Glutamate metabolism was investigated in the isolated dually perfused human placental cotyledon. U–13C-glutamate was used to investigate the movement of carbon and 15N-leucine to study movement of amino-nitrogen. Labelled amino acids were perfused via maternal or fetal arteries at defined flow rates. The enrichment and concentration of amino acids in the maternal and fetal veins were measured following 5 h of perfusion. Results Glutamate taken up from the maternal and fetal circulations was primarily converted into glutamine the majority of which was released into the maternal circulation. The glutamine transporter SNAT5 was localised to the maternal-facing membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast. Enrichment of 13C or 15N glutamine in placental tissue was lower than in either the maternal or fetal circulation, suggesting metabolic compartmentalisation within the syncytiotrophoblast. Discussion Placental glutamine synthesis may help ensure the placenta's ability to supply this amino acid to the fetus does not become limiting to fetal growth. Glutamine synthesis may also influence placental transport of other amino acids, metabolism, nitrogen flux and cellular regulation. Conclusions Placental glutamine synthesis may therefore be a central mechanism in ensuring that the human fetus receives adequate nutrition and is able to maintain growth. PMID:24183194

  5. De Novo Glutamine Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiao; Shi, Xinchong; Zhang, Linqi; Yi, Chang; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of de novo glutamine (Gln) synthesis in the proliferation of C6 glioma cells and its detection with 13N-ammonia. Methods: Chronic Gln-deprived C6 glioma (0.06C6) cells were established. The proliferation rates of C6 and 0.06C6 cells were measured under the conditions of Gln deprivation along with or without the addition of ammonia or glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor. 13N-ammonia uptake was assessed in C6 cells by gamma counting and in rats with C6 and 0.06C6 xenografts by micro–positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. The expression of GS in C6 cells and xenografts was assessed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: The Gln-deprived C6 cells showed decreased proliferation ability but had a significant increase in GS expression. Furthermore, we found that low concentration of ammonia was sufficient to maintain the proliferation of Gln-deprived C6 cells, and 13N-ammonia uptake in C6 cells showed Gln-dependent decrease, whereas inhibition of GS markedly reduced the proliferation of C6 cells as well as the uptake of 13N-ammoina. Additionally, microPET/computed tomography exhibited that subcutaneous 0.06C6 xenografts had higher 13N-ammonia uptake and GS expression in contrast to C6 xenografts. Conclusion: De novo Gln synthesis through ammonia–glutamate reaction plays an important role in the proliferation of C6 cells. 13N-ammonia can be a potential metabolic PET tracer for Gln-dependent tumors. PMID:27118759

  6. Glutamine Assimilation and Feedback Regulation of L-acetyl-N-glutamate Kinase Activity in Chlorella variabilis NC64A Results in Changes in Arginine Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaeva, Ekaterina; Forchhammer, Karl; Ermilova, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine is a metabolite of central importance in nitrogen metabolism of microorganisms and plants. The Chlorella PII signaling protein controls, in a glutamine-dependent manner, the key enzyme of the ornithine/arginine biosynthesis pathway, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) that leads to arginine formation. We provide evidence that glutamine promotes effective growth of C. variabilis strain NC64A. The present study shows that externally supplied glutamine directly influences the internal pool of arginine in NC64A. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonium to glutamine. The results of this study demonstrate that glutamine acts as a negative effector of GS activity. These data emphasize the importance of glutamine-dependent coupling of metabolism and signaling as components of an efficient pathway allowing the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and sustaining growth of Chlorella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation

  8. Reductive glutamine metabolism by IDH1 mediates lipogenesis under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallo, Christian M; Gameiro, Paulo A; Bell, Eric L; Mattaini, Katherine R; Yang, Juanjuan; Hiller, Karsten; Jewell, Christopher M; Johnson, Zachary R; Irvine, Darrell J; Guarente, Leonard; Kelleher, Joanne K; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2011-11-20

    Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) is the central biosynthetic precursor for fatty-acid synthesis and protein acetylation. In the conventional view of mammalian cell metabolism, AcCoA is primarily generated from glucose-derived pyruvate through the citrate shuttle and ATP citrate lyase in the cytosol. However, proliferating cells that exhibit aerobic glycolysis and those exposed to hypoxia convert glucose to lactate at near-stoichiometric levels, directing glucose carbon away from the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty-acid synthesis. Although glutamine is consumed at levels exceeding that required for nitrogen biosynthesis, the regulation and use of glutamine metabolism in hypoxic cells is not well understood. Here we show that human cells use reductive metabolism of α-ketoglutarate to synthesize AcCoA for lipid synthesis. This isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1)-dependent pathway is active in most cell lines under normal culture conditions, but cells grown under hypoxia rely almost exclusively on the reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, renal cell lines deficient in the von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor protein preferentially use reductive glutamine metabolism for lipid biosynthesis even at normal oxygen levels. These results identify a critical role for oxygen in regulating carbon use to produce AcCoA and support lipid synthesis in mammalian cells.

  9. Reductive glutamine metabolism by IDH1 mediates lipogenesis under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallo, Christian M.; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Bell, Eric L.; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Yang, Juanjuan; Hiller, Karsten; Jewell, Christopher M.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Guarente, Leonard; Kelleher, Joanne K.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) is the central biosynthetic precursor for fatty acid synthesis and protein acetylation. In the conventional view of mammalian cell metabolism, AcCoA is primarily generated from glucose-derived pyruvate through the citrate shuttle and adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase (ACL) in the cytosol1-3. However, proliferating cells that exhibit aerobic glycolysis and those exposed to hypoxia convert glucose to lactate at near stoichiometric levels, directing glucose carbon away from the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and fatty acid synthesis4. Although glutamine is consumed at levels exceeding that required for nitrogen biosynthesis5, the regulation and utilization of glutamine metabolism in hypoxic cells is not well understood. Here we show that human cells employ reductive metabolism of alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG) to synthesize AcCoA for lipid synthesis. This isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) dependent pathway is active in most cell lines under normal culture conditions, but cells grown under hypoxia rely almost exclusively on the reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived αKG for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, renal cell lines deficient in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein preferentially utilize reductive glutamine metabolism for lipid biosynthesis even at normal oxygen levels. These results identify a critical role for oxygen in regulating carbon utilization in order to produce AcCoA and support lipid synthesis in mammalian cells. PMID:22101433

  10. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  11. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Theron

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase is a ubiquitous central enzyme in nitrogen metabolism that is controlled by up to four regulatory mechanisms, including adenylylation of some or all of the twelve subunits by adenylyl transferase. It is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tuberculosis, being essential for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is found extracellularly only in the pathogenic Mycobacterium strains. Human glutamine synthetase is not regulated by the adenylylation mechanism, so the adenylylated form of bacterial glutamine synthetase is of particular interest. Previously published reports show that, when M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli adenylyl transferase does not optimally adenylylate the M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase. Here, we demonstrate the production of soluble adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase in E. coli by the co-expression of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase and M. tuberculosis adenylyl transferase. The differential inhibition of adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase and deadenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase by ATP based scaffold inhibitors are reported. Compounds selected on the basis of their enzyme inhibition were also shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis in the BACTEC 460TB™ assay as well as the intracellular inhibition of M. tuberculosis in a mouse bone-marrow derived macrophage assay.

  12. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, A; Roth, R L; Hoppe, H; Parkinson, C; van der Westhuyzen, C W; Stoychev, S; Wiid, I; Pietersen, R D; Baker, B; Kenyon, C P

    2017-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is a ubiquitous central enzyme in nitrogen metabolism that is controlled by up to four regulatory mechanisms, including adenylylation of some or all of the twelve subunits by adenylyl transferase. It is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tuberculosis, being essential for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is found extracellularly only in the pathogenic Mycobacterium strains. Human glutamine synthetase is not regulated by the adenylylation mechanism, so the adenylylated form of bacterial glutamine synthetase is of particular interest. Previously published reports show that, when M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli adenylyl transferase does not optimally adenylylate the M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase. Here, we demonstrate the production of soluble adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase in E. coli by the co-expression of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase and M. tuberculosis adenylyl transferase. The differential inhibition of adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase and deadenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase by ATP based scaffold inhibitors are reported. Compounds selected on the basis of their enzyme inhibition were also shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis in the BACTEC 460TB™ assay as well as the intracellular inhibition of M. tuberculosis in a mouse bone-marrow derived macrophage assay.

  13. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    or GABA from neurons and subsequent uptake into astrocytes. In return, astrocytes release glutamine to be taken up into neurons for use as neurotransmitter precursor. In this review, the basic properties of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle will be discussed, including aspects of transport and metabolism...... of intercellular transfer of ammonia produced in neurons (when glutamine is deamidated to glutamate) and utilized in astrocytes (for amidation of glutamate) when the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle is operating. A main objective of this review is to endorse the view that the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle must...

  14. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cánovas Francisco M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1 and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2. Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types.

  15. New perspectives on glutamine synthetase in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Defoin-Platel, M; Hindle, M; Saqi, M; Habash, Dimah Z

    2011-02-01

    Members of the glutamine synthetase (GS) gene family have now been characterized in many crop species such as wheat, rice, and maize. Studies have shown that cytosolic GS isoforms are involved in nitrogen remobilization during leaf senescence and emphasized a role in seed production particularly in small grain crop species. Data from the sequencing of genomes for model crops and expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries from non-model species have strengthened the idea that the cytosolic GS genes are organized in three functionally and phylogenetically conserved subfamilies. Using a bioinformatic approach, the considerable publicly available information on high throughput gene expression was mined to search for genes having patterns of expression similar to GS. Interesting new hypotheses have emerged from searching for co-expressed genes across multiple unfiltered experimental data sets in rice. This approach should inform new experimental designs and studies to explore the regulation of the GS gene family further. It is expected that understanding the regulation of GS under varied climatic conditions will emerge as an important new area considering the results from recent studies that have shown nitrogen assimilation to be critical to plant acclimation to high CO(2) concentrations.

  16. Glutamine supplementation in a child with inherited GS deficiency improves the clinical status and partially corrects the peripheral and central amino acid imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häberle Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glutamine synthetase (GS is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian organisms and is a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism. It is the only known enzyme capable of synthesising glutamine, an amino acid with many critical roles in the human organism. A defect in GLUL, encoding for GS, leads to congenital systemic glutamine deficiency and has been described in three patients with epileptic encephalopathy. There is no established treatment for this condition. Here, we describe a therapeutic trial consisting of enteral and parenteral glutamine supplementation in a four year old patient with GS deficiency. The patient received increasing doses of glutamine up to 1020 mg/kg/day. The effect of this glutamine supplementation was monitored clinically, biochemically, and by studies of the electroencephalogram (EEG as well as by brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Treatment was well tolerated and clinical monitoring showed improved alertness. Concentrations of plasma glutamine normalized while levels in cerebrospinal fluid increased but remained below the lower reference range. The EEG showed clear improvement and spectroscopy revealed increasing concentrations of glutamine and glutamate in brain tissue. Concomitantly, there was no worsening of pre-existing chronic hyperammonemia. In conclusion, supplementation of glutamine is a safe therapeutic option for inherited GS deficiency since it corrects the peripheral biochemical phenotype and partially also improves the central biochemical phenotype. There was some clinical improvement but the patient had a long standing severe encephalopathy. Earlier supplementation with glutamine might have prevented some of the neuronal damage.

  17. effects of enteral glutamine supplementation on reduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, there is limited published data focused on effect of enteral glutamine on infection rate in patients with severe burns. Results from recently published RCT on effects of enteral glutamine, show a trend of an overall reduction in incidence of bacteraemia, lower antibiotic usage and lower mortality rates in patients with ...

  18. The Glutamine-Glutamate/GABA Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein...... synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase...... inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide...

  19. Plasma Glutamine Concentrations in Liver Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnel Helling

    Full Text Available Higher than normal plasma glutamine concentration at admission to an intensive care unit is associated with an unfavorable outcome. Very high plasma glutamine levels are sometimes seen in both acute and chronic liver failure. We aimed to systematically explore the relation between different types of liver failure and plasma glutamine concentrations.Four different groups of patients were studies; chronic liver failure (n = 40, acute on chronic liver failure (n = 20, acute fulminant liver failure (n = 20, and post-hepatectomy liver failure (n = 20. Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD scores were assessed as indices of liver function. All groups except the chronic liver failure group were followed longitudinally during hospitalisation. Outcomes were recorded up to 48 months after study inclusion.All groups had individuals with very high plasma glutamine concentrations. In the total group of patients (n = 100, severity of liver failure correlated significantly with plasma glutamine concentration, but the correlation was not strong.Liver failure, regardless of severity and course of illness, may be associated with a high plasma glutamine concentration. Further studies are needed to understand whether high glutamine levels should be regarded as a biomarker or as a contributor to symptomatology in liver failure.

  20. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V; Carvalho, Helena G; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  1. Exogenous glutamine increases lipid accumulation in developing seeds of castor bean (Ricinus communis L. cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes biomass production and compositional changes of developing castor seeds in response to change in the nitrogen resource (glutamine of the medium. During the early developmental period (24-36 days after pollination, oil was found to initially accumulate in the developing seeds. Carbohydrates and oil were inversely related after glutamine provision (35 mM, in the culture medium. [U-14C] sucrose labeling was used to investigate the effect of metabolic fluxes among different storage materials. Addition of glutamine led to a 7% increase of labeling in lipids and an inverse decrease of labeling in carbohydrates. It was postulated that changes in the glutamine concentration in the medium are likely to influence the partitioning of resources between the various storage products, especially carbohydrates and oil. These observations will contribute to a better understanding of assimilate partitioning in developing castor seeds and the development of molecular strategies to improve castor bean seed quality and plant breeding studies.

  2. Glutamine supplementation maintains intramuscular glutamine concentrations and normalizes lymphocyte function in infected early weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, S S; Field, C J; McBurney, M I

    1997-11-01

    Numerous studies in humans and rats have shown that glutamine supplementation during stressful conditions has favorable outcomes. However, the requirements for glutamine during weaning are unknown. Thus, the effects of glutamine supplementation in healthy and infected weaned pigs were investigated. At 21 d of age, pigs were weaned to an elemental diet supplemented with glutamine (+Gln) or an isonitrogenous diet containing nonessential amino acids (-Gln). At 26 d of age, pigs were intraperitoneally injected with Escherichia coli (+Ecoli) or buffered saline (-Ecoli) and killed at 28 d of age. Infection decreased (P Ecoli+Gln pigs were greater (P Ecoli-Gln pigs and not different than those of noninfected pigs. Hence, glutamine supplementation maintained muscular glutamine concentrations and normalized lymphocyte function in infected pigs.

  3. The Glutamine Transporters and Their Role in the Glutamate/GABA-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine is a key amino acid in the CNS, playing an important role in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle (GGC). In the GGC, glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to neurons, where it will replenish the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter pools. Different transporters participate...... and translational mechanisms, which are induced by several determinants such as amino acid deprivation, hormones, pH, and the activity of different signaling pathways. Dysfunctional glutamine transporter activity has been associated with the pathophysiological mechanisms of certain neurologic diseases...

  4. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor....... This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate...... released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...

  5. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    . This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate......The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor...... released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...

  6. Glutamine Synthetase in Muscle Is Required for Glutamine Production during Fasting and Extrahepatic Ammonia Detoxification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Youji; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L. M.; de Waart, D. Rudi; de Theije, Chiel; ten Have, Gabrie A. M.; van Eijk, Hans M. H.; Kunne, Cindy; Labruyere, Wilhelmina T.; Houten, Sander M.; Sokolovic, Milka; Ruijter, Jan M.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2010-01-01

    The main endogenous source of glutamine is de novo synthesis in striated muscle via the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS). The mice in which GS is selectively but completely eliminated from striated muscle with the Cre-loxP strategy (GS-KO/M mice) are, nevertheless, healthy and fertile. Compared with

  7. The Glutamine Transporters and Their Role in the Glutamate/GABA-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine is a key amino acid in the CNS, playing an important role in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle (GGC). In the GGC, glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to neurons, where it will replenish the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter pools. Different transporters participate...... in this neural communication, i.e., the transporters responsible for glutamine efflux from astrocytes and influx into the neurons, such as the members of the SNAT, LAT, y(+)LAT, and ASC families of transporters. The SNAT family consists of the transporter isoforms SNAT3 and SNAT5 that are related to efflux from...... the astrocytic compartment, and SNAT1 and SNAT2 that are associated with glutamine uptake into the neuronal compartment. The isoforms SNAT7 and SNAT8 do not have their role completely understood, but they likely also participate in the GGC. The isoforms LAT2 and y(+)LAT2 facilitate the exchange of neutral amino...

  8. The Glutamine Transporters and Their Role in the Glutamate/GABA-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    in this neural communication, i.e., the transporters responsible for glutamine efflux from astrocytes and influx into the neurons, such as the members of the SNAT, LAT, y(+)LAT, and ASC families of transporters. The SNAT family consists of the transporter isoforms SNAT3 and SNAT5 that are related to efflux from......Glutamine is a key amino acid in the CNS, playing an important role in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle (GGC). In the GGC, glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to neurons, where it will replenish the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter pools. Different transporters participate...... the astrocytic compartment, and SNAT1 and SNAT2 that are associated with glutamine uptake into the neuronal compartment. The isoforms SNAT7 and SNAT8 do not have their role completely understood, but they likely also participate in the GGC. The isoforms LAT2 and y(+)LAT2 facilitate the exchange of neutral amino...

  9. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-05-01

    Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Animal experimentation. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required.

  10. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlkin Çankayalı

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required.

  11. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torreira, Eva [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Seabra, Ana Rita [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Llorca, Óscar [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Robinson, Carol V. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Carvalho, Helena G. [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  12. Effects of honey, glutamine and their combination on canine small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutamine/honey combination, glutamine and honey had gradual increase in body weight from days 3-15 of weight evaluation. The control group, however, had a remarkable drop in body weight compared with other groups. Oral glutamine/honey combination showed the best overall effect based on body weight gain, ...

  13. Loss of RBF1 changes glutamine catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolay, Brandon N.; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Tschöp, Katrin; Korenjak, Michael; Heilmann, Andreas M.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Iliopoulos, Othon; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRB) alters the expression of a myriad of genes. To understand the altered cellular environment that these changes create, we took advantage of the Drosophila model system and used targeted liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to profile the metabolic changes that occur when RBF1, the fly ortholog of pRB, is removed. We show that RBF1-depleted tissues and larvae are sensitive to fasting. Depletion of RBF1 causes major changes in nucleotide synthesis and glutathione metabolism. Under fasting conditions, these changes interconnect, and the increased replication demand of RBF1-depleted larvae is associated with the depletion of glutathione pools. In vivo 13C isotopic tracer analysis shows that RBF1-depleted larvae increase the flux of glutamine toward glutathione synthesis, presumably to minimize oxidative stress. Concordantly, H2O2 preferentially promoted apoptosis in RBF1-depleted tissues, and the sensitivity of RBF1-depleted animals to fasting was specifically suppressed by either a glutamine supplement or the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. Effects of pRB activation/inactivation on glutamine catabolism were also detected in human cell lines. These results show that the inactivation of RB proteins causes metabolic reprogramming and that these consequences of RBF/RB function are present in both flies and human cell lines. PMID:23322302

  14. 15N-enrichments of ammonia and glutamine in blood after infusion of 15N-ammonia in chickens fed low or high protein diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Yutaka; Koh, Katsuki

    1985-01-01

    In this experment, the blood ammonia and glutamine amide came from infused ammonia were determined when N-15 labeled ammonium acetate was intraportally infused into the chickens fed 5 or 20 % protein diet. The data obtained indicated that the infused ammonia was taken into blood glutamine amide, and also accumulated in blood as it is, in both dietary groups. 10 to 12 months old White Leghorn male birds were used. The experimental diet was fed once a day for 5 days to the birds weighting about 1.2 kg by 35 g per kg body weight. The experimental diet was consumed within 40 min in all cases. Cardiac and portal catheterization were performed for blood collection and ammonia infusion, respectively. After finishing the infusion, blood samples were taken to analyze the ammonia and glutamine contents and their N-15 enrichment. Statistical difference was not observed in the appearance of N-15 in ammonia and glutamine amide between two dietary groups. The N-15 enrichment in blood ammonia and the amide of plasma glutamine, and the calculated exogenous nitrogen in the ammonia and glutamine amide tended to be more in the 5 % protein diet group than the other. (Kako, I.)

  15. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Seabra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine Synthetase (GS catalyses the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of glutamine synthetase isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  16. 15N- and [13C]NMR Determination of Utilization of Glycine for Synthesis of Storage Protein in the Presence of Glutamine in Developing Cotyledons of Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokut, Thomas A.; Varner, Joseph E.; Schaefer, Jacob; Stejskal, Edward O.; McKay, Robert A.

    1982-01-01

    Solid-state 15N- and [13C] NMR have been used to measure quantitatively the utilization of glycine in the presence of glutamine for the synthesis of storage protein in immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv. Elf) in culture. The presence of an equal molar amount of glycine in the medium causes a decrease in the use of glutamine-amide nitrogen. Glycine nitrogen is incorporated extensively into peptide bonds (in amounts greater than what would be expected if it appeared solely in glycine residues), but is used sparingly for synthesis of histidine ring residues, guanidino nitrogen residues of arginine, and lysine residues. The modest use of glycine carbon in protein synthesis does not parallel the use of glycine nitrogen. PMID:16662199

  17. Alkali metal ion binding to glutamine and glutamine derivatives investigated by infrared action spectroscopy and theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bush, M. F.; Oomens, J.; Saykally, R. J.; Williams, E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali-metal cationized glutamine are investigated by using both infrared multiple photon dissociation (TRMPD) action spectroscopy, utilizing light generated by a free electron laser, and theory. The IRMPD spectra contain many similarities that are most consistent with

  18. Nucleic acids encoding plant glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-03-29

    Glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) proteins, nucleic acid molecules encoding GPT proteins, and uses thereof are disclosed. Provided herein are various GPT proteins and GPT gene coding sequences isolated from a number of plant species. As disclosed herein, GPT proteins share remarkable structural similarity within plant species, and are active in catalyzing the synthesis of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (2-oxoglutaramate), a powerful signal metabolite which regulates the function of a large number of genes involved in the photosynthesis apparatus, carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolism.

  19. Novel molecular anti-colorectalcancer conjugate:chlorambucil-adipic acid dihydrizide-glutamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasi, Maryam Akhavan; Amanlou, Massoud; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Nourmohammadi, Zahra; Omoomi, Farnoor Davachi; Ebrahimi, Seyed Esmaeil Sadat; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Rahimi, Pooneh; Pourhosseini, Sahar; Mehravi, Bita; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-11-01

    Cancer is one of the most fatal diseases in the world and it has been years that finding new drugs and chemotherapeutic techniques with lowest side effects become one of the most important challenging matters needs really hard efforts. Chlorambucil (CBL), an ancient direct-acting alkylating anticancer agent, is commonly used for initial treatment of some kinds of cancers but the use of CBL is often limited because of the unpleasant side effects due to its lack of specificity for targeting cancer cells. In this research we tried to increase the specificity of CBL by producing a novel conjugate by using glutamine amino acid (Glut). Based on previous studies, poly amines and nitrogen compounds noticeably are used by cancer cells increasingly; therefore we decided to increase the efficiency and specificity of CBL by designing and producing a novel anti cancer conjugate using glutamine amino acid as an uptake enhancer, CBL, and Adipic acid Dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer and linker. The biological tests were carried out on HT29 colorectal cancer cell line to evaluate its anticancer properties. Biological tests like MTT assay, finding IC50, evaluating the induced mechanism of the death of our novel CBL-Glutamine conjugate on HT29 cells, testing abnormal toxicity of this conjugate on mice in comparison with CBL drug were careid out. We found that not only CBL-Glutamine conjugate preserved its anti cancer property with regard to CBL drug, but also it represent lower abnormal toxicity in mice. Apoptosis was detected as its mechanism of the death. Our present study provides a promising strategy for targeting cancer cells using amino acids nano-conjugate drugs. The future perspectives have also been highlighted in continuing similar and relative researches.

  20. Randomised trial of glutamine and selenium supplemented parenteral nutrition for critically ill patients. Protocol Version 9, 19 February 2007 known as SIGNET (Scottish Intensive care Glutamine or seleNium Evaluative Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Luke D

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality rates in the Intensive Care Unit and subsequent hospital mortality rates in the UK remain high. Infections in Intensive Care are associated with a 2–3 times increased risk of death. It is thought that under conditions of severe metabolic stress glutamine becomes "conditionally essential". Selenium is an essential trace element that has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Approximately 23% of patients in Intensive Care require parenteral nutrition and glutamine and selenium are either absent or present in low amounts. Both glutamine and selenium have the potential to influence the immune system through independent biochemical pathways. Systematic reviews suggest that supplementing parenteral nutrition in critical illness with glutamine or selenium may reduce infections and mortality. Pilot data has shown that more than 50% of participants developed infections, typically resistant organisms. We are powered to show definitively whether supplementation of PN with either glutamine or selenium is effective at reducing new infections in critically ill patients. Methods/design 2 × 2 factorial, pragmatic, multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial. The trial has an enrolment target of 500 patients. Inclusion criteria include: expected to be in critical care for at least 48 hours, aged 16 years or over, patients who require parenteral nutrition and are expected to have at least half their daily nutritional requirements given by that route. Allocation is to one of four iso-caloric, iso-nitrogenous groups: glutamine, selenium, both glutamine & selenium or no additional glutamine or selenium. Trial supplementation is given for up to seven days on the Intensive Care Unit and subsequent wards if practicable. The primary outcomes are episodes of infection in the 14 days after starting trial nutrition and mortality. Secondary outcomes include antibiotic usage, length of hospital stay, quality of life and

  1. Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency in Murine Astrocytes Results in Neonatal Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Youji; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L. M.; Labruyère, Wilhelmina T.; de Waart, D. Rudi; van der Hel, W. Saskia; Ruijter, Jan M.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the "glutamine-glutamate cycle" between astrocytes and neurons, but its function in vivo was thus far tested only pharmacologically. Crossing GS(fl/lacZ) or GS(fl/f)l mice with hGFAP-Cre mice resulted in prenatal excision of the GS(fl) allele in

  2. Understanding the mechanisms of glutamine action in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele P. Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine (Gln is an important energy source and has been used as a supplementary energy substrate. Furthermore, Gln is an essential component for numerous metabolic functions, including acid-base homeostasis, gluconeogenesis, nitrogen transport and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, glutamine plays a significant role in cell homeostasis and organ metabolism. This article aims to review the mechanisms of glutamine action during severe illnesses. In critically ill patients, the increase in mortality was associated with a decreased plasma Gln concentration. During catabolic stress, Gln consumption rate exceeds the supply, and both plasma and skeletal muscle pools of free Gln are severely reduced. The dose and route of Gln administration clearly influence its effectiveness: high-dose parenteral appears to be more beneficial than low-dose enteral administration. Experimental studies reported that Gln may protect cells, tissues, and whole organisms from stress and injury through the following mechanisms: attenuation of NF (nuclear factor-kB activation, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, reduction in neutrophil accumulation, improvement in intestinal integrity and immune cell function, and enhanced of heat shock protein expression. In conclusion, high-doses of parenteral Gln (>0.50 g/kg/day demonstrate a greater potential to benefit in critically ill patients, although Gln pathophysiological mechanisms requires elucidation.A glutamina (Gln é uma importante fonte de energia e tem sido usada como substrato energético suplementar. Além disso, a Gln é um componente essencial para numerosas funções metabólicas tais como: homeostase ácido-base, gliconeogênese, transporte de nitrogênio e síntese de proteínas e ácidos nucléicos. Portanto, a glutamina desempenha um papel importante na homeostase celular e no metabolismo dos órgãos. Esse artigo objetiva rever os mecanismos de ação da glutamina na doen

  3. Exogenous trehalose improves growth under limiting nitrogen through upregulation of nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingchao; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Weichang; Chen, Yi; Li, Hongxun; Lawlor, David W; Paul, Matthew J; Pan, Wenjie

    2017-12-19

    The trehalose (Tre) pathway has strong effects on growth and development in plants through regulation of carbon metabolism. Altering either Tre or trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P) can improve growth and productivity of plants as observed under different water availability. As yet, there are no reports of the effects of modification of Tre orT6P on plant performance under limiting nutrition. Here we report that nitrogen (N) metabolism is positively affected by exogenous application of Tre in nitrogen-deficient growing conditions. Spraying foliage of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with trehalose partially alleviated symptoms of nitrogen deficiency through upregulation of nitrate and ammonia assimilation and increasing activities of nitrate reductase (NR), glycolate oxidase (GO), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) with concomitant changes in ammonium (NH 4 + ) and nitrate (NO 3 - ) concentrations, glutamine and amino acids. Chlorophyll and total nitrogen content of leaves and rates of photosynthesis were increased compared to nitrogen-deficient plants without applied Tre. Total plant biomass accumulation was also higher in Tre -fed nitrogen-deficient plants, with a smaller proportion of dry weight partitioned to roots, compared to nitrogen-deficient plants without applied Tre. Consistent with higher nitrogen assimilation and growth, Tre application reduced foliar starch. Minimal effects of Tre feeding were observed on nitrogen-sufficient plants. The data show, for the first time, significant stimulatory effects of exogenous Tre on nitrogen metabolism and growth in plants growing under deficient nitrogen. Under such adverse conditions metabolism is regulated for survival rather than productivity. Application of Tre can alter this regulation towards maintenance of productive functions under low nitrogen. This has implications for considering approaches to modifying the Tre pathway for to improve crop nitrogen-use efficiency and

  4. Glutamine dipeptide for parenteral nutrition in abdominal surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ya-Min; Li, Fei; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Wu, Xiao-Ting

    2006-12-14

    To assess the clinical and economical validity of glutamine dipeptide supplemented to parenteral nutrition (PN) in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. A meta-analysis of all the relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. The trials compared the standard PN and PN supplemented with glutamine dipeptide in abdominal surgery. RCTs were identified from the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI web of knowledge (SCI). The search was undertaken in April 2006. Literature references were checked by computer or hand at the same time. Clinical trials were extracted and evaluated by two reviewers independently. Statistical analysis was performed by RevMan4.2 software from Cochrane Collaboration. A P value of nitrogen balance (weighted mean difference (WMD = 8.35, 95% CI [2.98, 13.71], P = 0.002), decreasing postoperative infectious morbidity (OR = 0.24, 95% CI [0.06, 0.93], P = 0.04), shortening the length of hospital stay (WMD= -3.55, 95% CI [-5.26, -1.84], P nitrogen balance in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Further high quality trials in children and severe patients are required, and mortality and hospital cost should be considered in future RCTs with sufficient size and rigorous design.

  5. Mitochondrial citrulline synthesis from ammonia and glutamine in the liver of ureogenic air-breathing catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbuli, Zaiba Y; Biswas, Kuheli; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2007-12-01

    The possible synthesis of citrulline, a rate limiting step for urea synthesis via the ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) in teleosts was tested both in the presence of ammonia and glutamine as nitrogen-donating substrates by the isolated liver mitochondria of ureogenic air-breathing walking catfish, C. batrachus. Both ammonia and glutamine could be used as nitrogen-donating substrates for the synthesis of citrulline by the isolated liver mitochondria, since the rate of citrulline synthesis was almost equal in presence of both the substrates. The citrulline synthesis by the isolated liver mitochondria requires succinate at a concentration of 0.1 mM as an energy source, and also requires the involvement of intramitochondrial carbonic anhydrase activity for supplying HCO3 as another substrate for citrulline synthesis. The rate of citrulline synthesis was further stimulated significantly by the isolated liver mitochondria of the fish after pre-exposure to 25 mM NH4Cl for 7 days. Due to possessing this biochemical adaptational strategy leading to the amelioration of ammonia toxicity mainly by channeling ammonia directly and/or via the formation of glutamine to the OUC, this air-breathing catfish could succeed in surviving in high external ammonia, which it faces in its natural habitat in certain seasons of the year.

  6. The re-assimilation of ammonia produced by photorespiration and the nitrogen economy of C3 higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Alfred J

    2006-02-01

    Photorespiration involves the conversion of glycine to serine with the release of ammonia and CO(2). In C(3) terrestrial higher plants the flux through glycine and serine is so large that it results in the production of ammonia at a rate far exceeding that from reduction of new nitrogen entering the plant. The photorespiratory nitrogen cycle re-assimilates this ammonia using the enzymes glutamine synthetase and glutamine:2-oxoglutarateaminotransferase.

  7. Role of glucocorticoids in increased muscle glutamine production in starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Cook, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The role of glucocorticoids in the synthesis of muscle glutamine during starvation was investigated in adrenalectomized fasted rats injected with cortisol (1 mg/100 g body weight). It was found that administration of cortisol in vivo increased (compared to nontreated starved adrenalectomized controls) the glutamine/glutamate ratio and the activity of glutamine synthetase in the diaphragm and the extensor digitorum muscles, and that these effects were abolished by prior treatment with actinomycin D or proflavine. The results obtained in in vitro experiments, using fresh-frozen soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscle preparations, supported the in vivo indications of the cortisol-enhanced glutamine synthesis and protein turnover in starved adrenalectomized animals.

  8. Oral Glutamine Supplementation Benefits Jejunum but Not Ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Hardy

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the primary metabolic fuel of the small intestine. The ability of enteral glutamine to support jejunal architecture and metabolism is well established, but its effect on intestinal absorptive function, especially in the terminal ileum, remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to develop a functional ileal fluid absorption surgical injury model and to determine if oral glutamine supplementation would be beneficial in accelerating healing and restoring function. The effects of either 1 cm resection and ileal end-to-end anastomosis or sham laparotomy on rat in vivo fluid absorption at study start (day 0, one and two days was investigated. In sham-operated rats, fluid absorption was not altered. In contrast, ileal fluid absorption was significantly reduced at days 0 (17.2±4.8 μL/cm/h and 1 (31.4±13.6 μL/cm/h, but returned to normal by day 2 (71.0±6.2 μL/cm/h in anastomosed rats. To examine the effects of glutamine in this model, rats were fed either glutamine (2.4 g/kg/day or an isonitrogenous glycine-supplemented elemental oral diet for five days before their randomization to sham or anastomotic groups. This dose of glutamine reached the ileum and was completely absorbed along the small intestine. Glutamine-fed rats demonstrated no difference in recovery of in vivo ileal fluid absorption, ileal villus morphometric measurements, mg DNA:mg protein ratio, degree of inflammation or glutaminase activity. In contrast, jejunal, but not ileal, villus morphometry, mg DNA:mg protein ratio and glutaminase activity were increased in glutamine-fed ‘not operated’ rats (P<0.01, indicating that the jejunum, but not the ileum, responded to the glutamine-supplemented diet. These studies demonstrate that ileal resection and anastomosis causes transient impairments in in vivo fluid absorption, and oral glutamine supplementation offers a beneficial effect to jejunal, but not ileal, intestinal mucosa. These results suggest

  9. Nitrogen assimilation in soybean nodules, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuji; Kumazawa, Kikuo

    1980-01-01

    15 N assimilation was studied in bacteroid and cytosol fractions of soybean nodules. In the first experiment, after exposing the intact nodules to 15 N 2 for 5 min and 10 min, most of the fixed 15 N was detected in cytosol fraction. In cytosol fraction, 15 N content of glutamine was the highest and followed by glutamic acid, alanine, and allantoin in this sequence, whereas, in bacteroid fraction, glutamic acid showed the highest 15 N content and alanine and glutamine followed. In the second experiment, 15 N assimilation of various 15 N-labeled compounds in the separated bacteroid and cytosol fractions was investigated. In the separated bacteroid fraction which was fed with 15 NH 4 , 15 N was incorporated very rapidly into glutamic acid, alanine, and aspartic acid, but very slowly into glutamine. From these results, it was suggested that most of the fixed ammonia was exported to cytosol and assimilated via glutamine synthetase to glutamine, then via glutamate synthase to glutamic acid, and from these compounds various nitrogenous compounds were formed, but in bacteroids glutamate dehydrogenase and alanine dehydrogenase played an important role in the assimilation of fixed ammonia though quantitatively the contribution to ammonia assimilation in nodules was much less compared with cytosol. (author)

  10. Nitrogen Metabolism During Hepatectomy and Hyperbaric Oxygenation: Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Savilov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to examine nitrogen metabolism in the organs of the portal system during liver resection (LR and hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO.Material and methods: Experiments were conducted on 65 female albino rats. LR was made under ether anesthesia, by removing a portion of the left hepatic lobe with an electric knife, which amounted to 15—20% of the organ’s mass. HBO was performed using medical oxygen at 3 ata for 50 min once daily within the first three days after LR. Lung tissue, gastrointestinal tract (GIT, spleen, and choledochal bile were the subject of the study. The tissue and blood levels of ammonia, glutamine, and urea were measured.Results: LR leads to pathological ammonia accumulation and decreases arterial glutamine consumption in GIT organs. Concurrently, the urea contained in the organs begins to come into portal blood flow, splenic glutamine deficiency develops, and hepatic ammonia-absorptive, glutamine- and urea-excretory functions diminish. Post-LR HBO prevents the accumulation of ammonia in the liver and GIT, restores the ammonia-absorptive, glutamine- and urea-excretory functions of the liver, and stimulates its glutamine and urea accumulation. Concomitantly, under HBO, there is an increase in glutamine entrance from the GIT into blood flow, but there is a decrease in GIT urea excretion and portal venous blood ammonia levels. HBO eliminates arterial hyperammonemia after LR and splenic glutamine deficiency.Conclusion: Hyperbaric oxygen eliminates nitrogen metabolic disturbances in the portal system, regulates compensatory-adaptive ammonia metabolic reactions triggered in the GIT and spleen during LR. 

  11. Hyperhydricity Phenomena Problem in Embryonic Callus of Date Palm, Solving by Glutamine and NH4+: No3- Ratio in Basal Nutrient Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dawayaty, M.M.; Zayed, Z.E.; Abdel-Gelil, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperhydricity is a serious problem faced in vitro date palm propagation which directly effects on the commercial production. So we try to solve this problem by studying, the effect of glutamine as the organic source of nitrogen and NH 4 + :NO 3- ratio as the inorganic source of nitrogen to decrease hyperhydricity phenomena and to produce normal somatic embryos of date palm cv. Gondila.Vitrified embryonic callus were inoculated on MS basal nutrient medium modified with glutamine levels and NH 4 + : NO 3 - ratio. Five concentration ratios of NH 4 : NO 3 (10:15, 15:10, 0:20, 20:0, 0:0 ml/l) were used with 0.1 mg/l NAA for 8 weeks throughout 2 recultures. There were gradually increasing in the percentage of vitrified embryonic callus differentiation to normal somatic embryos by increasing glutamine levels from 0.0 to 400 mg/l. Glutamine at the lowest level (50 mg/l) increased significantly the number of vitrified somatic embryos. Ammonium as the sole source of N resulted in depression in somatic embryos differentiation and escalated the frequency of hyperhydricity whereas,if nitrate was used as the sole N source, somatic embryos good quality were produced and hyperhydricity was eliminated

  12. Effect of glutamine and sugars after bull spermatozoa cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Pürhan Barbaros; Sarıözkan, Serpil; Bucak, Mustafa Numan; Ulutaş, Pınar Alkım; Akalın, Pınar Peker; Büyükleblebici, Serhat; Canturk, Fazile

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the addition of different sugars (raffinose, sucrose, and trehalose) on bull spermatozoa cryopreserved in a commercial extender (Optidyl) supplemented with glutamine on semen parameters, fertilizing ability and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Nine ejaculates for each bull were used in the study. Semen was frozen in five different extenders: raffinose 25 mM plus glutamine 3 mM (RGO), sucrose 25 mM plus glutamine 3 mM (SGO), trehalose 25 mM plus glutamine 3 mM (TGO), glutamine 3 mM (GO) and control (O). Insemination doses were processed so that each 0.25 mL straw contained 15 x 10(6)sperm. Groups of GO and RGO resulted in the higher rates of subjective (54.0 ± 1.7% and 64.0 ± 1.1%; P effect on the level of post-thaw sperm CASA progressive motilities, the sperm motion characteristics and pregnancy rates. GO and RGO provided the better protective effect for sperm acrosome (4.0 ± 0.5% and 12.0 ± 0.6%) and total abnormalities (5.0 ± 0.3% and 13.0 ± 0.7%; P effect in comparison to Optydil extender without additives (P > 0.05). For pregnancy rates, there were no significant differences among the groups. The supplementation of additives did not provide any significant difference on the level of SOD activity (P > 0.05). It can be also thought that these sugars might have worked with glutamine in a synergy. Thereby, sugars such as raffinose and sucrose with glutamine in freezing extender may be recommended to facilitate bull semen freezability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The mTORC1 pathway stimulates glutamine metabolism and cell proliferation by repressing SIRT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csibi, Alfred; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Li, Chenggang; Poulogiannis, George; Choo, Andrew Y.; Chapski, Douglas J.; Jeong, Seung Min; Dempsey, Jamie; Parkhitko, Andrey; Morrison, Tasha; Henske, Elizabeth; Haigis, Marcia; Cantley, Lewis C.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Yu, Jane; Blenis, John

    2013-01-01

    Summary Proliferating mammalian cells use glutamine as a source of nitrogen and as a key anaplerotic source to provide metabolites to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) for biosynthesis. Recently, mTORC1 activation has been correlated with increased nutrient uptake and metabolism, but no molecular connection to glutaminolysis has been reported. Here, we show that mTORC1 promotes glutamine anaplerosis by activating glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). This regulation requires transcriptional repression of SIRT4, the mitochondrial-localized sirtuin that inhibits GDH. Mechanistically, mTORC1 represses SIRT4 by promoting the proteasome-mediated destabilization of cAMP response element binding-2 (CREB2). Thus, a relationship between mTORC1, SIRT4 and cancer is suggested by our findings. Indeed, SIRT4 expression is reduced in human cancer, and its overexpression reduces cell proliferation, transformation and tumor development. Finally, our data indicate that targeting nutrient metabolism in energy-addicted cancers with high mTORC1 signaling may be an effective therapeutic approach. PMID:23663782

  14. Effects of monosodium glutamate supplementation on glutamine metabolism in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutry, Claire; Bos, Cecile; Matsumoto, Hideki; Even, Patrick; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Tome, Daniel; Blachier, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a worldwide used flavor enhancer. Supplemental glutamate may impact physiological functions. The aim of this study was to document the metabolic and physiological consequences of supplementation with 2% MSG (w/w) in rats. After 15 days-supplementation and following the ingestion of a test meal containing 2% MSG, glutamic acid accumulated for 5h in the stomach and for 1h in the small intestine. This coincided with a significant decrease of intestinal glutaminase activity, a marked specific increase in plasma glutamine concentration and a transient increase of plasma insulin concentration. MSG after chronic or acute supplementation had no effect on food intake, body weight, adipose tissue masses, gastric emptying rate, incorporation of dietary nitrogen in gastrointestinal and other tissues, and protein synthesis in intestinal mucosa, liver and muscles. The only significant effects of chronic supplementation were a slightly diminished gastrocnemius muscle mass, increased protein mass in intestinal mucosa and decreased protein synthesis in stomach. It is concluded that MSG chronic supplementation promotes glutamine synthesis in the body but has little effect on the physiological functions examined.

  15. ACTIVITIES OF AMMONIA ASSIMILATION ENZYMES AS INDICATORS OF THE RELATIVE SUPPLY OF NITROGEN SUBSTRATES FOR MARINE BACTERIOPLANKTON IN SUB-TROPICAL COASTAL WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The supply of nitrogen substrates available for bacterial production in seawater was determined using the activities of ammonia assimilation enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Expression of GS and GDH by bacteria in pure culture is generally ind...

  16. Global Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Ammonium, L-Alanine, or L-Glutamine Limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Grotkjær, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encounters a range of nitrogen sources at various concentrations in its environment. The impact of these two parameters on transcription and metabolism was studied by growing S. cerevisiae in chemostat cultures with L-glutamine, L-alanine, or L-ammonium in limit......The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encounters a range of nitrogen sources at various concentrations in its environment. The impact of these two parameters on transcription and metabolism was studied by growing S. cerevisiae in chemostat cultures with L-glutamine, L-alanine, or L......-ammonium in limitation and by growing cells in an excess of ammonium. Cells grown in L-alanine-limited cultures had higher biomass yield per nitrogen mole (19%) than those from ammonium-limited cultures. Whole-genome transcript profiles were analyzed with a genome-scalle metabolic model that suggested increased anabolic...... activity in L-alanine-limited cells. The changes in these cells were found to be focused around pyruvate, acetyl coenzyme A, glyoxylate, and alpha-ketoglutarate via increased levels of ALT1, DAL7, PYC1, GDH2, and ADH5 and decreased levels of GDH3, CIT2, and ACS1 transcripts. The transcript profiles were...

  17. PPARδ Reprograms Glutamine Metabolism in Sorafenib-Resistant HCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Jin; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Park, Soo Young; Jang, Se Young; Lee, Jung Yi; Ham, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jung-Guk; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2017-09-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib is the only therapeutic agent approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but acquired resistance to sorafenib is high. Here, we report metabolic reprogramming in sorafenib-resistant HCC and identify a regulatory molecule, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ), as a potential therapeutic target. Sorafenib-resistant HCC cells showed markedly higher glutamine metabolism and reductive glutamine carboxylation, which was accompanied by increased glucose-derived pentose phosphate pathway and glutamine-derived lipid biosynthetic pathways and resistance to oxidative stress. These glutamine-dependent metabolic alterations were attributed to PPARδ, which was upregulated in sorafenib-resistant HCC cells and human HCC tissues. Furthermore, PPARδ contributed to increased proliferative capacity and redox homeostasis in sorafenib-resistant HCC cells. Accordingly, inhibiting PPARδ activity reversed compensatory metabolic reprogramming in sorafenib-resistant HCC cells and sensitized them to sorafenib. Therefore, targeting compensatory metabolic reprogramming of glutamine metabolism in sorafenib-resistant HCC by inhibiting PPARδ constitutes a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming sorafenib-resistance in HCC. Implications: This study provides novel insight into the mechanism underlying sorafenib resistance and a potential therapeutic strategy targeting PPARδ in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Mol Cancer Res; 15(9); 1230-42. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechteld A. R. Vermeulen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%. Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285.

  19. Characterisation of a major enzyme of bovine nitrogen metabolism

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathomu, LM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available of cellular protein metabolism (Curthoys & Watford, 1995; Meister, 1974). Glutamine functions as a major inter-organ transport form of nitrogen, carbon and serves as a source of energy between tissues such as brain, liver, kidney and even muscles...

  20. Glutamine for induction of remission in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akobeng, Anthony K; Elawad, Mamoun; Gordon, Morris

    2016-02-08

    Crohn's disease is a chronic relapsing condition of the alimentary tract with a high morbidity secondary to bowel inflammation. Glutamine plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal mucosa and has been shown to reduce inflammation and disease activity in experimental models of Crohn's disease. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of glutamine supplementation for induction of remission in Crohn's disease. We searched the following databases from inception to November 15, 2015: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane IBD Group Specialised Register. Study references were also searched for additional trials. There were no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared glutamine supplementation administered by any route to a placebo, active comparator or no intervention in people with active Crohn's disease were considered for inclusion. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess methodological quality. The primary outcome measure was clinical or endoscopic remission. Secondary outcomes included intestinal permeability, clinical response, quality of life, growth in children and adverse events. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the primary outcome was evaluated using the GRADE criteria. Two small RCTs (total 42 patients) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. One study (18 patients) compared four weeks of treatment with a glutamine-enriched polymeric diet (42% amino acid composition) to a standard polymeric diet (4% amino acid composition) with low glutamine content in paediatric patients ( 18 years of age) with acute exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease. The paediatric study was rated as low risk of bias. The study in adult patients was rated as

  1. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of

  2. Nitrogen assimilation in soybean nodules, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuji; Kumazawa, Kikuo

    1980-01-01

    In order to elucidate the pathways to assimilate the ammonia produced by N 2 -fixation in soybean nodules, 15 N-labeled compounds were administered to intact nodules or nodule slices pretreated with various inhibitors of nitrogen assimilation. After exposure to 15 N 2 , 15 N-incorporation into various nitrogenous compounds was investigated in attached nodules injected with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) or azaserine (AS). MSX treatment increased the 15 N content of ammonia more than 6 times, however, depressed 15 N content of most of amides and amino acids. AS treatment enhanced 15 N content of amido-N of glutamine as well as ammonia, but decreased amino-N of glutamine and most of amino acids. Experiments with nodule slices pretreated with MSX or AS solution and then fed with 15 N-labeled ammonia or amido- 15 N of glutamine showed the same trends. Aminooxyacetate inhibited nitrogen flow from glutamic acid to other amino acids. These results strongly indicate that the ammonia produced by N 2 -fixation is assimilated by GS/GOGAT system to glutamic acid and then transaminated to various amino acids in situ. 15 N-incorporation patterns in nodule slices fed with 15 N-labeled ammonia, hydroxylamine, nitrite were similar, but nitrate seemed to be reduced in a definite compartment and assimilated similarly as in intact nodules fed with 15 N 2 (author)

  3. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...... and Gat1 act positively on gene expression whereas :Da180 and Deh1 act negatively. Expression of nitrogen catabolite pathway genes known to be regulated by these four regulators are glutamine, glutamate, proline, urea, arginine, GABA, and allantoine. In addition, the expression of the genes encoding...... thereby providing a nitrogen source to the cell.In this review, all known promoter sequences related to expression of nitrogen catabolite pathways are discussed as well as other regulatory proteins. Overview of metabolic pathways and promoters are presented....

  4. The hydrogen-bonding ability of the amino acid glutamine revealed by neutron diffraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhys, N H; Soper, A K; Dougan, L

    2012-11-15

    Hydrogen bonding between glutamine residues has been identified as playing an important role in the intermolecular association and aggregation of proteins. To establish the molecular mechanisms of glutamine interactions, neutron diffraction coupled with hydrogen/deuterium isotopic substitution in combination with computational modeling has been used to investigate the structure and hydration of glutamine in aqueous solution. The final structures obtained are consistent with the experimental data and provide insight into the hydrogen-bonding ability of glutamine. We find that the backbone of glutamine is able to coordinate more water molecules than the side chain, suggesting that charged groups on the glutamine molecule are more successful in attracting water than the dipole in the side chain. In both the backbone and the side chain, we find that the carbonyl groups interact more readily with water molecules than the amine groups. We find that glutamine-glutamine interactions are present, despite their low concentration in this dilute solution. This is evidenced through the occurrence of dimers of glutamine molecules in the solution, demonstrating the effective propensity of this molecule to associate through backbone-backbone, backbone-side chain, and side chain-side chain hydrogen bond interactions. The formation of dimers of glutamine molecules in such a dilute solution (30 mg/mL glutamine) may have implications in the aggregation of glutamine-rich proteins in neurological diseases where aggregation is prevalent.

  5. The impact of perioperative glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition on outcomes of patients undergoing abdominal surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chao; Tian, Weiliang; Wang, Wei; Huang, Qian; Zhao, Risheng; Zhao, Yunzhao; Li, Qiurong; Li, Jieshou

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of perioperative glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition (GLN-PN) on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register were searched to retrieve the eligible studies. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effect of GLN-PN and standard PN on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Clinical outcomes of interest were postoperative mortality, length of hospital stay, morbidity of infectious complication, and cumulative nitrogen balance. Statistical analysis was conducted by RevMan 5.0 software from the Cochrane Collaboration. Sixteen RCTs with 773 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed a significant decrease in the infectious complication rates of patients undergoing abdominal surgery receiving GLN-PN (risk ratio [RR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32 to 0.72; P = 0.0004). The overall effect indicated glutamine significantly reduced the length of hospital stay in the form of alanyl-glutamine (weighted mean difference [WMD], -3.17; 95% CI, -5.51 to -0.82; P = 0.008) and in the form of glycyl-glutamine (WMD, -3.40; 95% CI, -5.82 to -0.97; P = 0.006). A positive effect in improving postoperative cumulative nitrogen balance was observed between groups (WMD, 7.40; 95% CI, 3.16 to 11.63; P = 0.0006), but no mortality (RR, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.21 to 11.9; P = 0.68). Perioperative GLN-PN is effective and safe to shorten the length of hospital stay, reduce the morbidity of postoperative infectious complications, and improve nitrogen balance in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  6. Effects of honey, glutamine and their combination on canine small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    bowel following massive small bowel resection were studied in some Nigerian non-descript breeds of dogs. 24 dogs (3- ... Oral glutamine/honey combination showed the best overall effect based on body weight gain, intestinal mucosal growth and adaptation .... anastomosis as earlier described (Orsher et al, 1993).

  7. Effects of Enteral Glutamine Supplementation on Reduction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the effect of enteral glutamine in reducing the incidence of post burn infections in patients with severe burns. Design: A double blind randomised clinical trial. Setting: Burns unit and ward 4D of Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya Subjects: Sixty patients with severe burns who were randomised to two ...

  8. Heterogeneous distribution of glutamine synthetase during rat liver development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasbeek Janzen, J. W.; Gebhardt, R.; ten Voorde, G. H.; Lamers, W. H.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two days before birth, immunohistochemical detection of glutamine synthetase already reveals a heterogeneous distribution pattern related to the vascular architecture of the liver. Only a small number of hepatocytes in the vicinity of the efferent venules show relatively high staining intensity.

  9. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-res...

  10. Glutamine and its use in selected oncology settings | Tydeman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review summarises the latest evidence for the use of glutamine (GLN) in oncology taking cognisance of current systematic reviews and available guidelines. Various studies in adults suggest that GLN supplementation suppresses tumour growth, by restoring the function of natural killer cells; improves protein ...

  11. The role of glutamine in Pseudomonas mediterranea in biotechnological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Chines, Valeria; Franco, Domenico; Nicolò, Marco S; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-07-25

    In this work, in order to study the effect of glutamine as co-feeder on growth kinetics, biomass and PHA production in Pseudomonas mediterranea, different co-metabolic strategies were employed. Unrelated (glycerol and glucose) and related (sodium octanoate) carbon sources both in presence and absence of glutamine have been tested. For each cultural condition, we (i) evaluated growth kinetics and measured the cell metabolic activity by MTT assay, (ii) monitored PHA production and (iii) estimated the expression of phaC1 and phaC2 genes through RT-PCR. Our results show that the use of glutamine as co-feeder in P. mediterranea led to an improvement of the specific growth rate and cell metabolic activity and enhanced the uptake of all the carbon sources assayed. Moreover, the use of glutamine reduced significantly the time required for PHA production and increased biopolymer yield, as consequence of an early activation of phaC1 and phaC2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Intravenous glutamine enhances COX-2 activity giving cardioprotection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Jonathan

    2009-03-01

    Preconditioning, a highly evolutionary conserved endogenous protective response, provides the most powerful form of anti-infarct protection known. We investigated whether acute intravenous glutamine, through an effect on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and heat shock protein (HSP) 72, might induce preconditioning.

  13. Synthesis of Biobased Succinonitrile from Glutamic Acid and Glutamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Nôtre, Le J.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Succinonitrile is the precursor of 1,4-diaminobutane, which is used for the industrial production of polyamides. This paper describes the synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine, amino acids that are abundantly present in many plant proteins. Synthesis of the

  14. Effect of dexamethasone on fetal hepatic glutamine-glutamate exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Timmerman (Michelle); C. Teng; R.B. Wilkening; P.V. Fennessey (Paul); F.C. Battaglia (Frederick); G. Meschia

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIntravenous infusion of dexamethasone (Dex) in the fetal lamb causes a two- to threefold increase in plasma glutamine and other glucogenic amino acids and a decrease of plasma glutamate to approximately one-third of normal. To explore the underlying

  15. Restoration Of Glutamine Synthetase Activity, Nitric Oxide Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Propolis has been proposed to be protective on neurodegenerative disorders. To understand the neuroprotective effects of honeybee propolis, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were studied in different brain ...

  16. Antioxidant defence of L-glutamine on mitochondrial function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myocardial infarction is a major public health concern and the leading cause of death all over the world. A better understanding of the processes involved in myocardial infarction has stimulated the search for biomolecules, which could limit the myocardial injury. We determined the protective activity of L-glutamine on ...

  17. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    . Glutamine synthetase activity in muscle was significantly higher in the 14-day exposed group (4.32 µmol γ-glutamyl hydroxamate formed.g protein-1.min-1) in comparison to normal (1.53 µmol γ-glutamyl hydroxamate formed.g protein-1.min-1) this parameter had decreased by 40% following 21 days of exposure. These results suggest that since no dramatic changes in the levels of protein were observed in the muscle and liver, there is an alteration in glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activity in order to maintain nitrogen metabolism in the initial phase of hypoxic exposure.

  18. Importance of glutamine metabolism in leukemia cells by energy production through TCA cycle and by redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Mineaki; Miwa, Hiroshi; Shikami, Masato; Tsunekawa-Imai, Norikazu; Suganuma, Kazuto; Mizuno, Shohei; Takahashi, Miyuki; Mizutani, Motonori; Hanamura, Ichiro; Nitta, Masakazu

    2014-07-01

    Some cancer cells depend on glutamine despite of pronounced glycolysis. We examined the glutamine metabolism in leukemia cells, and found that HL-60 cells most depended on glutamine in the 4 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lines examined: growth of HL-60 cells was most suppressed by glutamine deprivation and by inhibition of glutaminolysis, which was rescued by tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate, oxaloacetic acid. Glutamine is also involved in antioxidant defense function by increasing glutathione. Glutamine deprivation suppressed the glutathione content and elevated reactive oxygen species most evidently in HL-60 cells. Glutamine metabolism might be a therapeutic target in some leukemia.

  19. Distinctive properties and expression profiles of glutamine synthetase from a plant symbiotic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, Barbara; Betti, Marco; Márquez, Antonio J; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2003-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank(R)/EBI Nucleotide Sequence Databases with accession numbers AF462037 (glutamine synthetase) and AF462032 (glutamate synthase). Nitrogen retrieval and assimilation by symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi is thought to play a central role in the mutualistic interaction between these organisms and their plant hosts. Here we report on the molecular characterization of the key N-assimilation enzyme glutamine synthetase from the mycorrhizal ascomycete Tuber borchii (TbGS). TbGS displayed a strong positive co-operativity ( n =1.7+/-0.29) and an unusually high S(0.5) value (54+/-16 mM; S(0.5) is the substrate concentration value at which v =(1/2) V (max)) for glutamate, and a correspondingly low sensitivity towards inhibition by the glutamate analogue herbicide phosphinothricin. The TbGS mRNA, which is encoded by a single-copy gene in the Tuber genome, was up-regulated in N-starved mycelia and returned to basal levels upon resupplementation of various forms of N, the most effective of which was nitrate. Both responses were accompanied by parallel variations of TbGS protein amount and glutamine synthetase activity, thus indicating that TbGS levels are primarily controlled at the pre-translational level. As revealed by a comparative analysis of the TbGS mRNA and of the mRNAs for the metabolically related enzymes glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamate synthase, TbGS is not only the sole messenger that positively responds to N starvation, but also the most abundant under N-limiting conditions. A similar, but even more discriminating expression pattern, with practically undetectable glutamate dehydrogenase mRNA levels, was observed in fruitbodies. The TbGS mRNA was also found to be expressed in symbiosis-engaged hyphae, with distinctively higher hybridization signals in hyphae that were penetrating among and within root cells. PMID:12683951

  20. Effect of the association l-glutamine – ethylene glycol In equine semen cryopreservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Neira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the effectiveness in the cryopreservation of horse sperm, the effect of association L-glutamine with Ethylenglicole and Glycerol in the freezing media spermatozoa was evaluated. 4 Colombian native stallions were used to complete a total of 21 samples which were frozen in two different media: INRA 97 and cryoprotectant. The following study was done: L-glutamine 80mM + Etilenglicol 2.5% (protocol 1, L-glutamine 80 mM + Glycerol 2.5% (protocol 2, Etilenglicol 2.5% (protocol 3 and glycerol 2.5% (protocol 4. The freezing methodology was: 60 minutes to descend the temperature from 38°C to 5°C (0.55°C/min during the transport. The samples were centrifuged at 600G/10min., and the semen was diluted with the four protocols in straws of 0.5 ml. Then, 60 minutes of equilibrium in refrigeration; 20 minutes in liquid nitrogen vapors and then immersed. In the progressive motility evaluation there was not any significant difference between protocols at 0 time (p ≤ 0.6383, at 30 minutes (p ≤ 0.511, and at 60 minutes (p ≤ 0.1659. The motility averages for the 4 protocols at 0 time were (1 29,6 ± 15,1; (2 28,1 ± 13,5; (3 28,4 ± 12,3 and (4 30,8 ± 11,1; at the 30 minutes: (1 25,1 ± 13,6; (2 22,3 ± 13,0; (3 24,9 ± 12,4 and (4 25,5 ± 11,6, and at 60 minutes (1 17,1 ± 10,2; (2 15,4 ± 11,7; (3 19,9 ± 11,5 and (4 17,6 ± 10,4. The spermatic survival was evaluated with eosine-nigrosine coloration, after thawing and there was not any significant difference among the protocols (p≤ 0.6336, the average measures were (1 30,7; (2 28,8; (3 28,7 and (4 31,7. As a conclusion, although significant difference was not demonstrated among the protocols; the tendency to the highest average was presented by the protocol 4 (glycerol 2.5%.

  1. Comparasion between effects of nutritional immunomodulation with glutamine: An integral part of the treatment of critically ill: Trend and perspective (immunonitrition in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Miomir 0000-0001-9537-7975 0000-0001-9537-7975

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades the advanced technology significantly changed the treatment of critically ill patients. Mechanical ventilation, transfusion of blood products, renal replacement therapy, invasive monitoring and many other procedures drastically prolonged and changed life, modulating homeostasis, developing new pathways and mechanisms of adaptation - allostasis. Systemic inflammatory response and immunomodulatory activity are a part of complex underlying mechanisms involved in allostasis. Based on recently published results of certain studies, a few nutrients (omega-3 fatty acids, arginine, glutamine added to the standard formula for enteral and parenteral nutrition, reduced ICU stay and rate of infection as well as duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients. Glutamine, 'essential' nonessential amino acid has high immunomodulatory capacity, as fuel for muscles and 'shuttle' for nitrogen, protecting lung and gut function as well as the function of immunocompetent cells. Despite that there is no universally accepted strategy concerning nutritional immunomodulation, it is implemented in ASPEN and ESPEN guidelines.

  2. Structural analysis of the wheat genes encoding NADH-dependent glutamine-2-oxoglutarate amidotransferases and correlation with grain protein content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Nigro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrogen uptake and the efficient absorption and metabolism of nitrogen are essential elements in attempts to breed improved cereal cultivars for grain or silage production. One of the enzymes related to nitrogen metabolism is glutamine-2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase (GOGAT. Together with glutamine synthetase (GS, GOGAT maintains the flow of nitrogen from NH4 (+ into glutamine and glutamate, which are then used for several aminotransferase reactions during amino acid synthesis. RESULTS: The aim of the present work was to identify and analyse the structure of wheat NADH-GOGAT genomic sequences, and study the expression in two durum wheat cultivars characterized by low and high kernel protein content. The genomic sequences of the three homoeologous A, B and D NADH-GOGAT genes were obtained for hexaploid Triticum aestivum and the tetraploid A and B genes of Triticum turgidum ssp. durum. Analysis of the gene sequences indicates that all wheat NADH-GOGAT genes are composed of 22 exons and 21 introns. The three hexaploid wheat homoeologous genes have high conservation of sequence except intron 13 which shows differences in both length and sequence. A comparative analysis of sequences among di- and mono-cotyledonous plants shows both regions of high conservation and of divergence. qRT-PCR performed with the two durum wheat cvs Svevo and Ciccio (characterized by high and low protein content, respectively indicates different expression levels of the two NADH-GOGAT-3A and NADH-GOGAT-3B genes. CONCLUSION: The three hexaploid wheat homoeologous NADH-GOGAT gene sequences are highly conserved - consistent with the key metabolic role of this gene. However, the dicot and monocot amino acid sequences show distinctive patterns, particularly in the transit peptide, the exon 16-17 junction, and the C-terminus. The lack of conservation in the transit peptide may indicate subcellular differences between the two plant divisions - while the sequence

  3. Dietary nitrogen and fish welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Luis E C; Aragão, Cláudia; Dias, Jorge; Costas, Benjamín; Terova, Genciana; Martins, Catarina; Tort, Lluis

    2012-02-01

    Little research has been done in optimizing the nitrogenous fraction of the fish diets in order to minimize welfare problems. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on how amino acid (AA) metabolism may be affected when fish are under stress and the possible effects on fish welfare when sub-optimal dietary nitrogen formulations are used to feed fish. In addition, it intends to evaluate the current possibilities, and future prospects, of using improved dietary nitrogen formulations to help fish coping with predictable stressful periods. Both metabolomic and genomic evidence show that stressful husbandry conditions affect AA metabolism in fish and may bring an increase in the requirement of indispensable AA. Supplementation in arginine and leucine, but also eventually in lysine, methionine, threonine and glutamine, may have an important role in enhancing the innate immune system. Tryptophan, as precursor for serotonin, modulates aggressive behaviour and feed intake in fish. Bioactive peptides may bring important advances in immunocompetence, disease control and other aspects of welfare of cultured fish. Fishmeal replacement may reduce immune competence, and the full nutritional potential of plant-protein ingredients is attained only after the removal or inactivation of some antinutritional factors. This review shows that AA metabolism is affected when fish are under stress, and this together with sub-optimal dietary nitrogen formulations may affect fish welfare. Furthermore, improved dietary nitrogen formulations may help fish coping with predictable stressful events.

  4. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: A good molecular clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesole, G.; Lanvave, C.; Saccone, C.; Bozzetti, M.P.; Preparata, G.

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. The calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. The data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves

  5. Glutamine uptake and metabolism are coordinately regulated by ERK/MAPK during T lymphocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Erikka L; Kelman, Alina; Wu, Glendon S; Gopaul, Ravindra; Senkevitch, Emilee; Aghvanyan, Anahit; Turay, Achmed M; Frauwirth, Kenneth A

    2010-07-15

    Activation of a naive T cell is a highly energetic event, which requires a substantial increase in nutrient metabolism. Upon stimulation, T cells increase in size, rapidly proliferate, and differentiate, all of which lead to a high demand for energetic and biosynthetic precursors. Although amino acids are the basic building blocks of protein biosynthesis and contribute to many other metabolic processes, the role of amino acid metabolism in T cell activation has not been well characterized. We have found that glutamine in particular is required for T cell function. Depletion of glutamine blocks proliferation and cytokine production, and this cannot be rescued by supplying biosynthetic precursors of glutamine. Correlating with the absolute requirement for glutamine, T cell activation induces a large increase in glutamine import, but not glutamate import, and this increase is CD28-dependent. Activation coordinately enhances expression of glutamine transporters and activities of enzymes required to allow the use of glutamine as a Krebs cycle substrate in T cells. The induction of glutamine uptake and metabolism requires ERK function, providing a link to TCR signaling. Together, these data indicate that regulation of glutamine use is an important component of T cell activation. Thus, a better understanding of glutamine sensing and use in T cells may reveal novel targets for immunomodulation.

  6. Regulation of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and activation by glutamine metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Li

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, which is mainly caused by accumulation of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. The mechanisms of activation and proliferation of HSCs, two key events after liver damage, have been studied for many years. Here we report a novel pathway to control HSCs by regulating glutamine metabolism. We demonstrated that the proliferation of HSCs is critically dependent on glutamine that is used to generate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG and non-essential amino acid (NEAA. In addition, both culture- and in vivo-activated HSCs have increased glutamine utilization and increased expression of genes related to glutamine metabolism, including GLS (glutaminase, aspartate transaminase (GOT1 and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1. Inhibition of these enzymes, as well as glutamine depletion, had a significant inhibitory effect on HSCs activation. In addition to providing energy expenditure, conversion of glutamine to proline is enhanced. The pool of free proline may also be increased via downregulation of POX expression. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in the regulation of glutamine metabolism, as well as TGF-β1, c-Myc, and Ras signalings, via transcriptional upregulation and repression of key metabolic enzymes in this pathway. Finally, changes in glutamine metabolism were also found in mouse liver tissue following CCl4-induced acute injury.Glutamine metabolism plays an important role in regulating the proliferation and activation of HSCs. Strategies that are targeted at glutamine metabolism may represent a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  7. Glutamine triggers long-lasting increase in striatal network activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Wiebke; Theiss, Stephan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Sergeeva, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Accumulation of ammonium and glutamine in blood and brain is a key factor in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) - a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by various cognitive and motor deficits. MRI imaging identified abnormalities notably in the basal ganglia of HE patients, including its major input station, the striatum. While neurotoxic effects of ammonia have been extensively studied, glutamine is primarily perceived as "detoxified" form of ammonia. We applied ammonium and glutamine to striatal and cortical cells from newborn rats cultured on microelectrode arrays. Glutamine, but not ammonium significantly increased spontaneous spike rate with a long-lasting excitation outlasting washout. This effect was more prominent in striatal than in cortical cultures. Calcium imaging revealed that glutamine application caused a rise in intracellular calcium that depended both on system A amino acid transport and activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This pointed to downstream glutamate release that was triggered by intracellular glutamine. Using an enzymatic assay kit we confirmed glutamine-provoked glutamate release from striatal cells. Real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry demonstrated the presence of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) necessary for synaptic glutamate release in striatal neurons. We conclude that extracellular glutamine is taken up by neurons, triggers synaptic release of glutamate which is then taken up by astrocytes and again converted to glutamine. This feedback-loop causes a sustained long-lasting excitation of network activity. Thus, apart from ammonia also its "detoxified" form glutamine might be responsible for the neuropsychiatric symptoms in HE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A stochastic modeling of isotope exchange reactions in glutamine synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmiruk, N. V.; Boronovskiy, S. E.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    The model presented in this work allows simulation of isotopic exchange reactions at chemical equilibrium catalyzed by a glutamine synthetase. To simulate the functioning of the enzyme the algorithm based on the stochastic approach was applied. The dependence of exchange rates for 14C and 32P on metabolite concentration was estimated. The simulation results confirmed the hypothesis of the ascertained validity for preferred order random binding mechanism. Corresponding values of K0.5 were also obtained.

  9. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine on fracture healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Küçükalp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods: Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results: Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion: One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  10. l-glutamine and l-alanine supplementation increase glutamine-glutathione axis and muscle HSP-27 in rats trained using a progressive high-intensity resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Raizel, Raquel; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Rosa, Thiago Dos Santos; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    In this study we investigated the chronic effects of oral l-glutamine and l-alanine supplementation, either in their free or dipeptide form, on glutamine-glutathione (GLN-GSH) axis and cytoprotection mediated by HSP-27 in rats submitted to resistance exercise (RE). Forty Wistar rats were distributed into 5 groups: sedentary; trained (CTRL); and trained supplemented with l-alanyl-l-glutamine, l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form (GLN+ALA), or free l-alanine (ALA). All trained animals were submitted to a 6-week ladder-climbing protocol. Supplementations were offered in a 4% drinking water solution for 21 days prior to euthanasia. Plasma glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), myoglobin (MYO), and erythrocyte concentration of reduced GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) were measured. In tibialis anterior skeletal muscle, GLN-GSH axis, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and the expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP-27), and glutamine synthetase were determined. In CRTL animals, high-intensity RE reduced muscle glutamine levels and increased GSSG/GSH rate and TBARS, as well as augmented plasma CK and MYO levels. Conversely, l-glutamine-supplemented animals showed an increase in plasma and muscle levels of glutamine, with a reduction in GSSG/GSH rate, TBARS, and CK. Free l-alanine administration increased plasma glutamine concentration and lowered muscle TBARS. HSF-1 and HSP-27 were high in all supplemented groups when compared with CTRL (p alanine, in both a free or dipeptide form, improve the GLN-GSH axis and promote cytoprotective effects in rats submitted to high-intensity RE training.

  11. Effect of sodium benzoate on blood ammonia response to oral glutamine challenge in cirrhotic patients: a note of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efrati, C; Masini, A; Merli, M; Valeriano, V; Riggio, O

    2000-12-01

    The administration of sodium benzoate provides an alternative pathway for the disposal of waste nitrogen and this substance has been used to treat patients with urea cycle defects and more recently cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy. The aim of the study was to assess the ammonia-lowering effect of benzoate in cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy. Glutamine challenge, a method to induce an increase of blood ammonia, was performed in six cirrhotics before and after 5 days of benzoate treatment (10 microg/day). Number Connection Test and Posner's Attention Test were also performed before and after benzoate treatment. Blood ammonia increased after the glutamine load both before (from 66 +/- 12 microg/dl to 123 +/- 34 microg/dl and 179 +/- 53 microg/dl after 30 and 60 min, respectively; ANOVA p = 0.0004) and after benzoate treatment (from 102 +/- 27 microg/dl to 185 +/- 49 microg/dl and 250 +/- 39 microg/dl after 30 and 60 min, respectively; ANOVA p = 0.00001). However, after benzoate treatment, the basal values (102 +/- 27 vs 66 +/- 12 microg/dl; p = 0.01) and peak increments of ammonia (166 +/- 56 microg/dl vs 102 +/- 40 microg/dl; p = 0.04) were significantly higher than before. The Number Connection test and the Posner's test were not altered by benzoate treatment. Benzoate increased both the basal and post-glutamine ammonia levels. These results confirm what has already been observed in experimental animals and suggest a note of caution in the use of sodium benzoate in cirrhotic patients.

  12. [Imbalance of system of glutamin - glutamic acid in the placenta and amniotic fluid at placental insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelova, T N; Gunko, V O; Linde, V A

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamine and glutamic acid has been investigated in the placenta and amniotic fluid under conditions of placental insufficiency. The development of placental insufficiency is characterized by the increased content of glutamic acid and a decrease of glutamine in both placenta and amniotic fluid. These changes changes were accompanied by changes in the activity of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these amino acids. There was a decrease in glutamate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutaminase activity with the simultaneous decrease of glutamine synthetase activity. The compensatory decrease in the activity of glutamine keto acid aminotransferase did not prevent a decrease in the glutamine level. The impairments in the system glutamic acid-glutamine were more pronounced during the development of premature labor.

  13. NMR spectroscopy of cultured astrocytes: effects of glutamine and the gliotoxin fluorocitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, B; Sonnewald, U; Unsgård, G; Fonnum, F

    1994-06-01

    Glial synthesis of glutamine, citrate, and other carbon skeletons, as well as metabolic effects of the gliotoxin fluorocitrate, were studied in cultured astrocytes with 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopy. [2-13C]Acetate and [1-13C]glucose were used as labeled precursors. In some experiments glutamine (2.5 mM) was added to the culture medium. Fluorocitrate (20 microM) inhibited the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle without affecting the level of ATP. The net export of glutamine was reduced significantly, and that of citrate increased similarly, consistent with an inhibition of aconitase. Fluorocitrate (100 microM) inhibited TCA cycle activity even more and (without addition of glutamine) caused a 40% reduction in the level of ATP. In the presence of 2.5 mM glutamine, 100 microM fluorocitrate did not affect ATP levels, although glutamine synthesis was nearly fully blocked. The consumption of the added glutamine increased with increasing concentrations of fluorocitrate, whereas the consumption of glucose decreased. This shows that glutamine fed into the TCA cycle, substituting for glucose as an energy substrate. These findings may explain how fluorocitrate selectively lowers the level of glutamine and inhibits glutamine formation in the brain in vivo, viz., not by depleting glial cells of ATP, but by causing a rerouting of 2-oxoglutarate from glutamine synthesis into the TCA cycle during inhibition of aconitase. Analysis of the 13C labeling of the C-2 versus the C-4 positions in glutamine obtained with [2-13C]acetate revealed that 57% of the TCA cycle intermediates were lost per turn of the cycle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine, and alanine production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmaun, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bier, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Physiological elevations of plasma cortisol levels, as are encountered in stress and severe trauma, were produced in six normal subjects by infusing them with hydrocortisone for 64 h. Amino acid kinetics were measured in the postabsorptive state using three 4-h infusions of L-[1- 13 C]leucine, L-phenyl[ 2 H 5 ]phenylalanine, L-[2- 15 N]glutamine, and L-[1- 13 C]alanine tracers (1) before, (2) at 12 h, and (3) at 60 h of cortisol infusion. Before and throughout the study, the subjects ate a normal diet of adequate protein and energy intake. The cortisol infusion raised plasma cortisol levels significantly from 10 ± 1 to 32 ± 4 μg/dl, leucine flux from 83 ± 3 to 97 ± 3 μmol·kg -1 ·h -1 , and phenylalanine flux from 34 ± 1 to 39 ± 1 (SE) μmol·kg -1 ·h -1 after 12 h of cortisol infusion. These increases were maintained until the cortisol infusion was terminated. These nearly identical 15% increases in two different essential amino acid appearance rates are reflective of increased whole body protein breakdown. Glutamine flux rose by 12 h of cortisol infusion and remained elevated at the same level at 64 h. The increase in flux was primarily due to a 55% increase in glutamine de novo synthesis. Alanine flux increased with acute hypercortisolemia and increased further at 60 h of cortisol infusion, a result primarily of increased alanine de novo synthesis. Insulin, alanine, and lactate plasma levels responded similarly with significant rises between the acute and chronic periods of cortisol infusion. Thus hypercortisolemia increases both protein breakdown and the turnover of important nonessential amino acids for periods of up to 64 h

  15. Biochemical and mutational analysis of glutamine synthetase type III from the rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus albus 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Kensey R; Kocherginskaya, Svetlana A; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2005-11-01

    Two different genes encoding glutamine synthetase type I (GSI) and GSIII were identified in the genome sequence of R. albus 8. The identity of the GSIII protein was confirmed by the presence of its associated conserved motifs. The glnN gene, encoding the GSIII, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. The recombinant protein was purified and subjected to biochemical and physical analyses. Subunit organization suggested a protein present in solution as both monomers and oligomers. Kinetic studies using the forward and the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) assays were carried out. Mutations that changed conserved glutamic acid residues to alanine in the four GSIII motifs resulted in drastic decreases in GS activity using both assays, except for an E380A mutation, which rather resulted in an increase in activity in the forward assay compared to the wild-type protein. Reduced GSIII activity was also exhibited by mutating, individually, two lysines (K308 and K318) located in the putative nucleotide-binding site to alanine. Most importantly, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the glnN gene in R. albus 8 cells grown under ammonia limiting conditions, whereas little or no transcript was detected in cells grown under ammonia sufficient conditions, suggested an important role for the GSIII in the nitrogen metabolism of R. albus 8. Furthermore, the mutational studies on the conserved GSIII motifs demonstrated, for the first time, their importance in the structure and/or function of a GSIII protein.

  16. BLOOD AMMONIA AND GLUTAMINE AS PREDICTORS OF HYPERAMMONEMIC CRISES IN UREA CYCLE DISORDER PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brendan; Diaz, George A.; Rhead, William; Lichter-Konecki, U.; Feigenbaum, Annette; Berry, Susan A.; Le Mons, C.; Bartley, James A; Longo, Nicola; Nagamani, Sandesh C.; Berquist, William; Gallagher, Renata; Bartholomew, Dennis; Harding, Cary O.; Korson, Mark S.; McCandless, Shawn E.; Smith, Wendy; Cederbaum, Stephen; Wong, Derek; Merritt, J. Lawrence; Schulze, A.; Vockley, Gerard.; Kronn, David; Zori, Roberto; Summar, Marshall; Milikien, D.A.; Marino, M.; Coakley, D.F.; Mokhtarani, M.; Scharschmidt, B.F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine predictors of ammonia exposure and hyperammonemic crises (HAC) in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). Methods The relationships between fasting ammonia, daily ammonia exposure, and HACs were analyzed in >100 UCD patients. Results Fasting ammonia correlated strongly with daily ammonia exposure (r=0.764, pammonia levels ammonia value was 87%, 60%, and 39%, respectively, and 10.3%, 14.1%, and 37.0% of these patients experienced ≥1 HAC over 12 months. Time to first HAC was shorter (p=0.008) and relative risk (4.5×; p=0.011) and rate (~5×, p=0.006) of HACs higher in patients with fasting ammonia ≥1.0 ULN vs. ammonia exposure increased the relative risk of a HAC by 50% and >200% (pammonia and HAC risk appeared independent of treatment, age, UCD subtype, dietary protein intake, or blood urea nitrogen. Fasting glutamine correlated weakly with AUC0-24 and was not a significant predictor of HACs. Conclusions Fasting ammonia correlates strongly and positively with daily ammonia exposure and with the risk and rate of HACs, suggesting that UCD patients may benefit from tight ammonia control. PMID:25503497

  17. The effect of glutamine intake on complications of colorectal and colon cancer treatment: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramezani Jolfaie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improvement in complications of antitumor agents and surgery is important to enhance life quality and survival among patients with colon and colorectal cancer. It has been reported that some dietary components such as glutamine (Gln have beneficial effects on these complications of cancer therapies. However, the results of studies are inconsistent in this area. We performed a review on randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating the effects of Gln intake on complications related to therapeutic strategies of the colon and colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods: A systematic search was conducted in PubMed, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library, and SID databases to find the relevant literature, published before July 2015. Results: Nine RCTs of 217 screened articles were included in this systematic review. The results of the present review suggested that Gln intake among colon and colorectal cancer patients could reduce some complications induced by chemotherapy such as gut mucositis and diarrhea and improve nitrogen balance, immune system and wound healing after surgery, whereas benefits role of Gln on radiochemotherapy side effects were not provided. Conclusion: The role of Gln intake on some improvement of complications induced by cancer therapeutic methods and shorten the length of hospital stay may be promising and one that is worthy of further exploration.

  18. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  19. Coordination of glucose and glutamine utilization by an expanded Myc network

    OpenAIRE

    Kaadige, Mohan R; Elgort, Marc G; Ayer, Donald E

    2010-01-01

    Glucose and glutamine are the most abundant circulating nutrients and support the growth and proliferation of all cells, in particular rapidly growing and dividing cancer cells. Several recent studies implicate an expanded Myc network in how cells sense and utilize both glucose and glutamine. These studies reveal an unappreciated coordination between glycolysis and glutaminolysis, potentially providing new targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer.

  20. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored product pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereals have storage proteins with high amounts of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Therefore, storage pests need to have digestive enzymes that are efficient in hydrolyzing these types of proteins. Post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored product pe...

  1. LRH-1-dependent programming of mitochondrial glutamine processing drives liver cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Pan; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Stein, Sokrates; Demagny, Hadrien; Ryu, Dongryeol; Moullan, Norman; Wang, Xu; Can, Emine; Zamboni, Nicola; Comment, Arnaud; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Various tumors develop addiction to glutamine to support uncontrolled cell proliferation. Here we identify the nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) as a key regulator in the process of hepatic tumorigenesis through the coordination of a noncanonical glutamine pathway that is reliant on

  2. Majority of dietary glutamine is utilized in first pass in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, S.R.D.; Schierbeek, H.; Bet, P.M.; Vermeulen, M.J.; Lafeber, H.N.; van Goudoever, J.B.; van Elburg, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamine is a conditionally essential amino acid for very low-birth weight infants by virtue of its ability to play an important role in several key metabolic processes of immune cells and enterocytes. Although glutamine is known to be used to a great extend, the exact splanchnic metabolism in

  3. Regulation of the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of the glutamine synthetase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-Venema, H.; Hakvoort, T. B.; van Hemert, F. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase, the enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonia into glutamine, is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally controlled manner. The first part of this review focuses on its spatiotemporal pattern of expression, the factors that regulate

  4. Majority of dietary glutamine is utilized in first pass in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.; Schierbeek, Henk; Bet, Pierre M.; Vermeulen, Marijn J.; Lafeber, Harrie N.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamine is a conditionally essential amino acid for very low-birth weight infants by virtue of its ability to play an important role in several key metabolic processes of immune cells and enterocytes. Although glutamine is known to be used to a great extent, the exact splanchnic metabolism in

  5. Hepatocytes explanted in the spleen preferentially express carbamoylphosphate synthetase rather than glutamine synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Been, W.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    Urea cycle enzymes and glutamine synthetase are essential for NH3 detoxification and systemic pH homeostasis in mammals. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase, the first and flux-determining enzyme of the cycle, is found only in a large periportal compartment, and glutamine synthetase is found only in a

  6. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Verlander, Jill W.; Weiner, I. David

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of

  7. Effects of glutamine on performance and intestinal mucosa morphometry of broiler chickens vaccinated against coccidiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Carla Luquetti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to assess the effects of glutamine as feed additive on performance and intestinal mucosa morphometry of broiler chickens vaccinated against coccidiosis. A total of 400 day-old male chicks were randomly assigned to four treatments (NVNG – no vaccination, no glutamine supplementation; NVG – no vaccination, glutamine supplementation (10 g kg−1; VNG – vaccination, no glutamine supplementation; VG – vaccination, glutamine supplementation replicated four times with 25 birds per replicate. A commercial sprayed-on vaccine against coccidiosis containing Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, E. mivati, and E. tenella was administered at the hatchery. Broiler performance was evaluated from 1-28 days, and morphometric parameters were analyzed at 14, 21, and 28 days of age. Body weight gain and feed intake were negatively affected by vaccination, but not by glutamine. Vaccination increased crypt depth in the duodenum and jejunum at 21 and 28 days. In conclusion, this study showed that glutamine was not able to increase weight gain of broiler chickens, irrespective of whether the animals were vaccinated or not against coccidiosis. Glutamine supplementation was able to improve feed conversion in vaccinated birds suggesting trophic effect on intestinal epithelium improving.

  8. The role of glutamine transport in metabolism in the brain cortical tissue slice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, N.; Bubb, W.A.; Rae, C.; Broeer, S.

    2001-01-01

    The widely accepted 'glutamate/glutamine cycle' holds that glutamate released as a neurotransmitter in the brain is taken up by surrounding astrocytes, converted to neuro-inactive glutamine and transported back to neurons for reconversion to glutamate. Little, however, is known about the role of glutamine transport in this process. The situation is complicated by the fact that glutamine is transported by a variety of general amino-acid transporters of low specificity. The role of these transporters in flux of glutamine through the glutamate/glutamine cycle was investigated by 13 C NMR monitoring of the flux of C from [3- 13 C]L-lactate in guinea pig cortical tissue slices in the presence of competitive inhibitors of the A-type(α-(methylamino)isobutyrate; MeAIB) and N-type (histidine) transporters. The presence of each inhibitor (10 mM) produced no significant decrease in total metabolite pool size but resulted in a significant decrease in flux of [ 13 C] into the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA and also into glutamine and alanine. The factional enrichment of glutamate and GABA was also significantly lower. By contrast there was no effect on the amount of [ 13 C] incorporated into aspartate isotopomers which may represent a predominantly astrocyte-labelled pool. These results are consistent with involvement of glutamine transporters in the recycling of synaptic glutamate by demonstrating partial blockage of incorporation of [ 13 C] label into neuronal metabolites

  9. De novo glutamine synthesis induced by corticosteroids in vivo in rats is secondary to weight loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, I. de; Schols, A.M.W.J.; Koerts-de Lang, E.; Wouters, E.F.M.; Deutz, N.E.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Corticosteroid treatment affects muscle protein and glutamine metabolism. In the present study we aimed to clarify to what extent anorexia, weight loss and corticosteroids determine protein and glutamine metabolism in muscle. METHODS: The study was performed in Wistar rats (300-350 g,

  10. Enteral L-Arginine and Glutamine Supplementation for Prevention of NEC in Preterm Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. El-Shimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluating the efficacy and safety of arginine and glutamine supplementation in decreasing the incidence of NEC among preterm neonates. Methods. Prospective case-control study done on 75 preterm neonates ≤34 weeks, divided equally into L-arginine group receiving enteral L-arginine, glutamine group receiving enteral glutamine, and control group. Serum L-arginine and glutamine levels were measured at time of enrollment (sample 1, after 14 days of enrollment (sample 2, and at time of diagnosis of NEC (sample 3. Results. The incidence of NEC was 9.3%. There was no difference in the frequency of NEC between L-arginine and control groups (P>0.05. NEC was not detected in glutamine group; L-arginine concentrations were significantly lower in arginine group than control group in both samples while glutamine concentrations were comparable in glutamine and control groups in both samples. No significant difference was found between groups as regards number of septic episodes, duration to reach full oral intake, or duration of hospital stay. Conclusion. Enteral L-arginine supplementation did not seem to reduce the incidence of NEC. Enteral glutamine may have a preventive role against NEC if supplied early to preterm neonates. However, larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. This work is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01263041.

  11. Cerebral glutamine concentration and lactate-pyruvate ratio in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, P.N.; Hauerberg, J.; Frederiksen, Hans-Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Hyperammonemia causes brain edema and high intracranial pressure (ICP) in acute liver failure (ALF) by accumulation of glutamine in brain. Since a high-level glutamine may compromise mitochondrial function, the aim of this study was to determine if the lactate-pyruvate ratio is associated...

  12. Response of Pearl Millet to nitrogen as affected by water deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Diouf , O.; Brou , Yao Télesphore; Diouf , M.; Sarr , B.; Eyletters , M.; Roy-Macauley , H.; Delhaye , J.

    2004-01-01

    International audience; In the Sahelian zone, low soil N could be as limiting as drought in pearl millet production. Although growth and crop productivity depend on several biochemical reactions in which the nitrogen metabolism plays a great role, there is little information available on how N uptake and key enzymes, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase, are affected by nitrogen and water interaction in millet. For this purpose, the millet variety cv. Souna III was grown in the field du...

  13. Key Roles of Glutamine Pathways in Reprogramming the Cancer Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Piotr Michalak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine (GLN is commonly known as an important metabolite used for the growth of cancer cells but the effects of its intake in cancer patients are still not clear. However, GLN is the main substrate for DNA and fatty acid synthesis. On the other hand, it reduces the oxidative stress by glutathione synthesis stimulation, stops the process of cancer cachexia, and nourishes the immunological system and the intestine epithelium, as well. The current paper deals with possible positive effects of GLN supplementation and conditions that should be fulfilled to obtain these effects. The analysis of GLN metabolism suggests that the separation of GLN and carbohydrates in the diet can minimize simultaneous supply of ATP (from glucose and NADPH2 (from glutamine to cancer cells. It should support to a larger extent the organism to fight against the cancer rather than the cancer cells. GLN cannot be considered the effective source of ATP for cancers with the impaired oxidative phosphorylation and pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition. GLN intake restores decreased levels of glutathione in the case of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; thus, it facilitates regeneration processes of the intestine epithelium and immunological system.

  14. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Thai Q.; Ishak Gabra, Mari B.; Lowman, Xazmin H.; Yang, Ying; Reid, Michael A.; Pan, Min; O’Connor, Timothy R.; Kong, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH) enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damag...

  15. Influence of glutamine on the effect of resistance exercise on cardiac ANP in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeu Rodrigues de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Various nutritional supplements (herbs, vitamins, and micronutrients improve responses and adaptations to resistance exercise. ANP is a heart hormone that contributes to fluid, electrolyte and blood pressure homeostasis through its natriuretic and vasodilative actions. In the present study, the adaptation of ANP in response to resistance exercise was investigated in rats supplemented with glutamine for five weeks. The results showed that supplementation with glutamine did not influence the number of ANP granules per atrial cardiocyte in sedentary animals. In exercised-trained rats, the number and diameter of the granules was significantly higher in comparison with the control group and in exercised animals supplemented with glutamine there was significant increase in the number and diameter of ANP granules compared with controls. Altogether, these data indicated that in resistance exercise rats, glutamine significantly enhances cardiac ANP thus implicating the beneficial effects of glutamine supplementation to the ANP system.

  16. Systematic analyses of glutamine and glutamate metabolisms across different cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuan; Du, Wei; Cao, Sha; Wu, Yue; Dong, Ning; Wang, Yan; Xu, Ying

    2017-11-07

    Glutamine and glutamate are known to play important roles in cancer biology. However, no detailed information is available in terms of their levels of involvement in various biological processes across different cancer types, whereas such knowledge could be critical for understanding the distinct characteristics of different cancer types. Our computational study aimed to examine the functional roles of glutamine and glutamate across different cancer types. We conducted a comparative analysis of gene expression data of cancer tissues versus normal control tissues of 11 cancer types to understand glutamine and glutamate metabolisms in cancer. Specifically, we developed a linear regression model to assess differential contributions by glutamine and/or glutamate to each of seven biological processes in cancer versus control tissues. While our computational predictions were consistent with some of the previous observations, multiple novel predictions were made: (1) glutamine is generally not involved in purine synthesis in cancer except for breast cancer, and is similarly not involved in pyridine synthesis except for kidney cancer; (2) glutamine is generally not involved in ATP production in cancer; (3) glutamine's contribution to nucleotide synthesis is minimal if any in cancer; (4) glutamine is not involved in asparagine synthesis in cancer except for bladder and lung cancers; and (5) glutamate does not contribute to serine synthesis except for bladder cancer. We comprehensively predicted the roles of glutamine and glutamate metabolisms in selected metabolic pathways in cancer tissues versus control tissues, which may lead to novel approaches to therapeutic development targeted at glutamine and/or glutamate metabolism. However, our predictions need further functional validation.

  17. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Verwer, R.W.H.; van Wamelen, D.J.; Qi, X.R.; Gao, S.F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Swaab, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the

  18. A Randomized controlled trial of enteral glutamine supplementation in very low birth weight infants: Plasma amino acid concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; van Elburg, Ruurd M.; Teerlink, T.; Lafeber, Harrie N.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Fetter, Willem P. F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Glutamine depletion has negative effects on the functional integrity of the gut and leads to immunosuppression. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion, as enteral nutrition is limited in the first weeks of life. Enteral glutamine supplementation may

  19. A randomized controlled trial of enteral glutamine supplementation in very low birth weight infants: plasma amino acid concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A.; van Elburg, R.M.; Teerlink, T.; Lafeber, H.N.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Fetter, W.P.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Glutamine depletion has negative effects on the functional integrity of the gut and leads to immunosuppression. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion, as enteral nutrition is limited in the first weeks of life. Enteral glutamine supplementation may

  20. Kinetic Properties of a Phosphate-Bond-Driven Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; SMID, EJ; KONINGS, WN

    In Streptococcus lactis ML3 and Streptococcus cremoris Wg2 the uptake of glutamate and glutamine is mediated by the same transport system, which has a 30-fold higher affinity for glutamine than for glutamate at pH 6.0. The apparent affinity constant for transport (KT) of glutamine is 2.5 ± 0.3 μM,

  1. Nitrogen Assimilation in Escherichia coli: Putting Molecular Data into a Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heeswijk, Wally C.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical network of intracellular processes revolving around central nitrogen metabolism in Escherichia coli. The hierarchy intertwines transport, metabolism, signaling leading to posttranslational modification, and transcription. The protein components of the network include an ammonium transporter (AmtB), a glutamine transporter (GlnHPQ), two ammonium assimilation pathways (glutamine synthetase [GS]-glutamate synthase [glutamine 2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase {GOGAT}] and glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH]), the two bifunctional enzymes adenylyl transferase/adenylyl-removing enzyme (ATase) and uridylyl transferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase), the two trimeric signal transduction proteins (GlnB and GlnK), the two-component regulatory system composed of the histidine protein kinase nitrogen regulator II (NRII) and the response nitrogen regulator I (NRI), three global transcriptional regulators called nitrogen assimilation control (Nac) protein, leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp), and cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (Crp), the glutaminases, and the nitrogen-phosphotransferase system. First, the structural and molecular knowledge on these proteins is reviewed. Thereafter, the activities of the components as they engage together in transport, metabolism, signal transduction, and transcription and their regulation are discussed. Next, old and new molecular data and physiological data are put into a common perspective on integral cellular functioning, especially with the aim of resolving counterintuitive or paradoxical processes featured in nitrogen assimilation. Finally, we articulate what still remains to be discovered and what general lessons can be learned from the vast amounts of data that are available now. PMID:24296575

  2. The glutamine synthetase of Trypanosoma cruzi is required for its resistance to ammonium accumulation and evasion of the parasitophorous vacuole during host-cell infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcell Crispim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, consumes glucose and amino acids depending on the environmental availability of each nutrient during its complex life cycle. For example, amino acids are the major energy and carbon sources in the intracellular stages of the T. cruzi parasite, but their consumption produces an accumulation of NH4+ in the environment, which is toxic. These parasites do not have a functional urea cycle to secrete excess nitrogen as low-toxicity waste. Glutamine synthetase (GS plays a central role in regulating the carbon/nitrogen balance in the metabolism of most living organisms. We show here that the gene TcGS from T. cruzi encodes a functional glutamine synthetase; it can complement a defect in the GLN1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and utilizes ATP, glutamate and ammonium to yield glutamine in vitro. Overall, its kinetic characteristics are similar to other eukaryotic enzymes, and it is dependent on divalent cations. Its cytosolic/mitochondrial localization was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Inhibition by Methionine sulfoximine revealed that GS activity is indispensable under excess ammonium conditions. Coincidently, its expression levels are maximal in the amastigote stage of the life cycle, when amino acids are preferably consumed, and NH4+ production is predictable. During host-cell invasion, TcGS is required for the parasite to escape from the parasitophorous vacuole, a process sine qua non for the parasite to replicate and establish infection in host cells. These results are the first to establish a link between the activity of a metabolic enzyme and the ability of a parasite to reach its intracellular niche to replicate and establish host-cell infection.

  3. A metabolic core model elucidates how enhanced utilization of glucose and glutamine, with enhanced glutamine-dependent lactate production, promotes cancer cell growth: The WarburQ effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Chiara; Colombo, Riccardo; Gaglio, Daniela; Mastroianni, Fabrizia; Pescini, Dario; Westerhoff, Hans Victor; Mauri, Giancarlo; Vanoni, Marco; Alberghina, Lilia

    2017-09-01

    Cancer cells share several metabolic traits, including aerobic production of lactate from glucose (Warburg effect), extensive glutamine utilization and impaired mitochondrial electron flow. It is still unclear how these metabolic rearrangements, which may involve different molecular events in different cells, contribute to a selective advantage for cancer cell proliferation. To ascertain which metabolic pathways are used to convert glucose and glutamine to balanced energy and biomass production, we performed systematic constraint-based simulations of a model of human central metabolism. Sampling of the feasible flux space allowed us to obtain a large number of randomly mutated cells simulated at different glutamine and glucose uptake rates. We observed that, in the limited subset of proliferating cells, most displayed fermentation of glucose to lactate in the presence of oxygen. At high utilization rates of glutamine, oxidative utilization of glucose was decreased, while the production of lactate from glutamine was enhanced. This emergent phenotype was observed only when the available carbon exceeded the amount that could be fully oxidized by the available oxygen. Under the latter conditions, standard Flux Balance Analysis indicated that: this metabolic pattern is optimal to maximize biomass and ATP production; it requires the activity of a branched TCA cycle, in which glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation cooperates to the production of lipids and proteins; it is sustained by a variety of redox-controlled metabolic reactions. In a K-ras transformed cell line we experimentally assessed glutamine-induced metabolic changes. We validated computational results through an extension of Flux Balance Analysis that allows prediction of metabolite variations. Taken together these findings offer new understanding of the logic of the metabolic reprogramming that underlies cancer cell growth.

  4. Glutamine supplementation in sick children: is it beneficial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Elise; Hankard, Régis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a critical appraisal of the literature on Glutamine (Gln) supplementation in various conditions or illnesses that affect children, from neonates to adolescents. First, a general overview of the proposed mechanisms for the beneficial effects of Gln is provided, and subsequently clinical studies are discussed. Despite safety, studies are conflicting, partly due to different effects of enteral and parenteral Gln supplementation. Further insufficient evidence is available on the benefits of Gln supplementation in pediatric patients. This includes premature infants, infants with gastrointestinal disease, children with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome, malnutrition/diarrhea, cancer, severe burns/trauma, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, methodological issues have been noted in some studies. Further mechanistic data is needed along with large randomized controlled trials in select populations of sick children, who may eventually benefit from supplemental Gln.

  5. Glutamine Supplementation in Sick Children: Is It Beneficial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Mok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to provide a critical appraisal of the literature on Glutamine (Gln supplementation in various conditions or illnesses that affect children, from neonates to adolescents. First, a general overview of the proposed mechanisms for the beneficial effects of Gln is provided, and subsequently clinical studies are discussed. Despite safety, studies are conflicting, partly due to different effects of enteral and parenteral Gln supplementation. Further insufficient evidence is available on the benefits of Gln supplementation in pediatric patients. This includes premature infants, infants with gastrointestinal disease, children with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome, malnutrition/diarrhea, cancer, severe burns/trauma, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, methodological issues have been noted in some studies. Further mechanistic data is needed along with large randomized controlled trials in select populations of sick children, who may eventually benefit from supplemental Gln.

  6. Impact of dietary glutamine on amino acid digestibility values and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nebonid F. Namroud

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... animal's requirements may not always guarantee performances in neonatal animals. In high crude ... nitrogen groups and carbon skeleton, Gln as a nitrogen and carbon transmitter causes rapid turnover of ... morphometric parameters of the intestine and essential AA digestibility in newly hatched chicks.

  7. Glutamine Transporters Are Targets of Multiple Oncogenic Signaling Pathways in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark A; Lin, Chenchu; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Dong, Jianrong; Shi, Yan; Tsouko, Efrosini; Mukhopadhyay, Ratna; Jasso, Diana; Dawood, Wajahat; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E

    2017-08-01

    Despite the known importance of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in prostate cancer, the processes downstream of AR that drive disease development and progression remain poorly understood. This knowledge gap has thus limited the ability to treat cancer. Here, it is demonstrated that androgens increase the metabolism of glutamine in prostate cancer cells. This metabolism was required for maximal cell growth under conditions of serum starvation. Mechanistically, AR signaling promoted glutamine metabolism by increasing the expression of the glutamine transporters SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 , genes commonly overexpressed in prostate cancer. Correspondingly, gene expression signatures of AR activity correlated with SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 mRNA levels in clinical cohorts. Interestingly, MYC, a canonical oncogene in prostate cancer and previously described master regulator of glutamine metabolism, was only a context-dependent regulator of SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 levels, being unable to regulate either transporter in PTEN wild-type cells. In contrast, rapamycin was able to decrease the androgen-mediated expression of SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 independent of PTEN status, indicating that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) was needed for maximal AR-mediated glutamine uptake and prostate cancer cell growth. Taken together, these data indicate that three well-established oncogenic drivers (AR, MYC, and mTOR) function by converging to collectively increase the expression of glutamine transporters, thereby promoting glutamine uptake and subsequent prostate cancer cell growth. Implications: AR, MYC, and mTOR converge to increase glutamine uptake and metabolism in prostate cancer through increasing the levels of glutamine transporters. Mol Cancer Res; 15(8); 1017-28. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Lack of functional benefit with glutamine versus placebo in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a randomized crossover trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Mok

    Full Text Available Oral glutamine decreases whole body protein breakdown in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. We evaluated the functional benefit of 4 months oral glutamine in DMD.30 ambulant DMD boys were included in this double-blind, randomized crossover trial with 2 intervention periods: glutamine (0.5 g/kg/d and placebo, 4 months each, separated by a 1-month wash-out, at 3 outpatient clinical investigation centers in France. Functional benefit was tested by comparing glutamine versus placebo on change in walking speed at 4 months. Secondary outcome measures were: 2-minute walk test, work, power, muscle mass (urinary creatinine, markers of myofibrillar protein breakdown (urinary 3-methyl-histidine/creatinine, serum creatine phospho-kinase, body composition (fat free mass, fat mass percentage, safety and oral nutrient intake. There was no improvement in the primary end point (walking speed or in secondary measures of muscle function (2-minute walk test, work, power in the glutamine group compared with placebo. However, subjects receiving glutamine or placebo showed no deterioration in functional measures over the course of the 9-month trial. No differences in muscle mass, markers of protein breakdown or serum creatine phosho-kinase were observed, except for a blunted increase in fat free mass in the glutamine group which led to a greater increase in fat mass percentage. Glutamine was safe and well-tolerated.This trial did not identify additional benefit of 4 months oral glutamine over placebo on muscle mass or function in ambulatory DMD boys. Although apparently safe, current data cannot support routine supplementation in this population as a whole, until further research proves otherwise.(ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00296621.

  9. Characteristics of glutamine transport in dog jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulus, N M; Abumrad, N N; Ghishan, F K

    1989-07-01

    The present study characterizes glutamine transport across brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from dog jejunum. The purity of these vesicles was demonstrated by a 20-fold enrichment of leucine aminopeptidase, a marker for BBM. Glutamine uptake was found to occur into an osmotically active space with no membrane binding and to exhibit temperature and pH dependence (optimal uptake at pH 7-7.5). Glutamine uptake was driven by an inwardly directed Na+ gradient with a distinct overshoot not observed under K+ gradient. Lithium could not substitute for Na+ as a stimulator of glutamine uptake. Na+-dependent glutamine uptake was not inhibited by methylaminoisobutyric acid, a typical substrate for system A, and was found to be electrogenic and saturable with a Km of 0.97 +/- 0.58 mM and a Vmax of 3.93 +/- 0.99 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1. A Na+-glutamine coupling ratio of 1:1 could be demonstrated by a plot of Hill transformation. Na+-independent glutamine uptake was found to be electroneutral and saturable with a Km of 3.70 +/- 0.66 mM and a Vmax of 2.70 +/- 1.55 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1. Inhibition studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-dependent as well as a Na+-independent carrier for glutamine uptake. We conclude that glutamine uptake across dog BBMV occurs via two transport systems: a Na+-dependent high-affinity system similar to the neutral brush-border system and a Na+-independent lower-affinity system similar to system L.

  10. Glutamine acts as a neuroprotectant against DNA damage, beta-amyloid and H2O2-induced stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Chen

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the human blood stream and is 'conditionally essential' to cells. Its intracellular levels are regulated both by the uptake of extracellular glutamine via specific transport systems and by its intracellular synthesis by glutamine synthetase (GS. Adding to the regulatory complexity, when extracellular glutamine is reduced GS protein levels rise. Unfortunately, this excess GS can be maladaptive. GS overexpression is neurotoxic especially if the cells are in a low-glutamine medium. Similarly, in low glutamine, the levels of multiple stress response proteins are reduced rendering cells hypersensitive to H(2O(2, zinc salts and DNA damage. These altered responses may have particular relevance to neurodegenerative diseases of aging. GS activity and glutamine levels are lower in the Alzheimer's disease (AD brain, and a fraction of AD hippocampal neurons have dramatically increased GS levels compared with control subjects. We validated the importance of these observations by showing that raising glutamine levels in the medium protects cultured neuronal cells against the amyloid peptide, Aβ. Further, a 10-day course of dietary glutamine supplementation reduced inflammation-induced neuronal cell cycle activation, tau phosphorylation and ATM-activation in two different mouse models of familial AD while raising the levels of two synaptic proteins, VAMP2 and synaptophysin. Together, our observations suggest that healthy neuronal cells require both intracellular and extracellular glutamine, and that the neuroprotective effects of glutamine supplementation may prove beneficial in the treatment of AD.

  11. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thai Q; Ishak Gabra, Mari B; Lowman, Xazmin H; Yang, Ying; Reid, Michael A; Pan, Min; O'Connor, Timothy R; Kong, Mei

    2017-11-01

    Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH) enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  12. The effect of glutamine infusion on the inflammatory response and HSP70 during human experimental endotoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    was associated with alterations in white blood cell and differential counts, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, IL-6, temperature and heart rate, but glutamine affected neither the endotoxin-induced change in these variables nor the expression of HSP70 in BMNCs. CONCLUSIONS: Endotoxin reduced plasma glutamine...... an infusion of alanine-glutamine at a rate of 0.025 g/(kg body weight x hour) or saline for 10 hours. After 2 hours, an intravenous bolus of Escherichia coli endotoxin (0.3 ng/kg) was administered. Blood samples were collected hourly for the following 8 hours. HSP70 protein content in isolated blood...

  13. Reductive glutamine metabolism is a function of the α-ketoglutarate to citrate ratio in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Bell, Eric L; Keibler, Mark A; Olenchock, Benjamin A; Mayers, Jared R; Wasylenko, Thomas M; Vokes, Natalie I; Guarente, Leonard; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Reductively metabolized glutamine is a major cellular carbon source for fatty acid synthesis during hypoxia or when mitochondrial respiration is impaired. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of what determines reductive metabolism is missing. Here we identify several cellular conditions where the α-ketoglutarate/citrate ratio is changed due to an altered acetyl-CoA to citrate conversion, and demonstrate that reductive glutamine metabolism is initiated in response to perturbations that result in an increase in the α-ketoglutarate/citrate ratio. Thus, targeting reductive glutamine conversion for a therapeutic benefit might require distinct modulations of metabolite concentrations rather than targeting the upstream signalling, which only indirectly affects the process.

  14. Reduced parietooccipital white matter glutamine measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in treated graves' disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Else Rubæk; Elberling, T.V.; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2008-01-01

    and a battery of biochemical, affective, and cognitive tests were used. RESULTS: Previously reported findings of reduced choline and myo-inositol in acute Graves' disease were confirmed and reversibility was demonstrated. Parieto-occipital white matter glutamine was and remained significantly reduced (P ....01). Acute phase parieto-occipital white matter total choline correlated significantly (r = -0.57; P glutamine (r = -0.52; P ....01) and parietooccipital white matter glutamate (r = -0.54; P glutamine in white matter, the decreasing glutamate in occipital gray matter...

  15. Possible role of glutamine synthetase in the NO signaling response in root nodules by contributing to the antioxidant defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Santos Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is emerging as an important regulatory player in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. The occurrence of NO during several steps of the symbiotic interaction suggests an important, but yet unknown, signaling role of this molecule for root nodule formation and functioning. The identification of the molecular targets of NO is key for the assembly of the signal transduction cascade that will ultimately help to unravel NO function. We have recently shown that the key nitrogen assimilatory enzyme Glutamine Synthetase (GS is a molecular target of NO in root nodules of Medicago truncatula, being post-translationally regulated by tyrosine nitration in relation to nitrogen fixation. In functional nodules of M. truncatula NO formation has been located in the bacteroid containing cells of the fixation zone, where the ammonium generated by bacterial nitrogenase is released to the plant cytosol and assimilated into the organic pools by plant GS. We propose that the NO-mediated GS post-translational inactivation is connected to nitrogenase inhibition induced by NO and is related to metabolite channeling to boost the nodule antioxidant defenses. Glutamate, a substrate for GS activity is also the precursor for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH, which is highly abundant in root nodules of several plant species and known to play a major role in the antioxidant defense participating in the ascorbate/GSH cycle. Existing evidence suggests that upon NO-mediated GS inhibition, glutamate could be channeled for the synthesis of GSH. According to this hypothesis, GS would be involved in the NO-signaling responses in root nodules and the NO-signaling events would meet the nodule metabolic pathways to provide an adaptive response to the inhibition of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by reactive nitrogen species (RNS.

  16. Modeling the role of covalent enzyme modification in Escherichia coli nitrogen metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, Philip B; Wingreen, Ned S

    2010-01-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. GS is principally active when the cell is experiencing nitrogen limitation, and its activity is regulated by a bicyclic covalent modification cascade. The advantages of this bicyclic-cascade architecture are poorly understood. We analyze a simple model of the GS cascade in comparison to other regulatory schemes and conclude that the bicyclic cascade is suboptimal for maintaining metabolic homeostasis of the free glutamine pool. Instead, we argue that the lag inherent in the covalent modification of GS slows the response to an ammonium shock and thereby allows GS to transiently detoxify the cell, while maintaining homeostasis over longer times

  17. [The structure and stability of the glutamine-binding protein from Escherichia coli and its complex with glutamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Ol'ga V; Kuznetsova, I M; Turoverov, K K; Scognamiglio, V; Staiano, M; D'Auria, S

    2005-01-01

    A study was made of the conformational changes in the Escherichia coli glutamine-binding potein (GlnBP) induced by GdnHCl, and of the effect of glutamine (Gln) binding on these processes. Intrinsic fluorescence, ANS emission fluorescence, and far- and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy were used. The obtained experimental data were interpreted, taking into the account results of the analysis of tryptophan and tyrosine residues microenvironments. This enabled us to explain the negligible contribution of Tyr residues to the bulk fluorescence of the native protein, the similarity of fluorescence characteristics of GlnBP and GlnBP/Gln, and an uncommon effect of the excess of fluorescence intensity at 365 nm (Trp emission) upon excitation at 297 nm compared to the excitation at 280 nm. The latter effect is explained by the spectral dependence of Trp 32 and Trp 220 contributions to protein absorption. The dependence of Trp fluorescence of protein on the excitation wavelength must be taken into account for the evaluation of Tyr residues contribution to the bulk fluorescence of protein, and in principle, it may also be used for the development of an approach to decomposition of multi-component protein fluorescence spectrum. The parametric presentation of fluorescence data showed that both GlnBP unfolding and GlnBP/Gln unfolding are three-step processes (N-->I1-->I2-->U), though in the case of the GlnBP/Gln complex these stages essentially overlap. Despite its complex character, GlnBP unfolding is completely reversible. In comparison with GlnBP, in the case of GlnBP/Gln the dramatic shift of N-->I1 process to higher GdHCl concentrations is shown.

  18. Deamidation reactions of protonated asparagine and glutamine investigated by ion spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempkes, Lisanne J M; Martens, Jonathan K; Grzetic, Josipa; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2016-02-28

    Deamidation of Asn and Gln residues is a primary route for spontaneous post-translational protein modification. Several structures have been proposed for the deamidation products of the protonated amino acids. Here we verify these structures by ion spectroscopy, as well as the structures of parallel and sequential fragmentation products. Infrared ion spectroscopy using the free electron laser FELIX has been applied to the reaction products from deamidation of protonated glutamine and asparagine in a tandem mass spectrometer. IR spectra were recorded over the 800-1900 cm(-1) spectral range by infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. Molecular structures of the fragment ions are derived from comparison of the experimental spectra with spectra predicted for different candidate structures by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. [AsnH(+) -NH3](+) is found to possess a 3-aminosuccinic anhydride structure protonated on the amino group. The dissociation reaction involving loss of H2O and CO forms a linear immonium ion. For [GlnH(+)-NH3](+), the N-terminal nitrogen acts as the nucleophile leading to an oxo-proline product ion structure. For [GlnH(+)-NH3](+), a sequential loss of [CO + H2O] is found, leading to a pyrolidone-like structure. We also confirm by IR spectroscopy that dehydration of protonated aspartic acid (AspH(+)) and glutamic acid (GluH(+)) leads to identical structures as to those found for the loss of NH3 from AsnH(+) and GlnH(+). The structure determined for AsnH(+) is in agreement with the suggested structure derived from measured and computed activation energies. IR ion spectra for the NH3 -loss product from GlnH(+) establish that a different reaction mechanism occurs for this species as compared to AsnH(+). For both amino acids, loss of NH3 occurs from the side chain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Studies towards the synthesis of ATP analogs as potential glutamine synthetase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salisu, S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In research directed at the development of adenine triphosphate (ATP) analogs as potential glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitors, adenine and allopurinol derivatives have been synthesized either as novel ATP analogs or as scaffolds...

  20. Lack of cardioprotection from metabolic support with glutamine or glutamate in a porcine coronary occlusion model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jens; Mæng, Michael; Mortensen, Ulrik

    2005-01-01

    vascular resistance, while glutamate preserved cardiac output during infusion. CONCLUSION: Substrate supplementation with the anaplerotic precursors glutamine and glutamate is ineffective as adjunctive therapy for severe myocardial ischemia. Beneficial effects documented in less complex experimental...

  1. Metformin decreases glucose oxidation and increases the dependency of prostate cancer cells on reductive glutamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Bell, Eric L; Keibler, Mark A; Davidson, Shawn M; Wirth, Gregory J; Fiske, Brian; Mayers, Jared R; Schwab, Matthias; Bellinger, Gary; Csibi, Alfredo; Patnaik, Akash; Blouin, Marie Jose; Cantley, Lewis C; Guarente, Leonard; Blenis, John; Pollak, Michael N; Olumi, Aria F; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-07-15

    Metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation, and epidemiology studies suggest an association with increased survival in patients with cancer taking metformin; however, the mechanism by which metformin improves cancer outcomes remains controversial. To explore how metformin might directly affect cancer cells, we analyzed how metformin altered the metabolism of prostate cancer cells and tumors. We found that metformin decreased glucose oxidation and increased dependency on reductive glutamine metabolism in both cancer cell lines and in a mouse model of prostate cancer. Inhibition of glutamine anaplerosis in the presence of metformin further attenuated proliferation, whereas increasing glutamine metabolism rescued the proliferative defect induced by metformin. These data suggest that interfering with glutamine may synergize with metformin to improve outcomes in patients with prostate cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  2. Effects of Standard and/or Glutamine Dipeptide and/or Omega-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition on Neutrophil Functions, Interleukin-8 Level and Length of ... Standard TPN and glutamine and lipid emulsion with omega 3 fatty acids were given to colorectal cancer patients and the effects of these to neutrophil ...

  3. Effect of carbohydrate supplementation on plasma glutamine during prolonged exercise and recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Saris, W H; Wagenmakers, A J

    1998-01-01

    . Eight well-trained subjects cycled at an alternating workload of 50 and 80% Wmax until exhaustion (59 to 140 min). During the exercise bout the subjects received either water (control) or a carbohydrate (CHO) drink (83 g CHO x l(-1), 2 ml x kg(-1) per kg body weight every 15 min). Plasma glutamine...... concentration appeared not to be affected by exercise, as a significant increase was only observed at some points in time during the control test. During recovery, however, plasma glutamine concentration decreased from 682+/-24 and 685+/-19 micromol x l(-1) at exhaustion to 552+/-19 and 534+/-12 micromol x l(-1......Muscle glycogen and glucose have been suggested to be carbon-chain precursors for glutamine synthesis in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate whether carbohydrate supplementation affects plasma glutamine and other amino acids during exercise and 7 h of recovery...

  4. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine......Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains...... but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia....

  5. Glutamine granule-supplemented enteral nutrition maintains immunological function in severely burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi; Yan, Hong; You, Zhongyi; Wang, Pei; Wang, Shiliang

    2006-08-01

    Glutamine is an important energy source for immune cells. It is a necessary nutrient for cell proliferation, and serves as specific fuel for lymphocytes, macrophages, and enterocytes when it is present in appropriate concentrations. The purpose of this clinical study was to observe the effects of enteral nutrition supplemented with glutamine granules on immunologic function in severely burned patients. Forty-eight severely burned patients (total burn surface area 30-75%, full thickness burn area 20-58%) who met the requirements of the protocol joined this double-blind randomized controlled clinical trail. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: burn control group (B group, 23 patients) and glutamine treated group (Gln group, 25 patients). There was isonitrogenous and isocaloric intake in both groups, Gln and B group patents were given glutamine granules or placebo (glycine) at 0.5 g/kgd for 14 days with oral feeding or tube feeding, respectively. The plasma level of glutamine and several indices of immunologic function including lymphocyte transformation ratio, neutrophil phagocytosis index (NPI), CD4/CD8 ratio, the content of immunoglobulin, complement C3, C4 and IL-2 levels were determined. Moreover, wound healing rate of burn area was observed and then hospital stay was recorded. The results showed significantly reduced plasma glutamine and damaged immunological function after severe burn Indices of cellular immunity function were remarkably decreased from normal controls. After taking glutamine granules for 14 days, plasma glutamine concentration was significantly higher in Gln group than that in B group (607.86+/-147.25 micromol/L versus 447.63+/-132.38 micromol/L, P0.05). In addition, wound healing was better and hospital stay days were reduced in Gln group (46.59+/-12.98 days versus 55.68+/-17.36 days, Pfeeding or tube feeding abate the degree of immunosuppression, improve immunological function especially cellular immunity function, ameliorate wound

  6. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass alters small intestine glutamine transport in the obese Zucker rat

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, Brynn S.; Meirelles, Katia; Meng, Qinghe; Pan, Ming; Cooney, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are caused by postsurgical changes in gastrointestinal anatomy affecting gut function. Glutamine is a critical gut nutrient implicated in regulating glucose metabolism as a substrate for intestinal gluconeogenesis. The present study examines the effects of obesity and RYGB on intestinal glutamine transport and metabolism. First, lean and obese Zucker rats (ZRs) were compared. Then the effects of RYGB and sham surgery with pair feeding (...

  7. Robustness in Escherichia coli Glutamate and Glutamine Synthesis Studied by a Kinetic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lodeiro, Aníbal; Melgarejo, Augusto

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic control of glutamine and glutamate synthesis from ammonia and oxoglutarate in Escherichia coli is tight and complex. In this work, the role of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) regulation in this control was studied. Both enzymes form a linear pathway, which can also have a cyclic topology if glutamate–oxoglutarate amino transferase (GOGAT) activity is included. We modelled the metabolic pathways in the linear or cyclic topologies using a coupled nonlinear...

  8. Glutamine protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by decreasing cisplatin accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Dong Jun; Kim, Jin Hyun; Jeong, Eun Young; Jung, Myeong Hee; Kim, Tae-Ho; Yang, Jung Ill; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Chung, Hye Jin; Chang, Se-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic drug but induces acute kidney injury (AKI). Cisplatin-induced AKI depends on several signaling pathways leading to apoptosis in tubular epithelial cells. Glutamine is a substrate for the synthesis of glutathione, the most abundant intracellular thiol and antioxidant, and plays an important role in protecting cells from apoptosis induced by different stimuli. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of glutamine on cisplatin-induced AKI. Rats ...

  9. Coupled effects of light and nitrogen source on the urea cycle and nitrogen metabolism over a diel cycle in the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Sara J; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-03-01

    Diatoms are photoautotrophic organisms capable of growing on a variety of inorganic and organic nitrogen sources. Discovery of a complete urea cycle in diatoms was surprising, as this pathway commonly functions in heterotrophic organisms to rid cells of waste nitrogen. To determine how the urea cycle is integrated into cellular nitrogen metabolism and energy management, the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was maintained in semi-continuous batch cultures on nitrate, ammonium, or urea as the sole nitrogen source, under a 16: 8 light: dark cycle and at light intensities that were low, saturating, or high for growth. Steady-state transcript levels were determined for genes encoding enzymes linked to the urea cycle, urea hydrolysis, glutamine synthesis, pyrimidine synthesis, photorespiration, and energy storage. Transcript abundances were significantly affected by nitrogen source, light intensity and a diel cycle. The impact of N source on differential transcript accumulation was most apparent under the highest light intensity. Models of cellular metabolism under high light were developed based on changes in transcript abundance and predicted enzyme localizations. We hypothesize that the urea cycle is integrated into nitrogen metabolism through its connection to glutamine and in the eventual production of urea. These findings have important implications for nitrogen flow in the cell over diel cycles at surface ocean irradiances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Urea and Ammonia Metabolism and the Control of Renal Nitrogen Excretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitch, William E.; Sands, Jeff M.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nitrogen metabolism primarily involves urea and ammonia metabolism, and is essential to normal health. Urea is the largest circulating pool of nitrogen, excluding nitrogen in circulating proteins, and its production changes in parallel to the degradation of dietary and endogenous proteins. In addition to serving as a way to excrete nitrogen, urea transport, mediated through specific urea transport proteins, mediates a central role in the urine concentrating mechanism. Renal ammonia excretion, although often considered only in the context of acid-base homeostasis, accounts for approximately 10% of total renal nitrogen excretion under basal conditions, but can increase substantially in a variety of clinical conditions. Because renal ammonia metabolism requires intrarenal ammoniagenesis from glutamine, changes in factors regulating renal ammonia metabolism can have important effects on glutamine in addition to nitrogen balance. This review covers aspects of protein metabolism and the control of the two major molecules involved in renal nitrogen excretion: urea and ammonia. Both urea and ammonia transport can be altered by glucocorticoids and hypokalemia, two conditions that also affect protein metabolism. Clinical conditions associated with altered urine concentrating ability or water homeostasis can result in changes in urea excretion and urea transporters. Clinical conditions associated with altered ammonia excretion can have important effects on nitrogen balance. PMID:25078422

  11. Cerebral glutamine concentration and lactate-pyruvate ratio in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, P.N.; Hauerberg, J.; Frederiksen, Hans-Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Hyperammonemia causes brain edema and high intracranial pressure (ICP) in acute liver failure (ALF) by accumulation of glutamine in brain. Since a high-level glutamine may compromise mitochondrial function, the aim of this study was to determine if the lactate-pyruvate ratio is associated...... with a rise in the glutamine concentration and ICP. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 13 patients with ALF (8F/5M; median age 46 (range 18-66) years) the cerebral extracellular concentrations of glutamine, lactate, and pyruvate were measured by in vivo brain microdialysis together with ICP and cerebral perfusion...... pressure (CPP). RESULTS: The cerebral glutamine concentration was 4,396 (1,011-9,712) microM, lactate 2.15 (1.1-4.45) mM, and pyruvate 101 (43-255) microM. The lactate-pyruvate ratio was 21 (16-40), ICP 20 (2-28) mmHg, and CPP 72 (56-115) mmHg. Cerebral glutamine concentration correlated with the lactate...

  12. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ren Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2 were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n=20 and control (normal saline, n=20 groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5 or to culture medium (control. Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p<0.05. In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53 and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR. L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5. More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells’ beating function at a low pH level.

  13. Assay of glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase using [1-14C]phosphoribosylpyrophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.R.; Idriss, S.D.; Willis, R.C.; Seegmiller, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Glutamine phosphoribosylpyrophosphate amidotransferase (EC 2.4.2.14) catalyzes the transfer of the amide group of glutamine to 5-phospho-α-D-ribose-1-pyrophosphate. It is the first enzyme committed to the synthesis of purines by the de novo pathway. Previous assays of enzyme activity have either measured the phosphoribosylpyrophosphate-dependent disappearance of radioactive glutamine or have linked this reaction to subsequent steps in the purine pathway. A new assay for activity of the enzyme by directly measuring the synthesis of the product of the reaction, 5-β-phosphoribosyl-1-amine, using [1- 14 C]phosphoribosylpyrophosphate as substrate is described. Substrate and product are separated by thin-layer chromatography and identified by autoradiography. Glutamine or ammonia may be used as substrates; the apparent K/sub m/ values of the human lymphoblast enzyme are 0.46 mM for glutamine and 0.71 mM for ammonia. GMP is a considerably more potent inhibitor of the human lymphoblast enzyme than is AMP; 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine inhibits only glutamine-dependent activity and has no effect on ammonia-dependent activity

  14. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  15. Pilot study with a glutamine-supplemented enteral formula in critically ill infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Eliana

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seriously ill infants often display protein-calorie malnutrition due to the metabolic demands of sepsis and respiratory failure. Glutamine has been classified as a conditionally essential amino acid, with special usefulness in critical patients. Immunomodulation, gut protection, and prevention of protein depletion are mentioned among its positive effects in such circumstances. With the intent of evaluating the tolerance and clinical impact of a glutamine supplement in seriously ill infants, a prospective randomized study was done with nine patients. Anthropometric and biochemical determinations were made, and length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU, in the hospital, and under artificial ventilation, and septic morbidity and mortality were tabulated. Infants in the treatment group (n=5 were enterally administered 0.3 g/kg of glutamine, whereas controls received 0.3 g/kg of casein during a standard period of five days. Septic complications occurred in 75% of the controls (3/4 versus 20% of the glutamine-treated group (1/5, p<=0.10, and two patients in the control group died of bacterial infections (50% vs. 0%, p<=0.10. Days in the ICU, in the hospital, and with ventilation numerically favored glutamine therapy, although without statistical significance. The supplements were usually well tolerated, and no patient required discontinuation of the program. The conclusion was that glutamine supplementation was safe and tended to be associated with less infectious morbidity and mortality in this high-risk population.

  16. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Spodenkiewicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism—congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition.

  17. Glutamine domain of the chimeric protein, CAD, that initiates pyrimidine biosynthesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.E.; Kim, H.; Evans, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthesis, the first step in mammalian de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, is catalyzed by a 240 kDa chimeric protein, CAD, that also has the aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydroorotase activities. The complex was found to have a separate glutaminase activity of 0.04 μmol/min/mg, that increased five fold in the presence of bicarbonate and ATP. To determine whether the glutaminase activity, which provides ammonia for carbamyl phosphate synthesis, is associated with a separate structural domain (GLN), CAD was subjected to controlled proteolysis with elastase. The glutaminase, glutamine and ammonia dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activities, as well as the partial reactions; carbamyl phosphate dependent ATP synthesis and bicarbonate dependent ATPase, were correlated with the concentration of the various proteolytic fragments that accumulated in the digest. While the glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase was rapidly inactivated, the glutaminase activity was found to be very resistant to proteolysis. The glutamine binding site of CAD was also specifically modified with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON). The modification was accompanied by a loss of both glutaminase and glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activities. Bicarbonate and ATP increased the rate of reaction of CAD with DON, while glutamine protected against inactivation. The stoichiometry of the reaction and the identity of the modified proteolytic fragments was determined using 14 C labelled DON

  18. Variation in amino acid content and its relationship to nitrogen content and growth rate in Ulva ohnoi (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Alex R; Mata, Leonardo; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the quantitative and qualitative changes in amino acids related to internal nitrogen content and growth rate of Ulva ohnoi, the supply of nitrogen to outdoor cultures of the seaweed was manipulated by simultaneously varying water nitrogen concentrations and renewal rate. Both internal nitrogen content and growth rate varied substantially, and the quantitative and qualitative changes in amino acids were described in the context of three internal nitrogen states: nitrogen-limited, metabolic, and luxury. The nitrogen limited state was defined by increases in all amino acids with increasing nitrogen content and growth up until 1.2% internal nitrogen. The metabolic nitrogen state was defined by increases in all amino acids with increasing internal nitrogen content up to 2.6%, with no increases in growth rate. Luxury state was defined by internal nitrogen content above 2.6%, which occurred only when nitrogen availability was high but growth rates were reduced. In this luxury circumstance, excess nitrogen was accumulated as free amino acids, in two phases. The first phase was distinguished by a small increase in the majority of amino acids up to ≈3.3% internal nitrogen, and the second by a large increase in glutamic acid, glutamine, and arginine up to 4.2% internal nitrogen. These results demonstrate that the relationship between internal nitrogen content and amino acid quality is dynamic but predictable, and could be used for the selective culture of seaweeds. © 2013 Phycological Society of America.

  19. Glutamine protection in an experimental model of acetaminophen nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovedan, Marco A; Molinas, Sara M; Pisani, Gerardo B; Monasterolo, Liliana A; Trumper, Laura

    2018-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely prescribed analgesic and antipyretic drug. In the present work, we studied the effects of glutamine (Gln) in an in vivo model of APAP-induced nephrotoxicity in male Wistar rats. Renal function, histological characteristics, and Na + ,K + -ATPase cortical abundance and distribution were analyzed. The appearance of HSP70 and actin in urine was also evaluated. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in cortical tissue was measured as an index of the inflammatory response. Gln administration 30 min before APAP protected from the renal functional and histological damage promoted by APAP. Rats that received the dual treatment Gln and APAP (Gln/APAP) showed the same level of Na + ,K + -ATPase cortical induction as APAP-treated animals, but the enzyme maintained its normal basolateral localization. HSP70 abundance was increased up to the same level in the Gln, APAP, and Gln/APAP groups. Urinary HSP70 and actin were detected only in the APAP-treated animals, reinforcing the protection of renal tubular integrity afforded by the Gln pretreatment. Gln pretreatment also protected from the increment in MPO activity promoted by APAP. Our results support the idea that Gln pretreatment could be a therapeutic option to prevent APAP-induced renal injury.

  20. Plasma glutamine levels before cardiac surgery are related to post-surgery infections; an observational study

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    Hanneke Buter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A low plasma glutamine level was found in 34% of patients after elective cardiothoracic surgery. This could be a result of the inflammation caused by surgical stress or the use of extracorporeal circulation (ECC. But it is also possible that plasma glutamine levels were already lowered before surgery and reflect an impaired metabolic state and a higher likelihood to develop complications. In the present study plasma glutamine levels were measured before and after cardiac surgery and we questioned whether there is a relation between plasma glutamine levels and duration of ECC and the occurrence of postoperative infections. Methods We performed a single-centre prospective, observational study in a closed-format, 20-bed, mixed ICU in a tertiary teaching hospital. We included consecutive patients after elective cardiac surgery with use of extracorporeal circulation. Blood samples were collected on the day prior to surgery and at admission on the ICU. The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (Regional Review Committee Patient-related Research, Medical Centre Leeuwarden, nWMO 115, April 28th 2015. Results Ninety patients were included. Pre-operative plasma glutamine level was 0.42 ± 0.10 mmol/l and post-operative 0.38 ± 0.09 mmol/l (p < 0.001. There was no relation between duration of extracorporeal circulation or aortic occlusion time and changes in plasma glutamine levels. A logistic regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the presence of a positive culture during the post-operative course and pre-operative plasma glutamine levels (p = 0.04. Conclusion Plasma glutamine levels are significantly lower just after cardiac surgery compared to pre-operative levels. We did not find a relation between the decrease in plasma glutamine levels and the duration of extracorporeal circulation or aortic clamp time. There was a correlation between pre-operative plasma glutamine levels

  1. The effect of free glutamine and peptide ingestion on the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Saris, W H; van de Schoor, P A

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated previous claims that ingestion of glutamine and of protein-carbohydrate mixtures may increase the rate of glycogen resynthesis following intense exercise. Eight trained subjects were studied during 3 h of recovery while consuming one of four drinks in random order....... Drinks were ingested in three 500 ml boluses, immediately after exercise and then after 1 and 2 h of recovery. Each bolus of the control drink contained 0.8 g x kg(-1) body weight of glucose. The other drinks contained the same amount of glucose and 0.3 g x kg(-1) body weight of 1) glutamine, 2) a wheat...... hydrolysate (26% glutamine) and 3) a whey hydrolysate (6.6% glutamine). Plasma glutamine, decreased by approximately 20% during recovery with ingestion of the control drink, no changes with ingestion of the protein hydrolysates drinks, and a 2-fold increase with ingestion of the free glutamine drinks...

  2. Effects of L-glutamine supplementation on maternal and fetal hemodynamics in gestating ewes exposed to alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Onkar B.; Ramadoss, Jayanth; Hankins, Gary D.; Wu, Guoyao; Washburn, Shannon E.

    2014-01-01

    Not much is known about effects of gestational alcohol exposure on maternal and fetal cardiovascular adaptations. This study determined whether maternal binge alcohol exposure and L-glutamine supplementation could affect maternal-fetal hemodynamics and fetal regional brain blood flow during the brain growth spurt period. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to one of four groups: saline control, alcohol (1.75–2.5 g/kg body weight), glutamine (100 mg/kg body weight) or alcohol + glutamine. A ...

  3. GLUTAMIN MEMPERCEPAT WAKTU PEMULIHAN JUMLAH SEL LIMFOSIT LIEN SETELAH AKTIVITAS FISIK MAKSIMAL PADA MENCIT (GLUTAMINE SHORTENS RECOVERY TIME OF LIEN LYMPHOCYTES AFTER EXCESSIVE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Jawi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The immunologic? system? of the body requires? suitable recovery time after? excessive physical? activity. The recovery? time of spleen lymphocytes after? excessive? physical activity? in one? investigation was? 3? days. The? aim? of this? research is to identify?the role of? glutamine? in shortening? the recovery time of? spleen? lymphocytes? after?excessive physical activity. The? study? was conducted? on? 70? adults? Balb/c mice which? were? divided? into? 7? groups, with? a randomized control? group post-test? only design. In this? study? an observation? was made on? spleen? lymphocytes? of control, after? excessive? physical activity(in the the? form of swimming? until? near? drowning with glutamine,? without glutamine ?and? after? the? recovery time of 1 and 2 days? of? each of? the 10 mice. Spleen? lymphocytes? were? counted in spleen preparation by mikroskop. The data obtained were tested? by? one way Anova. The findings? showed? that the number of spleen? lymphocytes significantly decrease after? excessive? physical activity?? in the?glutamine? and? non glutamine groups ( p < 0,05.The number of spleen? lymphocytes? was? not different as compered to control group or returned? to normal after recovery? time? of 1? day? in? the? glutamine group (p > 0,05 .?In the nonglutamine group the number of spleen lymphocytes was different from control group until 2 days (p<0,05 . From this finding it can be concluded that glutamine? shortens the recovery time of spleen lymphocytes? after? excessive? physical activity in mice.

  4. Glutamine reduces postprandial glycemia and augments the glucagon-like peptide-1 response in type 2 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samocha-Bonet, Dorit; Wong, Olivia; Synnott, Emma-Leigh

    2011-01-01

    Impaired glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) secretion or response may contribute to ineffective insulin release in type 2 diabetes. The conditionally essential amino acid glutamine stimulates GLP-1 secretion in vitro and in vivo. In a randomized, crossover study, we evaluated the effect of oral...... glutamine, with or without sitagliptin (SIT), on postprandial glycemia and GLP-1 concentration in 15 type 2 diabetes patients (glycated hemoglobin 6.5 ± 0.6%). Participants ingested a low-fat meal (5% fat) after receiving either water (control), 30 g l-glutamine (Gln-30), 15 g L-glutamine (Gln-15), 100 mg...... concentration and limiting postprandial glycemia in type 2 diabetes....

  5. The MYC mRNA 3'-UTR couples RNA polymerase II function to glutamine and ribonucleotide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejure, Francesca R; Royla, Nadine; Herold, Steffi; Kalb, Jacqueline; Walz, Susanne; Ade, Carsten P; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Vanselow, Jens T; Schlosser, Andreas; Wolf, Elmar; Kempa, Stefan; Eilers, Martin

    2017-07-03

    Deregulated expression of MYC enhances glutamine utilization and renders cell survival dependent on glutamine, inducing "glutamine addiction". Surprisingly, colon cancer cells that express high levels of MYC due to WNT pathway mutations are not glutamine-addicted but undergo a reversible cell cycle arrest upon glutamine deprivation. We show here that glutamine deprivation suppresses translation of endogenous MYC via the 3'-UTR of the MYC mRNA, enabling escape from apoptosis. This regulation is mediated by glutamine-dependent changes in adenosine-nucleotide levels. Glutamine deprivation causes a global reduction in promoter association of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and slows transcriptional elongation. While activation of MYC restores binding of MYC and RNAPII function on most promoters, restoration of elongation is imperfect and activation of MYC in the absence of glutamine causes stalling of RNAPII on multiple genes, correlating with R-loop formation. Stalling of RNAPII and R-loop formation can cause DNA damage, arguing that the MYC 3'-UTR is critical for maintaining genome stability when ribonucleotide levels are low. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Glutamine effects on heat shock protein 70 and interleukines 6 and 10: Randomized trial of glutamine supplementation versus standard parenteral nutrition in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Iolanda; Balaguer, Mònica; Esteban, M Esther; Cambra, Francisco José; Felipe, Aida; Hernández, Lluïsa; Alsina, Laia; Molero, Marta; Villaronga, Miquel; Esteban, Elisabeth

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether glutamine (Gln) supplementation would have a role modifying both the oxidative stress and the inflammatory response of critically ill children. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, interventional clinical trial. Selection criteria were children requiring parenteral nutrition for at least 5 days diagnosed with severe sepsis or post major surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to standard parenteral nutrition (SPN, 49 subjects) or standard parenteral nutrition with glutamine supplementation (SPN + Gln, 49 subjects). Glutamine levels failed to show statistical differences between groups. At day 5, patients in the SPN + Gln group had significantly higher levels of HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) as compared with the SPN group (68.6 vs 5.4, p = 0.014). In both groups, IL-6 (interleukine 6) levels showed a remarkable descent from baseline and day 2 (SPN: 42.24 vs 9.39, p < 0.001; SPN + Gln: 35.20 vs 13.80, p < 0.001) but only the treatment group showed a statistically significant decrease between day 2 and day 5 (13.80 vs 10.55, p = 0.013). Levels of IL-10 (interleukine 10) did not vary among visits except in the SPN between baseline and day 2 (9.55 vs 5.356, p < 0.001). At the end of the study, no significant differences between groups for PICU and hospital stay were observed. No adverse events were detected in any group. Glutamine supplementation in critically-ill children contributed to maintain high HSP-70 levels for longer. Glutamine supplementation had no influence on IL-10 and failed to show a significant reduction of IL-6 levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Fragmentation reactions of protonated peptides containing glutamine or glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Alex G

    2003-02-01

    A variety of protonated dipeptides and tripeptides containing glutamic acid or glutamine were prepared by electrospray ionization or by fast atom bombardment ionization and their fragmentation pathways elucidated using metastable ion studies, energy-resolved mass spectrometry and triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(3)) experiments. Additional mechanistic information was obtained by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium. Protonated H-Gln-Gly-OH fragments by loss of NH(3) and loss of H(2)O in metastable ion fragmentation; under collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions loss of H-Gly-OH + CO from the [MH - NH(3)](+) ion forms the base peak C(4)H(6)NO(+) (m/z 84). Protonated dipeptides with an alpha-linkage, H-Glu-Xxx-OH, are characterized by elimination of H(2)O and by elimination of H-Xxx-OH plus CO to form the glutamic acid immonium ion of m/z 102. By contrast, protonated dipeptides with a gamma-linkage, H-Glu(Xxx-OH)-OH, do not show elimination of H(2)O or formation of m/z 102 but rather show elimination of NH(3), particularly in metastable ion fragmentation, and elimination of H-Xxx-OH to form m/z 130. Both the alpha- and gamma-dipeptides show formation of [H-Xxx-OH]H(+), with this reaction channel increasing in importance as the proton affinity (PA) of H-Xxx-OH increases. The characteristic loss of H(2)O and formation of m/z 102 are observed for the protonated alpha-tripeptide H-Glu-Gly-Phe-OH whereas the protonated gamma-tripeptide H-Glu(Gly-Gly-OH)-OH shows loss of NH(3) and formation of m/z 130 as observed for dipeptides with the gamma-linkage. Both tripeptides show abundant formation of the y(2)'' ion under CID conditions, presumably because a stable anhydride neutral structure can be formed. Under metastable ion conditions protonated dipeptides of structure H-Xxx-Glu-OH show abundant elimination of H(2)O whereas those of structure H-Xxx-Gln-OH show abundant elimination of NH(3). The importance of these reaction channels is much reduced under CID

  8. Glutamine protects intestinal calcium absorption against oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, Luciana; Díaz de Barboza, Gabriela; Pérez, Adriana; Benedetto, Mercedes; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether glutamine (GLN) could block the inhibition of the intestinal Ca 2+ absorption caused by menadione (MEN), and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To do this, one-month old chicks were divided in four groups: 1) controls, 2) MEN treated, 3) GLN treated and 4) GLN treated before or after MEN treatment. Intestinal Ca 2+ absorption as well as protein expression of molecules involved in the transcellular Ca 2+ pathway were determined. Glutathione (GSH) and superoxide anion and activity of enzymes of the antioxidant system were evaluated. Apoptosis was measured by the TUNEL technique, the expression of FAS and FASL and the caspase-3 activity. A previous dose of 0.5gGLN/kg of b.w. was necessary to show its protector effect and a dose of 1g/kg of b.w. could restore the intestinal Ca 2+ absorption after MEN treatment. GLN alone did not modify the protein expression of calbindin D 28k and plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase, but blocked the inhibitory effect of the quinone. GLN avoided changes in the intestinal redox state provoked by MEN such as a decrease in the GSH content, and increases in the superoxide anion and in the SOD and CAT activities. GLN abrogated apoptotic effects caused by MEN in intestinal mucosa, as indicated by the reduction of TUNEL (+) cells and the FAS/FASL/caspase-3 pathway. In conclusion, GLN could be an oral nutritional supplement to normalize the redox state and the proliferation/cell death ratio in the small intestine improving the intestinal Ca 2+ absorption altered by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Asparagine and glutamine ladders promote cross-species prion conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Timothy D; Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Jiang, Lin; Rodriguez, José A; Alderson, Nazilla; Eisenberg, David S; Sigurdson, Christina J

    2017-11-17

    Prion transmission between species is governed in part by primary sequence similarity between the infectious prion aggregate, PrP Sc , and the cellular prion protein of the host, PrP C A puzzling feature of prion formation is that certain PrP C sequences, such as that of bank vole, can be converted by a remarkably broad array of different mammalian prions, whereas others, such as rabbit, show robust resistance to cross-species prion conversion. To examine the structural determinants that confer susceptibility or resistance to prion conversion, we systematically tested over 40 PrP C variants of susceptible and resistant PrP C sequences in a prion conversion assay. Five key residue positions markedly impacted prion conversion, four of which were in steric zipper segments where side chains from amino acids tightly interdigitate in a dry interface. Strikingly, all five residue substitutions modulating prion conversion involved the gain or loss of an asparagine or glutamine residue. For two of the four positions, Asn and Gln residues were not interchangeable, revealing a strict requirement for either an Asn or Gln residue. Bank voles have a high number of Asn and Gln residues and a high Asn:Gln ratio. These findings suggest that a high number of Asn and Gln residues at specific positions may stabilize β-sheets and lower the energy barrier for cross-species prion transmission, potentially because of hydrogen bond networks from side chain amides forming extended Asn/Gln ladders. These data also suggest that multiple PrP C segments containing Asn/Gln residues may act in concert along a replicative interface to promote prion conversion. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Latent KSHV Infected Endothelial Cells Are Glutamine Addicted and Require Glutaminolysis for Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Sanchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS. KSHV establishes a predominantly latent infection in the main KS tumor cell type, the spindle cell, which is of endothelial cell origin. KSHV requires the induction of multiple metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis, for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells. Here we demonstrate that latent KSHV infection leads to increased levels of intracellular glutamine and enhanced glutamine uptake. Depletion of glutamine from the culture media leads to a significant increase in apoptotic cell death in latently infected endothelial cells, but not in their mock-infected counterparts. In cancer cells, glutamine is often required for glutaminolysis to provide intermediates for the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA cycle and support for the production of biosynthetic and bioenergetic precursors. In the absence of glutamine, the TCA cycle intermediates alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG and pyruvate prevent the death of latently infected cells. Targeted drug inhibition of glutaminolysis also induces increased cell death in latently infected cells. KSHV infection of endothelial cells induces protein expression of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5. Chemical inhibition of SLC1A5, or knockdown by siRNA, leads to similar cell death rates as glutamine deprivation and, similarly, can be rescued by αKG. KSHV also induces expression of the heterodimeric transcription factors c-Myc-Max and related heterodimer MondoA-Mlx. Knockdown of MondoA inhibits expression of both Mlx and SLC1A5 and induces a significant increase in cell death of only cells latently infected with KSHV, again, fully rescued by the supplementation of αKG. Therefore, during latent infection of endothelial cells, KSHV activates and requires the Myc/MondoA-network to upregulate the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, leading to increased glutamine uptake for glutaminolysis. These findings

  11. 13C isotope-assisted methods for quantifying glutamine metabolism in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Ahn, Woo Suk; Gameiro, Paulo A; Keibler, Mark A; Zhang, Zhe; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Glutamine has recently emerged as a key substrate to support cancer cell proliferation, and the quantification of its metabolic flux is essential to understand the mechanisms by which this amino acid participates in the metabolic rewiring that sustains the survival and growth of neoplastic cells. Glutamine metabolism involves two major routes, glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation, both of which begin with the deamination of glutamine to glutamate and the conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate. In glutaminolysis, α-ketoglutarate is oxidized via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and decarboxylated to pyruvate. In reductive carboxylation, α-ketoglutarate is reductively converted into isocitrate, which is isomerized to citrate to supply acetyl-CoA for de novo lipogenesis. Here, we describe methods to quantify the metabolic flux of glutamine through these two routes, as well as the contribution of glutamine to lipid synthesis. Examples of how these methods can be applied to study metabolic pathways of oncological relevance are provided. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of butyrate or glutamine in enema solution reduces inflammation and fibrosis in experimental diversion colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Rodrigo Goulart; Esposito, Christiano Costa; Müller, Lucas C M; Castelo-Branco, Morgana T L; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Chagas, Vera Lucia A; de Souza, Heitor Siffert P; Schanaider, Alberto

    2012-08-28

    To investigate whether butyrate or glutamine enemas could diminish inflammation in experimental diversion colitis. Wistar specific pathogen-free rats were submitted to a Hartmann's end colostomy and treated with enemas containing glutamine, butyrate, or saline. Enemas were administered twice a week in the excluded segment of the colon from 4 to 12 wk after the surgical procedure. Follow-up colonoscopy was performed every 4 wk for 12 wk. The effect of treatment was evaluated using video-endoscopic and histologic scores and measuring interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor beta production in organ cultures by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Colonoscopies of the diverted segment showed mucosa with hyperemia, increased number of vessels, bleeding and mucus discharge. Treatment with either glutamine or butyrate induced significant reductions in both colonoscopic (P < 0.02) and histological scores (P < 0.01) and restored the densities of collagen fibers in tissue (P = 0.015; P = 0.001), the number of goblet cells (P = 0.021; P = 0.029), and the rate of apoptosis within the epithelium (P = 0.043; P = 0.011) to normal values. The high levels of cytokines in colon explants from rats with diversion colitis significantly decreased to normal values after treatment with butyrate or glutamine. The improvement of experimental diversion colitis following glutamine or butyrate enemas highlights the importance of specific luminal nutrients in the homeostasis of the colonic mucosa and supports their utilization for the treatment of human diversion colitis.

  13. Dietary glutamine supplementation affects macrophage function, hematopoiesis and nutritional status in early weaned mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Borelli, Primavera; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; de Oliveira Pires, Ivanir Santana; Tirapegui, Julio

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the effect that early weaning associated with the ingestion of either a glutamine-free or supplemented diet has on the functioning of peritoneal macrophages, hematopoiesis and nutritional status of mice. Swiss Webster mice were early weaned on their 14th day of life and distributed to two groups, being fed either a glutamine-free diet (-GLN) or a glutamine-supplemented diet (+GLN). Animals belonging to a control group (CON) were weaned on their 21st day of life. The -GLN and +GLN groups had a lower lean body mass, carcass protein and ash content, plasma glutamine concentration and lymphocyte counts both in the peripheral blood and bone marrow when compared to the CON group (Psupplementation with glutamine reversed both the lower concentrations of protein and DNA in the muscle and liver, as well as the reduced capacity of spreading and synthesizing nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 in cultures of peritoneal macrophages obtained from the -GLN group (Psupplemented diet cannot substitute maternal milk in respect to immunological and metabolic parameters.

  14. Glutamine Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Türkay Aydoğmuş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a form of nosocomial pneumonia that increases patient morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Glutamine preserves the intestinal mucosal structure, increases immune function, and reduces harmful changes in gut permeability in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN. We hypothesized that TPN supplemented by glutamine might prevent the development of VAP in patients on mechanical ventilator support in the intensive care unit (ICU. Material and Methods: With the approval of the ethics committee and informed consent from relatives, 60 patients who were followed in the ICU with mechanical ventilator support were included in our study. Patients were divided into three groups. The first group received enteral nutrition (n=20, and the second was prescribed TPN (n=20 while the third group was given glutamine-supplemented TPN (n=20. C-reactive protein (CRP, sedimentation rate, body temperature, development of purulent secretions, increase in the amount of secretions, changes in the characteristics of secretions and an increase in requirement of deep tracheal aspiration were monitored for seven days by daily examination and radiographs. Results: No statistically significant difference was found among groups in terms of development of VAP (p=0.622. Conclusion: Although VAP developed at a lower rate in the glutamine-supplemented TPN group, no statistically significant difference was found among any of the groups. Glutamine-supplemented TPN may have no superiority over unsupplemented enteral and TPN in preventing VAP.

  15. Glutamine supplemented parenteral nutrition to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğmuş, Meltem Türkay; Tomak, Yakup; Tekin, Murat; Katı, Ismail; Hüseyinoğlu, Urfettin

    2012-12-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a form of nosocomial pneumonia that increases patient morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Glutamine preserves the intestinal mucosal structure, increases immune function, and reduces harmful changes in gut permeability in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). We hypothesized that TPN supplemented by glutamine might prevent the development of VAP in patients on mechanical ventilator support in the intensive care unit (ICU). With the approval of the ethics committee and informed consent from relatives, 60 patients who were followed in the ICU with mechanical ventilator support were included in our study. Patients were divided into three groups. The first group received enteral nutrition (n=20), and the second was prescribed TPN (n=20) while the third group was given glutamine-supplemented TPN (n=20). C-reactive protein (CRP), sedimentation rate, body temperature, development of purulent secretions, increase in the amount of secretions, changes in the characteristics of secretions and an increase in requirement of deep tracheal aspiration were monitored for seven days by daily examination and radiographs. No statistically significant difference was found among groups in terms of development of VAP (p=0.622). Although VAP developed at a lower rate in the glutamine-supplemented TPN group, no statistically significant difference was found among any of the groups. Glutamine-supplemented TPN may have no superiority over unsupplemented enteral and TPN in preventing VAP.

  16. Oncogenic K-Ras decouples glucose and glutamine metabolism to support cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglio, Daniela; Metallo, Christian M; Gameiro, Paulo A; Hiller, Karsten; Danna, Lara Sala; Balestrieri, Chiara; Alberghina, Lilia; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando

    2011-08-16

    Oncogenes such as K-ras mediate cellular and metabolic transformation during tumorigenesis. To analyze K-Ras-dependent metabolic alterations, we employed ¹³C metabolic flux analysis (MFA), non-targeted tracer fate detection (NTFD) of ¹⁵N-labeled glutamine, and transcriptomic profiling in mouse fibroblast and human carcinoma cell lines. Stable isotope-labeled glucose and glutamine tracers and computational determination of intracellular fluxes indicated that cells expressing oncogenic K-Ras exhibited enhanced glycolytic activity, decreased oxidative flux through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic synthesis. Surprisingly, a non-canonical labeling of TCA cycle-associated metabolites was detected in both transformed cell lines. Transcriptional profiling detected elevated expression of several genes associated with glycolysis, glutamine metabolism, and nucleotide biosynthesis upon transformation with oncogenic K-Ras. Chemical perturbation of enzymes along these pathways further supports the decoupling of glycolysis and TCA metabolism, with glutamine supplying increased carbon to drive the TCA cycle. These results provide evidence for a role of oncogenic K-Ras in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells.

  17. Response to Dietary Supplementation of Glutamine in Broiler Chickens Subjected to Transportation Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid SHAKERI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine effects of glutamine supplementation on performance and blood parameters including Hsp70 and acute phase protein when chicken were subjected to transportation stress. A total of four hundred day-old-male cobb-500 chicks were obtained directly from a local hatchery. The chicks were allotted to two groups as: immediate placement (1 hour after hatching with access to feed and water and placement after 24h transportation without access to feed and water. The experiment consisted of a factorial arrangement of 2 different diets and 2 different time of placement. Chicks from each placement group were fed either basal diet or basal diet + 1% glutamine from 1 to 21 days of age. The results indicated that dietary glutamine improved the body weight gain and feed conversion ratio significantly when chicks were subjected to delayed or immediate placement. In conclusion, supplementing chicken with glutamine in diet can reduce negative effects of delayed access to feed and water during transportation. Moreover, APP concentration and HSP70 level were positively affected when chicks supplemented with glutamine in the diet.

  18. Effect of parenteral glutamine supplementation on plasma amino acid concentrations in extremely low-birth-weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Brenda B; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Stoll, Barbara J; Koch, Matthew A; Wright, Linda L; Oh, William; Papile, Lu-Ann; Bauer, Charles R; Carlo, Waldemar A; Donovan, Edward F; Fanaroff, Avroy A; Korones, Sheldon B; Laptook, Abbot R; Shankaran, Seetha; Stevenson, David K; Tyson, Jon E; Lemons, James A

    2003-03-01

    Glutamine is one of the most abundant amino acids in both plasma and human milk and may be conditionally essential in premature infants. However, glutamine is not provided by standard intravenous amino acid solutions. We assessed the effect of parenteral glutamine supplementation on plasma amino acid concentrations in extremely low-birth-weight infants receiving parenteral nutrition (PN). A total of 141 infants with birth weights of 401-1000 g were randomly assigned to receive a standard intravenous amino acid solution that did not contain glutamine or an isonitrogenous amino acid solution with 20% of the total amino acids as glutamine. Blood samples were obtained just before initiation of study PN and again after the infants had received study PN (mean intake: 2.3 +/- 1.0 g amino acids x kg(-1) x d(-1)) for approximately 10 d. Infants randomly assigned to receive glutamine had mean plasma glutamine concentrations that increased significantly and were approximately 30% higher than those in the control group in response to PN (425 +/- 182 and 332 +/- 148 micromol/L for the glutamine and control groups, respectively). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the relative change in plasma glutamate concentration between the baseline and PN samples. In both groups, there were significant decreases in plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine between the baseline and PN samples; the decrease in tyrosine was greater in the group that received glutamine. In extremely low-birth-weight infants, parenteral glutamine supplementation can increase plasma glutamine concentrations without apparent biochemical risk. Currently available amino acid solutions are likely to be suboptimal in their supply of phenylalanine, tyrosine, or both for these infants.

  19. Regulation of stem-like cancer cells by glutamine through β-catenin pathway mediated by redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jianwei; Liu, Pan-Pan; Hou, Guoxin; Shao, Jiajia; Yang, Jing; Liu, Kaiyan; Lu, Wenhua; Wen, Shijun; Hu, Yumin; Huang, Peng

    2017-02-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to play an important role in tumor recurrence and drug resistance, and present a major challenge in cancer therapy. The tumor microenvironment such as growth factors, nutrients and oxygen affect CSC generation and proliferation by providing the necessary energy sources and growth signals. The side population (SP) analysis has been used to detect the stem-like cancer cell populations based on their high expression of ABCG2 that exports Hoechst-33342 and certain cytotoxic drugs from the cells. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of a main nutrient molecule, glutamine, on SP cells and the possible underlying mechanism(s). Biochemical assays and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the effect of glutamine on stem-like side population cells in vitro. Molecular analyses including RNAi interfering, qRT-PCR, and immunoblotting were employed to investigate the molecular signaling in response to glutamine deprivation and its influence on tumor formation capacity in vivo. We show that glutamine supports the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype by promoting glutathione synthesis and thus maintaining redox balance for SP cells. A deprivation of glutamine in the culture medium significantly reduced the proportion of SP cells. L-asparaginase, an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of asparagine and glutamine to aspartic acid and glutamate, respectively, mimics the effect of glutamine withdrawal and also diminished the proportion of SP cells. Mechanistically, glutamine deprivation increases intracellular ROS levels, leading to down-regulation of the β-catenin pathway. Glutamine plays a significant role in maintaining the stemness of cancer cells by a redox-mediated mechanism mediated by β-catenin. Inhibition of glutamine metabolism or deprivation of glutamine by L-asparaginase may be a new strategy to eliminate CSCs and overcome drug resistance.

  20. Effects of Supplemental Glutamine on Growth Performance, Plasma Parameters and LPS-induced Immune Response of Weaned Barrows after Castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Hsu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of supplemental glutamine on growth performance, plasma parameters and LPS-induced immune response of weaned barrows after castration. In experiment 1, forty-eight weaned male piglets were used and fed maize and soybean meal diets supplemented with 0 (Control or 2% L-Gln (Gln+ for 25 days. The results indicated that the Gln+ group tended to increase average daily gain compared to control in stages of days 7 to 14 and 0 to 25. The Gln+ had significantly better feed efficiency than the control group did during days 14 to 25 and 0 to 25. The plasma blood urea nitrogen and alkaline phosphatase contents of Gln+ group were higher than those of the control group on day 14 post-weaning. In experiment 2, sixteen weaned male piglets were injected with E. coli K88+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS on day 14 post-weaning. The results showed that the Gln+ group had lower concentrations of plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone and cortisol than the control group on day 14 pre-LPS challenge. In addition, Gln+ group had higher plasma IgG concentration than the control group for pre- or post-LPS challenged on day 14 post-weaning. In summary, dietary supplementation of Gln was able to alleviate the stressful condition and inflammation associated with castration in weaned barrows, and to improve their immunity and growth performance in the early starter stage.

  1. Influx of double labelled glutamine into mistletoes (Viscum album) from the xylem sap of its host (Abies alba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, P; Rennenberg, H

    2006-01-01

    The flux of glutamine into the mistletoe Viscum album from the xylem sap of a coniferous host was analyzed. For this purpose, a perfusion system was used in which the xylem sap of the host was replaced by an artificial perfusion solution. With this system, flux rates into the mistletoe were determined in feeding experiments with the organic nitrogen source U(13)C/(15)N-Gln. At the end of the experiments the delta values of C and N were significantly depleted in the outflow compared to the percolation solution. Since this depletion was higher for C than for N, a combination of Gln uptake and simultaneous uploading of organic compounds in the host xylem can be assumed. Gln was strongly metabolized during its allocation in the mistletoe. As a consequence, the C skeleton of Gln was equally distributed between leaf and stem tissue, whereas N of Gln preferentially accumulated in the stem. Apparently, the C atoms of the Gln taken up are transported faster in the mistletoe to the sink tissues than the N atoms. It is concluded that C liberated from Gln is transported rapidly to different sink tissues, whereas N in the oversupplied mistletoes is transported slowly to sinks in the leaves.

  2. Induction of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III and glutamine synthetase mRNA during confinement stress in gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, H; Kahatapitiya, N; Kingsley, K; Salo, W L; Anderson, P M; Wang, Y S; Walsh, P J

    2000-01-01

    Gulf toadfish (Opsanus &bgr;) rapidly switch to excretion of urea as their main nitrogenous waste product under several laboratory conditions, including confinement to small volumes of water. Prior evidence suggested that the activities of two key enzymes of urea synthesis exhibited potentially different modes of upregulation during this switch, with carbamoyl phosphate synthethase III (CPSase III) activated allosterically by N-acetylglutamate, and glutamine synthetase (GSase) activated by increases in the concentration of protein. The present study was undertaken to examine additional aspects of the regulation of these enzymes. The sequence for O. beta CPSase III cDNA was obtained, and it was found to be similar to that of other piscine CPSases. The sequence also allowed us to develop riboprobes for CPSase III mRNA analysis using ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs). CPSase III mRNA was expressed in liver, muscle, kidney and intestine, in agreement with prior enzymatic measurements. Levels of CPSase III mRNA increased five- to tenfold (relative to beta-actin mRNA) in liver (but not muscle) following 48 h of confinement stress. Measured by western analysis using an antibody to chicken GSase, confined O. beta GSase protein concentrations increased eightfold over control levels, in agreement with prior and present measurements of increases in GSase activity. Furthermore, RPAs of GSase mRNA levels demonstrated an increase of fivefold during confinement.

  3. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Expressions of Adhesion Molecules and Chemokine Receptors on T Cells in a Murine Model of Acute Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migration of T cells into the colon plays a major role in the pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln supplementation on chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules expressed by T cells in mice with dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a Gln diet replacing 25% of the total nitrogen. After being fed the diets for 5 days, half of the mice from both groups were given 1.5% DSS in drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were killed after 5 days of DSS exposure. Results. DSS colitis resulted in higher expression levels of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- (PSGL- 1, leukocyte function-associated antigen- (LFA- 1, and C-C chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9 by T helper (Th and cytotoxic T (Tc cells, and mRNA levels of endothelial adhesion molecules in colons were upregulated. Gln supplementation decreased expressions of PSGL-1, LFA-1, and CCR9 by Th cells. Colonic gene expressions of endothelial adhesion molecules were also lower in Gln-colitis mice. Histological finding showed that colon infiltrating Th cells were less in the DSS group with Gln administration. Conclusions. Gln supplementation may ameliorate the inflammation of colitis possibly via suppression of T cell migration.

  4. The utilization of glutamine by the retina: an autoradiographic and metabolic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voaden, M.J.; Lake, N.; Marshall, J.; Morjaria, B.

    1978-01-01

    The cells able to accumulate exogenously applied [ 3 H] glutamine in rat, cat, frog, pigeon and guinea pig retinas have been located by autoradiography, and the fate of the labelled glutamine, as regards its incorporation into aspartic, glutamic and γ-amino-butyric acids, followed for 60 min. The results support the notion of glutamine as a precursor of transmitter amino acids in some neurones. In particular, it would appear to be a source of a relatively stable pool of GABA which may be located, with species variation, in amacrine or ganglion cells. In the pigeon retina glutamate pool incorporates and retains a major percentage of the label, and perikarya in the middle of the inner nuclear layer of the tissue are predominantly labelled. (author)

  5. Glutamine methylation in histone H2A is an RNA-polymerase-I-dedicated modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessarz, Peter; Santos-Rosa, Helena; Robson, Sam C

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are decorated with numerous post-translational modifications capable of influencing many DNA processes. Here we describe a new class of histone modification, methylation of glutamine, occurring on yeast histone H2A at position 105 (Q105) and human H2A at Q104. We identify Nop1...... as the methyltransferase in yeast and demonstrate that fibrillarin is the orthologue enzyme in human cells. Glutamine methylation of H2A is restricted to the nucleolus. Global analysis in yeast, using an H2AQ105me-specific antibody, shows that this modification is exclusively enriched over the 35S ribosomal DNA...... and increased transcription at the ribosomal DNA locus. These features are phenocopied by mutations in FACT complex components. Together these data identify glutamine methylation of H2A as the first histone epigenetic mark dedicated to a specific RNA polymerase and define its function as a regulator of FACT...

  6. Quantification of l-alanyl-l-glutamine in mammalian cell culture broth: Evaluation of different detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krömer, Jens O; Dietmair, Stefanie; Jacob, Shana S; Nielsen, Lars K

    2011-09-01

    l-Alanyl-l-glutamine (also known as Ala-Gln or GlutaMAX) is widely used as a stable l-glutamine source in cell culture for the production of biopharmaceuticals. System approaches for the optimization of production processes require the analysis of all major substrates and products. We have compared four alternative detection systems for l-alanyl-l-glutamine in culture broth. Matrix effects prevented the use of ultraviolet or evaporative light scattering detection. Fluorescence detection used in routine amino acid protocols is compatible with culture broth and has a broad linear dynamic range. Mass spectrometry has superior sensitivity and can be integrated into quantitative metabolomic workflows. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of fluorocitrate on renal ammoniagenesis and glutamine metabolism in the intact dog kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, E; Frindt, G; Schreiner, G E; Preuss, H G

    1979-03-01

    Renal glutamine metabolism was studied in vivo following infusions of fluorocitrate into chronically acidotic and alkalotic dogs. Coincident with a dramatic rise in renal cortical citrate concentrations, there was a significant fall in tissue glutamate in both acid-base states. This was accompanied by a significant increase in total renal ammonia production. Glutamine metabolism and ammoningenesis in alkalotic dogs receiving fluorocitrate simulated that achieved in acidotic dogs. The simultaneous administration of alpha-ketoglutarate and fluorocitrate significantly diminished the fall in tissue glutamate and the rise in ammoniagenesis induced by fluorocitrate alone. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that ammonia production from glutamine is enhanced secondary to increased glutamate deamination. We postulate that this chain of events may be the consequence of impaired alpha-ketoglutarate production from citrate.

  8. Phosphorylation of nitrogen regulator I (NRI) of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, V; Magasanik, B

    1988-01-01

    It has previously been shown that phosphorylated nitrogen regulator I (NRI-phosphate) is the activator responsible for increasing the transcription of glnA, the structural gene for glutamine synthetase, and that NRII catalyzes the transfer of the gamma-phosphate of ATP to NRI. We have now shown that the reaction of ATP with NRII results in the reversible transfer of the gamma-phosphate of ATP to a histidine residue of NRII. In turn, NRII-phosphate transfers its phosphate reversibly to an aspa...

  9. Protective effects of l-glutamine against toxicity of deltamethrin in the cerebral tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Sefer; Özdemir, Hasan Hüseyin; Çevik, Mehmet Uğur; Altun, Yaşar; Ibiloğlu, Ibrahim; Ekinci, Aysun; Ibiloğlu, Aslıhan Okan; Balduz, Metin; Arslan, Demet; Tekin, Recep; Aktar, Fesih; Aluçlu, Mehmet Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Background Deltamethrin (DLM) is a broad-spectrum synthetic dibromo-pyrethroid pesticide that is widely used for agricultural and veterinary purposes. However, human exposure to the pesticide leads to neurotoxicity. Glutamine is one of the principal, free intracellular amino acids and may also be an antioxidant. This study was undertaken in order to examine the neuroprotective and antioxidant potential of l-glutamine against DLM toxicity in female Wistar albino rats. Materials and methods The rats were divided into the following groups (n=10): Group I: control (distilled water; 10 mL/kg, po one dose), Group II: l-glutamine (1.5 g/kg, po one dose), Group III: DLM (35 mg/kg, po one dose), and Group IV: DLM (35 mg/kg, po one dose) and l-glutamine (1.5 g/kg, po one dose after 4 hours). Total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS), tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels and apoptosis were evaluated in brain tissue. Results DLM-treated animals had a significant increase in brain biochemical parameters, as well as TOS and TAS. Furthermore, the histopathological examination showed neuronal cell degeneration in the cerebral tissue. l-Glutamine treatment decreased the elevated brain levels of TOS and neuronal cell degeneration. There was no difference in tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels between the groups. Conclusion l-Glutamine may reduce the toxic effects of DLM in the cerebral tissue through antioxidant properties. PMID:27143900

  10. [Effect of glutamine on small intestinal repair in weanling rats after chronic diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zu-xiong; Ye, Li-yan; Zheng, Zhi-yong; Chen, Xin-min; Ren, Rong-na; Tong, Guo-yuan

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the nutrient effect of glutamine on small intestinal repair in weanling rats after chronic diarrhea. Forty 21-day-old wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups (8 in each). Animal model of chronic diarrhea was induced by a lactose enriched diet in the weanling Wistar rat, normal control group was fed with a standard semipurified diet, and after 14 days the rats in both groups were killed to test the establishment of the model. After the establishment of the model, the other groups were fed with the standard semipurified diet to recover for 7 days, and were randomly divided into three groups: non-intervention group, glutamine (Gln)-intervention group and control group. Glutamine concentrations in blood was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Morphological changes including villus height and villus surface area of the jejunum were measured under a light microscope and electron microscope, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as an index of cell proliferation was observed using immunohistochemical staining and image analysis. The diarrhea rate in model group was 100 percent, average diarrhea index was 1.16 +/- 0.06, but both diarrhea rate and average diarrhea index in control group were 0 (P 0.05). And compared with non-intervened group, except for body weight (P > 0.05), plasma glutamine, villus height, villus surface area and expression of PCNA were all significantly increased in Gln-intervened group. Chronic diarrhea can induce malnutrition and reduce the villus height, villus surface area, expression of PCNA and plasm glutamine concentration. Oral glutamine could improve the proliferation of crypt cell and promote repair of intestinal mucosa after chronic diarrhea.

  11. Oral L-glutamine administration attenuated cutaneous wound healing in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Saurabh; Kandhare, Amit; Zanwar, Anand A; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Shinde, Sudhir; Deshmukh, Shahaji; Kharat, Ravindran

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the wound healing potential of L-glutamine in laboratory rats using excision and incision wound models. Excision wounds of size 500 mm(2) and depth 2 mm were made on the dorsal portion of male Wistar rats (230-250 g) and were used for the study of oral L-glutamine (1 g/kg) treatment on the rate of contraction of wound and epithelisation. Histological evaluation of wound tissue was also performed. Six-centimetre-long two linear-paravertebral incisions in male Wistar rats (230-250 g) were used to study the effect of L-glutamine (1 g/kg, p.o.) treatment on tensile strength, total protein and hydroxyproline content in the incision model. Oral administration of L-glutamine (1 g/kg) significantly decreased wound area, epithelisation period and wound index, whereas the rate of wound contraction significantly increased (P wound model. Tensile strength, hydroxyproline content and protein level were significantly increased (P wound model. Histological evaluation of wound tissue from L-glutamine (1 g/kg, p.o.)-treated rats showed complete epithelialisation with new blood vessel formation and high fibrous tissues in the excision wound model. In conclusion, oral administration of l-glutamine (1 g/kg) promotes wound healing by acting on various stages of wound healing such as collagen synthesis, wound contraction and epithelialisation. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effect of energy intake on the metabolism of glucose and glutamine in rumen epithelial tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Ten Holstein steers (579 kg average body weight) were fed either alfalfa hay (12.2% crude protein) or a 90% concentrate diet to supply 14.2 or 25.2 Mcal ME respectively for a minimum of 28 days. Samples of rumen epithelial tissue were removed at slaughter from the anterior ventral sac, washed free of feed particles and transported to the laboratory in oxygenated Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (KRB; pH 7.4). Papillae were weighed (100-200 mg) in triplicate into flasks containing 3 ml KRB with 1 mM glutamine or 5 mM glucose and acetate (50 mM), propionate (25 mM), butyrate (15 mM), lactate (1 mM) and glucose (5 mM) or glutamine (1 mM) as competing substrates. A parallel set of flasks contained 1 or .5 μCi of [U- 14 C]-glutamine or glucose respectively for 14 CO 2 production. There were no interactions with dietary energy intake and substrate addition. Increasing the dietary energy intake increased (P 14 CO 2 production and net lactate production from glucose and increased the 14 CO 2 production from glutamine. Addition of acetate, propionate, butyrate and lactate decreased (P 14 CO 2 production from glucose (40%). Addition of butyrate and glucose decreased 14 CO 2 production from glutamine while propionate addition decreased net glutamate production and increased net alanine production. At these substrate concentrations rates of glucose oxidation to 14 CO 2 were 7-fold higher than glutamine

  13. The effect of free glutamine and peptide ingestion on the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Saris, W H; van de Schoor, P A

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated previous claims that ingestion of glutamine and of protein-carbohydrate mixtures may increase the rate of glycogen resynthesis following intense exercise. Eight trained subjects were studied during 3 h of recovery while consuming one of four drinks in random order. ...... of the control and free glutamine drinks, implying that further research is needed on the potential protein effect....

  14. Long-term effects of neonatal glutamine-enriched nutrition in very-low-birth-weight infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwol, Annelies; Neu, Josef; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants have investigated the effect of parenteral or enteral glutamine supplementation on morbidity, mortality, and outcome in the neonatal period. No evidence of toxicity of glutamine supplementation was found in these clinical trials, but the

  15. Dose intercomparison for 400–500 keV electrons using FWT-60 film and glutamine (spectrophotometric readout) dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, B. L.; Nilekani, S. R.; Gehringer, P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the dose and the depth dose measurements with FWT-60 film and glutamine (Spectrophotometric readout) dosimeters for 400–500 keV electrons. The glutamine powder was spread uniformly in polyethylene bags and the powder thickness in each bag was 5 mg cm−2. Both techniques show...

  16. Maternal L-glutamine supplementation prevents prenatal alcohol exposure-induced fetal growth restriction in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Onkar B; Wu, Guoyao; Washburn, Shannon E

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure is known to cause fetal growth restriction and disturbances in amino acid bioavailability. Alterations in these parameters can persist into adulthood and low birth weight can lead to altered fetal programming. Glutamine has been associated with the synthesis of other amino acids, an increase in protein synthesis and it is used clinically as a nutrient supplement for low birth weight infants. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of repeated maternal alcohol exposure and L-glutamine supplementation on fetal growth and amino acid bioavailability during the third trimester-equivalent period in an ovine model. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to four groups, saline control, alcohol (1.75-2.5 g/kg), glutamine (100 mg/kg, three times daily) or alcohol + glutamine. In this study, a weekend binge drinking model was followed where treatment was done 3 days per week in succession from gestational day (GD) 109-132 (normal term ~147). Maternal alcohol exposure significantly reduced fetal body weight, height, length, thoracic girth and brain weight, and resulted in decreased amino acid bioavailability in fetal plasma and placental fluids. Maternal glutamine supplementation successfully mitigated alcohol-induced fetal growth restriction and improved the bioavailability of glutamine and glutamine-related amino acids such as glycine, arginine, and asparagine in the fetal compartment. All together, these findings show that L-glutamine supplementation enhances amino acid availability in the fetus and prevents alcohol-induced fetal growth restriction.

  17. Physiological Effects of GLT1 Modulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Growing on Different Nitrogen Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco; Adamo, Giusy Manuela; Frascotti, Gianni; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most employed cell factories for the production of bioproducts. Although monomeric hexose sugars constitute the preferential carbon source, this yeast can grow on a wide variety of nitrogen sources that are catabolized through central nitrogen metabolism (CNM). To evaluate the effects of internal perturbations on nitrogen utilization, we characterized strains deleted or overexpressed in GLT1, encoding for one of the key enzymes of the CNM node, the glutamate synthase. These strains, together with the parental strain as control, have been cultivated in minimal medium formulated with ammonium sulfate, glutamate, or glutamine as nitrogen source. Growth kinetics, together with the determination of protein content, viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation at the single cell level, revealed that GLT1 modulations do not significantly influence the cellular physiology, whereas the nitrogen source does. As important exceptions, GLT1 deletion negatively affected the scavenging activity of glutamate against ROS accumulation, when cells were treated with H2O2, whereas Glt1p overproduction led to lower viability in glutamine medium. Overall, this confirms the robustness of the CNM node against internal perturbations, but, at the same time, highlights its plasticity in respect to the environment. Considering that side-stream protein-rich waste materials are emerging as substrates to be used in an integrated biorefinery, these results underline the importance of preliminarily evaluating the best nitrogen source not only for media formulation, but also for the overall economics of the process.

  18. Effect of carbohydrate supplementation on plasma glutamine during prolonged exercise and recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Saris, W H; Wagenmakers, A J

    1998-01-01

    . Eight well-trained subjects cycled at an alternating workload of 50 and 80% Wmax until exhaustion (59 to 140 min). During the exercise bout the subjects received either water (control) or a carbohydrate (CHO) drink (83 g CHO x l(-1), 2 ml x kg(-1) per kg body weight every 15 min). Plasma glutamine......) after 2 h of recovery for the control and CHO test, respectively. Plasma glutamine concentration returned to pre-exercise values after 7 h of recovery. Alanine concentration increased during exercise in both tests. During the recovery period the concentration of alanine (48%), and total amino acids (23...

  19. Regulation of glutamine synthetase isoforms in two differentially drought-tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars under water deficit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamal Krishna; Ghosh, Shilpi

    2013-02-01

    KEY MESSAGE : The regulation of GS isoforms by WD was organ specific. Two GS isoforms i.e. OsGS1;1 and OsGS2 were differentially regulated in IR-64 (drought-sensitive) and Khitish (drought-tolerant) cultivars of rice. Water deficit (WD) has adverse effect on rice (Oryza sativa L.) and acclimation requires essential reactions of primary metabolism to continue. Rice plants utilize ammonium as major nitrogen source, which is assimilated into glutamine by the reaction of Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2). Rice plants possess one gene (OsGS2) for chloroplastic GS2 and three genes (OsGS1;1, OsGS1;2 and OsGS1;3) for cytosolic GS1. Here, we report the effect of WD on regulation of GS isoforms in drought-sensitive (cv. IR-64) and drought-tolerant (cv. Khitish) rice cultivars. Under WD, total GS activity in root and leaf decreased significantly in IR-64 seedlings in comparison to Khitish seedlings. The reduced GS activity in IR-64 leaf was mainly due to decrease in GS2 activity, which correlated with decrease in corresponding transcript and polypeptide contents. GS1 transcript and polypeptide accumulated in leaf during WD, however, GS1 activity was maintained at a constant level. Total GS activity in stem of both the varieties was insensitive to WD. Among GS1 genes, OsGS1;1 expression was differently regulated by WD in the two rice varieties. Its transcript accumulated more abundantly in IR-64 leaf than in Khitish leaf. Following WD, OsGS1;1 mRNA level in stem and root tissues declined in IR-64 and enhanced in Khitish. A steady OsGS1;2 expression patterns were noted in leaf, stem and root of both the cultivars. Results suggest that OsGS2 and OsGS1;1 expression may contribute to drought tolerance of Khitish cultivar under WD conditions.

  20. The effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal permeability in very-low-birth-weight infants : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; Fetter, Willem P. F.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Vegt, Ina M.; van der Molen, Hilda R. A.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion. Glutamine depletion has negative effects on intestinal integrity. The lower infection rate in VLBW infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition may originate from improved intestinal integrity, as

  1. The effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal permeability in very-low-birth-weight infants: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; Fetter, Willem P. F.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Vegt, Ina M.; van der Molen, Hilda R. A.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion. Glutamine depletion has negative effects on intestinal integrity. The lower infection rate in VLBW infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition may originate from improved intestinal integrity, as

  2. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  3. L-Glutamine Metabolism Is Not A Major Source Of Increased Free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10 weeks (2K-1C) and 4 weeks (1K-1C) respectively after renal artery clamping, clipped rats exhibited elevated blood pressures (P<0.001), which was sustained under anaesthesia. No significant difference in plasma glutamine levels were found in hypertensive rats compared to controls (11.3±1.3 mg/l in 2K-1C vs.

  4. Glutamine-derived 2-hydroxyglutarate is associated with disease progression in plasma cell malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Wilson I.; Hitosugi, Taro; Ghosh, Toshi; Jevremovic, Dragan; Petterson, Xuan-Mai; Wellik, Linda; Kumar, Shaji K.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2018-01-01

    The production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) has been associated with c-MYC overexpression. c-MYC also regulates glutamine metabolism and drives progression of asymptomatic precursor plasma cell (PC) malignancies to symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). However, the presence of 2-HG and its clinical significance in PC malignancies is unknown. By performing 13C stable isotope resolved metabolomics (SIRM) using U[13C6]Glucose and U[13C5]Glutamine in human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs), we show that 2-HG is produced in clonal PCs and is derived predominantly from glutamine anaplerosis into the TCA cycle. Furthermore, the 13C SIRM studies in HMCLs also demonstrate that glutamine is preferentially utilized by the TCA cycle compared with glucose. Finally, measuring the levels of 2-HG in the BM supernatant and peripheral blood plasma from patients with precursor PC malignancies such as smoldering MM (SMM) demonstrates that relatively elevated levels of 2-HG are associated with higher levels of c-MYC expression in the BM clonal PCs and with a subsequent shorter time to progression (TTP) to MM. Thus, measuring 2-HG levels in BM supernatant or peripheral blood plasma of SMM patients offers potential early identification of those patients at high risk of progression to MM, who could benefit from early therapeutic intervention. PMID:29321378

  5. Evidence for Tautomerisation of Glutamine in BLUF Blue Light Receptors by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domratcheva, Tatiana; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Schlichting, Ilme; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    BLUF (blue light sensor using flavin) domains regulate the activity of various enzymatic effector domains in bacteria and euglenids. BLUF features a unique photoactivation through restructuring of the hydrogen-bonding network as opposed to a redox reaction or an isomerization of the chromophore. A conserved glutamine residue close to the flavin chromophore plays a central role in the light response, but the underlying modification is still unclear. We labelled this glutamine with 15N in two representative BLUF domains and performed time-resolved infrared double difference spectroscopy. The assignment of the signals was conducted by extensive quantum chemical calculations on large models with 187 atoms reproducing the UV-vis and infrared signatures of BLUF photoactivation. In the dark state, the comparatively low frequency of 1,667 cm−1 is assigned to the glutamine C=O accepting a hydrogen bond from tyrosine. In the light state, the signature of a tautomerised glutamine was extracted with the C=N stretch at ~1,691 cm−1 exhibiting the characteristic strong downshift by 15N labelling. Moreover, an indirect isotope effect on the flavin C4=O stretch was found. We conclude that photoactivation of the BLUF receptor does not only involve a rearrangement of hydrogen bonds but includes a change in covalent bonds of the protein. PMID:26947391

  6. Inhibitory plant serpins with a sequence of three glutamine residues in the reactive center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn

    2005-01-01

    Serpins appear to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes, except fungi, and are also present in some bacteria, archaea and viruses. Inhibitory serpins with a glutamine as the reactive-center P1 residue have been identified exclusively in a few plant species. Unique serpins with a reactive center sequence...

  7. Intravenous glutamine supplementation enhances renal de novo arginine synthesis in humans: a stable isotope study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Nikki; Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Oosterink, J. Efraim; Luttikhold, Joanna; Schierbeek, Henk; Wisselink, Willem; Beishuizen, Albertus; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Arginine plays a role in many different pathways in multiple cell types. Consequently, a shortage of arginine, caused by pathologic conditions such as cancer or injury, has the potential to disturb many cellular and organ functions. Glutamine is the ultimate source for de novo synthesis of arginine

  8. Regulation of the Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System by Intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; HELLINGWERF, KJ; KONINGS, WN

    Various methods of manipulation of the intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis result in a unique relationship between the rate of glutamate and glutamine transport and the cytoplasmic pH. The initial rate of glutamate uptake by S. lactis cells increases more than 30-fold when the intracellular pH

  9. Assessing the extent of bone degradation using glutamine deamidation in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Julie; van Doorn, Nienke L; Collins, Matthew J

    2012-11-06

    Collagen peptides are analyzed using a low-cost, high-throughput method for assessing deamidation using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). For each chosen peptide, the theoretical distribution is calculated and the measured distribution for each sample compared with this to determine the extent of glutamine deamidation. The deamidation of glutamine (Q) to glutamic acid (E) results in a mass shift of +0.984 Da. Thus, from the resolution of our data, the second peak in the isotope distribution for a peptide containing one glutamine residue coincides with the first peak of the isotope distribution for the peptide in which the residue is deamidated. A genetic algorithm is used to determine the extent of deamidation that gives the best fit to the measured distribution. The method can be extended to peptides containing more than one glutamine residue. The extent of protein degradation assessed in this way could be used, for example, to assess the damage of collagen, and screen samples for radiocarbon dating and DNA analysis.

  10. Combined Effects of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid and Glutamine on Bacterial Translocation in Obstructive Jaundiced Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Rahmi Hatipoğlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial Translocation is believed to be an important factor on mortality and morbidity in Obstructive Jaundiced. Aims: We investigated the probable or estimated positive effects of tauroursodeoxycholic acid, which has antibacterial and regulatory effects on intestinal flora, together with glutamine on BT in an experimental obstructive jaundiced rat model. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Forty adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study. Animals were randomised and divided into five groups of eight each: sham (Sh; control (common bile duct ligation, CBDL; and supplementation groups administered tauroursodeoxycholic acid (CBDL+T, glutamine (CBDL+G, or tauroursodeoxycholic acid plus glutamine (CBDL+TG. Blood and liver, spleen, MLN, and ileal samples were taken via laparotomy under sterile conditions for investigation of bacterial translocation and intestinal mucosal integrity and hepatic function tests on the tenth postoperative day. Results: There were statistically significant differences in BT rates in all samples except the spleen of the CBDL+TG group compared with the CBDL group (p=0.041, p=0.026, and p=0.041, respectively. Conclusion: It is essential to protect hepatic functions besides maintaining intestinal mucosal integrity in the active struggle against BT occurring in obstructive jaundice. The positive effect on intestinal mucosal integrity can be increased if glutamine is used with tauroursodeoxycholic acid, which also has hepatoprotective and immunomodulatory features.

  11. miR-137 inhibits glutamine catabolism and growth of malignant melanoma by targeting glutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Wenkang; Zhou, Zhou; Zhu, Yan; Xia, Yun; Wang, Jinlong; Xu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Glutamine catabolism is considered to be an important metabolic pathway for cancer cells. Glutaminase (GLS) is the important rate-limiting enzyme of glutamine catabolism. miR-137 functions as a tumor suppressor in many human malignant tumors. However, the role and molecular mechanism of miR-137 and GLS in malignant melanoma has not been reported. In this study, we showed that miR-137 was decreased in melanoma tissue, and the low miR-137 level and high GLS expression are independent risk factor in melanoma. miR-137 suppressed the proliferation and glutamine catabolism of melanoma cells. GLS is crucial for glutamine catabolism and growth of malignant melanoma. We also demonstrated that miR-137 acts as a tumor suppressor in melanoma by targeting GLS. This result elucidates a new mechanism for miR-137 in melanoma development and provides a survival indicator and potential therapeutic target for melanoma patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. cDNA sequence of the long mRNA for human glutamine synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Geerts, W. J.; Das, A. T.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    Screening a human liver cDNA library in lambda ZAP revealed several clones for the mRNA of glutamine synthase. The longest clone was completely sequenced and consists of a 109 bp 5' untranslated region, a 1119 bp protein coding region, a 1498 bp 3' untranslated region and a poly(A) tract of 12 bp

  13. Deamidation of asparagine and glutamine residues in proteins and peptides: structural determinants and analytical methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, Rainer; Kolbe, H.V.

    1994-01-01

    Non-enzymatic deamidation of asparagine and glutamine residues in proteins and peptides are reviewed by first outlining the well-described reaction mechanism involving cyclic imide intermediates, followed by a discussion of structural features which influence the reaction rate. The second and major

  14. Deamidation Reactions of Asparagine- and Glutamine-Containing Dipeptides Investigated by Ion Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempkes, L.J.M.; Martens, J.; Grzetic, J.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.

    2016-01-01

    Deamidation is a major fragmentation channel upon activation by collision induced dissociation (CID) for protonated peptides containing glutamine (Gln) and asparagine (Asn) residues. Here, we investigate these NH3-loss reactions for four Asn- and Gln-containing protonated peptides in terms of the

  15. Expression pattern of glutamine synthetase marks transition from collecting into conducting hepatic veins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Hakvoort, T. B.; Moorman, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The expression of glutamine synthetase (GS) is confined to a rim of hepatocytes surrounding the efferent hepatic veins in all mammalian species investigated. In rat liver, a two- to three-cell thick layer of GS-positive (GS(+)) hepatocytes uniformly surrounds the two to four terminal branching

  16. Isolation and characterization of the rat glutamine synthetase-encoding gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Zande, L.; Labruyère, W. T.; Arnberg, A. C.; Wilson, R. H.; van den Bogaert, A. J.; Das, A. T.; van Oorschot, D. A.; Frijters, C.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    From a rat genomic library in phage lambda Charon4A, a complete glutamine synthetase-encoding gene was isolated. The gene is 9.5-10 kb long, consists of seven exons, and codes for two mRNA species of 1375 nucleotides (nt) and 2787 nt, respectively. For both mRNAs, full-length cDNAs containing a

  17. Expression of glutamine transporter isoforms in cerebral cortex of rats with chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Escobar, Thayssa D.C.; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that occurs due to acute and chronic liver diseases, the hallmark of which is the increased levels of ammonia and subsequent alterations in glutamine synthesis, i.e. conditions associated with the pathophysiology of HE. Under physiological...

  18. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Chemical speciation of L-glutamine complexes with Co(II), Ni(II) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of cationic micelles on the protonation equilibria of L-glutamine and chemical speciation of its complexes with Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) have been studied by monitoring hydrogen ion concentration pH metrically at 303 K and at an ionic strength of 0.16 M. The protonation constants and binary stability constants ...

  20. Changes in Activities of Glutamine Synthetase during Grain Filling and Their Relation to Rice Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-xun JIN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Four japonica rice varieties differed in cooking and eating qualities were used in a pot experiment to study the relationship between the activities of glutamine synthetase during grain filling and rice quality. The activities of glutamine synthetase gradually increased and then declined as a single peak curve in the course of grain filling. The 15th day after heading was a turning point, before which the enzymatic activities in the inferior rice varieties with high protein content were higher than those in the superior rice varietie with low protein content, and after which it was converse. The activity of glutamine synthetase in grain was correlated with the taste meter value, peak viscosity and breakdown negatively at the early stage of grain filling whereas positively at the middle and late stages. Moreover, it was correlated with the protein content of rice grain and setback positively at the early stage and negatively at the middle and late stages. The correlation degree varied with the course of grain filling. From 15 days to 20 days after heading was a critical stage, in which the direction of correlation between the activity of glutamine synthetase and taste meter value and RVA properties of rice changed.

  1. Protective effects of L-glutamine against toxicity of deltamethrin in the cerebral tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varol S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sefer Varol, Hasan Hüseyin Özdemir, Mehmet Uğur Çevik, Yaşar Altun, Ibrahim Ibiloğlu, Aysun Ekinci, Aslıhan Okan Ibiloğlu, Metin Balduz, Demet Arslan, Recep Tekin, Fesih Aktar, Mehmet Ufuk Aluçlu Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, Turkey Background: Deltamethrin (DLM is a broad-spectrum synthetic dibromo-pyrethroid pesticide that is widely used for agricultural and veterinary purposes. However, human exposure to the pesticide leads to neurotoxicity. Glutamine is one of the principal, free intracellular amino acids and may also be an antioxidant. This study was undertaken in order to examine the neuroprotective and antioxidant potential of L-glutamine against DLM toxicity in female Wistar albino rats. Materials and methods: The rats were divided into the following groups (n=10: Group I: control (distilled water; 10 mL/kg, po one dose, Group II: L-glutamine (1.5 g/kg, po one dose, Group III: DLM (35 mg/kg, po one dose, and Group IV: DLM (35 mg/kg, po one dose and L-glutamine (1.5 g/kg, po one dose after 4 hours. Total oxidant status (TOS, total antioxidant status (TAS, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1β, and IL-6 levels and apoptosis were evaluated in brain tissue. Results: DLM-treated animals had a significant increase in brain biochemical parameters, as well as TOS and TAS. Furthermore, the histopathological examination showed neuronal cell degeneration in the cerebral tissue. L-Glutamine treatment decreased the elevated brain levels of TOS and neuronal cell degeneration. There was no difference in tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels between the groups. Conclusion: L-Glutamine may reduce the toxic effects of DLM in the cerebral tissue through antioxidant properties. Keywords: deltamethrin, L-glutamine, rat

  2. Glutamine, glutamate, and arginine-based acid resistance in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Januana S; Seeras, Arisha; Sanchez-Maldonado, Alma Fernanda; Zhang, Chonggang; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glutamine deamidation improves acid resistance of Lactobacillus reuteri, and to assess whether arginine, glutamine, and glutamate-mediated acid resistance are redundant or complementary mechanisms of acid resistance. Three putative glutaminase genes, gls1, gls2, and gls3, were identified in L. reuteri 100-23. All three genes were expressed during growth in mMRS and wheat sourdough. L. reuteri consistently over-expressed gls3 and the glutamate decarboxylase gadB. L. reuteri 100-23ΔgadB over-expressed gls3 and the arginine deiminase gene adi. Analysis of the survival of L. reuteri in acidic conditions revealed that arginine conversion is effective at pH of 3.5 while glutamine or glutamate conversion were effective at pH of 2.5. Arginine conversion increased the pHin but not ΔΨ; glutamate decarboxylation had only a minor effect on the pHin but increased the ΔΨ. This study demonstrates that glutamine deamidation increases the acid resistance of L. reuteri independent of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Arginine and glutamine/glutamate conversions confer resistance to lactate at pH of 3.5 and phosphate at pH of 2.5, respectively. Knowledge of L. reuteri's acid resistance improves the understanding of the adaptation of L. reuteri to intestinal ecosystems, and facilitates the selection of probiotic and starter cultures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai Q Tran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  4. Metabolism of Glutamine by the Intact Functioning Kidney of the Dog STUDIES IN METABOLIC ACIDOSIS AND ALKALOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, R. F.; Pilkington, L. A.; MacLeod, M. B.; Leal-Pinto, E.

    1972-01-01

    The renal conversion of glutamine to glucose and its oxidation to CO2 were compared in dogs in chronic metabolic acidosis and alkalosis. These studies were performed at normal endogenous levels of glutamine utilizing glutamine-34C (uniformly labeled) as a tracer. It was observed in five experiments in acidosis that mean renal extraction of glutamine by one kidney amounted to 27.7 μmoles/min. Of this quantity, 5.34 μmoles/min was converted to glucose, and 17.5 μmoles/min was oxidized to CO2. Acidotic animals excreted an average of 41 μmoles/min of ammonia in the urine formed by one kidney. In contrast, in five experiments in alkalosis, mean renal extraction of glutamine amounted to 8.04 μmoles/min. Of this quantity, 0.92 μmole/min was converted to glucose, and 4.99 μmoles/min was oxidized to CO2. Alkalotic animals excreted an average of 3.23 μmoles/min of ammonia in the urine. We conclude that renal gluconeogenesis is not rate limiting for the production and excretion of ammonia in either acidosis or alkalosis. Since 40% of total CO2 production is derived from oxidation of glutamine by the acidotic kidney and 14% by the alkalotic kidney, it is apparent that renal energy sources change with acid-base state and that glutamine constitutes a major metabolic fuel in acidosis. Images PMID:5011100

  5. Lid L11 of the glutamine amidotransferase domain of CTP synthase mediates allosteric GTP activation of glutaminase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Mølgaard, Anne; Johansson, Eva

    2005-01-01

    GTP is an allosteric activator of CTP synthase and acts to increase the k(cat) for the glutamine-dependent CTP synthesis reaction. GTP is suggested, in part, to optimally orient the oxy-anion hole for hydrolysis of glutamine that takes place in the glutamine amidotransferase class I (GATase) doma...... with lid L11 and indicate that the GTP activation of glutamine dependent CTP synthesis may be explained by structural rearrangements around the oxy-anion hole of the GATase domain......GTP is an allosteric activator of CTP synthase and acts to increase the k(cat) for the glutamine-dependent CTP synthesis reaction. GTP is suggested, in part, to optimally orient the oxy-anion hole for hydrolysis of glutamine that takes place in the glutamine amidotransferase class I (GATase) domain...... of CTP synthase. In the GATase domain of the recently published structures of the Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus CTP synthases a loop region immediately proceeding amino acid residues forming the oxy-anion hole and named lid L11 is shown for the latter enzyme to be flexible and change position...

  6. Effect of Nutrient Dilution and Glutamine Supplementation on Growth Performance, Small Intestine Morphology and Immune Response of Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majid gheshlagh olyayee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Glutamine (Gln, a semi-essential or conditionally essential amino acid, is an abundant amino acid in plasma and skeletal muscle. It is the main energy substrate for cells that undergo intense replication, such as enterocytes, lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and kidney cells and plays an important role in their function and homeostasis. Apart from providing nitrogen for protein synthesis, Gln is a precursor for nucleic acids, nucleotides, hexose amines, the nitric oxide precursor arginine (Arg, and the major antioxidant-glutathione. It plays a central role in nitrogen transport between tissues, specifically from muscle to gut, kidney, and liver. In addition to its role as a gluconeogenic substrate in the liver, kidney, and intestine, Gln is involved in the renal handling of ammonia, serving as a regulator of acid base homeostasis. So the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nutrient dilution and L- glutamine (Gln supplementation on growth performance, intestine morphology and immune response of broilers during starter (0 to 10 days, growth (11 to 24 days and finisher (25 to 42 days periods. Materials and methods A total of 320 one-day-old male Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to eight treatments with 4 replicates and 10 chicks per each. In this study two levels of nutrient dilution (Ross 308 broiler nutrition recommendation and 5% diluted and 4 levels of Gln supplementation (0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5% were used in a completely randomized design as factorial arrangement 2×4. Growth performance was measured periodically. In order to investigate jejenual histomorphology such as villus height, depth of crypt, villus height to depth of crypt ratio, villus width, muscle layer thickness and epithelium thickness, on day 42 after 4 h fasting, one bird per each replicate was randomly selected, slaughtered and 1 cm of middle section of jejenum was cut. Cellular immune response was assessed in 40-d-old chick using the in

  7. Variations in glutamine deamidation for a Châtelperronian bone assemblage as measured by peptide mass fingerprinting of collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welker, Frido; Soressi, Marie A.; Roussel, Morgan

    2017-01-01

    AbstractPeptide mass fingerprinting of bone collagen (ZooMS) has previously been proposed as a method to calculate the extent of the non-enzymatic degradation of glutamine into glutamic acid (deamidation). Temporal and spatial variation of glutamine deamidation at a single site, however, has...... not been investigated. Here we apply ZooMS screening of Châtelperronian and Early Holocene bone specimens from Quinçay, France, to explore temporal and spatial variation in glutamine deamidation. Our results indicate that chronological resolution is low, while spatial variation is high. Nevertheless, our...

  8. Glutamine and antioxidants in the critically ill patient: a post hoc analysis of a large-scale randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyland, Daren K; Elke, Gunnar; Cook, Deborah; Berger, Mette M; Wischmeyer, Paul E; Albert, Martin; Muscedere, John; Jones, Gwynne; Day, Andrew G

    2015-05-01

    The recent large randomized controlled trial of glutamine and antioxidant supplementation suggested that high-dose glutamine is associated with increased mortality in critically ill patients with multiorgan failure. The objectives of the present analyses were to reevaluate the effect of supplementation after controlling for baseline covariates and to identify potentially important subgroup effects. This study was a post hoc analysis of a prospective factorial 2 × 2 randomized trial conducted in 40 intensive care units in North America and Europe. In total, 1223 mechanically ventilated adult patients with multiorgan failure were randomized to receive glutamine, antioxidants, both glutamine and antioxidants, or placebo administered separate from artificial nutrition. We compared each of the 3 active treatment arms (glutamine alone, antioxidants alone, and glutamine + antioxidants) with placebo on 28-day mortality. Post hoc, treatment effects were examined within subgroups defined by baseline patient characteristics. Logistic regression was used to estimate treatment effects within subgroups after adjustment for baseline covariates and to identify treatment-by-subgroup interactions (effect modification). The 28-day mortality rates in the placebo, glutamine, antioxidant, and combination arms were 25%, 32%, 29%, and 33%, respectively. After adjusting for prespecified baseline covariates, the adjusted odds ratio of 28-day mortality vs placebo was 1.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-2.1, P = .05), 1.2 (0.8-1.8, P = .40), and 1.4 (0.9-2.0, P = .09) for glutamine, antioxidant, and glutamine plus antioxidant arms, respectively. In the post hoc subgroup analysis, both glutamine and antioxidants appeared most harmful in patients with baseline renal dysfunction. No subgroups suggested reduced mortality with supplements. After adjustment for baseline covariates, early provision of high-dose glutamine administered separately from artificial nutrition was not beneficial and may be

  9. Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine but not Glutamate Support Depolarization-Induced Increased Respiration in Isolated Nerve Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Bak, Lasse K

    2017-01-01

    . Synaptosomal respiration using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was significantly higher compared to basal respiration, whereas oligomycin-dependent and FCCP-induced respiration was lower compared to the responses obtained in the presence of glucose as substrate. We provide evidence that synaptosomes...... are able to use besides glucose and pyruvate also the substrates lactate, glutamate and glutamine to support their basal respiration. Veratridine was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate, lactate and glutamine and FCCP was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate...

  10. The Populus superoxide dismutase gene family and its responses to drought stress in transgenic poplar overexpressing a pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jesús Molina-Rueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutamine synthetase (GS plays a central role in plant nitrogen assimilation, a process intimately linked to soil water availability. We previously showed that hybrid poplar (Populus tremula X alba, INRA 717-1B4 expressing ectopically a pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene (GS1a display enhanced tolerance to drought. Preliminary transcriptome profiling revealed that during drought, members of the superoxide dismutase (SOD family were reciprocally regulated in GS poplar when compared with the wild-type control, in all tissues examined. SOD was the only gene family found to exhibit such patterns. RESULTS: In silico analysis of the Populus genome identified 12 SOD genes and two genes encoding copper chaperones for SOD (CCSs. The poplar SODs form three phylogenetic clusters in accordance with their distinct metal co-factor requirements and gene structure. Nearly all poplar SODs and CCSs are present in duplicate derived from whole genome duplication, in sharp contrast to their predominantly single-copy Arabidopsis orthologs. Drought stress triggered plant-wide down-regulation of the plastidic copper SODs (CSDs, with concomitant up-regulation of plastidic iron SODs (FSDs in GS poplar relative to the wild type; this was confirmed at the activity level. We also found evidence for coordinated down-regulation of other copper proteins, including plastidic CCSs and polyphenol oxidases, in GS poplar under drought conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Both gene duplication and expression divergence have contributed to the expansion and transcriptional diversity of the Populus SOD/CCS families. Coordinated down-regulation of major copper proteins in drought-tolerant GS poplars supports the copper cofactor economy model where copper supply is preferentially allocated for plastocyanins to sustain photosynthesis during drought. Our results also extend previous findings on the compensatory regulation between chloroplastic CSDs and FSDs, and suggest that this

  11. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, Anjo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available studies indicating an alternative mechanism via the cytochrome cytochrome bc1 complex impacting on the homeostasis of ATP synthesis [39]. The inhibition of glutamine synthetase may also impact the ATP homeostasis as the resultant accumulation of α...

  12. Impaired Hippocampal Glutamate and Glutamine Metabolism in the db/db Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Velde; Nissen, Jakob Dahl; Christensen, Sofie Kjellerup

    2017-01-01

    in the db/db mouse model of T2DM. Glutamate and glutamine are both substrates for mitochondrial oxidation, and oxygen consumption was assessed in isolated brain mitochondria by Seahorse XFe96 analysis. In addition, acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices were incubated with [U-13C......]glutamate and [U-13C]glutamine, and tissue extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The oxygen consumption rate using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was not different in isolated cerebral mitochondria of db/db mice compared to controls. Hippocampal slices of db/db mice exhibited......Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, and changes in brain energy metabolism have been suggested as a causative mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the cerebral metabolism of the important amino acids glutamate and glutamine...

  13. Arginine, N-carbamylglutamate, and glutamine exert protective effects against oxidative stress in rat intestine

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    Liang Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study is to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with arginine (ARG, N-carbamylglutamate (NCG, and glutamine (GLN on rat intestinal morphology and antioxidant status under oxidative stress. Rats were fed for 30 d with one of the following iso-nitrogenous diets: basal diet (BD, BD plus 1% ARG, BD plus 0.1% NCG, and BD plus 1% GLN. On day 28, half of the rats fed BD were intraperitoneally injected with 12 mg/kg body weight of diquat (DT; i.e., the DT group and the other half was intraperitoneally injected with sterile solution (i.e., the control group. The other diet groups were intraperitoneally injected with 12 mg/kg body weight of DT (i.e., DT + 1% GLN [DT + GLN], DT + 1% ARG [DT + ARG], and DT + 0.1% NCG [DT + NCG]. Rat jejunum samples obtained at 48 h after DT injection were analyzed. Results showed that DT significantly decreased catalase (CAT activity and glutathione (GSH content by 58.25% and 56.57%, respectively, and elevated malondialdehyde (MDA content and crypt depth (CD by 19.39% and 22.13%, respectively, in the jejunum (P < 0.05, relative to the control group. Compared with the DT group, the DT + GLN group exhibited significantly improved villus height (VH, villus width (VW, villus surface area (VSA, CD and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC activity (P < 0.05; the DT + ARG group exhibited significantly increased the ratio of VH to CD (H:D and T-AOC activity (P < 0.05; the DT + GLN, DT + ARG and DT + NCG groups exhibited significantly enhanced CAT activity and GSH content as well as decreased MDA content (P < 0.05. Moreover, VH, VW, VSA, CD and GSH content in the DT + GLN group were higher whereas MDA content was lower compared with the corresponding values observed in both the DT + ARG and the DT + NCG groups (P < 0.05. The H:D ratio in the DT + ARG group significantly increased compared with that in the DT + NCG and DT + GLN groups (P < 0

  14. Steady-state and dynamic gene expression programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to variation in environmental nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Miller, Darach; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Brandt, Nathan; Abdul-Rahman, Farah; Neymotin, Benjamin; Hashimoto, Tatsu; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Gresham, David

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth rate is regulated in response to the abundance and molecular form of essential nutrients. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), the molecular form of environmental nitrogen is a major determinant of cell growth rate, supporting growth rates that vary at least threefold. Transcriptional control of nitrogen use is mediated in large part by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which results in the repression of specific transcripts in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source that supports a fast growth rate, such as glutamine, that are otherwise expressed in the presence of a nonpreferred nitrogen source, such as proline, which supports a slower growth rate. Differential expression of the NCR regulon and additional nitrogen-responsive genes results in >500 transcripts that are differentially expressed in cells growing in the presence of different nitrogen sources in batch cultures. Here we find that in growth rate–controlled cultures using nitrogen-limited chemostats, gene expression programs are strikingly similar regardless of nitrogen source. NCR expression is derepressed in all nitrogen-limiting chemostat conditions regardless of nitrogen source, and in these conditions, only 34 transcripts exhibit nitrogen source–specific differential gene expression. Addition of either the preferred nitrogen source, glutamine, or the nonpreferred nitrogen source, proline, to cells growing in nitrogen-limited chemostats results in rapid, dose-dependent repression of the NCR regulon. Using a novel means of computational normalization to compare global gene expression programs in steady-state and dynamic conditions, we find evidence that the addition of nitrogen to nitrogen-limited cells results in the transient overproduction of transcripts required for protein translation. Simultaneously, we find that that accelerated mRNA degradation underlies the rapid clearing of a subset of transcripts, which is most pronounced for the highly expressed NCR

  15. Inhibitory serpins from rye grain with glutamine as P-1 and P-2 residues in the reactive center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn

    2001-01-01

    (k(a)'similar to 10(6) M-1 s(-1)). Similar but differently organized glutamine-rich reactive centers were recently found in grain serpins cloned from wheat [Ostergaard et al. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 33272] but not from barley. The prolamin storage proteins of cereal grains contain similar...... sequences in their glutamine-rich repeats. A possible adaption of hypervariable serpin reactive centers late in Triticeae cereal evolution as defence against insects feeding on cereal grains is discussed....

  16. Nitrogen-13-labeled ammonia for myocardial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, W.F.; Fill, H.R.; Harper, P.V.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclotron-produced nitrogen-13 (half-life 10 min), as labeled ammonia (/sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/), has been evaluated as a myocardial perfusion imaging agent. The regional myocardial uptake of /sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/ has been shown to be proportional to regional tissue perfusion in animal studies. Intravenously administered /sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/ is rapidly cleared from the circulation, being extracted by the liver (15 percent), lungs, myocardium (2 percent--4 percent), brain, kidney, and bladder. Myocardial ammonia is metabolized mainly to glutamine via the glutamine synthetase pathway. Pulmonary uptake is substantial, but usually transient, except in smokers where clearance may be delayed. The positron annihilation irradiation (511 keV) of /sup 13/N may be imaged with a scintillation camera, using either a specially designed tungsten collimator or a pinhole collimator. After early technical problems with collimation and the production method of /sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/ were overcome, reproducible high quality myocardial images were consistently obtained. The normal myocardial image was established to be of a homogeneous ''doughnut'' configuration. Imaging studies performed in patients with varying manifestations of ischemic and valvular heart disease showed a high incidence of localized perfusion defects, especially in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Sequential studies at short intervals in patients with acute infarction showed correlation between alterations in regional perfusion and the clinical course of the patient. It is concluded that myocardial imaging with /sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/ and a scintillation camera provides a valid and noninvasive means of assessing regional myocardial perfusion. This method is especially suitable for sequential studies of acute cardiac patients at short intervals. Coincidence imaging of the 511 keV annihilation irradiation provides a tomographic and potentially quantitative assessment of the

  17. Paradoxical sleep deprivation increases the content of glutamate and glutamine in rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettendorff, L; Sallanon-Moulin, M; Touret, M; Wins, P; Margineanu, I; Schoffeniels, E

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the sleep/waking cycle, the effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and of the vigilance-promoting drug modafinil on the amino acid contents of rat brain cortex. No significant nycthemeral variations in amino acid levels could be detected. PSD (12-24 hours), using the water tank method, significantly increased the levels of glutamate and glutamine. The increase was still observed after the sleep rebound period. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels did not change significantly during the instrumental sleep deprivation but increased during the rebound period. Control experiments indicate that the increase in glutamate and glutamine levels is due to PSD rather than to the stress associated with the experimental procedure. The increase in glutamate content cannot arise only from transamination reactions, because the levels of other amino acids (such as aspartate) did not decrease. Modafinil treatment did not significantly modify the brain cortex content of any of the amino acids tested.

  18. Addiction to Coupling of the Warburg Effect with Glutamine Catabolism in Cancer Cells

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    Bradley Smith

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming is critical to oncogenesis, but the emergence and function of this profound reorganization remain poorly understood. Here we find that cooperating oncogenic mutations drive large-scale metabolic reprogramming, which is both intrinsic to cancer cells and obligatory for the transition to malignancy. This involves synergistic regulation of several genes encoding metabolic enzymes, including the lactate dehydrogenases LDHA and LDHB and mitochondrial glutamic pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2. Notably, GPT2 engages activated glycolysis to drive the utilization of glutamine as a carbon source for TCA cycle anaplerosis in colon cancer cells. Our data indicate that the Warburg effect supports oncogenesis via GPT2-mediated coupling of pyruvate production to glutamine catabolism. Although critical to the cancer phenotype, GPT2 activity is dispensable in cells that are not fully transformed, thus pinpointing a metabolic vulnerability specifically associated with cancer cell progression to malignancy.

  19. Dietary glutamine supplementation effects on amino acid metabolism, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity and antioxidant response of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F; Castro, C; Rufino-Palomares, E; Ordóñez-Grande, B; Gallardo, M A; Oliva-Teles, A; Peres, H

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate dietary glutamine supplementation effects on gilthead sea bream performance, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity, hepatic and intestinal glutamine metabolism and oxidative status. For that purpose gilthead sea bream juveniles (mean weight 13.0g) were fed four isolipidic (18% lipid) and isonitrogenous (43% protein) diets supplemented with 0, 0.5, 1 and 2% glutamine for 6weeks. Fish performance, body composition and intestinal nutrient absorption capacity were not affected by dietary glutamine levels. Hepatic and intestinal glutaminase (GlNase), glutamine synthetase (GSase), alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities were also unaffected by dietary glutamine supplementation. In the intestine GlNase activity was higher and GSase/GlNase ratio was two-fold lower than in the liver, suggesting a higher use of glutamine for energy production by the intestine than by the liver. The liver showed higher catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, while the intestine presented higher glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities and oxidised glutathione content, which seems to reveal a higher glutathione dependency of the intestinal antioxidant response. Total and reduced glutathione contents in liver and intestine and superoxide dismutase activity in the intestine were enhanced by dietary glutamine, though lipid peroxidation values were not affected. Overall, differences between liver and intestine glutamine metabolism and antioxidant response were identified and the potential of dietary glutamine supplementation to gilthead sea bream's antioxidant response was elucidated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Robustness in Escherichia coli glutamate and glutamine synthesis studied by a kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodeiro, Aníbal; Melgarejo, Augusto

    2008-04-01

    Metabolic control of glutamine and glutamate synthesis from ammonia and oxoglutarate in Escherichia coli is tight and complex. In this work, the role of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) regulation in this control was studied. Both enzymes form a linear pathway, which can also have a cyclic topology if glutamate-oxoglutarate amino transferase (GOGAT) activity is included. We modelled the metabolic pathways in the linear or cyclic topologies using a coupled nonlinear differential equations system. To simulate GS regulation by covalent modification, we introduced a relationship that took into account the levels of oxoglutarate and glutamine as signal inputs, as well as the ultrasensitive response of enzyme adenylylation. Thus, by including this relationship or not, we were able to model the system with or without GS regulation. In addition, GS and GDH activities were changed manually. The response of the model in different stationary states, or under the influence of N-input exhaustion or oscillation, was analyzed in both pathway topologies. Our results indicate a metabolic control coefficient for GDH ranging from 0.94 in the linear pathway with GS regulation to 0.24 in the cyclic pathway without regulation, employing a default GDH concentration of 8 microM. Thus, in these conditions, GDH seemed to have a high degree of control in the linear pathway while having limited influence in the cyclic one. When GS was regulated, system responses to N-input perturbations were more sensitive, especially in the cyclic pathway. Furthermore, we found that effects of regulation against perturbations depended on the relative values of the glutamine and glutamate output first-order kinetic constants, which we named k(6) and k(7), respectively. Effects of regulation grew exponentially with a factor around 2, with linear increases of (k(7) - k(6)). These trends were sustained but with lower differences at higher GS concentration. Hence, GS regulation seemed

  1. Glutamine uptake contributes to central sensitization in the medullary dorsal horn

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Chen Yu; Li, Zhaohui; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Hu, James W.; Sessle, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    Mustard oil application to tooth pulp produces central sensitization in rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons, which has been implicated in persistent pain mechanisms. We found that superfusion onto MDH of methylaminoisobutyric acid, a competitive inhibitor of the neuronal system A transporter for presynaptic uptake of glutamine (a glutamate precursor released from astroglia), significantly depressed development of mustard oil-induced central sensitization in rat MDH nociceptive...

  2. Dexamethasone enhances glutamine synthetase activity and reduces N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity in mixed cultures of neurons and astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Debroas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are claimed to protect neurons against excitotoxicity by clearing glutamate from the extracellular space and rapidly converting it into glutamine. Glutamine, is then released into the extracellular medium, taken up by neurons and transformed back into glutamate which is then stored into synaptic vesicles. Glutamine synthetase (GS, the key enzyme that governs this glutamate/glutamine cycle, is known to be upregulated by glucocorticoids. In the present work we have thus studied in parallel the effects of dexamethasone on glutamine synthetase activity and NMDA-induced neuronal death in cultures derived from the brain cortex of murine embryos. We showed that dexamethasone was able to markedly enhance GS activity in cultures of astrocytes but not in near pure neuronal cultures. The pharmacological characteristics of the dexamethasone action strongly suggest that it corresponds to a typical receptor-mediated effect. We also observed that long lasting incubation (72 h of mixed astrocyte-neuron cultures in the presence of 100 nM dexamethasone significantly reduced the toxicity of NMDA treatment. Furthermore we demonstrated that methionine sulfoximine, a selective inhibitor of GS, abolished the dexamethasone-induced increase in GS activity and also markedly potentiated NMDA toxicity. Altogether these results suggest that dexamethasone may promote neuroprotection through a stimulation of astrocyte glutamine synthetase.

  3. Maintainance of specificity, information, and thermostability in thermophilic Bacillus sp. glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedler, F C; Hoffmann, F M; Kenney, R; Carfi, J

    1976-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase has been purified to homogeneity from B. subtilis (37 degrees) B. stearothermophilus (55 degrees), and B. caldolyticus (75 degrees). Those characteristics compared include size (6.0 +/- 0.3 X 10(5) daltons), quaternary structure (12 SU) amino acid content, substrate Km's and specificity for structural analogs, metal ion activation, number and kind of separate feedback modifier sites, and the complexity of modifier-substrate and modifier-modifier site interactions. Although the 37 degrees and 55 degrees systems are quite similar, the 75 degrees system shows important alterations in substrate specificity and modes of modifier action. Whereas at 37 degrees and 55 degrees AMP inhibits synergistically with amino acids (glycine, glutamine, histidine), the 75 degrees enzyme is inhibited directly by the products ADP, (which assumes the role of AMP) and glutamine, plus other ligands. Ligand binding domains are compared and found to be very different. Thermostabilization occurs by (a) protection by bound L-glutamate, (b) protein aggregation, (c) trends in the content of total polar residues, total Asx + Flx residues, the average hydrophobicity, and (d) disulfide bond cross-linking. Such studies provide insights to molecular evolution occurring with changes in environmental stress.

  4. The Effectiveness of Combined Use of Antioxidant and Glutamine in Abdominal Sepsis

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    V. V. Nazaretyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: the effectiveness of concomitant use of antioxidant therapy with antioxidant 2-ethyl-6- methyl-3-hydroxypyridine succinate (mexidol and intensive nutritional support with glutamine in patients with abdominal sepsis (AS. Materials and methods. 170 patients with abdominal sepsis (AS involved in the study were separated into two groups. Patients of group 1 (control group, n=70 received basic treatment. Patients from group 2 (n=100 were divided into 2 subgroups. Patients from the subgroup 21 (n=70, in additon to the basic treatment, received intravenously, by drop infusion, mexidol (2000 mg per day and dipeptiven (27.5 g per day, patients from subgroup 22 (n=30 additionally to that received per os glutamine. Survival analysis was carried out according to the Kaplan-Meier method with using of the Cox's F-test and Mantel-Cox test for testing of statistical hypotheses. Results. Treatment outcomes analysis showed that in the basic group 2, mortality was lower than in the control group 1. A statistically significant increase of cumulative part in the survivors was revealed using mexidol and glutamine. Conclusion. Concomitant intravenous administration of medications had positive effects on treatment outcomes. Following on from the analysis results, we may suggest that the pair mexidol + dipeptiven interrupts the cascade of development of abdominal sepsis and contributes to avoiding a critical condition during sepsis.

  5. The effects of high-dose glutamine ingestion on weightlifting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Jose; Sanders, Michael S; Kalman, Douglas; Woodgate, Derek; Street, Chris

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if high-dose glutamine ingestion affected weightlifting performance. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 6 resistance-trained men (mean +/- SE: age, 21.5 +/- 0.3 years; weight, 76.5 +/- 2.8 kg(-1)) performed weightlifting exercises after the ingestion of glutamine or glycine (0.3 g x kg(-1)) mixed with calorie-free fruit juice or placebo (calorie-free fruit juice only). Each subject underwent each of the 3 treatments in a randomized order. One hour after ingestion, subjects performed 4 total sets of exercise to momentary muscular failure (2 sets of leg presses at 200% of body weight, 2 sets of bench presses at 100% of body weight). There were no differences in the average number of maximal repetitions performed in the leg press or bench press exercises among the 3 groups. These data indicate that the short-term ingestion of glutamine does not enhance weightlifting performance in resistance-trained men.

  6. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu [Department of Urology, Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hwa [Department of Urology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam 463-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung-Sup, E-mail: KYUNGSUP59@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  7. Lanthanide complexation with amino acids. Eu(III) with glutamine and serine in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silber, H.B.; Ghajari, N.; Maraschin, V.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A problem of long term interest in lanthanide chemistry is whether a ligand resides in the inner or outer solvation shell of the cation. Complexation between lanthanide ions and ligands can be detected by deviations from Beer's Law using hypersensitive peaks. We have been investigating lanthanide complexation with amino acids as a function of temperature in water and mixed solvents to learn about the nature of the complexes. In our previous studies using alanine and glycine, as well as in this investigation with glutamine and serine, only a single complex forms, and the Benesi-Hildebrand method allows us to determine the complexation constants. Enthalpy and entropy data are used to predict if a complex is outer or inner sphere in water. In all four amino acid systems, the complexation constant in water is near unity, with little differences found in its magnitude. The equilibrium constants with Eu(III) at I = 0.5 and 25 C is 1.3 with serine and 1.5 with glutamine. The enthalpy and entropy are consistent with inner sphere complexation with glutamine and outer sphere with serine. These results will be compared to other lanthanide amino acid systems

  8. Is long term creatine and glutamine supplementation effective in enhancing physical performance of military police officers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Celismar Lázaro; de Souza, Thiago Siqueira Paiva; Batista, Gilmário Ricarte; de Araújo, Adenilson Targino; da Silva, Júlio César Gomes; de Sousa, Maria do Socorro Cirilo; Marta, Carlos; Garrido, Nuno Domingo

    2014-09-29

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of supplementation with creatine and glutamine on physical fitness of military police officers. Therefore, an experimental double blind study was developed, with the final sample composed by 32 men randomly distributed into three groups: a group supplemented with creatine (n=10), glutamine (n=10) and a placebo group (n=12) and evaluated in three distinct moments, in an interval of three months (T1, T2 and T3). The physical training had a weekly frequency of 5 sessions × 90 min, including strength exercises, local muscular resistance, flexibility and both aerobic and anaerobic capacity. After analyzing the effect of time, group and interaction (group × time) for measures that indicated the physical capabilities of the subjects, a significant effect of time for the entire variable was identified (p0,05). In face of the results it was concluded that supplementation with creatine and glutamine showed no ergogenic effect on physical performance in military police officers.

  9. Effects of Glutamine and Alanine Supplementation on Central Fatigue Markers in Rats Submitted to Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Yule Coqueiro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that increased brain serotonin synthesis impairs performance in high-intensity intermittent exercise and specific amino acids may modulate this condition, delaying fatigue. This study investigated the effects of glutamine and alanine supplementation on central fatigue markers in rats submitted to resistance training (RT. Wistar rats were distributed in: sedentary (SED, trained (CON, trained and supplemented with alanine (ALA, glutamine and alanine in their free form (G + A, or as dipeptide (DIP. Trained groups underwent a ladder-climbing exercise for eight weeks, with progressive loads. In the last 21 days, supplementations were offered in water with a 4% concentration. Albeit without statistically significance difference, RT decreased liver glycogen, and enhanced the concentrations of plasma glucose, free fatty acids (FFA, hypothalamic serotonin, and ammonia in muscle and the liver. Amino acids affected fatigue parameters depending on the supplementation form. G + A prevented the muscle ammonia increase by RT, whereas ALA and DIP augmented ammonia and glycogen concentrations in muscle. DIP also increased liver ammonia. ALA and G + A reduced plasma FFA, whereas DIP increased this parameter, free tryptophan/total tryptophan ratio, hypothalamic serotonin, and the serotonin/dopamine ratio. The supplementations did not affect physical performance. In conclusion, glutamine and alanine may improve or impair central fatigue markers depending on their supplementation form.

  10. Evolution of the Maillard Reaction in Glutamine or Arginine-Dextrinomaltose Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastoriza, Silvia; Rufián-Henares, José Ángel; García-Villanova, Belén; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo

    2016-12-07

    Enteral formulas are foods designed for medical uses to feed patients who are unable to eat normally. They are prepared by mixing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates and fats and submitted to sterilization. During thermal treatment, the Maillard reaction takes place through the reaction of animo acids with reducing sugars. Thus, although glutamine and arginine are usually added to improve the nutritional value of enteral formulas, their final concentration may vary. Thus, in the present paper the early, intermediate, and advanced states of the Maillard reaction were studied in model systems by measuring loss of free amino acids through the decrease of fluorescence intensity with o -phtaldialdehyde (OPA), 5-Hydroximethylfurfural (HMF), furfural, glucosylisomaltol, fluorescence, and absorbance at 420 nm. The systems were prepared by mixing glutamine or arginine with dextrinomaltose (similar ingredients to those used in special enteral formula), and heated at 100 °C, 120 °C and 140 °C for 0 to 30 min. The recorded changes in the concentration of furanic compounds was only useful for longer heating times of high temperatures, while absorbance and fluorescence measurements were useful in all the assayed conditions. In addition, easiness and sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence make them useful techniques that could be implemented as indicators for monitoring the manufacture of special enteral formulas. Glucosylisomaltol is a useful indicator to monitor the manufacture of glutamine-enriched enteral formulas.

  11. Evolution of the Maillard Reaction in Glutamine or Arginine-Dextrinomaltose Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pastoriza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteral formulas are foods designed for medical uses to feed patients who are unable to eat normally. They are prepared by mixing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates and fats and submitted to sterilization. During thermal treatment, the Maillard reaction takes place through the reaction of animo acids with reducing sugars. Thus, although glutamine and arginine are usually added to improve the nutritional value of enteral formulas, their final concentration may vary. Thus, in the present paper the early, intermediate, and advanced states of the Maillard reaction were studied in model systems by measuring loss of free amino acids through the decrease of fluorescence intensity with o-phtaldialdehyde (OPA, 5-Hydroximethylfurfural (HMF, furfural, glucosylisomaltol, fluorescence, and absorbance at 420 nm. The systems were prepared by mixing glutamine or arginine with dextrinomaltose (similar ingredients to those used in special enteral formula, and heated at 100 °C, 120 °C and 140 °C for 0 to 30 min. The recorded changes in the concentration of furanic compounds was only useful for longer heating times of high temperatures, while absorbance and fluorescence measurements were useful in all the assayed conditions. In addition, easiness and sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence make them useful techniques that could be implemented as indicators for monitoring the manufacture of special enteral formulas. Glucosylisomaltol is a useful indicator to monitor the manufacture of glutamine-enriched enteral formulas.

  12. Effects of Glutamine and Alanine Supplementation on Central Fatigue Markers in Rats Submitted to Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Raizel, Raquel; Bonvini, Andrea; Hypólito, Thaís; Godois, Allan da Mata; Pereira, Jéssica Ramos Rocha; Garcia, Amanda Beatriz de Oliveira; Lara, Rafael de Souza Bittencourt; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Tirapegui, Julio

    2018-01-25

    Recent evidence suggests that increased brain serotonin synthesis impairs performance in high-intensity intermittent exercise and specific amino acids may modulate this condition, delaying fatigue. This study investigated the effects of glutamine and alanine supplementation on central fatigue markers in rats submitted to resistance training (RT). Wistar rats were distributed in: sedentary (SED), trained (CON), trained and supplemented with alanine (ALA), glutamine and alanine in their free form (G + A), or as dipeptide (DIP). Trained groups underwent a ladder-climbing exercise for eight weeks, with progressive loads. In the last 21 days, supplementations were offered in water with a 4% concentration. Albeit without statistically significance difference, RT decreased liver glycogen, and enhanced the concentrations of plasma glucose, free fatty acids (FFA), hypothalamic serotonin, and ammonia in muscle and the liver. Amino acids affected fatigue parameters depending on the supplementation form. G + A prevented the muscle ammonia increase by RT, whereas ALA and DIP augmented ammonia and glycogen concentrations in muscle. DIP also increased liver ammonia. ALA and G + A reduced plasma FFA, whereas DIP increased this parameter, free tryptophan/total tryptophan ratio, hypothalamic serotonin, and the serotonin/dopamine ratio. The supplementations did not affect physical performance. In conclusion, glutamine and alanine may improve or impair central fatigue markers depending on their supplementation form.

  13. The effects of fluorocitrate on renal glutamine, lactate, alanine, and oxygen metabolism in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, A

    1989-06-01

    Acid-base status is considered the major factor controlling renal NH4+ production from glutamine, with maximal values found in chronic acidosis. However, metabolic inhibitors have been shown to increase NH4+ production without acid-base change; the mechanism for this increase is unclear. Fluorocitrate was administered to dogs with chronic metabolic alkalosis. Following fluorocitrate total renal NH4+ production rose from 32 +/- 5 to 104 +/- 15 mumol/(min.100 mL glomerular filtration rate (GFR] (p less than 0.01) and glutamine extraction rose from 26 +/- 8 to 65 +/- 8 mumol/(min.100 mL GFR) (p less than 0.01). These values approximate maximal values found in chronic acidosis. Lactate utilization fell from 165 +/- 19 to 99 +/- 7 mumol/(min.100 mL GFR) following fluorocitrate (p less than 0.01). Citrate extraction fell to zero and alanine production rose from 27 +/- 4 to 46 +/- 7 mumol/(min.100 mL GFR) (p less than 0.01). Oxygen consumption remained unchanged following fluorocitrate, 584 +/- 29 vs. 549 +/- 29 mumol/(min.100 mL GFR). These results demonstrate that in the presence of metabolic inhibition in the kidney, ATP production remains constant. This is achieved by increased utilization of one substrate, glutamine, when the ATP production from other substrates is reduced. Thus the necessity to maintain constant ATP production appears to modulate renal NH4+ production.

  14. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu; Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  15. [Research advance in nitrogen metabolism of plant and its environmental regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2004-03-01

    Nitrogen metabolism is not only one of the basic processes of plant physiology, but also one of the important parts of global chemical cycle. Plant nitrogen assimilation directly takes part in the synthesis and conversion of amino acid through the reduction of nitrate. During this stage, some key enzymes, e.g., nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamine synthase (GOGAT), aspargine synthetase (AS), and asparate aminotransferase (AspAT) participate these processes. The protein is assimilated in plant cell through amino acid, and becomes a part of plant organism through modifying, classifying, transporting and storing processes, etc. The nitrogen metabolism is associated with carbonic metabolism through key enzyme regulations and the conversion of products, which consists of basic life process. Among these amino acids in plant cell, glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), aspartic acid (Asp) and asparagines (Asn), etc., play a key role, which regulates their conversion each other and their contents in the plant cell through regulating formation and activity of those key enzymes. Environmental factors also affect the conversion and recycle of the key amino acids through regulating gene expression of the key enzymes and their activities. Nitrate and light intensity positively regulate the gene transcription of NR, but ammonium ions and Glu, Gln do the negative way. Water deficit is a very serious constraint on N2 fixation rate and soybean (Glycine max Merr.) grain yield, in which, ureide accumulation and degradation under water deficit appear to be the key issues of feedback mechanism on nitrogen fixation. Water stress decreases NR activity, but increases proteinase activity, and thus, they regulate plant nitrogen metabolism, although there are some different effects among species and cultivars. Water stress also decreases plant tissue protein content, ratio of protein and amino acid, and reduces the absorption of amino

  16. The Nitrogen Moieties of Dietary Nonessential Amino Acids Are Distinctively Metabolized in the Gut and Distributed to the Circulation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Sakai, Ryosei

    2017-08-01

    Background: Although previous growth studies in rodents have indicated the importance of dietary nonessential amino acids (NEAAs) as nitrogen sources, individual NEAAs have different growth-promoting activities. This phenomenon might be attributable to differences in the nitrogen metabolism of individual NEAAs. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare nitrogen metabolism across dietary NEAAs with the use of their 15 N isotopologues. Methods: Male Fischer rats (8 wk old) were given 1.0 g amino acid-defined diets containing either 15 N-labeled glutamate, glutamine (amino or amide), aspartate, alanine, proline, glycine, or serine hourly for 5-6 h. Then, steady-state amino acid concentrations and their 15 N enrichments in the gut and in portal and arterial plasma were measured by an amino acid analyzer and LC tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Results: The intestinal 15 N distribution and portal-arterial balance of 15 N metabolites indicated that most dietary glutamate nitrogen (>90% of dietary input) was incorporated into various amino acids, including alanine, proline, and citrulline, in the gut. Dietary aspartate nitrogen, alanine nitrogen, and amino nitrogen of glutamine were distributed similarly to other amino acids both in the gut and in the circulation. In contrast, incorporation of the nitrogen moieties of dietary proline, serine, and glycine into other amino acids was less than that of other NEAAs, although interconversion between serine and glycine was very active. Cluster analysis of 15 N enrichment data also indicated that dietary glutamate nitrogen, aspartate nitrogen, alanine nitrogen, and the amino nitrogen of glutamine were distributed similarly to intestinal and circulating amino acids. Further, the analysis revealed close relations between intestinal and arterial 15 N enrichment for each amino acid. The steady-state 15 N enrichment of arterial amino acids indicated that substantial amounts of circulating amino acid nitrogen are derived

  17. Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses in Sinorhizobium meliloti

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    Kelly Lynn Hagberg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have developed various stress response pathways to improve their assimilation and allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphate. While both the Nitrogen Stress Response (NSR and Phosphate Stress Response (PSR have been studied individually, there are few experiments reported that characterize effects of multiple stresses on one or more pathways in Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultatively symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, regulate the NSR activity, but analysis of global transcription changes in a PII deficient mutant suggest that the S. meliloti PII proteins may also regulate the PSR. PII double deletion mutants grow very slowly and pseudoreversion of the slow growth phenotype is common. To understand this phenomenon better, transposon mutants were isolated that had a faster growing phenotype. One mutation was in phoB, the response regulator for a two component regulatory system that is important in the PSR. phoB::Tn5 mutants had different phenotypes in the wild type compared to a PII deficient background. This led to the hypothesis that phosphate stress affects the NSR and conversely, that nitrogen stress affects the PSR. Our results show that phosphate availability affects glutamine synthetase activity and expression, which are often used as indicators of NSR activity, but that nitrogen availability did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity and expression, which are indicators of PSR activity. We conclude that the NSR is co-regulated by nitrogen and phosphate, whereas the PSR does not appear to be co-regulated by nitrogen in addition to its known phosphate regulation.

  18. Effects of L-glutamine supplementation on the myenteric neurons from the duodenum and cecum of diabetic rats

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    Jacqueline Nelisis Zanoni

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Peripheral neuropathy is one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus and is directly related to gastrointestinal consequences of the disease. Myenteric neurons are affected in some pathological conditions such as diabetic neuropathy. The imbalance between cellular antioxidants and free radicals, leading to an increase in oxidative stress, is considered one of the main factors responsible for neuronal damages in diabetes. Drugs that reduce the oxidative stress may play a significant role in the treatment of neurological complications of diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of L-glutamine supplementation on the myenteric neurons from the cecum and duodenum of Wistar rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. METHODS: The animals were divided in four groups (n = 5: non-treated normoglycemics, normoglycemics treated with L-glutamine, non-treated diabetics and diabetics treated with L-glutamine from the 4th day of diabetes induction on. The amino acid L-glutamine was added to their diet at 1%. Giemsa's technique was employed to stain the myenteric neurons. We determined the cell body area of 500 neurons in each group studied. The quantitative analysis was performed by sampling in an area of 16.6 mm² in the cecum and 3.6 mm² in the duodenum of each animal. RESULTS: After the supplementation with L-glutamine in the duodenum, we observed a preservation of neuronal density in groups normoglycemic and diabetic (P<0.05. We also observed a preservation of the cell bodies area in diabetic animals (group treated with L-glutamine (P<0.05. In the cecum, that preservation was not evident. CONCLUSION: Supplementation with L-glutamine (1% promoted a neuroprotective effect on the myenteric neurons from the duodenum of rats, both in terms of natural aging and of diabetes mellitus.

  19. [Cardioprotective effects of glutamine in patients with ischemic heart disease operated under conditions of extracorporeal blood circulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomivorotov, V V; Efremov, S M; Shmyrev, V A; Ponomarev, D N; Sviatchenko, A V; Kniaz'kova, L G

    2012-01-01

    It was conducted a study of glutamine cardioptotective effects during perioperative use in patients with ischemic heart disease, operated under CB. Exclusion criteria were: left ventricular ejection fraction less than 50%, diabetes melitus, myocardial infarction less than 3 months ago, Patients of the study group (n=25) had glutamine (20% solution N(2)-L-alanine-L-glutamine ("Dipeptiven" Fresenius Kabi, Germany); 0.4 g/kg/day. Patients of control group (n=25) received placebo (0.9% NaCl solution). The main indicators were the dynamics of troponin I, as well as central hemodynamics parameters. On the 1-st day after operation the concentration of troponin I was significantly lower in the glutamine-group compared placebo-group (1.280 (0.840-2.230) 2.410 (1.060-6.600) ng/ml; p=0.035). 4 hours after CB in a glutamine-group also had significantly large indicators of cardiac index (2.58 (2.34-2.91) l/min/m2 vs 2.03 (1.76-2.32)) l/min/m2; p=0,002) and stroke index (32.8 (27.8-36.0.) ml/m2 vs 26.1 (22.6-31.8) ml/m2; p=0.023). Systemic vascular resistance index was significantly lower in glutamine-group (1942 (1828-2209) dyn x s/cm(-5)/m2 vs 2456 (2400-3265) dyn x s/cm(-5)/m2; p=0.001). Conclusion. Perioperative use of N(2)-L-alanine-L-glutamine during the first 24 hours ofperioperative period gives cardioprotective effect in patients with ischemic heart disease operated under CB.

  20. Comparison of nitrogen narcosis and helium pressure effects on striatal amino acids: a microdialysis study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Nicolas; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Boussuges, Alain; Risso, Jean-Jacques

    2009-05-01

    Exposure to nitrogen-oxygen mixture at high pressure induces narcosis, which can be considered as a first step toward general anaesthesia. Narcotic potencies of inert gases are attributed to their lipid solubility. Nitrogen narcosis induces cognitive and motor disturbances that occur from 0.3 MPa in man and from 1 MPa in rats. Neurochemical studies performed in rats up to 3 MPa have shown that nitrogen pressure decreases striatal dopamine release like argon, another inert gas, or nitrous oxide, an anaesthetic gas. Striatal dopamine release is under glutamatergic and other amino acid neurotransmission regulations. The aim of this work was to study the effects of nitrogen at 3 MPa on striatal amino acid levels and to compare to those of 3 MPa of helium which is not narcotic at this pressure, by using a new technique of microdialysis samples extraction under hyperbaric conditions, in freely moving rats. Amino acids were analysed by HPLC coupled to fluorimetric detection in order to appreciate glutamate, aspartate, glutamine and asparagine levels. Nitrogen-oxygen mixture exposure at 3 MPa decreased glutamate, glutamine and asparagine concentrations. In contrast, with helium-oxygen mixture, glutamate and aspartate levels were increased during the compression phase but not during the stay at maximal pressure. Comparison between nitrogen and helium highlighted the narcotic effects of nitrogen at pressure. As a matter of fact, nitrogen induces a reduction in glutamate and in other amino acids that could partly explain the decrease in striatal dopamine level as well as the motor and cognitive disturbances reported in nitrogen narcosis.

  1. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D inhibits glutamine metabolism in Harvey-ras transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuanzhu; Zheng, Wei; Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel; Donkin, Shawn S; Bequette, Brian; Teegarden, Dorothy

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the US. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), is proposed to inhibit cellular processes and to prevent breast cancer. The current studies investigated the effect of 1,25(OH)2D on glutamine metabolism during cancer progression employing Harvey-ras oncogene transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A-ras). Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D significantly reduced intracellular glutamine and glutamate levels measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by 23±2% each. Further, 1,25(OH)2D treatment reduced glutamine and glutamate flux, determined by [U-(13)C5] glutamine tracer kinetics, into the TCA cycle by 31±0.2% and 17±0.4%, respectively. The relative levels of mRNA and protein abundance of the major glutamine transporter, solute linked carrier family 1 member A5 (SLC1A5), was significantly decreased by 1,25(OH)2D treatment in both MCF10A-ras cells and MCF10A which overexpress ErbB2 (HER-2/neu). Consistent with these results, glutamine uptake was reduced by 1,25(OH)2D treatment and the impact was eliminated with the SLC1A5 inhibitor L-γ-Glutamyl-p-nitroanilide (GPNA). A consensus sequence to the vitamin D responsive element (VDRE) was identified in silico in the SLC1A5 gene promoter, and site-directed mutagenesis analyses with reporter gene studies demonstrate a functional negative VDRE in the promoter of the SLC1A5 gene. siRNA-SLC1A5 transfection in MCF10A-ras cells significantly reduced SLC1A5 mRNA expression as well as decreased viable cell number similar to 1,25(OH)2D treatment. SLC1A5 knockdown also induced an increase in apoptotic cells in MCF10A-ras cells. These results suggest 1,25(OH)2D alters glutamine metabolism in MCF10A-ras cells by inhibiting glutamine uptake and utilization, in part through down-regulation of SLC1A5 transcript abundance. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D down-regulation of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, may facilitate vitamin D prevention of breast

  2. Nitrogen recycling during phenylpropanoid metabolism in sweet potato tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Lewis, N. G.; Towers, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    In the first step of the phenylpropanoid metabolic pathway, L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) is deaminated to form E-cinnamate, in a conversion catalyzed by phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5). The metabolic fate of the ammonium ion (NH4+) produced in this reaction was investigated in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) tuber discs. [15N]-Labeled substrates including L-Phe, in the presence or absence of specific enzyme inhibitors, were administered to sweet potato discs in light under aseptic conditions. 15N-Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses revealed that the 15NH4+ liberated during the PAL reaction is first incorporated into the amide nitrogen of L-glutamine (L-Gln) and then into L-glutamate (L-Glu). These results extend our previous observations in pine and potato that PAL-generated NH4+ is assimilated by the glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT; EC 1.4.1.13) pathway, with the NH4+ so formed ultimately being recycled back to L-Phe via L-Glu as aminoreceptor and donor.

  3. The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Zachary; Bagnall, Nicholas; Kimmerly, Derek S

    2015-10-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects that L-glutamine supplementation has on quadriceps muscle strength and soreness ratings following eccentric exercise. It was hypothesized that glutamine ingestion would quicken the recovery rate of peak force production and decrease muscle soreness ratings over a 72-hr recovery period. Sixteen healthy participants (8♀/8♂; 22 ± 4 years) volunteered in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. Supplement conditions consisted of isoenergetic placebo (maltodextrin, 0.6 g·kg-1·day-1) and L-glutamine (0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 + 0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 maltodextrin) ingestion once per day over 72 hr. Knee extensor peak torque at 0°, 30°, and 180° per second and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately following, 24, 48, and 72 hr posteccentric exercise. Eccentric exercise consisted of 8 sets (10 repetitions/set) of unilateral knee extension at 125% maximum concentric force with 2-min rest intervals. L-glutamine resulted in greater relative peak torque at 180°/sec both immediately after (71 ± 8% vs. 66 ± 9%), and 72 hr (91 ± 8% vs. 86 ± 7%) postexercise (all, p exercise. The effect of L-glutamine on muscle force recovery may be greater in men than women.

  4. Structure of the Dispase Autolysis-inducing Protein from Streptomyces mobaraensis and Glutamine Cross-linking Sites for Transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, David; Schmelz, Stefan; Zindel, Stephan; Ehret, Vera; Beck, Jan; Ebenig, Aileen; Ehret, Marina; Fröls, Sabrina; Pfeifer, Felicitas; Kolmar, Harald; Fuchsbauer, Hans-Lothar; Scrima, Andrea

    2016-09-23

    Transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis (MTG) is an important enzyme for cross-linking and modifying proteins. An intrinsic substrate of MTG is the dispase autolysis-inducing protein (DAIP). The amino acid sequence of DAIP contains 5 potential glutamines and 10 lysines for MTG-mediated cross-linking. The aim of the study was to determine the structure and glutamine cross-linking sites of the first physiological MTG substrate. A production procedure was established in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) to obtain high yields of recombinant DAIP. DAIP variants were prepared by replacing four of five glutamines for asparagines in various combinations via site-directed mutagenesis. Incorporation of biotin cadaverine revealed a preference of MTG for the DAIP glutamines in the order of Gln-39 ≫ Gln-298 > Gln-345 ∼ Gln-65 ≫ Gln-144. In the structure of DAIP the preferred glutamines do cluster at the top of the seven-bladed β-propeller. This suggests a targeted cross-linking of DAIP by MTG that may occur after self-assembly in the bacterial cell wall. Based on our biochemical and structural data of the first physiological MTG substrate, we further provide novel insight into determinants of MTG-mediated modification, specificity, and efficiency. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. L-glutamine supplementation prevents the development of experimental diabetic cardiomyopathy in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin L Badole

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of L-glutamine on cardiac myopathy in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in overnight fasted Sprague Dawely rats by using intraperitonial injection of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg. Nicotinamide (100 mg/kg, i.p. was administered 20 min before administration of streptozotocin. Experimental rats were divided into Group I: non-diabetic control (distilled water; 10 ml/kg, p.o., II: diabetic control (distilled water, 10 ml/kg, p.o., III: L-glutamine (500 mg/kg, p.o. and IV: L-glutamine (1000 mg/kg, p.o.. All groups were diabetic except group I. The plasma glucose level, body weight, electrocardiographic abnormalities, hemodynamic changes and left ventricular contractile function, biological markers of cardiotoxicity, antioxidant markers were determined after 4 months after STZ with nicotinamide injection. Histopathological changes of heart tissue were carried out by using H and E stain. L-glutamine treatment improved the electrocardiographic, hemodynamic changes; LV contractile function; biological markers; oxidative stress parameters and histological changes in STZ induced diabetic rats. Results from the present investigation demonstrated that L-glutamine has seemed a cardioprotective activity.

  6. Application of Glutamine-enriched nutrition therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yueqin; Zhang, Fengzhi; Wang, Jinshen; Zhu, Yanping; Dai, Jianhua; Bu, Yueqing; Yang, Qiaozhi; Xiao, Yingying; Sun, Xiaojing

    2016-07-11

    We investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln)-enriched nutritional therapy during chemotherapy on the nutritional status and immune function of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We enrolled 48 children who were newly diagnosed with ALL in our department during the period of 2013.1-2014.12. The patients (follow random number table) were randomly divided into the control group (peptamen) and the treatment group (peptamen + glutamine), 24 cases in each group. The remission induction regimens were all based on VDLP (D) chemotherapy (VCR (Vincrisstine), DNR (Daunomycin), L-ASP (L-Asparagiase), Prednisolone and Dexamethasone). The treatment group received Gln-enriched nutritional therapy every day during the full course of chemotherapy,and the control group is as same as the treatment group except without glutamine. The indicators of general nutritional status, such as weight, height, and triceps skinfold thickness, and the indicators of biochemical tests, such as serum albumin, prealbumin, creatinine-height index, retinol binding protein, and urinary hydroxyproline index, were compared between the two groups at the end of the first, second, third and the fourth week when the chemotherapy was completed. And in the fourth week, flow cytometry was applied to detect the levels of T cell subsets and the activities of natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood of the two groups. 1. after 4 weeks nutritional therapy, there is no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the two groups of children in weight, height and other indicators. 2. At the end of 2 weeks treatment, the level of prealbumin (PA) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) is higher in treatment group than that in the control group (P nutritional therapy can effectively improve the systemic nutritional status of children with leukemia, improve immune function.

  7. Peptide glutamine supplementation for tolerance of intermittent exercise in soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Favano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether supplementation of carbohydrate together with peptide glutamine would increase exercise tolerance in soccer players. METHODS: Nine male soccer players (mean age: 18.4 ± 1.1 years; body mass: 69.2 ± 4.6 kg; height: 175.5 ± 7.3 cm; and maximum oxygen consumption of 57.7 ± 4.8 ml.kg-1.min-1 were evaluated. All of them underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test and followed a protocol that simulated the movements of a soccer game in order to evaluate their tolerance to intermittent exercise. By means of a draw, either carbohydrate with peptide glutamine (CARBOGLUT: 50g of maltodextrin + 3.5g of peptide glutamine in 250 ml of water or carbohydrate alone (CARBO: 50g of maltodextrin in 250 ml of water was administered in order to investigate the enhancement of the soccer players' performances. The solution was given thirty minutes before beginning the test, which was performed twice with a one-week interval between tests. RESULTS: A great improvement in the time and distance covered was observed when the athletes consumed the CARBOGLUT mixture. Total distance covered was 12750 ± 4037m when using CARBO, and 15571 ± 4184m when using CARBOGLUT (p<0.01; total duration of tolerance was 73 ± 23 min when using CARBO and 88 ± 24 min when using CARBOGLUT (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: The CARBOGLUT mixture was more efficient in increasing the distance covered and the length of time for which intermittent exercise was tolerated. CARBOGLUT also reduced feelings of fatigue in the players compared with the use of the CARBO mixture alone.

  8. Antioxidant properties of glutamine and its role in VEGF-Akt pathways in portal hypertension gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Camila; Licks, Francielli; Zattoni, Ingrid; Borges, Beatriz; de Souza, Luiz Eduardo Rizzo; Marroni, Claudio Augusto; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2013-07-28

    To investigate the effects of glutamine on oxidative/nitrosative stress and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-Akt-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling pathway in an experimental model of portal hypertension induced by partial portal vein ligation (PPVL). Portal hypertension was induced by PPVL. The PPVL model consists of a partial obstruction of the portal vein, performed using a 20 G blunt needle as a guide, which is gently removed after the procedure. PPVL model was performed for 14 d beginning treatment with glutamine on the seventh day. On the fifteenth day, the mesenteric vein pressure was checked and the stomach was removed to test immunoreactivity and oxidative stress markers. We evaluated the expression and the immunoreactivity of proteins involved in the VEGF-Akt-eNOS pathway by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. Oxidative stress was measured by quantification of the cytosolic concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) as well as the levels of total glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, nitric oxide (NO) production and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity. All data are presented as the mean ± SE. The production of TBARS and NO was significantly increased in PPVL animals. A reduction of SOD activity was detected in PPVL + G group. In the immunohistochemical analyses of nitrotyrosine, Akt and eNOS, the PPVL group exhibited significant increases, whereas decreases were observed in the PPVL + G group, but no difference in VEGF was detected between these groups. Western blotting analysis detected increased expression of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), P-Akt and eNOS in the PPVL group compared with the PPVL + G group, which was not observed for the expression of VEGF when comparing these groups. Glutamine administration markedly alleviated oxidative/nitrosative stress, normalized SOD activity, increased levels of total GSH and blocked NO overproduction as well as the formation of

  9. Inhibitory plant serpins with a sequence of three glutamine residues in the reactive center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn

    2005-01-01

    Serpins appear to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes, except fungi, and are also present in some bacteria, archaea and viruses. Inhibitory serpins with a glutamine as the reactive-center P1 residue have been identified exclusively in a few plant species. Unique serpins with a reactive center sequence...... for proteinases that specifically degrade storage prolamins containing Gln-rich repetitive sequences, most likely for digestive proteinases of insect pests or fungal pathogens that infect cereals. An assembled full-length amino acid sequence of a serpin expressed in cotton boll fiber (GaZ1) included conserved...

  10. Ability to Achieve Meiotic Maturation in the Dog Oocyte is Linked to Glycolysis and Glutamine Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songsasen, Nucharin; Wesselowski, Sonya; Carpenter, James W.; Wildt, David E.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that meiotic competence of dog oocytes was tightly linked with donor follicle size and energy metabolism. Oocytes were recovered from small (glycolysis, glucose oxidation, pyruvate uptake, glutamine oxidation and then nuclear status. More oocytes (P 0.05). Glycolytic rate increased (P dog follicles contain a more metabolically-active oocyte with a greater chance of achieving nuclear maturation in vitro. These findings demonstrate a significant role of energy metabolism in promoting dog oocyte maturation, information that will be useful for improving culture systems for rescuing intraovarian genetic material. PMID:22213348

  11. Hemoglobin istanbul: substitution of glutamine for histidine in a proximal histidine (F8(92)β)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, M.; Erdem, S.; Efremov, G. D.; Wilson, J. B.; Huisman, T. H. J.; Schroeder, W. A.; Shelton, J. R.; Shelton, J. B.; Ulitin, O. N.; Müftüoğlu, A.

    1972-01-01

    A presumably spontaneous mutation has resulted in the formation of Hemoglobin (Hb) Istanbul in which glutamine is substituted for histidine in the proximal position of the β-chain (F8(92)). The anemia and other physiological effects that occur in the presence of Hb Istanbul were much ameliorated by splenectomy. Hb Istanbul is a relatively unstable molecule which produces a rather moderate case of “unstable hemoglobin hemolytic anemia.” In the determination of structure, a method of preferential cleavage of an aspartyl-proline bond at residues 99-100 of the β-chain was used. Images PMID:4639022

  12. Effects of glutamine alone or in combination with zinc and vitamin A on growth, intestinal barrier function, stress and satiety-related hormones in Brazilian shantytown children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aldo A M; Anstead, Gregory M; Zhang, Qiong; Figueiredo, Ítalo L; Soares, Alberto M; Mota, Rosa M S; Lima, Noélia L; Guerrant, Richard L; Oriá, Reinaldo B

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of supplemental zinc, vitamin A, and glutamine alone or in combination on growth, intestinal barrier function, stress and satiety-related hormones among Brazilian shantytown children with low median height-for-age z-scores. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in children aged two months to nine years from the urban shanty compound community of Fortaleza, Brazil. Demographic and anthropometric information was assessed. The random treatment groups available for testing (a total of 120 children) were as follows: (1) glutamine alone, n = 38; (2) glutamine plus vitamin A plus zinc, n = 37; and a placebo (zinc plus vitamin A vehicle) plus glycine (isonitrogenous to glutamine) control treatment, n = 38. Leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), and plasma levels of cortisol were measured with immune-enzymatic assays; urinary lactulose/mannitol and serum amino acids were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00133406. Glutamine treatment significantly improved weight-for-height z-scores compared to the placebo-glycine control treatment. Either glutamine alone or all nutrients combined prevented disruption of the intestinal barrier function, as measured by the percentage of lactulose urinary excretion and the lactulose:mannitol absorption ratio. Plasma leptin was negatively correlated with plasma glutamine (p = 0.002) and arginine (p = 0.001) levels at baseline. After glutamine treatment, leptin was correlated with weight-for-age (WAZ) and weight-for-height z-scores (WHZ) (p≤0.002) at a 4-month follow-up. In addition, glutamine and all combined nutrients (glutamine, vitamin A, and zinc) improved the intestinal barrier function in these children. Taken together, these findings reveal the benefits of glutamine alone or in combination with other gut-trophic nutrients in growing children via interactions with leptin.

  13. Nitrogen assimilation in Citrus based on CitEST data mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Wickert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Assimilation of nitrate and ammonium are vital procedures for plant development and growth. From these primary paths of inorganic nitrogen assimilation, this metabolism integrates diverse paths for biosynthesis of macromolecules, such as amino acids and nucleotides, and the central intermediate metabolism, like carbon metabolism and photorespiration. This paper reports research performed in the CitEST (Citrus Expressed Sequence Tag database for the main genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and those previously described in other organisms. The results show that a complete cluster of genes involved in the assimilation of nitrogen and the metabolisms of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and asparagine can be found in the CitEST data. The main enzymes found were nitrate reductase (NR, nitrite reductase (NiR, glutamine synthetase (GS, glutamate synthetase (GOGAT, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT and asparagine synthetase (AS. The different enzymes involved in this metabolism have been shown to be highly conserved among the Citrus and Poncirus species. This work serves as a guide for future functional analysis of these enzymes in citrus.

  14. An 15N study of the effects of nitrate, ammonium, and nitrate + ammonium nutrition on nitrogen assimilation in Zea mays L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, A.T.

    1984-10-01

    A brief review of the literature on the effects of nitrate and ammonium nitrogen sources on plant growth, and the assimilation of those nitrogen sources, has been presented. It was concluded that ammonium nutrition produces optimum growth, with nitrate + ammonium being a better nitrogen source than only nitrate. Leaf blade nitrate reductase activity exceeded that of the root in nitrate-fed plants, suggesting that the shoot is the major region of nitrate assimilation. This is further supported by the results of xylem exudate analysis, where 93% of the newly-absorbed nitrogen exported by the roots was detected as nitrate. Evidence in support of this hypothesis was also obtained by studying the distribution of 15 N in the various nitrogenous compounds. The effects of nitrogen source on plant growth, organic nitrogen and inorganic nitrogen contents, and the rates of incorporation into nitrogenous compounds were studied. The observed differences were explained with reference to the effects of the various nitrogen sources on the physiology of the plants. The experimental techniques included assays of the enzymes nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase, whole plant growth studies, and the analysis of nitrogenous compounds of xylem exudate and those extracted from the leaf blade, leaf base, and root regions of maize plants after feeding with a nutrient solution containing nitrogen as 15 N

  15. Concurrent overactivation of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase and the GABA shunt in the ABA-deficient sitiens mutant of tomato leads to resistance against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Hamed Soren; Curvers, Katrien; De Vleesschauwer, David; Delaere, Ilse; Aziz, Aziz; Höfte, Monica

    2013-07-01

    Deficiency of abscisic acid (ABA) in the sitiens mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) culminates in increased resistance to Botrytis cinerea through a rapid epidermal hypersensitive response (HR) and associated phenylpropanoid pathway-derived cell wall fortifications. This study focused on understanding the role of primary carbon : nitrogen (C : N) metabolism in the resistance response of sitiens to B. cinerea. How alterations in C : N metabolism are linked with the HR-mediated epidermal arrest of the pathogen has been also investigated. Temporal alterations in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt, glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) cycle and phenylpropanoid pathway were transcriptionally, enzymatically and metabolically monitored in both wild-type and sitiens plants. Virus-induced gene silencing, microscopic analyses and pharmacological assays were used to further confirm the data. Our results on the sitiens-B. cinerea interaction favor a model in which cell viability in the cells surrounding the invaded tissue is maintained by a constant replenishment of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle through overactivation of the GS/GOGAT cycle and the GABA shunt, resulting in resistance through both tightly controlling the defense-associated HR and slowing down the pathogen-induced senescence. Collectively, this study shows that maintaining cell viability via alterations in host C : N metabolism plays a vital role in the resistance response against necrotrophic pathogens. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Enhanced expression of glutamine synthetase (GS1a) confers altered fibre and wood chemistry in field grown hybrid poplar (Populus tremula X alba) (717-1B4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Heather D; Cánovas, Francisco M; Man, Huimin; Kirby, Edward G; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2012-09-01

    Hybrid poplar (Populus tremula X P. alba) genetically engineered to express the pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene (GS1a) has been previously shown to display desirable field performance characteristics, including enhancements in growth and nitrogen use efficiency. Analysis of wood samples from a 3-year-old field trial of three independently transformed GS1a transgenic hybrid poplar lines revealed that, when compared with wild-type controls, ectopic expression of GS1a resulted in alterations in wood properties and wood chemistry. Included were significant enhancements in wood fibre length, wood density, microfibre angle, per cent syringyl lignin and elevated concentrations of wood sugars, specifically glucose, galactose, mannose and xylose. Total extractive content and acid-insoluble lignin were significantly reduced in wood of GS1a transgenics when compared with wild-type trees. Together, these cell wall characteristics resulted in improved wood pulping attributes, including improved lignin solubilization with no concurrent decrease in yield. Trees with increased GS1a expression have improved characteristics for pulp and paper production and hold potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Evidence supporting distinct functions of three cytosolic glutamine synthetases and two NADH-glutamate synthases in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Kusano, Miyako

    2014-10-01

    The functions of the three isoenzymes of cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1;1, GS1;2, and GS1;3) and two NADH-glutamate synthases (NADH-GOGAT1 and NADH-GOGAT2) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) were characterized using a reverse genetics approach and spatial expression of the corresponding genes. OsGS1;2 and OsNADH-GOGAT1 were mainly expressed in surface cells of rice roots in an NH4 (+)-dependent manner. Disruption of either gene by the insertion of endogenous retrotransposon Tos17 caused reduction in active tiller number and hence panicle number at harvest. Re-introduction of OsGS1;2 cDNA under the control of its own promoter into the knockout mutants successfully restored panicle number to wild-type levels. These results indicate that GS1;2 and NADH-GOGAT1 are important in the primary assimilation of NH4 (+) taken up by rice roots. OsGS1;1 and OsNADH-GOGAT2 were mainly expressed in vascular tissues of mature leaf blades. OsGS1;1 mutants showed severe reduction in growth rate and grain filling, whereas OsNADH-GOGAT2 mutants had marked reduction in spikelet number per panicle. Complementation of phenotypes seen in the OsGS1;1 mutant was successfully observed when OsGS1;1 was re-introduced. Thus, these two enzymes could be important in remobilization of nitrogen during natural senescence. Metabolite profiling data showed a crucial role of GS1;1 in coordinating metabolic balance in rice. Expression of OsGS1:3 was spikelet-specific, indicating that it is probably important in grain ripening and/or germination. Thus, these isoenzymes seem to possess distinct and non-overlapping functions and none was able to compensate for the individual function of another. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Reverse effects of DPI administration combined with glutamine supplementation on function of rat neutrophils induced by overtraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jingmei; Chen, Peijie; Liu, Qing; Wang, Ru; Xiao, Weihua; Zhang, Yajun

    2013-04-01

    To examine the excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and the combined effect of glutamine supplementation and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) on the function of neutrophils induced by overtraining. Fifty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: control group (C), overtraining group (E), DPI-administration group (D), glutamine-supplementation group (G), and combined DPI and glutamine group (DG). Blood was sampled from the orbital vein after rats were trained on treadmill for 11 wk. Cytokine and lipid peroxidation in blood plasma were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The colocalization between gp91phox and p47phox of the NADPH oxidase was detected using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. The activity of NADPH oxidase was assessed by chemiluminescence. Neutrophils' respiratory burst and phagocytosis function were measured by flow cytometry. NADPH oxidase was activated by overtraining. Cytokine and lipid peroxidation in blood plasma and the activity of NADPH oxidase were markedly increased in Group E compared with group C. Neutrophil function was lower in group E than group C. Both lower neutrophils function and higher ROS production were reversed in Group DG. The glutamine and DPI interference alone in group D and group G was less effective than DPI and glutamine combined in group DG. Activation of NADPH oxidase is responsible for the production of superoxide anions, which leads to excessive ROS and is related to the decrease in neutrophil function induced by overtraining. The combined DPI administration and glutamine supplementation reversed the decreased neutrophil function after overtraining.

  19. Effects of L-glutamine supplementation on maternal and fetal hemodynamics in gestating ewes exposed to alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Onkar B; Ramadoss, Jayanth; Hankins, Gary D; Wu, Guoyao; Washburn, Shannon E

    2014-08-01

    Not much is known about effects of gestational alcohol exposure on maternal and fetal cardiovascular adaptations. This study determined whether maternal binge alcohol exposure and L-glutamine supplementation could affect maternal-fetal hemodynamics and fetal regional brain blood flow during the brain growth spurt period. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to one of four groups: saline control, alcohol (1.75-2.5 g/kg body weight), glutamine (100 mg/kg body weight) or alcohol + glutamine. A chronic weekend binge drinking paradigm between gestational days (GD) 99 and 115 was utilized. Fetuses were surgically instrumented on GD 117 ± 1 and studied on GD 120 ± 1. Binge alcohol exposure caused maternal acidemia, hypercapnea, and hypoxemia. Fetuses were acidemic and hypercapnic, but not hypoxemic. Alcohol exposure increased fetal mean arterial pressure, whereas fetal heart rate was unaltered. Alcohol exposure resulted in ~40 % reduction in maternal uterine artery blood flow. Labeled microsphere analyses showed that alcohol induced >2-fold increases in fetal whole brain blood flow. The elevation in fetal brain blood flow was region-specific, particularly affecting the developing cerebellum, brain stem, and olfactory bulb. Maternal L-glutamine supplementation attenuated alcohol-induced maternal hypercapnea, fetal acidemia and increases in fetal brain blood flow. L-Glutamine supplementation did not affect uterine blood flow. Collectively, alcohol exposure alters maternal and fetal acid-base balance, decreases uterine blood flow, and alters fetal regional brain blood flow. Importantly, L-glutamine supplementation mitigates alcohol-induced acid-base imbalances and alterations in fetal regional brain blood flow. Further studies are warranted to elucidate mechanisms responsible for alcohol-induced programming of maternal uterine artery and fetal circulation adaptations in pregnancy.

  20. Enteral nutrition supplemented with L-glutamine in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to pulmonary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Ana Augusta Monteiro; Campelo, Márcio Wilker Soares; de Vasconcelos, Marcelo Pinho Pessoa; Ferreira, Camila Marques; Guimarães, Sergio Botelho; Garcia, José Huygens Parente; de Vasconcelos, Paulo Roberto Leitão

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of enteral nutrition (EN) supplemented with l-glutamine on glycolytic parameters, inflammation, immune function, and oxidative stress in moderately ill intensive care patients with sepsis. Thirty patients received EN. Fifteen patients received EN supplemented with glutamine (30 g; GLN group) for 2 d followed by EN supplemented with calcium caseinate (30 g, CAS group), also over 2 d. The other 15 patients received EN with calcium caseinate (30 g; CAS group) for 2 d followed by EN with glutamine (30 g; GLN group), also over 2 days. One washout day with only EN was provided between every 2-d period of EN plus supplementation to all patients. Blood samples were taken before and after supplementation. There were no changes in glycolytic parameters in either group. Leukocytes decreased in the two groups (from 13 650 to 11 500 in the CAS group, P = 0.019; from 12.850 to 11.000 in the GLN group, P = 0.046). Lymphocytes increased in the GLN group (from 954 to 1916, P < 0.0001) and were more numerous after glutamine supplementation (from 1916 to 1085, P < 0.0001, GLN versus CAS). No significant changes were observed in interleukin levels, but urea levels were higher in the GLN compared with the CAS group (50.0-47.0, P = 0.030). Glutathione plasma concentrations did not differ significantly between the groups. No significant changes were observed in the plasma glutamine and glutamate concentrations. The EN supplemented with glutamine increased the lymphocyte count and helped to decrease lipid peroxidation but presented no effect on the antioxidant glutathione capacity and on cytokine concentrations or glycolytic parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in very-low-birth-weight infants and effects on feeding tolerance and infectious morbidity: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; van Elburg, Ruurd M.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Fetter, Willem P. F.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Glutamine depletion has negative effects on the functional integrity of the gut and leads to immunosuppression. Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants are susceptible to glutamine depletion because nutrition is limited in the first weeks of life. Objective: The objective was to determine

  2. A randomised trial of enteral glutamine supplementation for very preterm children showed no beneficial or adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twilhaar, E. Sabrina; de Kieviet, Jorrit F.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term effects of enteral glutamine supplementation on neurodevelopmental outcomes of a Dutch cohort of very preterm children at 13 years of age. The cohort was enrolled in a randomised placebo-controlled trial between 2001-2003 in which infants received glutamine- or

  3. L-glutamine and whole protein restore first-phase insulin response and increase glucagon-like Peptide-1 in type 2 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samocha-Bonet, Dorit; Chisholm, Don J; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    l-glutamine triggers glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release from L cells in vitro and when ingested pre-meal, decreases postprandial glycaemia and increases circulating insulin and GLP-1 in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. We aimed to evaluate the effect of oral l-glutamine, compared with whole...... protein low in glutamine, on insulin response in well-controlled T2D patients. In a randomized study with a crossover design, T2D patients (n = 10, 6 men) aged 65.1 ± 5.8, with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 6.6% ± 0.7% (48 ± 8 mmol/mol), received oral l-glutamine (25 g), protein (25 g) or water...... tested 1–2 weeks apart. Both l-glutamine and protein increased first-phase insulin response (p ≤ 0.02). Protein (p = 0.05), but not l-glutamine (p = 0.2), increased second-phase insulin response. Total GLP-1 was increased by both l-glutamine and protein (p ≤ 0.02). We conclude that oral l-glutamine...

  4. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  5. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Verlander, Jill W.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4+ with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na+-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression. PMID:27009341

  6. Activation of the TOR Signalling Pathway by Glutamine Regulates Insect Fecundity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yifan; Sun, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jianqing; Kang, Kui; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Wenqing

    2015-05-29

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) positively controls cell growth in response to nutrients such as amino acids. However, research on the specific nutrients sensed by TOR is limited. Glutamine (Gln), a particularly important amino acid involved in metabolism in organisms, is synthesised and catalysed exclusively by glutamine synthetase (GS), and our previous studies have shown that Gln may regulate fecundity in vivo levels of the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens. Until now, it has remained unclear whether Gln activates or inhibits the TOR signalling pathway. Here, we performed the combined analyses of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) and DGE (tag-based digital gene expression) data in N. lugens at the protein and transcript levels after GS RNAi, and we found that 52 pathways overlap, including the TOR pathway. We further experimentally demonstrate that Gln activates the TOR pathway by promoting the serine/threonine protein kinase AKT and inhibiting the 5'AMP-activated protein kinase AMPK phosphorylation activity in the pest. Furthermore, TOR regulates the fecundity of N. lugens probably by mediating vitellogenin (Vg) expression. This work is the first report that Gln activates the TOR pathway in vivo.

  7. Stereospecific assignment of the asparagine and glutamine sidechain amide protons in proteins from chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harsch, Tobias; Schneider, Philipp; Kieninger, Bärbel; Donaubauer, Harald; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert, E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@biologie.uni-regensburg.de [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry and Centre of Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry and Biomedicine (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Side chain amide protons of asparagine and glutamine residues in random-coil peptides are characterized by large chemical shift differences and can be stereospecifically assigned on the basis of their chemical shift values only. The bimodal chemical shift distributions stored in the biological magnetic resonance data bank (BMRB) do not allow such an assignment. However, an analysis of the BMRB shows, that a substantial part of all stored stereospecific assignments is not correct. We show here that in most cases stereospecific assignment can also be done for folded proteins using an unbiased artificial chemical shift data base (UACSB). For a separation of the chemical shifts of the two amide resonance lines with differences ≥0.40 ppm for asparagine and differences ≥0.42 ppm for glutamine, the downfield shifted resonance lines can be assigned to H{sup δ21} and H{sup ε21}, respectively, at a confidence level >95%. A classifier derived from UASCB can also be used to correct the BMRB data. The program tool AssignmentChecker implemented in AUREMOL calculates the Bayesian probability for a given stereospecific assignment and automatically corrects the assignments for a given list of chemical shifts.

  8. Facile electrosynthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with cysteine, glycine and glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Mustafa; Karimzadeh, Isa; Doroudi, Taher; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Kolivand, Peir Hossein; Gharailou, Davoud

    2017-08-01

    A novel and facile strategy has been developed for the preparation of cysteine-, glycine- and glutamine-coated magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs). According to this strategy, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were electrodeposited from an aqueous electrolyte containing a dissolved iron salt and amino acids. A simple deposition mode i.e., constant current and two-electrode set-up was used in the electrosynthesis procedure. The magnetite phase of the deposited nanoparticles was confirmed through XRD and FT-IR analyses. Morphological observations through FE-SEM and TEM confirmed the formation of spherical MNP particles with an average size of 10 nm. The formation of cysteine, glycine and glutamine layers on the surface of the electro-synthesized particles was proved based on FT-IR, DLS and TG data. Vibrating sample magnetometery (VSM) measurements confirmed the prepared iron oxide nanoparticles to have a super-paramagnetic nature, since they exhibit a high saturation magnetization (Ms ≈ 58 emu g-1), as well as, negligible remnant magnetization (Mr) and coercivity (Ce). Based on the obtained results, the proposed platform can be considered as a fast, simple and efficient method for the preparation of surface-coated magnetite nanoparticles.

  9. Effectiveness and mode of action of phosphonate inhibitors of plant glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, Andrea; Berlicki, Łukasz; Giberti, Samuele; Dziedzioła, Gabriela; Kafarski, Paweł; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Aiming at the rational design of new herbicides, the availability of the three-dimensional structure of the target enzyme greatly enhances the optimisation of lead compounds and the design of derivatives with increased activity. Among the most widely exploited herbicide targets is glutamine synthetase. Recently, the structure of a cytosolic form of the maize enzyme has been described, making it possible to verify whether steric, electronic and hydrophobic features of a compound are in agreement with inhibitor-protein interaction geometry. Three series of compounds (aminophosphonates, hydroxyphosphonates and aminomethylenebisphosphonates) were evaluated as possible inhibitors of maize glutamine synthetase. Aminomethylenebisphosphonate derivatives substituted in the phenyl ring retained the inhibitory potential, whereas variations in the scaffold, i.e. the replacement of the second phosphonate moiety with a hydroxyl or an amino residue, resulted in a significant loss of activity. A kinetic characterisation showed a non-competitive mechanism against glutamate and an uncompetitive mechanism against ATP. A docking analysis suggested the mode of bisphosphonate binding to the active site. Results made it possible to define the features required to maintain or enhance the biological activity of these compounds, which represent lead structures to be further exploited for the design of new substances endowed with herbicidal activity.

  10. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  11. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cypermethrin induced alterations in nitrogen metabolism in freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Sharma, Bechan; Pandey, Ravi S

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, two fresh water fishes namely, Channa punctatus and Clarias batrachus, were exposed to three sub-acute concentrations of synthetic pyrethroid, cypermethrin, for 96 h to evaluate the role of amino acids in fulfilling the immediate energy needs of fishes under pyrethroid induced stress as well as to find out the mechanism of ammonia detoxification. The experiments were designed to estimate the levels of free amino acid, urea, ammonia and the activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AAT), alanine aminotransferase (AlAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamine synthetase (GS) and arginase in some of the vital organs like brain, gills, liver, kidney and muscle of both fish species. The significant decrease in the levels of amino acids concomitant with remarkable increase in the activities of AAT, AlAT and GDH in these vital tissues of fish species elucidated the amino acid catabolism as one of the main mechanism of meeting out the immediate energy demand of the fishes in condition of cypermethrin exposure. The levels of ammonia were significantly increased at 10% of 96 h LC(50) of cypermethrin in the different organs such as brain, gills, liver, kidney and muscle of both fish species while 15% and 20% concentrations of 96 h LC(50) of cypermehrin registered remarkable decline in both fish species. The differential increment in the activities of GDH, GS and arginase and in the level of urea established three different alternative mechanisms of ammonia detoxification. The results indicated that in C. punctatus, the prevalent mode of nitrogen excretion is in the form of conversion of ammonia into glutamine and glutamate while in C. batrachus, the excessive nitrogen is excreted in the form of urea synthesized from ammonia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate...... concentrations in vivo in patients with schizophrenia using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T, which allows separation of metabolites that would otherwise overlap at lower field strengths. In addition, we investigated whether altered levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus......, and 24 healthy nonrelatives. Glutamate, glutamine, and GABA were measured cortically and subcortically in bilateral basal ganglia and occipital cortex. RESULTS: Patients with schizophrenia had reduced cortical GABA compared with healthy relatives and the combined sample of healthy relatives and healthy...

  14. Activation of glnA transcription by nitrogen regulator I (NRI)-phosphate in Escherichia coli: evidence for a long-range physical interaction between NRI-phosphate and RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Reitzer, L J; Movsas, B; Magasanik, B

    1989-01-01

    Growth of cells of Escherichia coli in nitrogen-limited medium induces the formation of glutamine synthetase, product of the glnA gene, and of other proteins that facilitate the assimilation of nitrogen-containing compounds. Transcription from the glnAp2 promoter of the glnALG operon requires the phosphorylation of nitrogen regulator I (NRI) and, for optimal transcription, the binding of NRI-phosphate to two sites that can be over 1,000 base pairs from the binding site for RNA polymerase. In ...

  15. Parenteral glutamine supplementation does not reduce the risk of mortality or late-onset sepsis in extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Brenda B; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Stoll, Barbara J; Wright, Linda L; Poole, W Kenneth; Oh, William; Bauer, Charles R; Papile, Lu-Ann; Tyson, Jon E; Carlo, Waldemar A; Laptook, Abbot R; Narendran, Vivek; Stevenson, David K; Fanaroff, Avroy A; Korones, Sheldon B; Shankaran, Seetha; Finer, Neil N; Lemons, James A

    2004-05-01

    Glutamine is one of the most abundant amino acids in both plasma and human milk, yet it is not included in standard intravenous amino acid solutions. Previous studies have suggested that parenteral nutrition (PN) supplemented with glutamine may reduce sepsis and mortality in critically ill adults. Whether glutamine supplementation would provide a similar benefit to extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants is not known. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-masked, clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of early PN supplemented with glutamine in decreasing the risk of death or late-onset sepsis in ELBW infants. Infants 401 to 1000 g were randomized within 72 hours of birth to receive either TrophAmine (control) or an isonitrogenous study amino acid solution with 20% glutamine whenever they received PN up to 120 days of age, death, or discharge from the hospital. The primary outcome was death or late-onset sepsis. Of the 721 infants who were assigned to glutamine supplementation, 370 (51%) died or developed late-onset sepsis, as compared with 343 of the 712 infants (48%) assigned to control (relative risk: 1.07; 95% confidence interval: 0.97-1.17). Glutamine had no effect on tolerance of enteral feeds, necrotizing enterocolitis, or growth. No significant adverse events were observed with glutamine supplementation. Parenteral glutamine supplementation as studied did not decrease mortality or the incidence of late-onset sepsis in ELBW infants. Consequently, although no harm was demonstrated, routine use of parenteral glutamine supplementation cannot be recommended in this population.

  16. Oral supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine do not change metabolic alterations induced by long-term high-fat diet in the B6.129F2/J mouse model of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Patricia Martins; Krause, Mauricio; Schroeder, Helena Trevisan; Hahn, Gabriela Fernandes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji; Schöler, Cinthia Maria; Nicoletti, Graziella; Neto, Luiz Domingos Zavarize; Rodrigues, Maria Inês Lavina; Bruxel, Maciel Alencar; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed B6.129SF2/J mouse model over insulin sensitivity response and signaling, oxidative stress markers, metabolism and HSP70 expression. Mice were fed in a standard low-fat diet (STA) or a HFD for 20 weeks. In the 21th week, mice from the HFD group were allocated in five groups and supplemented for additional 8 weeks with different amino acids: HFD control group (HFD-Con), HFD + dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine group (HFD-Dip), HFD + L-alanine group (HFD-Ala), HFD + L-glutamine group (HFD-Gln), or the HFD + L-alanine + L-glutamine (in their free forms) group (HFD-Ala + Gln). HFD induced higher body weight, fat pad, fasted glucose, and total cholesterol in comparison with STA group. Amino acid supplementations did not induce any modifications in these parameters. Although insulin tolerance tests indicated insulin resistance in all HFD groups, amino acid supplementations did not improve insulin sensitivity in the present model. There were also no significant differences in the immunocontents of insulin receptor, Akt, and Toll-like receptor-4. Notably, total 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 + HSP73) contents in the liver was markedly increased in HFD-Con group as compared to STA group, which might suggest that insulin resistance is only in the beginning. Apparently, B6.129SF2/J mice are more resistant to the harmful effects of HFD through a mechanism that may include gut adaptation, reducing the absorption of nutrients, including amino acids, which may explain the lack of improvements in our intervention.

  17. Lymphocyte Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism as Targets of the Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Effects of Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Wasinski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and glutamine are important energetic and biosynthetic nutrients for T and B lymphocytes. These cells consume both nutrients at high rates in a function-dependent manner. In other words, the pathways that control lymphocyte function and survival directly control the glucose and glutamine metabolic pathways. Therefore, lymphocytes in different functional states reprogram their glucose and glutamine metabolism to balance their requirement for ATP and macromolecule production. The tight association between metabolism and function in these cells was suggested to introduce the possibility of several pathologies resulting from the inability of lymphocytes to meet their nutrient demands under a given condition. In fact, disruptions in lymphocyte metabolism and function have been observed in different inflammatory, metabolic, and autoimmune pathologies. Regular physical exercise and physical activity offer protection against several chronic pathologies, and this benefit has been associated with the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of exercise/physical activity. Chronic exercise induces changes in lymphocyte functionality and substrate metabolism. In the present review, we discuss whether the beneficial effects of exercise on lymphocyte function in health and disease are associated with modulation of the glucose and glutamine metabolic pathways.

  18. Systematic replacement of lysine with glutamine and alanine in Escherichia coli malate synthase G: effect on crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstrom, David M.; Colip, Leslie; Moshofsky, Brian; Hatcher, Eric; Remington, S. James

    2005-01-01

    Alanine and glutamine mutations were made to the same 15 lysine positions on the surface of E. coli malate synthase G and the impact on crystallization observed. The results support lysine replacement for improvement of crystallization and provide insight into site selection and type of amino-acid replacement. Two proposals recommend substitution of surface lysine residues as a means to improve the quality of protein crystals. In proposal I, substitution of lysine by alanine has been suggested to improve crystallization by reducing the entropic cost of ordering flexible side chains at crystal contacts. In proposal II, substitution of lysine by residues more commonly found in crystal contacts, such as glutamine, has been proposed to improve crystallization. 15 lysine residues on the surface of Escherichia coli malate synthase G, distributed over a variety of secondary structures, were individually mutated to both alanine and glutamine. For 28 variants, detailed studies of the effect on enzymatic activity and crystallization were conducted. This has permitted direct comparison of the relative effects of the two types of mutations. While none of the variants produced crystals suitable for X-ray structural determination, small crystals were obtained in a wide variety of conditions, in support of the general approach. Glutamine substitutions were found to be more effective than alanine in producing crystals, in support of proposal II. Secondary structure at the site of mutation does not appear to play a major role in determining the rate of success

  19. Dietary L-glutamine supplementation increases Pasteurella multocida burden and the expression of its major virulence factors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Shuping; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Fengmei; Li, Nengzhang; Yin, Jie; Peng, Yuanyi; Wu, Li; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of graded doses of L-glutamine supplementation on the replication and distribution of Pasteurella multocida, and the expression of its major virulence factors in mouse model. Mice were randomly assigned to the basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 % glutamine. Pasteurella multocida burden was detected in the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney after 12 h of P. multocida infection. The expression of major virulence factors, toll-like receptors (TLRs), proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha) and anti-oxidative factors (GPX1 and CuZnSOD) was analyzed in the lung and spleen. Dietary 0.5 % glutamine supplementation has little significant effect on these parameters, compared to those with basal diet. However, results showed that a high dose of glutamine supplementation increased the P. multocida burden (P multocida burden and the expression of its major virulence factors, while affecting the functions of the lung and spleen.

  20. The Effects of Glutamine Feeding Upon Some Aspects of the Immune System of Air Force Personnel Undergoing Intensive Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    This was a prospective study with the goal of the effects of long-term supplementary feeding of glutamine versus a placebo on some aspects of immune cell function, on the incidence of infections and on mood. Highly trained U.S...

  1. Gene expression, cellular localisation and function of glutamine synthetase isozymes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, Stéphanie M.; Møller, Anders Laurell Blom; Dionisio, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We present the first cloning and study of glutamine synthetase (GS) genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Based on sequence analysis, phylogenetic studies and mapping data, ten GS sequences were classified into four sub-families: GS2 (a, b and c), GS1 (a, b and c), GSr (1 and 2) and GSe (1 and 2...

  2. Intestinal microbiota in allergic and nonallergic 1-year-old very low birth weight infants after neonatal glutamine supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwol, A.; van den Berg, A.; Knol, J.; Twisk, J. W. R.; Fetter, W. P. F.; van Elburg, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Previously, glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants (VLBW) decreased the incidence of atopic dermatitis at age 1 year. The aim of this study was to determine whether this effect is related to changes in intestinal bacterial species that are associated with allergy,

  3. Effect of L-Glutamine Supplementation on Electromyographic Activity of the Quadriceps Muscle Injured By Eccentric Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Rahmani Nia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of L-glutamine on electromyographic (EMG activity of the quadriceps muscle injured by eccentric exercise (EE.   Materials and Methods: Seventeen healthy men (age: 22.35±2.27 yr; body mass: 69.91±9.78 kg; height: 177.08±4.32 cm were randomly and double-blind study with subjects assigned to either an L-glutamine supplementation (n=9 or placebo (n=8 group. The subjects in two groups were asked to take three times during a week for 4 weeks. Each subject was screened for dietary habits before inclusion into the study. Participants performed 6 set to exhaustion eccentric leg extensions at 75% of 1RM and rest intervals were 3 min among sets. Pain Assessment Scale (PAS, EMG activity and range of motion (ROM measurements were taken before exercise protocol and 24 and 48 hr afterwards. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups in perceived muscle soreness (SOR, ROM and EMG activity (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results indicate that L-glutamine supplementation has no significant effect on muscle injury markers in between groups, although glutamine supplementation attenuated delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS effects in sup group.

  4. Enzymatic-fluorometric analyses for glutamine, glutamate and free amino groups in protein-free plasma and milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Fernández, Carlos J.

    2017-01-01

    This Technical Research Communication describes new analytical methods for free, unbound glutamic acid and glutamine in protein-free blood plasma and milk and introduces the use of quantitation of free amino groups in the same matrices for descriptive and analytical purposes. The present enzymati...

  5. Light-induced flipping of a conserved glutamine sidechain and its oreintation in the AppA BLUF domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinstead, J.S.; Avila-Perez, M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Boelens, R.; Kaptein, R.

    2006-01-01

    The AppA BLUF domain is a blue light photoreceptor containing flavin. Conserved glutamine 63 is necessary for the photocycle of the protein, and its side chain has been proposed to flip in response to blue light illumination. Recently published crystal structures of AppA WT and the AppA mutant C20S

  6. The influence of glutamine on the changes of lactate and cortisole levels in the elite wrestlers blood

    OpenAIRE

    Minassian

    2012-01-01

    Wrestling is weight classification sport and due to the time of competition various energy systems are involved in it. Nutrition is very effective in the performance of an athlete during exercise, competition and weight loss period. Therefore, most of athletes have attended to take nutritional supplements such as creatine and glutamine to improve their athletic performance.

  7. Effects of combined pulse electromagnetic field stimulation plus glutamine on the healing of colonic anastomosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgin, Sadullah; Gedik, Ercan; Ozturk, Hayrettin; Akpolat, Veysi; Akbulut, Veysi; Kale, Ebru; Buyukbayram, Huseyin; Celik, Salih

    2009-04-01

    An experimental study was designed to investigate the effect of combined pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation plus glutamine administration on colonic anastomosis. Anastomosis of the left colon was performed in 28 rats, which were divided into four groups; Group 1: normal resection anastomosis plus oral 50 mg/kg/day glutamine; Group 2: normal resection anastomosis plus PEMF stimulation plus oral 50 mg/kg/day glutamine; Group 3: normal resection anastomosis plus PEMF stimulation; Group 4: normal resection anastomosis. On the seventh postoperative day, the animals were killed and the bursting pressure and tissue hydroxyproline concentration of the anastomosis were analyzed and compared. The mean anastomotic bursting pressure in Group 2 was significantly higher than in Groups 1 and 4. On the other hand, the mean anastomotic bursting pressure in Group 1 was significantly higher than in Group 4. The collagen deposition and the fibroblast infiltration were significantly increased on the seventh day in Group 3 compared the other groups. On the other hand, Groups 1 and 2 had higher scores for collagen deposition and fibroblast infiltration than Group 4. In conclusion, burst pressures, hydroxyproline, and histologic features (fibroblast infiltration and collagen deposition) were improved in the PEMF group, and both PEMF and glutamine-enriched nutrition provide a significant gain in the strength of colonic anastomoses in rats.

  8. [Effects of transporter Agp1p ubiquitination on nitrogen utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingyu; Lv, Yongkun; Zhou, Jingwen; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of this work is to studythe effects of ubiquitination of key nitrogen transporter Agp1p on nitrogen utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ubiquitination detection vector to examine the ubiquitination process of Agp1p was constructed based on the bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology. The site-directed mutagenesis on the potential ubiquitination sites were performed to verify the effect on its ubiquitination regulation and nitrogen utilization. Agp1p can be ubiquitinated on the medium with glutamine, arginine, proline or ammonium. The fluorescence levels of mutant strains were down-regulated compared to the wild type strain. The quadruple mutant Agp1pK11-14-98-112R achieved the lowest level among all strains. The ubiuitination process could be significantly repressed by removing the potential ubiquitination residues. Furthermore, flask-shaking experiments with nineamino acids or urea as sole nitrogen source showed that the effect of nitrogen utilization efficiencyinthe quadruple mutant was the highest. Ubiquitination was involved in the regulation of Agp1p. Site-directed mutagenesis of potential ubiquitination sites of the transporter could significantly affect the nitrogen utilization process by altering the ubiquitination process.

  9. A Glutamine-Rich Factor Affects Stem Cell Genesis in Leech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A. Hohenstein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Leech embryogenesis is a model for investigating cellular and molecular processes of development. Due to the unusually large size of embryonic stem cells (teloblasts: 50–300 μm in the glossiphoniid leech, Theromyzon tessulatum, and the presence of identifiable stem cell precursors (proteloblasts, we previously isolated a group of genes upregulated upon stem cell birth. In the current study, we show that one of these genes, designated Theromyzon proliferation (Tpr, is required for normal stem cell genesis; specifically, transient Tpr knockdown experiments conducted with antisense oligonucleotides and monitored by semiquantitative RT-PCR, caused abnormal proteloblast proliferation leading to embryonic death, but did not overtly affect neuroectodermal or mesodermal stem cell development once these cells were born. Tpr encodes a large glutamine-rich (∼34% domain that shares compositional similarity with strong transcriptional enhancers many of which have been linked with trinucleotide repeat disorders (e.g., Huntington's.

  10. Short poly-glutamine repeat in the androgen receptor in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Paukner, Annika; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo; Suomi, Stephen J; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2017-12-01

    The androgen receptor mediates various physiological and developmental functions and is highly conserved in mammals. Although great intraspecific length polymorphisms in poly glutamine (poly-Q) and poly glycine (poly-G) regions of the androgen receptor in humans, apes and several Old World monkeys have been reported, little is known about the characteristics of these regions in New World monkeys. In this study, we surveyed 17 species of New World monkeys and found length polymorphisms in these regions in three species (common squirrel monkeys, tufted capuchin monkeys and owl monkeys). We found that the poly-Q region in New World monkeys is relatively shorter than that in catarrhines (humans, apes and Old World monkeys). In addition, we observed that codon usage for poly-G region in New World monkeys is unique among primates. These results suggest that the length of polymorphic regions in androgen receptor genes have evolved uniquely in New World monkeys.

  11. N-carbamylglutamate augments ureagenesis and reduces ammonia and glutamine levels in patients with propionic acidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mew, Nicholas Ah; McCarter, Robert; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Nissim, Itzhak; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, Mendel

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether N-carbamylglutamate reduces plasma levels of ammonia and glutamine and increases ureagenesis rate in patients with propionic acidemia Patients and Methods Identical four-hour studies were performed before and immediately after a 3-day trial of oral N-carbamylglutamate in 7 patients with propionic acidemia. An oral bolus of [13C]-sodium acetate was administered at the start of each study, and sequential blood samples were obtained to measure [13C]-urea, ammonia, urea and amino acids. Results With longitudinal mixed effects linear regression, peak [13C]urea increased following treatment with N-carbamylglutamate (from 2.2 μM to 3.8 μM; p propionic acidemia. The drug may serve as an important therapeutic adjunct in the treatment of acute hyperammonemia in this disorder. PMID:20566609

  12. Knockout of GAD65 has major impact on synaptic GABA synthesized from astrocyte-derived glutamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne Byriel; Eyjolfsson, Elvar M.; Smeland, Olav B.

    2011-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis from glutamate is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) of which two isoforms, GAD65 and GAD67, have been identified. The GAD65 has repeatedly been shown to be important during intensified synaptic activity. To specifically elucidate the significance of GAD......65 for maintenance of the highly compartmentalized intracellular and intercellular GABA homeostasis, GAD65 knockout and corresponding wild-type mice were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and the astrocyte-specific substrate [1,2-(13)C]acetate. Synthesis of GABA from glutamine in the GABAergic synapses...... was further investigated in GAD65 knockout and wild-type mice using [1,2-(13)C]acetate and in some cases γ-vinylGABA (GVG, Vigabatrin), an inhibitor of GABA degradation. A detailed metabolic mapping was obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis of tissue extracts of cerebral cortex...

  13. Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase: A Potential Drug Target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L. Mowbray

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Globally, tuberculosis is second only to AIDS in mortality and the disease is responsible for over 1.3 million deaths each year. The impractically long treatment schedules (generally 6–9 months and unpleasant side effects of the current drugs often lead to poor patient compliance, which in turn has resulted in the emergence of multi-, extensively- and totally-drug resistant strains. The development of new classes of anti-tuberculosis drugs and new drug targets is of global importance, since attacking the bacterium using multiple strategies provides the best means to prevent resistance. This review presents an overview of the various strategies and compounds utilized to inhibit glutamine synthetase, a promising target for the development of drugs for TB therapy.

  14. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase: a potential drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Sherry L; Kathiravan, Muthu K; Pandey, Abhishek A; Odell, Luke R

    2014-08-26

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Globally, tuberculosis is second only to AIDS in mortality and the disease is responsible for over 1.3 million deaths each year. The impractically long treatment schedules (generally 6-9 months) and unpleasant side effects of the current drugs often lead to poor patient compliance, which in turn has resulted in the emergence of multi-, extensively- and totally-drug resistant strains. The development of new classes of anti-tuberculosis drugs and new drug targets is of global importance, since attacking the bacterium using multiple strategies provides the best means to prevent resistance. This review presents an overview of the various strategies and compounds utilized to inhibit glutamine synthetase, a promising target for the development of drugs for TB therapy.

  15. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of dietary L-glutamine supplementation on specific and general defense responses in mice immunized with inactivated Pasteurella multocida vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Liu, Shuping; Zhang, Fengmei; Ren, Wenkai; Li, Nengzhang; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Peng, Yuanyi; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about effects of dietary glutamine supplementation on specific and general defense responses in a vaccine-immunized animal model. Thus, this study determined roles for dietary glutamine supplementation in specific and general defense responses in mice immunized with inactivated Pasteurella multocida vaccine. The measured variables included: (1) the production of pathogen-specific antibodies; (2) mRNA levels for pro-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors and anti-oxidative factors; and (3) the distribution of P. multocida in tissues and the expression of its major virulence factors in vivo. Dietary supplementation with 0.5 % glutamine had a better protective role than 1 or 2 % glutamine against P. multocida infection in vaccine-immunized mice, at least partly resulting from its effects in modulation of general defense responses. Dietary glutamine supplementation had little effects on the production of P. multocida-specific antibodies. Compared to the non-supplemented group, dietary supplementation with 0.5 % glutamine had no effect on bacterial burden in vivo but decreased the expression of major virulence factors in the spleen. Collectively, supplementing 0.5 % glutamine to a conventional diet provides benefits in vaccine-immunized mice by enhancing general defense responses and decreasing expression of specific virulence factors.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and biological evaluation of poly(L-γ-glutamyl-glutamine-paclitaxel nanoconjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Van

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Sang Van1, Sanjib K Das1, Xinghe Wang1, Zhongling Feng1, Yi Jin1, Zheng Hou1, Fu Chen1, Annie Pham1, Nan Jiang1, Stephen B Howell2, Lei Yu11Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, Oceanside, CA, USA; 2Moores Cancer Center, University of California, La Jolla, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: The purpose of this study was to develop a novel, highly water-soluble poly(L-γ-glutamyl-glutamine-paclitaxel nanoconjugate (PGG-PTX that would improve the therapeutic index of paclitaxel (PTX. PGG-PTX is a modification of poly(L-glutamic acid-paclitaxel conjugate (PGA-PTX in which an additional glutamic acid has been added to each glutamic side chain in the polymer. PGG-PTX has higher water-solubility and faster dissolution than PGA-PTX. Unlike PGA-PTX, PGG-PTX self-assembles into nanoparticles, whose size remains in the range of 12–15 nm over the concentration range from 25 to 2,000 µg/mL in saline. Its critical micellar concentration in saline was found to be ~25 µg/mL. The potency of PGG-PTX when tested in vitro against the human lung cancer H460 cell line was comparable to other known polymer-PTX conjugates. However, PGG-PTX possesses lower toxicity compared with PGA-PTX in mice. The maximum tolerated dose of PGG-PTX was found to be 350 mg PTX/kg, which is 2.2-fold higher than the maximum tolerated dose of 160 mg PTX/kg reported for the PGA-PTX. This result indicates that PGG-PTX was substantially less toxic in vivo than PGA-PTX.Keywords: nanoconjugates, poly(L-glutamic acid, poly(L-γ-glutamyl-glutamine-paclitaxel, nanoparticles, anticancer

  18. Glutamine Provides Effective Protection against Deltamethrin-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity in Rats But Not Against Nephrotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ercan; Ülger, Burak Veli; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Ekinci, Aysun; Dursun, Recep; Zengin, Yılmaz; İçer, Mustafa; Uslukaya, Ömer; Ekinci, Cenap; Güloğlu, Cahfer

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of L-glutamine (GLN) against liver and kidney injury caused by acute toxicity of deltamethrin (DLM). Material/Methods Thirty-two rats were indiscriminately separated into 4 groups with 8 rats each: control group (distilled water; 10 ml/kg, perorally [p.o.]), DLM group (35 mg/kg p.o. one dose.), GLN group (1.5 gr/kg, p.o. single dose.) and DLM (35 mg/kg p.o. one dose.) + GLN group (1.5 gr/kg, p.o. one dose after 4 hours.). Testing for total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) analyses were performed on tissue samples, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), urea, and creatinine were analyzed on serum samples. Liver and kidney samples were histopathologically analyzed. Results The TOS level in liver was significantly higher in the DLM group than in the control group, and the level in DLM+GLN group was considerably lower than in the DLM group. The TAS level in the DLM+GLN group was considerably higher than in the control and DLM groups. The TAS level in kidney tissues was considerably lower in the DLM group than in controls, but was similar to other groups. Histopathological analyses of liver tissues established a significant difference between DLM and DLM+GLN groups in terms of grade 2 hepatic injury. However, no significant difference was found between DLM and DLM+GLN groups in terms of kidney injury. Conclusions Glutamine leads to significant improvement in deltamethrin-induced acute hepatotoxicity in terms of histopathologic results, tissue oxidative stress parameters, and serum liver function marker enzymes. PMID:25890620

  19. Cytoplasmic glutamine synthetase gene expression regulates larval development in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng-Yi; Wei, Dong; Li, Ran; Jia, Hong-Ting; Liu, Yu-Wei; Taning, Clauvis Nji Tizi; Wang, Jin-Jun; Smagghe, Guy

    2018-04-01

    In insects, glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in the synthesis of glutamine, has been reported to be associated with embryonic development, heat shock response, and fecundity regulation. However, little is known about the influence of GS on postembryonic development. In this study, we demonstrate that blocking the activity of GS in the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) with use of a GS-specific inhibitor (L-methionine S-sulfoximine), led to a significant delay in larval development, pupal weight loss, and inhibition of pupation. We further identify cloned and characterized two GS genes (BdGS-c and BdGS-m) from B. dorsalis. The two GS genes identified in B. dorsalis were predicted to be located in the cytosol (BdGS-c) and mitochondria (BdGS-m), and homology analysis indicated that both genes were similar to homologs from other Dipterans, such as Drosophila melanogaster and Aedes aegypti. BdGS-c was highly expressed in the larval stages, suggesting that cytosolic GS plays a predominant role in larval development. Furthermore, RNA interference experiments against BdGS-c, to specifically decrease the expression of cytosolic GS, resulted in delay in larval development as well as pupal weight loss. This study presents the prominent role played by BdGS-c in regulating larval development and suggests that the observed effect could have been modulated through ecdysteroid synthesis, agreeing with the reduced expression of the halloween gene spook. Also, the direct effects of BdGS-c silencing on B. dorsalis, such as larval lethality, delayed pupation, and late emergence, can be further exploited as novel insecticide target in the context of pest management. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara (SSRL); (Maryland)

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  1. NOX4 supports glycolysis and promotes glutamine metabolism in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Wu, Qipeng; Wang, Jing; Yao, Bei; Ma, Lei; Yang, Zhicheng; Li, Juan; Liu, Bing

    2016-12-01

    Our previous studies have confirmed that NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is abundantly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contributes to cancer progression. Nevertheless, the comprehensive mechanisms for NOX4-mediated malignant progression and oxidative resistance of cancer cells remain largely unknown. This study found that NOX4 directed glucose metabolism not only to the glycolysis but also to pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) pathway for production of NADPH in NSCLC cell lines. Besides, we also found that NOX4 promoted glutaminolysis into total GSH synthesis. Specifically, the data showed that ectopic NOX4 expression did not induce apoptosis of NSCLC cells; however, inhibition of GSH production resulted in obvious apoptotic death of NOX4-overexpressed NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NOX4-induced glycolysis probably via ROS/PI3K/Akt signaling-dependent c-Myc upregulation. The selective NOX4 inhibitor, GKT137831, significantly inhibited glucose and glutamine metabolic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and itself or combination with 2-DG, a synthetic glycolytic inhibitor, suppressed cancer cell growth both in vivo and in vitro. Elimination of NOX4-derived H 2 O 2 effectively reversed NOX4 overexpression-mediated metabolic effects in NSCLC cells. NOX4 levels were significantly correlated with increased glucose and glutamine metabolism-related genes, as well as Akt phosphorylation and c-Myc expression in primary NSCLC specimens. In conclusion, these results reveal that NOX4 promotes glycolysis, contributing to NSCLC growth, and supports glutaminolysis for oxidative resistance. Therefore, NOX4 may be a promising target to reverse malignant progression of NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced shoot multiplication in Ficus religiosa L. in the presence of adenine sulphate, glutamine and phloroglucinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwach, Priyanka; Gill, Anita Rani

    2011-07-01

    Ficus religiosa (Pipal) is a long-lived valuable multipurpose forest tree. The tree is exploited because of its religious, ornamental and medicinal value and the regeneration rate in natural habitat is low. An in vitro propagation protocol has been developed from nodal segments obtained from a 45-50-year old tree. The highest bud break frequency (100 %) followed by maximum number of multiple shoots (13.9) as well as length (2.47 cm) were obtained on Woody Plant medium (WPM) supplemented with 1.0 mg/l BAP along with 0.5 mg/l IAA. Two modifications in this medium resulted in enhanced shoot regeneration-one with 200 mg/l glutamine + 150 mg/l ADS (called as MM-1) giving 32.5 shoots per nodal explant while another modification-with 200 mg/l glutamine + 150 mg/l ADS + 100 mg/l phloroglucinol (called as MM-2) giving 35.65 shoots per explant. These two media were used for sub-culturing of shoots for 4 months. The rate of shoot multiplication was same during the first three sub-cultures on MM-1 and the shoots regenerated were healthy, afterwards shoot multiplication declined. While on MM-2, shoot multiplication declined after first sub-culture and shoots underwent the problem of early leaf fall. Rooting was best induced in micro-shoots excised from proliferated shoot cultures on semi-solid as well as liquid WPM modified with 2.0 mg/l IBA and 0.5 mg/l IAA. The in vitro-raised plantlets were potted and acclimatized under culture room conditions for 25-30 days before transfer to soil conditions, where the established plants showed more than 90 % survival.

  3. Marine nitrogen cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    of the marine nitrogen cycle and its influence on atmospheric CO 2 , in: The Ocean Carbon Cycle and Climate, edited by: Follows, M., and Oguz, T., Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, 97-148, 2004. ISBN 1402020864. Citation Naqvi, Syed. 2006. "Marine nitrogen cycle...]. nitrogen_cycle> All text is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license. Please see the Encyclopedia of Earth's website for Terms of Use information. Supported...

  4. Developments in nitrogen generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, C.L.; Abrardo, J.M.; Himmelberger, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three process cycles for the production of nitrogen by the cryogenic separation of air are described in detail. These cycles are: (1) a waste expander cycle; (2) an air expander cycle; and (3) a cycle for producing large quantities of gaseous nitrogen. Each cycle has distinct advantages for various production ranges and delivery pressures. A dicussion of key parameters that must be considered when selecting a cycle to meet specific product requirements is presented. The importance of high plant reliability and a dependable liquid nitrogen back up system is also presented. Lastly, a discussion of plant safety dealing with the hazards of nitrogen, enriched oxygen, and hydrocarbons present in the air is reviewed

  5. Lactation during hibernation in wild black bears: effects on plasma amino acids and nitrogen metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, P A; Obbard, M E; Battersby, B J; Felskie, A K; LeBlanc, P J; Ballantyne, J S

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the seasonal and reproductive influences on individual plasma amino acid concentrations and nitrogen metabolites in a black bear population (Ontario, Canada). During hibernation, 11 of 23 plasma amino acids were significantly higher (13%-108%) in lactating than in nonlactating females, without an alteration in plasma total protein or total essential or nonessential amino acid levels. The greatest changes were observed in glutamine, arginine, and glycine levels. Plasma urea, urea/creatinine, and ammonia levels were significantly lower in hibernating compared with active female bears, but lactation had no effect on these parameters. Taken together these results show that lactation during hibernation is an additional metabolic challenge that results in increased mobilization of individual plasma amino acids and no accumulation of nitrogen end products, underlining the remarkable efficiency of amino acid and urea recycling in denning female black bears.

  6. Emersion induces nitrogen release and alteration of nitrogen metabolism in the intertidal genus Porphyra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang K; Kraemer, George P; Yarish, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N) release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ(15)N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate) of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion.

  7. Emersion induces nitrogen release and alteration of nitrogen metabolism in the intertidal genus Porphyra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang K Kim

    Full Text Available We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ(15N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion.

  8. Soybean Nitrogen Fixing Attributes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reproductive unit and nitrogen fixing attributes (Carruthers er. al., 2000). In combination with various lupin and forages, these authors showed that soybean grain yield was decreased by most treatments. In order to limit over population and pollution risks, low nitrogen fertilizer agricultural systems are likely to be advocated.

  9. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  10. Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for communications about resource use efficiency and for measures to increase the use efficiency of nutrients in relation to food production. This holds especially for nitrogen. Nitrogen (N) is essential for life and a main nutrient element. It is needed in relatively large

  11. Nitrogen trading tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  12. Disruption of the glutamate-glutamine cycle involving astrocytes in an animal model of depression for males and females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Rappeneau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women are twice as likely as men to develop major depression (MD. The brain mechanisms underlying this sex disparity are not clear. Disruption of the glutamate-glutamine cycle has been implicated in psychiatric disturbances. This study identifies sex-based impairments in the glutamate-glutamine cycle involving astrocytes using an animal model of depression. Methods: Male and female adult Long-Evans rats were exposed to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS for 21 days, using a modified resident-intruder paradigm. Territorial aggression was used for males and maternal aggression was used for females to induce depressive-like deficits for intruders. The depressive-like phenotype was assessed with intake for saccharin solution, weight gain, estrous cycle, and corticosterone (CORT. Behaviors displayed by the intruders during daily encounters with residents were characterized. Rats with daily handling were used as controls for each sex. Ten days after the last encounter, both the intruders and controls were subjected to a no-net-flux in vivo microdialysis to assess glutamate accumulation and extracellular glutamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc. The contralateral hemispheres were used for determining changes in astrocytic markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1. Results: Both male and female intruders reduced saccharin intake over the course of CSDS, compared to their pre-stress period and to their respective controls. Male intruders exhibited submissive/defensive behaviors to territorial aggression by receiving sideways threats and bites. These males showed reductions in striatal GLT-1 and spontaneous glutamine in the NAc, compared to controls. Female intruders exhibited isolated behaviors to maternal aggression, including immobility, rearing, and self-grooming. Their non-reproductive days were extended. Also, they showed reductions in prefrontal and accumbal GFAP+ cells and prefrontal GLT

  13. Molecular and functional analyses support a role of Ornithine-{delta}-aminotransferase in the provision of glutamate for glutamine biosynthesis during pine germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Rafael A; Villalobos, David P; Díaz-Moreno, Sara M; Cánovas, Francisco M; Cantón, Francisco R

    2008-09-01

    We report the molecular characterization and functional analysis of a gene (PsdeltaOAT) from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) encoding Orn-delta-aminotransferase (delta-OAT; EC 2.6.1.13), an enzyme of arginine metabolism. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative N-terminal signal peptide for mitochondrial targeting. The polypeptide is similar to other delta-OATs from plants, yeast, and mammals and encoded by a single-copy gene in pine. PsdeltaOAT encodes a functional delta-OAT as determined by expression of the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and analysis of the active enzyme. The expression of PsdeltaOAT was undetectable in the embryo, but highly induced at early stages of germination and seedling development in all different organs. Transcript levels decreased in later developmental stages, although an increase was observed in lignified stems of 90-d-old plants. An increase of delta-OAT activity was observed in germinating embryos and seedlings and appears to mirror the observed alterations in PsdeltaOAT transcript levels. Similar expression patterns were also observed for genes encoding arginase and isocitrate dehydrogenase. Transcripts of PsdeltaOAT and the arginase gene were found widely distributed in different cell types of pine organs. Consistent with these results a metabolic pathway is proposed for the nitrogen flow from the megagametophyte to the developing seedling, which is also supported by the relative abundance of free amino acids in embryos and seedlings. Taken together, our data support that delta-OAT plays an important role in this process providing glutamate for glutamine biosynthesis during early pine growth.

  14. Molecular and Functional Analyses Support a Role of Ornithine-δ-Aminotransferase in the Provision of Glutamate for Glutamine Biosynthesis during Pine Germination1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Rafael A.; Villalobos, David P.; Díaz-Moreno, Sara M.; Cánovas, Francisco M.; Cantón, Francisco R.

    2008-01-01

    We report the molecular characterization and functional analysis of a gene (PsδOAT) from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) encoding Orn-δ-aminotransferase (δ-OAT; EC 2.6.1.13), an enzyme of arginine metabolism. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative N-terminal signal peptide for mitochondrial targeting. The polypeptide is similar to other δ-OATs from plants, yeast, and mammals and encoded by a single-copy gene in pine. PsδOAT encodes a functional δ-OAT as determined by expression of the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and analysis of the active enzyme. The expression of PsδOAT was undetectable in the embryo, but highly induced at early stages of germination and seedling development in all different organs. Transcript levels decreased in later developmental stages, although an increase was observed in lignified stems of 90-d-old plants. An increase of δ-OAT activity was observed in germinating embryos and seedlings and appears to mirror the observed alterations in PsδOAT transcript levels. Similar expression patterns were also observed for genes encoding arginase and isocitrate dehydrogenase. Transcripts of PsδOAT and the arginase gene were found widely distributed in different cell types of pine organs. Consistent with these results a metabolic pathway is proposed for the nitrogen flow from the megagametophyte to the developing seedling, which is also supported by the relative abundance of free amino acids in embryos and seedlings. Taken together, our data support that δ-OAT plays an important role in this process providing glutamate for glutamine biosynthesis during early pine growth. PMID:18621980

  15. Residual gastric volume evaluation with ultrasonography after ingestion of carbohydrate- or carbohydrate plus glutamine-enriched beverages: a randomized, crossover clinical trial with healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Paulo Cesar; Caporossi, Cervantes; Aguilar-Nascimento, Jose Eduardo; Silva, Ageo Mario Candido da; Araujo, Viviane Maeve Tavares de

    2017-01-01

    - Abbreviation of preoperative fasting to 2 hours with maltodextrin (CHO)-enriched beverage is a safe procedure and may enhance postoperative recovery. Addition of glutamine (GLN) to CHO beverages may include potential benefits to the metabolism. However, by adding a nitrogenous source to CHO beverages, gastric emptying may be delayed and increase the risk of bronchoaspiration during anesthesia. - In this study of safety, we aimed at investigating the residual gastric volume (RGV) 2 hours after the intake of either CHO beverage alone or CHO beverage combined with GLN. - We performed a randomized, crossover clinical trial. We assessed RGV by means of abdominal ultrasonography (US) in 20 healthy volunteers (10 males and 10 females) after an overnight fast of 8 hours. Then, they were randomized to receive 600 mL (400 mL immediately after US followed by another 200 mL 2 hours afterwards) of either CHO (12.5% maltodextrin) or CHO-GLN (12.5% maltodextrin plus 15 g GLN). Two sequential US evaluations were done at 120 and 180 minutes after ingestion of the second dose. The interval of time between ingestion of the two types of beverages was 2 weeks. - The mean (SD) RGV observed after 8 hours fasting (13.56±13.25 mL) did not statistically differ (P>0.05) from the RGV observed after ingesting CHO beverage at both 120 (16.32±11.78 mL) and 180 minutes (14.60±10.39 mL). The RGV obtained at 120 (15.63±18.83 mL) and 180 (13.65±10.27 mL) minutes after CHO-GLN beverage also was not significantly different from the fasting condition. - The RGV at 120 and 180 minutes after ingestion of CHO beverage combined with GLN is similar to that observed after an overnight fast.

  16. Lack of cytosolic glutamine synthetase1;2 in vascular tissues of axillary buds causes severe reduction in their outgrowth and disorder of metabolic balance in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Miwa; Ishiyama, Keiki; Kusano, Miyako; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kojima, Soichi; Hanada, Atsushi; Kanno, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Toshihiko; Seto, Yoshiya; Kyozuka, Junko; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Yamaya, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The development and elongation of active tillers in rice was severely reduced by a lack of cytosolic glutamine synthetase1;2 (GS1;2), and, to a lesser extent, lack of NADH-glutamate synthase1 in knockout mutants. In situ hybridization using the basal part of wild-type seedlings clearly showed that expression of OsGS1;2 was detected in the phloem companion cells of the nodal vascular anastomoses and large vascular bundles of axillary buds. Accumulation of lignin, visualized using phloroglucin HCl, was also observed in these tissues. The lack of GS1;2 resulted in reduced accumulation of lignin. Re-introduction into the mutants of OsGS1;2 cDNA under the control of its own promoter successfully restored the outgrowth of tillers and lignin deposition to wild-type levels. Transcriptomic analysis using a 5 mm basal region of rice shoots showed that the GS1;2 mutants accumulated reduced amounts of mRNAs for carbon and nitrogen metabolism, including C1 unit transfer in lignin synthesis. Although a high content of strigolactone in rice roots is known to reduce active tiller number, the reduction of outgrowth of axillary buds observed in the GS1;2 mutants was independent of the level of strigolactone. Thus metabolic disorder caused by the lack of GS1;2 resulted in a severe reduction in the outgrowth of axillary buds and lignin deposition. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Asparagine and glutamine side-chain conformation in solution and crystal: A comparison for hen egg-white lysozyme using residual dipolar ouplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higman, Victoria A.; Boyd, Jonathan; Smith, Lorna J.; Redfield, Christina

    2004-01-01

    Experimental 15 N- 1 H and 1 H- 1 H residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) for the asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln) side chains of hen egg-white lysozyme are measured and analysed in conjunction with 1 N relaxation data, information about χ 1 torsion angles in solution and molecular dynamics simulations. The RDCs are compared to values predicted from 16 high-resolution crystal structures. Two distinct groups of Asn and Gln side chains are identified. The first contains residues whose side chains show a fixed, relatively rigid, conformation in solution. For these residues there is good agreement between the experimental and predicted RDCs. This agreement improves when the experimental order parameter, S, is included in the calculation of the RDCs from the crystal structures. The comparison of the experimental RDCs with values calculated from the X-ray structures shows that the similarity between the oxygen and nitrogen electron densities is a limitation to the correct assignment of the Asn and Gln side-chain orientation in X-ray structures. In the majority of X-ray structures a 180 deg. rotation about χ 2 or χ 3 , leading to the swapping of N δε2 and O δε1 , is necessary for at least one Asn or Gln residue in order to achieve good agreement between experimental and predicted RDCs. The second group contains residues whose side chains do not adopt a single, well-defined, conformation in solution. These residues do not show a correlation between the experimental and predicted RDCs. In many cases the family of crystal structures shows a range of orientations for these side chains, but in others the crystal structures show a well-defined side-chain position. In the latter case, this is found to arise from crystallographic contacts and does not represent the behaviour of the side chain in solution

  18. Residual gastric volume evaluation with ultrasonography after ingestion of carbohydrate- or carbohydrate plus glutamine-enriched beverages: a randomized, crossover clinical trial with healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar GOMES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Abbreviation of preoperative fasting to 2 hours with maltodextrin (CHO-enriched beverage is a safe procedure and may enhance postoperative recovery. Addition of glutamine (GLN to CHO beverages may include potential benefits to the metabolism. However, by adding a nitrogenous source to CHO beverages, gastric emptying may be delayed and increase the risk of bronchoaspiration during anesthesia. OBJECTIVE In this study of safety, we aimed at investigating the residual gastric volume (RGV 2 hours after the intake of either CHO beverage alone or CHO beverage combined with GLN. METHODS We performed a randomized, crossover clinical trial. We assessed RGV by means of abdominal ultrasonography (US in 20 healthy volunteers (10 males and 10 females after an overnight fast of 8 hours. Then, they were randomized to receive 600 mL (400 mL immediately after US followed by another 200 mL 2 hours afterwards of either CHO (12.5% maltodextrin or CHO-GLN (12.5% maltodextrin plus 15 g GLN. Two sequential US evaluations were done at 120 and 180 minutes after ingestion of the second dose. The interval of time between ingestion of the two types of beverages was 2 weeks. RESULTS The mean (SD RGV observed after 8 hours fasting (13.56±13.25 mL did not statistically differ (P>0.05 from the RGV observed after ingesting CHO beverage at both 120 (16.32±11.78 mL and 180 minutes (14.60±10.39 mL. The RGV obtained at 120 (15.63±18.83 mL and 180 (13.65±10.27 mL minutes after CHO-GLN beverage also was not significantly different from the fasting condition. CONCLUSION The RGV at 120 and 180 minutes after ingestion of CHO beverage combined with GLN is similar to that observed after an overnight fast.

  19. GlnK Facilitates the Dynamic Regulation of Bacterial Nitrogen Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosztolai, Adam; Schumacher, Jörg; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G.; Heydenreich, Franziska; Bennett, Mark H.; Buck, Martin; Barahona, Mauricio

    2017-05-01

    Ammonium assimilation in E. coli is regulated by two paralogous proteins (GlnB and GlnK), which orchestrate interactions with regulators of gene expression, transport proteins and metabolic pathways. Yet how they conjointly modulate the activity of glutamine synthetase (GS), the key enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, is poorly understood. We combine experiments and theory to study the dynamic roles of GlnB and GlnK during nitrogen starvation and upshift. We measure time-resolved in vivo concentrations of metabolites, total and post-translationally modified proteins, and develop a concise biochemical model of GlnB and GlnK that incorporates competition for active and allosteric sites, as well as functional sequestration of GlnK. The model predicts the responses of GS, GlnB and GlnK under time-varying external ammonium level in the wild type and two genetic knock-outs. Our results show that GlnK is tightly regulated under nitrogen-rich conditions, yet it is expressed during ammonium run-out and starvation. This suggests a role for GlnK as a buffer of nitrogen shock after starvation, and provides a further functional link between nitrogen and carbon metabolisms.

  20. Effects of Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen on the Growth and Production of Domoic Acid by Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis (Bacillariophyceae) in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Jézéquel, Véronique; Calu, Guillaume; Candela, Leo; Amzil, Zouher; Jauffrais, Thierry; Séchet, Véronique; Weigel, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Over the last century, human activities have altered the global nitrogen cycle, and anthropogenic inputs of both inorganic and organic nitrogen species have increased around the world, causing significant changes to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The increasing frequency of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. in estuarine and coastal waters reinforces the need to understand better the environmental control of its growth and domoic acid (DA) production. Here, we document Pseudo-nitzschia spp. growth and toxicity on a large set of inorganic and organic nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium, urea, glutamate, glutamine, arginine and taurine). Our study focused on two species isolated from European coastal waters: P. multiseries CCL70 and P. australis PNC1. The nitrogen sources induced broad differences between the two species with respect to growth rate, biomass and cellular DA, but no specific variation could be attributed to any of the inorganic or organic nitrogen substrates. Enrichment with ammonium resulted in an enhanced growth rate and cell yield, whereas glutamate did not support the growth of P. multiseries. Arginine, glutamine and taurine enabled good growth of P. australis, but without toxin production. The highest DA content was produced when P. multiseries grew with urea and P. australis grew with glutamate. For both species, growth rate was not correlated with DA content but more toxin was produced when the nitrogen source could not sustain a high biomass. A significant negative correlation was found between cell biomass and DA content in P. australis. This study shows that Pseudo-nitzschia can readily utilize organic nitrogen in the form of amino acids, and confirms that both inorganic and organic nitrogen affect growth and DA production. Our results contribute to our understanding of the ecophysiology of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and may help to predict toxic events in the natural environment. PMID:26703627

  1. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Sørensen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present...... study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo...... synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis...

  2. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of IGFBP6, IGFBP7, NOV, CYR61, WISP1 and WISP2 genes in U87 glioma cells in glutamine deprivation condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Minchenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We have studied gene expression of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in U87 glioma cells upon glutamine deprivation depending on the inhibition of IRE1 (inositol requiring enzyme-1, a central mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress. We have shown that exposure of control glioma cells upon glutamine deprivation leads to down-regulation of NOV/IGFBP9, WISP1 and WISP2 gene expressions and up-regulation of CYR61/IGFBP10 gene expression at the mRNA level. At the same time, the expression of IGFBP6 and IGFBP7 genes in control glioma cells was resistant to glutamine deprivation. It was also shown that the inhibition of IRE1 modifies the effect of glutamine deprivation on the expression of all studied genes. Thus, the inhibition of IRE1 signaling enzyme enhances the effect of glutamine deprivation on the expression of CYR61 and WISP1 genes and suppresses effect of the deprivation on WISP2 gene expression in glioma cells. Moreover, the inhibition of IRE1 introduces sensitivity of the expression of IGFBP6 and IGFBP7 genes to glutamine deprivation and removes this sensitivity to NOV gene. We have also demonstrated that the expression of all studied genes in glioma cells growing with glutamine is regulated by IRE1 signaling enzyme, because the inhibition of IRE1 significantly down-regulates IGFBP6 and NOV genes and up-regulates IGFBP7, CYR61, WISP1, and WISP2 genes as compared to control glioma cells. The present study demonstrates that glutamine deprivation condition affects most studied IGFBP and WISP gene expressions in relation to IRE1 signaling enzyme function and possibly contributes to slower glioma cell proliferation upon inhibition of IRE1.

  4. The nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-08

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. L-glutamine: Dynamical properties investigation by means of INS, IR, RAMAN, {sup 1}H NMR and DFT techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlukojć, A., E-mail: andrzej@jinr.ru [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16 str., 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Hołderna-Natkaniec, K. [Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Bator, G. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, F. Joliot-Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Natkaniec, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2014-10-31

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The L-glutamine was investigated by INS, IR, Raman and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. • DFT calculations for the solids state model were performed. • The NH{sub 3}{sup +} torsional vibration mode is observed in the INS spectra. • Activation energy for the NH{sub 3}{sup +} group reorientation is obtained. - Abstract: Vibrational spectra of L-glutamine in the solid state were studied using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS), infrared (IR), Raman and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy techniques. DFT calculation using CASTEP code with the periodic boundary conditions was used to determine and describe the normal modes in the vibrational spectra of pure L-glutamine. An excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental INS, IR and Raman data has been found. Bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the NH{sub 3}{sup +} group in hydrogen bonds are observed at 2400, 2618 and 2619 cm{sup −1}, while the NH{sub 3}{sup +} torsion vibration mode is observed at 441 cm{sup −1}. The band at 2041 cm{sup −1} is assigned to combinations of the NH{sub 3}{sup +} bending symmetry vibration and the CO{sub 2}{sup -} rocking vibration and can be used as an “indicator band” for the identification of the NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups in amino acid. For the L-glutamine an activation energy needed for the NH{sub 3}{sup +} group reorientation was obtained as 7.4 kcal/mol. It was found, that the combination three spectroscopic methods (INS, IR and Raman) with calculations for the crystal state proved to be an effective tool to investigate dynamical properties of amino acid crystals.

  6. Hydrogen bond assisted interaction of glutamine with chromium (III) complex of 8-hydroxyquinoline: Experimental and theoretical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Jayanthi; Carlos-Alberto, Aguilar H.; Arturo, Lazarini M.; Höpfl, Herbert; Enrique-Fernando, Velazquez C.; Fernando, Rocha A.; Fernando-Toyohiko, Wakida K.; Velazquez-Lopez, José E.; Lesli, Arroyo O.

    2018-03-01

    Chromium (III) complex [Cr (hq)3;C2H5OH] of 8-hydroxyquinoline (hq) was prepared and its structure was resolved by X-ray diffraction analysis at low-temperature, showing that Cr3+ ion presents in distorted octahedral geometry, and it is consistent with the DFT optimized structure. It was observed that solvent ethanol is involved a hydrogen bond with 8-hydroxyquinoline anion. Furthermore, the molecular orbital contributions to spectral bands observed for the complex were determined by TD-DFT. The interaction of [Cr (hq)3;C2H5OH] with glutamine (Gln) or asparagine (Asn) shows that the complex binds effectively with glutamine through hydrogen bonding (H2N+-HṡṡṡOethanol) to form a possible stable adduct [Cr (hq)3;C2H5OH)Gln], yielding its binding constant 10,000 times greater (1.4315 M-1) than that for Asn (5.0 × 10-4 M-1). This is apparently due to the formation of stable secondary coordination sphere through the hydrogen bond between the metal complex with Gln. This observation is good agreement with the total molecular energy as well as with the molecular orbital study, i.e. in the DFT calculation, a lower total molecular energy (-8299,549.441 kcal/mmol) for [Cr (hq)3;C2H5OH) Gln] was obtained than that resulted for [Cr (hq)3;C2H5OH)Asn] (-8194,799.867 kcal/mmol), establishing ethanol effectively stabilizes the interaction between glutamine and the complex. Finally, antibacterial properties of [Cr (hq)3;C2H5OH] against Gram positive Bacillus cereus and Gram negative Escherichia coli was also studied, and compared its bacterial growths for its adducts of glutamine or of asparagine.

  7. Surface Electromyography Assessments of the Vastus medialis and Rectus femoris Muscles and Creatine Kinase after Eccentric Contraction Following Glutamine Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani-Nia, Farhad; Farzaneh, Esmail; Damirchi, Arsalan; Majlan, Ali Shamsi; Tadibi, Vahid

    2014-03-01

    L-glutamine is the most abundant amino acid found in human muscle and plays an important role in protein synthesis and can reduce the levels of inflammation biomarkers and creatine kinase (CK) after training sessions. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) develops after intense exercise and is associated with an inflammatory response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of glutamine supplementation on surface electromyography activity of the vastus medialis muscle (VMM) and rectus femoris muscle (RFM) and levels of creatine kinase after an eccentric contraction. SEVENTEEN HEALTHY MEN (AGE: 22.35±2.27yr; body mass: 69.91± 9.78kg; height: 177.08±4.32cm) were randomly assigned to experimental (n=9) and control groups (n=8) in a double-blind manner. In both groups, subjects were given L-glutamine supplementation (0.1g.kg(-1)) or placebo three times a week for 4 weeks. Median frequency (MDF) and mean power frequency (MPF) for VMM and RFM muscles and also CK measurements were performed before, 24h and 48 h after a resistance training session. The resistance training included 6 sets of eccentric leg extensions to exhaustion with 75% of 1RM. There was no significant difference between groups for MDF or MPF in VMM and RFM. The difference of CK level between the groups was also not significant. The results of this study indicate that glutamine supplementation has no positive effect on muscle injury markers after a resistance training session.

  8. Addition of Alanyl-Glutamine to Dialysis Fluid Restores Peritoneal Cellular Stress Responses - A First-In-Man Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kratochwill

    Full Text Available Peritonitis and ultrafiltration failure remain serious complications of chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD. Dysfunctional cellular stress responses aggravate peritoneal injury associated with PD fluid exposure, potentially due to peritoneal glutamine depletion. In this randomized cross-over phase I/II trial we investigated cytoprotective effects of alanyl-glutamine (AlaGln addition to glucose-based PDF.In a prospective randomized cross-over design, 20 stable PD outpatients underwent paired peritoneal equilibration tests 4 weeks apart, using conventional acidic, single chamber 3.86% glucose PD fluid, with and without 8 mM supplemental AlaGln. Heat-shock protein 72 expression was assessed in peritoneal effluent cells as surrogate parameter of cellular stress responses, complemented by metabolomics and functional immunocompetence assays.AlaGln restored peritoneal glutamine levels and increased the primary outcome heat-shock protein expression (effect 1.51-fold, CI 1.07-2.14; p = 0.022, without changes in peritoneal ultrafiltration, small solute transport, or biomarkers reflecting cell mass and inflammation. Further effects were glutamine-like metabolomic changes and increased ex-vivo LPS-stimulated cytokine release from healthy donor peripheral blood monocytes. In patients with a history of peritonitis (5 of 20, AlaGln supplementation decreased dialysate interleukin-8 levels. Supplemented PD fluid also attenuated inflammation and enhanced stimulated cytokine release in a mouse model of PD-associated peritonitis.We conclude that AlaGln-supplemented, glucose-based PD fluid can restore peritoneal cellular stress responses with attenuation of sterile inflammation, and may improve peritoneal host-defense in the setting of PD.

  9. L-glutamine: Dynamical properties investigation by means of INS, IR, RAMAN, 1H NMR and DFT techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Bator, G.; Natkaniec, I.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The L-glutamine was investigated by INS, IR, Raman and 1 H NMR spectroscopy. • DFT calculations for the solids state model were performed. • The NH 3 + torsional vibration mode is observed in the INS spectra. • Activation energy for the NH 3 + group reorientation is obtained. - Abstract: Vibrational spectra of L-glutamine in the solid state were studied using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS), infrared (IR), Raman and 1 H NMR spectroscopy techniques. DFT calculation using CASTEP code with the periodic boundary conditions was used to determine and describe the normal modes in the vibrational spectra of pure L-glutamine. An excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental INS, IR and Raman data has been found. Bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the NH 3 + group in hydrogen bonds are observed at 2400, 2618 and 2619 cm −1 , while the NH 3 + torsion vibration mode is observed at 441 cm −1 . The band at 2041 cm −1 is assigned to combinations of the NH 3 + bending symmetry vibration and the CO 2 - rocking vibration and can be used as an “indicator band” for the identification of the NH 3 + groups in amino acid. For the L-glutamine an activation energy needed for the NH 3 + group reorientation was obtained as 7.4 kcal/mol. It was found, that the combination three spectroscopic methods (INS, IR and Raman) with calculations for the crystal state proved to be an effective tool to investigate dynamical properties of amino acid crystals

  10. Addition of Alanyl-Glutamine to Dialysis Fluid Restores Peritoneal Cellular Stress Responses – A First-In-Man Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Michael; Herzog, Rebecca; Gruber, Katharina; Lichtenauer, Anton Michael; Kuster, Lilian; Csaicsich, Dagmar; Gleiss, Andreas; Alper, Seth L.; Aufricht, Christoph; Vychytil, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Peritonitis and ultrafiltration failure remain serious complications of chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD). Dysfunctional cellular stress responses aggravate peritoneal injury associated with PD fluid exposure, potentially due to peritoneal glutamine depletion. In this randomized cross-over phase I/II trial we investigated cytoprotective effects of alanyl-glutamine (AlaGln) addition to glucose-based PDF. Methods In a prospective randomized cross-over design, 20 stable PD outpatients underwent paired peritoneal equilibration tests 4 weeks apart, using conventional acidic, single chamber 3.86% glucose PD fluid, with and without 8 mM supplemental AlaGln. Heat-shock protein 72 expression was assessed in peritoneal effluent cells as surrogate parameter of cellular stress responses, complemented by metabolomics and functional immunocompetence assays. Results AlaGln restored peritoneal glutamine levels and increased the primary outcome heat-shock protein expression (effect 1.51-fold, CI 1.07–2.14; p = 0.022), without changes in peritoneal ultrafiltration, small solute transport, or biomarkers reflecting cell mass and inflammation. Further effects were glutamine-like metabolomic changes and increased ex-vivo LPS-stimulated cytokine release from healthy donor peripheral blood monocytes. In patients with a history of peritonitis (5 of 20), AlaGln supplementation decreased dialysate interleukin-8 levels. Supplemented PD fluid also attenuated inflammation and enhanced stimulated cytokine release in a mouse model of PD-associated peritonitis. Conclusion We conclude that AlaGln-supplemented, glucose-based PD fluid can restore peritoneal cellular stress responses with attenuation of sterile inflammation, and may improve peritoneal host-defense in the setting of PD. PMID:27768727

  11. Effects of Glutamine and Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Erythrocyte Deformability and Oxidative Damage in Rat Model of Enterocolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Cehreli, Ruksan; Akpinar, Hale; Artmann, Aysegul Temiz; Sagol, Ozgul

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate preventive effects of glutamine (Gln), omega-3 fatty acids (FA) on erythrocyte deformability (EDEF) in rat model of indomethacin-induced enterocolitis. Methods Nineteen Wistar albino male rats were divided into three groups: control group, colitis induced by indomethacin and were fed with a standard laboratory diet (group 1), and colitis induced by indomethacin and were also fed with Gln, omega-3 FA (group 2). An investigation was performed i...

  12. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvements Glutation Levels in the Hippocampus of Aged and Oxidative-Stressed Rats by Supplementation of Alanine-Glutamine Dipeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunarno Sunarno

    2012-06-01

    Design and Methods: The experimental rats were assigned into a completely randomized design with 2x2x4 factorial arrangement. The first factor was the age of the experimental rats, consisted of two levels i.e., 12 and 24 months. The second factor was oxidative stress consisted of two levels, i.e., without or with oxidative stress. The third factor was the level of alanine-glutamine dipeptide administration consisted of 4 concentrations, i.e. 0%, 3%, 5%, and 7%. Results: The results showed that administration of 7% alanine-glutamine dipeptide has resulted the highest levels of glutathione hippocampus in younger (0.0154 mg/mg tissue or aged (0.0140 mg/mg tissue rats or in normal (0.0150 mg/mg tissue and in oxidative-stressed (0.0144 mg/mg tissue rats. The increased hippocampus glutathione levels were associated to the improved functions of the hippocampus. Conclusion: alanine-glutamine dipeptide administration of 7% consentrations gave the best results on repair function of the hippocampus and has the potential to slow aging, both physiological aging or oxidative-stress aging rats (Sains Medika, 4(1:1-12.

  14. Hypoxia-Like Signatures Induced by BCR-ABL Potentially Alter the Glutamine Uptake for Maintaining Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sontakke

    Full Text Available The Warburg effect is probably the most prominent metabolic feature of cancer cells, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms and consequences. Here, we set out to study these features in detail in a number of leukemia backgrounds. The transcriptomes of human CB CD34+ cells transduced with various oncogenes, including BCR-ABL, MLL-AF9, FLT3-ITD, NUP98-HOXA9, STAT5A and KRASG12V were analyzed in detail. Our data indicate that in particular BCR-ABL, KRASG12V and STAT5 could impose hypoxic signaling under normoxic conditions. This coincided with an upregulation of glucose importers SLC2A1/3, hexokinases and HIF1 and 2. NMR-based metabolic profiling was performed in CB CD34+ cells transduced with BCR-ABL versus controls, both cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. Lactate and pyruvate levels were increased in BCR-ABL-expressing cells even under normoxia, coinciding with enhanced glutaminolysis which occurred in an HIF1/2-dependent manner. Expression of the glutamine importer SLC1A5 was increased in BCR-ABL+ cells, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES. Oxygen consumption rates also decreased upon BPTES treatment, indicating a glutamine dependency for oxidative phosphorylation. The current study suggests that BCR-ABL-positive cancer cells make use of enhanced glutamine metabolism to maintain TCA cell cycle activity in glycolytic cells.

  15. L-glutamine: Dynamical properties investigation by means of INS, IR, RAMAN, 1H NMR and DFT techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Bator, G.; Natkaniec, I.

    2014-10-01

    Vibrational spectra of L-glutamine in the solid state were studied using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS), infrared (IR), Raman and 1H NMR spectroscopy techniques. DFT calculation using CASTEP code with the periodic boundary conditions was used to determine and describe the normal modes in the vibrational spectra of pure L-glutamine. An excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental INS, IR and Raman data has been found. Bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the NH3+ group in hydrogen bonds are observed at 2400, 2618 and 2619 cm-1, while the NH3+ torsion vibration mode is observed at 441 cm-1. The band at 2041 cm-1 is assigned to combinations of the NH3+ bending symmetry vibration and the CO2- rocking vibration and can be used as an "indicator band" for the identification of the NH3+ groups in amino acid. For the L-glutamine an activation energy needed for the NH3+ group reorientation was obtained as 7.4 kcal/mol. It was found, that the combination three spectroscopic methods (INS, IR and Raman) with calculations for the crystal state proved to be an effective tool to investigate dynamical properties of amino acid crystals.

  16. Pharmacologic or Genetic Targeting of Glutamine Synthetase Skews Macrophages toward an M1-like Phenotype and Inhibits Tumor Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M. Palmieri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine-synthetase (GS, the glutamine-synthesizing enzyme from glutamate, controls important events, including the release of inflammatory mediators, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR activation, and autophagy. However, its role in macrophages remains elusive. We report that pharmacologic inhibition of GS skews M2-polarized macrophages toward the M1-like phenotype, characterized by reduced intracellular glutamine and increased succinate with enhanced glucose flux through glycolysis, which could be partly related to HIF1α activation. As a result of these metabolic changes and HIF1α accumulation, GS-inhibited macrophages display an increased capacity to induce T cell recruitment, reduced T cell suppressive potential, and an impaired ability to foster endothelial cell branching or cancer cell motility. Genetic deletion of macrophagic GS in tumor-bearing mice promotes tumor vessel pruning, vascular normalization, accumulation of cytotoxic T cells, and metastasis inhibition. These data identify GS activity as mediator of the proangiogenic, immunosuppressive, and pro-metastatic function of M2-like macrophages and highlight the possibility of targeting this enzyme in the treatment of cancer metastasis.

  17. Commercial Nitrogen Fertilizer Purchased

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Amounts of fertilizer nitrogen (N) purchased by states in individual years 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009 and 2011, and the % change in average amounts purchased per year...

  18. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  19. Blood Urea Nitrogen Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture Blood Gases Blood Ketones Blood Smear Blood Typing Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) BNP and NT-proBNP ... Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Lyme Disease Tests Magnesium Maternal Serum Screening, Second Trimester Measles and Mumps Tests Mercury ...

  20. Nuclear glutamine synthetase evolution in Nicotiana: phylogenetics and the origins of allotetraploid and homoploid (diploid) hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, James J; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Andrew R; Knapp, Sandra; Chase, Mark W

    2010-04-01

    Interspecies relationships in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) are complex because 40 species are diploid (two sets of chromosomes) and 35 species are allotetraploid (four sets of chromosomes, two from each progenitor diploid species). We sequenced a fragment (containing four introns) of the nuclear gene 'chloroplast-expressed glutamine synthetase' (ncpGS) in 65 species of Nicotiana. Here we present the first phylogenetic analysis based on a low-copy nuclear gene for this well studied and important genus. Diploid species have a single-copy of ncpGS, and allotetraploids as expected have two homeologous copies, each derived from their progenitor diploid. Results were particularly useful for determining the paternal lineage of previously enigmatic taxa (for which our previous analyses had revealed only the maternal progenitors). In particular, we were able to shed light on the origins of the two oldest and largest allotetraploid sections, N. sects. Suaveolentes and Repandae. All homeologues have an intact reading frame and apparently similar rates of divergence, suggesting both remain functional. Difficulties in fitting certain diploid species into the sectional classification of Nicotiana on morphological grounds, coupled with discordance between the ncpGS data and previous trees (i.e. plastid, nuclear ribosomal DNA), indicate a number of homoploid (diploid) hybrids in the genus. We have evidence for Nicotiana glutinosa and Nicotiana linearis being of hybrid origin and patterns of intra-allelic recombination also indicate the possibility of reticulate origins for other diploid species. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural and functional insights into small, glutamine-rich, tetratricopeptide repeat protein alpha

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    Joanna D Roberts

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SGTA is a co-chaperone that interacts with molecular chaperones and steroid receptor complexes and plays an important role in various cellular pathways. It consists of three structural domains with individual functions, an N-terminal dimerisation domain (SGTA_NT that assists protein sorting pathways, a central tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain that interacts with heat-shock proteins and a C-terminal glutamine rich region that binds hydrophobic substrates. A range of biophysical techniques has been employed to characterize its structure and to investigate its interactions with binding partners. SGTA interacts with the androgen receptor and other steroid receptor complexes and has been shown to be linked to hormonally induced disease states. Therefore, a full structure of SGTA and further investigation of its function as a molecular co-chaperone could provide us with useful insights into the mechanisms of related pathologies. This review describes how some structural features of SGTA have been elucidated, and what this has uncovered about its function as a co-chaperone. A brief background on the structure and function of SGTA is given, highlighting its importance to biomedicine and related fields. The current level of knowledge and what remains to be understood about the structure and function of SGTA is summarised, discussing the potential direction of future research.

  2. Sleep spindles are related to schizotypal personality traits and thalamic glutamine/glutamate in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; O'Gorman, Ruth L; Pugin, Fiona; Tüshaus, Laura; Wehrle, Flavia; Achermann, Peter; Huber, Reto

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder affecting approximately 1% of the worldwide population. Yet, schizophrenia-like experiences (schizotypy) are very common in the healthy population, indicating a continuum between normal mental functioning and the psychosis found in schizophrenic patients. A continuum between schizotypy and schizophrenia would be supported if they share the same neurobiological origin. Two such neurobiological markers of schizophrenia are: (1) a reduction of sleep spindles (12-15 Hz oscillations during nonrapid eye movement sleep), likely reflecting deficits in thalamo-cortical circuits and (2) increased glutamine and glutamate (Glx) levels in the thalamus. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether sleep spindles and Glx levels are related to schizotypal personality traits in healthy subjects. Twenty young male subjects underwent 2 all-night sleep electroencephalography recordings (128 electrodes). Sleep spindles were detected automatically. After those 2 nights, thalamic Glx levels were measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Subjects completed a magical ideation scale to assess schizotypy. Sleep spindle density was negatively correlated with magical ideation (r = -.64, P .1). The common relationship of sleep spindle density with schizotypy and thalamic Glx levels indicates a neurobiological overlap between nonclinical schizotypy and schizophrenia. Thus, sleep spindle density and magical ideation may reflect the anatomy and efficiency of the thalamo-cortical system that shows pronounced impairment in patients with schizophrenia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Cannabidiol protects retinal neurons by preserving glutamine synthetase activity in diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Remessy, A.B.; Khalifa, Y.; Ibrahim, A.S.; Liou, G.I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We have previously shown that non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD) protects retinal neurons in diabetic rats by inhibiting reactive oxygen species and blocking tyrosine nitration. Tyrosine nitration may inhibit glutamine synthetase (GS), causing glutamate accumulation and leading to further neuronal cell death. We propose to test the hypothesis that diabetes-induced glutamate accumulation in the retina is associated with tyrosine nitration of GS and that CBD treatment inhibits this process. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by streptozotocin injection and received either vehicle or CBD (10 mg/kg/2 days). After eight weeks, retinal cell death, Müller cell activation, GS tyrosine nitration, and GS activity were determined. Results Diabetes causes significant increases in retinal oxidative and nitrative stress compared with controls. These effects were associated with Müller cell activation and dysfunction as well as with impaired GS activity and tyrosine nitration of GS. Cannabidiol treatment reversed these effects. Retinal neuronal death was indicated by numerous terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-labeled cells in diabetic rats compared with untreated controls or CBD-treated rats. Conclusions These results suggest that diabetes-induced tyrosine nitration impairs GS activity and that CBD preserves GS activity and retinal neurons by blocking tyrosine nitration. PMID:20806080

  4. Hypophysectomy decrease and growth hormone increases the turnover and mass of rat liver glutamine synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chingkow; Dunn, A.

    1989-01-01

    Hypophysectomy diminishes rat liver glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and growth hormone (GH) administration restores this activity to normal levels; brain GS is unaffected. We have now investigated the effects of long-term hypophysectomy (45-day) and GH treatment on the GS mass (amount of enzyme) and turnover in rat liver and brain. Labeled GS was isolated by immunoprecipitation at intervals between one and six days after pulse administration of [U- 14 C] leucine and the GS half-life (t 1/2 ) was determined. The GS mass was obtained by immunoassay and by calculation using the specific activity of purified GS. GS turnover was calculated by multiplying the GS mass by the first-order rate constant of degradation (k d ). During the time course of each experiment, the GS mass did not change, indicating that in each o the three hormonal states studied, a steady state existed. Hypophysectomy increased the t 1/2 of hepatic GS from 3.8 to 8.8 days and decreased GS turnover from 0.38 to 0.1 μg/100 g body wt/day; the GH regimen used restored the turnover to above normal levels, 0.6μg/100 g body wt/day. The GS mass decreased from 2.0 to 1.2 μg/100 g body wt and GH restored the GS mass to normal levels. The brain enzyme was not affected by hypophysectomy or GH

  5. Threonine, arginine, and glutamine: Influences on intestinal physiology, immunology, and microbiology in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, C; Rochell, S J; Applegate, T J

    2018-03-01

    Even though the intestine represents a small proportion of body weight in broiler chickens, its requirements for energy and nutrients are high. A healthy broiler intestine has a well-coordinated immune system that must accommodate commensal microbiota while inhibiting the colonization and proliferation of harmful pathogens. Modern commercial intensive practices impose a high sanitary pressure that may exacerbate the progression of intestinal diseases such as coccidiosis and necrotic enteritis. The incidence of these diseases may increase worldwide due to mounting pressure to limit the use of subtherapeutic antibiotics as growth promoters or ionophores for coccidial suppression/prevention in the diets of broilers. For this reason, altering dietary concentrations of some amino acids, particularly trophic amino acids, may be beneficial to modulate the intestinal physiology, immunology, and microbiology of broilers. Trophic amino acids, such as threonine, arginine, and glutamine, play a very important role on the intestinal mucosa and may support increased epithelial turnover rates to improve intestinal recovery following an insult. Furthermore, these amino acids may help to minimize over-activation of the innate immune system, which is the most expensive in terms of nutrients and energy, as well as modulate the intestinal microbiota. The objective of this review is to provide insight into the potential role of trophic amino acids in these processes and report some updated studies of their use in diets for broiler chickens.

  6. Disrupted glutamate-glutamine cycle in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Terai, Masaru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University Yachiyo Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Yachiyo-shi (Japan); Mizuguchi, Masashi [The University of Tokyo, Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Barkovich, A.J. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype of infectious pediatric encephalopathy in Japan. It is sometimes difficult to make an early diagnosis of AESD; excitotoxicity is postulated to be the pathogenesis based on elevated glutamine (Gln) and glutamate (Glu) complex (Glx = Glu + Gln) observed on MR spectroscopy. It is uncertain whether Gln or Glu contributes to the elevated Glx, or whether MR spectroscopy is useful for an early diagnosis. Five Japanese patients with AESD (three boys and two girls, 1 year of age) were enrolled in this study. MR spectroscopy was acquired from the frontal white matter (repetition time (TR) of 5000 ms, echo time (TE) of 30 ms) with a 1.5- or 3.0-T scanner. MR spectroscopy was performed four times for two patients, three times for one patient, and two times for two patients. Quantification of Glu and Gln was performed using LCModel. Glu was elevated in three of four studies on days 1-4 and became normal or low afterward. Gln was normal in three studies on days 1-2, elevated in all seven studies on days 4-12, and became normal or low afterward. These findings suggest that MR spectroscopy may be useful for an early diagnosis. Acute Glu elevation changes to subacute Gln elevation, suggesting that a disrupted Glu-Gln cycle may play an important role. (orig.)

  7. Simultaneous quantification of glutamate and glutamine by J-modulated spectroscopy at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Shen, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The echo time (TE) averaged spectrum is the one-dimensional (1D) cross-section of the J-resolved spectrum at J = 0. In multiecho TE-averaged spectroscopy, glutamate (Glu) is differentiated from glutamine (Gln) at 3 Tesla (T). This method, however, almost entirely suppresses Gln resonance lines around 2.35 ppm, leaving Gln undetermined. This study presents a novel method for quantifying both Glu and Gln using multi-echo spectral data. A 1D cross-section of J-resolved spectroscopy at J = 7.5 Hz-referred to as J-modulated spectroscopy-was developed to simultaneously quantify Glu and Gln levels in the human brain. The transverse relaxation times (T2 s) of metabolites were first determined using conventional TE-averaged spectroscopy with different starting echo time and then incorporated into the spectral model for fitting J-modulated data. Simulation and in vivo data showed that the resonance signals of Glu and Gln were clearly separated around 2.35 ppm in J-modulated spectroscopy. In the anterior cingulate cortex, both Glu and Gln levels were found to be significantly higher in gray matter than in white matter in healthy subjects (P S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Plant nutritional status modulates glutamine synthetase levels in ripe tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpeci, Telma E; Marro, Martin L; Bortolotti, Santiago; Boggio, Silvana B; Valle, Estela M

    2007-02-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening implies that chloroplastic proteins are degraded and new proteins are synthesized. Supplementary nutrition is frequently required when tomato plants begin to fruit and continues until the end of the plant's life cycle. Ammonium assimilation is crucial in these fruit maturation and ripening processes. Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2), the main ammonium-fixing enzyme in plants, could not be detected in red fruits of several tomato varieties when growing under standard nutrition. In this paper, we analyze the influence of the nutritional status on the ammonium assimilation capacity of ripe tomato (cv. Micro-Tom) fruit. For this purpose, GS expression and protein profiles were followed in mature green and red fruits harvested from plants grown under standard or supplemented nutrition. Under standard nutrient regime (weekly supplied with 0.5 x Hoagland solution) GS activity was found in chloroplasts (GS2) of mature green fruits, but it was not detected either in the chromoplasts or in the cytosol of red fruits. When plants were shifted to a supplemented nutritional regime (daily supplied with 0.5 x Hoagland solution), GS was found in red fruits. Also, cytosolic transcripts (gs1) preferentially accumulated in red fruits under high nutrition. These results indicate that mature green Micro-Tom fruits assimilate ammonia through GS2 under standard nutrition, while ripe red fruits accumulate GS1 under high nutrition, probably in order to assimilate the extra N-compounds made available through supplemented nutrition.

  9. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

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    Margarita eGarcía-Calderón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2 in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L .japonicus plants in response to stress.

  10. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  11. N-acetylcysteine prevents HIV gp 120-related damage of human cultured astrocytes: correlation with glutamine synthase dysfunction

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    Costa Nicola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV envelope gp 120 glycoprotein is released during active HIV infection of brain macrophages thereby generating inflammation and oxidative stress which contribute to the development of the AIDS-Dementia Complex (ADC. Gp120 has also been found capable to generate excitotoxic effect on brain tissue via enhancement of glutamatergic neurotransmission, leading to neuronal and astroglial damage, though the mechanism is still to be better understood. Here we investigated on the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, on gp120-induced damage in human cultured astroglial cells and the possible contribution of gp120-related reacting oxygen species (ROS in the imbalanced activity of glutamine synthase (GS, the enzyme that metabolizes glutamate into glutamine within astroglial cells playing a neuroprotective role in brain disorders. Results Incubation of Lipari human cultured astroglial cells with gp 120 (0.1–10 nM produced a significant reduction of astroglial cell viability and apoptosis as evaluated by TUNEL reaction and flow cytometric analysis (FACS. This effect was accompanied by lipid peroxidation as detected by means of malondialdehyde assay (MDA. In addition, gp 120 reduced both glutamine concentration in astroglial cell supernatants and GS expression as detected by immunocytochemistry and western blotting analysis. Pre-treatment of cells with NAC (0.5–5 mM, dose-dependently antagonised astroglial apoptotic cell death induced by gp 120, an effect accompanied by significant attenuation of MDA accumulation. Furthermore, both effects were closely associated with a significant recovery of glutamine levels in cell supernatants and by GS expression, thus suggesting that overproduction of free radicals might contribute in gp 120-related dysfunction of GS in astroglial cells. Conclusion In conclusion, the present experiments demonstrate that gp 120 is toxic to astroglial cells, an effect accompanied by lipid peroxidation and by altered

  12. Nitrogen acquisition, transport and metabolism in intact ectomycorrhizal associations studied by 15N stable isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, H.

    1993-05-01

    The focus of this thesis is on the external mycelium and its role in nitrogen uptake, assimilation and translocation. Tree seedlings in association with ectomycorrhizal fungi were grown in observation chambers. The fungal mycelium were fed with 15-N ammonium or 15-N nitrate or a combination of both. The effects of Collembola on the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis were also studied. The results demonstrates an important role of the external mycelium of Paxillus involutus not only in the uptake but also in the assimilation of ammonium into a variety of different amino acids, primarily glutamine but also glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and alanine, immediately after uptake. The results indicate that ammonium is assimilated by GS and GOGAT or GDH in the mycelium at the uptake site. When nitrate was added to the mycelium as the sole nitrogen source nitrate was reduced in the mycelium and the product assimilated into amino acids. When ammonium nitrate was supplied to the fungal mycelium nitrate was taken up the fungus and transferred to the plant, however, apparently no assimilation of nitrate occurred in the external mycelium. Ammonium or an assimilation product, such as glutamine, probably represses nitrate reductase (NR) but not nitrate uptake and transfer in P. involutus. P. involutus nitrogen uptake and transfer to the associated mycorrhizal pine was up to 76% higher when low numbers of the Collembola Onychiurus armatus were present compared to when they were completely absent. This was probably an indirect effect as P. involutus hyphal growth rate and extramatrical biomass increased at a low Collembola density. At high Collembola densities P. involutus hyphal growth rate was retarded. (74 refs.)

  13. Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts Nitrogen Source Preferences: Impact on Sequential Fermentation and Wine Volatile Compounds Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Antoine; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle; Morge, Christophe; Sparrow, Céline; Liu, Youzhong; Quintanilla-Casas, Beatriz; Vichi, Stefania; Alexandre, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen sources in the must are important for yeast metabolism, growth, and performance, and wine volatile compounds profile. Yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) deficiencies in grape must are one of the main causes of stuck and sluggish fermentation. The nitrogen requirement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism has been described in detail. However, the YAN preferences of non-Saccharomyces yeasts remain unknown despite their increasingly widespread use in winemaking. Furthermore, the impact of nitrogen consumption by non-Saccharomyces yeasts on YAN availability, alcoholic performance and volatile compounds production by S. cerevisiae in sequential fermentation has been little studied. With a view to improving the use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking, we studied the use of amino acids and ammonium by three strains of non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Starmerella bacillaris, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, and Pichia membranifaciens) in grape juice. We first determined which nitrogen sources were preferentially used by these yeasts in pure cultures at 28 and 20°C (because few data are available). We then carried out sequential fermentations at 20°C with S. cerevisiae, to assess the impact of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on the availability of assimilable nitrogen for S. cerevisiae. Finally, 22 volatile compounds were quantified in sequential fermentation and their levels compared with those in pure cultures of S. cerevisiae. We report here, for the first time, that non-Saccharomyces yeasts have specific amino-acid consumption profiles. Histidine, methionine, threonine, and tyrosine were not consumed by S. bacillaris, aspartic acid was assimilated very slowly by M. pulcherrima, and glutamine was not assimilated by P. membranifaciens. By contrast, cysteine appeared to be a preferred nitrogen source for all non-Saccharomyces yeasts. In sequential fermentation, these specific profiles of amino-acid consumption by non-Saccharomyces yeasts may account for some of the

  14. Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses inSinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Kelly L; Yurgel, Svetlana N; Mulder, Monika; Kahn, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have developed various stress response pathways to improve their assimilation and allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphate. While both the nitrogen stress response (NSR) and phosphate stress response (PSR) have been studied individually, there are few experiments reported that characterize effects of multiple stresses on one or more pathways in Sinorhizobium meliloti , a facultatively symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The P II proteins, GlnB and GlnK, regulate the NSR activity, but analysis of global transcription changes in a P II deficient mutant suggest that the S. meliloti P II proteins may also regulate the PSR. P II double deletion mutants grow very slowly and pseudoreversion of the slow growth phenotype is common. To understand this phenomenon better, transposon mutants were isolated that had a faster growing phenotype. One mutation was in phoB , the response regulator for a two component regulatory system that is important in the PSR. phoB ::Tn 5 mutants had different phenotypes in the wild type compared to a P II deficient background. This led to the hypothesis that phosphate stress affects the NSR and conversely, that nitrogen stress affects the PSR. Our results show that phosphate availability affects glutamine synthetase activity and expression, which are often used as indicators of NSR activity, but that nitrogen availability did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity and expression, which are indicators of PSR activity. We conclude that the NSR is co-regulated by nitrogen and phosphate, whereas the PSR does not appear to be co-regulated by nitrogen in addition to its known phosphate regulation.

  15. Non-SaccharomycesYeasts Nitrogen Source Preferences: Impact on Sequential Fermentation and Wine Volatile Compounds Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Antoine; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle; Morge, Christophe; Sparrow, Céline; Liu, Youzhong; Quintanilla-Casas, Beatriz; Vichi, Stefania; Alexandre, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen sources in the must are important for yeast metabolism, growth, and performance, and wine volatile compounds profile. Yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) deficiencies in grape must are one of the main causes of stuck and sluggish fermentation. The nitrogen requirement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism has been described in detail. However, the YAN preferences of non- Saccharomyces yeasts remain unknown despite their increasingly widespread use in winemaking. Furthermore, the impact of nitrogen consumption by non- Saccharomyces yeasts on YAN availability, alcoholic performance and volatile compounds production by S. cerevisiae in sequential fermentation has been little studied. With a view to improving the use of non- Saccharomyces yeasts in winemaking, we studied the use of amino acids and ammonium by three strains of non- Saccharomyces yeasts ( Starmerella bacillaris, Metschnikowia pulcherrima , and Pichia membranifaciens ) in grape juice. We first determined which nitrogen sources were preferentially used by these yeasts in pure cultures at 28 and 20°C (because few data are available). We then carried out sequential fermentations at 20°C with S. cerevisiae , to assess the impact of the non- Saccharomyces yeasts on the availability of assimilable nitrogen for S. cerevisiae . Finally, 22 volatile compounds were quantified in sequential fermentation and their levels compared with those in pure cultures of S. cerevisiae . We report here, for the first time, that non- Saccharomyces yeasts have specific amino-acid consumption profiles. Histidine, methionine, threonine, and tyrosine were not consumed by S. bacillaris , aspartic acid was assimilated very slowly by M. pulcherrima , and glutamine was not assimilated by P. membranifaciens . By contrast, cysteine appeared to be a preferred nitrogen source for all non- Saccharomyces yeasts. In sequential fermentation, these specific profiles of amino-acid consumption by non- Saccharomyces yeasts may account for

  16. Ammonia stress on nitrogen metabolism in tolerant aquatic plant-Myriophyllum aquaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingyang; Gao, Jingqing; Zhang, Ruimin; Zhang, Ruiqin

    2017-09-01

    Ammonia has been a major reason of macrophyte decline in the water environment, and ammonium ion toxicity should be seen as universal, even in species frequently labeled as "NH 4 + specialists". To study the effects of high NH 4 + -N stress of ammonium ion nitrogen on tolerant submerged macrophytes and investigate the pathways of nitrogen assimilation in different organisms, Myriophyllum aquaticum was selected and treated with various concentrations of ammonium ions at different times. Increasing of ammonium concentration leads to an overall increase in incipient ammonia content in leaves and stems of plants. In middle and later stages, high concentrations of NH 4 + ion nitrogen taken up by M. aquaticum decreased, whereas the content of NO 3 - ion nitrogen increased. Moreover, in M. aquaticum, the activities of the enzymes nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase changed remarkably in the process of alleviating NH 4 + toxicity and deficiency. The results of the present study may support the studies on detoxification of high ammonium ion content in NH 4 + -tolerant submerged macrophytes and exploration of tissue-specific expression systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Metabolic engineering of ammonium release for nitrogen-fixing multispecies microbial cell-factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Do Nascimento, Mauro; Curatti, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    The biological nitrogen fixation carried out by some Bacteria and Archaea is one of the most attractive alternatives to synthetic nitrogen fertilizers. In this study we compared the effect of controlling the maximum activation state of the Azotobacter vinelandii glutamine synthase by a point mutation at the active site (D49S mutation) and impairing the ammonium-dependent homeostatic control of nitrogen-fixation genes expression by the ΔnifL mutation on ammonium release by the cells. Strains bearing the single D49S mutation were more efficient ammonium producers under carbon/energy limiting conditions and sustained microalgae growth at the expense of atmospheric N2 in synthetic microalgae-bacteria consortia. Ammonium delivery by the different strains had implications for the microalga׳s cell-size distribution. It was uncovered an extensive cross regulation between nitrogen fixation and assimilation that extends current knowledge on this key metabolic pathway and might represent valuable hints for further improvements of versatile N2-fixing microbial-cell factories. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gamma-Glutamylpolyamine Synthetase GlnA3 Is Involved in the First Step of Polyamine Degradation Pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor M145

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    Agnieszka Bera

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces coelicolor M145 was shown to be able to grow in the presence of high concentrations of polyamines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, or spermine, as a sole nitrogen source. However, hardly anything is known about polyamine utilization and its regulation in streptomycetes. In this study, we demonstrated that only one of the three proteins annotated as glutamine synthetase-like protein, GlnA3 (SCO6962, was involved in the catabolism of polyamines. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the expression of glnA3 was strongly induced by exogenous polyamines and repressed in the presence of ammonium. The ΔglnA3 mutant was shown to be unable to grow on defined Evans agar supplemented with putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, and spermine as sole nitrogen source. HPLC analysis demonstrated that the ΔglnA3 mutant accumulated polyamines intracellularly, but was unable to degrade them. In a rich complex medium supplemented with a mixture of the four different polyamines, the ΔglnA3 mutant grew poorly showing abnormal mycelium morphology and decreased life span in comparison to the parental strain. These observations indicated that the accumulation of polyamines was toxic for the cell. An in silico analysis of the GlnA3 protein model suggested that it might act as a gamma-glutamylpolyamine synthetase catalyzing the first step of polyamine degradation. GlnA3-catalyzed glutamylation of putrescine was confirmed in an enzymatic in vitro assay and the GlnA3 reaction product, gamma-glutamylputrescine, was detected by HPLC/ESI-MS. In this work, the first step of polyamine utilization in S. coelicolor has been elucidated and the putative polyamine utilization pathway has been deduced based on the sequence similarity and transcriptional analysis of homologous genes expressed in the presence of polyamines.

  19. Fibronectin-integrin signaling is required for L-glutamine's protection against gut injury.

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    Stefanie Niederlechner

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM stabilization and fibronectin (FN-Integrin signaling can mediate cellular protection. L-glutamine (GLN is known to prevent apoptosis after injury. However, it is currently unknown if ECM stabilization and FN-Integrin osmosensing pathways are related to GLN's cell protective mechanism in the intestine.IEC-6 cells were treated with GLN with or without FN siRNA, integrin inhibitor GRGDSP, control peptide GRGESP or ERK1/2 inhibitors PD98059 and UO126 under basal and stressed conditions. Cell survival measured via MTS assay. Phosphorylated and/or total levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bax, Bcl-2, heat shock proteins (HSPs, ERK1/2 and transcription factor HSF-1 assessed via Western blotting. Cell size and F-actin morphology quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy and intracellular GLN concentration by LC-MS/MS.GLN's prevention of FN degradation after hyperthermia attenuated apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of FN-Integrin interaction by GRGDSP and ERK1/2 kinase inhibition by PD98059 inhibited GLN's protective effect. GRGDSP attenuated GLN-mediated increases in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and HSF-1 levels. PD98059 and GRGDSP also decreased HSP levels after GLN treatment. Finally, GRGDSP attenuated GLN-mediated increases in cell area size and disrupted F-actin assembly, but had no effect on intracellular GLN concentrations.Taken together, this data suggests that prevention of FN degradation and the FN-Integrin signaling play a key role in GLN-mediated cellular protection. GLN's signaling via the FN-Integrin pathway is associated with HSP induction via ERK1/2 and HSF-1 activation leading to reduced apoptosis after gut injury.

  20. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Effects of oral glutamine supplementation on exercise-induced gastrointestinal permeability and tight junction protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhl, Micah N; Lanphere, Kathryn R; Kravitz, Len; Mermier, Christine M; Schneider, Suzanne; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope L

    2014-01-15

    The objectives of this study are threefold: 1) to assess whether 7 days of oral glutamine (GLN) supplementation reduces exercise-induced intestinal permeability; 2) whether supplementation prevents the proinflammatory response; and 3) whether these changes are associated with upregulation of the heat shock response. On separate occasions, eight human subjects participated in baseline testing and in GLN and placebo (PLA) supplementation trials, followed by a 60-min treadmill run. Intestinal permeability was higher in the PLA trial compared with baseline and GLN trials (0.0604 ± 0.047 vs. 0.0218 ± 0.008 and 0.0272 ± 0.007, respectively; P supplementation (0, 4, and 6 mM) on heat-induced (37° or 41.8°C) heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), and occludin expression. HSF-1 and HSP70 levels increased in 6 mM supplementation at 41°C compared with 0 mM at 41°C (1.785 ± 0.495 vs. 0.6681 ± 0.290, and 1.973 ± 0.325 vs. 1.133 ± 0.129, respectively; P supplementation at 41°C and 6 mM at 41°C compared with 0 mM at 41°C (1.236 ± 0.219 and 1.849 ± 0.564 vs. 0.7434 ± 0.027, respectively; P supplementation prevented exercise-induced permeability, possibly through HSF-1 activation.

  2. Roles of glutamate and glutamine transport in ammonia neurotoxicity: state of the art and question marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Katarzyna; Skowronska, Katarzyna; Popek, Mariusz; Obara-Michlewska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan; Zielinska, Magdalena

    2017-12-19

    Excessive accumulation of ammonia in the brain is a causative factor of an array of neurological manifestations of hyperammonemic encephalopathies ("hyperammonemias", HA) among which hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major epidemiologic and therapeutic challenge. While ammonia neurotoxicity is symptomatically and mechanistically very complex, there is a consensus with regard to the leading role in its pathogenesis of: i) astrocytes being the primary cellular target of ammonia toxicity; ii) alterations of glutamate (Glu)-dependent neurotransmission (over-excitation followed by inhibition of glutamatergic tone) being the cornerstone of its neurophysiological manifestations; and iii) brain edema, an often lethal consequence of astrocytic swelling, being among other factors caused by the retention of glutamine (Gln) in these cells. This article critically evaluates the present literature attempting to relate manifestations of HA to changes in astrocytic Glu and Gln transport as observed in different in vivo and in vitro HA and/or HE models. Emphasis is put on two disproportions in the state of the art: i) the paucity of available data regarding ammonia-dependent changes in Glu transport activity vs the relative abundance of information on the expression of astrocytic Glu transporters (GLT-1/EAAT2 and GLAST/EAAT1); ii) the just emerging still not very conclusive knowledge on the response of astrocytic Gln transporters SN1 and SN2. The review on the above issues is complemented by own recent data which fill some of the many gaps in the knowledge. A brief account is included on the roles of heteromeric cell membrane Glu/arginine (Arg) exchanger y+LAT2 and on the mitochondrial Gln transport. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  4. Mechanism of nitrogen metabolism-related parameters and enzyme activities in the pathophysiology of autism

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    Abu Shmais Ghada A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that impaired metabolism play an important role in the etiology of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Although this has not been investigated to date, several recent studies proposed that nitrogen metabolism-related parameters may have a pathophysiological role in autism. Methods The study enrolled 20 Saudi boys with autism aged 4 to 12 years and 20 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Levels of creatine, urea, ammonia, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, glutamate:glutamine (Glu:Gln ratio, and enzymatic activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, 5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine deaminase (ADA were determined in plasma samples from both groups. Results We found a significant elevation of creatine, 5'-nucleotidase, GABA, and glutamic acid and a significant decrease in the enzymatic activity of ADA and glutamine level in patients with autism compared with healthy controls. The most significant variation between the two groups was found in the Glu:Gln ratio. Conclusion A raised Glu:Gln ratio together with positive correlations in creatine, GABA, and 5'-nucleotidase levels could contribute to the pathophysiology of autism, and might be useful diagnostic markers. The mechanism through which these parameters might be related to autism is discussed in detail.

  5. Flux of Nitrogen-13 from L-[N-13]Glutamate in isolated myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, R.E.; Barrio, J.R.; Krivokapich, J.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Specific activity of nitrogen-13 containing metabolites in tissue and effluent was determined following an intra-arterial bolus of non-carrier added L-[N-13]glutamate (N-13 GLU) given to isolated rabbit septa under different metabolic states which include pyruvate (2 mM), transaminase inhibition (aminooxy-acetate, AOA, 2 mM), or pyruvate with AOA superimposed on the insulin and glucose perfused septa. Six minutes after the N-13 GLU bolus administration relative tissue specific activities of glutamine, alanine, aspartate, and glutamate were approximately 3:38:52:100, respectively, in the control and pyruvate perfused septa. The lower alanine specific activity when compared with control tissue indicated that alanine output was from a pool separate from GPT alanine pools. Higher glutamate specific activity suggested that its output is from a pool(s) different than the larger intra-cellular glutamate pool(s). All interventions with AOA blocked N-13 flux through transminases altering tissue and effluent relative specific activities with increase in % N-13 and specific activities for glutamine, glutamate, ammonia, and protein concomittant with disappearance of labeled aspartate and alanine. These results indicate that N-13 distribution in myocardium after N-13 GLU administration is mainly controlled by glutamate interaction with reversible transaminases. The differences in reactant (N-13 GLU) and product specific activities are a consequence of channeling between different cytosolic and mitochondrial glutamate microcompartments

  6. Perbaikan Respons Seluler pada Penuaan Hipokampus yang Diperantarai Glutation Hasil Pemberian Alanin-glutamin Dipeptida (IMPROVEMENTS CELLULAR RESPONS IN AGED HIPPOCAMPUS RELATED GLUTATHIONE RESULT OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF ALANINE-GLUTAMINE DIPEPTIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunarno .

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Physiological aging or aging due to oxidative stress decrease glutathione level in the hippocampuswhich impacts the respons impaired hippocampus celuller. Hippocampus cellular respons disorderscharacterized with decreased viability, increased mortality, and the shortening of the axons of neurons.One way to improve hippocampus cellular respons is to  increase the levels of glutathione and theconcentration of glutathione precursor. One compound that provides glutathione precursors is alanine-glutamine dipeptide. This research was designed to obtain the improve of hippocampus cellular responsresult from the administration of 7% alanine-glutamine dipeptide concentration of aged or oxidative-stressed rats. The improvement of hippocampus cellular respons affect  the improvement of the hippocampus function. The experimental rats were assigned into a completely randomized design consisted of threefactors with 2x2x2 factorial arrangement. The first factor was the age of the experimental rats, consistedof two levels i.e., 12 and 24 months. The second factor was oxidative stress consisted of two levels, i.e.,without and with oxidative stress. The third factor was alanine-glutamine dipeptide administrationconsisted of 2 concentrations, i.e. 0% and 7%. The results showed that  administration of 7% alanine-glutamine dipeptide improved level of glutathione in the hippocampus either in younger (58,76% or aged(125,81% rats or in normal (76,47% and in oxidative-stressed rats (97,26%. These antioxidant hadmediated the respons improve viability, mortality, and long axons responses of neurons at younger (4,11%,37,07%, and 12,58% or aged (6,91%, 37,85%, and 32,84% rats, in normal (3,25%, 29,21%, and 21,04%and oxidative stress (7,80%, 43,01%, dan 25,56% rats. This research concluded that the alanine-glutaminedipeptide 7% increased glutathione levels.  This increased level affected the improvement of cellularresponds in aging hippocampus, physiological aging, or

  7. [Effects of glutamine supplemented parenteral nutrition on the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis, nosocomial sepsis and length of hospital stay in very low birth weight infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bober-Olesińska, Krystyna; Kornacka, Maria Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    Parenteral feeding is the basic way of nutrition in the first day of life in infants with very low birth weight. Due to its instability glutamine is not included in aminoacid solutions used for parenteral nutrition. Meanwhile glutamine is an important aminoacid, which plays a major role in the maturation of the gastrointestinal tract as well as the immunological system. The aim of our study was to estimate if glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition in neonates with the very low birth weight can decrease the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis -- NEC (> 1 degree according to the Bell criteria), nosocomial sepsis, and shorten the total length of hospitalization. Prospective, randomized study included 55 neonates born between 26 and 32 weeks of gestation, with birth weight range of 580 g to 1250 g. On the third day of life patients were randomized into 2 groups. Each group was fed with a different aminoacid solution. Group 1 consisted of patients who received a standard aminoacid solution with an addition of glutamine dipeptide (20% of total amount of aminoacids). Group 2 (acknowledged as the control group) including 30 patients received a standard aminoacid solution. Glutamine and glutaminic acid levels were checked in the cord blood, and on the 3rd and 14th day of life. Venous samples were taken at 8 a.m. and were estimated using HPLC. The Ethics Committee of the Warsaw Medical University had approved the research. In group 1 nosocomial sepsis had occurred in 7/25 neonates, and in the control group in 11/30; NEC was diagnosed in none of the 25 neonates in group 1 and in 5/30 of the control group; the total length of hospitalization in group 1 was 75 days (median 70) versus 73 in the control group (median 70). The lowest glutamine concentration was noted in cord blood samples, and increased on the third day of life in both groups. There were a statistically significant difference among the levels of glutamine concentration between the cord sample and the

  8. Toxoplasma gondii is dependent on glutamine and alters migratory profile of infected host bone marrow derived immune cells through SNAT2 and CXCR4 pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ping Lee

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, disseminates through its host inside infected immune cells. We hypothesize that parasite nutrient requirements lead to manipulation of migratory properties of the immune cell. We demonstrate that 1 T. gondii relies on glutamine for optimal infection, replication and viability, and 2 T. gondii-infected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs display both "hypermotility" and "enhanced migration" to an elevated glutamine gradient in vitro. We show that glutamine uptake by the sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2 is required for this enhanced migration. SNAT2 transport of glutamine is also a significant factor in the induction of migration by the small cytokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 in uninfected DCs. Blocking both SNAT2 and C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4; the unique receptor for SDF-1 blocks hypermotility and the enhanced migration in T. gondii-infected DCs. Changes in host cell protein expression following T. gondii infection may explain the altered migratory phenotype; we observed an increase of CD80 and unchanged protein level of CXCR4 in both T. gondii-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated DCs. However, unlike activated DCs, SNAT2 expression in the cytosol of infected cells was also unchanged. Thus, our results suggest an important role of glutamine transport via SNAT2 in immune cell migration and a possible interaction between SNAT2 and CXCR4, by which T. gondii manipulates host cell motility.

  9. IRE1 KNOCKDOWN MODIFIES THE GLUTAMINE AND GLUCOSE DEPRIVATION EFFECT ON THE EXPRESSION OF NUCLEAR GENES ENCODING MITOCHONDRIAL PROTEINS IN U87 GLIOMA CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the glucose and glutamine deprivation effect on the expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in U87 glioma cells in relation to inhibition of inositol requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1. It was shown that glutamine deprivation down-regulated the expression of mitochondrial (NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2, malic enzyme 2 (ME2, mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (GOT2, and subunit B of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB genes in control glioma cells in gene specific manner. At the same time, the expression level of malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2 and subunit D of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHD genes in these cells was not changed upon glutamine deprivation. It was also shown that inhibition of ІRE1 signaling enzyme function in U87 glioma cells modified the glutamine deprivation effect on the expression of all studied genes. Furthermore, the expression of the majority of studied genes was resistant to glucose deprivation, except IDH2 and SDHB genes, which expression levels were slightly down-regulated. Inhibition of IRE1 modified the effect of glucose deprivation on ME2, SDHB, SDHD, and GOT2 genes expression. Therefore, glucose and glutamine deprivation affected the expression level of the majority of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in relation to the functional activity of IRE1 enzyme, which is a central mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress and controls cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  10. Robust method for investigating nitrogen metabolism of 15N labeled amino acids using AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: application to a parasitic plant-plant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Zachary; Cerveau, Delphine; Marnet, Nathalie; Bouchereau, Alain; Delavault, Philippe; Simier, Philippe; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard

    2014-01-21

    An AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (AccQ•Tag-UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS) method is presented here for the fast, robust, and sensitive quantification of (15)N isotopologue enrichment of amino acids in biological samples, as for example in the special biotic interaction between the cultivated specie Brassica napus (rapeseed) and the parasitic weed Phelipanche ramosa (broomrape). This method was developed and validated using amino acid standard solutions containing (15)N amino acid isotopologues and/or biological unlabeled extracts. Apparatus optimization, limits of detection and quantification, quantification reproducibility, and calculation method of (15)N isotopologue enrichment are presented. Using this method, we could demonstrate that young parasite tubercles assimilate inorganic nitrogen as (15)N-ammonium when supplied directly through batch incubation but not when supplied by translocation from host root phloem, contrary to (15)N2-glutamine. (15)N2-glutamine mobility from host roots to parasite tubercles followed by its low metabolism in tubercles suggests that the host-derived glutamine acts as an important nitrogen containing storage compound in the young tubercle of Phelipanche ramosa.

  11. Dietary glutamine, glutamic acid and nucleotide supplementation accelerate carbon turnover (δ13C on stomach of weaned piglets

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    Amanda D. Assoni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of stable isotope analysis as a tool for characterization of carbon turnover (δ13C in piglet's tissues by tracing its feeding system has drawn attention. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating the influence of dietary glutamine, glutamic acid and nucleotides supplementation on carbon turnover in fundic-stomach region of weaned piglets at an average age of 21 days. The diets consisted of additive-free diet – control (C; 1% glutamine (G; 1% glutamic acid (GA and 1% nucleotides (Nu. At weaning day (day 0: baseline, 3 piglets were slaughtered to quantify the δ13C of stomach. The remaining 120 piglets were blocked by weight and sex, randomly assigned to pens with 3 piglets slaughtered per treatment at days 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27 and 49 after weaning in order to verify the fundic-stomach isotopic composition by treatments. Samples were analyzed in terms of 13C/12C ratio by mass spectrometry and converted to relative isotopic enrichment values (δ13C ‰ used to plot the first order exponential curves over time using OriginPro 8.0 software. The inclusion of glutamine, glutamate and nucleotides in piglet's diets has accelerated the carbon turnover in stomach during the post-weaning period, demonstrating also that glutamate has guaranteed fastest 13C incorporation rate on fundic-stomach region and pH-lowering. Besides that, stable isotopes technique (δ13C has proved to be an important methodology to determine the time-scales at which piglets shift among diets with different isotopic values, characterizing the trophic effects of additives and the phenotypic flexibility of stomach.

  12. Separation and determination of acetyl-glutamine enantiomers by HPLC–MS and its application in pharmacokinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS method was established for the separation and determination of acetyl-glutamine enantiomers (acetyl-L-glutamine and acetyl-D-glutamine simultaneously. Baseline separation was achieved on Chiralpak AD-H column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 µm. n-Hexane (containing 0.1% acetic acid and ethanol (75:25, v/v were used as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. The detection was operated in the negative ion mode with an ESI source. [M-H]− m/z 187.0540 for enantiomers and [M-H]− m/z 179.0240 for aspirin (IS were selected as detecting ions. The linear range of the calibration curve for each enantiomer was 0.05–40 µg/mL. The precision of this method at concentrations of 0.5–20 µg/mL was within 7.23%, and the accuracy was 99.81%–107.81%. The precision at LOQ (0.05 µg/mL was between 16.28% and 17.56%, which was poor than that at QC levels. The average extraction recovery was higher than 85% for both enantiomers at QC levels. The pharmacokinetics of enantiomers was found to be stereoselective. There was not chiral inversion in vivo or in vitro between enantiomers.

  13. Uptake and metabolism of L-[3H]glutamate and L-[3H]glutamine in adult rat cerebellar slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Barry, J.; Vincendon, G.; Gombos, G.

    1983-01-01

    Using very low concentrations (1 mumol range) of L-2-3-[ 3 H]glutamate, ( 3 H-Glu) or L-2-3-[ 3 H]glutamine ( 3 H-Gln), the authors have previously shown by autoradiography that these amino acids were preferentially taken up in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, the accumulation of 3 H-Glu was essentially glial in these conditions. Uptake and metabolism of either ( 3 H-Glu) or ( 3 H-Gln) were studied in adult rat cerebellar slices. Both amino acids were rapidly converted into other metabolic compounds: after seven minutes of incubation in the presence of exogenous 3 H-Glu, 70% of the tissue accumulated radioactivity was found to be in compounds other than glutamate. The main metabolites were Gln (42%), alpha-ketoglutarate (25%) and GABA (1,4%). In the presence of exogenous 3 H-Gln the rate of metabolism was slightly slower (50% after seven minutes of incubation) and the metabolites were also Glu (29%), alpha-ketoglutarate (15%) and GABA (5%). Using depolarizing conditions (56 mM KCl) with either exogenous 3 H-Glu or 3 H-Gln, the radioactivity was preferentially accumulated in glutamate compared to control. From these results we conclude: i) there are two cellular compartments for the neurotransmission-glutamate-glutamine cycle; one is glial, the other neuronal; ii) these two cellular compartments contain both Gln and Glu; iii) transmitter glutamate is always in equilibrium with the so-called ''metabolic'' pool of glutamate; iv) the regulation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle occurs at least at two different levels: the uptake of glutamate and the enzymatic activity of the neuronal glutaminase

  14. Effect of alanyl glutamine on the acute inflammatory reaction and immunological function in elderly patients with intestinal obstruction

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    Fei-Guo Ma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the application value of alanyl glutamine in improving the acute inflammatory reaction and immunological function in elderly patients with intestinal obstruction. Methods: A total of 97 elderly patients with intestinal obstruction who were admitted in our hospital were included in the study and randomized into the treatment group (n=49 and the control group (n=48. The patients in the control group were given total parenteral nutrition (TPN treatment. On this basis, the patients in the treatment group were given intravenous injection of alanyl glutamine for 1 week. The plasma prealbumin, albumin, serum related cytokines, L/M, and DAO before and after treatment in the two groups were detected. The serum immunoglobulin and T lymphocyte subsets before and after treatment in the two groups were compared. Results: The plasma prealbumin and albumin levels after treatment in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group, while the serum CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, and those in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group. When compared with before treatment, L/M and plasma DAO level after treatment in the control group were significantly elevated, while those in the observation group were significantly reduced, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant. The serum IgG and IgA levels after treatment in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group. The serum CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+/CD8+ after treatment in the two groups were significantly elevated when compared with before treatment, and those in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Conclusions: Alanyl glutamine in the treatment of elderly intestinal obstruction can significantly improve the acute inflammatory reaction and

  15. Protective Effects of Glutamine Antagonist 6-Diazo-5-Oxo-l-Norleucine in Mice with Alphavirus Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Sivabalan; Baxter, Victoria K.; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammation is a necessary part of the response to infection but can also cause neuronal injury in both infectious and autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). A neurovirulent strain of Sindbis virus (NSV) causes fatal paralysis in adult C57BL/6 mice during clearance of infectious virus from the CNS, and the virus-specific immune response is implicated as a mediator of neuronal damage. Previous studies have shown that survival is improved in T-cell-deficient mice and in mice with pharmacological inhibition of the inflammatory response and glutamate excitotoxicity. Because glutamine metabolism is important in the CNS for the generation of glutamate and in the immune system for lymphocyte proliferation, we tested the effect of the glutamine antagonist DON (6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine) on the outcome of NSV infection in mice. DON treatment for 7 days from the time of infection delayed the onset of paralysis and death. Protection was associated with reduced lymphocyte proliferation in the draining cervical lymph nodes, decreased leukocyte infiltration into the CNS, lower levels of inflammatory cytokines, and delayed viral clearance. In vitro studies showed that DON inhibited stimulus-induced proliferation of lymphocytes. When in vivo treatment with DON was stopped, paralytic disease developed along with the inflammatory response and viral clearance. These studies show that fatal NSV-induced encephalomyelitis is immune mediated and that antagonists of glutamine metabolism can modulate the immune response and protect against virus-induced neuroinflammatory disease. IMPORTANCE Encephalomyelitis due to infection with mosquito-borne alphaviruses is an important cause of death and of long-term neurological disability in those who survive infection. This study demonstrates the role of the virus-induced immune response in the generation of neurological disease. DON, a glutamine antagonist, inhibited the proliferation of lymphocytes in response to

  16. [Effects of panthenol-glutamine on intestine of rats with burn injury and its dose-effect relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Zhao, Yun; Qi, Hua-bing; Yi, Dong; Wang, Feng-jun; Wang, Shi-liang; Peng, Xi

    2013-08-01

    To study the effects of the panthenol-glutamine on intestinal damage and motor function of intestine in rats with burn injury as well as its dose-effect relationship. (1) Experiment 1. Ninety SD rats were divided into groups A-I according to the random number table, with 10 rats in each group. Rats in groups A-I were inflicted with 30% TBSA full-thickness burn and fed by gavage with panthenol and glutamine at post injury hour (PIH) 4, in the whole dosage of 1.00 and 4, 0.50 and 4, 0.25 and 4, 1.00 and 2, 0.50 and 2, 0.25 and 2, 1.00 and 1, 0.50 and 1, 0.25 and 1 g·kg(-1)·d(-1). The feeding was carried out twice a day to achieve the total dosage in 7 days. On drug withdrawal day, blood and intestinal tissue were harvested to detect the intestinal propulsion index, diamine oxidase (DAO) activity in serum, and the content of acetylcholine and intestinal mucosa protein. The best proportion of panthenol and glutamine was screened. (2) Experiment 2. Seventy SD rats were divided into normal control (NC), burn (B), burn+panthenol (B+P), burn+glutamine (B+G), and burn+low, moderate, or high dose of panthenol-glutamine (B+LPG, B+MPG, B+HPG) groups according to the random number table, with 10 rats in each group. Rats in the latter 6 groups were inflicted with 30% TBSA full-thickness burn. Rats in the latter 5 groups were fed by gavage with panthenol and (or) glutamine at PIH 4. Rats in group B+P were fed with panthenol for 1 g·kg(-1)·d(-1), rats in group B+G with glutamine for 4 g·kg(-1)·d(-1), rats in groups B+LPG, B+MPG, and B+HPG with panthenol and glutamine in the dosage of 0.50 and 2, 1.00 and 4, 2.00 and 8 g·kg(-1)·d(-1). The feeding was carried out twice a day to achieve the total dosage for 7 days. The indexes and time point for observation were the same as those of experiment 1. Meanwhile, the pathological change in intestine was observed. The same process was carried out in the rats of group NC. Data were processed with factorial designed analysis of

  17. Protective Effects of Glutamine Antagonist 6-Diazo-5-Oxo-l-Norleucine in Mice with Alphavirus Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Sivabalan; Baxter, Victoria K; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Slusher, Barbara S; Griffin, Diane E

    2016-10-15

    Inflammation is a necessary part of the response to infection but can also cause neuronal injury in both infectious and autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). A neurovirulent strain of Sindbis virus (NSV) causes fatal paralysis in adult C57BL/6 mice during clearance of infectious virus from the CNS, and the virus-specific immune response is implicated as a mediator of neuronal damage. Previous studies have shown that survival is improved in T-cell-deficient mice and in mice with pharmacological inhibition of the inflammatory response and glutamate excitotoxicity. Because glutamine metabolism is important in the CNS for the generation of glutamate and in the immune system for lymphocyte proliferation, we tested the effect of the glutamine antagonist DON (6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine) on the outcome of NSV infection in mice. DON treatment for 7 days from the time of infection delayed the onset of paralysis and death. Protection was associated with reduced lymphocyte proliferation in the draining cervical lymph nodes, decreased leukocyte infiltration into the CNS, lower levels of inflammatory cytokines, and delayed viral clearance. In vitro studies showed that DON inhibited stimulus-induced proliferation of lymphocytes. When in vivo treatment with DON was stopped, paralytic disease developed along with the inflammatory response and viral clearance. These studies show that fatal NSV-induced encephalomyelitis is immune mediated and that antagonists of glutamine metabolism can modulate the immune response and protect against virus-induced neuroinflammatory disease. Encephalomyelitis due to infection with mosquito-borne alphaviruses is an important cause of death and of long-term neurological disability in those who survive infection. This study demonstrates the role of the virus-induced immune response in the generation of neurological disease. DON, a glutamine antagonist, inhibited the proliferation of lymphocytes in response to infection, prevented the

  18. Nitrogen availability for nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria upon growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120 is able to convert dinitrogen to ammonia in the absence of combined nitrogen. The expression of 20% of coding sequences from all major metabolic categories was examined in nitrogen fixing and non-nitrogen fixing growth conditions. The expression data were correlated ...

  19. Nitrogen Fixation in Cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that are widespread in marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments and many of them are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. But ironically, nitrogenase, the enzyme that is responsible for the reduction of N2, is extremely sensitive to O2.

  20. Phosphorus-nitrogen compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 120; Issue 4. Phosphorus-nitrogen compounds: Part 15. Synthesis, anisochronism and the relationship between crystallographic and spectral data of monotopic spiro-crypta phosphazenes. Nuran Asmafi̇li̇z Eli̇f Ece İl Ter Zeynel Kiliç Tuncer Hökelek Ertan Şahin.

  1. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto, José F; Koide, Tie; Gomes, Suely L; Marques, Marilis V

    2010-08-28

    Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours) of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase), was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  2. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Neto José F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. Results In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase, was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Conclusions Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  3. Nano-nutrition of chicken embryos. The effect of silver nanoparticles and glutamine on molecular responses, and the morphology of pectoral muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Filip; Pineda, Lane Manalili; Hotowy, Anna Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    and vascular endothelial growth factor. We have therefore tested if silver nanoparticles can affect muscle development of chicken embryos and, furthermore, if they can be used in in ovo nutrition as carriers of nutrients e.g. glutamine into muscle cells. Methods: 160 broiler eggs were randomly divided......Background: It has been demonstrated that concentrations of certain amino acids in the egg, in late-term embryos, are not sufficient to fully support embryonic development. One of the methods to assure an adequate nutrient content in the egg is in ovo administration of nutrients, which increases...... into the control group (Control) without injection and injected groups with hydrocolloids of nanoparticles of silver (Nano-Ag), glutamine (Glu) and the complex of nanoparticles of silver and glutamine (Nano-Ag/Glu). The embryos were evaluated on day 20 of incubation. Samples of the breast muscles were collected...

  4. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Once upon a time nitrogen did not exist. Today it does. In the intervening time the universe was formed, nitrogen was created, the Earth came into existence, and its atmosphere and oceans were formed! In this analysis of the Earth's nitrogen cycle, I start with an overview of these important events relative to nitrogen and then move on to the more traditional analysis of the nitrogen cycle itself and the role of humans in its alteration.The universe is ˜15 Gyr old. Even after its formation, there was still a period when nitrogen did not exist. It took ˜300 thousand years after the big bang for the Universe to cool enough to create atoms; hydrogen and helium formed first. Nitrogen was formed in the stars through the process of nucleosynthesis. When a star's helium mass becomes great enough to reach the necessary pressure and temperature, helium begins to fuse into still heavier elements, including nitrogen.Approximately 10 Gyr elapsed before Earth was formed (˜4.5 Ga (billion years ago)) by the accumulation of pre-assembled materials in a multistage process. Assuming that N2 was the predominate nitrogen species in these materials and given that the temperature of space is -270 °C, N2 was probably a solid when the Earth was formed since its boiling point (b.p.) and melting point (m.p.) are -196 °C and -210 °C, respectively. Towards the end of the accumulation period, temperatures were probably high enough for significant melting of some of the accumulated material. The volcanic gases emitted by the resulting volcanism strongly influenced the surface environment. Nitrogen was converted from a solid to a gas and emitted as N2. Carbon and sulfur were probably emitted as CO and H2S (Holland, 1984). N2 is still the most common nitrogen volcanic gas emitted today at a rate of ˜2 TgN yr-1 (Jaffee, 1992).Once emitted, the gases either remained in the atmosphere or were deposited to the Earth's surface, thus continuing the process of biogeochemical cycling. The rate of

  5. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Araújo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/- and wild-type (APOE+/+ C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86 were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM or phosphate buffered saline (PBS by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection. Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001 in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05 were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/--challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge.

  6. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, C.V.; Lazzarotto, C.R.; Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; Oliveira Alves, L.A. de; Ribeiro, R.A.; Bertolini, L.R.; Lima, A.A.M.; Brito, G.A.C.; Oriá, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE -/- ) and wild-type (APOE +/+ ) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE -/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE +/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE -/- -challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge

  7. Risk-Conferring Glutamatergic Genes and Brain Glutamate Plus Glutamine in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan R. Bustillo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS signals from glutamate (or the combined glutamate and glutamine signal—Glx have been found to be greater in various brain regions in people with schizophrenia. Recently, the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium reported that several common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in glutamate-related genes confer increased risk of schizophrenia. Here, we examined the relationship between presence of these risk polymorphisms and brain Glx levels in schizophrenia.Methods1H-MRS imaging data from an axial, supraventricular tissue slab were acquired in 56 schizophrenia patients and 67 healthy subjects. Glx was measured in gray matter (GM and white matter (WM regions. The genetic data included six polymorphisms genotyped across an Illumina 5M SNP array. Only three of six glutamate as well as calcium-related SNPs were available for examination. These included three glutamate-related polymorphisms (rs10520163 in CLCN3, rs12704290 in GRM3, and rs12325245 in SLC38A7, and three calcium signaling polymorphisms (rs1339227 in RIMS1, rs7893279 in CACNB2, and rs2007044 in CACNA1C. Summary risk scores for the three glutamate and the three calcium polymorphisms were calculated.ResultsGlx levels in GM positively correlated with glutamate-related genetic risk score but only in younger (≤36 years schizophrenia patients (p = 0.01. Glx levels did not correlate with calcium risk scores. Glx was higher in the schizophrenia group compared to levels in controls in GM and WM regardless of age (p < 0.001.ConclusionElevations in brain Glx are in part, related to common allelic variants of glutamate-related genes known to increase the risk for schizophrenia. Since the glutamate risk scores did not differ between groups, some other genetic or environmental factors likely interact with the variability in glutamate-related risk SNPs to contribute to an increase in brain Glx early in the illness.

  8. L-alanyl-L-glutamine ingestion maintains performance during a competitive basketball game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Williams, David R; Emerson, Nadia S; Hoffman, Mattan W; Wells, Adam J; McVeigh, Daniele M; McCormack, William P; Mangine, Gerald T; Gonzalez, Adam M; Fragala, Maren S

    2012-03-07

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of L-alanyl-L-glutamine (AG) ingestion on basketball performance, including jump power, reaction time, shooting accuracy and fatigue. Ten women (21.2 ± 1.6 years; height: 177.8 ± 8.7 cm; body mass: 73.5 ± 8.0 kg), all scholarship NCAA Division I basketball players, volunteered for this study. Subjects participated in four trials, each consisting of a 40-min basketball game with controlled time-outs for rehydration. During the first trial (DHY) subjects were not allowed to rehydrate, and the total weight lost during the contest was used to determine fluid replenishment during the subsequent three trials. During one trial subjects consumed only water (W), while during the other two trials subjects consumed the AG supplement mixed in water using either a low dose (1 g per 500 ml) (AG1) or high dose (2 g per 500 ml) (AG2) concentration. All data assessed prior to and following each game were converted into a Δ score (Post results - Pre results). All performance data were then analyzed using a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance. During DHY subjects lost 1.72 ± 0.42 kg (2.3%) of their body mass. No differences in fluid intake (1.55 ± 0.43 L) were seen between rehydration trials. A 12.5% (p = 0.016) difference in basketball shooting performance was noted between DHY and AG1 and an 11.1% (p = 0.029) difference was seen between AG1 and W. Visual reaction time was significantly greater following AG1 (p = 0.014) compared to DHY. Differences (p = 0.045) in fatigue, as determined by player loads, were seen only between AG2 and DHY. No differences were seen in peak or mean vertical jump power during any trial. Rehydration with AG appears to maintain basketball skill performance and visual reaction time to a greater extent than water only.

  9. L-alanyl-L-glutamine ingestion maintains performance during a competitive basketball game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman Jay R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of L-alanyl-L-glutamine (AG ingestion on basketball performance, including jump power, reaction time, shooting accuracy and fatigue. Methods Ten women (21.2 ± 1.6 years; height: 177.8 ± 8.7 cm; body mass: 73.5 ± 8.0 kg, all scholarship NCAA Division I basketball players, volunteered for this study. Subjects participated in four trials, each consisting of a 40-min basketball game with controlled time-outs for rehydration. During the first trial (DHY subjects were not allowed to rehydrate, and the total weight lost during the contest was used to determine fluid replenishment during the subsequent three trials. During one trial subjects consumed only water (W, while during the other two trials subjects consumed the AG supplement mixed in water using either a low dose (1 g per 500 ml (AG1 or high dose (2 g per 500 ml (AG2 concentration. All data assessed prior to and following each game were converted into a Δ score (Post results - Pre results. All performance data were then analyzed using a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results During DHY subjects lost 1.72 ± 0.42 kg (2.3% of their body mass. No differences in fluid intake (1.55 ± 0.43 L were seen between rehydration trials. A 12.5% (p = 0.016 difference in basketball shooting performance was noted between DHY and AG1 and an 11.1% (p = 0.029 difference was seen between AG1 and W. Visual reaction time was significantly greater following AG1 (p = 0.014 compared to DHY. Differences (p = 0.045 in fatigue, as determined by player loads, were seen only between AG2 and DHY. No differences were seen in peak or mean vertical jump power during any trial. Conclusion Rehydration with AG appears to maintain basketball skill performance and visual reaction time to a greater extent than water only.

  10. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, C.V. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lazzarotto, C.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; Oliveira Alves, L.A. de [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Ribeiro, R.A. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Bertolini, L.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lima, A.A.M. [Laboratório de Doenças Infecciosas, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Brito, G.A.C. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Oriá, R.B. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE{sup -/-}) and wild-type (APOE{sup +/+}) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE{sup -/-} mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE{sup +/+} mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE{sup -/-}-challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU

  11. L-glutamine is a key parameter in the immunosuppression phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammami, Ines; Chen, Jingkui [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, 2500 Chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Bronte, Vincenzo [Department of Pathology, Immunology Section, Verona University, P.le L.A. Scuro, 10 - 37134 Verona (Italy); DeCrescenzo, Gregory [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, 2500 Chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Jolicoeur, Mario, E-mail: mario.jolicoeur@polymtl.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, 2500 Chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The absence of L-Gln inhibited iNOS activity, but not ARG1 one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC-1 cells were able to inhibit Jurkat cell growth, but not their viability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of L-Gln down-regulated central carbon metabolism and L-Arg recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of L-Gln deteriorated cell bioenergetic status. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Gln is crucial for iNOS-mediated immunosuppression activity. -- Abstract: Suppression of tumour-specific T-cell functions by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is a dominant mechanism of tumour escape. MDSCs express two enzymes, i.e. inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and arginase (ARG1), which metabolize the semi-essential amino acid L-arginine (L-Arg) whose bioavailability is crucial for T-cell proliferation and functions. Recently, we showed that glutaminolysis supports MDSC maturation process by ensuring the supply of intermediates and energy. In this work, we used an immortalized cell line derived from mouse MDSCs (MSC-1 cell line) to further investigate the role of L-glutamine (L-Gln) in the maintenance of MDSC immunosuppressive activity. Culturing MSC-1 cells in L-Gln-limited medium inhibited iNOS activity, while ARG1 was not affected. MSC-1 cells inhibited Jukat cell growth without any noticeable effect on their viability. The characterization of MSC-1 cell metabolic profile revealed that L-Gln is an important precursor of lactate production via the NADP{sup +}-dependent malic enzyme, which co-produces NADPH. Moreover, the TCA cycle activity was down-regulated in the absence of L-Gln and the cell bioenergetic status was deteriorated accordingly. This strongly suggests that iNOS activity, but not that of ARG1, is related to an enhanced central carbon metabolism and a high bioenergetic status. Taken altogether, our results suggest that the control of glutaminolysis fluxes may represent a valuable target for immunotherapy.

  12. L-glutamine is a key parameter in the immunosuppression phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammami, Ines; Chen, Jingkui; Bronte, Vincenzo; DeCrescenzo, Gregory; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The absence of L-Gln inhibited iNOS activity, but not ARG1 one. ► MSC-1 cells were able to inhibit Jurkat cell growth, but not their viability. ► Absence of L-Gln down-regulated central carbon metabolism and L-Arg recycling. ► Absence of L-Gln deteriorated cell bioenergetic status. ► L-Gln is crucial for iNOS-mediated immunosuppression activity. -- Abstract: Suppression of tumour-specific T-cell functions by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is a dominant mechanism of tumour escape. MDSCs express two enzymes, i.e. inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and arginase (ARG1), which metabolize the semi-essential amino acid L-arginine (L-Arg) whose bioavailability is crucial for T-cell proliferation and functions. Recently, we showed that glutaminolysis supports MDSC maturation process by ensuring the supply of intermediates and energy. In this work, we used an immortalized cell line derived from mouse MDSCs (MSC-1 cell line) to further investigate the role of L-glutamine (L-Gln) in the maintenance of MDSC immunosuppressive activity. Culturing MSC-1 cells in L-Gln-limited medium inhibited iNOS activity, while ARG1 was not affected. MSC-1 cells inhibited Jukat cell growth without any noticeable effect on their viability. The characterization of MSC-1 cell metabolic profile revealed that L-Gln is an important precursor of lactate production via the NADP + -dependent malic enzyme, which co-produces NADPH. Moreover, the TCA cycle activity was down-regulated in the absence of L-Gln and the cell bioenergetic status was deteriorated accordingly. This strongly suggests that iNOS activity, but not that of ARG1, is related to an enhanced central carbon metabolism and a high bioenergetic status. Taken altogether, our results suggest that the control of glutaminolysis fluxes may represent a valuable target for immunotherapy.

  13. Changes in amino acid composition and nitrogen metabolizing enzymes in ripening fruits of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio; Palatnik; Heldt; Valle

    2000-10-16

    The free amino acid content of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruits from cultivars Platense, Vollendung and Cherry were determined during ripening. It was found that glutamate markedly increased in red fruits of the three cultivars under study. At this stage, the cv Cherry had the highest relative glutamate molar content (52%) of all the analyzed tomato fruit cultivars. Measurements of nitrogen-assimilating enzyme activities of these fruits showed a decrease in glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) during fruit ripening and a concomitant increase in NADH-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.3) and aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1) activities. Western blot analysis of protein extracts revealed that while GS was principally present in green fruit extracts, GDH was almost exclusively observed in the extracts of red fruits. These results suggest a reciprocal pattern of induction between GS and GDH during tomato fruit ripening.

  14. Improving nitrogen use efficiency in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) through the cisgenic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kichey, Thomas; Holme, Inger; Møller, Inge Skrumsager

    2009-01-01

    Barley is one of the major crops cultivated worldwide and constitutes an important basis for animal feed. However, the production is facing a number of challenges that will be accentuated in the years to come, in particular restrictions on the use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer. In order to improve...... the N use efficiency in barley, we are developing a new generation of genetically modified plants based on the concept of cisgenesis. In this approach, plants are transformed only with their own genetic material. The genes encoding the cytosolic isoform of the glutamine synthetase (GS1...... into the pGreenII binary vector. The genes have been inserted into barley by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene for selection of transformed lines on hygromycin. In this system, the resistance gene is placed on the helper plasmid pSoup allowing for separate...

  15. Isolation of a symbiotic cyanobacterium, Nostoc cycadae, and its nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, V; Goyle, M R; Srivastava, A K; Talpasayi, E R

    1994-05-01

    Nostoc cycadae isolated from the host Cycas revoluta grew well in medium devoid of combined nitrogen but maximum growth was in medium containing nitrate (4.1 μg chlorophyll a ml(-1)). Aerated coralloid roots in the dark produced more NH3 when treated with L-methionine-DL-sulphoximine (MSO), an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. With cultured N. cycadae and freshly isolated N. cycadae, NH3 production was enhanced by adding a host-tissue extract in the light or in the dark, whereas it was decreased by adding MSO. Nitrogenase activity was four times higher in coralloid root than in the cultured endophyte N. cycadae. The host-tissue extract may inhibit NH3 assimilatory pathways, thus inducing production of NH3 that can be utilized by the host itself.

  16. Conformation-Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of the Amino Acid Glutamine: Amide-Stacking and Hydrogen Bonding in AN Important Residue in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Dean, Jacob C.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease (HD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). An intriguing aspect of the structure of glutamine is its incorporation of an amide group in its side chain, thereby opening up the possibility of forming amide-amide H-bonds between the peptide backbone and side chain. In this study the conformational preferences of two capped gluatamines Z(carboxybenzyl)-Glutamine-X (X=OH, NHMe) are studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase in order to unlock the intrinsic structural motifs that are favored by this flexible sidechain. Conformational assignments are made by comparing the hydride stretch ( 3100-3700 cm-1) and amide I and II ( 1400-1800 cm-1) resonant ion-dip infrared spectra with predictions from harmonic frequency calculations. Assigned structures will be compared to previously published results on both natural and unnatural residues. Particular emphasis will be placed on the comparison between glutamine and unconstrained γ-peptides due to the similar three-carbon spacing between backbone and side chain in glutamine to the backbone spacing in γ-peptides. The ability of the glutamine side-chain to form amide stacked conformations will be a main focus, along with the prevalence of extended backbone type structures. W. H. James, III, C W. Müller, E. G. Buchanan, M. G. D. Nix, L. Guo, L. Roskop, M. S. Gordon, L. V. Slipchenko, S. H. Gellman, and T. S. Zwier, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131(40), 14243-14245.

  17. The clinical and economic value of the dipeptide alanyl-glutamine in total parenteral nutrition of critically ill patients treated in intensive care units in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Muscaritoli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the supplementation of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide in critically ill patients necessitating total parenteral nutrition (TPN improves clinical outcomes, reducing mortality, infection rate, and shortening ICU hospital lengths of stay (LOS, as compared to standard TPN regimens. Here we present a pharmacoeconomic evaluation of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide in critically ill patients admitted to Italian Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Methods: a Discrete Event Simulation model that incorporates outcomes rates from 200 Italian ICUs for over 60,000 patients, alanyl-glutamine dipeptide efficacy data synthesized by means of a Bayesian Random-Effects meta-analysis, and national cost data has been developed to evaluated the alternatives from the point of view of the hospital. Simulated clinical outcomes are death and infection rates in ICU, death rate in general ward, and hospital LOSs. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses are performed by varying all uncertain parameter values in a plausible range. Results: alanyl-glutamine dipeptide results more effective and less costly than standard TPN: reduced mortality rate (23.55% ± 15.2% vs 34.50% ± 2.06%, infection rate (15.91% ± 3.95% vs 18.97% ± 3.94%, and hospital LOS (25.47 ± 0.26 vs 26.00 ± 0.27 days come at a lower total cost per patient (23,922 ± 3,249 vs 24,145 ± 3,361 Euro. Treatment cost is completely offset by savings on ICU and antibiotic costs. The cost/effectiveness acceptability curve indicates an estimated 78% probability of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide resulting dominant and a 90% probability of resulting cost/effective for a willingness to pay up to 1,500 Euro for one patient death avoided. Conclusions: alanyl-glutamine dipeptide is expected to improve clinical outcomes and to do so with a concurrent saving for the hospital.

  18. Zinc, vitamin A, and glutamine supplementation in Brazilian shantytown children at risk for diarrhea results in sex-specific improvements in verbal learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo A. M. Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the impact of supplemental zinc, vitamin A, and glutamine, alone or in combination, on long-term cognitive outcomes among Brazilian shantytown children with low median height-for-age z-scores. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in children aged three months to nine years old from the urban shanty compound community of Fortaleza, Brazil. Demographic and anthropometric information was assessed. The random treatment groups available for cognitive testing (total of 167 children were: (1 placebo, n = 25; (2 glutamine, n = 23; (3 zinc, n = 18; (4 vitamin A, n = 19; (5 glutamine+zinc, n = 20; (6 glutamine+vitamin A, n = 21; (7 zinc+vitamin A, n = 23; and (8 glutamine+zinc+vitamin A, n = 18. Neuropsychological tests were administered for the cognitive domains of non-verbal intelligence and abstraction, psychomotor speed, verbal memory and recall ability, and semantic and phonetic verbal fluency. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS, version 16.0. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00133406. RESULTS: Girls receiving a combination of glutamine, zinc, and vitamin A had higher mean age-adjusted verbal learning scores than girls receiving only placebo (9.5 versus 6.4, p = 0.007 and girls receiving zinc+vitamin A (9.5 versus 6.5, p = 0.006. Similar group differences were not found between male study children. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that combination therapy offers a sex-specific advantage on tests of verbal learning, similar to that seen among female patients following traumatic brain injury.

  19. Bacteria and the Nitrogen Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanaba, A.

    1982-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation accounts for almost 70 percent of nitrogen for plant growth. If food is to keep abreast of population growth, even more nitrogen must be fixed. For this international research institutes continue the search for natural variants in the bacterial population while also pursuing novel genetic engineering methods. (Author)

  20. Specificity of exogenous acetate and glutamate as astrocyte substrates examined in acute brain slices from female mice using methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to inhibit glutamine synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Velde; McNair, Laura Frendrup; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    cortical slices from female NMRI mice were incubated in media containing [1,2-(13) C]acetate or [U-(13) C]glutamate, with or without methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to inhibit glutamine synthetase (GS). Tissue extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Blocking GS abolished the majority...... of glutamine (13) C-labeling from [1,2-(13) C]acetate as intended. However, (13) C-labeling of GABA was only 40-50% reduced by MSO, suggesting considerable neuronal uptake of acetate. Moreover, labeling of glutamate from [1,2-(13) C]acetate in the presence of MSO exceeded the level probable from exclusive...

  1. Oral feeding with L-Glutamine and Nucleotides: impact on some GALT (gut associated lymphoid tissue parameters and cell proliferation/death rates in weaning piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bontempo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplementation with glutamine and nucleotides may be useful during piglets weaning, when a rough passage from milk suckling to a solid feed may cause a strong reduction of the length of intestinal villi height and the depth of the crypts, and consequently of the intestinal digestive and absorptive capacities (Van Beers-Schreurs et al., 1998. Glutamine stimulates cell proliferation and activates protein kinases, suggesting that it could control the regularly alternating cellular apoptosis/proliferation sequence (Rhoads et al., 2000...

  2. Modulation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway by glutamine in peritoneal macrophages of a murine model of protein malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Lima, Fabiana; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Ramos, Mayara Caldas; Borelli, Primavera; Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio

    2013-06-01

    Protein malnutrition affects resistance to infection by impairing the inflammatory response, modifying the function of effector cells, such as macrophages. Recent studies have revealed that glutamine-a non-essential amino acid, which could become conditionally essential in some situations like trauma, infection, post-surgery and sepsis-is able to modulate the synthesis of cytokines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of glutamine on the expression of proteins involved in the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway of peritoneal macrophages from malnourished mice. Two-month-old male Balb/c mice were submitted to protein-energy malnutrition (n = 10) with a low-protein diet containing 2 % protein, whereas control mice (n = 10) were fed a 12 % protein-containing diet. The haemogram and analysis of plasma glutamine and corticosterone were evaluated. Peritoneal macrophages were pre-treated in vitro with glutamine (0, 0.6, 2 and 10 mmol/L) for 24 h and then stimulated with 1.25 μg LPS for 30 min, and the synthesis of TNF-α and IL-1α and the expression of proteins related to the NF-κB pathway were evaluated. Malnourished animals had anaemia, leucopoenia, lower plasma glutamine and increased corticosterone levels. TNF-α production of macrophages stimulated with LPS was significantly lower in cells from malnourished animals when cultivated in supraphysiological (2 and 10 mmol/L) concentrations of glutamine. Further, glutamine has a dose-dependent effect on the activation of macrophages, in both groups, when stimulated with LPS, inducing a decrease in TNF-α and IL-1α production and negatively modulating the NF-κB signalling pathway. These data lead us to infer that the protein malnutrition state interferes with the activation of macrophages and that higher glutamine concentrations, in vitro, have the capacity to act negatively in the NF-κB signalling pathway.

  3. The amino acid transporters of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle and their impact on insulin and glucagon secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eJenstad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication is pivotal in optimising and synchronising cellular responses to keep internal homeostasis and to respond adequately to external stimuli. In the central nervous system (CNS, glutamatergic and GABAergic signals are postulated to be dependent on the glutamate/GABA-glutamine (GGG cycle for vesicular loading of neurotransmitters, for inactivating the signal and for the replenishment of the neurotransmitters. Islets of Langerhans release the hormones insulin and glucagon, but share similarities with CNS cells in for example transcriptional control of development and differentiation, and chromatin methylation. Interestingly, proteins involved in the CNS in secretion of the neurotransmitters and emitting their responses as well as the regulation of these processes, are also found in islet cells. Moreover, high levels of glutamate, GABA and glutamine and their respective vesicular and plasma membrane transporters have been shown in the islet cells and there is emerging support for these amino acids and their transporters playing important roles in the maturation and secretion of insulin and glucagon. In this review, we will discuss the feasibility of recent data in the field in relation to the biophysical properties of the transporters (Slc1, Slc17, Slc32 and Slc38 and physiology of hormone secretion in islets of Langerhans.

  4. Amino acid transport across the tonoplast of vacuoles isolated from barley mesophyll protoplasts: Uptake of alanine, leucine, and glutamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, K.J.; Jaeger, R.; Kaiser, G.; Martinoia, E.

    1990-01-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts from leaves of well-fertilized barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants contained amino acids at concentrations as high as 120 millimoles per liter. With the exception of glutamic acid, which is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, a major part of all other amino acids was contained inside the large central vacuole. Alanine, leucine, and glutamine are the dominant vacuolar amino acids in barley. Their transport into isolated vacuoles was studied using 14 C-labeled amino acids. Uptake was slow in the absence of ATP. A three- to sixfold stimulation of uptake was observed after addition of ATP or adenylyl imidodiphosphate an ATP analogue not being hydrolyzed by ATPases. Other nucleotides were ineffective in increasing the rate of uptake. ATP-Stimulated amino acid transport was not dependent on the transtonoplast pH or membrane potential. p-Chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and n-ethyl maleimide increased transport independently of ATP. Neutral amino acids such as valine or leucine effectively decreased the rate of alanine transport. Glutamine and glycine were less effective or not effective as competitive inhibitors of alanine transport. The results indicate the existence of a uniport translocator specific for neutral or basic amino acids that is under control of metabolic effectors

  5. Sp2 is the only glutamine-rich specificity protein with minor impact on development and differentiation in myelinating glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Amélie; Küspert, Melanie; Sock, Elisabeth; Philipsen, Sjaak; Suske, Guntram; Wegner, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells are the myelinating glia of the vertebrate nervous system and by generation of myelin sheaths allow rapid saltatory conduction. Previous in vitro work had pointed to a role of the zinc finger containing specificity proteins Sp1 and Sp3 as major regulators of glial differentiation and myelination. Here, we asked whether such a role is also evident in vivo using mice with specific deletions of Sp1 or Sp3 in myelinating glia. We also studied glia-specific conditional Sp2- and constitutive Sp4-deficient mice to include all related glutamine-rich Sp factors into our analysis. Surprisingly, we did not detect developmental Schwann cell abnormalities in any of the mutant mice. Oligodendrocyte development and differentiation was also not fundamentally affected as oligodendrocytes were present in all mouse mutants and retained their ability to differentiate and initiate myelin gene expression. The most severe defect we observed was a 50% reduction in Mbp- and proteolipid protein 1 (Plp1)-positive differentiating oligodendrocytes in Sp2 mutants at birth. Unexpectedly, glial development appeared undisturbed even in the joint absence of Sp1 and Sp3. We conclude that Sp2 has a minor effect on the differentiation of myelinating glia, and that glutamine-rich Sp proteins are not essential regulators of the process. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Functional and Transcriptomic Characterization of Peritoneal Immune-Modulation by Addition of Alanyl-Glutamine to Dialysis Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Rebecca; Kuster, Lilian; Becker, Julia; Gluexam, Tobias; Pils, Dietmar; Spittler, Andreas; Bhasin, Manoj K; Alper, Seth L; Vychytil, Andreas; Aufricht, Christoph; Kratochwill, Klaus

    2017-07-24

    Peritonitis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality during chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD). Glucose-based PD fluids reduce immunological defenses in the peritoneal cavity. Low concentrations of peritoneal extracellular glutamine during PD may contribute to this immune deficit. For these reasons we have developed a clinical assay to measure the function of the immune-competent cells in PD effluent from PD patients. We then applied this assay to test the impact on peritoneal immune-competence of PD fluid supplementation with alanyl-glutamine (AlaGln) in 6 patients in an open-label, randomized, crossover pilot trial (EudraCT 2012-004004-36), and related the functional results to transcriptome changes in PD effluent cells. Ex-vivo stimulation of PD effluent peritoneal cells increased release of interleukin (IL) 6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α. Both IL-6 and TNF-α were lower at 1 h than at 4 h of the peritoneal equilibration test but the reductions in cytokine release were attenuated in AlaGln-supplemented samples. AlaGln-supplemented samples exhibited priming of IL-6-related pathways and downregulation of TNF-α upstream elements. Results from measurement of cytokine release and transcriptome analysis in this pilot clinical study support the conclusion that suppression of PD effluent cell immune function in human subjects by standard PD fluid is attenuated by AlaGln supplementation.

  7. Seventy day safety assessment of an orally ingested, l-glutamine-containing oat and yeast supplement for horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindinger, Michael I; Anderson, Scott C

    2014-10-01

    We describe a safety assessment of an oral supplement designed to nutritionally support the gastrointestinal system of horses. The supplement comprised a mixture of essential (l-threonine) and conditionally essential (l-glutamine) amino acids, polar lipids, oat bran rich in beta glucans and yeast extract. Young (1-2years) horses of both sexes were allocated to control (n=7) and treatment groups (n=7) and studied for 9weeks. Horses in the treatment group received the supplement daily for 8weeks. After 8weeks of supplementation, horses were studied for one additional week. Outcome measures included body mass, weight gain, results of clinical examination, hematology and plasma chemistry. There were no adverse events associated with supplementation and horses in both groups showed normal weight gain, clinical signs, hematology and chemistry. l-Glutamine, which is not yet listed as GRAS, was considered with respect to its potential for nutritional support and safety when ingested orally. It is concluded that this oral supplement, when ingested by horses at twice the recommended daily level, was safe and does not pose a health risk when used in accordance with good feeding practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Kirby, Brian J; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell–cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells. (paper)

  9. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  10. L-Glutamine and L-arginine protect against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection via intestinal innate immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Ren, Wenkai; Fang, Jun; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Guan, Guiping; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yin, Jie; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Chen, Shuai; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2017-12-01

    Dietary glutamine (Gln) or arginine (Arg) supplementation is beneficial for intestinal health; however, whether Gln or Arg may confer protection against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is not known. To address this, we used an ETEC-infected murine model to investigate the protective effects of Gln and Arg. Experimentally, we pre-treated mice with designed diet of Gln or Arg supplementation prior to the oral ETEC infection and then assessed mouse mortality and intestinal bacterial burden. We also determined the markers of intestinal innate immunity in treated mice, including secretory IgA response (SIgA), mucins from goblet cells, as well as antimicrobial peptides from Paneth cells. ETEC colonized in mouse small intestine, including duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and inhibited the mRNA expression of intestinal immune factors, such as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), cryptdin-related sequence 1C (CRS1C), and Reg3γ. We found that dietary Gln or Arg supplementation decreased bacterial colonization and promoted the activation of innate immunity (e.g., the mRNA expression of pIgR, CRS1C, and Reg3γ) in the intestine of ETEC-infected mice. Our results suggest that dietary arginine or glutamine supplementation may inhibit intestinal ETEC infection through intestinal innate immunity.

  11. The fertilizer nitrogen problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.A.; Halstead, E.H.

    1974-01-01

    A world-wide fossil fuel crisis has surfaced in the past year by reason of shortage and high cost, which is felt throughout all segments of human society. Nor has the agriculture sector, with its very high demand for energy to supply its power, machinery, fertilizer, processing and transport, escaped the energy crisis. Among the agricultural inputs, fertilizer nitrogen is one of major concern. This commodity is currently in extremely short supply, world prices having more than doubled in the past year alone. Serious as this situation is to agricultural production in the highly developed countries of the world, it is a real disaster to the production potential of the developing countries. The birth of the 'Green Revolution' in those countries in the last ten years came about from an amalgamation of higher yielding varieties, improved pest and disease control, better crop watering practices, and the introduction of fertilizer nitrogen. Shortcomings in any one of these requisites invalidates the entire package. (author)

  12. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  13. Nitrogen Research Programme STOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erisman, J.W.; Van der Eerden, L.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution is one of the main threats to the environment now in the Netherlands as well as other parts of Europe. In order to address the main gaps on the issues of nitrogen pollution related to the local scale, the Ministries of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment (VROM) and of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries (LNV) have initiated a research programme, the Dutch Nitrogen Research Programme (STOP), which aims to provide a scientific basis to develop and implement policy on a local scale for the realisation and conservation of the EHS ('Dutch Mainframe of Natural Landscapes'). The results of the programme show that the description of emissions from manure in the field is difficult to describe and show large uncertainties. On the contrary, emissions from housings could be modelled well, if local actual data were available. The OPS model to describe the dispersion and deposition was evaluated with the measurements and the limitations were quantified. It appears that the model works well on the long term, whereas on the short term (hours) and short distance (tenths of meters) there is large uncertainty, especially in complex terrain. Critical loads for nitrogen for ecosystems were evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of management options was quantified. A method to determine critical loads as a function of soil conditions, such as acidification and water availability was derived. This resulted in a combination of the soil model SMART and the so-called 'nature planner' (Natuurplanner). It was concluded that the combination of SMART, the nature planner and OPS provide a good tool to develop and support policy on the local scale. 4 refs

  14. High Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    crack growth (FCG) test (ASTM E 647-95a) - square bar specimen of 0.4x0.4x2.8 in. in L-orientation with a Charpy notch at the mid- length for SCC...Hydrogen Embrittlement in Steel by the Increment Loading Technique. Fractography: After the stress-life fatigue tests , the fracture surface morphology...NAWCADPAX/TR-2011/162 HIGH NITROGEN STAINLESS STEEL by E. U. Lee R. Taylor 19 July 2011 Approved for

  15. Nitrogen in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambouleyron, I.; Zanatta, A. R.

    1998-07-01

    The known properties of nitrogen as an impurity in, and as an alloy element of, the germanium network are reviewed in this article. Amorphous and crystalline germanium-nitrogen alloys are interesting materials with potential applications for protective coatings and window layers for solar conversion devices. They may also act as effective diffusion masks for III-V electronic devices. The existing data are compared with similar properties of other group IV nitrides, in particular with silicon nitride. To a certain extent, the general picture mirrors the one found in Si-N systems, as expected from the similar valence structure of both elemental semiconductors. However, important differences appear in the deposition methods and alloy composition, the optical properties of as grown films, and the electrical behavior of nitrogen-doped amorphous layers. Structural studies are reviewed, including band structure calculations and the energies of nitrogen-related defects, which are compared with experimental data. Many important aspects of the electronic structure of Ge-N alloys are not yet completely understood and deserve a more careful investigation, in particular the structure of defects associated with N inclusion. The N doping of the a-Ge:H network appears to be very effective, the activation energy of the most effectively doped samples becoming around 120 meV. This is not the case with N-doped a-Si:H, the reasons for the difference remaining an open question. The lack of data on stoichiometric β-Ge3N4 prevents any reasonable assessment on the possible uses of the alloy in electronic and ceramic applications.

  16. Is nitrogen the next carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battye, William; Aneja, Viney P.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2017-09-01

    Just as carbon fueled the Industrial Revolution, nitrogen has fueled an Agricultural Revolution. The use of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and the cultivation of nitrogen-fixing crops both expanded exponentially during the last century, with most of the increase occurring after 1960. As a result, the current flux of reactive, or fixed, nitrogen compounds to the biosphere due to human activities is roughly equivalent to the total flux of fixed nitrogen from all natural sources, both on land masses and in the world's oceans. Natural fluxes of fixed nitrogen are subject to very large uncertainties, but anthropogenic production of reactive nitrogen has increased almost fivefold in the last 60 years, and this rapid increase in anthropogenic fixed nitrogen has removed any uncertainty on the relative importance of anthropogenic fluxes to the natural budget. The increased use of nitrogen has been critical for increased crop yields and protein production needed to keep pace with the growing world population. However, similar to carbon, the release of fixed nitrogen into the natural environment is linked to adverse consequences at local, regional, and global scales. Anthropogenic contributions of fixed nitrogen continue to grow relative to the natural budget, with uncertain consequences.

  17. Expressed sequence tags related to nitrogen metabolism in maize inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Defilippi, L; Pereira, E M; Silva, F M; Moro, G V

    2017-05-31

    The relative quantitative real-time expression of two expressed sequence tags (ESTs) codifying for key enzymes in nitrogen metabolism in maize, nitrate reductase (ZmNR), and glutamine synthetase (ZmGln1-3) was performed for genotypes inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense. Two commercial single-cross hybrids (AG7098 and 2B707) and two experimental synthetic varieties (V2 and V4) were raised under controlled greenhouse conditions, in six treatment groups corresponding to different forms of inoculation and different levels of nitrogen application by top-dressing. The genotypes presented distinct responses to inoculation with A. brasilense. Increases in the expression of ZmNR were observed for the hybrids, while V4 only displayed a greater level of expression when the plants received nitrogenous fertilization by top-dressing and there was no inoculation. The expression of the ZmGln1-3EST was induced by A. brasilense in the hybrids and the variety V4. In contrast, the variety V2 did not respond to inoculation.

  18. GATOR1 regulates nitrogenic cataplerotic reactions of the mitochondrial TCA cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Sutter, Benjamin M; Shi, Lei; Tu, Benjamin P

    2017-11-01

    The GATOR1 (SEACIT) complex consisting of Iml1-Npr2-Npr3 inhibits target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) in response to amino acid insufficiency. In glucose medium, Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking the function of this complex grow poorly in the absence of amino acid supplementation, despite showing hallmarks of increased TORC1 signaling. Such mutants sense that they are amino acid replete and thus repress metabolic activities that are important for achieving this state. We found that npr2Δ mutants have defective mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA)-cycle activity and retrograde response. Supplementation with glutamine, and especially aspartate, which are nitrogen-containing forms of TCA-cycle intermediates, rescues growth of npr2Δ mutants. These amino acids are then consumed in biosynthetic pathways that require nitrogen to support proliferative metabolism. Our findings revealed that negative regulators of TORC1, such as GATOR1 (SEACIT), regulate the cataplerotic synthesis of these amino acids from the TCA cycle, in tune with the amino acid and nitrogen status of cells.

  19. Ammonium nitrate and iron nutrition effects on some nitrogen assimilation enzymes and metabolites in Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Merve; Ozturk Urek, Raziye

    2015-01-01

    The effect of various concentrations of ammonium nitrate (5-60 mM), an economical nitrogen source, on the growth, nitrate-ammonium uptake rates, production of some pigments and metabolites, and some nitrogen assimilation enzymes such as nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in Spirulina platensis (Gamont) Geitler was investigated. Ten millimolars of ammonium nitrate stimulated the growth, production of pigments and the other metabolites, and enzyme activities, whereas 30 and 60 mM ammonium nitrate caused inhibition. In the presence of 10 mM ammonium nitrate, different concentrations of iron were tried in the growth media of S. platensis. After achieving the best growth, levels of metabolite and pigment production, and enzyme activities in the presence of 10 mM ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source, different iron concentrations (10-100 µM) were tried in the growth medium of S. platensis. The highest growth, pigment and metabolite levels, and enzyme activities were determined in the medium containing 50 µM iron and 10 mM ammonium nitrate. In this optimum condition, the highest dry biomass level, chlorophyll a, and pyruvate contents were obtained as 55.42 ± 3.8 mg mL(-1) , 93.114 ± 7.9 µg g(-1) , and 212.5 ± 18.7 µg g(-1) , respectively. The highest NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities were 67.16 ± 5.1, 777.92 ± 52, 0.141 ± 0.01, and 44.45 ± 3.6, respectively. Additionally, 10 mM ammonium nitrate is an economical and efficient nitrogen source for nitrogen assimilation of S. platensis, and 50 µM iron is optimum for the growth of S. platensis. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. 862.1515... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine...

  1. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  2. Metabolic features involved in drought stress tolerance mechanisms in peanut nodules and their contribution to biological nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Ana Laura; Bianucci, Eliana; Castro, Stella; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2017-10-01

    Legumes belong to the most important crops worldwide. They increase soil fertility due their ability to establish symbiotic associations with soil microorganisms, known as rhizobia, capable of fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere. However, they are frequently exposed to abiotic stress conditions in particular drought. Such adverse conditions impair the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and depend largely on the legume. Therefore, two peanut cultivars with contrasting tolerance to drought, namely the more tolerant EC-98 and the sensitive Granoleico, were investigated to elucidate the relative contribution of BNF to the tolerance to drought. The tolerant cultivar EC-98 sustained growth and BNF similar to the control condition despite the reduced water potential and photosynthesis, suggesting the functioning of distinct metabolic pathways that contributed to enhance the tolerance. The biochemical and metabolomics approaches revealed that nodules from the tolerant cultivar accumulated trehalose, proline and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), metabolites with known function in protecting against drought stress. The amide metabolism was severely affected in nodules from the sensitive cultivar Granoleico as revealed by the low content of asparagine and glutamine in the drought stressed plants. The sensitive cultivar upon rehydration was unable to re-establish a metabolism similar to well-watered plants. This was evidenced by the low level of metabolites and, transcripts and specific activities of enzymes from the carbon (sucrose synthase) and nitrogen (glutamine synthetase) metabolism which decreased below the values of control plants. Therefore, the increased content of metabolites with protective functions under drought stress likely is crucial for the full restoration upon rehydration. Smaller changes of drought stress-related metabolites in nodule are another trait that contributes to the effective control of BNF in the tolerant peanut cultivar (EC-98). Copyright © 2017

  3. Metabolic Impacts of Using Nitrogen and Copper-Regulated Promoters to Regulate Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Beecher, Consuelo N; Wang, Kang; Larive, Cynthia K; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2015-07-20

    The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is a long-studied eukaryotic microbial system amenable to heterologous expression of native and foreign proteins. However, relatively few highly tunable promoters have been developed for this species. In this study, we compare the tcu-1 and nit-6 promoters for controlled expression of a GFP reporter gene in N. crassa. Although the copper-regulated tcu-1 has been previously characterized, this is the first investigation exploring nitrogen-controlled nit-6 for expression of heterologous genes in N. crassa. We determined that fragments corresponding to 1.5-kb fragments upstream of the tcu-1 and nit-6 open reading frames are needed for optimal repression and expression of GFP mRNA and protein. nit-6 was repressed using concentrations of glutamine from 2 to 20 mM and induced in medium containing 0.5-20 mM nitrate as the nitrogen source. Highest levels of expression were achieved within 3 hr of induction for each promoter and GFP mRNA could not be detected within 1 hr after transfer to repressing conditions using the nit-6 promoter. We also performed metabolic profiling experiments using proton NMR to identify changes in metabolite levels under inducing and repressing conditions for each promoter. The results demonstrate that conditions used to regulate tcu-1 do not significantly change the primary metabolome and that the differences between inducing and repressing conditions for nit-6 can be accounted for by growth under nitrate or glutamine as a nitrogen source. Our findings demonstrate that nit-6 is a tunable promoter that joins tcu-1 as a choice for regulation of gene expression in N. crassa. Copyright © 2015 Ouyang et al.

  4. The better growth phenotype of DvGS1-transgenic arabidopsis thaliana is attributed to the improved efficiency of nitrogen assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Chenguang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The overexpression of the algal glutamine synthetase (GS gene DvGS1 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in higher plant biomass and better growth phenotype. The purpose of this study was to recognize the biological mechanism for the growth improvement of DvGS1-transgenic Arabidopsis. A series of molecular and biochemical investigations related to nitrogen and carbon metabolism in the DvGS1-transgenic line was conducted. Analysis of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE-related gene transcription and enzymatic activity revealed that the transcriptional level and enzymatic activity of the genes encoding GS, glutamate synthase, glutamate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, were significantly upregulated, especially from leaf tissues of the DvGS1-transgenic line under two nitrate conditions. The DvGS1-transgenic line showed increased total nitrogen content and decreased carbon: nitrogen ratio compared to wild-type plants. Significant reduced concentrations of free nitrate, ammonium, sucrose, glucose and starch, together with higher concentrations of total amino acids, individual amino acids (glutamate, aspartate, asparagine, methionine, soluble proteins and fructose in leaf tissues confirmed that the DvGS1-transgenic line demonstrated a higher efficiency of nitrogen assimilation, which subsequently affected carbon metabolism. These improved metabolisms of nitrogen and carbon conferred the DvGS1-transgenic Arabidopsis higher NUE, more biomass and better growth phenotype compared with the wild-type plants.

  5. Dietary glutamine, glutamic acid and nucleotides increase the carbon turnover (δ 13C) on the intestinal mucosa of weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, A B; Berto, D A; Saleh, M A D; Miassi, G M; Ducatti, C

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the influence of dietary glutamine, glutamic acid and nucleotides on duodenal and jejunal carbon turnover, and on mucosa morphometry of piglets weaned at an age of 21 days. The diets were: additive-free diet - control (C); 1% of glutamine (G); 1% of glutamic acid (GA); and 1% of nucleotides (N). In intestinal mucosa morphometry trial, 65 animals were used. At day 0 (baseline), five animals were slaughtered to determine the villus height (VH), crypt depth (CD), VH : CD ratio and villi density (VD). The remaining 60 animals were allocated into a randomized block design with 4×3 factorial arrangement (four diets: C - control, G - glutamine, GA - glutamic acid and N - nucleotides; three slaughter ages: 7, 14 and 21 days post-weaning) with five piglets slaughtered per treatment. In carbon turnover trial, 123 animals were used. At day 0 (baseline), three animals were slaughtered to quantify the δ 13C half-life (T50%) and the 99% carbon substitution (T99%) on intestinal mucosa. The remaining 120 animals were blocked by three weight categories (light, medium and heavy) and, randomly assigned to pen with the same four diets from the previous trial with one piglet slaughtered per weight category per treatment at days 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27 and 49 after weaning. Morphometric analyses have yielded no consistent results regarding the action of the evaluated additives, and few reproducible age-related effects. The N diets determined lower T50% values (5.18 days) and T99% (17.21 days) than G and C diets (T50%=7.29, 7.58 days and T99%=24.22, 25.17 days, respectively) in the duodenal mucosa. In jejunum, the N, GA and G diets determined the lowest T50% means (4.9, 6.2 and 6.7 days, respectively) and T99% means (15.34, 21.10 and 21.84 days, respectively) in comparison with C diets (T50%=7.44 and T99%=24.72 days). The inclusion of the additives in the diets of piglets accelerated the carbon turnover in piglets during the post-weaning period. The

  6. Examination of the efficacy of acute L-alanyl-L-glutamine ingestion during hydration stress in endurance exercise

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    Yamamoto Linda M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of acute L-alanyl-L-glutamine (AG; Sustamine™ ingestion on performance changes and markers of fluid regulation, immune, inflammatory, oxidative stress, and recovery was examined in response to exhaustive endurance exercise, during and in the absence of dehydration. Methods Ten physically active males (20.8 ± 0.6 y; 176.8 ± 7.2 cm; 77.4 ± 10.5 kg; 12.3 ± 4.6% body fat volunteered to participate in this study. During the first visit (T1 subjects reported to the laboratory in a euhydrated state to provide a baseline (BL blood draw and perform a maximal exercise test. In the four subsequent randomly ordered trials, subjects dehydrated to -2.5% of their baseline body mass. For T2, subjects achieved their goal weight and were not rehydrated. During T3 - T5, subjects reached their goal weight and then rehydrated to 1.5% of their baseline body mass by drinking either water (T3 or two different doses (T4 and T5 of the AG supplement (0.05 g·kg-1 and 0.2 g·kg-1, respectively. Subjects then exercised at a workload that elicited 75% of their VO2 max on a cycle ergometer. During T2 - T5 blood draws occurred once goal body mass was achieved (DHY, immediately prior to the exercise stress (RHY, and immediately following the exercise protocol (IP. Resting 24 hour (24P blood samples were also obtained. Blood samples were analyzed for glutamine, potassium, sodium, aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP, C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, malondialdehyde (MDA, testosterone, cortisol, ACTH, growth hormone and creatine kinase. Statistical evaluation of performance, hormonal and biochemical changes was accomplished using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Glutamine concentrations for T5 were significantly higher at RHY and IP than T2 - T4. When examining performance changes (difference between T2 - T5 and T1, significantly greater times to exhaustion occurred during T4 (130.2 ± 340.2 sec and T5 (157.4

  7. Effects of neonatal enteral glutamine supplementation on cognitive, motor and behavioural outcomes in very preterm and/or very low birth weight children at school age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kieviet, J.F.; Oosterlaan, J.; van Zwol, A.; Boehm, G.; Lafeber, H.N.; van Elburg, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    In very preterm (< 32 weeks of gestation) and/or very low birth weight (VLBW, < 1500 g birth weight) children, serious neonatal infections are among the main causes of poor developmental outcomes later in childhood. The amino acid glutamine has been shown to reduce the incidence of serious neonatal

  8. Glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants. Design of a double-blind randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN73254583

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; van Elburg, Ruurd M.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Fetter, Willem P. F.

    2004-01-01

    Enteral feeding of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants is a challenge, since metabolic demands are high and administration of enteral nutrition is limited by immaturity of the gastrointestinal tract. The amino acid glutamine plays an important role in maintaining functional integrity of the gut. In

  9. Effects of neonatal enteral glutamine supplementation on cognitive, motor and behavioural outcomes in very preterm and/or very low birth weight children at school age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kieviet, Jorrit F.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; van Zwol, Annelies; Boehm, Guenther; Lafeber, Harrie N.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2012-01-01

    In very preterm ( < 32 weeks of gestation) and/or very low birth weight (VLBW, < 1500 g birth weight) children, serious neonatal infections are among the main causes of poor developmental outcomes later in childhood. The amino acid glutamine has been shown to reduce the incidence of serious neonatal

  10. Survey of Synergistic Effect of L-carnitine with Glutamine on Body Composition and Dietary Intake in Soccer Players: A Double-blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hozoori

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was conducted to investigate the possible effects of L-carnitine and glutamine and their synergistic effects on male soccer athletes. Methods: 28 male soccer players (21.1 ± 0.7 y were enrolled in a randomized pre and post intervention, double-blind design. Before the intervention, their performances were assessed by Bruce protocol, and their body composition was measured with the body composition analyzer. Then, athletes were randomly allocated into four groups: 2 g L-glutamine, 2 g L-carnitine, 2 g L-carnitine + 2 g L-glutamine and placebo. Supplements were prescribed for 21 days and after three weeks, athletes' performances and body composition were re-evaluated. Results: The results showed that body weight, body fat percentage, lean muscle mass, and dietary intake made no significant changes in different groups of athletes. In between groups comparison, results did not significantly change in any performance indices. However, in L-carnitine supplement group, the results of pre and post intervention showed that the running distance and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max increased significantly while the subjective sense of fatigue decreased significantly. Conclusions: Based on our findings, a three-week prescription of separateor combined glutamine and L-carnitine, had no effects on body composition or dietary intake in soccer players. But, the athletes' energy intake was more than the one reported in other studies. Although further studies are required to assess these effects on athletic performance.

  11. The effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal microflora in very low birth weight infants: A randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A.; van Elburg, R.M.; Westerbeek, E.A.; van der Linde, E.G.; Knol, J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Fetter, W.P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Background & aims: In a previous study, we have found that glutamine supplementation decreased the infection rate in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. In this study, we investigated whether this beneficial effect originated from increased number of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the

  12. The effect of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal microflora in very low birth weight infants: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anemone; van Elburg, Ruurd M.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Linde, Esmeralda G. M.; Knol, J.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Fetter, Willem P. F.

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, we have found that glutamine supplementation decreased the infection rate in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. In this study, we investigated whether this beneficial effect originated from increased number of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the intestinal microflora of

  13. A randomised trial of enteral glutamine supplementation for very preterm children showed no beneficial or adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twilhaar, E.S.; de Kieviet, J.F.; Oosterlaan, J.; van Elburg, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the long-term effects of enteral glutamine supplementation on neurodevelopmental outcomes of a Dutch cohort of very preterm children at 13 years of age. Methods The cohort was enrolled in a randomised placebo-controlled trial between 2001 and 2003 in which infants received

  14. Molecular identification and characterisation of the glycine transporter (GLYT1) and the glutamine/glutamate transporter (ASCT2) in the rat lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)