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Sample records for glucocorticoid stimulates expression

  1. Glucocorticoid stimulates expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone gene in human placenta

    Robinson, B.G.; Emanuel, R.L.; Frim, D.M.; Majzoub, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of purified human cytotrophoblasts have been used to examine the expression of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) gene in placenta. The authors report here that glucocorticoids stimulate placental CRH synthesis and secretion in primary cultures of human placenta. This stimulation is in contrast to the glucocorticoid suppression of CRH expression in hypothalamus. The positive regulation of CRH by glucocorticoids suggests that the rise in CRH preceding parturition could result from the previously described rise in fetal glucocorticoids. Furthermore, this increase in placental CRH could stimulate, via adrenocorticotropic hormone, a further rise in fetal glucocorticoids, completing a positive feedback loop that would be terminated by delivery

  2. Glucocorticoid-induced reversal of interleukin-1β-stimulated inflammatory gene expression in human oviductal cells.

    Stéphanie Backman

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC, the most common epithelial ovarian carcinoma histotype, originates from the fallopian tube epithelium (FTE. Risk factors for this cancer include reproductive parameters associated with lifetime ovulatory events. Ovulation is an acute inflammatory process during which the FTE is exposed to follicular fluid containing both pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-1 (IL1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF, and cortisol. Repeated exposure to inflammatory cytokines may contribute to transforming events in the FTE, with glucocorticoids exerting a protective effect. The global response of FTE cells to inflammatory cytokines or glucocorticoids has not been investigated. To examine the response of FTE cells and the ability of glucocorticoids to oppose this response, an immortalized human FTE cell line, OE-E6/E7, was treated with IL1β, dexamethasone (DEX, IL1β and DEX, or vehicle and genome-wide gene expression profiling was performed. IL1β altered the expression of 47 genes of which 17 were reversed by DEX. DEX treatment alone altered the expression of 590 genes, whereas combined DEX and IL1β treatment altered the expression of 784 genes. Network and pathway enrichment analysis indicated that many genes altered by DEX are involved in cytokine, chemokine, and cell cycle signaling, including NFκΒ target genes and interacting proteins. Quantitative real time RT-PCR studies validated the gene array data for IL8, IL23A, PI3 and TACC2 in OE-E6/E7 cells. Consistent with the array data, Western blot analysis showed increased levels of PTGS2 protein induced by IL1β that was blocked by DEX. A parallel experiment using primary cultured human FTE cells indicated similar effects on PTGS2, IL8, IL23A, PI3 and TACC2 transcripts. These findings support the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory signaling is induced in FTE cells by inflammatory mediators and raises the possibility that

  3. GPR158, an orphan member of G protein-coupled receptor Family C: glucocorticoid-stimulated expression and novel nuclear role.

    Patel, Nitin; Itakura, Tatsuo; Gonzalez, Jose M; Schwartz, Stephen G; Fini, M Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Members of the large G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) clan are implicated in many physiological and disease processes, making them important therapeutic drug targets. In the present study, we follow up on results of a pilot study suggesting a functional relationship between glucocorticoid (GC)-induced ocular hypertension and GPR158, one of three orphan members of the GPCR Family C. GC treatment increases levels of GPR158 mRNA and protein through transcriptional mechanisms, in cultured trabecular meshwork (TBM) cells derived from the eye's aqueous outflow pathway. Like treatment with GCs, transient overexpression of GPR158 stimulates cell proliferation, while siRNA knockdown of endogenous GPR158 has the opposite effect. Both endogenous and overexpressed GPR158 show an unusual subcellular localization pattern, being found almost entirely in the nucleus. However, when cells are treated with inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, GPR158 is shifted to the plasma membrane. Mutation of a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the 8(th) helix also shifts GPR158 out of the nucleus, but in this case the protein is found in vesicles localized in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that newly synthesized GPR158 first traffics to the plasma membrane, where it rapidly undergoes endocytosis and translocation to the nucleus. Significantly, mutation of the NLS abrogates GPR158-mediated enhancement of cell proliferation, indicating a functional requirement for nuclear localization. GPR158 overexpression upregulates levels of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, but mutation of the NLS reverses this. Overexpression of GPR158 enhances the barrier function of a TBM cell monolayer, which is associated with an increase in the levels of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin, similar to reported studies on GC treatment. Regulated paracellular permeability controls aqueous outflow facility in vivo. Since GCs stimulate GPR158 expression, the result is consistent with a

  4. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  5. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis.

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-10-18

    Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines regulate DKK1 synthesis in synovial fibroblasts during inflammatory arthritis. We examined expression and regulation of DKK1 in primary cultures of human synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with inflammatory arthritis. The effect of TNFα, IL-1β and glucocorticoids on DKK1 mRNA and protein expression was examined by real-time PCR and ELISA. The ability of inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of the glucocorticoid-activating enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) to sensitise fibroblasts to endogenous glucocorticoids was explored. Global expression of Wnt signalling and target genes in response to TNFα and glucocorticoids was assessed using a custom array. DKK1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts was directly regulated by glucocorticoids but not proinflammatory cytokines. Glucocorticoids, but not TNFα, regulated expression of multiple Wnt agonists and antagonists in favour of inhibition of Wnt signalling. However, TNFα and IL-1β indirectly stimulated DKK1 production through increased expression of 11β-HSD1. These results demonstrate that in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, DKK1 expression is directly regulated by glucocorticoids rather than TNFα. Consequently, the links between synovial inflammation, altered Wnt signalling and bone remodelling are not direct but are dependent on local activation of endogenous glucocorticoids.

  6. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; van der Vliet, Albert; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNFα gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNFα expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ex vivo stimulation of whole blood as a means to determine glucocorticoid sensitivity

    Burnsides C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Burnsides,1,* Jacqueline Corry,1,* Jacob Alexander,1 Catherine Balint,1 David Cosmar,1 Gary Phillips,2 Jeanette I Webster Marketon1,31Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Center for Biostatistics, 3Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA*JC and CB have equally contributed to this workPurpose: Glucocorticoids are commonly prescribed to treat a number of diseases including the majority of inflammatory diseases. Despite considerable interpersonal variability in response to glucocorticoids, an insensitivity rate of about 30%, and the risk of adverse side effects of glucocorticoid therapy, currently no assay is performed to determine sensitivity.Patients and methods: Here we propose a whole blood ex vivo stimulation assay to interrogate known glucocorticoid receptor (GR up- and downregulated genes to indicate glucocorticoid sensitivity. We have chosen to employ real-time PCR in order to provide a relatively fast and inexpensive assay.Results: We show that the GR-regulated genes, GILZ and FKBP51, are upregulated in whole blood by treatment with dexamethasone and that LPS-induction of cytokines (IL-6 and TNFα are repressed by dexamethasone in a dose responsive manner. There is considerable interpersonal variability in the maximum induction of these genes but little variation in the EC50 and IC50 concentrations. The regulation of the GR-induced genes differs throughout the day whereas the suppression of LPS-induced cytokines is not as sensitive to time of day.Conclusion: In all, this assay would provide a method to determine glucocorticoid receptor responsiveness in whole blood.Keywords: glucocorticoid responsiveness, gene regulation, nuclear receptor, GILZ, FKBP51, cytokines

  8. Reduced glucocorticoid receptor expression predicts bladder tumor recurrence and progression.

    Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Zheng, Yichun; Netto, George J; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    To assess the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in bladder tumors because the status and its prognostic value remain largely unknown. We immunohistochemically stained for GR in bladder tumor and matched non-neoplastic bladder tissue specimens. Overall, GR was positive in 129 (87%) of 149 urothelial tumors, which was significantly (P=.026) lower than in non-neoplastic urothelium (90 [96%] of 94). Forty-two (79%) of 53 low-grade tumors vs 45 (47%) of 96 high-grade carcinomas (Pcancer-specific survival of MI tumors (P=.067). Multivariate analysis identified low GR expression as a strong predictor for recurrence of NMI tumors (P=.034). GR expression was downregulated in bladder tumors compared with nonneoplastic bladder tumors and in high-grade/MI tumors compared with low-grade/NMI tumors. Decreased expression of GR, as an independent prognosticator, predicted recurrence of NMI tumors. These results support experimental evidence suggesting an inhibitory role of GR signals in bladder cancer outgrowth. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  9. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression.

    Hinds, Terry D; Peck, Bailey; Shek, Evan; Stroup, Steven; Hinson, Jennifer; Arthur, Susan; Marino, Joseph S

    2016-02-11

    Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα), GR β (GRβ) has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex) responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C₂C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C₂C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a) mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids.

  10. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression

    Terry D. Hinds

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα, GR β (GRβ has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C2C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C2C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1 response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids.

  11. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper expression is associated with response to treatment and immunoregulation in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Ebadpour, Mohammad Reza; Sedighi, Sima; Saeedi, Mohsen; Memarian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder in which cytokine balance is disturbed. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are shown to balance immune response by transcriptional regulation of glucocorticoid receptor target genes such as Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) which has been introduced as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator. In the present study, we assessed the expression of GILZ in association with interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukine-10 (IL-10), and B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) plasma levels in SLE patients. A total of 40 female patients (18 under treatment and 22 newly diagnosed) were recruited in this study. Real-time RT PCR was conducted to quantify the mRNA expression of GILZ. The plasma levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, and BLyS were evaluated using ELISA method. GILZ was overexpressed among under treatment SLE patients. The mRNA expression of GILZ was significantly correlated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score. IFN-γ and BLyS were downregulated in response to therapies with negative correlations to GILZ. Moreover, IL-10 was upregulated among treated patients. The levels of IFN-γ and BLyS were correlated with the severity of disease, while IL-10 was negatively correlated with SLEDAI score. GILZ could be introduced as one of the acting molecules in mediating the regulatory effects of GCs on producing pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in SLE.

  12. Ultradian hormone stimulation induces glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pulses of gene transcription.

    Stavreva, Diana A; Wiench, Malgorzata; John, Sam; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; McKenna, Mervyn A; Pooley, John R; Johnson, Thomas A; Voss, Ty C; Lightman, Stafford L; Hager, Gordon L

    2009-09-01

    Studies on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) action typically assess gene responses by long-term stimulation with synthetic hormones. As corticosteroids are released from adrenal glands in a circadian and high-frequency (ultradian) mode, such treatments may not provide an accurate assessment of physiological hormone action. Here we demonstrate that ultradian hormone stimulation induces cyclic GR-mediated transcriptional regulation, or gene pulsing, both in cultured cells and in animal models. Equilibrium receptor-occupancy of regulatory elements precisely tracks the ligand pulses. Nascent RNA transcripts from GR-regulated genes are released in distinct quanta, demonstrating a profound difference between the transcriptional programs induced by ultradian and constant stimulation. Gene pulsing is driven by rapid GR exchange with response elements and by GR recycling through the chaperone machinery, which promotes GR activation and reactivation in response to the ultradian hormone release, thus coupling promoter activity to the naturally occurring fluctuations in hormone levels. The GR signalling pathway has been optimized for a prompt and timely response to fluctuations in hormone levels, indicating that biologically accurate regulation of gene targets by GR requires an ultradian mode of hormone stimulation.

  13. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation Improves Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis in a Rat Model

    Gabriele Pizzino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO is a secondary cause of bone loss. Bisphosphonates approved for GIO, might induce jaw osteonecrosis; thus additional therapeutics are required. Adenosine receptor agonists are positive regulators of bone remodeling, thus the efficacy of adenosine receptor stimulation for treating GIO was tested. In a preventive study GIO was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by methylprednisolone (MP for 60 days. Animals were randomly assigned to receive polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN, an adenosine A2 receptor agonist, or PDRN and DMPX (3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 antagonist, or vehicle (0.9% NaCl. Another set of animals was used for a treatment study, following the 60 days of MP-induction rats were randomized to receive (for additional 60 days PDRN, or PDRN and DMPX (an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist, or zoledronate (as control for gold standard treatment, or vehicle. Control animals were administered with vehicle for either 60 or 120 days. Femurs were analyzed after treatments for histology, imaging, and breaking strength analysis. MP treatment induced severe bone loss, the concomitant use of PDRN prevented the developing of osteoporosis. In rats treated for 120 days, PDRN restored bone architecture and bone strength; increased b-ALP, osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin and stimulated the Wnt canonical and non-canonical pathway. Zoledronate reduced bone resorption and ameliorated the histological features, without significant effects on bone formation. Our results suggest that adenosine receptor stimulation might be useful for preventing and treating GIO.

  14. Expression of glucocorticoid and progesterone nuclear receptor genes in archival breast cancer tissue

    Smith, Robert A; Lea, Rod A; Curran, Joanne E; Weinstein, Stephen R; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown associations of specific nuclear receptor gene variants with sporadic breast cancer. In order to investigate these findings further, we conducted the present study to determine whether expression levels of the progesterone and glucocorticoid nuclear receptor genes vary in different breast cancer grades. RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded archival breast tumour tissue and converted into cDNA. Sample cDNA underwent PCR using labelled primers to enable quantitation of mRNA expression. Expression data were normalized against the 18S ribosomal gene multiplex and analyzed using analysis of variance. Analysis of variance indicated a variable level of expression of both genes with regard to breast cancer grade (P = 0.00033 for glucocorticoid receptor and P = 0.023 for progesterone receptor). Statistical analysis indicated that expression of the progesterone nuclear receptor is elevated in late grade breast cancer tissue

  15. Expression and regulation of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in the developing anterior pituitary gland.

    Ellestad, Laura E; Malkiewicz, Stefanie A; Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R; Porter, Tom E

    2009-02-01

    The expression profile of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in the anterior pituitary during the second half of embryonic development in the chick is consistent with in vivo regulation by circulating corticosteroids. However, nothing else has been reported about the presence of GILZ in the neuroendocrine system. We sought to characterize expression and regulation of GILZ in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland and determine the effect of GILZ overexpression on anterior pituitary hormone levels. Pituitary GILZ mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on the day of hatch, and decreased through the first week after hatch. GILZ expression was rapidly upregulated by corticosterone in embryonic pituitary cells. To determine whether GILZ regulates hormone gene expression in the developing anterior pituitary, we overexpressed GILZ in embryonic pituitary cells and measured mRNA for the major pituitary hormones. Exogenous GILZ increased prolactin mRNA above basal levels, but not as high as that in corticosterone-treated cells, indicating that GILZ may play a small role in lactotroph differentiation. The largest effect we observed was a twofold increase in FSH beta subunit in cells transfected with GILZ but not treated with corticosterone, suggesting that GILZ may positively regulate gonadotroph development in a manner not involving glucocorticoids. In conclusion, this is the first report to characterize avian GILZ and examine its regulation in the developing neuroendocrine system. We have shown that GILZ is upregulated by glucocorticoids in the embryonic pituitary gland and may regulate expression of several pituitary hormones.

  16. Analysis of Facial Expression by Taste Stimulation

    Tobitani, Kensuke; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    In this study, we focused on the basic taste stimulation for the analysis of real facial expressions. We considered that the expressions caused by taste stimulation were unaffected by individuality or emotion, that is, such expressions were involuntary. We analyzed the movement of facial muscles by taste stimulation and compared real expressions with artificial expressions. From the result, we identified an obvious difference between real and artificial expressions. Thus, our method would be a new approach for facial expression recognition.

  17. Application of LC–MS/MS for quantitative analysis of glucocorticoids and stimulants in biological fluids

    Jamshed Haneef

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography tandem mass chromatography (LC–MS/MS is an important hyphenated technique for quantitative analysis of drugs in biological fluids. Because of high sensitivity and selectivity, LC–MS/MS has been used for pharmacokinetic studies, metabolites identification in the plasma and urine. This manuscript gives comprehensive analytical review, focusing on chromatographic separation approaches (column packing materials, column length and mobile phase as well as different acquisition modes (SIM, MRM for quantitative analysis of glucocorticoids and stimulants. This review is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to provide a general overview for detection and confirmation of target drugs using LC–MS/MS and thus useful in the doping analysis, toxicological studies as well as in pharmaceutical analysis. Keywords: LC–MS/MS, Ionization techniques, Glucocorticoids, Stimulants, Hyphenated techniques, Biological fluid

  18. Glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycaemia

    Gerards, M.C.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis contains studies on current practice, clinical implications and treatment of excess glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) stimulation, with a focus on glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycaemia (GCIH). Chapter 1 is a general introduction to the glucocorticoid hormone. In chapter 2 , we have

  19. Glucocorticoids have state-dependent stimulant effects on the mesencephalic dopaminergic transmission.

    Piazza, P V; Rougé-Pont, F; Deroche, V; Maccari, S; Simon, H; Le Moal, M

    1996-01-01

    An increase in the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons has been implicated in the appearance of pathological behaviors such as psychosis and drug abuse. Several observations suggest that glucocorticoids might contribute to such an increase in dopaminergic activity. The present experiments therefore analyzed the effects of corticosterone, the major glucocorticoid in the rat, both on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving animals by means of microdialysis, and on ...

  20. The role of glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation in Mcl-1 and NOXA gene expression

    Demonacos Constantinos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK mediated phosphorylation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR exerts opposite effects on GR transcriptional activity and affects other posttranslational modifications within this protein. The major phosphorylation site of human GR targeted by MAPK family is the serine 226 and multiple kinase complexes phosphorylate receptor at the serine 211 residue. We hypothesize that GR posttranslational modifications are involved in the determination of the cellular fate in human lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We investigated whether UV signalling through alternative GR phosphorylation determined the cell type specificity of glucocorticoids (GCs mediated apoptosis. Results We have identified putative Glucocorticoid Response Elements (GREs within the promoter regulatory regions of the Bcl-2 family members NOXA and Mcl-1 indicating that they are direct GR transcriptional targets. These genes were differentially regulated in CEM-C7-14, CEM-C1-15 and A549 cells by glucocorticoids and JNK pathway. In addition, our results revealed that the S211 phosphorylation was dominant in CEM-C7-14, whereas the opposite was the case in CEM-C1-15 where prevalence of S226 GR phosphorylation was observed. Furthermore, multiple GR isoforms with cell line specific patterns were identified in CEM-C7-14 cells compared to CEM-C1-15 and A549 cell lines with the same antibodies. Conclusions GR phosphorylation status kinetics, and site specificity as well as isoform variability differ in CEM-C7-14, CEM-C1-15, and A549 cells. The positive or negative response to GCs induced apoptosis in these cell lines is a consequence of the variable equilibrium of NOXA and Mcl-1 gene expression potentially mediated by alternatively phosphorylated GR, as well as the balance of MAPK/CDK pathways controlling GR phosphorylation pattern. Our results provide molecular base and valuable knowledge for improving the GC

  1. Expression of neuropeptide W in rat stomach mucosa: regulation by nutritional status, glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones.

    Caminos, Jorge E; Bravo, Susana B; García-Rendueles, María E R; Ruth González, C; Garcés, Maria F; Cepeda, Libia A; Lage, Ricardo; Suárez, Miguel A; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2008-02-07

    Neuropeptide W (NPW) is a recently identified neuropeptide that binds to G-protein-coupled receptor 7 (GPR7) and 8 (GPR8). In rodent brain, NPW mRNA is confined to specific nuclei in hypothalamus, midbrain and brainstem. Expression of NPW mRNA has also been confirmed in peripheral organs such as stomach. Several reports suggested that brain NPW is implicated in the regulation of energy and hormonal homeostasis, namely the adrenal and thyroid axes; however the precise physiological role and regulation of peripheral NPW remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of nutritional status on the regulation of NPW in stomach mucosa. Our results show that in this tissue, NPW mRNA and protein expression is negatively regulated by fasting and food restriction, in all the models we studied: males, females and pregnant females. Next, we examined the effect of glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones on NPW mRNA expression in the stomach mucosa. Our data showed that NPW expression is decreased in this tissue after glucocorticoid treatment or hyperthyroidism. Conversely, hypothyroidism induces a marked increase in the expression of NPW in rat stomach. Overall, these data indicate that stomach NPW is regulated by nutritional and hormonal status.

  2. Expression of glucocorticoid receptor and glucose transporter-1 during placental development in the diabetic rat

    Ramazan Demir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In various tissues, glucocorticoids (GCs are known to downregulate glucose transport systems; however, their effects on glucose transporters (GLUTs in the placenta of a diabetic rat are unknown. Glucocorticoid hormone action within the cell is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the relationship between GR and glucose transporter expression in the placenta of the diabetic rat. Our immunohistochemical results indicated that GR and glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT 1 are expressed ubiquitously in the trophoblast and endothelial cells of the labyrinthine zone, where maternal fetal transport takes place in the rat placenta. Expression of GR in the junctional zone of the rat placenta was detected in giant cells, and in some spongiotrophoblast cells, but not in the glycogen cells. GLUT 1 was present, especially in glycogen cells during early pregnancy, and in the spongiotrophoblast cells of the junctional zone during late pregnancy. Amounts of GR and GLUT 1 protein were increased towards the end of gestation both in the control and the diabetic placenta. However, at days 17 and 19 of gestation, only the placental GR protein was significantly increased in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats compared to control rats. Diabetes led to a significant decrease in placental weight at gestation day 15. In contrast, at gestational days 17 and 21, the weights of the diabetic placenta were significantly increased as compared with the controls. Moreover, diabetes induced fetus intrauterine growth retardation at gestational days 13, 17 and 21. In conclusion, the localization pattern of GR and GLUT 1 proteins in the same cell types led us to believe that there might be a relationship between GR and GLUT 1 expressions at the cellular level. GLUT 1 does not play a pivotal role in diabetic pregnancies. However, placental growth abnormalities during diabetic pregnancy may be related to the amount of GR

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor limits autoimmune neuroinflammation via glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper expression in dendritic cells.

    Benkhoucha, Mahdia; Molnarfi, Nicolas; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Merkler, Doron; Schneiter, Gregory; Bruscoli, Stefano; Riccardi, Carlo; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Reith, Walter; Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Lalive, Patrice H

    2014-09-15

    Autoimmune neuroinflammation, including multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a prototype for T cell-mediated autoimmunity, is believed to result from immune tolerance dysfunction leading to demyelination and substantial neurodegeneration. We previously showed that CNS-restricted expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a potent neuroprotective factor, reduced CNS inflammation and clinical deficits associated with EAE. In this study, we demonstrate that systemic HGF treatment ameliorates EAE through the development of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) with high expression levels of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a transcriptional repressor of gene expression and a key endogenous regulator of the inflammatory response. RNA interference-directed neutralization of GILZ expression by DCs suppressed the induction of tolerance caused by HGF. Finally, adoptive transfer of HGF-treated DCs from wild-type but not GILZ gene-deficient mice potently mediated functional recovery in recipient mice with established EAE through effective modulation of autoaggressive T cell responses. Altogether, these results show that by inducing GILZ in DCs, HGF reproduces the mechanism of immune regulation induced by potent immunomodulatory factors such as IL-10, TGF-β1, and glucocorticoids and therefore that HGF therapy may have potential in the treatment of autoimmune dysfunctions. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist-induced down-regulation of hepatic glucocorticoid receptor expression in SD rats

    Chen Xiang; Li Ming; Sun Weiping; Bi Yan; Cai Mengyin; Liang Hua; Yu Qiuqiong; He Xiaoying; Weng Jianping

    2008-01-01

    It was reported that glucocorticoid production was inhibited by fenofibrate through suppression of type-1 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in liver. The inhibition might be a negative-feedback regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), which is quickly induced by glucocorticoid in the liver. However, it is not clear if GR expression is changed by fenofibrate-induced PPARα activation. In this study, we tested this possibility in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. GR expression was reduced by fenofibrate in a time- and does-dependent manner. The inhibition was observed in liver, but not in fat and muscle. The corticosterone level in the blood was increased significantly by fenofibrate. These effects of fenofibrate were abolished by PPARα inhibitor MK886, suggesting that fenofibrate activated through PPARα. In conclusion, inhibition of GR expression may represent a new molecular mechanism for the negative feedback regulation of GR activity by PPARα

  5. Electroconvulsive stimulations normalizes stress-induced changes in the glucocorticoid receptor and behaviour

    Hageman, Ida; Nielsen, Marianne; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of chronic stress, such as 21 days of 6h/daily restraint stress cause changes in neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and alter behaviour. These changes are partly mediated by the glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was threefold: (1) to study how this particular chronic ...

  6. Expression microarray identifies the unliganded glucocorticoid receptor as a regulator of gene expression in mammary epithelial cells

    Ritter, Heather D; Mueller, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    While glucocorticoids and the liganded glucocorticoid receptor (GR) have a well-established role in the maintenance of differentiation and suppression of apoptosis in breast tissue, the involvement of unliganded GR in cellular processes is less clear. Our previous studies implicated unliganded GR as a positive regulator of the BRCA1 tumour suppressor gene in the absence of glucocorticoid hormone, which suggested it could play a similar role in the regulation of other genes. An shRNA vector directed against GR was used to create mouse mammary cell lines with depleted endogenous levels of this receptor in order to further characterize the role of GR in breast cells. An expression microarray screen for targets of unliganded GR was performed using our GR-depleted cell lines maintained in the absence of glucocorticoids. Candidate genes positively regulated by unliganded GR were identified, classified by Gene Ontology and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and validated using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and dual luciferase expression assays were conducted to further investigate the mechanism through which unliganded GR regulates these genes. Expression microarray analysis revealed 260 targets negatively regulated and 343 targets positively regulated by unliganded GR. A number of the positively regulated targets were involved in pro-apoptotic networks, possibly opposing the activity of liganded GR targets. Validation and further analysis of five candidates from the microarray indicated that two of these, Hsd11b1 and Ch25h, were regulated by unliganded GR in a manner similar to Brca1 during glucocorticoid treatment. Furthermore, GR was shown to interact directly with and upregulate the Ch25h promoter in the absence, but not the presence, of hydrocortisone (HC), confirming our previously described model of gene regulation by unliganded GR. This work presents the first identification of targets of unliganded GR. We propose that

  7. Dexamethasone stimulates expression of C-type Natriuretic Peptide in chondrocytes

    Beier Frank

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth of endochondral bones is regulated through the activity of cartilaginous growth plates. Disruption of the physiological patterns of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation – such as in endocrine disorders or in many different genetic diseases (e.g. chondrodysplasias – generally results in dwarfism and skeletal defects. For example, glucocorticoid administration in children inhibits endochondral bone growth, but the molecular targets of these hormones in chondrocytes remain largely unknown. In contrast, recent studies have shown that C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP is an important anabolic regulator of cartilage growth, and loss-of-function mutations in the human CNP receptor gene cause dwarfism. We asked whether glucocorticoids could exert their activities by interfering with the expression of CNP or its downstream signaling components. Methods Primary mouse chondrocytes in monolayer where incubated with the synthetic glucocorticoid Dexamethasone (DEX for 12 to 72 hours. Cell numbers were determined by counting, and real-time PCR was performed to examine regulation of genes in the CNP signaling pathway by DEX. Results We show that DEX does influence expression of key genes in the CNP pathway. Most importantly, DEX significantly increases RNA expression of the gene encoding CNP itself (Nppc. In addition, DEX stimulates expression of Prkg2 (encoding cGMP-dependent protein kinase II and Npr3 (natriuretic peptide decoy receptor genes. Conversely, DEX was found to down-regulate the expression of the gene encoding its receptor, Nr3c1 (glucocorticoid receptor, as well as the Npr2 gene (encoding the CNP receptor. Conclusion Our data suggest that the growth-suppressive activities of DEX are not due to blockade of CNP signaling. This study reveals a novel, unanticipated relationship between glucocorticoid and CNP signaling and provides the first evidence that CNP expression in chondrocytes is regulated by endocrine

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor gene expression and promoter CpG modifications throughout the human brain.

    Cao-Lei, Lei; Suwansirikul, Songkiet; Jutavijittum, Prapan; Mériaux, Sophie B; Turner, Jonathan D; Muller, Claude P

    2013-11-01

    Glucocorticoids and the glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors have been implicated in many processes, particularly in negative feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Epigenetically programmed GR alternative promoter usage underlies transcriptional control of GR levels, generation of GR 3' splice variants, and the overall GC response in the brain. No detailed analysis of GR first exons or GR transcript variants throughout the human brain has been reported. Therefore we investigated post mortem tissues from 28 brain regions of 5 individuals. GR first exons were expressed throughout the healthy human brain with no region-specific usage patterns. First exon levels were highly inter-correlated suggesting that they are co-regulated. GR 3' splice variants (GRα and GR-P) were equally distributed in all regions, and GRβ expression was always low. GR/MR ratios showed significant differences between the 28 tissues with the highest ratio in the pituitary gland. Modification levels of individual CpG dinucleotides, including 5-mC and 5-hmC, in promoters 1D, 1E, 1F, and 1H were low, and diffusely clustered; despite significant heterogeneity between the donors. In agreement with this clustering, sum modification levels rather than individual CpG modifications correlated with GR expression. Two-way ANOVA showed that this sum modification was both promoter and brain region specific, but that there was however no promoter*tissue interaction. The heterogeneity between donors may however hide such an interaction. In both promoters 1F and 1H modification levels correlated with GRα expression suggesting that 5-mC and 5-hmC play an important role in fine tuning GR expression levels throughout the brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucose-induced serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase activation in oncofetal fibronectin expression

    Khan, Zia A.; Barbin, Yousef P.; Farhangkhoee, Hana; Beier, Norbert; Scholz, Wolfgang; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2005-01-01

    Preferential expression of oncofetal extra domain-B fibronectin (EDB + FN), a proposed angiogenic marker, has been shown in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. High levels of glucose also increase EDB + FN expression in endothelial cells (ECs) via transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1). The present study was aimed at elucidating the role of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK-1) in glucose-induced EDB + FN expression. Using human macro- and microvascular ECs, we show that high levels of glucose, TGF-β1, and ET-1 increase the EDB + FN expression via SGK-1 alteration at the mRNA, protein, and activity levels. Inhibition of TGF-β1 and ET-1 prevented glucose-induced SGK-1 activation and the EDB + FN expression. Furthermore, using siRNA-mediated SGK-1 gene silencing, we show that glucose-induced EDB + FN expression can be completely prevented. These findings provide first evidence of glucose-induced SGK-1 activation in altered EDB + FN expression and provide novel avenues for therapeutic modalities

  10. Effect of glucocorticoids on melatonin receptor expression under T-cell activated immune response

    Tauschanova, P.; Georgiev, G.; Manchev, S.; Konakchieva, R.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was aimed to explore the stress response in rats under conditions of T-cell antigen-activated immune function and to investigate the specific melatonin (MEL) receptor binding in primary and secondary immune tissue of rats employing 2-( 125 I)-iodo melatonin autoradiography and in vitro ligand binding assay. The study revealed that melatonin receptor binding was specifically expressed in discrete areas of the lymphoid sheath of the spleen and in a network of interdigitating cells of the experimental rats. Demonstration of the modulation of MEL receptor binding in the course of a primary immune response under hypercorticalemic conditions indicate that the pineal hormone might interfere in the processes of glucocorticoid-dependent immune competency. (authors)

  11. Glucocorticoids affect 24 h clock genes expression in human adipose tissue explant cultures.

    Purificación Gómez-Abellán

    Full Text Available to examine firstly whether CLOCK exhibits a circadian expression in human visceral (V and subcutaneous (S adipose tissue (AT in vitro as compared with BMAL1 and PER2, and secondly to investigate the possible effect of the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone (DEX on positive and negative clock genes expression.VAT and SAT biopsies were obtained from morbid obese women (body mass index ≥ 40 kg/m(2 (n = 6. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of clock genes and the effect of DEX on CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 expression, control AT (without DEX and AT explants treated with DEX (2 hours were cultured during 24 h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 10:00 h, 14:00 h, 18:00 h, 22:00 h, 02:00 h and 06:00 h, using qRT-PCR.CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 expression exhibited circadian patterns in both VAT and SAT explants that were adjusted to a typical 24 h sinusoidal curve. PER2 expression (negative element was in antiphase with respect to CLOCK and in phase with BMAL1 expression (both positive elements in the SAT (situation not present in VAT. A marked effect of DEX exposure on both positive and negative clock genes expression patterns was observed. Indeed, DEX treatment modified the rhythmicity pattern towards altered patterns with a period lower than 24 hours in all genes and in both tissues.24 h patterns in CLOCK and BMAL1 (positive clock elements and PER2 (negative element mRNA levels were observed in human adipose explants. These patterns were altered by dexamethasone exposure.

  12. Glucocorticoid Receptor Related Genes: Genotype And Brain Gene Expression Relationships To Suicide And Major Depressive Disorder

    Pantazatos, Spiro P.; Huang, Yung-yu; Rosoklija, Gorazd B.; Dwork, Andrew J.; Burke, Ainsley; Arango, Victoria; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We tested the relationship between genotype, gene expression and suicidal behavior and MDD in live subjects and postmortem samples for three genes, associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, suicidal behavior and major depressive disorder (MDD); FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5), Spindle and kinetochore-associated protein 2 (SKA2) and Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1). Materials and Methods Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes were tested for association with suicidal behavior and MDD in a live (N=277) and a postmortem sample (N=209). RNA-seq was used to examine gene and isoform-level brain expression postmortem (Brodmann Area 9) (N=59). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) relationships were examined using a public database (UK Brain Expression Consortium). Results We identified a haplotype within the FKBP5 gene, present in 47% of the live subjects, that was associated with increased risk of suicide attempt (OR=1.58, t=6.03, p=0.014). Six SNPs on this gene, three SNPs on SKA2 and one near NR3C1 showed before-adjustment association with attempted suicide, and two SNPs of SKA2 with suicide death, but none stayed significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Only the SKA2 SNPs were related to expression in the prefrontal cortex. One NR3C1 transcript had lower expression in suicide relative to non-suicide sudden death cases (b=-0.48, SE=0.12, t=-4.02, adjusted p=0.004). Conclusion We have identified an association of FKBP5 haplotype with risk of suicide attempt and found an association between suicide and altered NR3C1 gene expression in the prefrontal cortex. Our findings further implicate hypothalamic pituitary axis dysfunction in suicidal behavior. PMID:27030168

  13. Role of NeuroD1 on the negative regulation of Pomc expression by glucocorticoid.

    Rehana Parvin

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the negative regulation of proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc by glucocorticoids (Gcs is still unclear in many points. Here, we demonstrated the involvement of neurogenic differentiation factor 1 (NeuroD1 in the Gc-mediated negative regulation of Pomc. Murine pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH producing corticotroph tumor-derived AtT20 cells were treated with dexamethasone (DEX (1-100 nM and cultured for 24 hrs. Thereafter, Pomc mRNA expression was studied by quantitative real-time PCR and rat Pomc promoter (-703/+58 activity was examined by luciferase assay. Both Pomc mRNA expression and Pomc promoter activity were inhibited by DEX in a dose-dependent manner. Deletion and point mutant analyses of Pomc promoter suggested that the DEX-mediated transcriptional repression was mediated via E-box that exists at -376/-371 in the promoter. Since NeuroD1 is known to bind to and activate E-box of the Pomc promoter, we next examined the effect of DEX on NeuroD1 expression. Interestingly, DEX dose-dependently inhibited NeuroD1 mRNA expression, mouse NeuroD1 promoter (-2.2-kb activity, and NeuroD1 protein expression in AtT20 cells. In addition, we confirmed the inhibitory effect of DEX on the interaction of NeuroD1 and E-box on Pomc promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. Finally, overexpression of mouse NeuroD1 could rescue the DEX-mediated inhibition of Pomc mRNA expression and Pomc promoter activity. Taken together, it is suggested that the suppression of NeuroD1 expression and the inhibition of NeuroD1/E-box interaction may play an important role in the Gc-mediated negative regulation of Pomc.

  14. Chewing ameliorates stress-induced suppression of spatial memory by increasing glucocorticoid receptor expression in the hippocampus.

    Miyake, Shinjiro; Yoshikawa, Gota; Yamada, Kentaro; Sasaguri, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Onozuka, Minoru; Sato, Sadao

    2012-03-29

    Chewing alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and improves the ability to cope with stress in rodents. Given that stress negatively influences hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, we aimed to elucidate whether masticatory movements, namely chewing, improve the stress-induced impairment of spatial memory in conjunction with increased hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to restraint stress by immobilization for 2h: the stress with chewing (SC) group were allowed to chew on a wooden stick during the latter half of the immobilization period, whereas the stress without chewing (ST) group were not allowed to do so. Performance in the Morris water maze test was significantly impaired in the ST group compared with the SC group. Further, the numbers of glucocorticoid receptor immunopositive neurons in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 region were significantly lower in the ST group than in the control and SC groups. The control and SC rats showed no significant differences in both the water maze performance and the numbers of glucocorticoid receptor-immunopositive neurons. The immunohistochemical finding correlated with the performance in the water maze test. These results suggest that chewing is a behavioral mechanism to cope with stress by increasing hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Circulating cortisol-associated signature of glucocorticoid-related gene expression in subcutaneous fat of obese subjects.

    Pavlatou, Maria G; Vickers, Kasey C; Varma, Sudhir; Malek, Rana; Sampson, Maureen; Remaley, Alan T; Gold, Philip W; Skarulis, Monica C; Kino, Tomoshige

    2013-05-01

    Serum cortisol concentrations fluctuate in a circadian fashion, and glucocorticoids exert strong effects on adipose tissue and induce obesity through the glucocorticoid receptor. To examine the impact of physiologic levels of circulating cortisol on subcutaneous adipose tissue, 25 overweight and obese subjects were employed, and their serum levels of morning (AM) and evening (PM) cortisol, AM/PM cortisol ratios, and 24-h urinary-free cortisol (UFC) were compared with their clinical parameters, serum cytokine levels, and mRNA expression of 93 receptor action-regulating and 93 glucocorticoid-responsive genes in abdominal subcutaneous fat. AM cortisol levels did not correlate with mRNA expression of the all genes examined, whereas PM cortisol levels, AM/PM cortisol ratios, and 24-h UFC were associated with distinct sets of these genes. Body mass index did not significantly correlate with the four cortisol parameters employed. These results suggest that physiologic levels of AM serum cortisol do not solely represent biological effects of circulating cortisol on the expression of glucocorticoid-related genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue, whereas PM levels, amplitude, and net amounts of the diurnally fluctuating serum cortisol have distinct effects. Through the genes identified in this study, glucocorticoids appear to influence intermediary metabolism, energy balance, inflammation, and local circadian rythmicity in subcutaneous fat. Our results may also explain in part the development of metabolic abnormality and obesity in subjects under stress or patients with melancholic/atypical depression who demonstrate elevated levels of PM serum cortisol. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  16. Immunoglobulin production induced in vitro by glucocorticoid hormones: T cell-dependent stimulation of immunoglobulin production without B cell proliferation in cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Grayson, J.; Dooley, N.J.; Koski, I.R.; Blaese, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The direct effects of steroid hormones on the production of immunoglobulins and DNA synthesis by human T and B lymphocytes was evaluated in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As detected by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay, the addition of 0.1 mM to 10 nM hydrocortisone to lymphocytes in culture in the absence of other stimulants or mitogens, resulted in the dramatic induction of immunoglobulin production with responses comparable to those seen in similar cultures stimulated with pokeweed mitogen. Steroid-stimulated immunoglobulin production was first seen after 48 h and peaked at 8-10 d of culture. The production of IgG, IgA, and IgM was induced following incubation with steroid. Glucocorticoids, but not estrogens or androgens, were capable of mediating this effect, and only compounds with affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor were active. The induction of immunoglobulin production was dependent on both T cells and monocytes; cultures depleted of either cell type did not produce immunoglobulin when stimulated with glucocorticoid hormones. Proliferation of B cells or T cells could not be detected by [/sup 3/H]thymidine incorporation or total cell recovery from steroid-stimulated cultures, even though such cultures demonstrated marked increases in immunoglobulin production. The mechanism responsible for this functional maturation of B cells to become high rate immunoglobulin producing cells is as yet undefined, although it appears to involve more than merely steroid mediated inactivation of suppressor T cells

  17. Msx-2 expression and glucocorticoid-induced overexpression in embryonic mouse submandibular glands.

    Jaskoll, T; Luo, W; Snead, M L

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that the process of branching morphogenesis requires epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. One outstanding model for the study of tissue interactions during branching morphogenesis is the embryonic mouse submandibular gland (SMG). Although it has been clearly demonstrated that the branching pattern is dependent on interactions between the epithelium and the surrounding mesenchyme, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the branching process. One group of transcription factors that likely participates in the control of epithelial-mesenchymal inductive interactions are the Msx-class of homeodomain-containing proteins. In this paper, we focus on Msx-2 because its developmental expression is correlated with inductive interactions, suggesting that Msx-2 may play a functional role during cell-cell interactions. We demonstrate the expression of Msx-2 mRNA and protein to be primarily in the branching epithelia with progressive embryonic (E13 to E15) SMG development and, to a lesser extent, in the mesenchyme. We also show that Msx-2 is expressed by embryonic SMG primordia cultured under defined conditions. In addition, to begin to delineate a functional role for Msx-2, we employed an experimental strategy by using exogenous glucocorticoid (CORT) treatment of embryonic SMGs in vitro and in vivo to significantly enhance branching morphogenesis and evaluate the effect of CORT treatment on embryonic SMG Msx-2 expression. A marked increase in Msx-2 transcripts and protein is detected with in vitro and in vivo CORT treatment. Our studies indicate that one mechanism of CORT regulation of salivary gland morphogenesis is likely through the modulation of Msx-2 gene expression.

  18. Glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor expression in patients with cervical human papillomavirus infection

    Cacilda Tezelli Junqueira Padovani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The progression of human papillomavirus (HPV infection in the anogenital tract has been associated with the involvement of cells with regulatory properties. Evidence has shown that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR is an important surface molecule for the characterization of these cells and proposes that GITR ligand may constitute a rational treatment for many cancer types. We aimed to detect the presence of GITR and CD25 in cervical stroma cells with and without pathological changes or HPV infection to better understand the immune response in the infected tissue microenvironment. Methods We subjected 49 paraffin-embedded cervical tissue samples to HPV DNA detection and histopathological analysis, and subsequently immunohistochemistry to detect GITR and CD25 in lymphocytes. Results We observed that 76.9% of all samples with high GITR expression were HPV-positive regardless of histopathological findings. High GITR expression (77.8% was predominant in samples with ≥1,000 RLU/PCB. Of the HPV-positive samples negative for intraepithelial lesion and malignancy, 62.5% had high GITR expression. High GITR expression was observed in both carcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL samples (p = 0.16. CD25 was present in great quantities in all samples. Conclusions The predominance of high GITR expression in samples with high viral load that were classified as HSIL and carcinoma suggests that GITR+ cells can exhibit regulatory properties and may contribute to the progression of HPV-induced cervical neoplasia, emphasizing the importance of GITR as a potential target for immune therapy of cervical cancer and as a disease evolution biomarker.

  19. Microarray-based screening of differentially expressed genes in glucocorticoid-induced avascular necrosis

    Huang, Gangyong; Wei, Yibing; Zhao, Guanglei; Xia, Jun; Wang, Siqun; Wu, Jianguo; Chen, Feiyan; Chen, Jie; Shi, Jingshen

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) have yet to be fully understood, in particular the mechanisms associated with the change of gene expression pattern. The present study aimed to identify key genes with a differential expression pattern in GC-induced ANFH. E-MEXP-2751 microarray data were downloaded from the ArrayExpress database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in 5 femoral head samples of steroid-induced ANFH rats compared with 5 placebo-treated rat samples. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses were performed upon these DEGs. A total 93 DEGs (46 upregulated and 47 downregulated genes) were identified in GC-induced ANFH samples. These DEGs were enriched in different GO terms and pathways, including chondrocyte differentiation and detection of chemical stimuli. The enrichment map revealed that skeletal system development was interconnected with several other GO terms by gene overlap. The literature mined network analysis revealed that 5 upregulated genes were associated with femoral necrosis, including parathyroid hormone receptor 1 (PTHR1), vitamin D (1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3) receptor (VDR), collagen, type II, α1, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 6 and zinc finger protein 354C (ZFP354C). In addition, ZFP354C and VDR were identified to transcription factors. Furthermore, PTHR1 was revealed to interact with VDR, and α-2-macroglobulin (A2M) interacted with fibronectin 1 (FN1) in the PPI network. PTHR1 may be involved in GC-induced ANFH via interacting with VDR. A2M may also be involved in the development of GC-induced ANFH through interacting with FN1. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced ANFH may provide novel targets for diagnostics and therapeutic treatment. PMID:28393228

  20. Anti-Apoptotic Protein Bcl-xL Expression in the Midbrain Raphe Region Is Sensitive to Stress and Glucocorticoids.

    Shishkina, Galina T; Kalinina, Tatyana S; Bulygina, Veta V; Lanshakov, Dmitry A; Babluk, Ekaterina V; Dygalo, Nikolay N

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic proteins are suggested to be important for the normal health of neurons and synapses as well as for resilience to stress. In order to determine whether stressful events may influence the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the midbrain and specifically in the midbrain serotonergic (5-HT) neurons involved in neurobehavioral responses to adverse stimuli, adult male rats were subjected to short-term or chronic forced swim stress. A short-term stress rapidly increased the midbrain bcl-xl mRNA levels and significantly elevated Bcl-xL immunoreactivity in the midbrain 5-HT cells. Stress-induced increase in glucocorticoid secretion was implicated in the observed effect. The levels of bcl-xl mRNA were decreased after stress when glucocorticoid elevation was inhibited by metyrapone (MET, 150 mg/kg), and this decrease was attenuated by glucocorticoid replacement with dexamethasone (DEX; 0.2 mg/kg). Both short-term stress and acute DEX administration, in parallel with Bcl-xL, caused a significant increase in tph2 mRNA levels and slightly enhanced tryptophan hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the midbrain. The increasing effect on the bcl-xl expression was specific to the short-term stress. Forced swim repeated daily for 2 weeks led to a decrease in bcl-xl mRNA in the midbrain without any effects on the Bcl-xL protein expression in the 5-HT neurons. In chronically stressed animals, an increase in tph2 gene expression was not associated with any changes in tryptophan hydroxylase protein levels. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that both short-term stress and acute glucocorticoid exposures induce Bcl-xL protein expression in the midbrain 5-HT neurons concomitantly with the activation of the 5-HT synthesis pathway in these neurons.

  1. Anti-Apoptotic Protein Bcl-xL Expression in the Midbrain Raphe Region Is Sensitive to Stress and Glucocorticoids.

    Galina T Shishkina

    Full Text Available Anti-apoptotic proteins are suggested to be important for the normal health of neurons and synapses as well as for resilience to stress. In order to determine whether stressful events may influence the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL in the midbrain and specifically in the midbrain serotonergic (5-HT neurons involved in neurobehavioral responses to adverse stimuli, adult male rats were subjected to short-term or chronic forced swim stress. A short-term stress rapidly increased the midbrain bcl-xl mRNA levels and significantly elevated Bcl-xL immunoreactivity in the midbrain 5-HT cells. Stress-induced increase in glucocorticoid secretion was implicated in the observed effect. The levels of bcl-xl mRNA were decreased after stress when glucocorticoid elevation was inhibited by metyrapone (MET, 150 mg/kg, and this decrease was attenuated by glucocorticoid replacement with dexamethasone (DEX; 0.2 mg/kg. Both short-term stress and acute DEX administration, in parallel with Bcl-xL, caused a significant increase in tph2 mRNA levels and slightly enhanced tryptophan hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the midbrain. The increasing effect on the bcl-xl expression was specific to the short-term stress. Forced swim repeated daily for 2 weeks led to a decrease in bcl-xl mRNA in the midbrain without any effects on the Bcl-xL protein expression in the 5-HT neurons. In chronically stressed animals, an increase in tph2 gene expression was not associated with any changes in tryptophan hydroxylase protein levels. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that both short-term stress and acute glucocorticoid exposures induce Bcl-xL protein expression in the midbrain 5-HT neurons concomitantly with the activation of the 5-HT synthesis pathway in these neurons.

  2. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytok...

  3. Glucocorticoid effects on the programming of AT1b angiotensin receptor gene methylation and expression in the rat.

    Irina Bogdarina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Adverse events in pregnancy may 'programme' offspring for the later development of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Previously, using a rodent model of programmed hypertension we have demonstrated the role of the renin-angiotensin system in this process. More recently we showed that a maternal low protein diet resulted in undermethylation of the At1b angiotensin receptor promoter and the early overexpression of this gene in the adrenal of offspring. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that maternal glucocorticoid modulates this effect on fetal DNA methylation and gene expression. We investigated whether treatment of rat dams with the 11beta-hydroxylase inhibitor metyrapone, could prevent the epigenetic and gene expression changes we observed. Offspring of mothers subjected to a low protein diet in pregnancy showed reduced adrenal Agtr1b methylation and increased adrenal gene expression as we observed previously. Treatment of mothers with metyrapone for the first 14 days of pregnancy reversed these changes and prevented the appearance of hypertension in the offspring at 4 weeks of age. As a control for non-specific effects of programmed hypertension we studied offspring of mothers treated with dexamethasone from day 15 of pregnancy and showed that, whilst they had raised blood pressure, they failed to show any evidence of Agtr1b methylation or increase in gene expression. We conclude that maternal glucocorticoid in early pregnancy may induce changes in methylation and expression of the Agtr1b gene as these are clearly reversed by an 11 beta-hydroxylase inhibitor. However in later pregnancy a converse effect with dexamethasone could not be demonstrated and this may reflect either an alternative mechanism of this glucocorticoid or a stage-specific influence.

  4. Glucocorticoid receptor modulators.

    Meijer, Onno C; Koorneef, Lisa L; Kroon, Jan

    2018-06-01

    The glucocorticoid hormone cortisol acts throughout the body to support circadian processes and adaptation to stress. The glucocorticoid receptor is the target of cortisol and of synthetic glucocorticoids, which are used widely in the clinic. Both agonism and antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor may be beneficial in disease, but given the wide expression of the receptor and involvement in various processes, beneficial effects are often accompanied by unwanted side effects. Selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators are ligands that induce a receptor conformation that allows activation of only a subset of downstream signaling pathways. Such molecules thereby combine agonistic and antagonistic properties. Here we discuss the mechanisms underlying selective receptor modulation and their promise in treating diseases in several organ systems where cortisol signaling plays a role. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Reduced expression of glucocorticoid-inducible genes GILZ and SGK-1: high IL-6 levels are associated with reduced hippocampal volumes in major depressive disorder.

    Frodl, T

    2012-01-01

    Neuroplasticity may have a core role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD), a concept supported by experimental studies that found that excessive cortisol secretion and\\/or excessive production of inflammatory cytokines impairs neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The objective of this study was to examine how changes in the glucocorticoid and inflammatory systems may affect hippocampal volumes in MDD. A multimodal approach with structural neuroimaging of hippocampus and amygdala, measurement of peripheral inflammatory proteins interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP), glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression, and expression of glucocorticoid-inducible genes (glucocorticoid-inducible genes Leucin Zipper (GILZ) and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1)) was used in 40 patients with MDD and 43 healthy controls (HC). Patients with MDD showed smaller hippocampal volumes and increased inflammatory proteins IL-6 and CRP compared with HC. Childhood maltreatment was associated with increased CRP. Patients with MDD, who had less expression of the glucocorticoid-inducible genes GILZ or SGK-1 had smaller hippocampal volumes. Regression analysis showed a strong positive effect of GILZ and SGK-1 mRNA expression, and further inverse effects of IL-6 concentration, on hippocampal volumes. These findings suggest that childhood maltreatment, peripheral inflammatory and glucocorticoid markers and hippocampal volume are interrelated factors in the pathophysiology of MDD. Glucocorticoid-inducible genes GILZ and SGK-1 might be promising candidate markers for hippocampal volume changes relevant for diseases like MDD. Further studies need to explore the possible clinical usefulness of such a blood biomarker, for example, for diagnosis or prediction of therapy response.

  6. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca 2+ concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes

  7. Expressions of Hippocampal Mineralocorticoid Receptor (MR) and Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) in the Single-Prolonged Stress-Rats

    Zhe, Du; Fang, Han; Yuxiu, Shi

    2008-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a stress-related mental disorder caused by traumatic experience. Single-prolonged stress (SPS) is one of the animal models proposed for PTSD. Rats exposed to SPS showed enhanced inhibition of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which has been reliably reproduced in patients with PTSD. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the hippocampus regulate HPA axis by glucocorticoid negative feedback. Abnormalities in negative feedback are found in PTSD, suggesting that GR and MR might be involved in the pathophysiology of these disorders. In the present study, we performed immunohistochemistry and western blotting to examine the changes in hippocampal MR- and GR-expression after SPS. Immunohistochemistry revealed decreased MR- and GR-immunoreactivity (ir) in the CA1 of hippocampus in SPS animals. Change in GR sub-distribution was also observed, where GR-ir was shifted from nucleus to cytoplasm in SPS rats. Western blotting showed that SPS induced significantly decreased MR- and GR-protein in the whole hippocampus, although the degree of decreased expression of both receptors was different. Meanwhile, we also found the MR/GR ratio decreased in SPS rats. In general, SPS induced down-regulation of MR- and GR-expression. These findings suggest that MR and GR play critical roles in affecting hippocampal function. Changes in MR/GR ratio may be relevant for behavioral syndrome in PTSD

  8. Quantitative tissue-specific dynamics of in vivo GILZ mRNA expression and regulation by endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids.

    Ayyar, Vivaswath S; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J; DuBois, Debra C

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are steroid hormones, which regulate metabolism and immune function. Synthetic GCs, or corticosteroids (CS), have appreciable clinical utility via their ability to suppress inflammation in immune-mediated diseases like asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Recent work has provided insight to novel GC-induced genes that mediate their anti-inflammatory effects, including glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Since GILZ comprises an important part of GC action, its regulation by both drug and hormone will influence CS therapy. In addition, GILZ expression is often employed as a biomarker of GC action, which requires judicious selection of sampling time. Understanding the in vivo regulation of GILZ mRNA expression over time will provide insight into both the physiological regulation of GILZ by endogenous GC and the dynamics of its enhancement by CS. A highly quantitative qRT-PCR assay was developed for measuring GILZ mRNA expression in tissues obtained from normal and CS-treated rats. This assay was applied to measure GILZ mRNA expression in eight tissues; to determine its endogenous regulation over time; and to characterize its dynamics in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver following treatment with CS. We demonstrate that GILZ mRNA is expressed in several tissues. GILZ mRNA expression in adipose tissue displayed a robust circadian rhythm that was entrained with the circadian oscillation of endogenous corticosterone; and is strongly enhanced by acute and chronic dosing. Single dosing also enhanced GILZ mRNA in muscle and liver, but the dynamics varied. In conclusion, GILZ is widely expressed in the rat and highly regulated by endogenous and exogenous GCs. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  9. Expression and distribution of the glucocorticoid receptor DlGR1 in the teleost Dicentrarchus labrax brain

    Nicolò Parrinello

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the main corticosteroid secreted by the interrenal cells of the head kidney and it exerts a role in mantaining the omeostatic status in fish. In teleosts its effects are mediated through intracellular receptors expressed in several tissues, that are ligand-dependent transcription factors by binding to specific tissue DNA sequences. In Dicentrarchus labrax we previously cloned and sequenced a glucocorticoid receptor, DlGR1, isolated from leukocytes of peritoneal cavity. In this work we showed mRNA expression and tissue immunohistochemical localization of brain DlGR1 by in situ hybridization assays, with a riboprobe with DlGR1 cDNA trascriptional activation domain, and by immunohistochemical methods, using a specific antibody for a selected sequence of the receptor tran- scriptional domain. The mRNA and the protein are expressed in pyramidal cells of the optic lobe and in the small globular neurons of the diencephalon.

  10. Expression and function of nuclear receptor coregulators in brain : understanding the cell-specific effects of glucocorticoids

    Laan, Siem van der

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the raising awareness of the role of glucocorticoids in the onset of numerous (neuro)-pathologies constitutes the increasing necessity of understanding the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in bodily processes and brain functioning. Glucocorticoids mediate their effects by binding

  11. Cell-specific expression of the glucocorticoid receptor within granular convoluted tubules of the rat submaxillary gland

    Antakly, T.; Zhang, C.X.; Sarrieau, A.; Raquidan, D.

    1991-01-01

    The submaxillary gland, a heterogeneous tissue composed essentially of two functionally distinct cell types (tubular epithelial and acinar), offers an interesting system in which to study the mechanisms of steroid-dependent growth and differentiation. One cell type, the granular convoluted tubular (GCT) cell, secretes a large number of physiologically important polypeptides, including epidermal and nerve growth factors. Two steroids, androgens and glucocorticoids, greatly influence the growth, differentiation, and secretory activity of GCT cells. Because glucocorticoids can partially mimic or potentiate androgen effects, it has been thought that glucocorticoids act via androgen receptors. Since the presence of glucocorticoid receptors is a prerequisite for glucocorticoid action, we have investigated the presence and cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the rat submaxillary gland. Binding experiments using [3H]dexamethasone revealed the presence of high affinity binding sites in rat submaxillary tissue homogenates. Most of these sites were specifically competed by dexamethasone, corticosterone, and a pure glucocorticoid agonist RU 28362. Neither testosterone nor dihydrotestosterone competed for glucocorticoid binding. The cellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptors within the submaxillary gland was investigated by immunocytochemistry, using two highly specific glucocorticoid receptor antibodies. The receptor was localized in the GCT cells, but not in the acinar cells of rat and mouse submaxillary tissue sections. In GCT cells, the glucocorticoid receptor colocalized with several secretory polypeptides, including epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, alpha 2u-globulin, and atrial natriuretic factor

  12. Fatigue and gene expression in human leukocytes: Increased NF-κB and decreased glucocorticoid signaling in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue

    Bower, Julienne E.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Irwin, Michael R.; Arevalo, Jesusa M.G.; Cole, Steve W.

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is highly prevalent in the general population and is one of the most common side effects of cancer treatment. There is growing evidence that pro-inflammatory cytokines play a role in cancer-related fatigue, although the molecular mechanisms for chronic inflammation and fatigue have not been determined. The current study utilized genome-wide expression microarrays to identify differences in gene expression and associated alterations in transcriptional activity in leukocytes from breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue (n = 11) and non-fatigued controls (n = 10). We focused on transcription of inflammation-related genes, particularly those responsive to the pro-inflammatory NF-κB transcription control pathway. Further, given the role of glucocorticoids as key regulators of inflammatory processes, we examined transcription of glucocorticoid-responsive genes indicative of potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) desensitization. Plasma levels of cortisol were also assessed. Consistent with hypotheses, results showed increased expression of transcripts with response elements for NF-κB, and reduced expression of transcripts with response elements for glucocorticoids (p < .05) in fatigued breast cancer survivors. No differences in plasma levels of cortisol were observed. These data indicate that increased activity of pro-inflammatory transcription factors may contribute to persistent cancer-related fatigue and provide insight into potential mechanisms for tonic increases in NF-κB activity, specifically decreased expression of GR anti-inflammatory transcription factors. PMID:20854893

  13. Glucocorticoid Signaling and Bone Biology.

    Komori, T

    2016-11-01

    Since glucocorticoids remain an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis. Fractures may occur in as many as 30-50% of patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Under physiological conditions, glucocorticoids are required for normal bone development due to their regulation of osteoblast differentiation, possibly via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and TSC22D3. However, serum levels of endogenous corticosterone are elevated in aged mice and glucocorticoids exert negative effects on the survival of osteoblasts and osteocytes as well as angiogenesis. Glucocorticoid treatments impair bone formation and enhance bone resorption. Excess glucocorticoids induce osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis by increasing pro-apoptotic molecules, reactive oxygen species, and endoplasmic reticulum stress and suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Autophagy protects osteocytes from glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, but passed some threshold, the process of autophagy leads the cells to apoptosis. Excess glucocorticoids impair osteoblastogenesis by inducing Wnt antagonists, including Dkk1, Sost, and sFRP-1. However, the findings are controversial and the involvement of Wnt antagonists requires further study. Excess glucocorticoids reduce the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β, which enhances the degradation of β-catenin. Excess glucocorticoids have been shown to modulate the expression of miRNAs, including miR-29a, miR-34a-5p, and miR-199a-5p, which regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast lineage cells. Excess glucocorticoids also enhance bone resorption by reducing OPG expression, increasing Rankl expression and reactive oxygen species, and prolonging the life span of osteoclasts; however, they also suppress the bone-degrading capacity of osteoclasts by disturbing the organization of the cytoskeleton. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG

  14. Novel antidepressant candidate RO-05 modulated glucocorticoid receptors activation and FKBP5 expression in chronic mild stress model in rats.

    Xing, Y; Hou, J; Meng, Q; Yang, M; Kurihara, H; Tian, J

    2015-04-02

    In this study, a novel TRI (triple reuptake inhibitors) antidepressant candidate RO-05 (4-[1-[1-(benzoyloxy)cyclohexyl]-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-phenyl benzoate) was investigated in TST (tail suspension test), FST (forced swimming test) and CMS (chronic mild stress) model. Results showed RO-05 significantly decreased the immobility time in FST and TST at 4.5-, 9-, 18-mg/kg in rats and 9-, 18-, 36-mg/kg in mice. Chronic administration of 18-mg/kg RO-05 improved the behavioral index, anhedonia and normalized the hyperactivity of HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) of CMS rats. We further investigated the possible mechanisms of RO-05 in the CMS model. Eighteen milligrams per kilogram of RO-05 chronic administration significantly reversed the increase of mRNA and protein expression of FKBP5 in the CMS rat hippocampus, which facilitated the activation of GR- (glucocorticoid receptor) and GR-responsive gene Foxo1 expression. RO-05 also elevated the expression of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) in CMS rat hippocampus. In summary, our results indicated that RO-05 is a promising antidepressant candidate. The possible antidepressant mechanisms of RO-05 were the modulation of FKBP5 expression, GR activation, corresponding inhibition of HPA axis hyperactivity, and the increase of BDNF expression. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dibutyltin disrupts glucocorticoid receptor function and impairs glucocorticoid-induced suppression of cytokine production.

    Christel Gumy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotins are highly toxic and widely distributed environmental chemicals. Dibutyltin (DBT is used as stabilizer in the production of polyvinyl chloride plastics, and it is also the major metabolite formed from tributyltin (TBT in vivo. DBT is immunotoxic, however, the responsible targets remain to be defined. Due to the importance of glucocorticoids in immune-modulation, we investigated whether DBT could interfere with glucocorticoid receptor (GR function. METHODOLOGY: We used HEK-293 cells transiently transfected with human GR as well as rat H4IIE hepatoma cells and native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages expressing endogenous receptor to study organotin effects on GR function. Docking of organotins was used to investigate the binding mechanism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that nanomolar concentrations of DBT, but not other organotins tested, inhibit ligand binding to GR and its transcriptional activity. Docking analysis indicated that DBT inhibits GR activation allosterically by inserting into a site close to the steroid-binding pocket, which disrupts a key interaction between the A-ring of the glucocorticoid and the GR. DBT inhibited glucocorticoid-induced expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and tyrosine-aminotransferase (TAT and abolished the glucocorticoid-mediated transrepression of TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activity. Moreover, DBT abrogated the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: DBT inhibits ligand binding to GR and subsequent activation of the receptor. By blocking GR activation, DBT may disturb metabolic functions and modulation of the immune system, providing an explanation for some of the toxic effects of this organotin.

  16. Mitogen activated protein kinases selectively regulate palytoxin-stimulated gene expression in mouse keratinocytes

    Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Warmka, Janel K.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2003-01-01

    We have been investigating how the novel skin tumor promoter palytoxin transmits signals through mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Palytoxin activates three major MAPKs, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38, in a keratinocyte cell line derived from initiated mouse skin (308). We previously showed that palytoxin requires ERK to increase matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) gene expression, an enzyme implicated in carcinogenesis. Diverse stimuli require JNK and p38 to increase MMP-13 gene expression, however. We therefore used the JNK and p38 inhibitors SP 600125 and SB 202190, respectively, to investigate the role of these MAPKs in palytoxin-induced MMP-13 gene expression. Surprisingly, palytoxin does not require JNK and p38 to increase MMP-13 gene expression. Accordingly, ERK activation, independent of palytoxin and in the absence of JNK and p38 activation, is sufficient to induce MMP-13 gene expression in 308 keratinocytes. Dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid that inhibits activator protein-1 (AP-1), blocked palytoxin-stimulated MMP-13 gene expression. Therefore, the AP-1 site present in the promoter of the MMP-13 gene appears to be functional and to play a key role in palytoxin-stimulated gene expression. Previous studies showed that palytoxin simulates an ERK-dependent selective increase in the c-Fos content of AP-1 complexes that bind to the promoter of the MMP-13 gene. JNK and p38 can also modulate c-Fos. Palytoxin does not require JNK or p38 to increase c-Fos binding, however. Altogether, these studies indicate that ERK plays a distinctly essential role in transmitting palytoxin-stimulated signals to specific nuclear targets in keratinocytes derived from initiated mouse skin

  17. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR-RELATED GENES: GENOTYPE AND BRAIN GENE EXPRESSION RELATIONSHIPS TO SUICIDE AND MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER.

    Yin, Honglei; Galfalvy, Hanga; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Huang, Yung-Yu; Rosoklija, Gorazd B; Dwork, Andrew J; Burke, Ainsley; Arango, Victoria; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, J John

    2016-06-01

    We tested the relationship between genotype, gene expression and suicidal behavior and major depressive disorder (MDD) in live subjects and postmortem samples for three genes, associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, suicidal behavior, and MDD; FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP5), Spindle and kinetochore-associated protein 2 (SKA2), and Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes were tested for association with suicidal behavior and MDD in a live (N = 277) and a postmortem sample (N = 209). RNA-seq was used to examine gene and isoform-level brain expression postmortem (Brodmann Area 9; N = 59). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) relationships were examined using a public database (UK Brain Expression Consortium). We identified a haplotype within the FKBP5 gene, present in 47% of the live subjects, which was associated with increased risk of suicide attempt (OR = 1.58, t = 6.03, P = .014). Six SNPs on this gene, three SNPs on SKA2, and one near NR3C1 showed before-adjustment association with attempted suicide, and two SNPs of SKA2 with suicide death, but none stayed significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Only the SKA2 SNPs were related to expression in the prefrontal cortex (pFCTX). One NR3C1 transcript had lower expression in suicide relative to nonsuicide sudden death cases (b = -0.48, SE = 0.12, t = -4.02, adjusted P = .004). We have identified an association of FKBP5 haplotype with risk of suicide attempt and found an association between suicide and altered NR3C1 gene expression in the pFCTX. Our findings further implicate hypothalamic pituitary axis dysfunction in suicidal behavior. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fructose, Glucocorticoids and Adipose Tissue: Implications for the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Legeza, Balázs; Marcolongo, Paola; Gamberucci, Alessandra; Varga, Viola; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angiolo; Odermatt, Alex

    2017-04-26

    The modern Western society lifestyle is characterized by a hyperenergetic, high sugar containing food intake. Sugar intake increased dramatically during the last few decades, due to the excessive consumption of high-sugar drinks and high-fructose corn syrup. Current evidence suggests that high fructose intake when combined with overeating and adiposity promotes adverse metabolic health effects including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and inflammation. Similarly, elevated glucocorticoid levels, especially the enhanced generation of active glucocorticoids in the adipose tissue due to increased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) activity, have been associated with metabolic diseases. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that fructose stimulates the 11β-HSD1-mediated glucocorticoid activation by enhancing the availability of its cofactor NADPH. In adipocytes, fructose was found to stimulate 11β-HSD1 expression and activity, thereby promoting the adipogenic effects of glucocorticoids. This article aims to highlight the interconnections between overwhelmed fructose metabolism, intracellular glucocorticoid activation in adipose tissue, and their metabolic effects on the progression of the metabolic syndrome.

  19. Prednisolone-induced differential gene expression in mouse liver carrying wild type or a dimerization-defective glucocorticoid receptor

    Dokter Wim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids (GCs control expression of a large number of genes via binding to the GC receptor (GR. Transcription may be regulated either by binding of the GR dimer to DNA regulatory elements or by protein-protein interactions of GR monomers with other transcription factors. Although the type of regulation for a number of individual target genes is known, the relative contribution of both mechanisms to the regulation of the entire transcriptional program remains elusive. To study the importance of GR dimerization in the regulation of gene expression, we performed gene expression profiling of livers of prednisolone-treated wild type (WT and mice that have lost the ability to form GR dimers (GRdim. Results The GR target genes identified in WT mice were predominantly related to glucose metabolism, the cell cycle, apoptosis and inflammation. In GRdim mice, the level of prednisolone-induced gene expression was significantly reduced compared to WT, but not completely absent. Interestingly, for a set of genes, involved in cell cycle and apoptosis processes and strongly related to Foxo3a and p53, induction by prednisolone was completely abolished in GRdim mice. In contrast, glucose metabolism-related genes were still modestly upregulated in GRdim mice upon prednisolone treatment. Finally, we identified several novel GC-inducible genes from which Fam107a, a putative histone acetyltransferase complex interacting protein, was most strongly dependent on GR dimerization. Conclusions This study on prednisolone-induced effects in livers of WT and GRdim mice identified a number of interesting candidate genes and pathways regulated by GR dimers and sheds new light onto the complex transcriptional regulation of liver function by GCs.

  20. DNA sequence of 15 base pairs is sufficient to mediate both glucocorticoid and progesterone induction of gene expression

    Straehle, U.; Klock, G.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-01-01

    To define the recognition sequence of the glucocorticoid receptor and its relationship with that of the progesterone receptor, oligonucleotides derived from the glucocorticoid response element of the tyrosine aminotransferase gene were tested upstream of a heterologous promoter for their capacity to mediate effects of these two steroids. The authors show that a 15-base-pair sequence with partial symmetry is sufficient to confer glucocorticoid inducibility on the promoter of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. The same 15-base-pair sequence mediates induction by progesterone. Point mutations in the recognition sequence affect inducibility by glucocorticoids and progesterone similarly. Together with the strong conservation of the sequence of the DNA-binding domain of the two receptors, these data suggest that both proteins recognize a sequence that is similar, if not the same

  1. Spatial and temporal expression of glucocorticoid, retinoid, and thyroid hormone receptors is not altered in lungs of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Rajatapiti, Prapapan; Keijzer, Richard; Blommaart, Pietjan E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Visser, Theo J.; Tibboel, Dick; Rottier, Robbert

    2006-01-01

    The degree of associated pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension are major determination factors for survival in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) patients. Glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, and vitamin A have been shown to be involved in human lung development. To determine

  2. Expression profiling associates blood and brain glucocorticoid receptor signaling with trauma-related individual differences in both sexes.

    Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; Cohen, Hagit; Cai, Guiqing; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-09-16

    Delineating the molecular basis of individual differences in the stress response is critical to understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this study, 7 d after predator-scent-stress (PSS) exposure, male and female rats were classified into vulnerable (i.e., "PTSD-like") and resilient (i.e., minimally affected) phenotypes on the basis of their performance on a variety of behavioral measures. Genome-wide expression profiling in blood and two limbic brain regions (amygdala and hippocampus), followed by quantitative PCR validation, was performed in these two groups of animals, as well as in an unexposed control group. Differentially expressed genes were identified in blood and brain associated with PSS-exposure and with distinct behavioral profiles postexposure. There was a small but significant between-tissue overlap (4-21%) for the genes associated with exposure-related individual differences, indicating convergent gene expression in both sexes. To uncover convergent signaling pathways across tissue and sex, upstream activated/deactivated transcription factors were first predicted for each tissue and then the respective pathways were identified. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling was the only convergent pathway associated with individual differences when using the most stringent statistical threshold. Corticosterone treatment 1 h after PSS-exposure prevented anxiety and hyperarousal 7 d later in both sexes, confirming the GR involvement in the PSS behavioral response. In conclusion, genes and pathways associated with extreme differences in the traumatic stress behavioral response can be distinguished from those associated with trauma exposure. Blood-based biomarkers can predict aspects of brain signaling. GR signaling is a convergent signaling pathway, associated with trauma-related individual differences in both sexes.

  3. Mechanical stimulation increases proliferation, differentiation and protein expression in culture

    Grossi, Alberto; Yadav, Kavita; Lawson, Moira Ann

    2007-01-01

    Myogenesis is a complex sequence of events, including the irreversible transition from the proliferation-competent myoblast stage into fused, multinucleated myotubes. Myogenic differentiation is regulated by positive and negative signals from surrounding tissues. Stimulation due to stretch- or load...... to elucidate also the signaling pathway by which this mechanical stimulation can causes an increase in protein expression. When mechanically stimulated via laminin receptors on cell surface, C(2)C(12) cells showed an increase in cell proliferation and differentiation. Populations undergoing mechanical...... stimulation through laminin receptors show an increase in expression of Myo-D, myogenin and an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Cells stimulated via fibronectin receptors show no significant increases in fusion competence. We conclude that load induced signalling through integrin containing laminin...

  4. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Gulliver, Linda S M

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  5. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Gulliver, Linda S M, E-mail: linda.gulliver@otago.ac.nz

    2017-03-15

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  6. Glucocorticoid control of rat growth hormone gene expression: Effect on cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleic acid production and degradation

    Gertz, B.J.; Gardner, D.G.; Baxter, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone on the production and degradation of rat GH (rGH) cytoplasmic mRNA was studied in cultured rat pituitary tumor (GC) cells. The incorporation of [3H]uridine into both rGH cytoplasmic mRNA and the pyrimidine nucleotide precursor pool was determined in hormone-treated and control cells. From these measurements glucocorticoid effects on absolute production rates of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA were determined and compared to effects on rGH mRNA accumulation. Rat GH mRNA half-life was then calculated based on a first-order decay model. Rat GH mRNA half-life was also directly assayed by: (1) pulse-chase studies and (2) measuring the kinetics of decay of rGH mRNA in cells after transfer from serum-containing to hormone-deficient media. From these independent analyses rGH mRNA half-life estimates ranged from 28-55 h in different experiments. Within individual experiments there was little variability of rGH mRNA decay rates; glucocorticoids were found not to alter the stability of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA. Glucocorticoid induction of rGH cytoplasmic mRNA accumulation was accounted for solely on the basis of increased mRNA production

  7. Adult hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression and dentate synaptic plasticity correlate with maternal care received by individuals early in life

    van Hasselt, F.N.; Cornelisse, S.; Zhang, T.Y.; Meaney, M.J.; Velzing, E.H.; Krugers, H.J.; Joëls, M.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal care in mammals is the prevailing environmental influence during perinatal development. The adult rat offspring of mothers exhibiting increased levels of pup licking/grooming (LG; High LG mothers), compared to those reared by Low LG dams, show increased hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor

  8. C2C12 myotubes inhibit the proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by reducing the expression of glucocorticoid receptor gene

    Chu, Weiwei; Wei, Wei; Yu, Shigang; Han, Haiyin; Shi, Xiaoli [College of Animal Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Sun, Wenxing [College of Animal Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); College of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong 226019 (China); Gao, Ying [College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Zhang, Lifan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Chen, Jie, E-mail: jiechen@njau.edu.cn [College of Animal Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2016-03-25

    Obesity is a well-established risk factor to health for its relationship with insulin resistance, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Myocyte-adipocyte crosstalk model plays a significant role in studying the interaction of muscle and adipose development. Previous related studies mainly focus on the effects of adipocytes on the myocytes activity, however, the influence of myotubes on the preadipocytes development remains unclear. The present study was carried out to settle this issue. Firstly, the co-culture experiment showed that the proliferation, cell cycle, and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were arrested, and the apoptosis was induced, by differentiated C2C12 myotubes. Next, the sensitivity of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes to glucocorticoids (GCs), which was well known as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis factor, was decreased after co-cultured with C2C12 myotubes. What's more, our results showed that C2C12 myotubes suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, indicating the potential mechanism of GCs sensitivity reduction. Taken together, we conclude that C2C12 myotubes inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocytes proliferation and differentiation by reducing the expression of GR. These data suggest that decreasing GR by administration of myokines may be a promising therapy for treating patients with obesity or diabetes. - Highlights: • C2C12 myotubes inhibited proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • C2C12 myotubes arrested cell cycle of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • C2C12 myotubes induced apoptosis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • C2C12 inhibit 3T3-L1 cells by reducing the expression of glucocorticoid receptor gene.

  9. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    Kim, Gukhan [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Won [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seon [Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung-Whan, E-mail: swkim7@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. {yields} Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. {yields} SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. {yields} This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  10. NALP3 inflammasome up-regulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor causes glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    Paugh, Steven W.; Bonten, Erik J.; Savic, Daniel; Ramsey, Laura B.; Thierfelder, William E.; Gurung, Prajwal; Malireddi, R. K. Subbarao; Actis, Marcelo; Mayasundari, Anand; Min, Jaeki; Coss, David R.; Laudermilk, Lucas T.; Panetta, John C.; McCorkle, J. Robert; Fan, Yiping; Crews, Kristine R.; Stocco, Gabriele; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Wenjian; Karol, Seth E.; Fernandez, Christian A.; Diouf, Barthelemy; Smith, Colton; Hicks, J. Kevin; Zanut, Alessandra; Giordanengo, Audrey; Crona, Daniel; Bianchi, Joy J.; Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G.; den Boer, Monique L.; Pieters, Rob; Jeha, Sima; Dunwell, Thomas L.; Latif, Farida; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Myers, Richard M.; Guy, R. Kiplin; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and leukemia cell resistant to glucocorticoids confers a poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the sensitivity to prednisolone of primary leukemia cells from 444 newly diagnosed ALL patients, revealing significantly higher expression of caspase 1 (CASP1) and its activator NLRP3 in glucocorticoid resistant leukemia cells, due to significantly lower somatic methylation of CASP1 and NLRP3 promoters. Over-expression of CASP1 resulted in cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor, diminished glucocorticoid-induced transcriptional response and increased glucocorticoid resistance. Knockdown or inhibition of CASP1 significantly increased glucocorticoid receptor levels and mitigated glucocorticoid resistance in CASP1 overexpressing ALL. Our findings establish a new mechanism by which the NLRP3/CASP1 inflammasome modulates cellular levels of the glucocorticoid receptor and diminishes cell sensitivity to glucocorticoids. The broad impact on glucocorticoid transcriptional response suggests this mechanism could also modify glucocorticoid effects in other diseases. PMID:25938942

  11. Myostatin Suppression of Akirin1 Mediates Glucocorticoid-Induced Satellite Cell Dysfunction

    Dong, Yanjun; Pan, Jenny S.; Zhang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids production is increased in many pathological conditions that are associated with muscle loss, but their role in causing muscle wasting is not fully understood. We have demonstrated a new mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy: Dexamethasone (Dex) suppresses satellite cell function contributing to the development of muscle atrophy. Specifically, we found that Dex decreases satellite cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism involved Dex-induced upregulation of myostatin and suppression of Akirin1, a promyogenic gene. When myostatin was inhibited in Dex-treated mice, Akirin1 expression increased as did satellite cell activity, muscle regeneration and muscle growth. In addition, silencing myostatin in myoblasts or satellite cells prevented Dex from suppressing Akirin1 expression and cellular proliferation and differentiation. Finally, overexpression of Akirin1 in myoblasts increased their expression of MyoD and myogenin and improved cellular proliferation and differentiation, theses improvements were no longer suppressed by Dex. We conclude that glucocorticoids stimulate myostatin which inhibits Akirin1 expression and the reparative functions of satellite cells. These responses attribute to muscle atrophy. Thus, inhibition of myostatin or increasing Akirin1 expression could lead to therapeutic strategies for improving satellite cell activation and enhancing muscle growth in diseases associated with increased glucocorticoid production. PMID:23516508

  12. Myostatin suppression of Akirin1 mediates glucocorticoid-induced satellite cell dysfunction.

    Yanjun Dong

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids production is increased in many pathological conditions that are associated with muscle loss, but their role in causing muscle wasting is not fully understood. We have demonstrated a new mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy: Dexamethasone (Dex suppresses satellite cell function contributing to the development of muscle atrophy. Specifically, we found that Dex decreases satellite cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism involved Dex-induced upregulation of myostatin and suppression of Akirin1, a promyogenic gene. When myostatin was inhibited in Dex-treated mice, Akirin1 expression increased as did satellite cell activity, muscle regeneration and muscle growth. In addition, silencing myostatin in myoblasts or satellite cells prevented Dex from suppressing Akirin1 expression and cellular proliferation and differentiation. Finally, overexpression of Akirin1 in myoblasts increased their expression of MyoD and myogenin and improved cellular proliferation and differentiation, theses improvements were no longer suppressed by Dex. We conclude that glucocorticoids stimulate myostatin which inhibits Akirin1 expression and the reparative functions of satellite cells. These responses attribute to muscle atrophy. Thus, inhibition of myostatin or increasing Akirin1 expression could lead to therapeutic strategies for improving satellite cell activation and enhancing muscle growth in diseases associated with increased glucocorticoid production.

  13. Neonatal immune responses to TLR2 stimulation: Influence of maternal atopy on Foxp3 and IL-10 expression

    Gold Diane R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal atopic background and stimulation of the adaptive immune system with allergen interact in the development of allergic disease. Stimulation of the innate immune system through microbial exposure, such as activation of the innate Toll-like-receptor 2 (TLR2, may reduce the development of allergy in childhood. However, little is known about the immunological effects of microbial stimulation on early immune responses and in association with maternal atopy. Methods We analyzed immune responses of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC from 50 healthy neonates (31 non-atopic and 19 atopic mothers. Cells were stimulated with the TLR2 agonist peptidoglycan (Ppg or the allergen house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae (Derf1, and results compared to unstimulated cells. We analyzed lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine secretion of CBMC. In addition, we assessed gene expression associated with T regulatory cells including the transcription factor Foxp3, the glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR, and the cytotoxic lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured by 3H-Thymidine uptake, cytokine concentrations determined by ELISA, mRNA expression of T cell markers by real-time RT-PCR. Results Ppg stimulation induced primarily IL-10 cytokine production, in addition to IFN-γ, IL-13 and TNF-α secretion. GITR was increased following Ppg stimulation (p = 0.07. Ppg-induced IL-10 production and induction of Foxp3 were higher in CBMC without, than with maternal atopy (p = 0.04, p = 0.049. IL-10 production was highly correlated with increased expression of Foxp3 (r = 0.53, p = 0.001, GITR (r = 0.47, p = 0.004 and CTLA4 (r = 0.49, p = 0.003, independent of maternal atopy. Conclusion TLR2 stimulation with Ppg induces IL-10 and genes associated with T regulatory cells, influenced by maternal atopy. Increased IL-10 and Foxp3 induction in CBMC of non-atopic compared to atopic mothers, may indicate an increased capacity to

  14. Identification of gene expression modifications in myostatin-stimulated myoblasts

    Yang Wei; Zhang Yong; Ma Guoda; Zhao Xinyi; Chen Yan; Zhu Dahai

    2005-01-01

    Myostatin belongs to the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and has been shown to function as an inhibitor of skeletal muscle proliferation and differentiation. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of myostatin function during myogenesis, differential display reverse transcription PCR was employed to identify altered gene expressions associated with myostatin inhibitory function in chicken fetal myoblasts (CFMs). In this work, we have identified seven up-regulated and 12 down-regulated genes in myostatin stimulated CFMs. Those genes are involved in myogenic differentiation, cell architecture, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and apoptosis. The down-regulation of muscle creatine kinase B, troponin C, and myosin regulatory light chain is in agreement with the myostatin negative role in myocyte differentiation. In addition, the expression alteration of skeletal muscle-specific cardiac ankyrin repeat protein and the bcl-2 related anti-apoptotic protein Nr-13 suggests possible unique roles for myostatin in regulating myogenesis by controlling cofactors participated transcriptional regulation and apoptosis

  15. MSX2 stimulates chondrocyte maturation by controlling Ihh expression.

    Amano, Katsuhiko; Ichida, Fumitaka; Sugita, Atsushi; Hata, Kenji; Wada, Masahiro; Takigawa, Yoko; Nakanishi, Masako; Kogo, Mikihiko; Nishimura, Riko; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2008-10-24

    Several studies indicated that a homeobox gene, Msx2, is implicated in regulation of skeletal development by controlling enchondral ossification as well as membranous ossification. However, the molecular basis by which Msx2 conducts chondrogenesis is currently unclear. In this study, we examined the role of Msx2 in chondrocyte differentiation using mouse primary chondrocytes and embryonic metatarsal explants. Treatment with BMP2 up-regulated the expression of Msx2 mRNA along with chondrocyte differentiation in murine primary chondrocytes. Overexpression of wild-type Msx2 stimulated calcification of primary chondrocytes in the presence of BMP2. We also found that constitutively active Msx2 (caMsx2) enhanced BMP2-dependent calcification more efficiently than wild-type Msx2. Consistently, caMsx2 overexpression up-regulated the expression of alkaline phosphatase and collagen type X induced by BMP2. Furthermore, organ culture experiments using mouse embryonic metatarsals indicated that caMsx2 clearly stimulated the maturation of chondrocytes into the prehypertrophic and hypertrophic stages in the presence of BMP2. In contrast, knockdown of Msx2 inhibited maturation of primary chondrocytes. The stimulatory effect of Msx2 on chondrocyte maturation was enhanced by overexpression of Smad1 and Smad4 but inhibited by Smad6, an inhibitory Smad for BMP2 signaling. These data suggest that Msx2 requires BMP2/Smad signaling for its chondrogenic action. In addition, caMsx2 overexpression induced Ihh (Indian hedgehog) expression in mouse primary chondrocytes. Importantly, treatment with cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor for hedgehogs, blocked Msx2-induced chondrogenesis. Collectively, our results indicated that Msx2 promotes the maturation of chondrocytes, at least in part, through up-regulating Ihh expression.

  16. Effort-reward-imbalance in healthy teachers is associated with higher LPS-stimulated production and lower glucocorticoid sensitivity of interleukin-6 in vitro.

    Bellingrath, Silja; Rohleder, Nicolas; Kudielka, Brigitte M

    2013-02-01

    According to the effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) model, a lack of reciprocity between costs and gains at work increases the risk for adverse health outcomes. Inflammation has been shown to play a crucial role in a variety of stress-related diseases and alterations in immune system glucocorticoid sensitivity may help to explain the increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression related to chronic work stress. Changes in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin (IL)-6 production and inhibition of IL-6 production by dexamethasone in reaction to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) were assessed in forty-six healthy school teachers to test whether chronic work stress is accompanied by alterations in inflammatory activity and glucocorticoid sensitivity of the innate immune system. High ERI was associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory potential, reflected in elevated IL-6 production before and after stress and with a lower capacity of dexamethasone to suppress IL-6 production in vitro over all measurement time points. ERI was not associated with stress-related changes in GC sensitivity. The present findings suggest a less effective anti-inflammatory regulation by glucocorticoids in teachers suffering from chronic work stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship of glucocorticoid receptor expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the cochlea of guinea pigs and effects of dexamethasone administration.

    Ling Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoids (GCs are widely used to treat sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL and significantly improve hearing. However, GC insensitivity has been observed in some patients of SSNHL. OBJECTIVE: To study the correlation between GR expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and in the cochlea of guinea pigs at mRNA and protein levels. METHODS: One group of guinea pigs received dexamethasone (10 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally for 7 consecutive days (dexamethasone group, and another group of guinea pigs received normal saline (control group. Real time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the expression of GR mRNA and GR protein in PBMCs and the cochleae. RESULTS: The GR mRNA and GR protein were detected in both PBMCs and the cochlear tissue of guinea pigs. GR mRNA and GR protein levels in PBMCs were positively correlated with those in the cochlea. The expression of GR mRNA and GR protein was significantly increased in the dexamethasone group compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Levels of GR mRNA and GR protein in the PBMCs were positively correlated with those in the cochlea of guinea pigs. Systemic dexamethasone treatment can significantly up-regulate GR expression in PBMCs and in the cochlea. Measurement of the GR level in PBMCs could be used as an indicator of GR level in the cochlea.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of regulation of growth hormone gene expression in cultured rat pituitary cells by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones

    Yaffe, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In cultured GC cells, a rat pituitary tumor cell line, growth hormone [GH] is induced in a synergistic fashion by physiologic concentrations of thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones. Abundant evidence indicates that these hormones mediate this response via their specific receptors. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the mechanisms by which these hormones affect GH production. When poly (A) + RNA was isolated from cells grown both with and without hormones and translated in a cell-free wheat germ system, the preGH translation products were shown to be proportional to immunoassayable GH production under all combinations of hormonal milieux, indicating that changes in GH production is modulated at a pretranslational level. A cDNA library was constructed from poly (A) + RNA and one clone containing GH cDNA sequences was isolated. This was used to confirm the above results by Northern dot blot analysis. This probe was also used to assess hormonal effects on GH mRNA half-life and synthetic rates as well as GH gene transcription rates in isolated nuclei. Using a pulse-chase protocol in which cellular RNA was labeled in vivo with [ 3 H]uridine, and quantitating [ 3 H]GHmRNA directly by hybridization to GH cDNA bound to nitrocellulose filters, GHmRNA was found to have a half-life of approximately 50 hours, and was not significantly altered by the presence of inducing hormones

  19. Cell-Type Specific Changes in Glial Morphology and Glucocorticoid Expression During Stress and Aging in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    Thomas E. Chan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to stressors is known to produce large-scale remodeling of neurons within the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Recent work suggests stress-related forms of structural plasticity can interact with aging to drive distinct patterns of pyramidal cell morphological changes. However, little is known about how other cellular components within PFC might be affected by these challenges. Here, we examined the effects of stress exposure and aging on medial prefrontal cortical glial subpopulations. Interestingly, we found no changes in glial morphology with stress exposure but a profound morphological change with aging. Furthermore, we found an upregulation of non-nuclear glucocorticoid receptors (GR with aging, while nuclear levels remained largely unaffected. Both changes are selective for microglia, with no stress or aging effect found in astrocytes. Lastly, we show that the changes found within microglia inversely correlated with the density of dendritic spines on layer III pyramidal cells. These findings suggest microglia play a selective role in synaptic health within the aging brain.

  20. Association of suboptimal health status with psychosocial stress, plasma cortisol and mRNA expression of glucocorticoid receptor α/β in lymphocyte.

    Yan, Yu-Xiang; Dong, Jing; Liu, You-Qin; Zhang, Jie; Song, Man-Shu; He, Yan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal health status (SHS) has become a new public health challenge in China. This study investigated whether high SHS is associated with psychosocial stress, changes in cortisol level and/or glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform expression. Three-hundred eighty-six workers employed in three companies in Beijing were recruited. The SHS score was derived from data collection in the SHS questionnaire (SHSQ-25). The short standard version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) was used to assess job-related psychosocial stress. The mean value of the five scales of COPSOQ and distribution of plasma cortisol and mRNA expression of GRα/GRβ between the high level of SHS group and the low level of SHS group were compared using a general linear model procedure. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to analyze the effect of psychosocial stress on SHS. We identified three factors that were predictive of SHS, including "demands at work", "interpersonal relations and leadership" and "insecurity at work". Significantly higher levels of plasma cortisol and GRβ/GRα mRNA ratio were observed among the high SHS group. High level of SHS is associated with decreased mRNA expression of GRα. This study confirmed the association between chronic psychosocial stress and SHS, indicating that improving the psychosocial work environment may reduce SHS and then prevent chronic diseases effectively.

  1. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Expression of Immediate Early Genes (IEG’s)

    2015-12-01

    TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION OF EXPRESSION OF IMMEDIATE EARLY GENES (IEG’S) Jessica...AND SUBTITLE Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Expression of Immediate Early Genes (IEG’s) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b...community in better understanding what is occurring biologically during tDCS. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Transcranial direct current stimulation

  2. Reduced peripheral expression of the glucocorticoid receptor α isoform in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder: a cumulative effect of trauma burden.

    Gola, Hannah; Engler, Andrea; Morath, Julia; Adenauer, Hannah; Elbert, Thomas; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Engler, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious psychiatric condition that was found to be associated with altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and changes in glucocorticoid (GC) responsiveness. The physiological actions of GCs are primarily mediated through GC receptors (GR) of which isoforms with different biological activities exist. This study aimed to investigate whether trauma-experience and/or PTSD are associated with altered expression of GR splice variants. GRα and GRβ mRNA expression levels were determined by real-time quantitative PCR in whole blood samples of individuals with chronic and severe forms of PTSD (n = 42) as well as in ethnically matched reference subjects (non-PTSD, n = 35). Individuals suffering from PTSD exhibited significantly lower expression of the predominant and functionally active GRα isoform compared to non-PTSD subjects. This effect remained significant when accounting for gender, smoking, psychotropic medication or comorbid depression. Moreover, the GRα expression level was significantly negatively correlated with the number of traumatic event types experienced, both in the whole sample and within the PTSD patient group. Expression of the less abundant and non-ligand binding GRβ isoform was comparable between patient and reference groups. Reduced expression of the functionally active GRα isoform in peripheral blood cells of individuals with PTSD seems to be a cumulative effect of trauma burden rather than a specific feature of PTSD since non-PTSD subjects with high trauma load showed an intermediate phenotype between PTSD patients and individuals with no or few traumatic experiences.

  3. Reduced peripheral expression of the glucocorticoid receptor α isoform in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder: a cumulative effect of trauma burden.

    Hannah Gola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a serious psychiatric condition that was found to be associated with altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and changes in glucocorticoid (GC responsiveness. The physiological actions of GCs are primarily mediated through GC receptors (GR of which isoforms with different biological activities exist. This study aimed to investigate whether trauma-experience and/or PTSD are associated with altered expression of GR splice variants. METHODS: GRα and GRβ mRNA expression levels were determined by real-time quantitative PCR in whole blood samples of individuals with chronic and severe forms of PTSD (n = 42 as well as in ethnically matched reference subjects (non-PTSD, n = 35. RESULTS: Individuals suffering from PTSD exhibited significantly lower expression of the predominant and functionally active GRα isoform compared to non-PTSD subjects. This effect remained significant when accounting for gender, smoking, psychotropic medication or comorbid depression. Moreover, the GRα expression level was significantly negatively correlated with the number of traumatic event types experienced, both in the whole sample and within the PTSD patient group. Expression of the less abundant and non-ligand binding GRβ isoform was comparable between patient and reference groups. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced expression of the functionally active GRα isoform in peripheral blood cells of individuals with PTSD seems to be a cumulative effect of trauma burden rather than a specific feature of PTSD since non-PTSD subjects with high trauma load showed an intermediate phenotype between PTSD patients and individuals with no or few traumatic experiences.

  4. Expression, regulation and function of phosphofructo-kinase/fructose-biphosphatases (PFKFBs) in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Carlet, Michela; Kofler, Reinhard; Janjetovic, Kristina; Rainer, Johannes; Schmidt, Stefan; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Mann, Georg; Prelog, Martina; Meister, Bernhard; Ploner, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) cause apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in lymphoid cells and constitute a central component in the therapy of lymphoid malignancies, most notably childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PFKFB2 (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase-2), a kinase controlling glucose metabolism, was identified by us previously as a GC response gene in expression profiling analyses performed in children with ALL during initial systemic GC mono-therapy. Since deregulation of glucose metabolism has been implicated in apoptosis induction, this gene and its relatives, PFKFB1, 3, and 4, were further analyzed. Gene expression analyses of isolated lymphoblasts were performed on Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. GCRMA normalized microarray data were analyzed using R-Bioconductor packages version 2.5. Functional gene analyses of PFKFB2-15A and -15B isoforms were performed by conditional gene over-expression experiments in the GC-sensitive T-ALL model CCRF-CEM. Expression analyses in additional ALL children, non-leukemic individuals and leukemic cell lines confirmed frequent PFKFB2 induction by GC in most systems sensitive to GC-induced apoptosis, particularly T-ALL cells. The 3 other family members, in contrast, were either absent or only weakly expressed (PFKFB1 and 4) or not induced by GC (PFKFB3). Conditional PFKFB2 over-expression in the CCRF-CEM T-ALL in vitro model revealed that its 2 splice variants (PFKFB2-15A and PFKFB2-15B) had no detectable effect on cell survival. Moreover, neither PFKFB2 splice variant significantly affected sensitivity to, or kinetics of, GC-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that, at least in the model system investigated, PFKFB2 is not an essential upstream regulator of the anti-leukemic effects of GC

  5. Modifications of glucocorticoid receptors mRNA expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to early-life stress in female Japanese quail.

    Zimmer, C; Spencer, K A

    2014-12-01

    Stress exposure during early-life development can programme individual brain and physiology. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is one of the primary targets of this programming, which is generally associated with a hyperactive HPA axis, indicative of a reduced negative-feedback. This reduced feedback efficiency usually results from a reduced level of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and/or the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) within the HPA axis. However, a few studies have shown that early-life stress exposure results in an attenuated physiological stress response, suggesting an enhance feedback efficiency. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether early-life stress had long-term consequences on GR and MR levels in quail and whether the effects on the physiological response to acute stress observed in prenatally stressed individuals were underpinned by changes in GR and/or MR levels in one or more HPA axis components. We determined GR and MR mRNA expression in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and pituitary gland in quail exposed to elevated corticosterone during prenatal development, postnatal development, or both, and in control individuals exposed to none of the stressors. We showed that prenatal stress increased the GR:MR ratio in the hippocampus, GR and MR expression in the hypothalamus and GR expression in the pituitary gland. Postnatal stress resulted in a reduced MR expression in the hippocampus. Both early-life treatments permanently affected the expression of both receptor types in HPA axis regions. The effects of prenatal stress are in accordance with a more efficient negative-feedback within the HPA axis and thus can explain the attenuated stress response observed in these birds. Therefore, these changes in receptor density or number as a consequence of early-life stress exposure might be the mechanism that allows an adaptive response to later-life stressful conditions. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology published by

  6. Membrane-Associated Effects of Glucocorticoid on BACE1 Upregulation and Aβ Generation: Involvement of Lipid Raft-Mediated CREB Activation.

    Choi, Gee Euhn; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Ko, So Hee; Chae, Chang Woo; Han, Ho Jae

    2017-08-30

    Glucocorticoid has been widely accepted to induce Alzheimer's disease, but the nongenomic effect of glucocorticoid on amyloid β (Aβ) generation has yet to be studied. Here, we investigated the effect of the nongenomic pathway induced by glucocorticoid on amyloid precursor protein processing enzymes as well as Aβ production using male ICR mice and human neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells. Mice groups exposed to restraint stress or intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ showed impaired cognition, decreased intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR) level, but elevated level of membrane GR (mGR). In this respect, we identified the mGR-dependent pathway evoked by glucocorticoid using impermeable cortisol conjugated to BSA (cortisol-BSA) on SK-N-MC cells. Cortisol-BSA augmented the expression of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the level of C-terminal fragment β of amyloid precursor protein (C99) and Aβ production, which were maintained even after blocking intracellular GR. We also found that cortisol-BSA enhanced the interaction between mGR and Gαs, which colocalized in the lipid raft. The subsequently activated CREB by cortisol-BSA bound to the CRE site of the BACE1 promoter increasing its expression, which was downregulated by inhibiting CBP. Consistently, blocking CBP attenuated cognitive impairment and Aβ production induced by corticosterone treatment or intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ more efficiently than inhibiting intracellular GR in mice. In conclusion, glucocorticoid couples mGR with Gαs and triggers cAMP-PKA-CREB axis dependent on the lipid raft to stimulate BACE1 upregulation and Aβ generation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been growing sharply and stress is considered as the major environment factor of AD. Glucocorticoid is the primarily responsive factor to stress and is widely known to induce AD. However, most AD patients usually have impaired genomic pathway of glucocorticoid

  7. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    Teodorov, E.; Ferrari, M.F.R.; Fior-Chadi, D.R.; Camarini, R.; Felício, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  8. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    Teodorov, E. [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferrari, M.F.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fior-Chadi, D.R. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Camarini, R. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Felício, L.F. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  9. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    E. Teodorov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05 because a lower percentage of kappa group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05 and lactating female rats (P < 0.01, with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in

  10. Cryptochrome 2 expression level is critical for adrenocorticotropin stimulation of cortisol production in the capuchin monkey adrenal.

    Torres-Farfan, C; Abarzua-Catalan, L; Valenzuela, F J; Mendez, N; Richter, H G; Valenzuela, G J; Serón-Ferré, M

    2009-06-01

    Timely production of glucocorticoid hormones in response to ACTH is essential for survival by coordinating energy intake and expenditure and acting as homeostatic regulators against stress. Adrenal cortisol response to ACTH is clock time dependent, suggesting that an intrinsic circadian oscillator in the adrenal cortex contributes to modulate the response to ACTH. Circadian clock gene expression has been reported in the adrenal cortex of several species. However, there are no reports accounting for potential involvement of adrenal clock proteins on cortisol response to ACTH. Here we explored whether the clock protein cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) knockdown modifies the adrenal response to ACTH in a primate. Adrenal gland explants from adult capuchin monkey (n = 5) were preincubated for 6 h with transfection vehicle (control) or with two different Cry2 antisense and sense probes followed by 48 h incubation in medium alone (no ACTH) or with 100 nm ACTH. Under control and sense conditions, ACTH increased cortisol production, whereas CRY2 suppression inhibited ACTH-stimulated cortisol production. Expression of the steroidogenic enzymes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase at 48 h of incubation was increased by ACTH in control explants and suppressed by Cry2 knockdown. Additionally, we found that Cry2 knockdown decreased the expression of the clock gene brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein (Bmal1) at the mRNA and protein levels. Altogether these results strongly support that the clock protein CRY2 is involved in the mechanism by which ACTH increases the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Thus, adequate expression levels of components of the adrenal circadian clock are required for an appropriate cortisol response to ACTH.

  11. Quantitative expression of osteopontin in nasal mucosa of patients with allergic rhinitis: effects of pollen exposure and nasal glucocorticoid treatment

    O'Neil Serena E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional cytokine that has been primarily investigated in Th1 diseases. Recently, it has also been implicated in Th2-mediated allergic diseases, such as asthma. The expression of OPN in allergic rhinitis (AR is currently unknown, as is the effect of intranasal glucocorticosteroids (GCs on that expression. Methods Subjects with AR were randomised to receive treatment with fluticasone propionate (FP (n = 12 or a placebo (n = 16 over the grass pollen season and nasal biopsies were taken prior to, and during the season. OPN expression in the nasal mucosa was examined with immunohistochemistry. Healthy non-AR controls (n = 5 were used as a comparator. Results OPN expression was detected in epithelial cells, subepithelial infiltrating/inflammatory cells and cells lining the vessels and glands of all subjects. Comparison of the pre- and peak-pollen season biopsy sections in placebo treated patients revealed no increase in OPN expression during the grass pollen season (5.7% vs 6.4%. Treatment with a local glucocorticosteroid did not alter the expression of OPN during pollen exposure (6.2% vs 6.7%. Conclusion OPN has been increasingly associated with the pathogenesis of various Th2-mediated diseases. However, our finding that the OPN expression in the nasal mucosa of AR patients is not significantly affected by allergen exposure and is comparable to that of the healthy controls, suggests that intracellular OPN is not directly involved in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis.

  12. The effect of pre-eclampsia-like syndrome induced by L-NAME on learning and memory and hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression: A rat model.

    Zhu, Hao; Zhu, Weimin; Hu, Rong; Wang, Huijun; Ma, Duan; Li, Xiaotian

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to study the impacts of pre-eclampsia on the cognitive and learning capabilities of adolescent rat offspring and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms at the molecular level. Pregnant rats were subcutaneously injected with saline solution (control) (n = 16) or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (n = 16) from the 13th day of gestation until parturition. The brain tissues from fetal rats delivered by cesarean section were examined in both groups with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Rats born vaginally in both groups were subjected to the Morris water maze test when 8-week-old and their hippocampi were analyzed for glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. A pre-eclampsia-like model was successfully built in pregnant rats by infusion of the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME, including phenotypes as maternal hypertension and proteinuria, high stillbirth rate, and fetal growth retardation. Neuroepithelial cell proliferation was found in the hippocampus of fetal rats in the L-NAME group. Grown to 8-week-old, the L-NAME group showed significantly longer escape latency than the control group in the beginning as well as in the end of navigation trials. At the same time, the swimming distance achieved by the L-NAME group was significantly longer than that of the control group. Such differences in cognitive and learning capabilities between the two groups were not gender dependent. Besides, the 8-week-old rats in the L-NAME group had increased GR expression in the hippocampus than the control group. Pre-eclampsia would impair cognitive and learning capabilities in adolescent offspring, and the upregulated expression of hippocampal GR may be involved in the underlying mechanisms.

  13. Cytochrome P450 3A expression and activity in the rabbit lacrimal gland: glucocorticoid modulation and the impact on androgen metabolism.

    Attar, Mayssa; Ling, Kah-Hiing John; Tang-Liu, Diane D-S; Neamati, Nouri; Lee, Vincent H L

    2005-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) is an enzyme of paramount importance to drug metabolism. The expression and activity of CYP3A, an enzyme responsible for active androgen clearance, was investigated in the rabbit lacrimal gland. Analysis of CYP3A expression and activity was performed on lacrimal gland tissues obtained from naïve untreated and treated New Zealand White rabbits. For 5 days, treated rabbits received daily administration of vehicle or 0.1% or 1.0% dexamethasone, in the lower cul-de-sac of each eye. Changes in mRNA expression were monitored by real-time RT-PCR. Protein expression was confirmed by Western blot. Functional activity was measured by monitoring the metabolism of CYP3A probe substrates-namely, 7-benzyloxyquinoline (BQ) and [3H]testosterone. Cytochrome P450 heme protein was detected at a concentration of 44.6 picomoles/mg protein, along with its redox partner NADPH reductase and specifically CYP3A6 in the naïve rabbit lacrimal gland. Genes encoding CYP3A6, in addition to the pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) were expressed in the untreated tissue. BQ dealkylation was measured in the naïve rabbit lacrimal gland at a rate of 14 +/- 7 picomoles/mg protein per minute. Changes in CYP3A6, P-gp, and androgen receptor mRNA expression levels were detected after dexamethasone treatment. In addition, dexamethasone treatment resulted in significant increases in BQ dealkylation and CYP3A6-mediated [3H]testosterone metabolism. Concomitant increases in CYP3A6-mediated hydroxylated testosterone metabolites were observed in the treated rabbits. Furthermore, ketoconazole, all-trans retinoic acid, and cyclosporine inhibited CYP3A6 mediated [3H]testosterone 6beta hydroxylation in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC50 ranging from 3.73 to 435 microM. The results demonstrate, for the first time, the expression and activity of CYP3A6 in the rabbit lacrimal gland. In addition, this pathway was shown to be subject to modulation by a commonly

  14. [Glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis].

    Anić, Branimir; Mayer, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis most often develops due to glucocorticoid therapy. Glucocorticoids affect all stages of the bone remodeling cycle, its formation and resorption. Osteoblasts are primarily affected, decreasing their activity and enhancing apoptosis. Patients treated with glucocorticoids have lower bone mineral density and increased fracture risk. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis can be prevented by administering the minimal effective dose of glucocorticoids, calcium and vitamin D supplementation or, if possible, by hormone replace- ment therapy. Moreover, appropriate physical activity should be encouraged. Patients who are at higher risk for low-energy fractures (for example post-menopausal women) have to be actively treated, usually with antiresorptive drugs among which bisphosphonates are currently the first line therapy.

  15. Immunoprofiling of human uterine mast cells identifies three phenotypes and expression of ERβ and glucocorticoid receptor [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Bianca De Leo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human mast cells (MCs are long-lived tissue-resident immune cells characterised by granules containing the proteases chymase and/or tryptase. Their phenotype is modulated by their tissue microenvironment. The human uterus has an outer muscular layer (the myometrium surrounding the endometrium, both of which play an important role in supporting a pregnancy. The endometrium is a sex steroid target tissue consisting of epithelial cells (luminal, glandular surrounded by a multicellular stroma, with the latter containing an extensive vascular compartment as well as fluctuating populations of immune cells that play an important role in regulating tissue function. The role of MCs in the human uterus is poorly understood with little known about their regulation or the impact of steroids on their differentiation status. The current study had two aims: 1 To investigate the spatial and temporal location of uterine MCs and determine their phenotype; 2 To determine whether MCs express receptors for steroids implicated in uterine function, including oestrogen (ERα, ERβ, progesterone (PR and glucocorticoids (GR. Methods: Tissue samples from women (n=46 were used for RNA extraction or fixed for immunohistochemistry. Results: Messenger RNAs encoded by TPSAB1 (tryptase and CMA1 (chymase were detected in endometrial tissue homogenates. Immunohistochemistry revealed the relative abundance of tryptase MCs was myometrium>basal endometrium>functional endometrium. We show for the first time that uterine MCs are predominantly of the classical MC subtypes: (positive, +; negative, - tryptase+/chymase- and tryptase+/chymase+, but a third subtype was also identified (tryptase-/chymase+. Tryptase+ MCs were of an ERβ+/ERα-/PR-/GR+ phenotype mirroring other uterine immune cell populations, including natural killer cells. Conclusions: Endometrial tissue resident immune MCs have three protease-specific phenotypes. Expression of both ERβ and GR in MCs mirrors

  16. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 2: Mechanisms.

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    The lifelong health of an individual is shaped during critical periods of development. The fetus is particularly susceptible to internal and external stimuli, many of which can alter developmental trajectories and subsequent susceptibility to disease. Glucocorticoids are critical in normal development of the fetus, as they are involved in the growth and maturation of many organ systems. The surge in fetal glucocorticoid levels that occurs in most mammalian species over the last few days of pregnancy is an important developmental switch leading to fundamental changes in gene regulation in many organs, including the brain. These changes are important for the transition to postnatal life. Exposure of the fetus to increased levels of glucocorticoids, resulting from maternal stress or treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids, can lead to long-term 'programming' of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and behaviours. Glucocorticoids act at multiple levels within the fetal brain. Growing evidence indicates that they can exert powerful effects on the epigenome, including on DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA, to influence gene expression. Such influences probably represent a critical component of the 'programming' process, and might be partly responsible for the transgenerational effects of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure on neurologic, cardiovascular and metabolic function.

  17. Adrenal Insufficiency Caused by Locally Applied Glucocorticoids-Myth or Fact?

    Dinsen, Stina; Klose, Marianne; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Case-reports have made it evident that both inhaled, percutaneous, intranasal, intraarticular and ophthalmic administered glucocorticoids have the potential to cause life threatening adrenal insufficiency. With few and sometimes conflicting data and study methodology the prevalence of adrenal...... insufficiency secondary to locally applied glucocorticoids is not clear. Adrenal insufficiency can only be correctly evaluated by a stimulation test, and has by this procedure been reported in up to 40-50% of patients treated with high-dose inhaled glucocorticoids. Medium- to low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids...... have been shown to cause adrenal suppression in 0-16% of patients. Glucocorticoid creams and nasal glucocorticoids can cause adrenal insufficiency, also when used within prescribed doses, but the frequency seems to be less than with inhaled glucocorticoids. Intraarticularly administered glucocorticoids...

  18. Maternal separation in early life modifies anxious behavior and Fos and glucocorticoid receptor expression in limbic neurons after chronic stress in rats: effects of tianeptine.

    Trujillo, Verónica; Durando, Patricia E; Suárez, Marta M

    2016-01-01

    Early-life adversity can lead to long-term consequence persisting into adulthood. Here, we assess the implications of an adverse early environment on vulnerability to stress during adulthood. We hypothesized that the interplay between early and late stress would result in a differential phenotype regarding the number of neurons immunoreactive for glucocorticoid receptor (GR-ir) and neuronal activity as assessed by Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) in brain areas related to stress responses and anxiety-like behavior. We also expected that the antidepressant tianeptine could correct some of the alterations induced in our model. Male Wistar rats were subjected to daily maternal separation (MS) for 4.5 h during the first 3 weeks of life. As adults, the rats were exposed to chronic stress for 24 d and they were treated daily with tianeptine (10 mg/kg intraperitoneal) or vehicle (isotonic saline). Fos-ir was increased by MS in all structures analyzed. Chronic stress reduced Fos-ir in the hippocampus, but increased it in the paraventricular nucleus. Furthermore, chronic stress increased GR-ir in hippocampus (CA1) and amygdala in control non-MS rats. By contrast, when MS and chronic stress were combined, GR-ir was decreased in these structures. Additionally, whereas tianeptine did not affect Fos-ir, it regulated GR-ir in a region-dependent manner, in hippocampus and amygdala opposing in some cases the stress or MS effects. Furthermore, tianeptine reversed the MS- or stress-induced anxious behavior. The interplay between MS and chronic stress observed indicates that MS rats have a modified phenotype, which is expressed when they are challenged by stress in later life.

  19. Expression of genes that encode the annexin-1 and galectin-1 proteins in nasal polyposis and their modulation by glucocorticoid

    Fernandes, Atílio Maximino; Babeto, Erica; Rahal, Paula; Provazzi, Paola Jocelan Scarin; Hidalgo, Claudia Augusta; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T

    2010-01-01

    A fisiopatologia da polipose rinossinusal não é totalmente compreendida, apesar de várias hipóteses em relação ao seu processo inflamatório. OBJETIVOS: Estudo prospectivo da expressão dos genes das proteínas, anexina-1 e a galectina-1, que têm ação anti-inflamatória, e sua modulação pelo glicocorticoide. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Onze pacientes portadores de polipose rinossinusal tiveram biopsiados seus pólipos em dois momentos: na ausência de glicocorticoide sistêmico, e na sua presença. Nas duas ...

  20. New insights into the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced avascular necrosis: microarray analysis of gene expression in a rat model

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) occurs variably after exposure to corticosteroids. Microvascular thrombosis is a common pathological finding. Since systemic thrombophilia is only weakly linked with ANFH, we propose that microvascular vessel pathology may be more related to local endothelial dysfunction and femoral head apoptosis. Corticosteroid effects on the endothelium and resultant apoptosis have been reported. We hypothesize that corticosteroids contribute to a differential gene expression in the femoral head in rats with early ANFH. Methods Besides bone marrow necrosis, which is a common sign in ANFH and reported in the early stages, we include the presence of apoptosis in this study as a criterion for diagnosing early disease. Forty Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were randomized to either a corticosteroid-treated group or an age-matched control group for six months. After sacrifice, the femoral heads were examined for ANFH. Total mRNA was extracted from femoral heads. Affymetrix exon array (Santa Clara, CA, USA) was performed on 15 selected RNA samples. Validation methods included RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results Although rat exon array demonstrated a significant upregulation of 51 genes (corticosteroid(+)/ANFH(+) VS control), alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M) gene was particularly over-expressed. Results were validated by RT-PCR and IHC. Importantly, A2M is known to share vascular, osteogenic and cartilage functions relevant for ANFH. Conclusions The findings suggest that corticosteroid-induced ANFH in rats might be mediated by A2M. Investigation of A2M as a potential marker, and a treatment target, for early ANFH should be carried out. PMID:20579363

  1. Retinal expression, regulation, and functional bioactivity of prostacyclin-stimulating factor

    Hata, Yasuaki; Clermont, Allen Charles; Yamauchi, Teruaki; Pierce, Eric Adam; Suzuma, Izumi; Kagokawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Robinson, Gregory S.; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Hashimoto, Toshihiko; Umeda, Fumio; Bursell, Sven E.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul

    2000-01-01

    Prostacyclin-stimulating factor (PSF) acts on vascular endothelial cells to stimulate the synthesis of the vasodilatory molecule prostacyclin (PGI2). We have examined the expression, regulation, and hemodynamic bioactivity of PSF both in whole retina and in cultured cells derived from this tissue. PSF was expressed in all retinal cell types examined in vitro, but immunohistochemical analysis revealed PSF mainly associated with retinal vessels. PSF expression was constitutive in retinal pericy...

  2. Changes in gene expression following growth stimulation of cultured cells

    Nathans, D.; Lau, L.F.; Lee, S.J.; Linzer, D.I.H.

    1986-01-01

    To identify genes that may be part of a genetic program for the growth of mammalian cells. The authors are characterizing cDNA clones derived from mRNAs that appear at various times after stimulation of resting BALB/c 3T3 cells with serum or growth factors. cDNA libraries were prepared from polyA/sup +/ RNA from cells stimulated with serum for various periods of time, and the libraries were differentially screened with /sup 32/P-cDNA probes made from stimulated or resting cell mRNA. One cDNA library was prepared from cells that were stimulated with serum for 3 hrs in the presence of cycloheximide. The authors purpose in inhibiting protein synthesis was to limit new mRNAs to those that do not require de novo protein synthesis for their accumulation and to amplify mRNAs that are superinduced by serum in the absence of protein synthesis. Of approximately 50,000 recombinant phage plaques screened, 357 clones hybridized to probes derived from stimulated-cell RNA but not to probes from resting-cell RNA. Cross hybridization analysis showed that 4 RNA sequence families accounted for over 95% of the clones; other sequences were found only once

  3. Progestins Upregulate FKBP51 Expression in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells to Induce Functional Progesterone and Glucocorticoid Withdrawal: Implications for Contraceptive- Associated Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Ozlem Guzeloglu Kayisli

    Full Text Available Use of long-acting progestin only contraceptives (LAPCs offers a discrete and highly effective family planning method. Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB is the major side effect of, and cause for, discontinuation of LAPCs. The endometria of LAPC-treated women display abnormally enlarged, fragile blood vessels, decreased endometrial blood flow and oxidative stress. To understanding to mechanisms underlying AUB, we propose to identify LAPC-modulated unique gene cluster(s in human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs. Protein and RNA isolated from cultured HESCs treated 7 days with estradiol (E2 or E2+ medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA or E2+ etonogestrel (ETO or E2+ progesterone (P4 were analyzed by quantitative Real-time (q-PCR and immunoblotting. HSCORES were determined for immunostained-paired endometria of pre-and 3 months post-Depot MPA (DMPA treated women and ovariectomized guinea pigs (GPs treated with placebo or E2 or MPA or E2+MPA for 21 days. In HESCs, whole genome analysis identified a 67 gene group regulated by all three progestins, whereas a 235 gene group was regulated by E2+ETO and E2+MPA, but not E2+P4. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified glucocorticoid receptor (GR activation as one of upstream regulators of the 235 MPA and ETO-specific genes. Among these, microarray results demonstrated significant enhancement of FKBP51, a repressor of PR/GR transcriptional activity, by both MPA and ETO. q-PCR and immunoblot analysis confirmed the microarray results. In endometria of post-DMPA versus pre-DMPA administered women, FKBP51 expression was significantly increased in endometrial stromal and glandular cells. In GPs, E2+MPA or MPA significantly increased FKBP51 immunoreactivity in endometrial stromal and glandular cells versus placebo- and E2-administered groups. MPA or ETO administration activates GR signaling and increases endometrial FKBP51 expression, which could be one of the mechanisms causing AUB by inhibiting PR and GR

  4. Progestins Upregulate FKBP51 Expression in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells to Induce Functional Progesterone and Glucocorticoid Withdrawal: Implications for Contraceptive- Associated Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Guzeloglu Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit A; Basar, Murat; Semerci, Nihan; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Use of long-acting progestin only contraceptives (LAPCs) offers a discrete and highly effective family planning method. Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the major side effect of, and cause for, discontinuation of LAPCs. The endometria of LAPC-treated women display abnormally enlarged, fragile blood vessels, decreased endometrial blood flow and oxidative stress. To understanding to mechanisms underlying AUB, we propose to identify LAPC-modulated unique gene cluster(s) in human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Protein and RNA isolated from cultured HESCs treated 7 days with estradiol (E2) or E2+ medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) or E2+ etonogestrel (ETO) or E2+ progesterone (P4) were analyzed by quantitative Real-time (q)-PCR and immunoblotting. HSCORES were determined for immunostained-paired endometria of pre-and 3 months post-Depot MPA (DMPA) treated women and ovariectomized guinea pigs (GPs) treated with placebo or E2 or MPA or E2+MPA for 21 days. In HESCs, whole genome analysis identified a 67 gene group regulated by all three progestins, whereas a 235 gene group was regulated by E2+ETO and E2+MPA, but not E2+P4. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation as one of upstream regulators of the 235 MPA and ETO-specific genes. Among these, microarray results demonstrated significant enhancement of FKBP51, a repressor of PR/GR transcriptional activity, by both MPA and ETO. q-PCR and immunoblot analysis confirmed the microarray results. In endometria of post-DMPA versus pre-DMPA administered women, FKBP51 expression was significantly increased in endometrial stromal and glandular cells. In GPs, E2+MPA or MPA significantly increased FKBP51 immunoreactivity in endometrial stromal and glandular cells versus placebo- and E2-administered groups. MPA or ETO administration activates GR signaling and increases endometrial FKBP51 expression, which could be one of the mechanisms causing AUB by inhibiting PR and GR-mediated transcription

  5. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1 (PGC-1α) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits IL-6 expression via PPARγ-mediated expression of catalase in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells.

    Song, Eun Ah; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-07-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis mirrors human acute pancreatitis. In pancreatic acinar cells exposed to cerulein, reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate inflammatory signaling by Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, and cytokine induction. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) acts as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which mediates the expression of some antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized that DHA may induce PPARγ-target catalase expression and reduce ROS levels, leading to the inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 activation and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated acinar cells. Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were treated with DHA in the presence or absence of the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, or treated with the PPARγ agonist troglitazone, and then stimulated with cerulein. Expression of IL-6 and catalase, ROS levels, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and nuclear translocation of PPARγ were assessed. DHA suppressed the increase in ROS, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and IL-6 expression induced nuclear translocation of PPARγ and catalase expression in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Troglitazone inhibited the cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression, but induced catalase expression similar to DHA in AR42J cells. GW9662 abolished the inhibitory effect of DHA on cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression in AR42J cells. DHA-induced expression of catalase was suppressed by GW9662 in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Thus, DHA induces PPARγ activation and catalase expression, which inhibits ROS-mediated activation of JAK2/STAT3 and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Chronic restraint stress causes anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, downregulates glucocorticoid receptor expression, and attenuates glutamate release induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the prefrontal cortex.

    Chiba, Shuichi; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Ninomiya, Midori; Richards, Misty C; Wakabayashi, Chisato; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    Stress and the resulting increase in glucocorticoid levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. We investigated the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS: 6 hours × 28 days) on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in rats and on the possible changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent neural function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We observed significant reductions in body weight gain, food intake and sucrose preference from 1 week after the onset of CRS. In the 5th week of CRS, we conducted open-field (OFT), elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced swim tests (FST). We observed a decrease in the number of entries into open arms during the EPM (anxiety-like behavior) and increased immobility during the FST (depression-like behavior). When the PFC was removed after CRS and subject to western blot analysis, the GR expression reduced compared with control, while the levels of BDNF and its receptors remained unchanged. Basal glutamate concentrations in PFC acute slice which were measured by high performance liquid chromatography were not influenced by CRS. However, BDNF-induced glutamate release was attenuated after CRS. These results suggest that reduced GR expression and altered BDNF function may be involved in chronic stress-induced anxiety--and depression-like behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of early weaning and social isolation on the expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mRNAs in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of piglets.

    Poletto, R; Steibel, J P; Siegford, J M; Zanella, A J

    2006-01-05

    Pigs weaned at young ages show more abnormal and aggressive behaviors and cognitive deficits compared to later weaned pigs. We investigated the effects of age, weaning and/or social isolation on the expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid response [glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2)] in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Early- (EW; n = 6) and conventionally-weaned (CW; n = 6) piglets were weaned at 10 and 21 days after birth, respectively. Non-weaned (NW) piglets of both ages (NW; n = 6/group) remained with their dams. Immediately before euthanasia, half of CW, EW and NW animals were socially isolated for 15 min at 12 (EW, NW) and 23 (CW, NW) days of age. Differences in amounts of 11beta-HSD1, 11beta-HSD2, GR and MR mRNA were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and data subjected to multivariate linear mixed model analysis. When compared with NW piglets at 12 days of age, the hippocampi of EW piglets showed decreased gene expression (P Social isolation decreased gene expression (P social isolation affected frontal cortex regardless of age. These results may be correlated with behavioral and cognitive changes reported in EW piglets.

  9. Gene expression results in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocytes depend significantly on the choice of reference genes

    Øvstebø Reidun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated monocytes is mainly studied by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR using GAPDH (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase or ACTB (beta-actin as reference gene for normalization. Expression of traditional reference genes has been shown to vary substantially under certain conditions leading to invalid results. To investigate whether traditional reference genes are stably expressed in LPS-stimulated monocytes or if RT-qPCR results are dependent on the choice of reference genes, we have assessed and evaluated gene expression stability of twelve candidate reference genes in this model system. Results Twelve candidate reference genes were quantified by RT-qPCR in LPS-stimulated, human monocytes and evaluated using the programs geNorm, Normfinder and BestKeeper. geNorm ranked PPIB (cyclophilin B, B2M (beta-2-microglobulin and PPIA (cyclophilin A as the best combination for gene expression normalization in LPS-stimulated monocytes. Normfinder suggested TBP (TATA-box binding protein and B2M as the best combination. Compared to these combinations, normalization using GAPDH alone resulted in significantly higher changes of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL10 (interleukin 10 expression. Moreover, a significant difference in TNF-α expression between monocytes stimulated with equimolar concentrations of LPS from N. meningitides and E. coli, respectively, was identified when using the suggested combinations of reference genes for normalization, but stayed unrecognized when employing a single reference gene, ACTB or GAPDH. Conclusions Gene expression levels in LPS-stimulated monocytes based on RT-qPCR results differ significantly when normalized to a single gene or a combination of stably expressed reference genes. Proper evaluation of reference gene stabiliy is therefore mandatory before reporting RT-qPCR results in LPS-stimulated monocytes.

  10. Are BDNF and glucocorticoid activities calibrated?

    Jeanneteau, Freddy; Chao, Moses V.

    2012-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for the onset and severity of neurological disorders is the loss of trophic support. Indeed, changes in the levels and activities of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) occur in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. A deficit promotes vulnerability whereas a gain of function facilitates recovery by enhancing survival, synapse formation and synaptic plasticity. Implementation of ‘BDNF therapies’, however, faces numerous methodological and pharmacokinetic issues. Identifying BDNF mimetics that activate the BDNF receptor or downstream targets of BDNF signaling represent an alternative approach. One mechanism that shows great promise is to study the interplay of BDNF and glucocorticoid hormones, a major class of natural steroid secreted during stress reactions and in synchrony with circadian rhythms. While small amounts of glucocorticoids support normal brain function, excess stimulation by these steroid hormones precipitate stress-related affective disorders. To date, however, because of the paucity of knowledge of underlying cellular mechanisms, deleterious effects of glucocorticoids are not prevented following extreme stress. In the present review, we will discuss the complementary roles share by BDNF and glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity, and delineate possible signaling mechanisms mediating these effects. PMID:23022538

  11. Glucocorticoid up-regulation of high-affinity interleukin 6 receptors on human epithelial cells

    Snyers, L.; De Wit, L.; Content, J.

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a potent pleiotropic cytokine, known, among others, to stimulate immunoglobulin production by B cells and to trigger acute-phase protein synthesis by hepatocytes. Similar to IL-1, it is produced by monocytes and macrophages following an inflammatory challenge. Analysis of IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) expression on different human cell lines indicates that dexamethasone could up-regulate the number of IL-6R on one epithelial cell line (UAC) and on two hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Hep3B). This effect was confirmed by Scatchard analysis of binding experiments, using [ 35 S]methionine and [ 35 S]cysteine metabolically labeled IL-6. It was confirmed at the level of mRNA expression by Northern blot analysis. These results provide evidence for a link between IL-6 and glucocorticoids. They could represent an example of a system in which one role of glucocorticoids is to define more accurately the target of cytokines, and they could explain, at least partly, the frequently observed synergy between IL-6 and glucocorticoids, notably in the case of hepatocytes

  12. Furosemide stimulates macula densa cyclooxygenase-2 expression in rats

    Mann, Birgitte; Hartner, A; Jensen, B L

    2001-01-01

    of the loop diuretic furosemide (12 mg/day) or were fed with the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide (30 mg/kg day) for seven days each. To compensate for their salt and water loss, the animals had free access to normal water and to salt water (0.9% NaCl, 0.1% KCl). COX-2 expression in kidney cortex was assessed...

  13. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

    ... nervosa Cigarette smoking Alcohol abuse Low calcium and vitamin D, by low dietary intake or poor absorption in your gut Sedentary (inactive) lifestyle or immobility Certain medications besides glucocorticoids, including the following: excess thyroid hormone replacement the blood thinner heparin some ...

  14. Adverse parenting is associated with blunted salivary cortisol awakening response and altered expression of glucocorticoid receptor β and β2-adrenergic receptor mRNAs in leukocytes in Japanese medical students.

    Kawai, Tomoko; Kuwano, Yuki; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Kinuyo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nishikawa, Tatsuya; Rokutan, Kazuhito; Nishida, Kensei

    2017-03-01

    Adverse parenting is associated with an increased risk for the development of mood and behavioral disorders. In this study, we assessed the perceived parental bonding of 232 medical students using the parental bonding instrument (PBI) and extracted 22 students who reported their parents' rearing attitudes as affectionless control (LOW; low care, high overprotection). Using the 28-item general health questionnaire, the Zung self-rating depression scale (Zung-SDS), the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), and the Spielberger state-trait-anxiety-inventory (STAI), physical and mental state of the LOW students were compared with those of 30 students who reported their parental bonding as optimal (OPT; high care and low overprotection). These questionnaire measurements demonstrated significantly higher anxiety and depressive mood in the LOW students versus the OPT students. Compared with the OPT students, the LOW students also exhibited a significantly reduced salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR) without changes across the rest of the diurnal salivary cortisol profile. Among glucocorticoid-related genes examined (GR, ADRB2, IκBα, IL10, IL1R2, IL1RN, MR, MC2R, TGFB1, TGFB2 and FASLG), real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that the LOW students significantly increased expression of a dominant negative glucocorticoid receptor β (GRβ) mRNA and decreased β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) mRNA levels in circulating leukocytes. These results suggest that negative perception of parents' child-rearing attitudes may be associated with anxiety and depressive mood and altered glucocorticoid signaling even in healthy young adults.

  15. Msx2 Stimulates Chondrocyte Maturation by Controlling Ihh Expression*

    Amano, Katsuhiko; Ichida, Fumitaka; Sugita, Atsushi; Hata, Kenji; Wada, Masahiro; Takigawa, Yoko; Nakanishi, Masako; Kogo, Mikihiko; Nishimura, Riko; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Several studies indicated that a homeobox gene, Msx2, is implicated in regulation of skeletal development by controlling enchondral ossification as well as membranous ossification. However, the molecular basis by which Msx2 conducts chondrogenesis is currently unclear. In this study, we examined the role of Msx2 in chondrocyte differentiation using mouse primary chondrocytes and embryonic metatarsal explants. Treatment with BMP2 up-regulated the expression of Msx2 mRNA...

  16. Cross-talk between oxysterols and glucocorticoids: differential regulation of secreted phopholipase A2 and impact on oligodendrocyte death.

    Amalia Trousson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxysterols are oxidized forms of cholesterol. They have been shown to be implicated in cholesterol turnover, inflammation and in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. Glial cells are targets of oxysterols: they inhibit astrocyte proliferation after brain injury, and we have previously shown that 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OH provokes oligodendrocyte apoptosis and stimulates the expression of sPLA2 type IIA (sPLA2-IIA, which has a protective effect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As glucocorticoids are well-known for their anti-inflammatory effects, our aim was to understand their direct effects on oxysterol-induced responses in oligodendrocytes (sPLA2-IIA stimulation and apoptosis. We demonstrate that the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex abolishes the stimulation of sPLA2-IIA by 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-OH. This inhibition is mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which decreases the expression of the oxysterol receptor Pregnane X Receptor (PXR and interferes with oxysterol signaling by recruiting a common limiting coactivator PGC1alpha. Consistent with the finding that sPLA2-IIA can partially protect oligodendrocytes against oxysterol-triggered apoptosis, we demonstrate here that the inhibition of sPLA2-IIA by Dex accelerates the apoptotic phenomenon, leading to a shift towards necrosis. We have shown by atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy that 25-OH and Dex alters oligodendrocyte shape and disorganizes the cytoplasm. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide a new understanding of the cross-talk between oxysterol and glucocorticoid signaling pathways and their respective roles in apoptosis and oligodendrocyte functions.

  17. Infralimbic dopamine D2 receptors mediate glucocorticoid-induced facilitation of auditory fear memory extinction in rats.

    Dadkhah, Masoumeh; Abdullahi, Payman Raise; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali

    2018-03-01

    The infralimbic (IL) cortex of the medial prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the extinction of fear memory. Also, it has been showed that both brain glucocorticoid and dopamine receptors are involved in many processes such as fear extinction that drive learning and memory; however, the interaction of these receptors in the IL cortex remains unclear. We examined a putative interaction between the effects of glucocorticoid and dopamine receptors stimulation in the IL cortex on fear memory extinction in an auditory fear conditioning paradigm in male rats. Corticosterone (the endogenous glucocorticoid receptor ligand), or RU38486 (the synthetic glucocorticoid receptor antagonist) microinfusion into the IL cortex 10 min before test 1 attenuated auditory fear expression at tests 1-3, suggesting as an enhancement of fear extinction. The effect of corticosterone, but not RU38486 was counteracted by the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride pre-treatment administered into the IL (at a dose that failed to alter freezing behavior on its own). In contrast, intra-IL infusion of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 pre-treatment failed to alter freezing behavior. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of the IL cortex D2 receptors in CORT-induced facilitation of fear memory extinction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor and enhances its transcriptional activities

    Togi, Sumihito; Nakasuji, Misa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki; Oritani, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which interacts with cellular proteins, plays a central role in modification of viral and/or cellular gene expression. Here, we show that LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and that LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between LANA and GR in transiently transfected 293T and HeLa cells. In human B-lymphoma cells, LANA overexpression enhanced GR activity and cell growth suppression following glucocorticoid stimulation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that activated GR was bound to LANA and accumulated in the nucleus, leading to an increase in binding of activated GR to the glucocorticoid response element of target genes. Taken together, KSHV-derived LANA acts as a transcriptional co-activator of GR. Our results might suggest a careful use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of patients with KSHV-related malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman disease. - Highlights: • KSHV-LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR in 293T and HeLa cells. • KSHV-LANA physically associates with GR. • KSHV-LANA enhances GR activation and cell growth suppression in human B-lymphocytes. • KSHV-LANA influences the nuclear retention and DNA binding activity of GR

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor and enhances its transcriptional activities

    Togi, Sumihito; Nakasuji, Misa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Ikeda, Osamu; Okabe, Kanako; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Oritani, Kenji [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuda, Tadashi, E-mail: tmatsuda@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which interacts with cellular proteins, plays a central role in modification of viral and/or cellular gene expression. Here, we show that LANA associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and that LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between LANA and GR in transiently transfected 293T and HeLa cells. In human B-lymphoma cells, LANA overexpression enhanced GR activity and cell growth suppression following glucocorticoid stimulation. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that activated GR was bound to LANA and accumulated in the nucleus, leading to an increase in binding of activated GR to the glucocorticoid response element of target genes. Taken together, KSHV-derived LANA acts as a transcriptional co-activator of GR. Our results might suggest a careful use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of patients with KSHV-related malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman disease. - Highlights: • KSHV-LANA enhances the transcriptional activity of GR in 293T and HeLa cells. • KSHV-LANA physically associates with GR. • KSHV-LANA enhances GR activation and cell growth suppression in human B-lymphocytes. • KSHV-LANA influences the nuclear retention and DNA binding activity of GR.

  20. Glucocorticoid Regulation of the Vitamin D Receptor

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter. PMID:20398752

  1. Glucocorticoid-related bone changes from endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoids.

    Warriner, Amy H; Saag, Kenneth G

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoids have a negative impact on bone through direct effects on bone cells and indirect effects on calcium absorption. Here, recent findings regarding glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, bone changes in patients with endogenous glucocorticoid derangements, and treatment of steroid-induced bone disease are reviewed. Although the majority of our understanding arises from the outcomes of patients treated with exogenous steroids, endogenous overproduction appears to be similarly destructive to bone, but these effects are reversible with cure of the underlying disease process. Additionally, there are bone changes that occur in diseases that interrupt adrenal glucocorticoid production, both in response to our inability to perfectly match glucocorticoid replacement and also related to the underlying disease process. More investigation is required to understand which patients with endogenous overproduction or underproduction of glucocorticoid would benefit from osteoporosis treatment. Better understood is the benefit that can be achieved with currently approved treatments for glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis from exogenous steroids. With growing concern of long-term use of bisphosphonates, however, further investigation into the duration of use and use in certain populations, such as children and premenopausal women, is essential. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is a complex disease that is becoming better understood through advances in the study of exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoid exposure. Further advancement of proper treatment and prevention is on the horizon.

  2. Pathophysiology of Glucocorticoid Signaling.

    Vitellius, Géraldine; Trabado, Séverine; Bouligand, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Lombès, Marc

    2018-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC), such as cortisol or dexamethasone, control various physiological functions, notably those involved in development, metabolism, inflammatory processes and stress, and exert most of their effects upon binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by NR3C1 gene). GC signaling follows several consecutive steps leading to target gene transactivation, including ligand binding, nuclear translocation of ligand-activated GR complexes, DNA binding, coactivator interaction and recruitment of functional transcriptional machinery. Any step may be impaired and may account for altered GC signaling. Partial or generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome may result in a reduced level of functional GR, a decreased hormone affinity and binding, a defect in nuclear GR translocation, a decrease or lack of DNA binding and/or post-transcriptional GR modifications. To date, 26 loss-of-function NR3C1 mutations have been reported in the context of hypertension, hirsutism, adrenal hyperplasia or metabolic disorders. These clinical signs are generally associated with biological features including hypercortisolism without negative regulatory feedback loop on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Patients had often low plasma aldosterone and renin levels despite hypertension. Only one GR gain-of-function mutation has been described associating Cushing's syndrome phenotype with normal urinary-free cortisol. Some GR polymorphisms (ER22/23EK, GR-9β) have been linked to glucocorticoid resistance and a healthier metabolic profile whereas some others seemed to be associated with GC hypersensitivity (N363S, BclI), increasing cardiovascular risk (diabetes type 2, visceral obesity). This review focuses on the earlier findings on the pathophysiology of GR signaling and presents criteria facilitating identification of novel NR3C1 mutations in selected patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. TNF-{alpha} mediates the stimulation of sclerostin expression in an estrogen-deficient condition

    Kim, Beom-Jun [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Poongnap2-Dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sung Jin [Health Promotion Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Poongnap2-Dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Young-Sun; Baek, Ji-Eun; Park, Sook-Young [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, 388-1 Poongnap2-Dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Hun [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Poongnap2-Dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Jung-Min, E-mail: jmkoh@amc.seoul.kr [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Poongnap2-Dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ghi Su [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Poongnap2-Dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estrogen deprivation stimulates the bony sclerostin levels with reversal by estrogen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} increases the activity and expression of MEF2 in UMR-106 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} blocker prevents the stimulation of bony sclerostin expression by ovariectomy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No difference in bony sclerostin expression between sham-operated and ovariectomized nude mice. -- Abstract: Although recent clinical studies have suggested a possible role for sclerostin, a secreted Wnt antagonist, in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the detailed mechanisms how estrogen deficiency regulates sclerostin expression have not been well-elucidated. Bilateral ovariectomy or a sham operation in female C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c nude mice was performed when they were seven weeks of age. The C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with phosphate-buffered serum (PBS), 5 {mu}g/kg {beta}-estradiol five times per week for three weeks, or 10 mg/kg TNF-{alpha} blocker three times per week for three weeks. Bony sclerostin expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry staining in their femurs. The activity and expression of myocyte enhancer factors 2 (MEF2), which is essential for the transcriptional activation of sclerostin, in rat UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells were determined by luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Bony sclerostin expression was stimulated by estrogen deficiency and it was reversed by estradiol supplementation. When the UMR-106 cells were treated with well-known, estrogen-regulated cytokines, only TNF-{alpha}, but not IL-1 and IL-6, increased the MEF2 activity. Consistently, TNF-{alpha} also increased the nuclear MEF2 expression. Furthermore, the TNF-{alpha} blocker prevented the stimulation of bony sclerostin expression by ovariectomy. We also found that there was no difference in sclerostin expression between ovariectomized

  4. TNF-α mediates the stimulation of sclerostin expression in an estrogen-deficient condition

    Kim, Beom-Jun; Bae, Sung Jin; Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Young-Sun; Baek, Ji-Eun; Park, Sook-Young; Lee, Seung Hun; Koh, Jung-Min; Kim, Ghi Su

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Estrogen deprivation stimulates the bony sclerostin levels with reversal by estrogen. ► TNF-α increases the activity and expression of MEF2 in UMR-106 cells. ► TNF-α blocker prevents the stimulation of bony sclerostin expression by ovariectomy. ► No difference in bony sclerostin expression between sham-operated and ovariectomized nude mice. -- Abstract: Although recent clinical studies have suggested a possible role for sclerostin, a secreted Wnt antagonist, in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the detailed mechanisms how estrogen deficiency regulates sclerostin expression have not been well-elucidated. Bilateral ovariectomy or a sham operation in female C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c nude mice was performed when they were seven weeks of age. The C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with phosphate-buffered serum (PBS), 5 μg/kg β-estradiol five times per week for three weeks, or 10 mg/kg TNF-α blocker three times per week for three weeks. Bony sclerostin expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry staining in their femurs. The activity and expression of myocyte enhancer factors 2 (MEF2), which is essential for the transcriptional activation of sclerostin, in rat UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells were determined by luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Bony sclerostin expression was stimulated by estrogen deficiency and it was reversed by estradiol supplementation. When the UMR-106 cells were treated with well-known, estrogen-regulated cytokines, only TNF-α, but not IL-1 and IL-6, increased the MEF2 activity. Consistently, TNF-α also increased the nuclear MEF2 expression. Furthermore, the TNF-α blocker prevented the stimulation of bony sclerostin expression by ovariectomy. We also found that there was no difference in sclerostin expression between ovariectomized nude mice and sham-operated nude mice. In conclusion, these results suggest that TNF-α originating from T cells may be at least in part

  5. The Pro-inflammatory Effects of Glucocorticoids in the Brain

    Duque, Erica de Almeida; Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a class of steroid hormones derived from cholesterol. Their actions are mediated by the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors, which, once bound to their ligands, act as transcription factors that can directly modulate gene expression. Through protein–protein interactions with other transcription factors, they can also regulate the activity of many genes in a composite or tethering way. Rapid non-genomic signaling was also demonstrated since glucocorticoids can act through membrane receptors and activate signal transduction pathways, such as protein kinases cascades, to modulate other transcriptions factors and activate or repress various target genes. By all these different mechanisms, glucocorticoids regulate numerous important functions in a large variety of cells, not only in the peripheral organs but also in the central nervous system during development and adulthood. In general, glucocorticoids are considered anti-inflammatory and protective agents due to their ability to inhibit gene expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and other possible damaging molecules. Nonetheless, recent studies have uncovered situations in which these hormones can act as pro-inflammatory agents depending on the dose, chronicity of exposure, and the structure/organ analyzed. In this review, we will provide an overview of the conditions under which these phenomena occur, a discussion that will serve as a basis for exploring the mechanistic foundation of glucocorticoids pro-inflammatory gene regulation in the brain. PMID:27445981

  6. Effect of thyroid status on the expression of metabolic enzymes during chronic stimulation.

    Hood, D A; Simoneau, J A; Kelly, A M; Pette, D

    1992-10-01

    The effect of thyroid status on the expression of cytochrome c oxidase (CYTOX) and the activities of citrate synthase (CS) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) were examined in chronically stimulated (10 Hz; 35 days) and contralateral, nonstimulated rat tibialis anterior muscle of hypothyroid, hyperthyroid, and euthyroid animals. Stimulation increased CYTOX activity by 2.7-, 3.2-, and 4.9-fold in hyperthyroid, euthyroid, and hypothyroid animals, respectively, to similar absolute values. CS displayed similar increases. Stimulation reduced PFK activity in hypothyroid and euthyroid animals to 45% and 60% of control values. This effect was abolished with hyperthyroidism. Thus stimulation and thyroid hormone act antagonistically on PFK activity. Stimulation increased CYTOX subunit III (mitochondrially encoded) mRNA by 2.5- and 2.9-fold in hyperthyroid and euthyroid animals. Similar increases were observed in the nuclear-encoded mRNAs of CYTOX subunit VIc in euthyroid muscle. In hyperthyroid and euthyroid conditions, the mRNA changes paralleled the increases in enzyme activity. In hypothyroid muscle, the increase in mRNA was less for subunit VIc than III, suggesting that hypothyroidism upsets the coordinate expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Further, the increases in CYTOX activity exceeded that of both subunit mRNAs in hypothyroid muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Involvement of glucocorticoid prereceptor metabolism and signaling in rat visceral adipose tissue lipid metabolism after chronic stress combined with high-fructose diet.

    Bursać, Biljana; Djordjevic, Ana; Veličković, Nataša; Milutinović, Danijela Vojnović; Petrović, Snježana; Teofilović, Ana; Gligorovska, Ljupka; Preitner, Frederic; Tappy, Luc; Matić, Gordana

    2018-05-03

    Both fructose overconsumption and increased glucocorticoids secondary to chronic stress may contribute to overall dyslipidemia. In this study we specifically assessed the effects and interactions of dietary fructose and chronic stress on lipid metabolism in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of male Wistar rats. We analyzed the effects of 9-week 20% high fructose diet and 4-week chronic unpredictable stress, separately and in combination, on VAT histology, glucocorticoid prereceptor metabolism, glucocorticoid receptor subcellular redistribution and expression of major metabolic genes. Blood triglycerides and fatty acid composition were also measured to assess hepatic Δ9 desaturase activity. The results showed that fructose diet increased blood triglycerides and Δ9 desaturase activity. On the other hand, stress led to corticosterone elevation, glucocorticoid receptor activation and decrease in adipocyte size, while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, adipose tissue triglyceride lipase, FAT/CD36 and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were increased, pointing to VAT lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis. The combination of stress and fructose diet was associated with marked stimulation of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA level and with increased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase protein levels, suggesting a coordinated increase in hexose monophosphate shunt and de novo lipogenesis. It however did not influence the level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, SREBP-1c and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein. In conclusion, our results showed that only combination of dietary fructose and stress increase glucocorticoid prereceptor metabolism and stimulates lipogenic enzyme expression suggesting that interaction between stress and fructose may be instrumental in promoting VAT expansion and dysfunction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunoprecipitation assay of alpha-fetoprotein synthesis by cultured mouse hepatoma cells treated with estrogens and glucocorticoids.

    Rosebrock, J A; Parker, C L; Kute, T E

    1981-01-01

    This investigation was to study the biosynthesis of 3H-labeled alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) by cultured mouse hepatoma (HEPA-2) cells. Both the function and regulation of this oncodevelopmental gene are unknown. However, evidence indicates that mechanisms controlling the expression of AFP involve aspects of both normal embryonic development and neoplastic transformation. the secretion of AFP was analyzed during different phases of the growth cycle to provide information on AFP production using standard culture conditions. The highest rate of secretion occurred during the stationary phase, followed by the late logarithmic and early logarithmic phases of growth, respectively. The production of AFP was then determined following the addition of glucocorticoids and estrogens in an attempt to understand hormonal factors that may be involved. Studies utilizing estradiol-17 beta indicated that the secretion of AFP did not appear to be sensitive to this steroid even though sucrose density gradient analysis of HEPA-2 cytosol, for estrogenic receptors, revealed competitive binding moieties on the 8S and 4S regions of the gradient. In contrast, the secretion of the total complement of proteins, including AFP, was significantly stimulated by the glucocorticoids, dexamethasone and corticosterone. Analysis of HEPA-2 cytosol for glucocorticoid receptors revealed binding components in the 7S and 3-4S regions of the gradient. The 3H-dexamethasone binding appeared to be stereospecific since nonlabeled dexamethasone, but not nonlabeled estradiol-17 beta, effectively displaced the bound radioactivity. The glucocorticoid-binding component in HEPA-2 therefore displayed characteristics reported for glucocorticoid receptors in normal liver and other hepatomas.

  9. Tumor Suppressor p53 Stimulates the Expression of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1.

    Wang, Qianli; Lingel, Amy; Geiser, Vicki; Kwapnoski, Zachary; Zhang, Luwen

    2017-10-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple human malignancies. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is required for the efficient transformation of primary B lymphocytes in vitro and possibly in vivo The tumor suppressor p53 plays a seminal role in cancer development. In some EBV-associated cancers, p53 tends to be wild type and overly expressed; however, the effects of p53 on LMP1 expression is not clear. We find LMP1 expression to be associated with p53 expression in EBV-transformed cells under physiological and DNA damaging conditions. DNA damage stimulates LMP1 expression, and p53 is required for the stimulation. Ectopic p53 stimulates endogenous LMP1 expression. Moreover, endogenous LMP1 blocks DNA damage-mediated apoptosis. Regarding the mechanism of p53-mediated LMP1 expression, we find that interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a direct target of p53, is associated with both p53 and LMP1. IRF5 binds to and activates a LMP1 promoter reporter construct. Ectopic IRF5 increases the expression of LMP1, while knockdown of IRF5 leads to reduction of LMP1. Furthermore, LMP1 blocks IRF5-mediated apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. All of the data suggest that cellular p53 stimulates viral LMP1 expression, and IRF5 may be one of the factors for p53-mediated LMP1 stimulation. LMP1 may subsequently block DNA damage- and IRF5-mediated apoptosis for the benefits of EBV. The mutual regulation between p53 and LMP1 may play an important role in EBV infection and latency and its related cancers. IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical cellular protein in response to various stresses and dictates cells for various responses, including apoptosis. This work suggests that an Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) principal viral oncogene is activated by cellular p53. The viral oncogene blocks p53-mediated adverse effects during viral infection and transformation. Therefore, the induction of the viral oncogene by p53 provides a means for the virus to cope with infection and

  10. Glucocorticoids, chronic stress, and obesity

    Dallman, Mary F.; Pecoraro, Norman C.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Warne, James P.; Ginsberg, Abigail B.; Akana, Susan F.; Laugero, Kevin C.; Houshyar, Hani; Strack, Alison M.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Bell, Mary E.

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids either inhibit or sensitize stress-induced activity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, depending on time after their administration, the concentration of the steroids, and whether there is a concurrent stressor input. When there are high glucocorticoids together with a

  11. Modulation of the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in stimulated human monocytes

    Uhlin-Hansen, L.; Eskeland, T.; Kolset, S.O.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycan biosynthesis was studied in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after exposure to typical activators of the monocyte/macrophage system: interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). By morphological examination, both monocytes and MDM were stimulated by these activators. Treatment with IFN-gamma resulted in a slight decrease in the expression of [35S]chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) in both monocytes and MDM, whereas LPS treatment increased the [35S]CSPG expression 1.8 and 2.2 times, respectively. PMA, in contrast, decreased the CSPG expression 0.4 times in monocytes, whereas MDM were stimulated to increase the biosynthesis 1.9 times. An increase in the sulfate density of the chondroitin sulfate chains was evident following differentiation of monocytes into MDM due to the expression of disulfated disaccharide units of the chondroitin sulfate E type (CS-E). However, monocytes exposed to PMA did also express disaccharides of the chondroitin sulfate E type. Furthermore, the expression of CS-E in MDM was increased 2 times following PMA treatment. An inactive phorbol ester, phorbol 12,13-diacetate, did not affect the expression of CS-E in either monocytes or MDM when compared with control cultures, suggesting that protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways may be involved in the regulation of sulfation of CSPG. Exposure to LPS or IFN-gamma did not lead to any changes in the sulfation of the chondroitin sulfate chains

  12. Analytical expressions for time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence experiments in quartz

    Pagonis, V.; Lawless, J.; Chen, R.; Chithambo, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals can be obtained using a time-resolved optical stimulation (TR-OSL) method, also known as pulsed OSL. During TR-OSL measurements, the stimulation and emission of luminescence are experimentally separated in time using short light pulses. This paper presents analytical expressions for the TR-OSL intensity observed during and after such a pulse in quartz experiments. The analytical expressions are derived using a recently published kinetic model which describes thermal quenching phenomena in quartz samples. In addition, analytical expressions are derived for the concentration of electrons in the conduction band during and after the TR-OSL pulse, and for the maximum signals attained during optical stimulation of the samples. The relevance of the model for dosimetric applications is examined, by studying the dependence of the maximum TR-OSL signals on the degree of initial trap filling, and also on the probability of electron retrapping into the dosimetric trap. Analytical expressions are derived for two characteristic times of the TR-OSL mechanism; these times are the relaxation time for electrons in the conduction band, and the corresponding relaxation time for the radiative transition within the luminescence center. The former relaxation time is found to depend on several experimental parameters, while the latter relaxation time depends only on internal parameters characteristic of the recombination center. These differences between the two relaxation times can be explained by the presence of localized and delocalized transitions in the quartz sample. The analytical expressions in this paper are shown to be equivalent to previous analytical expressions derived using a different mathematical approach. A description of thermal quenching processes in quartz based on AlO 4 - /AlO 4 defects is presented, which illustrates the connection between the different descriptions of the luminescence process found in the literature

  13. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates Fas ligand expression via the EP1 receptor in colon cancer cells.

    O'Callaghan, G

    2012-02-03

    Fas ligand (FasL\\/CD95L) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily that triggers apoptosis following crosslinking of the Fas receptor. Despite studies strongly implicating tumour-expressed FasL as a major inhibitor of the anti-tumour immune response, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate FasL expression in tumours. In this study, we show that the cyclooxygenase (COX) signalling pathway, and in particular prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), plays a role in the upregulation of FasL expression in colon cancer. Suppression of either COX-2 or COX-1 by RNA interference in HCA-7 and HT29 colon tumour cells reduced FasL expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Conversely, stimulation with PGE(2) increased FasL expression and these cells showed increased cytotoxicity against Fas-sensitive Jurkat T cells. Prostaglandin E(2)-induced FasL expression was mediated by signalling via the EP1 receptor. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis using serial sections of human colon adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between COX-2 and FasL (r=0.722; P<0.0001) expression, and between EP1 receptor and FasL (r=0.740; P<0.0001) expression, in the tumour cells. Thus, these findings indicate that PGE(2) positively regulates FasL expression in colon tumour cells, adding another pro-neoplastic activity to PGE(2).

  14. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA ter...

  15. [Effect of Tribulus terrestris extract on melanocyte-stimulating hormone expression in mouse hair follicles].

    Yang, Liu; Lu, Jian-wei; An, Jing; Jiang, Xuan

    2006-12-01

    To observe the effect of Tribulus terrestris extract on melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) expression in C57BL/6J mouse hair follicles, and investigate the role of Tribulus terrestris extract in activation, proliferation, epidermal migration of dormant hair follicle melanocytes. The aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris was administered orally in specific pathogen-free C57BL/6J mouse at the daily dose equivalent to 1 g/1 kg in adult human, and the expression and distribution of MSH in the mouse hair follicles was observed with immunohistochemistry. The positivity rate of MSH expression in the hair follicle melanocytes was 75% in mice treated with the extract, significantly higher than the rate of only 18.75% in the control group (PTribulus terrestris can significantly increase MSH expression in the hair follicle melanocytes by activating tyrosinase activity and promoting melanocyte proliferation, melanine synthesis, and epidermal migration of dormant melanocytes.

  16. Instructions for producing a mouse model of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    Thiele, S.; Baschant, U.; Rauch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are effective drugs used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or asthma. Furthermore, they regulate various physiological processes, including bone remodeling. However, long-term high- and even low-dose glucocorticoid use is associated...... with a compromised bone quality and an increased fracture risk. At the cellular level, glucocorticoids suppress bone formation and stimulate bone resorption, which leads to loss of bone mass. To investigate the underlying mechanisms and new therapeutic strategies, the in vivo model for glucocorticoid-induced bone...... loss is widely used. This protocol outlines the common procedure that is currently used for the induction of bone loss in mice using glucocorticoids. It further provides useful hints and highlights possible pitfalls to take into account before starting an experiment....

  17. Expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor correlates with prognosis in oral and mesopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Tsuzuki, H; Fujieda, S; Sunaga, H; Noda, I; Saito, H

    1998-02-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptors (G-CSFRs) have been observed on the surface of not only hematopoietic cells but also several cancer cells. The stimulation of G-CSF has been demonstrated to induce proliferation and activation of G-CSFR-positive cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of G-CSFR on the surface of tumor cells and G-CSF production in oral and mesopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by an immunohistochemical approach. Of 58 oral and mesopharyngeal SCCs, 31 cases (53.4%) and 36 cases (62.1%) were positive for G-CSFR and G-CSF, respectively. There was no association between G-CSFR expression and G-CSF staining. In the group positive for G-CSFR expression, relapse was significantly more likely after primary treatment (P = 0.0069), whereas there was no association between G-CSFR expression and age, sex, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stage. Also, the G-CSFR-positive groups had a significantly lower disease-free and overall survival rate than the G-CSFR-negative groups (P = 0.0172 and 0.0188, respectively). However, none of the clinical markers correlated significantly with G-CSF staining, nor did the status of G-CSF production influence the overall survival. The results imply that assessment of G-CSFR may prove valuable in selecting patients with oral and mesopharyngeal SCC for aggressive therapy.

  18. Impact of glucocorticoid on neurogenesis

    Haruki Odaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is currently an area of great interest in neuroscience. It is closely linked to brain diseases, including mental disorders and neurodevelopmental disease. Both embryonic and adult neurogeneses are influenced by glucocorticoids secreted from the adrenal glands in response to a variety of stressors. Moreover, proliferation/differentiation of the neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs is affected by glucocorticoids through intracellular signaling pathways such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt, hedgehog, and Wnt. Our review presents recent evidence of the impact of glucocorticoids on NSPC behaviors and the underlying molecular mechanisms; this provides important information for understanding the pathological role of glucocorticoids on neurogenesis-associated brain diseases.

  19. HIV-1 Tat regulates the expression of the dcw operon and stimulates the proliferation of bacteria.

    Wei, Jinsong; Zhang, Yumin; Knapp, Pamela E; Zhao, Tianyong

    2016-01-01

    Infections of pathogenic bacteria are very common in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. However, the biological effects of HIV-1 Tat on bacteria are incompletely understood. In this study, HIV-1 Tat was expressed in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) to investigate its biological effects on bacteria. Bacterial cells expressing either HIV-1 Tat1-86 (Tat1-86) or HIV-1 Tat1-72 (Tat1-72) grow significantly faster than those with either only an empty vector or an unrelated control (GFP or Rluc). Supplementation of purified HIV-1 Tat1-86 or Tat1-101 protein into bacterial culture medium stimulated the growth of both E. coli and PA01. The expression profile of certain cell division-associated genes, such as those in the division cell wall (dcw) operon (ftsA, ftsQ, ftsW and ftsZ), yafO and zipA, was altered in HIV-1 Tat1-86 expressing E. coli BL21(DE3). Furthermore, the expression of firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter gene, when engineered for control by the dcw promoter and terminator, was enhanced by HIV-1 Tat in E. coli, confirming that HIV-1 Tat transcriptionally regulates the expression of the dcw operon. The finding that HIV-1 Tat stimulates bacterial growth whether it is produced intracellularly or applied extracellularly may have relevance for HIV patients who are highly susceptible to opportunistic bacterial infections. Contents category: Viruses -Retroviruses. The GenBank accession number for the sequence of HIV-1 Tat1-86 is AF324439.1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Recovery of facial expressions using functional electrical stimulation after full-face transplantation.

    Topçu, Çağdaş; Uysal, Hilmi; Özkan, Ömer; Özkan, Özlenen; Polat, Övünç; Bedeloğlu, Merve; Akgül, Arzu; Döğer, Ela Naz; Sever, Refik; Çolak, Ömer Halil

    2018-03-06

    We assessed the recovery of 2 face transplantation patients with measures of complexity during neuromuscular rehabilitation. Cognitive rehabilitation methods and functional electrical stimulation were used to improve facial emotional expressions of full-face transplantation patients for 5 months. Rehabilitation and analyses were conducted at approximately 3 years after full facial transplantation in the patient group. We report complexity analysis of surface electromyography signals of these two patients in comparison to the results of 10 healthy individuals. Facial surface electromyography data were collected during 6 basic emotional expressions and 4 primary facial movements from 2 full-face transplantation patients and 10 healthy individuals to determine a strategy of functional electrical stimulation and understand the mechanisms of rehabilitation. A new personalized rehabilitation technique was developed using the wavelet packet method. Rehabilitation sessions were applied twice a month for 5 months. Subsequently, motor and functional progress was assessed by comparing the fuzzy entropy of surface electromyography data against the results obtained from patients before rehabilitation and the mean results obtained from 10 healthy subjects. At the end of personalized rehabilitation, the patient group showed improvements in their facial symmetry and their ability to perform basic facial expressions and primary facial movements. Similarity in the pattern of fuzzy entropy for facial expressions between the patient group and healthy individuals increased. Synkinesis was detected during primary facial movements in the patient group, and one patient showed synkinesis during the happiness expression. Synkinesis in the lower face region of one of the patients was eliminated for the lid tightening movement. The recovery of emotional expressions after personalized rehabilitation was satisfactory to the patients. The assessment with complexity analysis of sEMG data can be

  1. Long-term optical stimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons to study network plasticity

    Lignani, Gabriele; Ferrea, Enrico; Difato, Francesco; Amarù, Jessica; Ferroni, Eleonora; Lugarà, Eleonora; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity produces changes in excitability, synaptic transmission, and network architecture in response to external stimuli. Network adaptation to environmental conditions takes place in time scales ranging from few seconds to days, and modulates the entire network dynamics. To study the network response to defined long-term experimental protocols, we setup a system that combines optical and electrophysiological tools embedded in a cell incubator. Primary hippocampal neurons transduced with lentiviruses expressing channelrhodopsin-2/H134R were subjected to various photostimulation protocols in a time window in the order of days. To monitor the effects of light-induced gating of network activity, stimulated transduced neurons were simultaneously recorded using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The developed experimental model allows discerning short-term, long-lasting, and adaptive plasticity responses of the same neuronal network to distinct stimulation frequencies applied over different temporal windows. PMID:23970852

  2. Basic calcium phosphate crystal-induced Egr-1 expression stimulates mitogenesis in human fibroblasts

    Zeng, Xiao R.; Sun Yubo; Wenger, Leonor; Cheung, Herman S.

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals stimulate mitogenesis and synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases in cultured human foreskin and synovial fibroblasts. However, the detailed mechanisms involved are still unclear. In the present study, using RT-PCR and Egr-1 promoter analysis we showed that BCP crystals could stimulate early growth response gene Egr-1 transcription through a PKCα-dependent p44/p42 MAPK pathway. Using a retrovirus gene expression system (Clontech) to overexpress Egr-1 in human fibroblast BJ-1 cells resulted in promotion of mitogenesis measured either by MTT cell proliferation analysis or by direct cell counting. The results demonstrate that Egr-1 may play a key role in mediating BCP crystal-induced synovial fibroblast mitogenesis

  3. Long-term optical stimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons to study network plasticity.

    Lignani, Gabriele; Ferrea, Enrico; Difato, Francesco; Amarù, Jessica; Ferroni, Eleonora; Lugarà, Eleonora; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity produces changes in excitability, synaptic transmission, and network architecture in response to external stimuli. Network adaptation to environmental conditions takes place in time scales ranging from few seconds to days, and modulates the entire network dynamics. To study the network response to defined long-term experimental protocols, we setup a system that combines optical and electrophysiological tools embedded in a cell incubator. Primary hippocampal neurons transduced with lentiviruses expressing channelrhodopsin-2/H134R were subjected to various photostimulation protocols in a time window in the order of days. To monitor the effects of light-induced gating of network activity, stimulated transduced neurons were simultaneously recorded using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The developed experimental model allows discerning short-term, long-lasting, and adaptive plasticity responses of the same neuronal network to distinct stimulation frequencies applied over different temporal windows.

  4. In vitro stimulation of rabbit T lymphocytes by cells expressing herpes simplex antigens.

    Kapoor, A K; Ling, N R; Nash, A A; Bachan, A; Wildy, P

    1982-04-01

    Lymphocyte stimulation responses to herpes antigens were studied using virus-infected X-irradiated cells. Rabbits were immunized with herpes simplex virus type 1 (strain HFEM) grown in RK 13 cells. For in vitro stimulation assay BHK21 cells were X-irradiated (15 000 rad) and infected with a high m.o.i. of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant (N102) of HFEM strain at the non-permissive temperature (38.5 degrees C) of virus. Virus antigens were expressed on the infected cells and there was no leakage of infectious virus into the medium at 38.5 degrees C. T lymphocytes from rabbits immunized with herpes simplex virus were specifically activated by herpesvirus-infected X-irradiated cells; lymph node cells from rabbits immunized with RK13 cells and from non-immune rabbits showed no proliferative response.

  5. PAMPs and DAMPs stimulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro in fibroblasts from fish

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Ossum, C.G.; Przybylska, Dominika

    . It is believed that this expression to a large extend is mediated by fibroblasts in the musculature. To investigate this, a fibroblast cell-line (RTHDF1) from the rainbow trout was stimulated with either LPS from E. coli, cell debris or supernatant from sonicated fibroblasts. Whereas LPS stimulation resulted...

  6. Optimal glucocorticoid therapy.

    Debono, Miguel; Ross, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    The rhythmic regulation of human physiology and behaviour is controlled by a central endogenous clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Most tissues have peripheral clocks that oscillate in time with this central clock. How the central time keeper controls peripheral clocks is not established, however there is evidence to suggest that the cortisol rhythm is one important secondary messenger. Loss of the endogenous cortisol rhythm is associated with sleep disturbance, depression, and metabolic abnormalities. In adrenal insufficiency, current glucocorticoid replacement regimens cannot replace the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol, and patients have an increased mortality and impaired quality of life. We propose that reproducing circadian cortisol levels may improve quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency and we have been investigating the impact of circadian hydrocortisone replacement. Using Chronocort, a modified release preparation of hydrocortisone, we have demonstrated that it is possible to simulate the overnight rise in cortisol release and, in preliminary studies in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, control morning androgen levels. Future studies are now required to determine whether Chronocort can improve quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Glucocorticoid and cytokine crosstalk: Feedback, feedforward, and co-regulatory interactions determine repression or resistance.

    Newton, Robert; Shah, Suharsh; Altonsy, Mohammed O; Gerber, Antony N

    2017-04-28

    Inflammatory signals induce feedback and feedforward systems that provide temporal control. Although glucocorticoids can repress inflammatory gene expression, glucocorticoid receptor recruitment increases expression of negative feedback and feedforward regulators, including the phosphatase, DUSP1, the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme, TNFAIP3, or the mRNA-destabilizing protein, ZFP36. Moreover, glucocorticoid receptor cooperativity with factors, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), may enhance regulator expression to promote repression. Conversely, MAPKs, which are inhibited by glucocorticoids, provide feedforward control to limit expression of the transcription factor IRF1, and the chemokine, CXCL10. We propose that modulation of feedback and feedforward control can determine repression or resistance of inflammatory gene expression toglucocorticoid. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) expression in plastids of Lactuca sativa.

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease.

  10. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune function.

    Walker, David J; Spencer, Karen A

    2018-01-15

    Throughout life physiological systems strive to maintain homeostasis and these systems are susceptible to exposure to maternal or environmental perturbations, particularly during embryonic development. In some cases, these perturbations may influence genetic and physiological processes that permanently alter the functioning of these physiological systems; a process known as developmental programming. In recent years, the neuroimmune system has garnered attention for its fundamental interactions with key hormonal systems, such as the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The ultimate product of this axis, the glucocorticoid hormones, play a key role in modulating immune responses within the periphery and the CNS as part of the physiological stress response. It is well-established that elevated glucocorticoids induced by developmental stress exert profound short and long-term physiological effects, yet there is relatively little information of how these effects are manifested within the neuroimmune system. Pre and post-natal periods are prime candidates for manipulation in order to uncover the physiological mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune responses. Understanding the potential programming role of glucocorticoids may be key in uncovering vulnerable windows of CNS susceptibility to stressful experiences during embryonic development and improve our use of glucocorticoids as therapeutics in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-Alpha-Hydroxylase-Dependent Stimulation of Renal Klotho Expression by Spironolactone

    Ioana Alesutan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Klotho, a transmembrane protein, protease and hormone mainly expressed in kidney, is required for the suppression of 1,25(OH2D3-generating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp27b1 by FGF23. Conversely, 1,25(OH2D3 stimulates, by activating the vitamin D3 receptor (Vdr, the expression of klotho, thus establishing a negative feedback loop. Klotho protects against renal and vascular injury. Klotho deficiency accelerates aging and early death, effects at least partially due to excessive formation of 1,25(OH2D3 and subsequent hyperphosphatemia. Klotho expression is inhibited by aldosterone. The present study explored the interaction of aldosterone and DOCA as well as the moderately selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone on klotho expression. Methods: mRNA levels were determined utilizing quantitative RT-PCR in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293 or in renal tissues from mice without or with prior mineralocorticoid (aldosterone or DOCA and/or spironolactone treatment. In HEK293 cells, protein levels were determined by western blotting. The experiments in HEK293 cells were performed without or with silencing of CYP27B1, of vitamin D3 receptor (VDR or of mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2. Results: In HEK293 cells aldosterone and in mice DOCA significantly decreased KLOTHO gene expression, effects opposed by spironolactone treatment. Spironolactone treatment alone significantly increased KLOTHO and CYP27B1 transcript levels in HEK293 cells (24 hours and mice (8 hours or 5 days. Moreover, spironolactone significantly increased klotho and CYP27B1 protein levels in HEK293 cells (48 hours. Reduced NR3C2 expression following silencing did not significantly affect KLOTHO and CYP27B1 transcript levels in presence or absence of spironolactone. Silencing of CYP27B1 and VDR significantly blunted the stimulating effect of spironolactone on KLOTHO mRNA levels in HEK293 cells. Conclusion: Besides blocking the effects of

  13. IL-8 and MCP Gene Expression and Production by LPS-Stimulated Human Corneal Stromal Cells

    Roni M. Shtein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine time course of effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS on production of interleukin-8 (IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP by cultured human corneal stromal cells. Methods. Human corneal stromal cells were harvested from donor corneal specimens, and fourth to sixth passaged cells were used. Cell cultures were stimulated with LPS for 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours. Northern blot analysis of IL-8 and MCP gene expression and ELISA for IL-8 and MCP secretion were performed. ELISA results were analyzed for statistical significance using two-tailed Student's t-test. Results. Northern blot analysis demonstrated significantly increased IL-8 and MCP gene expression after 4 and 8 hours of exposure to LPS. ELISA for secreted IL-8 and MCP demonstrated statistically significant increases (P<0.05 after corneal stromal cell stimulation with LPS. Conclusions. This paper suggests that human corneal stromal cells may participate in corneal inflammation by secreting potent leukocyte chemotactic and activating proteins in a time-dependent manner when exposed to LPS.

  14. Mechanical stimulation of C2C12 cells increases m-calpain expression, focal adhesion plaque protein degradation

    Grossi, Alberto; Karlsson, Anders H; Lawson, Moira Ann

    2008-01-01

    . Stimulation due to stretch- or load-induced signaling is now beginning to be understood as a factor which affects gene sequences, protein synthesis and an increase in Ca2+ influx in myocytes. Evidence of the involvement of Ca2+ -dependent activity in myoblast fusion, cell membrane and cytoskeleton component...... reorganization due to the activity of the ubiquitous proteolytic enzymes, calpains, has been reported. Whether there is a link between stretch- or load-induced signaling and calpain expression and activation is not known. Using a magnetic bead stimulation assay and C2C12 mouse myoblasts cell population, we have...... demonstrated that mechanical stimulation via laminin receptors leads to an increase in m-calpain expression, but no increase in the expression of other calpain isoforms. Our study revealed that after a short period of stimulation, m-calpain relocates into focal adhesion complexes and is followed by a breakdown...

  15. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces prolactin expression in rat pituitary gland.

    Hoshino, Satoya; Kurotani, Reiko; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Koike, Kanako; Maruyama, Minoru; Ishikawa, Fumio; Sakatai, Ichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the pituitary gland to understand the effect of M-CSF on pituitary hormones and the relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. When we attempted to establish pituitary cell lines from a thyrotropic pituitary tumor (TtT), a macrophage cell line, TtT/M-87, was established. We evaluated M-CSF-like activity in conditioned media (CM) from seven pituitary cell lines using TtT/M-87 cells. TtT/M-87 proliferation significantly increased in the presence of CM from TtT/GF cells, a pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cell line. M-CSF mRNA was detected in TtT/GF and MtT/E cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its expression in TtT/GF cells was increased in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependent manner. M-CSF mRNA expression was also increased in rat anterior pituitary glands by LPS. M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) mRNA was only detected in TtT/ M-87 cells and increased in the LPS-stimulated rat pituitary glands. In rat pituitary glands, M-CSF and M-CSFR were found to be localized in FS cells and prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells, respectively, by immunohistochemistry. The PRL concentration in rat sera was significantly increased at 24 h after M-CSF administration, and mRNA levels significantly increased in primary culture cells of rat anterior pituitary glands. In addition, TNF-α mRNA was increased in the primary culture cells by M-CSF. These results revealed that M-CSF was secreted from FS cells and M-CSF regulated PRL expression in rat pituitary glands.

  16. Rosiglitazone stimulates the release and synthesis of insulin by enhancing GLUT-2, glucokinase and BETA2/NeuroD expression

    Kim, Hyo-Sup; Noh, Jung-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Hwang, You-Cheol; Yang, Tae-Young; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Kwang-Won; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, and its ligands, the thiazolidinediones, might directly stimulate insulin release and insulin synthesis in pancreatic β-cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on insulin release and synthesis in pancreatic β-cell (INS-1). Insulin release and synthesis were stimulated by treatment with RGZ for 24 h. RGZ upregulated the expressions of GLUT-2 and glucokinase (GCK). Moreover, it was found that RGZ increased the expression of BETA2/NeuroD gene which could regulate insulin gene expression. These results suggest that RGZ could stimulate the release and synthesis of insulin through the upregulation of GLUT-2, GCK, and BETA2/NeuroD gene expression

  17. In vivo correlation between c-Fos expression and corticotroph stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone secretagogues in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    Takigami, Shu; Fujiwara, Ken; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    In the anterior pituitary gland, c-Fos expression is evoked by various stimuli. However, whether c-Fos expression is directly related to the stimulation of anterior pituitary cells by hypothalamic secretagogues is unclear. To confirm whether the reception of hormone-releasing stimuli evokes c-Fos expression in anterior pituitary cells, we have examined c-Fos expression of anterior pituitary glands in rats administered with synthetic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) intravenously or subjected to restraint stress. Single intravenous administration of CRH increases the number of c-Fos-expressing cells, and this number does not change even if the dose is increased. Double-immunostaining has revealed that most of the c-Fos-expressing cells contain adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH); corticotrophs that do not express c-Fos in response to CRH have also been found. However, restraint stress evokes c-Fos expression in most of the corticotrophs and in a partial population of lactotrophs. These results suggest that c-Fos expression increases in corticotrophs stimulated by ACTH secretagogues, including CRH. Furthermore, we have found restricted numbers of corticotrophs expressing c-Fos in response to CRH. Although the mechanism underlying the different responses to CRH is not apparent, c-Fos is probably a useful immunohistochemical marker for corticotrophs stimulated by ACTH secretagogues.

  18. Acute Exercise Stimulates Carnitine Biosynthesis and OCTN2 Expression in Mouse Kidney

    Tom L. Broderick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Carnitine is essential for the transport of long-chain FAs (FA into the mitochondria for energy production. During acute exercise, the increased demand for FAs results in a state of free carnitine deficiency in plasma. The role of kidney in carnitine homeostasis after exercise is not known. Methods: Swiss Webster mice were sacrificed immediately after a 1-hour moderate intensity treadmill run, and at 4-hours and 8-hours into recovery. Non-exercising mice served as controls. Plasma was analyzed for carnitine using acetyltransferase and [14C] acetyl-CoA. Kidney was removed for gene and protein expression of butyrobetaine hydroxylase (γ-BBH, organic cation transporter (OCTN2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα, a regulator of fatty acid oxidation activated by FAs. Results: Acute exercise caused a decrease in plasma free carnitine levels. Rapid return of free carnitine to control levels during recovery was associated with increased γ-BBH expression. Both mRNA and protein levels of OCTN2 were detected in kidney after exercise and during recovery, suggesting renal transport mechanisms were stimulated. These changes were accompanied with a reciprocal increase in PPARα protein expression. Conclusions: Our results show that the decrease in free carnitine after exercise rapidly activates carnitine biosynthesis and renal transport mechanism in kidney to establish carnitine homeostasis.

  19. Oral delivery of Bifidobacterium longum expressing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone to combat ulcerative colitis.

    Wei, Pijin; Yang, Yan; Ding, Qing; Li, Xiuying; Sun, Hanxiao; Liu, Zhaobing; Huang, Junli; Gong, Yahui

    2016-02-01

    α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a tridecapeptide derived from pro-opiomelanocortin that exhibits potent anti-inflammatory properties by regulating the production of inflammatory mediators. This peptide has been well established in several inflammatory models, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, its extremely short duration in vivo limits its clinical application. To address this limitation, Bifidobacterium was used here as a carrier to deliver α-MSH. We utilized α-MSH-engineered Bifidobacterium against IBD, which is closely linked to immune and intestinal microbiota dysfunction. First, we constructed a Bifidobacterium longum secreting α-MSH (B. longum-α-MSH). We then tested the recombinant α-MSH expression and determined its bioactivity in HT-29 cells. To assess its effectiveness, B. longum-α-MSH was used against an ulcerative colitis (UC) model in rats induced by dextran sulfate sodium. The data showed that α-MSH expression in B. longum-α-MSH was effective, and its biological activity was similar to the synthesized one. This UC model experiment indicated that B. longum-α-MSH successfully colonized the intestinal gut, expressed bioactive α-MSH and had a significant anti-inflammatory effect. The results demonstrate the feasibility of preventing IBD by using B. longum-α-MSH.

  20. Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) induces Fc receptor expression on macrophages

    Magee, D.M.; Wing, E.J.; Waheed, A.; Shadduck, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    M-CSF is a glycoprotein that stimulates bone marrow progenitor cells to proliferate and differentiate into macrophages (M theta). In addition, M-CSF can modulate the function of mature M theta. In this study, the authors determined the effect of M-CSF on expression of receptors for IgG (Fc receptors). Murine resident peritoneal M theta monolayers were incubated with either M-CSF, recombinant gamma interferon (IFN), or left untreated for 48 hrs. Expression of Fc receptors was assessed by microscopy using an antibody coated sheet erythrocytes (EA) rosette assay. The results indicated that M-CSF treated M theta had significantly higher numbers of bound EA (7.1 erythrocytes/M theta), than IFN M theta (4.4), or untreated M theta (2.5) (p 51 Cr labelled EA assay, CSF M theta (16,411 cpm), IFN M theta (10,887), untreated M theta (6897) (p < 0.001). Additionally, the maximal response was noted between 10 and 500 units M-CSF. Purified anti-M-CSF IgG, when included in the cultures, ablated the enhancement of EA binding, whereas normal rabbit IgG did not. These findings indicate that M-CSF is a potent inducer of Fc receptor expression on M theta and supports other data concerning the role of M-CSF as a biological response modifier

  1. I Show You How I Like You: Emotional Human-Robot Interaction through Facial Expression and Tactile Stimulation

    Canamero, Dolores; Fredslund, Jacob

    2001-01-01

    We report work on a LEGO robot that displays different emotional expressions in response to physical stimulation, for the purpose of social interaction with humans. This is a first step toward our longer-term goal of exploring believable emotional exchanges to achieve plausible interaction...... with a simple robot. Drawing inspiration from theories of human basic emotions, we implemented several prototypical expressions in the robot's caricatured face and conducted experiments to assess the recognizability of these expressions...

  2. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Moina Hasni Ebou

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1 and 2 (Tph2, leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells.

  3. TLR Stimulation Dynamically Regulates Heme and Iron Export Gene Expression in Macrophages

    Mary Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms to capture iron or iron-containing heme from host tissues or blood. In response, organisms have developed defense mechanisms to keep iron from pathogens. Very little of the body’s iron store is available as free heme; rather nearly all body iron is complexed with heme or other proteins. The feline leukemia virus, subgroup C (FeLV-C receptor, FLVCR, exports heme from cells. It was unknown whether FLVCR regulates heme-iron availability after infection, but given that other heme regulatory proteins are upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection, we hypothesized that macrophages dynamically regulate FLVCR. We stimulated murine primary macrophages or macrophage cell lines with LPS and found that Flvcr is rapidly downregulated in a TLR4/MD2-dependent manner; TLR1/2 and TLR3 stimulation also decreased Flvcr expression. We identified several candidate TLR-activated transcription factors that can bind to the Flvcr promoter. Macrophages must balance the need to sequester iron from systemic circulating or intracellular pathogens with the macrophage requirement for heme and iron to produce reactive oxygen species. Our findings underscore the complexity of this regulation and point to a new role for FLVCR and heme export in macrophages responses to infection and inflammation.

  4. Cytokine-induced loss of glucocorticoid function: effect of kinase inhibitors, long-acting β(2-adrenoceptor [corrected] agonist and glucocorticoid receptor ligands.

    Christopher F Rider

    Full Text Available Acting on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, glucocorticoid resistance often leads to suboptimal asthma control. Since glucocorticoid-induced gene expression contributes to glucocorticoid activity, the aim of this study was to use a 2 × glucocorticoid response element (GRE reporter and glucocorticoid-induced gene expression to investigate approaches to combat cytokine-induced glucocorticoid resistance. Pre-treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF or interleukin-1β inhibited dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of the putative anti-inflammatory genes RGS2 and TSC22D3, or just TSC22D3, in primary human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Dexamethasone-induced DUSP1 mRNA was unaffected. In human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, dexamethasone-induced TSC22D3 and CDKN1C expression (at 6 h was reduced by TNF pre-treatment, whereas DUSP1 and RGS2 mRNAs were unaffected. TNF pre-treatment also reduced dexamethasone-dependent 2×GRE reporter activation. This was partially reversed by PS-1145 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK inhibitor VIII, inhibitors of IKK2 and JNK, respectively. However, neither inhibitor affected TNF-dependent loss of dexamethasone-induced CDKN1C or TSC22D3 mRNA. Similarly, inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, phosphoinositide 3-kinase or protein kinase C pathways failed to attenuate TNF-dependent repression of the 2×GRE reporter. Fluticasone furoate, fluticasone propionate and budesonide were full agonists relative to dexamethasone, while GSK9027, RU24858, des-ciclesonide and GW870086X were partial agonists on the 2×GRE reporter. TNF reduced reporter activity in proportion with agonist efficacy. Full and partial agonists showed various degrees of agonism on RGS2 and TSC22D3 expression, but were equally effective at inducing CDKN1C and DUSP1, and did not affect the repression of CDKN1C or TSC22D3

  5. NADPH oxidase 4 mediates insulin-stimulated HIF-1α and VEGF expression, and angiogenesis in vitro.

    Dan Meng

    Full Text Available Acute intensive insulin therapy causes a transient worsening of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes patients and is related to VEGF expression. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been shown to be involved in HIF-1α and VEGF expression induced by insulin, but the role of specific ROS sources has not been fully elucidated. In this study we examined the role of NADPH oxidase subunit 4 (Nox4 in insulin-stimulated HIF-1α and VEGF expression, and angiogenic responses in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs. Here we demonstrate that knockdown of Nox4 by siRNA reduced insulin-stimulated ROS generation, the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR-β and IRS-1, but did not change the serine phosphorylation of IRS-1. Nox4 gene silencing had a much greater inhibitory effect on insulin-induced AKT activation than ERK1/2 activation, whereas it had little effect on the expression of the phosphatases such as MKP-1 and SHIP. Inhibition of Nox4 expression inhibited the transcriptional activity of VEGF through HIF-1. Overexpression of wild-type Nox4 was sufficient to increase VEGF transcriptional activity, and further enhanced insulin-stimulated the activation of VEGF. Downregulation of Nox4 expression decreased insulin-stimulated mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α, but did not change the rate of HIF-1α degradation. Inhibition of Nox4 impaired insulin-stimulated VEGF expression, cell migration, cell proliferation, and tube formation in HMVECs. Our data indicate that Nox4-derived ROS are essential for HIF-1α-dependent VEGF expression, and angiogenesis in vitro induced by insulin. Nox4 may be an attractive therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy caused by intensive insulin treatment.

  6. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  7. Glucocorticoid programming of intrauterine development.

    Fowden, A L; Valenzuela, O A; Vaughan, O R; Jellyman, J K; Forhead, A J

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important environmental and maturational signals during intrauterine development. Toward term, the maturational rise in fetal glucocorticoid receptor concentrations decreases fetal growth and induces differentiation of key tissues essential for neonatal survival. When cortisol levels rise earlier in gestation as a result of suboptimal conditions for fetal growth, the switch from tissue accretion to differentiation is initiated prematurely, which alters the phenotype that develops from the genotype inherited at conception. Although this improves the chances of survival should delivery occur, it also has functional consequences for the offspring long after birth. Glucocorticoids are, therefore, also programming signals that permanently alter tissue structure and function during intrauterine development to optimize offspring fitness. However, if the postnatal environmental conditions differ from those signaled in utero, the phenotypical outcome of early-life glucocorticoid receptor overexposure may become maladaptive and lead to physiological dysfunction in the adult. This review focuses on the role of GCs in developmental programming, primarily in farm species. It examines the factors influencing GC bioavailability in utero and the effects that GCs have on the development of fetal tissues and organ systems, both at term and earlier in gestation. It also discusses the windows of susceptibility to GC overexposure in early life together with the molecular mechanisms and long-term consequences of GC programming with particular emphasis on the cardiovascular, metabolic, and endocrine phenotype of the offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Deciphering the genetic control of gene expression following Mycobacterium leprae antigen stimulation.

    Manry, Jérémy; Nédélec, Yohann; Fava, Vinicius M; Cobat, Aurélie; Orlova, Marianna; Thuc, Nguyen Van; Thai, Vu Hong; Laval, Guillaume; Barreiro, Luis B; Schurr, Erwin

    2017-08-01

    Leprosy is a human infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. A strong host genetic contribution to leprosy susceptibility is well established. However, the modulation of the transcriptional response to infection and the mechanism(s) of disease control are poorly understood. To address this gap in knowledge of leprosy pathogenicity, we conducted a genome-wide search for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) that are associated with transcript variation before and after stimulation with M. leprae sonicate in whole blood cells. We show that M. leprae antigen stimulation mainly triggered the upregulation of immune related genes and that a substantial proportion of the differential gene expression is genetically controlled. Indeed, using stringent criteria, we identified 318 genes displaying cis-eQTL at an FDR of 0.01, including 66 genes displaying response-eQTL (reQTL), i.e. cis-eQTL that showed significant evidence for interaction with the M. leprae stimulus. Such reQTL correspond to regulatory variations that affect the interaction between human whole blood cells and M. leprae sonicate and, thus, likely between the human host and M. leprae bacilli. We found that reQTL were significantly enriched among binding sites of transcription factors that are activated in response to infection, and that they were enriched among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with susceptibility to leprosy per se and Type-I Reaction, and seven of them have been targeted by recent positive selection. Our study suggested that natural selection shaped our genomic diversity to face pathogen exposure including M. leprae infection.

  9. Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Expression of Pro-Osteoclastogenic Genes in Marrow and Skeletal Tissue

    Alwood, J. S.; Shahnazari, M.; Chicana, B.; Schreurs, A. S.; Kumar, A.; Bartolini, A.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Globus, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can cause rapid mineral loss and increase bone-resorbing osteoclasts within metabolically-active, cancellous-bone tissue leading to structural deficits. To better understand mechanisms involved in rapid, radiation-induced bone loss, we determined the influence of total-body irradiation on expression of select cytokines known both to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and contribute to inflammatory bone disease. Adult (16wk), male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either 2Gy gamma rays (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min) or heavy ions (56Fe, 600MeV, 0.50-1.1Gy/min); this dose corresponds to either a single fraction of radiotherapy (typical total dose is =10Gy) or accumulates over long-duration, interplanetary missions. Serum, marrow, and mineralized tissue were harvested 4hrs-7d later. Gamma irradiation caused a prompt (2.6-fold within 4hrs) and persistent (peaking at 4.1-fold within 1d) rise in the expression of the obligate osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB-ligand (Rankl) within marrow cells over controls. Similarly, Rankl expression peaked in marrow cells within 3d of iron exposure (9.2-fold). Changes in Rankl expression induced by gamma irradiation preceded and overlapped with a rise in expression of other pro-osteoclastic cytokines in marrow (e.g., monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased 11.9-fold, tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased 1.7- fold over controls). Marrow expression of the RANKL decoy receptor, osteoprotegerin (Opg), also rose after irradiation (11.3-fold). The ratio Rankl/Opg in marrow was increased 1.8-fold, a net pro-resorption balance. As expected, radiation increased a serum marker of resorption (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) and led to cancellous bone loss (16% decrease in bone volume/total volume) through reduced trabecular struts. We conclude that total-body irradiation (gamma or heavy-ion) caused temporal, concerted regulation of gene expression within marrow and mineralized tissue for

  10. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor by the vascular endothelium in tumor metastases

    Siraj, Ahsan; Gonin, Julie; Radu, Aurelian; Ghinea, Nicolae; Desestret, Virginie; Antoine, Martine; Fromont, Gaëlle; Huerre, Michel; Sanson, Marc; Camparo, Philippe; Pichon, Christophe; Planeix, François

    2013-01-01

    The Follicle Stimulating Hormone receptor (FSHR) is expressed by the vascular endothelium in a wide range of human tumors. It was not determined however if FSHR is present in metastases which are responsible for the terminal illness. We used immunohistochemistry based on a highly FSHR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect FSHR in cancer metastases from 6 major tumor types (lung, breast, prostate, colon, kidney, and leiomyosarcoma) to 6 frequent locations (bone, liver, lymph node, brain, lung, and pleura) of 209 patients. In 166 patients examined (79%), FSHR was expressed by blood vessels associated with metastatic tissue. FSHR-positive vessels were present in the interior of the tumors and some few millimeters outside, in the normally appearing tissue. In the interior of the metastases, the density of the FSHR-positive vessels was constant up to 7 mm, the maximum depth available in the analyzed sections. No significant differences were noticed between the density of FSHR-positive vessels inside vs. outside tumors for metastases from lung, breast, colon, and kidney cancers. In contrast, for prostate cancer metastases, the density of FSHR-positive vessels was about 3-fold higher at the exterior of the tumor compared to the interior. Among brain metastases, the density of FSHR-positive vessels was highest in lung and kidney cancer, and lowest in prostate and colon cancer. In metastases of breast cancer to the lung pleura, the percentage of blood vessels expressing FSHR was positively correlated with the progesterone receptor level, but not with either HER-2 or estrogen receptors. In normal tissues corresponding to the host organs for the analyzed metastases, obtained from patients not known to have cancer, FSHR staining was absent, with the exception of approx. 1% of the vessels in non tumoral temporal lobe epilepsy samples. FSHR is expressed by the endothelium of blood vessels in the majority of metastatic tumors

  11. Hippocampal low-frequency stimulation inhibits afterdischarge and increases GABA (A) receptor expression in amygdala-kindled pharmacoresistant epileptic rats.

    Wu, Guofeng; Wang, Likun; Hong, Zhen; Ren, Siying; Zhou, Feng

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to observe the effects of hippocampal low-frequency stimulation (Hip-LFS) on amygdala afterdischarge and GABA (A) receptor expression in pharmacoresistant epileptic (PRE) rats. A total of 110 healthy adult male Wistar rats were used to generate a model of epilepsy by chronic stimulation of the amygdala. Sixteen PRE rats were selected from 70 amygdala-kindled rats by testing their response to Phenytoin and Phenobarbital, and they were randomly assigned to a pharmacoresistant stimulation group (PRS group, 8 rats) or a pharmacoresistant control group (PRC group, 8 rats). A stimulation electrode was implanted into the hippocampus of all of the rats. Hip-LFS was administered twice per day in the PRS group for two weeks. Simultaneously, amygdala stimulus-induced seizures and afterdischarge were recorded. After the hippocampal stimulation was terminated, the brain tissues were obtained to determine the GABA (A) receptors by a method of immumohistochemistry and a real-time polymerase chain reaction. The stages and duration of the amygdala stimulus-induced epileptic seizures were decreased in the PRS group. The afterdischarge threshold was increased and the duration as well as the afterdischarge frequency was decreased. Simultaneously, the GABA (A) expression was significantly increased in the PRS group. Hip-LFS may inhibit amygdala stimulus-induced epileptic seizures and up-regulate GABA (A) receptor expression in PRE rats. The antiepileptic effects of hippocampal stimulation may be partly achieved by increasing the GABA (A) receptor.

  12. SDF-1 improves wound healing ability of glucocorticoid-treated adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Kato, Toshiki; Khanh, Vuong Cat; Sato, Kazutoshi; Takeuchi, Kosuke; Carolina, Erica; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Sugaya, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Mishima, Hajime; Ohneda, Osamu

    2017-11-18

    Glucocorticoids cause the delayed wound healing by suppressing inflammation that is required for wound healing process. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) play an important role for wound healing by their cytokine productions including stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1). However, it has not been clear how glucocorticoids affect the wound healing ability of AT-MSCs. In this study, we found that glucocorticoid downregulated SDF-1 expression in AT-MSCs. In addition, glucocorticoid-treated AT-MSCs induced less migration of inflammatory cells and impaired wound healing capacity compared with glucocorticoid-untreated AT-MSCs. Of note, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis-related gene expression was downregulated by glucocorticoid and PGE2 treatment rescued not only SDF-1 expression in the presence of glucocorticoid but also their wound healing capacity in vivo. Furthermore, we found SDF-1-overexpressed AT-MSCs restored wound healing capacity even after treatment of glucocorticoid. Consistent with the results obtained from glucocorticoid-treated AT-MSCs, we found that AT-MSCs isolated from steroidal osteonecrosis donors (sAT-MSCs) who received chronic glucocorticoid therapy showed less SDF-1 expression and impaired wound healing capacity compared with traumatic osteonecrosis donor-derived AT-MSCs (nAT-MSCs). Moreover, the SDF-1 level was also reduced in plasma derived from steroidal osteonecrosis donors compared with traumatic osteonecrosis donors. These results provide the evidence that concomitant application of AT-MSCs with glucocorticoid shows impaired biological modulatory effects that induce impaired wound healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic Network Reconstruction from Gene Expression Data Describing the Effect of LiCl Stimulation on Hepatocytes

    Zellmer Sebastian

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signalling plays an important role in zonation of liver parenchyma and in patterning of hepatocyte heterogeneity. A characteristic marker of this heterogeneity is glutamine synthetase, which is expressed only in a subset of pericentrally located hepatocytes. To investigate, whether and how the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway is involved a culture of hepatocytes was stimulated by LiCl. This resulted in an increase in the specific GS activity, indicating that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway may participate in regulating GS levels. Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays were used to monitor the gene expression changes during a period from 2 to 24 hours after stimulation by LiCl. Samples from a cultivation without stimulation were used as controls. Based on the gene expression profiles a hypothetic signal transduction network was constructed by a reverse engineering algorithm. The network robustness was tested and the most stable structure was identified.

  14. Divergent effects of endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in animal models of inflammation and arthritis

    Ngo, Devi; Beaulieu, Elaine; Gu, Ran; Leaney, Alexandra; Santos, Leilani; Fan, Huapeng; Yang, Yuanhang; Kao, Wenping; Xu, Jiake; Escriou, Virginie; Loiler, Scott; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Morand, Eric F.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) has effects on inflammatory pathways that suggest it to be a key inhibitory regulator of the immune system, and its expression is exquisitely sensitive to induction by glucocorticoids. We undertook this study to test our hypothesis that GILZ deficiency

  15. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    Liu, Chen; Jin, Rong [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Wang, Hong-Cheng [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Xiu-Yuan; Ge, Qing [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Sun, Xiao-Hong, E-mail: sunx@omrf.org [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: zhangyu007@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-κB activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4{sup +} cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-κB activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity.

  16. Hypophyseal corticosteroids stimulate somatotrope differentiation in the embryonic chicken pituitary gland.

    Zheng, Jun; Takagi, Hiroyasu; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Adachi, Akihito; Sakai, Takafumi

    2008-03-01

    Although it is known that glucocorticoids induce differentiation of growth hormone (GH)-producing cells in rodents and birds, the effect of mineralocorticoids on GH mRNA expression and the origin of corticosteroids affecting somatotrope differentiation have not been elucidated. In this study, we therefore carried out experiments to determine the effect of mineralocorticoids on GH mRNA expression in the chicken anterior pituitary gland in vitro and to determine whether corticosteroids are synthesized in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland. In a pituitary culture experiment with E11 embryos, both corticosterone and aldosterone stimulated GH mRNA expression and increased the number of GH cells in both lobes of the pituitary gland in a dose-dependent manner. These effects of the corticosteroids were significantly reversed by pretreatment with mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, or spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Interestingly, an in vitro serum-free culture experiment with an E11 pituitary gland showed that the GH mRNA level spontaneously increased during cultivation for 2 days without any extra stimulation, and this increase in GH mRNA level was completely suppressed by metyrapone, a corticosterone-producing enzyme P450C11 inhibitor. Moreover, progesterone, the corticosterone precursor, also stimulated GH mRNA expression in the cultured chicken pituitary gland, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment with metyrapone. We also detected mRNA expression of enzymes of cytochrome P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage (P450scc) and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase1 (3beta-HSD1) in the developmental chicken pituitary gland from E14 and E18, respectively. These results suggest that mineralocorticoids as well as glucocorticoids can stimulate GH mRNA expression and that corticosteroids generated in the embryonic pituitary gland by intrinsic steroidogenic enzymes stimulate somatotrope differentiation.

  17. Doxazosin stimulates galectin-3 expression and collagen synthesis in HL-1 cardiomyocytes independent of protein kinase C pathway

    Xiaoqian Qian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Doxazosin, a drug commonly prescribed for hypertension and prostate disease, increases heart failure risk. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Galectin-3 is an important mediator that plays a pathogenic role in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. In the present study, we investigated whether doxazosin could stimulate galectin-3 expression and collagen synthesis in cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes. We found that doxazosin dose-dependently induced galectin-3 protein expression, with a statistically significant increase in expression with a dose as low as 0.01 μM. Doxazosin upregulated collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA protein levels and also induced apoptotic protein caspase-3 in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Although we previously reported that activation of protein kinase C (PKC stimulates galectin-3 expression, blocking the PKC pathway with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine did not prevent doxazosin-induced galectin-3 and collagen expression. Consistently, doxazosin treatment did not alter total and phosphorylated PKC. These results suggest that doxazosin-stimulated galectin-3 is independent of PKC pathway. To determine if the α1-adrenergic pathway is involved, we pretreated the cells with the irreversible α-adrenergic receptor blocker phenoxybenzamine and found that doxazosin-stimulated galectin-3 and collagen expression was similar to controls, suggesting that doxazosin acts independently of α1-adrenergic receptor blockade. Collectively, we show a novel effect of doxazosin on cardiomycytes by stimulating heart fibrosis factor galectin-3 expression. The mechanism of action of doxazosin is not mediated through either activation of the PKC pathway or antagonism of α1-adrenergic receptors.

  18. Comprehensive evaluation of gene expression signatures in response to electroacupuncture stimulation at Zusanli (ST36) acupoint by transcriptomic analysis.

    Wu, Jing-Shan; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Feng-Yuan; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2017-08-15

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been applied to treat and prevent diseases for years. However, molecular events happened in both the acupunctured site and the internal organs after EA stimulation have not been clarified. Here we applied transcriptomic analysis to explore the gene expression signatures after EA stimulation. Mice were applied EA stimulation at ST36 for 15 min and nine tissues were collected three hours later for microarray analysis. We found that EA affected the expression of genes not only in the acupunctured site but also in the internal organs. EA commonly affected biological networks involved in cytoskeleton and cell adhesion, and also regulated unique process networks in specific organs, such as γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurotransmission in brain and inflammation process in lung. In addition, EA affected the expression of genes related to various diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases in brain and obstructive pulmonary diseases in lung. This report applied, for the first time, a global comprehensive genome-wide approach to analyze the gene expression profiling of acupunctured site and internal organs after EA stimulation. The connection between gene expression signatures, biological processes, and diseases might provide a basis for prediction and explanation on the therapeutic potentials of acupuncture in organs.

  19. CD1 molecule expression on human monocytes induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Kasinrerk, W; Baumruker, T; Majdic, O; Knapp, W; Stockinger, H

    1993-01-15

    In this paper we demonstrate that granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) specifically induces the expression of CD1 molecules, CD1a, CD1b and CD1c, upon human monocytes. CD1 molecules appeared upon monocytes on day 1 of stimulation with rGM-CSF, and expression was up-regulated until day 3. Monocytes cultured in the presence of LPS, FMLP, PMA, recombinant granulocyte-CSF, rIFN-gamma, rTNF-alpha, rIL-1 alpha, rIL-1 beta, and rIL-6 remained negative. The induction of CD1 molecules by rGM-CSF was restricted to monocytes, since no such effect was observed upon peripheral blood granulocytes, PBL, and the myeloid cell lines Monomac1, Monomac6, MV4/11, HL60, U937, THP1, KG1, and KG1A. CD1a mRNA was detectable in rGM-CSF-induced monocytes but not in those freshly isolated. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analyses of CD1a mAb VIT6 immunoprecipitate from lysate of rGM-CSF-activated monocytes revealed an appropriate CD1a polypeptide band of 49 kDa associated with beta 2-microglobulin. Expression of CD1 molecules on monocytes complements the distribution of these structures on accessory cells, and their specific induction by GM-CSF strengthens the suggestion that CD1 is a family of crucial structures required for interaction between accessory cells and T cells.

  20. Ethanol stimulates tumor progression and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in chick embryos.

    Gu, Jian-Wei; Bailey, Amelia Purser; Sartin, Amanda; Makey, Ian; Brady, Ann L

    2005-01-15

    The mechanisms by which alcohol consumption causes cancer have not been established due to a lack of experimental studies. A chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model that bore human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) was used to determine whether the administration of physiologically relevant doses of ethanol could stimulate tumor growth, angiogenesis, metastasis, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in tumors. HT1080 cells were inoculated onto the "upper CAM" on Day 8, saline or ethanol was administrated at a dose of 0.25 g/kg per day on the CAM, and the tumors were harvested on Day 17. VEGF mRNA and protein were determined by Northern blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intratumoral vascular volume density (IVVD) was determined by point counting on periodic acid-Schiff-stained sections. Intravasation of HT1080 cells was determined using human-Alu polymerase chain reaction analysis. The effects of ethanol on VEGF expression and cell proliferation were examined in cultured HT1080 cells. Ethanol treatment for 9 days caused a 2.2-fold increase in tumor volume (867 +/- 138 mm(3) vs. 402 +/- 28 mm(3)), a 2.1-fold increase in IVVD (0.021 +/- 0.004 mm(3)/mm(3) vs. 0.010 mm(3)/mm(3) +/- 0.002 mm(3)/mm(3)), and a significant increase in VEGF mRNA or protein expression in tumors compared with a group of control embryos (n = 6 embryos; P 8-fold in the intravasated HT1080 cells in the CAM group compared with the control group (n = 6 embryos; P < 0.01). Physiologically relevant levels of ethanol (10 mM and 20 mM) caused a dose-related increase in VEGF mRNA and protein expression in cultured HT1080 cells. The ethanol-HT1080-conditioned media increased the proliferation of endothelial cells, but not of HT1080 cells. The findings suggest that the induction of angiogenesis and VEGF expression by ethanol represents an important mechanism of cancer progression associated with alcoholic beverage consumption. (c) 2004 American Cancer Society.

  1. Histophilus somni Stimulates Expression of Antiviral Proteins and Inhibits BRSV Replication in Bovine Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

    C Lin

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV followed by Histophilus somni causes more severe bovine respiratory disease and a more permeable alveolar barrier in vitro than either agent alone. However, microarray analysis revealed the treatment of bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2 epithelial cells with H. somni concentrated culture supernatant (CCS stimulated up-regulation of four antiviral protein genes as compared with BRSV infection or dual treatment. This suggested that inhibition of viral infection, rather than synergy, may occur if the bacterial infection occurred before the viral infection. Viperin (or radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2--RSAD2 and ISG15 (IFN-stimulated gene 15--ubiquitin-like modifier were most up-regulated. CCS dose and time course for up-regulation of viperin protein levels were determined in treated bovine turbinate (BT upper respiratory cells and BAT2 lower respiratory cells by Western blotting. Treatment of BAT2 cells with H. somni culture supernatant before BRSV infection dramatically reduced viral replication as determined by qRT PCR, supporting the hypothesis that the bacterial infection may inhibit viral infection. Studies of the role of the two known H. somni cytotoxins showed that viperin protein expression was induced by endotoxin (lipooligosaccharide but not by IbpA, which mediates alveolar permeability and H. somni invasion. A naturally occurring IbpA negative asymptomatic carrier strain of H. somni (129Pt does not cause BAT2 cell retraction or permeability of alveolar cell monolayers, so lacks virulence in vitro. To investigate initial steps of pathogenesis, we showed that strain 129Pt attached to BT cells and induced a strong viperin response in vitro. Thus colonization of the bovine upper respiratory tract with an asymptomatic carrier strain lacking virulence may decrease viral infection and the subsequent enhancement of bacterial respiratory infection in vivo.

  2. Highly Expressed Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor (G-CSFR) in Human Gastric Cancer Leads to Poor Survival.

    Fan, Zhisong; Li, Yong; Zhao, Qun; Fan, Liqiao; Tan, Bibo; Zuo, Jing; Hua, Kelei; Ji, Qiang

    2018-03-23

    BACKGROUND Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients has been the mainstay of therapy for many years. Although adding anti-angiogenic drugs to chemotherapy improves patient survival slightly, identifying anti-angiogenic therapy-sensitive patients remains challenging for oncologists. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis, which can be minimized with the anti-G-CSF antibody. Thus, G-CSF might be a potential tumor marker. However, the effects of G-CSF and G-CSFR expression on GC patient survival remain unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy GC tissue samples were collected for G-CSF and G-CSFR detection by immunohistochemistry. A total of 40 paired GC tissues and matched adjacent mucosa were used to measure the G-CSF and G-CSFR levels by ELISA. Correlations between G-CSF/G-CSFR and clinical characteristics, VEGF-A levels and overall survival were analyzed. Biological function and underlying mechanistic investigations were carried out using SGC7901 cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF on tumor proliferation, migration, and tube formation were examined. RESULTS The levels of G-CSFR were upregulated in GC tissues compared to normal mucosa tissues. Higher G-CSF expression was associated with later tumor stages and higher tumor VEGF-A and serum CA724 levels, whereas higher G-CSFR expression was associated with lymph node metastasis. Patients with higher G-CSF expression had shorter overall survival times. In vitro, G-CSF stimulated SGC7901 proliferation and migration through the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and accelerated HUVEC tube formation. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that increased G-CSF and G-CSFR in tumors leads to unfavorable outcomes for GC patients by stimulating tumor proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, indicating that these factors are potential tumor targets for cancer treatment.

  3. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β attenuates glucocorticoid-induced suppression of myogenic differentiation in vitro.

    Zhenyu Ma

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are the only therapy that has been demonstrated to alter the progress of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, the most common muscular dystrophy in children. However, glucocorticoids disturb skeletal muscle metabolism and hamper myogenesis and muscle regeneration. The mechanisms involved in the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of myogenic differentiation are not fully understood. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β is considered to play a central role as a negative regulator in myogenic differentiation. Here, we showed that glucocorticoid treatment during the first 48 h in differentiation medium decreased the level of phosphorylated Ser9-GSK-3β, an inactive form of GSK-3β, suggesting that glucocorticoids affect GSK-3β activity. We then investigated whether GSK-3β inhibition could regulate glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of myogenic differentiation in vitro. Two methods were employed to inhibit GSK-3β: pharmacological inhibition with LiCl and GSK-3β gene knockdown. We found that both methods resulted in enhanced myotube formation and increased levels of muscle regulatory factors and muscle-specific protein expression. Importantly, GSK-3β inhibition attenuated glucocorticoid-induced suppression of myogenic differentiation. Collectively, these data suggest the involvement of GSK-3β in the glucocorticoid-mediated impairment of myogenic differentiation. Therefore, the inhibition of GSK-3β may be a strategy for preventing glucocorticoid-induced muscle degeneration.

  4. Endocannabinoids in the rat basolateral amygdala enhance memory consolidation and enable glucocorticoid modulation of memory

    Campolongo, Patrizia; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.; Cuomo, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) modulates the consolidation of memories for emotionally arousing experiences, an effect that involves the activation of the glucocorticoid system. Because the BLA expresses high densities of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, the present experiments investigated whether the endocannabinoid system in the BLA influences memory consolidation and whether glucocorticoids interact with this system. The CB1 receptor agonist WIN5...

  5. Glucocorticoids and hemopoietic stem cells

    Romashko, O.O.; Berin, G.I.

    1978-01-01

    Analyzing the data of home and foreign investigators the problems of the glucocorticoid effect on blood and bone marrow of experimental (including irradiated ones) animals are discussed. Considered are a character and mechanism of the adrenal cortex hormones effect on blood formation, as well as the effect of pharmacological doses of corticosteroids on CFU, their erythropoietic effect in physiological doses on a morphological picture of bone marrow after irradiation and subsequent introduction of hormones and the hormone effect on intensity of erythropoiesis recovery in irradiated mice. Presented are the experimental data on studying the effect of endogenic hypercorticoidism and a reduced level of endogenic corticosteroids on blood-forming stem cells in the irradiated mice and the data on the ACTH injection effect on CFU migration after irradiation. Evaluated are already available data and further investigations to ground advisability and conditions of using corticosteroids as well as determining rational therapeutic effects on secretion of endogenic glucocorticoids when treating blood system diseases

  6. I Show You How I Like You: Emotional Human-Robot Interaction through Facial Expression and Tactile Stimulation

    Fredslund, Jakob; Cañamero, Lola D.

    2001-01-01

    We report work on a LEGO robot capable of displaying several emo- tional expressions in response to physical contact. Our motivation has been to explore believable emotional exchanges to achieve plausible interaction with a simple robot. We have worked toward this goal in two ways. First......, acknowledging the importance of physical manipulation in children's inter- actions, interaction with the robot is through tactile stimulation; the various kinds of stimulation that can elicit the robot's emotions are grounded in a model of emotion activation based on different stimulation patterns. Sec- ond......, emotional states need to be clearly conveyed. We have drawn inspira- tion from theories of human basic emotions with associated universal facial expressions, which we have implemented in a caricaturized face. We have conducted experiments on both children and adults to assess the recogniz- ability...

  7. Kaempferol stimulates gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor through activation of Sp1 in cultured hepatocytes

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Iwase, Masamori; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-01-01

    A high level of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) is essential for clearing plasma LDL cholesterol, activation of LDLR is a promising therapeutic target for patients with atherosclerotic disease. Here we demonstrated how the flavonoid kaempferol stimulated the gene expression and activity of LDLR in HepG2 cells. The kaempferol-mediated stimulation of LDLR gene expression was completely inhibited by knockdown of Sp1 gene expression. Treatment of HepG2 cells with kaempferol stimulated the recruitment of Sp1 to the promoter region of the LDLR gene, as well as the phosphorylation of Sp1 on Thr-453 and Thr-739. Moreover, these kaempferol-mediated processes were inhibited in the presence of U0126, an ERK pathway inhibitor. These results suggest that kaempferol may increase the activity of Sp1 through stimulation of Sp1 phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity. PMID:27109240

  8. FBXW7 regulates glucocorticoid response in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia by targeting the glucocorticoid receptor for degradation.

    Malyukova, A; Brown, S; Papa, R; O'Brien, R; Giles, J; Trahair, T N; Dalla Pozza, L; Sutton, R; Liu, T; Haber, M; Norris, M D; Lock, R B; Sangfelt, O; Marshall, G M

    2013-04-01

    Loss of function mutation in FBXW7, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is associated with good prognosis and early glucocorticoid treatment response in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that FBXW7 targets the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) for ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in a manner dependent on glycogen synthase kinase 3 β-mediated phsophorylation. FBXW7 inactivation caused elevated GRα levels, and enhanced the transcriptional response to glucocorticoids. There was significant enhancement of GR transcriptional responses in FBXW7-deficient cell lines and primary T-ALL samples, in particular, for those pro-apoptotic regulatory proteins, BIM and PUMA. Reduced FBXW7 expression or function promoted glucocorticoid sensitivity, but not sensitivity to other chemotherapeutic agents used in T-ALL. Moreover, this was a general feature of different cancer cell types. Taken together, our work defines GRα as a novel FBXW7 substrate and demonstrates that favorable patient prognosis in T-ALL is associated with FBXW7 mutations due to enhanced GRα levels and steroid sensitivity. These findings suggest that inactivation of FBXW7, a putative tumor suppressor protein, may create a synthetic lethal state in the presence of specific anticancer therapies.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor signaling in health and disease

    Kadmiel, Mahita; Cidlowski, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones regulated in a circadian and stres-associated manner to maintain various metabolic and homeostatic functions that are necessary for life. Synthetic glucocorticoids are widely prescribed drugs for many conditions including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and inflammatory disorders of the eye. Research in the last few years has begun to unravel the profound complexity of glucocorticoid signaling and has contributed remarkably to improved therapeutic strategies. Glucocorticoids signal through the glucocorticoid receptor, a member of the superfamily of nuclear receptors, in both genomic and non-genomic ways in almost every tissue in the human body. In this review, we will provide an update on glucocorticoid receptor signaling and highlight the role of GR signaling in physiological and pathophysiological conditions in the major organ systems in the human body. PMID:23953592

  10. MCP-1 expressed by osteoclasts stimulates osteoclastogenesis in an autocrine/paracrine manner

    Miyamoto, Kana; Ninomiya, Ken; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Miyauchi, Yoshiteru; Hoshi, Hiroko; Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Miyamoto, Hiroya

    2009-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a chemokine that plays a critical role in the recruitment and activation of leukocytes. Here, we describe that multinuclear osteoclast formation was significantly inhibited in cells derived from MCP-1-deficient mice. MCP-1 has been implicated in the regulation of osteoclast cell-cell fusion; however defects of multinuclear osteoclast formation in the cells from mice deficient in DC-STAMP, a seven transmembrane receptor essential for osteoclast cell-cell fusion, was not rescued by recombinant MCP-1. The lack of MCP-1 in osteoclasts resulted in a down-regulation of DC-STAMP, NFATc1, and cathepsin K, all of which were highly expressed in normal osteoclasts, suggesting that osteoclast differentiation was inhibited in MCP-1-deficient cells. MCP-1 alone did not induce osteoclastogenesis, however, the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis in MCP-1-deficient cells was restored by addition of recombinant MCP-1, indicating that osteoclastogenesis was regulated in an autocrine/paracrine manner by MCP-1 under the stimulation of RANKL in osteoclasts.

  11. Acute and chronic glucocorticoid treatments regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in multiple brain regions in vivo

    Bradley S. Carter

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have primarily interpreted gene expression regulation by glucocorticoids in the brain in terms of impact on neurons; however, less is known about the corresponding impact of glucocorticoids on glia and specifically astrocytes in vivo. Recent microarray experiments have identified glucocorticoid-sensitive mRNAs in primary astrocyte cell culture, including a number of mRNAs that have reported astrocyte-enriched expression patterns relative to other brain cell types. Here, we have tested whether elevations of glucocorticoids regulate a subset of these mRNAs in vivo following acute and chronic corticosterone exposure in adult mice. Acute corticosterone exposure was achieved by a single injection of 10 mg/kg corticosterone, and tissue samples were harvested two hours post-injection. Chronic corticosterone exposure was achieved by administering 10 mg/mL corticosterone via drinking water for two weeks. Gene expression was then assessed in two brain regions associated with glucocorticoid action (prefrontal cortex and hippocampus by qPCR and by in situ hybridization. The majority of measured mRNAs regulated by glucocorticoids in astrocytes in vitro were similarly regulated by acute and/or chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vivo. In addition, the expression levels for mRNAs regulated in at least one corticosterone exposure condition (acute/chronic demonstrated moderate positive correlation between the two conditions by brain region. In situ hybridization analyses suggest that select mRNAs are regulated by chronic corticosterone exposure specifically in astroctyes based on (1 similar general expression patterns between corticosterone-treated and vehicle-treated animals and (2 similar expression patterns to the pan-astrocyte marker Aldh1l1. Our findings demonstrate that glucocorticoids regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in vivo and suggest that glucocorticoids regulate gene expression in the brain in a cell type-dependent fashion.

  12. Neuropilin-1 and neuropilin-2 are differentially expressed in human proteinuric nephropathies and cytokine-stimulated proximal tubular cells.

    Schramek, Herbert; Sarközi, Rita; Lauterberg, Christina; Kronbichler, Andreas; Pirklbauer, Markus; Albrecht, Rudolf; Noppert, Susie-Jane; Perco, Paul; Rudnicki, Michael; Strutz, Frank M; Mayer, Gert

    2009-11-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and neuropilin-2 (NRP2) are transmembrane glycoproteins with large extracellular domains that interact with class 3 semaphorins, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members, and ligands, such as hepatocyte growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor BB, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), and fibroblast growth factor2 (FGF2). Neuropilins (NRPs) have been implicated in tumor growth and vascularization, as novel mediators of the primary immune response and in regeneration and repair; however, their role in renal pathophysiology is largely unknown. Here, we report upregulation of tubular and interstitial NRP2 protein expression in patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In an additional cohort of patients with minimal change disease (MCD), membranous nephropathy (MN), and FSGS, elevated NRP2 mRNA expression in kidney biopsies inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at the time of biopsy. Furthermore, upregulation of NRP2 mRNA correlated with post-bioptic decline of kidney function. Expression of NRP1 and NRP2 in human proximal tubular cells (PTCs) was differentially affected after stimulation with TGF-beta1, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and oncostatin M (OSM). Although the pro-fibrotic mediators, TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta, induced upregulation of NRP2 expression but downregulation of NRP1 expression, OSM stimulated the expression of both NRP1 and NRP2. Basal and OSM-induced NRP1 mRNA expression, as well as TGF-beta1-induced NRP2 mRNA and protein expression were partially mediated by MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling. This is the first report suggesting a differential role of NRP1 and NRP2 in renal fibrogenesis, and TGF-beta1, IL-1beta, and OSM represent the first ligands known to stimulate NRP2 expression in mammalian cells.

  13. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene

  14. Regulation of NAD(P)H:quininone oxidoreductase by glucocorticoids

    Pinaire, J.A.; Xiao, G.-H.; Falkner, K.C.; Prough, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies in neonatal and adolescent rats as well as adrenalectomized rats have demonstrated that glucocorticoids regulate the expression of the rat NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase gene (QOR). We used primary cultures of rat adult hepatocytes to document that added glucorticoids repress both the basal and 1,2-benzanthracene-induced expression of QOR mRNA by 65-70%. QOR enzyme activity and protein were concomitantly suppressed as well. The monotonic concentration response for repression of QOR gene products up to 100 μM DEX concentration demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was most likely involved in this process. The lack of effect at higher concentration rules out a role for the Pregnane X receptor in this regulation by DEX. In addition, the anti-glucorticoid RU38486 blocked this negative regulation and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide had no effect on this repression process. Similar results of GR dependence were observed using a luciferase reporter construct containing the 5'-flanking region of the human QOR gene using HepG2 cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that GR must directly participate in the negative regulation of QOR gene expression by dexamethasone and other glucocorticoids in vivo

  15. High-frequency stimulation of the globus pallidus interna nucleus modulates GFRα1 gene expression in the basal ganglia.

    Ho, Duncun Xun Kiat; Tan, Yong Chee; Tan, Jiayi; Too, Heng Phon; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2014-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the efficacy of DBS is clear, its precise molecular mechanism remains unknown. The glial cell line derived factor (GDNF) family of ligands has been shown to confer neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons, and putaminal infusion of GDNF have been investigated in PD patients with promising results. Despite the potential therapeutic role of GDNF in alleviating motor symptoms, there is no data on the effects of electrical stimulation on GDNF-family receptor (GFR) expression in the basal ganglia structures. Here, we report the effects of electrical stimulation on GFRα1 isoforms, particularly GFRα1a and GFRα1b. Wistar rats underwent 2 hours of high frequency stimulation (HFS) at the globus pallidus interna nucleus. A control group was subjected to a similar procedure but without stimulation. The HFS group, sacrificed 24 hours after treatment, had a threefold decrease in mRNA expression level of GFRα1b (p=0.037), but the expression level reverted to normal 72 hours after stimulation. Our preliminary data reveal the acute effects of HFS on splice isoforms of GFRα1, and suggest that HFS may modulate the splice isoforms of GFRα1a and GFRα1b to varying degrees. Going forward, elucidating the interactions between HFS and GFR may shed new insights into the complexity of GDNF signaling in the nervous system and lead to better design of clinical trials using these signaling pathways to halt disease progression in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression Analysis of Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 in the Rock Bream Oplegnathus fasciatus against Rock Bream Iridovirus (RSIV) Challenge.

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Yang, In Jung; Kim, Woo-Jin; Park, Choul-Ji; Park, Jong-Won; Noh, Gyeong Eon; Lee, Seunghyung; Lee, Young Mee; Hwang, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Chul

    2017-12-01

    Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is known to interfere with viral replication and infection by limiting the viral infection of cells. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) interferes with viral replication and infectivity by limiting viral infection in cells. It also plays an important role in the immune response. In this study, tissue-specific expression of ISG15 in healthy rock bream samples and spatial and temporal expression analysis of rock bream ISG15 (RbISG15) were performed following rock bream iridovirus (RSIV) infection. RbISG15 expression was significantly higher in the eye, gill, intestine, kidney, liver, muscle, spleen, and stomach, but low in the brain. There were particularly high levels of expression in the liver and muscle. RbISG15 expression was also examined in several tissues and at various times following RSIV infection. ISG15 expression increased within 3 h in the whole body and decreased at 24 h after infection. In addition, temporal expression of several tissues following RSIV infection showed a similar pattern in the muscle, kidney, and spleen, increasing at 3 h and decreasing at 72 h. These results suggest that ISG15 plays an important role in the immune response of rock bream. Overall, this study characterizes the response of RbISG15 following RSIV infection.

  17. NALP3 inflammasome upregulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor cause glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    S.W. Paugh (Steven); E.J. Bonten (Erik J.); D. Savic (Daniel); L.B. Ramsey (Laura B.); W.E. Thierfelder (William E.); P. Gurung (Prajwal); R.K.S. Malireddi (R. K. Subbarao); M. Actis (Marcelo); A. Mayasundari (Anand); J. Min (Jaeki); D.R. Coss (David R.); L.T. Laudermilk (Lucas T.); J.C. Panetta (John); J.R. McCorkle (J. Robert); Y. Fan (Yiping); K.R. Crews (Kristine R.); G. Stocco (Gabriele); M.R. Wilkinson (Mark R.); A.M. Ferreira (Antonio M.); C. Cheng (Cheng); W. Yang (Wenjian); S.E. Karol (Seth E.); C.A. Fernandez (Christian A.); B. Diouf (Barthelemy); C. Smith (Colton); J.K. Hicks (J Kevin); A. Zanut (Alessandra); A. Giordanengo (Audrey); D.J. Crona; J.J. Bianchi (Joy J.); L. Holmfeldt (Linda); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Pieters (Rob); S. Jeha (Sima); T.L. Dunwell (Thomas L.); F. Latif (Farida); D. Bhojwani (Deepa); W.L. Carroll (William L.); C.-H. Pui (Ching-Hon); R.M. Myers (Richard M.); R.K. Guy (R Kiplin); T.-D. Kanneganti (Thirumala-Devi); M.V. Relling (Mary); W.E. Evans (William)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and resistance to glucocorticoids in leukemia cells confers poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the prednisolone sensitivity of primary leukemia

  18. Differential gene expression in human granulosa cells from recombinant FSH versus human menopausal gonadotropin ovarian stimulation protocols

    Bietz Mandi G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study was designed to test the hypothesis that granulosa cell (GC gene expression response differs between recombinant FSH and human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG stimulation regimens. Methods Females Results After exclusions, 1736 genes exhibited differential expression between groups. Over 400 were categorized as signal transduction genes, ~180 as transcriptional regulators, and ~175 as enzymes/metabolic genes. Expression of selected genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. Differentially expressed genes included A kinase anchor protein 11 (AKAP11, bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR2, epidermal growth factor (EGF, insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-4, IGFBP-5, and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 alpha. Conclusions Results suggest that major differences exist in the mechanism by which pure FSH alone versus FSH/LH regulate gene expression in preovulatory GC that could impact oocyte maturity and developmental competence.

  19. Tactile Stimulation of the Face and the Production of Facial Expressions Activate Neurons in the Primate Amygdala.

    Mosher, Clayton P; Zimmerman, Prisca E; Fuglevand, Andrew J; Gothard, Katalin M

    2016-01-01

    The majority of neurophysiological studies that have explored the role of the primate amygdala in the evaluation of social signals have relied on visual stimuli such as images of facial expressions. Vision, however, is not the only sensory modality that carries social signals. Both humans and nonhuman primates exchange emotionally meaningful social signals through touch. Indeed, social grooming in nonhuman primates and caressing touch in humans is critical for building lasting and reassuring social bonds. To determine the role of the amygdala in processing touch, we recorded the responses of single neurons in the macaque amygdala while we applied tactile stimuli to the face. We found that one-third of the recorded neurons responded to tactile stimulation. Although we recorded exclusively from the right amygdala, the receptive fields of 98% of the neurons were bilateral. A fraction of these tactile neurons were monitored during the production of facial expressions and during facial movements elicited occasionally by touch stimuli. Firing rates arising during the production of facial expressions were similar to those elicited by tactile stimulation. In a subset of cells, combining tactile stimulation with facial movement further augmented the firing rates. This suggests that tactile neurons in the amygdala receive input from skin mechanoceptors that are activated by touch and by compressions and stretches of the facial skin during the contraction of the underlying muscles. Tactile neurons in the amygdala may play a role in extracting the valence of touch stimuli and/or monitoring the facial expressions of self during social interactions.

  20. Drosophila pheromone-sensing neurons expressing the ppk25 ion channel subunit stimulate male courtship and female receptivity.

    Vijayan, Vinoy; Thistle, Rob; Liu, Tong; Starostina, Elena; Pikielny, Claudio W

    2014-03-01

    As in many species, gustatory pheromones regulate the mating behavior of Drosophila. Recently, several ppk genes, encoding ion channel subunits of the DEG/ENaC family, have been implicated in this process, leading to the identification of gustatory neurons that detect specific pheromones. In a subset of taste hairs on the legs of Drosophila, there are two ppk23-expressing, pheromone-sensing neurons with complementary response profiles; one neuron detects female pheromones that stimulate male courtship, the other detects male pheromones that inhibit male-male courtship. In contrast to ppk23, ppk25, is only expressed in a single gustatory neuron per taste hair, and males with impaired ppk25 function court females at reduced rates but do not display abnormal courtship of other males. These findings raised the possibility that ppk25 expression defines a subset of pheromone-sensing neurons. Here we show that ppk25 is expressed and functions in neurons that detect female-specific pheromones and mediates their stimulatory effect on male courtship. Furthermore, the role of ppk25 and ppk25-expressing neurons is not restricted to responses to female-specific pheromones. ppk25 is also required in the same subset of neurons for stimulation of male courtship by young males, males of the Tai2 strain, and by synthetic 7-pentacosene (7-P), a hydrocarbon normally found at low levels in both males and females. Finally, we unexpectedly find that, in females, ppk25 and ppk25-expressing cells regulate receptivity to mating. In the absence of the third antennal segment, which has both olfactory and auditory functions, mutations in ppk25 or silencing of ppk25-expressing neurons block female receptivity to males. Together these results indicate that ppk25 identifies a functionally specialized subset of pheromone-sensing neurons. While ppk25 neurons are required for the responses to multiple pheromones, in both males and females these neurons are specifically involved in stimulating

  1. Angiopoietin 2 stimulates TIE2-expressing monocytes to suppress T cell activation and to promote regulatory T cell expansion.

    Coffelt, Seth B; Chen, Yung-Yi; Muthana, Munitta; Welford, Abigail F; Tal, Andrea O; Scholz, Alexander; Plate, Karl H; Reiss, Yvonne; Murdoch, Craig; De Palma, Michele; Lewis, Claire E

    2011-04-01

    Angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) is a proangiogenic cytokine whose expression is often upregulated by endothelial cells in tumors. Expression of its receptor, TIE2, defines a highly proangiogenic subpopulation of myeloid cells in circulation and tumors called TIE2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEMs). Genetic depletion of TEMs markedly reduces tumor angiogenesis in various tumor models, emphasizing their essential role in driving tumor progression. Previously, we demonstrated that ANGPT2 augments the expression of various proangiogenic genes, the potent immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10, and a chemokine for regulatory T cells (Tregs), CCL17 by TEMs in vitro. We now show that TEMs also express higher levels of IL-10 than TIE2(-) macrophages in tumors and that ANGPT2-stimulated release of IL-10 by TEMs suppresses T cell proliferation, increases the ratio of CD4(+) T cells to CD8(+) T cells, and promotes the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(high)FOXP3(+) Tregs. Furthermore, syngeneic murine tumors expressing high levels of ANGPT2 contained not only high numbers of TEMs but also increased numbers of Tregs, whereas genetic depletion of tumor TEMs resulted in a marked reduction in the frequency of Tregs in tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that ANGPT2-stimulated TEMs represent a novel, potent immunosuppressive force in tumors.

  2. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation influences expression and suppression of impulsive behaviour in Parkinson’s disease

    Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Elias, William J.; Frysinger, Robert C.; Bashore, Theodore R.; Downs, Kara E.; van Wouwe, Nelleke C.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Past studies show beneficial as well as detrimental effects of subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation on impulsive behaviour. We address this paradox by investigating individuals with Parkinson’s disease treated with subthalamic nucleus stimulation (n = 17) and healthy controls without Parkinson’s disease (n = 17) on performance in a Simon task. In this reaction time task, conflict between premature response impulses and goal-directed action selection is manipulated. We applied distributional analytic methods to separate the strength of the initial response impulse from the proficiency of inhibitory control engaged subsequently to suppress the impulse. Patients with Parkinson’s disease were tested when stimulation was either turned on or off. Mean conflict interference effects did not differ between controls and patients, or within patients when stimulation was on versus off. In contrast, distributional analyses revealed two dissociable effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Fast response errors indicated that stimulation increased impulsive, premature responding in high conflict situations. Later in the reaction process, however, stimulation improved the proficiency with which inhibitory control was engaged to suppress these impulses selectively, thereby facilitating selection of the correct action. This temporal dissociation supports a conceptual framework for resolving past paradoxical findings and further highlights that dynamic aspects of impulse and inhibitory control underlying goal-directed behaviour rely in part on neural circuitry inclusive of the subthalamic nucleus. PMID:20861152

  3. Optimal glucocorticoid replacement in adrenal insufficiency.

    Øksnes, Marianne; Ross, Richard; Løvås, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (glucocorticoid deficiency) comprises a group of rare diseases, including primary adrenal insufficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Lifesaving glucocorticoid therapy was introduced over 60 years ago, but since then a number of advances in treatment have taken place. Specifically, little is known about short- and long-term treatment effects, and morbidity and mortality. Over the past decade, systematic cohort and registry studies have described reduced health-related quality of life, an unfavourable metabolic profile and increased mortality in patients with adrenal insufficiency, which may relate to unphysiological glucocorticoid replacement. This has led to the development of new modes of replacement that aim to mimic normal glucocorticoid physiology. Here, evidence for the inadequacy of conventional glucocorticoid therapy and recent developments in treatment are reviewed, with an emphasis on primary adrenal insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucocorticoids as mediators of developmental programming effects.

    Khulan, Batbayar; Drake, Amanda J

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to an adverse environment in early life is associated with an increased risk of cardio-metabolic and behavioral disorders in adulthood, a phenomenon termed 'early life programming'. One major hypothesis for early life programming is fetal glucocorticoid overexposure. In animal studies, prenatal glucocorticoid excess as a consequence of maternal stress or through exogenous administration to the mother or fetus is associated with programming effects on cardiovascular and metabolic systems and on the brain. These effects can be transmitted to subsequent generations. Studies in humans provide some evidence that prenatal glucocorticoid exposure may exert similar programming effects on glucose/insulin homeostasis, blood pressure and neurodevelopment. The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids mediate these effects are unclear but may include a role for epigenetic modifications. This review discusses the evidence for glucocorticoid programming in animal models and in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase expression by the farnesoid X receptor

    Savkur, Rajesh S.; Bramlett, Kelli S.; Michael, Laura F.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) functions as an important junction in intermediary metabolism by influencing the utilization of fat versus carbohydrate as a source of fuel. Activation of PDC is achieved by phosphatases, whereas, inactivation is catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs). The expression of PDK4 is highly regulated by the glucocorticoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. We demonstrate that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4), which regulates a variety of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism, also regulates the expression of PDK4. Treatment of rat hepatoma cells as well as human primary hepatocytes with FXR agonists stimulates the expression of PDK4 to levels comparable to those obtained with glucocorticoids. In addition, treatment of mice with an FXR agonist significantly increased hepatic PDK4 expression, while concomitantly decreasing plasma triglyceride levels. Thus, activation of FXR may suppress glycolysis and enhance oxidation of fatty acids via inactivation of the PDC by increasing PDK4 expression

  6. Quinapril treatment increases insulin-stimulated endothelial function and adiponectin gene expression in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Hermann, Thomas S; Li, Weijie; Dominguez, Helena

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce cardiovascular mortality and improve endothelial function in type 2 diabetic patients. We hypothesized that 2 months of quinapril treatment would improve insulin-stimulated endothelial function and glucose uptake in type 2 diabetic subjects...... and simultaneously increase the expression of genes that are pertinent for endothelial function and metabolism. METHODS: Twenty-four type 2 diabetic subjects were randomized to receive 2 months of quinapril 20 mg daily or no treatment in an open parallel study. Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation...... occlusion plethysmography. Gene expression was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS: Quinapril treatment increased insulin-stimulated endothelial function in the type 2 diabetic subjects (P = 0.005), whereas forearm glucose uptake was unchanged. Endothelial function was also increased by quinapril (P = 0...

  7. A CHROMATIN MODIFYING ENZYME, SDG8, IS REQUIRED FOR MORPHOLOGICAL, GENE EXPRESSION, AND EPIGENETIC RESPONSES TO MECHANICAL STIMULATION

    Christopher Ian Cazzonelli; Nazia eNisar; Andrea C Roberts; Kevin eMurray; Justin O Borevitz; Barry James Pogson

    2014-01-01

    Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzy...

  8. A chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8, is involved in morphological, gene expression, and epigenetic responses to mechanical stimulation

    Cazzonelli, Christopher I.; Nisar, Nazia; Roberts, Andrea C.; Murray, Kevin D.; Borevitz, Justin O.; Pogson, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzym...

  9. Trombinol, a bioactive fraction of Psidium guajava, stimulates thrombopoietin expression in HepG2 cells

    Guntur Berlian

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: Thrombopoietin stimulating function of trombinol could be potentially considered as one of alternative treatment for thrombocytopenia-related cases, including post chemotherapy shock, dengue fever and liver failure.

  10. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    Sato, Shoko, E-mail: satosho@rs.tus.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Shirakawa, Hitoshi, E-mail: shirakah@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Tomita, Shuhei, E-mail: tomita@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Tohkin, Masahiro, E-mail: tohkin@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Medical Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 267-8603 (Japan); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: gonzalef@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Komai, Michio, E-mail: mkomai@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  11. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction

  12. Effects of a single glucocorticoid injection on propylene glycol-treated cows with clinical ketosis.

    van der Drift, Saskia G A; Houweling, Martin; Bouman, Marina; Koets, Ad P; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Nielen, Mirjam; Jorritsma, Ruurd

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the metabolic effects of glucocorticoids when administered to propylene glycol-treated cows with clinical ketosis. Clinical ketosis was defined by depressed feed intake and milk production, and a maximal score for acetoacetate in urine. All cows received 250 mL oral propylene glycol twice daily for 3 days and were randomly assigned to a single intramuscular injection with sterile isotonic saline solution (n = 14) or dexamethasone-21-isonicotinate (n = 17). Metabolic blood variables were monitored for 6 days and adipose tissue variables for 3 days. β-Hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations in blood decreased in all cows during treatment, but were lower in glucocorticoid-treated cows. Cows treated with glucocorticoids had higher plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, whereas concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids, 3-methylhistidine and growth hormone were unaffected. mRNA expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, BHBA receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type γ in adipose tissue was not affected. This shows that lipolytic effects do not appear to be important in ketotic cows when glucocorticoids are combined with PG. Plasma 3-methyl histidine concentrations were similar in both groups, suggesting that glucocorticoids did not increase muscle breakdown and that the greater rise in plasma glucose in glucocorticoid-treated cows may not be due to increased supply of glucogenic amino acids from muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Glucocorticoids regulate surfactant protein synthesis in a pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line

    O'Reilly, M.A.; Gazdar, A.F.; Clark, J.C.; Pilot-Matias, T.J.; Wert, S.E.; Hull, W.M.; Whitsett, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis of pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C was demonstrated in a cell line derived from a human adenocarcinoma of the lung. The cells contained numerous lamellar inclusion bodies and formed organized groups of cells containing well-developed junctional complexes and apical microvillous membranes. Synthesis of SP-A was detected in the cells by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay and by immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled protein. SP-A was identified as an Mr 31,000-36,000 polypeptide containing asparagine-linked carbohydrate. Northern blot analysis detected SP-A mRNA of 2.2 kb. Dexamethasone (1-10 nM) enhanced the relative abundance of SP-A mRNA. Despite stimulation of SP-A mRNA, intracellular SP-A content was unaltered or inhibited by dexamethasone. SP-B and SP-C mRNAs and synthesis of the SP-B and SP-C precursors were markedly induced by dexamethasone. ProSP-B was synthesized and secreted primarily as an Mr 42,000-46,000 polypeptide. Proteolysis of the proSP-B resulted in the generation of endoglycosidase F-sensitive Mr = 19,000-21,000 and 25,000-27,000 peptides, which were detected both intra- and extracellularly. SP-C proprotein of Mr = 22,000 and smaller SP-C fragments were detected intracellularly but were not detected in the media. Mature forms of SP-B (Mr = 8,000) and SP-C (Mr = 4,000) were not detected. Glucocorticoids directly enhance the relative synthesis and mRNA of the surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C. Discrepancies among SP-A mRNA, its de novo synthesis, and cell content suggest that glucocorticoid may alter both pre- and posttranslational factors modulating SP-A expression

  14. Peripheral CLOCK regulates target-tissue glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity in a circadian fashion in man.

    Evangelia Charmandari

    Full Text Available Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the "master" circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral "slave" counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans.We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs as non-synchronized controls.GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo.Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night.

  15. Peripheral CLOCK Regulates Target-Tissue Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity in a Circadian Fashion in Man

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.; Lambrou, George I.; Pavlaki, Aikaterini; Koide, Hisashi; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Kino, Tomoshige

    2011-01-01

    Context and Objective Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the “master” circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral “slave” counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. Design and Participants We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs) as non-synchronized controls. Results GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. Conclusions Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night. PMID:21980503

  16. Effects of chronic mild stress on behavioral and neurobiological parameters - Role of glucocorticoid.

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zhen-zhen; Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Chu, Shi-feng; Chen, Nai-hong

    2016-02-01

    Major depression is thought to originate from maladaptation to adverse events, particularly when impairments occur in mood-related brain regions. Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is one of the major systems involved in physiological stress response. HPA axis dysfunction and high glucocorticoid concentrations play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. In addition, astrocytic disability and dysfunction of neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) greatly influence the development of depression and anxiety disorders. Therefore, we investigated whether depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviors manifest in the absence of glucocorticoid production and circulation in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats after chronic mild stress (CMS) exposure and its potential molecular mechanisms. The results demonstrate that glucocorticoid-controlled rats showed anxiety-like behaviors but not depression-like behaviors after CMS. Molecular and cellular changes included the decreased BDNF in the hippocampus, astrocytic dysfunction with connexin43 (cx43) decreasing and abnormality in gap junction in prefrontal cortex (PFC). Interestingly, we did not find any changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or its chaperone protein FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5) expression in the hippocampus or PFC in ADX rats subjected to CMS. In conclusion, the production and circulation of glucocorticoids are one of the contributing factors in the development of depression-like behaviors in response to CMS. In contrast, the effects of CMS on anxiety-like behaviors are independent of the presence of circulating glucocorticoids. Meanwhile, stress decreased GR expression and enhanced FKBP5 expression via higher glucocorticoid exposure. Gap junction dysfunction and changes in BDNF may be associated with anxiety-like behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Salix purpurea Stimulates the Expression of Specific Bacterial Xenobiotic Degradation Genes in a Soil Contaminated with Hydrocarbons.

    Antoine P Pagé

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to uncover Salix purpurea-microbe xenobiotic degradation systems that could be harnessed in rhizoremediation, and to identify microorganisms that are likely involved in these partnerships. To do so, we tested S. purpurea's ability to stimulate the expression of 10 marker microbial oxygenase genes in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. In what appeared to be a detoxification rhizosphere effect, transcripts encoding for alkane 1-monooxygenases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, laccase/polyphenol oxidases, and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase small subunits were significantly more abundant in the vicinity of the plant's roots than in bulk soil. This gene expression induction is consistent with willows' known rhizoremediation capabilities, and suggests the existence of S. purpurea-microbe systems that target many organic contaminants of interest (i.e. C4-C16 alkanes, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo(apyrene, biphenyl, polychlorinated biphenyls. An enhanced expression of the 4 genes was also observed within the bacterial orders Actinomycetales, Rhodospirillales, Burkholderiales, Alteromonadales, Solirubrobacterales, Caulobacterales, and Rhizobiales, which suggest that members of these taxa are active participants in the exposed partnerships. Although the expression of the other 6 marker genes did not appear to be stimulated by the plant at the community level, signs of additional systems that rest on their expression by members of the orders Solirubrobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Actinomycetales, and Sphingobacteriales were observed. Our study presents the first transcriptomics-based identification of microbes whose xenobiotic degradation activity in soil appears stimulated by a plant. It paints a portrait that contrasts with the current views on these consortia's composition, and opens the door for the development of laboratory test models geared towards the identification of root exudate characteristics that limit the

  18. Interleukin 6 downregulates p53 expression and activity by stimulating ribosome biogenesis: a new pathway connecting inflammation to cancer

    Brighenti, E; Calabrese, C; Liguori, G; Giannone, F A; Trerè, D; Montanaro, L; Derenzini, M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is an established risk factor for the onset of cancer, and the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 has a role in tumorigenesis by enhancing proliferation and hindering apoptosis. As factors stimulating proliferation also downregulate p53 expression by enhancing ribosome biogenesis, we hypothesized that IL-6 may cause similar changes in inflamed tissues, thus activating a mechanism that favors neoplastic transformation. Here, we showed that IL-6 downregulated the expression and activity of p53 in transformed and untransformed human cell lines. This was the consequence of IL-6-dependent stimulation of c-MYC mRNA translation, which was responsible for the upregulation of rRNA transcription. The enhanced rRNA transcription stimulated the MDM2-mediated proteasomal degradation of p53, by reducing the availability of ribosome proteins for MDM2 binding. The p53 downregulation induced the acquisition of cellular phenotypic changes characteristic of epithelial–mesenchymal transition, such as a reduced level of E-cadherin expression, increased cell invasiveness and a decreased response to cytotoxic stresses. We found that these changes also occurred in colon epithelial cells of patients with ulcerative colitis, a very representative example of chronic inflammation at high risk for tumor development. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of colon biopsy samples showed an upregulation of ribosome biogenesis, a reduced expression of p53, together with a focal reduction or absence of E-cadherin expression in chronic colitis in comparison with normal mucosa samples. These changes disappeared after treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs. Taken together, the present results highlight a new mechanism that may link chronic inflammation to cancer, based on p53 downregulation, which is activated by the enhancement of rRNA transcription upon IL-6 exposure. PMID:24531714

  19. Neutrophils are not less sensitive than other blood leukocytes to the genomic effects of glucocorticoids.

    Gaelle Hirsch

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are generally considered less responsive to glucocorticoids compared to other inflammatory cells. The reported increase in human neutrophil survival mediated by these drugs partly supports this assertion. However, it was recently shown that dexamethasone exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in equine peripheral blood neutrophils. Few comparative studies of glucocorticoid effects in neutrophils and other leukocytes have been reported and a relative insensitivity of neutrophils to these drugs could not be ruled out.We assessed glucocorticoid-responsiveness in equine and human peripheral blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes.Blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes were isolated from 6 healthy horses and 4 human healthy subjects. Cells were incubated for 5 h with or without LPS (100 ng/mL alone or combined with hydrocortisone, prednisolone or dexamethasone (10(-8 M and 10(-6 M. IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, glutamine synthetase and GR-α mRNA expression was quantified by qPCR. Equine neutrophils were also incubated for 20 h with or without the three glucocorticoids and cell survival was assessed by flow cytometry and light microscopy on cytospin preparations.We found that glucocorticoids down-regulated LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in both cell populations and species. These drugs also significantly increased glutamine synthetase gene expression in both equine cell populations. The magnitude of glucocorticoid response between cell populations was generally similar in both species. We also showed that dexamethasone had a comparable inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory gene expression in both human and equine neutrophils. As reported in other species, glucocorticoids significantly increase the survival in equine neutrophils.Glucocorticoids exert genomic effects of similar magnitude on neutrophils and on other blood leukocytes. We speculate that the poor response to glucocorticoids observed in some

  20. Neutrophils Are Not Less Sensitive Than Other Blood Leukocytes to the Genomic Effects of Glucocorticoids

    Hirsch, Gaelle; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Beauchamp, Guy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are generally considered less responsive to glucocorticoids compared to other inflammatory cells. The reported increase in human neutrophil survival mediated by these drugs partly supports this assertion. However, it was recently shown that dexamethasone exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in equine peripheral blood neutrophils. Few comparative studies of glucocorticoid effects in neutrophils and other leukocytes have been reported and a relative insensitivity of neutrophils to these drugs could not be ruled out. Objective We assessed glucocorticoid-responsiveness in equine and human peripheral blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes. Methods Blood neutrophils and neutrophil-depleted leukocytes were isolated from 6 healthy horses and 4 human healthy subjects. Cells were incubated for 5 h with or without LPS (100 ng/mL) alone or combined with hydrocortisone, prednisolone or dexamethasone (10−8 M and 10−6 M). IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, glutamine synthetase and GR-α mRNA expression was quantified by qPCR. Equine neutrophils were also incubated for 20 h with or without the three glucocorticoids and cell survival was assessed by flow cytometry and light microscopy on cytospin preparations. Results We found that glucocorticoids down-regulated LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in both cell populations and species. These drugs also significantly increased glutamine synthetase gene expression in both equine cell populations. The magnitude of glucocorticoid response between cell populations was generally similar in both species. We also showed that dexamethasone had a comparable inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory gene expression in both human and equine neutrophils. As reported in other species, glucocorticoids significantly increase the survival in equine neutrophils. Conclusions Glucocorticoids exert genomic effects of similar magnitude on neutrophils and on other blood leukocytes. We speculate that the poor response to

  1. DOSAGEM DE METABÓLITOS DE GLUCOCORTICOIDES E PROGESTERONA EM FEZES DE PAPAGAIO-VERDADEIRO (AMAZONA AESTIVA

    Caroline Junko Fujihara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to evaluate fecal concentrations of metabolites of glucocorticoids, measured by enzyme immunoassay with a cortisol antibody and by radioimmunoassay with a corticosterone antibody, and progesterone by radioimmunoassay with a progesterone antibody in blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva after ACTH challenge. The adrenal stimulation with ACTH (25 UI/animal resulted in an increase of fecal glucocorticoids metabolites concentration, but it did not affect the concentrations of fecal progesterone metabolites. Although there were no synchronized peaks of glucocorticoid metabolites excretion measured by enzyme immunoassay and radioimmunoassay, there were two peaks of excretion, one at 2-4 hours and other at 8-10 hours. Despite the occurrence of peaks, the analysis of fecal glucocorticoids metabolites and progesterone metabolites showed no effect of group (control and treatment, moment (hours of sampling and sex.

  2. Social Regulation of Leukocyte Homeostasis: The Role of Glucocorticoid Sensitivity

    Cole, Steve W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent small-scale genomics analyses suggest that physiologic regulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression by endogenous glucocorticoids may be compromised in individuals who experience chronic social isolation. This could potentially contribute to the elevated prevalence of inflammation-related disease previously observed in social isolates. The present study assessed the relationship between leukocyte distributional sensitivity to glucocorticoid regulation and subjective social isolation in a large population-based sample of older adults. Initial analyses confirmed that circulating neutrophil percentages were elevated, and circulating lymphocyte and monocyte percentages were suppressed, in direct proportion to circulating cortisol levels. However, leukocyte distributional sensitivity to endogenous glucocorticoids was abrogated in individuals reporting either occasional or frequent experiences of subjective social isolation. This finding held in both nonparametric univariate analyses and in multivariate linear models controlling for a variety of biological, social, behavioral, and psychological confounders. The present results suggest that social factors may alter immune cell sensitivity to physiologic regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in ways that could ultimately contribute to the increased physical health risks associated with social isolation. PMID:18394861

  3. Cannabinoids and glucocorticoids modulate emotional memory after stress.

    Akirav, Irit

    2013-12-01

    Bidirectional and functional relationships between glucocorticoids and the endocannabinoid system have been demonstrated. Here, I review the interaction between the endocannabinoid and glucocorticoid/stress systems. Specifically, stress is known to produce rapid changes in endocannabinoid signaling in stress-responsive brain regions. In turn, the endocannabinoid system plays an important role in the downregulation and habituation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity in response to stress. Glucocorticoids also recruit the endocannabinoid system to exert rapid negative feedback control of the HPA axis during stress. It became increasingly clear, however, that cannabinoid CB1 receptors are also abundantly expressed in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and other limbic regions where they modulate emotional arousal effects on memory. Enhancing cannabinoids signaling using exogenous CB1 receptor agonists prevent the effects of acute stress on emotional memory. I propose a model suggesting that the ameliorating effects of exogenously administered cannabinoids on emotional learning after acute stress are mediated by the decrease in the activity of the HPA axis via GABAergic mechanisms in the amygdala. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Columbia University: Direct Reversal of Glucocorticoid Resistance by AKT inhibition in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL) | Office of Cancer Genomics

    The goal of this project is to identify key druggable regulators of glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL. To this end, a reverse-engineered T-ALL context-specific regulatory interaction network was created from a phenotypically diverse T-ALL gene expression dataset, and then this network was interrogated using master regulator analysis to find drivers of glucocorticoid resistance.

  5. Circumvention of glucocorticoid resistance in childhood leukemia.

    Haarman, E G; Kaspers, G J L; Pieters, R; Rottier, M M A; Veerman, A J P

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we determined if in vitro resistance to prednisolone and dexamethasone could be circumvented by cortivazol or methylprednisolone, or reversed by meta-iodobenzylguanidine in pediatric lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia. As there were strong correlations between the LC50 values (drug concentration inducing 50% leukemic cell kill, LCK) of the different glucocorticoids and median prednisolone/methylprednisolone, prednisolone/dexamethasone and prednisolone/cortivazol LC50 ratios did not differ between the leukemia subtypes, we conclude that none of the glucocorticoids had preferential anti-leukemic activity. Meta-iodobenzylguanidine however, partially reversed glucocorticoid resistance in 19% of the lymphoblastic leukemia samples.

  6. Fecal Glucocorticoid Analysis: Non-invasive Adrenal Monitoring in Equids.

    Yarnell, Kelly; Purcell, Rebecca S; Walker, Susan L

    2016-04-25

    Adrenal activity can be assessed in the equine species by analysis of feces for corticosterone metabolites. During a potentially aversive situation, corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) is released from the hypothalamus in the brain. This stimulates the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland, which in turn stimulates release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal gland. In horses the glucocorticoid corticosterone is responsible for several adaptations needed to support equine flight behaviour and subsequent removal from the aversive situation. Corticosterone metabolites can be detected in the feces of horses and assessment offers a non-invasive option to evaluate long term patterns of adrenal activity. Fecal assessment offers advantages over other techniques that monitor adrenal activity including blood plasma and saliva analysis. The non-invasive nature of the method avoids sampling stress which can confound results. It also allows the opportunity for repeated sampling over time and is ideal for studies in free ranging horses. This protocol describes the enzyme linked immunoassay (EIA) used to assess feces for corticosterone, in addition to the associated biochemical validation.

  7. Studies on gene expressions analyses for Arabidopsis thaliana plants stimulated by space flight condition

    Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Pan, Yi; Li, Huasheng

    We carried out whole-genome microarray to screen the transcript profile of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings after three treatment: space microgravity condition( Seedlings grown in microgravity state of space flight of SIMBOX on Shenzhou-8), 1g centrifugal force in space(Seedlings grown in 1g centrifugal force state of space flight of SIMBOX on Shenzhou-8) and ground control. The result of microarray analysis is as followed: There were 368 genes significantly differentially expressed in space microgravity condition compared with that in 1g centrifuge space condition. Space radiation caused 246 genes significantly differentially expressed between seedlings in 1g centrifuge space condition and ground control. Space conditions (including microgravity and radiation) caused 621 genes significantly differentially expressed between seedlings in space microgravity condition and ground control. Microgravity and radiation as a single factor can cause plant gene expression change, but two factors synergism can produce some new effects on plant gene expression. The function of differential expression genes were analyst by bioinformatics, and we found the expression of genes related with stress were more different, such as the dehydration of protein (dehydrin Xero2) expression is up-regulated 57 times; low-temperature-induced protein expression is up-regulated in 49 times; heat shock protein expression is up-regulated 20 times; transcription factor DREB2A expression increase 25 times; protein phosphatase 2C expression is up-regulated 14 times; transcription factor NAM-like protein expression is up-regulated 13 times; cell wall metabolism related genes (xyloglucan, endo-1, 4-beta-D-glucanase) expression is down-regulated in 15 times. The results provide scientific data for the mechanism of space mutation.

  8. T-Cadherin Expression in Melanoma Cells Stimulates Stromal Cell Recruitment and Invasion by Regulating the Expression of Chemokines, Integrins and Adhesion Molecules

    Rubina, Kseniya A.; Surkova, Ekaterina I.; Semina, Ekaterina V.; Sysoeva, Veronika Y.; Kalinina, Natalia I.; Poliakov, Alexei A.; Treshalina, Helena M.; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A.

    2015-01-01

    T-cadherin is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored member of the cadherin superfamily involved in the guidance of migrating cells. We have previously shown that in vivo T-cadherin overexpression leads to increased melanoma primary tumor growth due to the recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells as well as the enhanced metastasis. Since tumor progression is highly dependent upon cell migration and invasion, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms of T-cadherin participation in these processes. Herein we show that T-cadherin expression results in the increased invasive potential due to the upregulated expression of pro-oncogenic integrins, chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The detected increase in chemokine expression could be responsible for the stromal cell recruitment. At the same time our previous data demonstrated that T-cadherin expression inhibited neoangiogenesis in the primary tumors. We demonstrate that T-cadherin overexpression leads to the increase in the expression of anti-angiogenic molecules and reduction in pro-angiogenic factors. Thus, T-cadherin plays a dual role in melanoma growth and progression: T-cadherin expression results in anti-angiogenic effects in melanoma, however, this also stimulates transcription of genes responsible for migration and invasion of melanoma cells

  9. T-Cadherin Expression in Melanoma Cells Stimulates Stromal Cell Recruitment and Invasion by Regulating the Expression of Chemokines, Integrins and Adhesion Molecules

    Rubina, Kseniya A., E-mail: rkseniya@mail.ru; Surkova, Ekaterina I.; Semina, Ekaterina V.; Sysoeva, Veronika Y.; Kalinina, Natalia I. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky av., 31/5, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation); Poliakov, Alexei A. [Division of Developmental Neurobiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Treshalina, Helena M. [Federal State Budgetary Scietific Institution «N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center» (FSBSI “N.N.Blokhin RCRC”), Kashirskoe Shosse 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Tkachuk, Vsevolod A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky av., 31/5, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-21

    T-cadherin is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored member of the cadherin superfamily involved in the guidance of migrating cells. We have previously shown that in vivo T-cadherin overexpression leads to increased melanoma primary tumor growth due to the recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells as well as the enhanced metastasis. Since tumor progression is highly dependent upon cell migration and invasion, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms of T-cadherin participation in these processes. Herein we show that T-cadherin expression results in the increased invasive potential due to the upregulated expression of pro-oncogenic integrins, chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The detected increase in chemokine expression could be responsible for the stromal cell recruitment. At the same time our previous data demonstrated that T-cadherin expression inhibited neoangiogenesis in the primary tumors. We demonstrate that T-cadherin overexpression leads to the increase in the expression of anti-angiogenic molecules and reduction in pro-angiogenic factors. Thus, T-cadherin plays a dual role in melanoma growth and progression: T-cadherin expression results in anti-angiogenic effects in melanoma, however, this also stimulates transcription of genes responsible for migration and invasion of melanoma cells.

  10. ROCK inhibition stimulates SOX9/Smad3-dependent COL2A1 expression in inner meniscus cells.

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Maehara, Ami; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Proper functioning of the meniscus depends on the composition and organization of its fibrocartilaginous extracellular matrix. We previously demonstrated that the avascular inner meniscus has a more chondrocytic phenotype compared with the outer meniscus. Inhibition of the Rho family GTPase ROCK, the major regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, stimulates the chondrogenic transcription factor Sry-type HMG box (SOX) 9-dependent α1(II) collagen (COL2A1) expression in inner meniscus cells. However, the crosstalk between ROCK inhibition, SOX9, and other transcription modulators on COL2A1 upregulation remains unclear in meniscus cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SOX9-related transcriptional complex on COL2A1 expression under the inhibition of ROCK in human meniscus cells. Human inner and outer meniscus cells were prepared from macroscopically intact lateral menisci. Cells were cultured in the presence or absence of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi, Y27632). Gene expression, collagen synthesis, and nuclear translocation of SOX9 and Smad2/3 were analyzed. Treatment of ROCKi increased the ratio of type I/II collagen double positive cells derived from the inner meniscus. In real-time PCR analyses, expression of SOX9 and COL2A1 genes was stimulated by ROCKi treatment in inner meniscus cells. ROCKi treatment also induced nuclear translocation of SOX9 and phosphorylated Smad2/3 in immunohistological analyses. Complex formation between SOX9 and Smad3 was increased by ROCKi treatment in inner meniscus cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that association between SOX9/Smad3 transcriptional complex with the COL2A1 enhancer region was increased by ROCKi treatment. This study demonstrated that ROCK inhibition stimulated SOX9/Smad3-dependent COL2A1 expression through the immediate nuclear translocation of Smad3 in inner meniscus cells. Our results suggest that ROCK inhibition can stimulates type II collagen synthesis through the cooperative activation

  11. Environmental Enrichment Effect on Fecal Glucocorticoid Metabolites and Captive Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) Behavior.

    Coelho, Carlyle Mendes; de Azevedo, Cristiano Schetini; Guimarães, Marcelo Alcino de Barros Vaz; Young, Robert John

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment is a technique that may reduce the stress of nonhuman animals in captivity. Stress may interfere with normal behavioral expression and affect cognitive decision making. Noninvasive hormonal studies can provide important information about the stress statuses of animals. This study evaluated the effectiveness of different environmental enrichment treatments in the diminution of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (stress indicators) of three captive maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus). Correlations of the fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels with expressed behaviors were also determined. Results showed that environmental enrichment reduced fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels. Furthermore, interspecific and foraging enrichment items were most effective in reducing stress in two of the three wolves. No definite pattern was found between behavioral and physiological responses to stress. In conclusion, these behavioral and physiological data showed that maned wolves responded positively from an animal well being perspective to the enrichment items presented.

  12. Glucocorticoids are ineffective in alcoholic hepatitis

    Christensen, E; Gluud, C

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials of glucocorticoid treatment in clinical alcoholic hepatitis, adjusting for prognostic variables and their possible interaction with therapy, because these trials have given appreciably different results. Weighted...... logistic regression analysis was applied using the summarised descriptive data (for example, % with encephalopathy, mean bilirubin value) of the treatment and control groups of 12 controlled trials that gave this information. Despite evidence of publication bias favouring glucocorticoid treatment, its...... overall effect on mortality was not statistically significant (p = 0.20)--the relative risk (steroid/control) was 0.78 (95% confidence intervals 0.51, 1.18). There was indication of interaction between glucocorticoid therapy and gender, but not encephalopathy. Thus, the effect of glucocorticoid treatment...

  13. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  14. Effects of Electrical Stimulation of the Rat Vestibular Labyrinth on c-Fos Expression in the Hippocampus.

    Hitier, Martin; Sato, Go; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F

    2018-04-22

    Several studies have demonstrated that electrical activation of the peripheral vestibular system can evoke field potential, multi-unit neuronal activity and acetylcholine release in the hippocampus (HPC). However, no study to date has employed the immediate early gene protein, c-Fos, to investigate the distribution of activation of cells in the HPC following electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. We found that vestibular stimulation increased the number of animals expressing c-Fos in the dorsal HPC compared to sham control rats (P ≤ 0.02), but not in the ventral HPC. c-Fos was also expressed in an increased number of animals in the dorsal dentate gyrus (DG) compared to sham control rats (P ≤ 0.0001), and to a lesser extent in the ventral DG (P ≤ 0.006). The results of this study show that activation of the vestibular system results in a differential increase in the expression of c-Fos across different regions of the HPC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The IFN Response in Bats Displays Distinctive IFN-Stimulated Gene Expression Kinetics with Atypical RNASEL Induction.

    De La Cruz-Rivera, Pamela C; Kanchwala, Mohammed; Liang, Hanquan; Kumar, Ashwani; Wang, Lin-Fa; Xing, Chao; Schoggins, John W

    2018-01-01

    Bats host a large number of zoonotic viruses, including several viruses that are highly pathogenic to other mammals. The mechanisms underlying this rich viral diversity are unknown, but they may be linked to unique immunological features that allow bats to act as asymptomatic viral reservoirs. Vertebrates respond to viral infection by inducing IFNs, which trigger antiviral defenses through IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. Although the IFN system of several bats is characterized at the genomic level, less is known about bat IFN-mediated transcriptional responses. In this article, we show that IFN signaling in bat cells from the black flying fox ( Pteropus alecto ) consists of conserved and unique ISG expression profiles. In IFN-stimulated cells, bat ISGs comprise two unique temporal subclusters with similar early induction kinetics but distinct late-phase declines. In contrast, human ISGs lack this decline phase and remained elevated for longer periods. Notably, in unstimulated cells, bat ISGs were expressed more highly than their human counterparts. We also found that the antiviral effector 2-5A-dependent endoribonuclease, which is not an ISG in humans, is highly IFN inducible in black flying fox cells and contributes to cell-intrinsic control of viral infection. These studies reveal distinctive innate immune features that may underlie a unique virus-host relationship in bats. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Glucocorticoid regulation of astrocytic fate and function.

    Shuang Yu

    Full Text Available Glial loss in the hippocampus has been suggested as a factor in the pathogenesis of stress-related brain disorders that are characterized by dysregulated glucocorticoid (GC secretion. However, little is known about the regulation of astrocytic fate by GC. Here, we show that astrocytes derived from the rat hippocampus undergo growth inhibition and display moderate activation of caspase 3 after exposure to GC. Importantly, the latter event, observed both in situ and in primary astrocytic cultures is not followed by either early- or late-stage apoptosis, as monitored by stage I or stage II DNA fragmentation. Thus, unlike hippocampal granule neurons, astrocytes are resistant to GC-induced apoptosis; this resistance is due to lower production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and a greater buffering capacity against the cytotoxic actions of ROS. We also show that GC influence hippocampal cell fate by inducing the expression of astrocyte-derived growth factors implicated in the control of neural precursor cell proliferation. Together, our results suggest that GC instigate a hitherto unknown dialog between astrocytes and neural progenitors, adding a new facet to understanding how GC influence the cytoarchitecture of the hippocampus.

  17. Baculovirus IE2 Stimulates the Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Insect and Mammalian Cells to Facilitate Its Proper Functioning.

    Tung, Hsuan; Wei, Sung-Chan; Lo, Huei-Ru; Chao, Yu-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Baculoviruses have gained popularity as pest control agents and for protein production in insect systems. These viruses are also becoming popular for gene expression, tissue engineering and gene therapy in mammalian systems. Baculovirus infection triggers a heat shock response, and this response is crucial for its successful infection of host insect cells. However, the viral protein(s) or factor(s) that trigger this response are not yet clear. Previously, we revealed that IE2-an early gene product of the baculovirus-could form unique nuclear bodies for the strong trans-activation of various promoters in mammalian cells. Here, we purified IE2 nuclear bodies from Vero E6 cells and investigated the associated proteins by using mass spectrometry. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were found to be one of the major IE2-associated proteins. Our experiments show that HSPs are greatly induced by IE2 and are crucial for the trans-activation function of IE2. Interestingly, blocking both heat shock protein expression and the proteasome pathway preserved the IE2 protein and its nuclear body structure, and revived its function. These observations reveal that HSPs do not function directly to assist the formation of the nuclear body structure, but may rather protect IE2 from proteasome degradation. Aside from functional studies in mammalian cells, we also show that HSPs were stimulated and required to determine IE2 protein levels, in insect cells infected with baculovirus. Upon inhibiting the expression of heat shock proteins, baculovirus IE2 was substantially suppressed, resulting in a significantly suppressed viral titer. Thus, we demonstrate a unique feature in that IE2 can function in both insect and non-host mammalian cells to stimulate HSPs, which may be associated with IE2 stabilization and lead to the protection of the its strong gene activation function in mammalian cells. On the other hand, during viral infection in insect cells, IE2 could also strongly stimulate HSPs and

  18. Continuous and intermittent transcranial magnetic theta burst stimulation modify tactile learning performance and cortical protein expression in the rat differently.

    Mix, Annika; Benali, Alia; Eysel, Ulf T; Funke, Klaus

    2010-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate cortical excitability in a stimulus-frequency-dependent manner. Two kinds of theta burst stimulation (TBS) [intermittent TBS (iTBS) and continuous TBS (cTBS)] modulate human cortical excitability differently, with iTBS increasing it and cTBS decreasing it. In rats, we recently showed that this is accompanied by changes in the cortical expression of proteins related to the activity of inhibitory neurons. Expression levels of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) and of the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) were strongly reduced following iTBS, but not cTBS, whereas both increased expression of the 65-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase. In the present study, to investigate possible functional consequences, we applied iTBS and cTBS to rats learning a tactile discrimination task. Conscious rats received either verum or sham rTMS prior to the task. Finally, to investigate how rTMS and learning effects interact, protein expression was determined for cortical areas directly involved in the task and for those either not, or indirectly, involved. We found that iTBS, but not cTBS, improved learning and strongly reduced cortical PV and GAD67 expression. However, the combination of learning and iTBS prevented this effect in those cortical areas involved in the task, but not in unrelated areas. We conclude that the improved learning found following iTBS is a result of the interaction of two effects, possibly in a homeostatic manner: a general weakening of inhibition mediated by the fast-spiking interneurons, and re-established activity in those neurons specifically involved in the learning task, leading to enhanced contrast between learning-induced and background activity. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The obesity-associated transcription factor ETV5 modulates circulating glucocorticoids

    Gutierrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Thompson, Abigail; Marchand, Nathalie; Dumont, Patrick; Woods, Stephen C.; de Launoit, Yvan; Seeley, Randy J.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor E-twenty-six version 5 (ETV5) has been linked with obesity in genome-wide association studies. Moreover, ETV5-deficient mice (knockout; KO) have reduced body weight, lower fat mass, and are resistant to diet-induced obesity, directly linking ETV5 to the regulation of energy balance and metabolism. ETV5 is expressed in hypothalamic brain regions that regulate both metabolism and HPA axis activity, suggesting that ETV5 may also modulate HPA axis function. In order to test this possibility, plasma corticosterone levels were measured in ETV5 KO and wildtype (WT) mice before (pre-stress) and after (post-stress) a mild stressor (intraperitoneal injection). ETV5 deficiency increased both pre- and post-stress plasma corticosterone, suggesting that loss of ETV5 elevated glucocorticoid tone. Consistent with this idea, ETV5 KO mice have reduced thymus weight, suggestive of increased glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution. ETV5 deficiency also decreased the mRNA expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and vasopressin receptor 1A in the hypothalamus, without altering vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone, or oxytocin mRNA expression. In order to test whether reduced MR and GR expression affected glucocorticoid negative feedback, a dexamethasone suppression test was performed. Dexamethasone reduced plasma corticosterone in both ETV5 KO and WT mice, suggesting that glucocorticoid negative feedback was unaltered by ETV5 deficiency. In summary, these data suggest that the obesity-associated transcription factor ETV5 normally acts to diminish circulating glucocorticoids. This might occur directly via ETV5 actions on HPA-regulatory brain circuitry, and/or indirectly via ETV5-induced alterations in metabolic factors that then influence the HPA axis. PMID:25813907

  20. T-Cadherin Expression in Melanoma Cells Stimulates Stromal Cell Recruitment and Invasion by Regulating the Expression of Chemokines, Integrins and Adhesion Molecules

    Kseniya A. Rubina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available T-cadherin is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored member of the cadherin superfamily involved in the guidance of migrating cells. We have previously shown that in vivo T-cadherin overexpression leads to increased melanoma primary tumor growth due to the recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells as well as the enhanced metastasis. Since tumor progression is highly dependent upon cell migration and invasion, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms of T-cadherin participation in these processes. Herein we show that T-cadherin expression results in the increased invasive potential due to the upregulated expression of pro-oncogenic integrins, chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The detected increase in chemokine expression could be responsible for the stromal cell recruitment. At the same time our previous data demonstrated that T-cadherin expression inhibited neoangiogenesis in the primary tumors. We demonstrate molecules and reduction in pro-angiogenic factors. Thus, T-cadherin plays a dual role in melanoma growth and progression: T-cadherin expression results in anti-angiogenic effects in melanoma, however, this also stimulates transcription of genes responsible for migration and invasion of melanoma cells.

  1. Isolation, nucleotide sequence and expression of a cDNA encoding feline granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Dunham, S P; Onions, D E

    2001-06-21

    A cDNA encoding feline granulocyte colony stimulating factor (fG-CSF) was cloned from alveolar macrophages using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA is 949 bp in length and encodes a predicted mature protein of 174 amino acids. Recombinant fG-CSF was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion and purified by affinity chromatography. Biological activity of the recombinant protein was demonstrated using the murine myeloblastic cell line GNFS-60, which showed an ED50 for fG-CSF of approximately 2 ng/ml. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. Contribution of glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid receptors to the regulation of neurodegenerative processes.

    Vyas, Sheela; Maatouk, Layal

    2013-12-01

    Isolation of glucocorticoids (GCs) from adrenal glands followed by synthesis led rapidly to their first clinical application, about 70 years ago, for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. To this day GCs are used in diseases that have an inflammatory component. However, their use is carefully monitored because of harmful side effects. GCs are also synonymous with stress and adaptation. In CNS, GC binds and activates high affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and low affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GR, whose expression is ubiquitous, is only activated when GC levels rise as during circadian peak and in response to stress. Numerous recent studies have yielded important and new insights on the mechanisms concerning pulsatile secretory pattern of GCs as well as various processes that tightly control their synthesis via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis involving regulated release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from hypothalamus and pituitary, respectively. GR modulates neuronal functions and viability through both genomic and non-genomic actions, and importantly its transcriptional regulatory activity is tightly locked with GC secretory pattern. There is increasing evidence pointing to involvement of GC-GR in neurodegenerative disorders. Patients with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's or Huntington's disease show chronically high cortisol levels suggesting changes occurring in controls of HPA axis. In experimental models of these diseases, chronic stress or GC treatment was found to exacerbate both the clinical symptoms and neurodegenerative processes. However, recent evidence also shows that GC-GR can exert neuroprotective effects. Thus, for any potential therapeutic strategies in these neurodegenerative diseases we need to understand the precise modifications both in HPA axis and in GR activity and find ways to harness their protective actions.

  3. Demineralised human dentine matrix stimulates the expression of VEGF and accelerates the bone repair in tooth sockets of rats.

    Reis-Filho, Cláudio R; Silva, Elisângela R; Martins, Adalberto B; Pessoa, Fernanda F; Gomes, Paula V N; de Araújo, Mariana S C; Miziara, Melissa N; Alves, José B

    2012-05-01

    In this study we investigated the possible use of human demineralised dentine matrix (DHDM), obtained from the extracted teeth, as bone graft material and evaluated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced by this material in the healing process of tooth sockets of rats. To evaluate bone regeneration and expression of VEGF induced by DHDM, thirty-two male Wistar rats weighing approximately 200 g were used. After maxillary second molar extraction, the left sockets were filled with DHDM and the right sockets were naturally filled by blood clot (control). The animals were sacrificed at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery and upper maxillaries were processed for histological, morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. DHDM was used to evaluate the mechanical effect of bone graft material into sockets. Expression of VEGF was determined by immunohistochemistry in all groups. Our results demonstrated a significant increase in the newly formed bone tissue in sockets of 7, 14 and 21 days and a significant increase in VEGF expression at days 7 and 14 on treated sockets. Our results showed that DHDM increases the expression of VEGF and accelerates the healing process in rats tooth sockets, by stimulating bone deposition and also vessels formation. These results suggest that DHDM has osteoinductive/osteoconductive potential and may represent an efficient grafting material on guided bone regeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chitin stimulates expression of acidic mammalian chitinase and eotaxin-3 by human sinonasal epithelial cells in vitro.

    Lalaker, Ashley; Nkrumah, Louis; Lee, Won-Kyung; Ramanathan, Murugappan; Lane, Andrew P

    2009-01-01

    Sinonasal epithelial cells participate in host defense by initiating innate immune mechanisms against potential pathogens. Antimicrobial innate mechanisms have been shown to involve Th1-like inflammatory responses. Although epithelial cells can also be induced by Th2 cytokines to express proeosinophilic mediators, no environmental agents have been identified that promote this effect. Human sinonasal epithelial cells from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNPs) and controls were harvested and grown in primary culture. Cell cultures were exposed to a range of concentrations of chitin for 24 hours, and mRNA for acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), eotaxin-3, and thymic stromal-derived lymphopoietin (TSLP) were assessed. Other cultures were exposed to interleukin 4 (IL- 4) alone and in combination with dust-mite antigen (DMA) for 36 hours. Extracted mRNA and cell culture supernatant were analyzed for expression of AMCase and eotaxin-3. Chitin induced a dose-dependent expression of AMCase and eotaxin-3 mRNA but not TSLP. Patients with recalcitrant CRSwNPs showed lower baseline expression of AMCase when compared with treatment-responsive CRSwNP and less induction of AMCase expression by chitin. DMA did not directly induce expression of AMCase or eotaxin-3. Expression of eotaxin-3 was stimulated by IL-4 and further enhanced with the addition of DMA. Levels of AMCase were not significantly affected by either IL-4 or DMA exposure. In some cases, the combination of IL-4 and DMA was able to induce AMCase expression in cell cultures not producing AMCase at baseline. The abundant biopolymer chitin appears to be recognized by a yet uncharacterized receptor on sinonasal epithelial cells. Chitin stimulates production of AMCase and eotaxin-3, two pro-Th2 effector proteins. This finding suggests the existence of a novel innate immune pathway for local defense against chitin-containing organisms in the sinonasal tract. Dysregulation of this function could

  5. Kinetics of human T-cell expression of LFA-1, IL-2 receptor, and ICAM-1 following antigenic stimulation in vitro

    Hviid, L; Felsing, A; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    -specific stimulation is available. In the present study we have examined phenotypic T-cell changes after in vitro stimulation by the antigens purified derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and tetanus toxoid (TT). We show that the well-established differences in kinetics of mitogen- and antigen-induced T-cell proliferation...... of all 3 surface antigens showed similar kinetics, and correlated with the magnitude of the lymphoproliferative response. By day 8 (PHA-stimulation) or day 12 (PPD or TT stimulation), the lymphoproliferative response was essentially completed, the expression of CD11a and CD54 had approached...

  6. Kynurenic Acid Inhibits the Electrical Stimulation Induced Elevated Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Expression in the TNC

    Tamás Körtési

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMigraine is a primary headache of imprecisely known mechanism, but activation of the trigeminovascular system (TS appears to be essential during the attack. Intensive research has recently focused on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and the kynurenine systems as potential pathogenic factors.AimWe investigated the link between these important mediators and the effects of kynurenic acid (KYNA and its synthetic analog (KYNA-a on PACAP expression in the rat trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC in a TS stimulation model related to migraine mechanisms.MethodsAdult male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with KYNA, KYNA-a, the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, or saline (vehicle. Next, the trigeminal ganglion (TRG was electrically stimulated, the animals were transcardially perfused following 180 min, and the TNC was removed. In the TNC samples, 38 amino acid form of PACAP (PACAP1–38-like radioimmunoactivity was measured by radioimmunoassay, the relative optical density of preproPACAP was assessed by Western blot analysis, and PACAP1–38 mRNA was detected by real-time PCR.Results and conclusionElectrical TRG stimulation resulted in significant increases of PACAP1–38-LI, preproPACAP, and PACAP1–38 mRNA in the TNC. These increases were prevented by the pretreatments with KYNA, KYNA-a, and MK-801. This is the first study to provide evidence for a direct link between PACAP and the kynurenine system during TS activation.

  7. A gibberellin-stimulated transcript, OsGASR1, controls seedling growth and α-amylase expression in rice.

    Lee, Sang-Choon; Kim, Soo-Jin; Han, Soon-Ki; An, Gynheung; Kim, Seong-Ryong

    2017-07-01

    From a T-DNA-tagging population in rice, we identified OsGASR1 (LOC_Os03g55290), a member of the GAST (gibberellin (GA)-Stimulated Transcript) family that is induced by salt stress and ABA treatment. This gene was highly expressed in the regions of cell proliferation and panicle development, as revealed by a GUS assay of the mutant line. In the osgasr1 mutants, the second leaf blades were much longer than those of the segregating wild type due to an increase in cell length. In addition, five α-amylase genes were up-regulated in the mutants, implying that OsGASR1 is a negative regulator of those genes. These results suggest that OsGASR1 plays important roles in seedling growth and α-amylase gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Stimulating effect of low dose radiation expression of G-CSF receptors in bone marrow cells in mice

    Zhang Honglai; Liu Shuzheng; Zhang Ming

    1993-01-01

    The expression of G-CSF receptors in bone marrow cells (BMC) was studied by using 125 I labelled G-CSF ( 1 '2 5 I-G-CSF). The results showed that the reaction equilibrium of 125 I-G-CSF bound to BMC at 37 degree C was reached in 60 minutes, the maximum binding (Bmax) to 3 x 10 6 BMC being 15.1 pmol, the dissociation constant (Kd) being 78.6 pmol, and the estimated number of G-CSF receptors per cell being about 3100. The number of G-CSF receptors in BMC in mice 48 hours after whole body exposure to doses of 50, 75 and 100 mGy X-rays increased significantly to 161%, 169% and 342% of controls, respectively. The results suggested that the expression of G-CSF receptors in BMC was enhanced markedly following low dose radiation, which would lead to stimulation of BMC proliferation

  9. MicroRNA Expression during Viral Infection or PolyI:C Stimulation in a Fish Model

    Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    Fish are important as small vertebrate models for studying various aspects of development and disease. MicroRNA regulation in fish has so far received attention especially in studies of their expression and function during embryonic development. In the studies carried out at the National Veterinary...... Institute in Århus we aim at using fish models for studying microRNA regulation during viral infection. In the studies presented here we make use of a qPCR method to detect miRNAs in fish cells. We present results regarding the expression of the immunologically relevant microRNAs, miR-155, miR-146a and mi......R-146b in fish cells during infection with the fish pathogenic virus viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and during immune stimulation with double stranded RNA (polyI:C). We highlight the need of finding stable normalization genes for microRNA detection....

  10. Sirtuin 1 stimulates the proliferation and the expression of glycolysis genes in pancreatic neoplastic lesions.

    Pinho, Andreia V; Mawson, Amanda; Gill, Anthony; Arshi, Mehreen; Warmerdam, Max; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Eling, Nils; Lie, Triyana; Kuster, Evelyne; Camargo, Simone; Biankin, Andrew V; Wu, Jianmin; Rooman, Ilse

    2016-11-15

    Metabolic reprogramming is a feature of neoplasia and tumor growth. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a lysine deacetylase of multiple targets including metabolic regulators such as p53. SIRT1 regulates metaplasia in the pancreas. Nevertheless, it is unclear if SIRT1 affects the development of neoplastic lesions and whether metabolic gene expression is altered.To assess neoplastic lesion development, mice with a pancreas-specific loss of Sirt1 (Pdx1-Cre;Sirt1-lox) were bred into a KrasG12D mutant background (KC) that predisposes to the development of pancreatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Similar grade PanIN lesions developed in KC and KC;Sirt1-lox mice but specifically early mucinous PanINs occupied 40% less area in the KC;Sirt1-lox line, attributed to reduced proliferation. This was accompanied by reduced expression of proteins in the glycolysis pathway, such as GLUT1 and GAPDH.The stimulatory effect of SIRT1 on proliferation and glycolysis gene expression was confirmed in a human PDAC cell line. In resected PDAC samples, higher proliferation and expression of glycolysis genes correlated with poor patient survival. SIRT1 expression per se was not prognostic but low expression of Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulator 2 (CCAR2), a reported SIRT1 inhibitor, corresponded to poor patient survival.These findings open perspectives for novel targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer.

  11. Sirtuin 1 stimulates the proliferation and the expression of glycolysis genes in pancreatic neoplastic lesions

    Pinho, Andreia V.; Mawson, Amanda; Gill, Anthony; Arshi, Mehreen; Warmerdam, Max; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Eling, Nils; Lie, Triyana; Kuster, Evelyne; Camargo, Simone; Biankin, Andrew V.; Wu, Jianmin; Rooman, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a feature of neoplasia and tumor growth. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a lysine deacetylase of multiple targets including metabolic regulators such as p53. SIRT1 regulates metaplasia in the pancreas. Nevertheless, it is unclear if SIRT1 affects the development of neoplastic lesions and whether metabolic gene expression is altered. To assess neoplastic lesion development, mice with a pancreas-specific loss of Sirt1 (Pdx1-Cre;Sirt1-lox) were bred into a KrasG12D mutant background (KC) that predisposes to the development of pancreatic intra-epithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Similar grade PanIN lesions developed in KC and KC;Sirt1-lox mice but specifically early mucinous PanINs occupied 40% less area in the KC;Sirt1-lox line, attributed to reduced proliferation. This was accompanied by reduced expression of proteins in the glycolysis pathway, such as GLUT1 and GAPDH. The stimulatory effect of SIRT1 on proliferation and glycolysis gene expression was confirmed in a human PDAC cell line. In resected PDAC samples, higher proliferation and expression of glycolysis genes correlated with poor patient survival. SIRT1 expression per se was not prognostic but low expression of Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulator 2 (CCAR2), a reported SIRT1 inhibitor, corresponded to poor patient survival. These findings open perspectives for novel targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27494892

  12. Cytokine modulation by glucocorticoids: mechanisms and actions in cellular studies.

    Brattsand, R; Linden, M

    1996-01-01

    Glucocorticoids inhibit the expression and action of most cytokines. This is part of the in vivo feed-back system between inflammation-derived cytokines and CNS-adrenal produced corticosteroids with the probable physiological relevance to balance parts of the host defence and anti-inflammatory systems of the body. Glucocorticoids modulate cytokine expression by a combination of genomic mechanisms. The activated glucocorticoid-receptor complex can (i) bind to and inactivate key proinflammatory transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, NF kappa B). This takes place at the promotor responsive elements of these factors, but has also been reported without the presence of DNA; (ii) via glucocorticoid responsive elements (GRE), upregulate the expression of cytokine inhibitory proteins, e.g. I kappa B, which inactivates the transcription factor NF kappa B and thereby the secondary expression of a series of cytokines; (iii) reduce the half-life time and utility of cytokine mRNAs. In studies with triggered human blood mononuclear cells in culture, glucocorticoids strongly diminish the production of the 'initial phase' cytokines IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha and the 'immunomodulatory' cytokines IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-gamma, as well as of IL-6, IL-8 and the growth factor GM-CSF. While steroid treatment broadly attenuates cytokine production, it cannot modulate it selectively, e.g. just the TH0, the TH1 or the TH2 pathways. The production of the 'anti-inflammatory' IL-10 is also inhibited. The exceptions of steroid down-regulatory activity on cytokine expression seem to affect 'repair phase' cytokines like TGF-beta and PDGF. These are even reported to be upregulated, which may explain the rather weak steroid dampening action on healing and fibrotic processes. Some growth factors, e.g. G-CSF and M-CSF, are only weakly affected. In addition to diminishing the production of a cytokine, steroids can also often inhibit its subsequent actions. Because cytokines work in

  13. Dynamic Changes in Host Gene Expression following In Vitro Viral Mimic Stimulation in Crocodile Cells

    Subir Sarker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The initial control of viral infection in a host is dominated by a very well orchestrated early innate immune system; however, very little is known about the ability of a host to control viral infection outside of mammals. The reptiles offer an evolutionary bridge between the fish and mammals, with the crocodile having evolved from the archosauria clade that included the dinosaurs, and being the largest living reptile species. Using an RNA-seq approach, we have defined the dynamic changes of a passaged primary crocodile cell line to stimulation with both RNA and DNA viral mimics. Cells displayed a marked upregulation of many genes known to be involved in the mammalian response to viral infection, including viperin, Mx1, IRF7, IRF1, and RIG-I with approximately 10% of the genes being uncharacterized transcripts. Both pathway and genome analysis suggested that the crocodile may utilize the main known mammalian TLR and cytosolic antiviral RNA signaling pathways, with the pathways being responsible for sensing DNA viruses less clear. Viral mimic stimulation upregulated the type I interferon, IFN-Omega, with many known antiviral interferon-stimulated genes also being upregulated. This work demonstrates for the first time that reptiles show functional regulation of many known and unknown antiviral pathways and effector genes. An enhanced knowledge of these ancient antiviral pathways will not only add to our understanding of the host antiviral innate response in non-mammalian species, but is critical to fully comprehend the complexity of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection.

  14. Hyaluronic Acid Suppresses the Expression of Metalloproteinases in Osteoarthritic Cartilage Stimulated Simultaneously by Interleukin 1β and Mechanical Load.

    Florian Pohlig

    Full Text Available In patients with osteoarthritis (OA, intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA frequently results in reduced pain and improved function for prolonged periods of time, i.e. more than 6 months. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. Our underlying hypothesis is that HA modifies the enzymatic breakdown of joint tissues.To test this hypothesis, we examined osteochondral cylinders from 12 OA patients. In a bioreactor, these samples were stimulated by interleukin 1β (Il1ß (2 ng/ml plus mechanical load (2.0 Mpa at 0.5 Hz horizontal and 0.1 Hz vertical rotation, thus the experimental setup recapitulated both catabolic and anabolic clues of the OA joint.Upon addition of HA at either 1 or 3 mg/ml, we observed a significant suppression of expression of metalloproteinase (MMP-13. A more detailed analysis based on the Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L OA grade, showed a much greater degree of suppression of MMP-13 expression in grade IV as compared to grade II OA. In contrast to the observed MMP-13 suppression, treatment with HA resulted in a suppression of MMP-1 expression only at 1 mg/ml HA, while MMP-2 expression was not significantly affected by either HA concentration.Together, these data suggest that under concurrent catabolic and anabolic stimulation, HA exhibits a pronounced suppressive effect on MMP-13. In the long-run these findings may benefit the development of treatment strategies aimed at blocking tissue degradation in OA patients.

  15. Eosinophil Resistance to Glucocorticoid-Induced Apoptosis is Mediated by the Transcription Factor NFIL3

    Pazdrak, Konrad; Moon, Young; Straub, Christof; Stafford, Susan; Kurosky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The mainstay of asthma therapy, glucocorticoids (GCs) exert their therapeutic effects through the inhibition of inflammatory signaling and induction of eosinophil apoptosis. However, laboratory and clinical observations of GC-resistant asthma suggest that GCs' effects on eosinophil viability may depend on the state of eosinophil activation. In the present study we demonstrate that eosinophils stimulated with IL-5 show impaired prop-aptoptotic response to GCs. We sought to determine the contribution of GC-mediated transactivating (TA) and transrepressing (TR) pathways in modulation of activated eosinophils' response to GC by comparing their response to the selective GC receptor (GR) agonist Compound A (CpdA) devoid of TA activity to that upon treatment with Dexamethasone (Dex). IL-5-activated eosinophils showed contrasting responses to CpdA and Dex, as IL-5-treated eosinophils showed no increase in apoptosis compared to cells treated with Dex alone, while CpdA elicited an apoptotic response regardless of IL-5 stimulation. Proteomic analysis revealed that both Nuclear Factor IL-3 (NFIL3) and Map Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP1) were inducible by IL-5 and enhanced by Dex; however, CpdA had no effect on NFIL3 and MKP1 expression. We found that inhibiting NFIL3 with specific siRNA or by blocking the IL-5-inducible Pim-1 kinase abrogated the protective effect of IL-5 on Dex-induced apoptosis, indicating crosstalk between IL-5 anti-apoptotic pathways and GR-mediated TA signaling occurring via the NFIL3 molecule. Collectively, these results indicate that 1) GCs' TA pathway may support eosinophil viability in IL-5-stimulated cells through synergistic upregulation of NFIL3; and 2) functional inhibition of IL-5 signaling (anti-Pim1) or the use of selective GR agonists that don't upregulate NFIL3 may be effective strategies for the restoring pro-apoptotic effect of GCs on IL-5-activated eosinophils. PMID:26880402

  16. [Effect of lipopolysaccharides from Porphyromonas endodontalis on the expression of macrophage colony stimulating factor in mouse osteoblasts].

    Yu, Yaqiong; Qiu, Lihong; Guo, Jiajie; Qu, Liu; Xu, Liya; Zhong, Ming

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from Porphyromonas endodontalis (Pe) on the expression of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) mRNA and protein in MC3T3-E1 cells and the role of nucler factor-κB (NF-κB) in the process. MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pe-LPS (0-50 mg/L) and 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for different hours (0-24 h). The expression of M-CSF mRNA and protein was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunoadsordent assay (ELISA). The cells untreated by Pe-LPS served as control. The expression of M- CSF mRNA and protein was also detected in 10 mg/L Pe- LPS treated MC3T3-E1 cells after pretreated with BAY 11-7082 for 1 h, a special NF-κB inhibitor. The groups were divided as follows, control group, BAY group (10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 treated alone MC3T3-E1 cells), Pe-LPS group (10 mg/L Pe-LPS stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells for 6 h), BAY combine with Pe-LPS group (10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 pretreated cells for 1 h and 10 mg/L of Pe-LPS stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells for 6 h). The level of M- CSF mRNA and protein increased significantly after treatment with different concentrations of Pe-LPS (0-50 mg/L), which indicated that Pe-LPS induced osteoblasts to express M-CSF mRNA and protein in dose dependent manners. The expression of M-CSF protein increased from (35 ± 2) ng/L (control group) to (170 ± 8) ng/L (50 mg/L group). Maximal induction of M-CSF mRNA expression was found in the MC3T3- E1 cells treated with 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for 6 h. After 6 h, the expression of M-CSF mRNA decreased gradually. The expression of M-CSF protein also increased with the treatment of 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for 10 h [(122 ± 4) ng/L]. After 10 h, the expression of M-CSF protein decreased gradually. The mRNA and proteins of M-CSF decreased significantly after pretreatment with 10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 for 1 h. There was no significant difference between BAY group and the control. Pe-LPS may induce

  17. Peripheral mechanisms contributing to the glucocorticoid hypersensitivity in proopiomelanocortin null mice treated with corticosterone

    Michailidou, Zoi; Coll, Anthony P; Kenyon, Christopher J; Morton, Nicholas M; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency causes severe obesity through hyperphagia of hypothalamic origin. However, low glucocorticoid levels caused by adrenal insufficiency mitigate against insulin resistance, hyperphagia and fat accretion in Pomc−/− mice. Upon exogenous glucocorticoid replacement, corticosterone-supplemented (CORT) Pomc−/− mice show exaggerated responses, including excessive fat accumulation, hyperleptinaemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the peripheral mechanisms underlying this glucocorticoid hypersensitivity, we examined the expression levels of key determinants and targets of glucocorticoid action in adipose tissue and liver. Despite lower basal expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which generates active glucocorticoids within cells, CORT-mediated induction of 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels was more pronounced in adipose tissues of Pomc−/− mice. Similarly, CORT treatment increased lipoprotein lipase mRNA levels in all fat depots in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with exaggerated fat accumulation. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were selectively elevated in liver and retroperitoneal fat of Pomc−/− mice but were corrected by CORT in the latter depot. In liver, CORT increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels specifically in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with their insulin-resistant phenotype. Furthermore, CORT induced hypertension in Pomc−/− mice, independently of adipose or liver renin–angiotensin system activation. These data suggest that CORT-inducible 11β-HSD1 expression in fat contributes to the adverse cardiometabolic effects of CORT in POMC deficiency, whereas higher GR levels may be more important in liver. PMID:17592030

  18. Expression of c-fos gene in central nervous system of adult medaka (Oryzias latipes) after hypergravity stimulation

    Shimomura, S.; Ijiri, K.

    The immediate-early genes serve as useful neurobiological tools for mapping brain activity induced by a sensory stimulation. In this study, we have examined brain activity related to gravity perception of medaka (Oryzias latipes) by use of c-fos. The gene, which is homologous to the c-fos genes of other vertebrates, was identified in medaka. Functionally important domains are highly conserved among all the vertebrate species analyzed. Intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid transiently induced the c-fos mRNAs in medaka brain. The results indicate that the expression of c-fos can be utilized as a suitable anatomical marker for the increased neural activities in the central nervous system of medaka. Fish were continuously exposed to 3G hypergravity by centrifugation. Investigation of c-fos mRNA expression showed that c-fos mRNA significantly increased 30 minutes after a start of 3G exposure. The distribution of its transcripts within brains was analyzed by an in situ hybridization method. The 3G-treated medakas displayed c-fos positive cells in their brainstem regions, which are related to vestibular function, such as torus semicircularis, posterior octavu nucleus, nucleus tangentialis and inferior olive. Our results established the method to trace the activated area in the fish brain following gravity stimulation. The method will be a useful tool for understanding gravity perception in the brain.

  19. [Study of signal transduction pathway in the expression of inflammatory factors stimulated by lipopolysaccharides from Porphyromonas endodontalis in osteoblasts].

    Yang, Di; Qiu, Li-hong; Li, Ren; Li, Zi-mu; Li, Chen

    2010-04-01

    To quantify the interleukin (IL)-1beta mRNA and IL-6 mRNA expression induced by lipopolysaccharides ([PS) extracted from Porphyromonoas endodontalis (P. endodontalis) in osteoblasts, and to relate P. endodontalis LPS to the bone resorptive pathogenesis in the lesions of chronic apical periodontitis. MG63 cells was pretreated with PD98059 or SB203580 for 1 h and then treated with P. endodontolis LPS for 6 h. The expression of IL-1beta mRNA and IL-6 mRNA were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. The production of IL-1beta mRNA induced by P. endodontalis LPS decreased in osteoblasts pretreated with PD98059. Both of the production of IL-1beta mRNA and JL-6 mRNA induced by P. endodontalis LPS decreased in osteoblasts pretreated with SB203580. The synthesis of IL-1beta mRNA stimulated by Pendodontalis LPS in MG63 probably occur via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction system. The synthesis of IL-6 mRNA stimulated by P.endodontalis LPS in MG63 probahly occur via p38MAPK signal transduction system.

  20. NK cells of the oldest seniors represent constant and resistant to stimulation high expression of cellular protective proteins SIRT1 and HSP70.

    Kaszubowska, Lucyna; Foerster, Jerzy; Kaczor, Jan Jacek; Schetz, Daria; Ślebioda, Tomasz Jerzy; Kmieć, Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) are cytotoxic lymphocytes of innate immunity that reveal some immunoregulatory properties, however, their role in the process of ageing is not completely understood. The study aimed to analyze the expression of proteins involved in cellular stress response: sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in human NK cells with reference to the process of ageing. Non-stimulated and stimulated with IL-2, LPS or PMA with ionomycin cells originated from peripheral blood samples of: seniors aged over 85 ('the oldest'; n  = 25; 88.5 ± 0.5 years, mean ± SEM), seniors aged under 85 ('the old'; n  = 30; 75.6 ± 0.9 years) and the young ( n  = 31; 20.9 ± 0.3 years). The relationships between the levels of expression of cellular protective proteins in the studied population were also analyzed. The concentrations of carbonyl groups and 8-isoprostanes, markers of oxidative stress, in both stimulated and non-stimulated cultured NK cells were measured to assess the level of the oxidative stress in the cells. The oldest seniors varied from the other age groups by significantly higher expression of SIRT1 and HSP70 both in non-stimulated and stimulated NK cells. These cells also appeared to be resistant to further stimulations with IL-2, LPS or PMA with ionomycin. Highly positive correlations between SIRT1 and intracellular HSP70 in both stimulated and non-stimulated NK cells were observed. SOD2 presented low expression in non-stimulated cells, whereas its sensitivity to stimulation increased with age of donors. High positive correlations between SOD2 and surface HSP70 were observed. We found that the markers of oxidative stress in NK cells did not change with ageing. The oldest seniors revealed well developed adaptive stress response in NK cells with increased, constant levels of SIRT1 and intracellular HSP70. They presented also very high positive correlations between

  1. Salmon trypsin stimulates the expression of interleukin-8 via protease-activated receptor-2

    Larsen, Anett K.; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Larsen, Merethe; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we focus on salmon trypsin as an activator of inflammatory responses in airway cells in vitro. The rationale behind the investigation is that salmon industry workers are exposed to aerosols containing enzymes, which are generated during industrial processing of the fish. Knowing that serine proteases such as trypsin are highly active mediators with diverse biological activities, the stimulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and interleukin (IL)-8 and the role of protease-activated receptors (PAR) in inflammatory signal mediation were investigated. Protease-activated receptors are considered important under pathological situations in the human airways, and a thorough understanding of PAR-induced cellular events and their consequences in airway inflammation is necessary. Human airway epithelial cells (A549) were exposed to trypsin isolated from fish (Salmo salar), and we observed that purified salmon trypsin could generate secretion of IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PAR-2 activation by salmon trypsin is coupled to an induction of NF-κB-mediated transcription using a PAR-2 transfected HeLa cell model. Finally, we show that the release of IL-8 from A549 following stimulation with purified salmon trypsin is mediated through activation of PAR-2 using specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The results presented suggest that salmon trypsin, via activation of PAR-2, might influence inflammation processes in the airways if inhaled in sufficient amounts

  2. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from Mycobacterium bovis infected cattle after in vitro antigenic stimulation with purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD).

    Meade, Kieran G; Gormley, Eamonn; Park, Stephen D E; Fitzsimons, Tara; Rosa, Guilherme J M; Costello, Eamon; Keane, Joseph; Coussens, Paul M; MacHugh, David E

    2006-09-15

    Microarray analysis of messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance was used to investigate the gene expression program of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. An immunospecific bovine microarray platform (BOTL-4) with spot features representing 1336 genes was used for transcriptional profiling of PBMC from six M. bovis-infected cattle stimulated in vitro with bovine purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD-bovine). Cells were harvested at four time points (3 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h post-stimulation) and a split-plot design with pooled samples was used for the microarray experiment to compare gene expression between PPD-bovine stimulated PBMC and unstimulated controls for each time point. Statistical analyses of these data revealed 224 genes (approximately 17% of transcripts on the array) differentially expressed between stimulated and unstimulated PBMC across the 24 h time course (PPPD-bovine across the 24 h time course. However, perturbation of the PBMC transcriptome was most apparent at time points 3 h and 12 h post-stimulation, with 81 and 84 genes differentially expressed, respectively. In addition, a more stringent statistical threshold (PPPD-bovine-, PPD-avian- and Concanavalin A (ConA) stimulated PBMC, including the interferon-gamma gene (IFNG), which was upregulated in PBMC stimulated with PPD-bovine (40-fold), PPD-avian (10-fold) and ConA (8-fold) after in vitro culture for 12 h. The pattern of expression of these genes in PPD-bovine stimulated PBMC provides the first description of an M. bovis-specific signature of infection that may provide insights into the molecular basis of the host response to infection. Although the present study was carried out with mixed PBMC cell populations, it will guide future studies to dissect immune cell-specific gene expression patterns in response to M. bovis infection.

  3. Endocannabinoids in the rat basolateral amygdala enhance memory consolidation and enable glucocorticoid modulation of memory

    Campolongo, Patrizia; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.; Cuomo, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) modulates the consolidation of memories for emotionally arousing experiences, an effect that involves the activation of the glucocorticoid system. Because the BLA expresses high densities of cannabinoid CB1 receptors,

  4. LONGITUDINAL CHANGES IN GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR 1F METHYLATION AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AFTER MILITARY DEPLOYMENT

    Schur, Remmelt; Boks, Marco; Rutten, Bart P. F.; Daskalakis, Nikolaos; de Nijs, Laurence; Joels, Marian; Kahn, Rene S.; Geuze, Elbert; Vermetten, Eric; Vinkers, Christiaan

    2017-01-01

    Background The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) 1F region is involved in transcription and expression of the GR protein and influences hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity. Several studies have investigated GR-1F DNA methylation in the context of traumatic stress and psychiatric disorders,

  5. AT2-receptor stimulation enhances axonal plasticity after spinal cord injury by upregulating BDNF expression

    Namsolleck, Pawel; Boato, Francesco; Schwengel, Katja

    2013-01-01

    -culture of GFP-positive entorhinal cortices with hippocampal target tissue served to evaluate the impact of C21 on reinnervation. Neuronal differentiation, apoptosis and expression of neurotrophins were investigated in primary murine astrocytes and neuronal cells. C21 significantly improved functional recovery...... outgrowth was absent in neurons derived from AT2R-KO mice. In primary neurons, treatment with C21 further induced RNA expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 (+75.7%), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (+53.7%), the neurotrophin receptors TrkA (+57.4%) and TrkB (+67.9%) and a marker for neurite growth...

  6. Glucocorticoids interact with the hippocampal endocannabinoid system in impairing retrieval of contextual fear memory

    Atsak, Piray; Hauer, Daniela; Campolongo, Patrizia; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that glucocorticoid hormones impair the retrieval of memory of emotionally arousing experiences. Although it is known that glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval impairment depend on rapid interactions with arousal-induced noradrenergic activity, the exact mechanism underlying this presumably nongenomically mediated glucocorticoid action remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the hippocampal endocannabinoid system, a rapidly activated retrograde messenger system, is involved in mediating glucocorticoid effects on retrieval of contextual fear memory. Systemic administration of corticosterone (0.3–3 mg/kg) to male Sprague–Dawley rats 1 h before retention testing impaired the retrieval of contextual fear memory without impairing the retrieval of auditory fear memory or directly affecting the expression of freezing behavior. Importantly, a blockade of hippocampal CB1 receptors with AM251 prevented the impairing effect of corticosterone on retrieval of contextual fear memory, whereas the same impairing dose of corticosterone increased hippocampal levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. We also found that antagonism of hippocampal β-adrenoceptor activity with local infusions of propranolol blocked the memory retrieval impairment induced by the CB receptor agonist WIN55,212–2. Thus, these findings strongly suggest that the endocannabinoid system plays an intermediary role in regulating rapid glucocorticoid effects on noradrenergic activity in impairing memory retrieval of emotionally arousing experiences. PMID:22331883

  7. Paired hormone response elements predict caveolin-1 as a glucocorticoid target gene.

    Marinus F van Batenburg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids act in part via glucocorticoid receptor binding to hormone response elements (HREs, but their direct target genes in vivo are still largely unknown. We developed the criterion that genomic occurrence of paired HREs at an inter-HRE distance less than 200 bp predicts hormone responsiveness, based on synergy of multiple HREs, and HRE information from known target genes. This criterion predicts a substantial number of novel responsive genes, when applied to genomic regions 10 kb upstream of genes. Multiple-tissue in situ hybridization showed that mRNA expression of 6 out of 10 selected genes was induced in a tissue-specific manner in mice treated with a single dose of corticosterone, with the spleen being the most responsive organ. Caveolin-1 was strongly responsive in several organs, and the HRE pair in its upstream region showed increased occupancy by glucocorticoid receptor in response to corticosterone. Our approach allowed for discovery of novel tissue specific glucocorticoid target genes, which may exemplify responses underlying the permissive actions of glucocorticoids.

  8. Autoimmune hyperthyroidism due to secondary adrenal insufficiency: resolution with glucocorticoids.

    Skamagas, Maria; Geer, Eliza B

    2011-01-01

    To describe the course of autoimmune hyperthyroid disease in a patient with corticotropin (ACTH) deficiency treated with glucocorticoids. We report the clinical presentation, laboratory data, imaging studies, and management of a patient with weight loss, fatigue, apathy, hallucinations, and arthritis. Autoimmune hyperthyroidism (positive thyroperoxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies and borderline positive thyrotropin receptor antibody) was diagnosed in a 71-year-old woman. New psychotic symptoms prompted brain magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed a partially empty sella. Undetectable morning cortisol, undetectable ACTH, and failure to stimulate cortisol with synthetic ACTH (cosyntropin 250 mcg) secured the diagnosis of long-standing secondary adrenal insufficiency. Hydrocortisone replacement improved the patient's symptoms, resolved the thyroid disease, and decreased thyroid antibody titers. In retrospect, the patient recalled severe postpartum hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion at age 38 years. A Sheehan event probably occurred 33 years before the patient presented with corticotropin deficiency. Hyperthyroidism accelerated cortisol metabolism and provoked symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. The hypocortisolemic state may precipitate hyperimmunity and autoimmune thyroid disease. Rapid resolution of hyperthyroidism and decreased thyroid antibody titers with glucocorticoid treatment support this hypothesis.

  9. Ras-dva is a novel Pit-1- and glucocorticoid-regulated gene in the embryonic anterior pituitary gland.

    Ellestad, Laura E; Porter, Tom E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a role in functional differentiation of pituitary somatotrophs and lactotrophs during embryogenesis. Ras-dva was identified as a gene regulated by anterior neural fold protein-1/homeobox expressed in embryonic stem cells-1, a transcription factor known to be critical in pituitary development, and has an expression profile in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland that is consistent with in vivo regulation by glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was to characterize expression and regulation of ras-dva mRNA in the developing chicken anterior pituitary. Pituitary ras-dva mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on embryonic day (e) 18 and then decreased and remained low or undetectable after hatch. Ras-dva expression was highly enriched in the pituitary gland on e18 relative to other tissues examined. Glucocorticoid treatment of pituitary cells from mid- and late-stage embryos rapidly increased ras-dva mRNA, suggesting it may be a direct transcriptional target of glucocorticoids. A reporter construct driven by 4 kb of the chicken ras-dva 5'-flanking region, containing six putative pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) binding sites and two potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites, was highly activated in embryonic pituitary cells and up-regulated by corticosterone. Mutagenesis of the most proximal Pit-1 site decreased promoter activity in chicken e11 pituitary cells, indicating regulation of ras-dva by Pit-1. However, mutating putative GR binding sites did not substantially reduce induction of ras-dva promoter activity by corticosterone, suggesting additional DNA elements within the 5'-flanking region are responsible for glucocorticoid regulation. We have identified ras-dva as a glucocorticoid-regulated gene that is likely expressed in cells of the Pit-1 lineage within the developing anterior pituitary gland.

  10. Chemotherapeutics and radiation stimulate MHC class I expression through elevated interferon-beta signaling in breast cancer cells.

    Shan Wan

    Full Text Available Low doses of anticancer drugs have been shown to enhance antitumor immune response and increase the efficacy of immunotherapy. The molecular basis for such effects remains elusive, although selective depletion of T regulatory cells has been demonstrated. In the current studies, we demonstrate that topotecan (TPT, a topoisomerase I-targeting drug with a well-defined mechanism of action, stimulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I expression in breast cancer cells through elevated expression/secretion of interferon-β (IFN-β and activation of type I IFN signaling. First, we show that TPT treatment elevates the expression of both total and cell-surface MHC I in breast cancer cells. Second, conditioned media from TPT-treated breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells induce elevated expression of cell-surface MHC I in drug-naïve recipient cells, suggesting the involvement of cytokines and/or other secreted molecules. Consistently, TPT-treated cells exhibit elevated expression of multiple cytokines such as IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. Third, either knocking down the type I interferon receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1 or addition of neutralizing antibody against IFN-β results in reduced MHC I expression in TPT-treated cells. Together, these results suggest that TPT induces increased IFN-β autocrine/paracrine signaling through type I IFN receptor, resulting in the elevated MHC I expression in tumor cells. Studies have also demonstrated that other chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. etoposide, cisplatin, paclitaxel and vinblastine similarly induce increased IFN-β secretion and elevated MHC I expression. In addition, conditioned media from γ-irradiated donor cells are shown to induce IFN-β-dependent MHC I expression in unirradiated recipient cells. In the aggregate, our results suggest that many cancer therapeutics induce elevated tumor antigen presentation through MHC I, which could represent a common mechanism for enhanced antitumor immune response through

  11. 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases: Intracellular Gate-Keepers of Tissue Glucocorticoid Action

    Chapman, Karen; Holmes, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid action on target tissues is determined by the density of “nuclear” receptors and intracellular metabolism by the two isozymes of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) which catalyze interconversion of active cortisol and corticosterone with inert cortisone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone. 11β-HSD type 1, a predominant reductase in most intact cells, catalyzes the regeneration of active glucocorticoids, thus amplifying cellular action. 11β-HSD1 is widely expressed in liver, adipose tissue, muscle, pancreatic islets, adult brain, inflammatory cells, and gonads. 11β-HSD1 is selectively elevated in adipose tissue in obesity where it contributes to metabolic complications. Similarly, 11β-HSD1 is elevated in the ageing brain where it exacerbates glucocorticoid-associated cognitive decline. Deficiency or selective inhibition of 11β-HSD1 improves multiple metabolic syndrome parameters in rodent models and human clinical trials and similarly improves cognitive function with ageing. The efficacy of inhibitors in human therapy remains unclear. 11β-HSD2 is a high-affinity dehydrogenase that inactivates glucocorticoids. In the distal nephron, 11β-HSD2 ensures that only aldosterone is an agonist at mineralocorticoid receptors (MR). 11β-HSD2 inhibition or genetic deficiency causes apparent mineralocorticoid excess and hypertension due to inappropriate glucocorticoid activation of renal MR. The placenta and fetus also highly express 11β-HSD2 which, by inactivating glucocorticoids, prevents premature maturation of fetal tissues and consequent developmental “programming.” The role of 11β-HSD2 as a marker of programming is being explored. The 11β-HSDs thus illuminate the emerging biology of intracrine control, afford important insights into human pathogenesis, and offer new tissue-restricted therapeutic avenues. PMID:23899562

  12. Suppression of autophagy in osteocytes does not modify the adverse effects of glucocorticoids on cortical bone.

    Piemontese, Marilina; Onal, Melda; Xiong, Jinhu; Wang, Yiying; Almeida, Maria; Thostenson, Jeff D; Weinstein, Robert S; Manolagas, Stavros C; O'Brien, Charles A

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoid excess decreases bone mass and strength in part by acting directly on osteoblasts and osteocytes, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Macroautophagy (herein referred to as autophagy) is a lysosome-based recycling pathway that promotes the turnover of intracellular components and can promote cell function and survival under stressful conditions. Recent studies have shown that glucocorticoids stimulate autophagy in osteocytes, suggesting that autophagy may oppose the negative actions of glucocorticoids on this cell type. To address this possibility, we compared the impact of prednisolone administration on the skeletons of adult mice in which autophagy was suppressed in osteocytes, via deletion of Atg7 with a Dmp1-Cre transgene, to their control littermates. In control mice, prednisolone increased autophagic flux in osteocyte-enriched bone as measured by LC3 conversion, but this change did not occur in the mice lacking Atg7 in osteocytes. Nonetheless, prednisolone reduced femoral cortical thickness, increased cortical porosity, and reduced bone strength to similar extents in mice with and without autophagy in osteocytes. Prednisolone also suppressed osteoblast number and bone formation in the cancellous bone of control mice. As shown previously, Atg7 deletion in osteocytes reduced osteoblast number and bone formation in cancellous bone, but these parameters were not further reduced by prednisolone administration. In cortical bone, prednisolone elevated osteoclast number to a similar extent in both genotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that although glucocorticoids stimulate autophagy in osteocytes, suppression of autophagy in this cell type does not worsen the negative impact of glucocorticoids on the skeleton. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Decreased adrenoceptor stimulation in heart failure rats reduces NGF expression by cardiac parasympathetic neurons.

    Hasan, Wohaib; Smith, Peter G

    2014-04-01

    Postganglionic cardiac parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves are physically proximate in atrial cardiac tissue allowing reciprocal inhibition of neurotransmitter release, depending on demands from central cardiovascular centers or reflex pathways. Parasympathetic cardiac ganglion (CG) neurons synthesize and release the sympathetic neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), which may serve to maintain these close connections. In this study we investigated whether NGF synthesis by CG neurons is altered in heart failure, and whether norepinephrine from sympathetic neurons promotes NGF synthesis. NGF and proNGF immunoreactivity in CG neurons in heart failure rats following chronic coronary artery ligation was investigated. NGF immunoreactivity was decreased significantly in heart failure rats compared to sham-operated animals, whereas proNGF expression was unchanged. Changes in neurochemistry of CG neurons included attenuated expression of the cholinergic marker vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and increased expression of the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. To further investigate norepinephrine's role in promoting NGF synthesis, we cultured CG neurons treated with adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists. An 82% increase in NGF mRNA levels was detected after 1h of isoproterenol (β-AR agonist) treatment, which increased an additional 22% at 24h. Antagonist treatment blocked isoproterenol-induced increases in NGF transcripts. In contrast, the α-AR agonist phenylephrine did not alter NGF mRNA expression. These results are consistent with β-AR mediated maintenance of NGF synthesis in CG neurons. In heart failure, a decrease in NGF synthesis by CG neurons may potentially contribute to reduced connections with adjacent sympathetic nerves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Stimulation of dopamine receptor D5 expressed on dendritic cells potentiates Th17-mediated immunity.

    Prado, Carolina; Contreras, Francisco; González, Hugo; Díaz, Pablo; Elgueta, Daniela; Barrientos, Magaly; Herrada, Andrés A; Lladser, Álvaro; Bernales, Sebastián; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2012-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are responsible for priming T cells and for promoting their differentiation from naive T cells into appropriate effector cells. Emerging evidence suggests that neurotransmitters can modulate T cell-mediated immunity. However, the involvement of specific neurotransmitters or receptors remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the role of dopamine in the regulation of DC function. We found that DCs express dopamine receptors as well as the machinery necessary to synthesize, store, and degrade dopamine. Notably, the expression of D5R decreased upon LPS-induced DC maturation. Deficiency of D5R on the surface of DCs impaired LPS-induced IL-23 and IL-12 production and consequently attenuated the activation and proliferation of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells. To determine the relevance of D5R expressed on DCs in vivo, we studied the role of this receptor in the modulation of a CD4(+) T cell-driven autoimmunity model. Importantly, D5R-deficient DCs prophylactically transferred into wild-type recipients were able to reduce the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Furthermore, mice transferred with D5R-deficient DCs displayed a significant reduction in the percentage of Th17 cells infiltrating the CNS without differences in the percentage of Th1 cells compared with animals transferred with wild-type DCs. Our findings demonstrate that by contributing to CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation to Th17 phenotype, D5R expressed on DCs is able to modulate the development of an autoimmune response in vivo.

  15. Perioperative glucocorticoids in hip and knee surgery - benefit vs. harm?

    Lunn, T H; Kehlet, H

    2013-01-01

    with systemic glucocorticoid. Pain was reduced with high-dose systemic and local glucocorticoid, but not with low-dose systemic glucocorticoid. Systemic inflammatory markers were reduced with low-dose and high-dose systemic glucocorticoid, and with local glucocorticoid. Functional recovery was improved...... with local glucocorticoid. All studies were small-sized and none sufficiently powered to meaningfully evaluate uncommon adverse events. Most of the local administration studies had poor scientific quality (high risk of bias). Due to clinical heterogeneity and poor scientific quality, no meta......-analysis was performed. In conclusion, in addition to PONV reduction with low-dose systemic glucocorticoid, this review supports high-dose systemic glucocorticoid to ameliorate post-operative pain after hip and knee surgery. However, large-scale safety and dose-finding studies are warranted before final recommendations....

  16. Glucocorticoids and the regulation of memory in health and disease

    de Quervain, Dominique J. -F; Aerni, Amanda; Schelling, Gustav; Roozendaal, Benno

    Over the last decades considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that glucocorticoids - stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex - are crucially involved in the regulation of memory. Specifically, glucocorticoids have been shown to enhance memory consolidation of emotionally arousing

  17. Adverse consequences of glucocorticoid medication: psychological, cognitive, and behavioral effects

    Judd, L.L.; Schettler, P.J.; Brown, E.S.; Wolkowitz, O.M.; Sternberg, E.M.; Bender, B.G.; Bulloch, K.; Cidlowski, J.A.; Kloet, E.R. de; Fardet, L.; Joels, M.; Leung, D.Y.; McEwen, B.S.; Roozendaal, B.; Rossum, E.F. van; Ahn, J.; Brown, D.W.; Plitt, A.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as

  18. Adverse Consequences of Glucocorticoid Medication : Psychological, Cognitive, and Behavioral Effects

    Judd, Lewis L.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Brown, E. Sherwood; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Sternberg, Esther M.; Bender, Bruce G.; Bulloch, Karen; Cidlowski, John A.; de Kloet, E. Ronald; Fardet, Laurence; Joëls, Marian; Leung, Donald Y. M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Roozendaal, Benno; Van Rossum, Elisabeth F. C.; Ahn, Junyoung; Brown, David W.; Plitt, Aaron; Singh, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressant medications worldwide. This article highlights the risk of clinically significant and sometimes severe psychological, cognitive, and behavioral disturbances that may be associated with glucocorticoid use, as well as

  19. Steroid receptor coactivators, HER-2 and HER-3 expression is stimulated by tamoxifen treatment in DMBA-induced breast cancer

    Moi, Line L Haugan; Flågeng, Marianne Hauglid; Gjerde, Jennifer; Madsen, Andre; Røst, Therese Halvorsen; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun Anita; Lien, Ernst A; Mellgren, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) may modulate estrogen receptor (ER) activity and the response to endocrine treatment in breast cancer, in part through interaction with growth factor receptor signaling pathways. In the present study the effects of tamoxifen treatment on the expression of SRCs and human epidermal growth factor receptors (HERs) were examined in an animal model of ER positive breast cancer. Sprague-Dawley rats with DMBA-induced breast cancer were randomized to 14 days of oral tamoxifen 40 mg/kg bodyweight/day or vehicle only (controls). Tumors were measured throughout the study period. Blood samples and tumor tissue were collected at sacrifice and tamoxifen and its main metabolites were quantified using LC-MS/MS. The gene expression in tumor of SRC-1, SRC-2/transcription intermediary factor-2 (TIF-2), SRC-3/amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), ER, HER-1, -2, -3 and HER-4, as well as the transcription factor Ets-2, was measured by real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels were further assessed by Western blotting. Tamoxifen and its main metabolites were detected at high concentrations in serum and accumulated in tumor tissue in up to tenfolds the concentration in serum. Mean tumor volume/rat decreased in the tamoxifen treated group, but continued to increase in controls. The mRNA expression levels of SRC-1 (P = 0.035), SRC-2/TIF-2 (P = 0.002), HER-2 (P = 0.035) and HER-3 (P = 0.006) were significantly higher in tamoxifen treated tumors compared to controls, and the results were confirmed at the protein level using Western blotting. SRC-3/AIB1 protein was also higher in tamoxifen treated tumors. SRC-1 and SRC-2/TIF-2 mRNA levels were positively correlated with each other and with HER-2 (P ≤ 0.001), and the HER-2 mRNA expression correlated with the levels of the other three HER family members (P < 0.05). Furthermore, SRC-3/AIB1 and HER-4 were positively correlated with each other and Ets-2 (P < 0.001). The expression of SRCs and HER-2 and -3 is stimulated

  20. Cloning and expression of porcine Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by CSF-1 and Interleukin 34

    Gow, Deborah J.; Garceau, Valerie; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sester, David P.; Fici, Greg J.; Shelly, John A.; Wilson, Thomas L.; Hume, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF-1) controls the survival, differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, Interleukin 34 (IL-34), has been described, but its physiological role is not yet known. The domestic pig provides an alternative to traditional rodent models for evaluating potential therapeutic applications of CSF-1R agonists and antagonists. To enable such studies, we cloned and expressed active pig CSF-1. To provide a bioassay, pig CSF-1R was expressed in the factor-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. On this transfected cell line, recombinant porcine CSF-1 and human CSF-1 had identical activity. Mouse CSF-1 does not interact with the human CSF-1 receptor but was active on pig. By contrast, porcine CSF-1 was active on mouse, human, cat and dog cells. IL-34 was previously shown to be species-specific, with mouse and human proteins demonstrating limited cross-species activity. The pig CSF-1R was equally responsive to both mouse and human IL-34. Based upon the published crystal structures of CSF-1/CSF-1R and IL34/CSF-1R complexes, we discuss the molecular basis for the species specificity. PMID:22974529

  1. A CHROMATIN MODIFYING ENZYME, SDG8, IS REQUIRED FOR MORPHOLOGICAL, GENE EXPRESSION, AND EPIGENETIC RESPONSES TO MECHANICAL STIMULATION

    Christopher Ian Cazzonelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8/ASHH2, which can regulate the expression of many touch responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis. SDG8 is required for the permissive expression of touch induced genes; and the loss of function of sdg8 perturbs the maximum levels of induction on selected touch gene targets. SDG8 is required to maintain permissive H3K4 trimethylation marks surrounding the Arabidopsis touch-inducible gene TOUCH 3 (TCH3, which encodes a calmodulin-like protein (CML12. The gene neighbouring was also slightly down regulated, revealing a new target for SDG8 mediated chromatin modification. Finally, sdg8 mutants show perturbed morphological response to wind-agitated mechanical stimuli, implicating an epigenetic memory-forming process in the acclimation response of thigmomorphogenesis.

  2. Leucine deprivation stimulates fat loss via increasing CRH expression in the hypothalamus and activating the sympathetic nervous system.

    Cheng, Ying; Zhang, Qian; Meng, Qingshu; Xia, Tingting; Huang, Zhiying; Wang, Chunxia; Liu, Bin; Chen, Shanghai; Xiao, Fei; Du, Ying; Guo, Feifan

    2011-09-01

    We previously showed that leucine deprivation decreases abdominal fat mass largely by increasing energy expenditure, as demonstrated by increased lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT). The goal of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of central nervous system (CNS) in this regulation and elucidate underlying molecular mechanisms. For this purpose, levels of genes and proteins related to lipolysis in WAT and UCP1 expression in BAT were analyzed in wild-type mice after intracerebroventricular administration of leucine or corticotrophin-releasing hormone antibodies, or in mice deleted for three β-adrenergic receptors, after being maintained on a leucine-deficient diet for 7 d. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular administration of leucine significantly attenuates abdominal fat loss and blocks activation of hormone sensitive lipase in WAT and induction of UCP1 in BAT in leucine-deprived mice. Furthermore, we provide evidence that leucine deprivation stimulates fat loss by increasing expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus via activation of stimulatory G protein/cAMP/protein kinase A/cAMP response element-binding protein pathway. Finally, we show that the effect of leucine deprivation on fat loss is mediated by activation of the sympathetic nervous system. These results suggest that CNS plays an important role in regulating fat loss under leucine deprivation and thereby provide novel and important insights concerning the importance of CNS leucine in the regulation of energy homeostasis.

  3. A chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8, is involved in morphological, gene expression, and epigenetic responses to mechanical stimulation.

    Cazzonelli, Christopher I; Nisar, Nazia; Roberts, Andrea C; Murray, Kevin D; Borevitz, Justin O; Pogson, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8/ASHH2, which can regulate the expression of many touch responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis. SDG8 is required for the permissive expression of touch induced genes; and the loss of function of sdg8 perturbs the maximum levels of induction on selected touch gene targets. SDG8 is required to maintain permissive H3K4 trimethylation marks surrounding the Arabidopsis touch-inducible gene TOUCH 3 (TCH3), which encodes a calmodulin-like protein (CML12). The gene neighboring was also slightly down regulated, revealing a new target for SDG8 mediated chromatin modification. Finally, sdg8 mutants show perturbed morphological response to wind-agitated mechanical stimuli, implicating an epigenetic memory-forming process in the acclimation response of thigmomorphogenesis.

  4. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 1: Outcomes.

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Fetal development is a critical period for shaping the lifelong health of an individual. However, the fetus is susceptible to internal and external stimuli that can lead to adverse long-term health consequences. Glucocorticoids are an important developmental switch, driving changes in gene regulation that are necessary for normal growth and maturation. The fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is particularly susceptible to long-term programming by glucocorticoids; these effects can persist throughout the life of an organism. Dysfunction of the HPA axis as a result of fetal programming has been associated with impaired brain growth, altered behaviour and increased susceptibility to chronic disease (such as metabolic and cardiovascular disease). Moreover, the effects of glucocorticoid-mediated programming are evident in subsequent generations, and transmission of these changes can occur through both maternal and paternal lineages.

  5. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  6. Islet-cell dysfunction induced by glucocorticoid treatment

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Kwa, Kelly A A; van Genugten, Renate E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system.......Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system....

  7. Heterologous expression and characterization of a glucose-stimulated β-glucosidase from the termite Neotermes koshunensis in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Uchima, Cristiane Akemi; Tokuda, Gaku; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Arioka, Manabu

    2011-03-01

    Neotermes koshunensis is a lower termite that secretes endogenous β-glucosidase in the salivary glands. This β-glucosidase (G1NkBG) was successfully expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. G1NkBG was purified to homogeneity from the culture supernatant through ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion exchange, hydrophobic, and gel filtration chromatographies with a 48-fold increase in purity. The molecular mass of the native enzyme appeared as a single band at 60 kDa after gel filtration analysis, indicating that G1NkBG is a monomeric protein. Maximum activity was observed at 50 °C with an optimum pH at 5.0. G1NkBG retained 80% of its maximum activity at temperatures up to 45 °C and lost its activity at temperatures above 55 °C. The enzyme was stable from pH 5.0 to 9.0. G1NkBG was most active towards laminaribiose and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-fucopyranoside. Cellobiose, as well as cello-oligosaccharides, was also well hydrolyzed. The enzyme activity was slightly stimulated by Mn(2+) and glycerol. The K(m) and V(max) values were 0.77 mM and 16 U/mg, respectively, against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. An unusual finding was that G1NkBG was stimulated by 1.3-fold when glucose was present in the reaction mixture at a concentration of 200 mM. These characteristics, particularly the stimulation of enzyme activity by glucose, make G1NkBG of great interest for biotechnological applications, especially for bioethanol production.

  8. Insulin stimulates the expression of the SHARP-1 gene via multiple signaling pathways.

    Takagi, K; Asano, K; Haneishi, A; Ono, M; Komatsu, Y; Yamamoto, T; Tanaka, T; Ueno, H; Ogawa, W; Tomita, K; Noguchi, T; Yamada, K

    2014-06-01

    The rat enhancer of split- and hairy-related protein-1 (SHARP-1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor. An issue of whether SHARP-1 is an insulin-inducible transcription factor was examined. Insulin rapidly increased the level of SHARP-1 mRNA both in vivo and in vitro. Then, signaling pathways involved with the increase of SHARP-1 mRNA by insulin were determined in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. Pretreatments with LY294002, wortmannin, and staurosporine completely blocked the induction effect, suggesting the involvement of both phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways. In fact, overexpression of a dominant negative form of atypical protein kinase C lambda (aPKCλ) significantly decreased the induction of the SHARP-1 mRNA. In addition, inhibitors for the small GTPase Rac or Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) also blocked the induction of SHARP-1 mRNA by insulin. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Rac1 prevented the activation by insulin. Furthermore, actinomycin D and cycloheximide completely blocked the induction of SHARP-1 mRNA by insulin. Finally, when a SHARP-1 expression plasmid was transiently transfected with various reporter plasmids into H4IIE cells, the promoter activity of PEPCK reporter plasmid was specifically decreased. Thus, we conclude that insulin induces the SHARP-1 gene expression at the transcription level via a both PI 3-K/aPKCλ/JNK- and a PI 3-K/Rac/JNK-signaling pathway; protein synthesis is required for this induction; and that SHARP-1 is a potential repressor of the PEPCK gene expression. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Hemocyanins Stimulate Innate Immunity by Inducing Different Temporal Patterns of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression in Macrophages.

    Zhong, Ta-Ying; Arancibia, Sergio; Born, Raimundo; Tampe, Ricardo; Villar, Javiera; Del Campo, Miguel; Manubens, Augusto; Becker, María Inés

    2016-06-01

    Hemocyanins induce a potent Th1-dominant immune response with beneficial clinical outcomes when used as a carrier/adjuvant in vaccines and nonspecific immunostimulant in cancer. However, the mechanisms by which hemocyanins trigger innate immune responses, leading to beneficial adaptive immune responses, are unknown. This response is triggered by a proinflammatory signal from various components, of which macrophages are an essential part. To understand how these proteins influence macrophage response, we investigated the effects of mollusks hemocyanins with varying structural and immunological properties, including hemocyanins from Concholepas concholepas, Fissurella latimarginata, and Megathura crenulata (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), on cultures of peritoneal macrophages. Hemocyanins were phagocytosed and slowly processed. Analysis of this process showed differential gene expression along with protein levels of proinflammatory markers, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, and TNF-α. An extended expression analysis of 84 cytokines during a 24-h period showed a robust proinflammatory response for F. latimarginata hemocyanin in comparison with keyhole limpet hemocyanin and C. concholepas hemocyanin, which was characterized by an increase in the transcript levels of M1 cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment. These cytokine genes included chemokines (Cxcl1, Cxcl3, Cxcl5, Ccl2, and Ccl3), ILs (Il1b and Ifng), growth factors (Csf2 and Csf3), and TNF family members (Cd40lg). The protein levels of certain cytokines were increased. However, every hemocyanin maintains downregulated key M2 cytokine genes, including Il4 and Il5 Collectively, our data demonstrate that hemocyanins are able to trigger the release of proinflammatory factors with different patterns of cytokine expression, suggesting differential signaling pathways and transcriptional network mechanisms that lead to the activation of M1-polarized macrophages. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of

  10. Transforming growth factor beta stimulation of biglycan gene expression is potentially mediated by sp1 binding factors

    Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Xie, Zhongjian; Young, Marian Frances

    2004-01-01

    . In this study, we have investigated the mechanism by which TGF-beta(1), TGF-beta(2) and TGF-beta(3) stimulate biglycan mRNA expression in the osteoblastic cell line MG-63. The cells were transfected with a series of deletional human biglycan promoter constructs and a region in the biglycan 5' DNA was found...... to respond to TGF-beta(1) with increased transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. Also TGF-beta(2) and TGF-beta(3), two structurally highly related TGF-beta isoforms stimulated biglycan transcription. A TGF-beta responsive region was identified within the first 218 bp of the human biglycan...... was abrogated by mithramycin, an inhibitor of Sp1 binding to GC-rich DNA sequences. A mutation in the Sp1 site at -216 to -208 within the -218 biglycan promoter construct substantially diminished the transcriptional up-regulation by TGF-beta(1). Taken together this data shows for the first time that TGF-beta(1...

  11. Cell Morphological Change and Caspase-3 Protein Expression on Epithelial Cells under Stimulation of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus sanguinis

    Suryani Hutomo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus sanguinis may find in periodontal lesions, deep seated infection, and infective endocarditis that are usually dominated by anaerobes. This bacterium caused cell death on some cells but host responses to this species remained unclear. Objective: This study was aimed to detect cell morphologica change and role of caspase-3 in cell death mechanism induced by S. sanguinis. Methods: HeLa cells as representative model for oral epithelial cells were exposed to 107 cells/ml bacteria for 48 h. Morphological change was observed microscopically after hematoxyline-eosin staining. Expression of active caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemical analysis after cell stimulation for 36 and 48 h with wild type supragingival S. sanguinis. Doxorubicin (0.5625 μg/ml was used as positive control for caspase-3 activation. Results: The results showed cell shrinkage of bacterial-treated cells; and active caspase-3 molecules were detected after 36 and 48 hours cell stimulation. Conclusion: This study would suggest cell shrinkage and caspase-3-dependent apoptotic cell death induced by S. sanguinis.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i1.375

  12. A baby with congenital hypothyroidism born to a hypothyroid mother who expressed undiagnosed thyroid stimulation blocking antibody

    Mock Ryeon Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In adults, hypothyroidism caused by thyroid stimulation blocking antibody (TSB Ab is rare, and confirmed cases are even fewer, as TSB Ab levels are rarely assayed. However, this may create problems in babies, as the transplacental passage of maternal TSB Ab can cause a rare type of hypothyroidism in the infant. Prompt levothyroxine replacement for the baby starting immediately after birth is important. We describe a congenital hypothyroid baby born to a hypothyroid mother who was not aware of the cause of her hypothyroid condition, which turned out to be associated with the expression of TSB Ab. This cause was confirmed in both the infant and mother using a series of thyroid function tests and measurements of autoantibody levels, including TSB Ab. During periodic follow-up, the TSB Ab and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody titers became negative in the baby at 8 months of age, but remained positive in the mother. Evaluation of hypothyroidism and its cause in mothers during pregnancy is important for both maternal and child health.

  13. Context-dependent memory following recurrent hypoglycaemia in non-diabetic rats is mediated via glucocorticoid signalling in the dorsal hippocampus.

    Osborne, Danielle M; O'Leary, Kelsey E; Fitzgerald, Dennis P; George, Alvin J; Vidal, Michael M; Anderson, Brian M; McNay, Ewan C

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycaemia is primarily caused by repeated over-administration of insulin to patients with diabetes. Although cognition is impaired during hypoglycaemia, restoration of euglycaemia after recurrent hypoglycaemia is associated with improved hippocampally mediated memory. Recurrent hypoglycaemia alters glucocorticoid secretion in response to hypoglycaemia; glucocorticoids are well established to regulate hippocampal processes, suggesting a possible mechanism for recurrent hypoglycaemia modulation of subsequent cognition. We tested the hypothesis that glucocorticoids within the dorsal hippocampus might mediate the impact of recurrent hypoglycaemia on hippocampal cognitive processes. We characterised changes in the dorsal hippocampus at several time points to identify specific mechanisms affected by recurrent hypoglycaemia, using a well-validated 3 day model of recurrent hypoglycaemia either alone or with intrahippocampal delivery of glucocorticoid (mifepristone) and mineralocorticoid (spironolactone) receptor antagonists prior to each hypoglycaemic episode. Recurrent hypoglycaemia enhanced learning and also increased hippocampal expression of glucocorticoid receptors, serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1, cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) phosphorylation, and plasma membrane levels of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. Both hippocampus-dependent memory enhancement and the molecular changes were reversed by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist treatment. These results indicate that increased glucocorticoid signalling during recurrent hypoglycaemia produces several changes in the dorsal hippocampus that are conducive to enhanced hippocampus-dependent contextual learning. These changes appear to be adaptive, and in addition to supporting cognition may reduce damage otherwise caused by repeated exposure to severe hypoglycaemia.

  14. UVB radiation prevents skeleton growth and stimulates the expression of stress markers in sea urchin embryos

    Bonaventura, Rosa; Poma, Veronica; Costa, Caterina; Matranga, Valeria

    2005-01-01

    Ozone depletion results in an increased flux of biologically damaging radiations reaching the earth. Although ultraviolet (UV) penetration is attenuated by the seawater, harmful effects can be still observed at low depths where sea urchin embryos are living. We have used Paracentrotus lividus embryos to study the impacts of UV radiation on their development. Blastula cultures were exposed to different doses of UVB (312 nm) radiations and the resulting endpoint effects were evaluated in terms of embryonic morphological abnormalities, variations in specific gene expression, and changes in the levels of stress proteins. We found that embryos were moderately sensitive to 50 J/m 2 UVB radiation; an increase in the number of developmentally delayed and malformed embryos was detected when increasing doses, up to 1000 J/m 2 , were used. Major developmental defects, observed 24 and 48 h after exposure, consisted in the failure of skeleton elongation and patterning. Accordingly, we found a reduction in the number of primary mesenchyme cells that expressed Pl-SM30, a gene coding for one of the specific matrix proteins of the skeleton. The morphological effects observed 1, 24, and 48 h after exposure were correlated with a dose-dependent increase in the level and in the activation of two recognized stress markers, namely hsp70 and p38 MAPk, respectively, consistent with their role in mediating cellular response to stress and suggesting a function in embryo survival

  15. DNA-damaging agents stimulate gene expression at specific loci in Escherichia coli

    Kenyon, C.J.; Walker, G.C.

    1988-05-01

    Operon fusions in Escherichia coli were obtained that showed increased beta-galactosidase expression in response to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C. These fusions were generated by using the Mud(ApR, lac) vector to insert the lactose structural genes randomly into the bacterial chromosome. Induction of beta-galactosidase in these strains, which carried fusions of lac to these din (damage-inducible) loci, was (i) triggered by UV light as well as by mitomycin C and (ii) abolished by either a recA- or a lexA- mutation. Similar characteristics of induction were observed when the lactose genes were fused to a prophage lambda promoter by using Mud(ApR, lac). These results indicate that E. coli contains a set of genes that, like prophage lambda genes, are expressed in response to DNA-damaging agents and regulated by the recA and lexA gene products. These din genes map at five bacterial loci. One din::Mud(ApR, lac) insertion results in a UV-sensitive phenotype and may be within the uvrA transcriptional unit.

  16. Stimulation of Protein Expression Through the Harmonic Resonance of Frequency-Specific Music.

    Orhan, Ibrahim Y; Gulbahar, Burak A

    2016-12-01

    The use of specific frequencies for specific individual amino acids may increase the potential energy of protein molecules in the medium [1]. The resonance would also increase the movement of particles in the cytosol, increasing the collisions necessary for the conduction of protein expression. The clash of two waves that share frequencies will exhibit an increase in energy through an increase in amplitude [2]. The increase in energy would in turn increase the number of collisions forming the tRNA-amino acid, increasing the amino acid acquiry for ribosomes to improve intracellular efficiency in gene expression. To test the hypothesis, Red Fluorescent Protein (RFP) in transformated BL-21 strains of E. coli and p53 protein of MCF-7 were examined after exposure to sounds of specific frequencies. Through the exposure of the experimental systems to a sequence of sounds that match the frequencies of specific amino acids, the levels of RFP exhibition respective to the control groups in the bacterial medium increased two-fold in terms of RFU. The experiments that targeted the p53 protein with the 'music' showed a decrease in the cell prevalence in the MCF-7 type breast cancer cells by 28%, by decreasing the speed of tumour formation. Exposure to 'music' that was designed through assigning a musical note for every single one of the twenty unique amino acids, produced both an analytical and a visible shift in protein synthesis, making it as potential tool for reducing procedural time uptake.

  17. DioxolaneA3-phosphatidylethanolamines are generated by human platelets and stimulate neutrophil integrin expression

    Maceler Aldrovandi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated platelets generate an eicosanoid proposed to be 8-hydroxy-9,10-dioxolane A3 (DXA3. Herein, we demonstrate that significant amounts of DXA3 are rapidly attached to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE forming four esterified eicosanoids, 16:0p, 18:0p, 18:1p and 18:0a/DXA3-PEs that can activate neutrophil integrin expression. These lipids comprise the majority of DXA3 generated by platelets, are formed in ng amounts (24.3±6.1 ng/2×108 and remain membrane bound. Pharmacological studies revealed DXA3-PE formation involves cyclooxygenase-1 (COX, protease-activated receptors (PAR 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, phospholipase C and intracellular calcium. They are generated primarily via esterification of newly formed DXA3, but can also be formed in vitro via co-oxidation of PE during COX-1 co-oxidation of arachidonate. All four DXA3-PEs were detected in human clots. Purified platelet DXA3-PE activated neutrophil Mac-1 expression, independently of its hydrolysis to the free eicosanoid. This study demonstrates the structures and cellular synthetic pathway for a family of leukocyte-activating platelet phospholipids generated on acute activation, adding to the growing evidence that enzymatic PE oxidation is a physiological event in innate immune cells.

  18. Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Is Expressed by Most Ovarian Cancer Subtypes and Is a Safe and Effective Immunotherapeutic Target.

    Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Allegrezza, Michael J; Tesone, Amelia J; Payne, Kyle K; Wickramasinghe, Jayamanna; Nguyen, Jenny M; O'Brien, Shane W; Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Huang, Qihong; Cadungog, Mark G; Connolly, Denise C; Tchou, Julia; Curiel, Tyler J; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2017-01-15

    To define the safety and effectiveness of T cells redirected against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR)-expressing ovarian cancer cells. FSHR expression was determined by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and qPCR in 77 human ovarian cancer specimens from 6 different histologic subtypes and 20 human healthy tissues. The effectiveness of human T cells targeted with full-length FSH in vivo was determined against a panel of patient-derived xenografts. Safety and effectiveness were confirmed in immunocompetent tumor-bearing mice, using constructs targeting murine FSHR and syngeneic T cells. FSHR is expressed in gynecologic malignancies of different histologic types but not in nonovarian healthy tissues. Accordingly, T cells expressing full-length FSHR-redirected chimeric receptors mediate significant therapeutic effects (including tumor rejection) against a panel of patient-derived tumors in vivo In immunocompetent mice growing syngeneic, orthotopic, and aggressive ovarian tumors, fully murine FSHR-targeted T cells also increased survival without any measurable toxicity. Notably, chimeric receptors enhanced the ability of endogenous tumor-reactive T cells to abrogate malignant progression upon adoptive transfer into naïve recipients subsequently challenged with the same tumor. Interestingly, FSHR-targeted T cells persisted as memory lymphocytes without noticeable PD-1-dependent exhaustion during end-stage disease, in the absence of tumor cell immunoediting. However, exosomes in advanced tumor ascites diverted the effector activity of this and other chimeric receptor-transduced T cells away from targeted tumor cells. T cells redirected against FSHR + tumor cells with full-length FSH represent a promising therapeutic alternative against a broad range of ovarian malignancies, with negligible toxicity even in the presence of cognate targets in tumor-free ovaries. Clin Cancer Res; 23(2); 441-53. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Allergen-stimulated T lymphocytes from allergic patients induce vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression and IL-6 production by endothelial cells.

    Delneste, Y; Jeannin, P; Gosset, P; Lassalle, P; Cardot, E; Tillie-Leblond, I; Joseph, M; Pestel, J; Tonnel, A B

    1995-01-01

    Adhesion of inflammatory cells to endothelium is a critical step for their transvascular migration to inflammatory sites. To evaluate the relationship between T lymphocytes (TL) and vascular endothelium, supernatants from allergen-stimulated TL obtained from patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) versus healthy subjects were added to endothelial cell (EC) cultures. TL were stimulated by autologous-activated antigen-presenting cells (APC) previously fixed in paraformaldehyde to prevent monokine secretion. Two parameters were measured: the expression of adhesion molecule and the production of IL-6. Related allergen-stimulated TL supernatants from allergic patients induced an increase of VCAM-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression when supernatants of the control groups (TL exposed to an unrelated allergen or not stimulated or TL obtained from healthy subjects) did not. E-selectin expression was not modulated whatever the supernatant added to EC culture. IL-6 production by EC was significantly enhanced after activation with related allergen-stimulated TL supernatants from allergics compared with control supernatants. Induction of VCAM-1 expression was inhibited by adding neutralizing antibodies against IL-4, whereas IL-6 production and ICAM-1 expression were inhibited by anti-interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) antibodies. Enhanced production of IL-4 and IFN-gamma was detected in related allergen-stimulated TL supernatants from allergic subjects compared with the different supernatants. These data suggest that allergen-specific TL present in the peripheral blood of allergic patients are of Th1 and Th2 subtypes. Their stimulation in allergic patients may lead to the activation of endothelial cells and thereby participate in leucocyte recruitment towards the inflammatory site. PMID:7542574

  20. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptor-α signaling.

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-03-25

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS.

  1. A membrane glucocorticoid receptor mediates the rapid/non-genomic actions of glucocorticoids in mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    Pérez, María Hernández-Alcalá; Cormack, Jonathan; Mallinson, David; Mutungi, Gabriel

    2013-10-15

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are steroid hormones released from the adrenal gland in response to stress. They are also some of the most potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs currently in clinical use. They exert most of their physiological and pharmacological actions through the classical/genomic pathway. However, they also have rapid/non-genomic actions whose physiological and pharmacological functions are still poorly understood. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to investigate the rapid/non-genomic effects of two widely prescribed glucocorticoids, beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) and prednisolone acetate (PDNA), on force production in isolated, intact, mouse skeletal muscle fibre bundles. The results show that the effects of both GCs on maximum isometric force (Po) were fibre-type dependent. Thus, they increased Po in the slow-twitch fibre bundles without significantly affecting that of the fast-twitch fibre bundles. The increase in Po occurred within 10 min and was insensitive to the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. Also, it was maximal at ∼250 nM and was blocked by the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) inhibitor RU486 and a monoclonal anti-GCR, suggesting that it was mediated by a membrane (m) GCR. Both muscle fibre types expressed a cytosolic GCR. However, a mGCR was present only in the slow-twitch fibres. The receptor was more abundant in oxidative than in glycolytic fibres and was confined mainly to the periphery of the fibres where it co-localised with laminin. From these findings we conclude that the rapid/non-genomic actions of GCs are mediated by a mGCR and that they are physiologically/therapeutically beneficial, especially in slow-twitch muscle fibres.

  2. T cell expression of IL-18R and DR3 is essential for non-cognate stimulation of Th1 cells and optimal clearance of intracellular bacteria.

    Pham, Oanh H; O'Donnell, Hope; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Tsolis, Renée M; McSorley, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Th1 cells can be activated by TCR-independent stimuli, but the importance of this pathway in vivo and the precise mechanisms involved require further investigation. Here, we used a simple model of non-cognate Th1 cell stimulation in Salmonella-infected mice to examine these issues. CD4 Th1 cell expression of both IL-18R and DR3 was required for optimal IFN-γ induction in response to non-cognate stimulation, while IL-15R expression was dispensable. Interestingly, effector Th1 cells generated by immunization rather than live infection had lower non-cognate activity despite comparable IL-18R and DR3 expression. Mice lacking T cell intrinsic expression of MyD88, an important adapter molecule in non-cognate T cell stimulation, exhibited higher bacterial burdens upon infection with Salmonella, Chlamydia or Brucella, suggesting that non-cognate Th1 stimulation is a critical element of efficient bacterial clearance. Thus, IL-18R and DR3 are critical players in non-cognate stimulation of Th1 cells and this response plays an important role in protection against intracellular bacteria.

  3. Expression of genes related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in murine fetal lungs in late gestation

    Côté Mélissa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung maturation is modulated by several factors, including glucocorticoids. Expression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis-related components, with proposed or described local regulatory systems analogous to the HPA axis, was reported in peripheral tissues. Here, HPA axis-related genes were studied in the mouse developing lung during a period overlapping the surge of surfactant production. Methods Expression of genes encoding for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, CRH receptors (CRHR 1 and 2beta, CRH-binding protein, proopiomelanocortin (POMC, melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R, and glucocorticoid receptor was quantified by real-time PCR and localized by in situ hydridization in fetal lungs at gestational days (GD 15.5, 16.5, and 17.5, and was also quantified in primary mesenchymal- and epithelial cell-enriched cultures. In addition, the capability of CRH and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH to stimulate pulmonary expression of enzymes involved in the adrenal pathway of glucocorticoid synthesis was addressed, as well as the glucocorticoid production by fetal lung explants. Results We report that all the studied genes are expressed in fetal lungs according to different patterns. On GD 15.5, Mc2r showed peaks in expression in samples that have previously presented high mRNA levels for glucocorticoid synthesizing enzymes, including 11beta-hydroxylase (Cyp11b1. Crhr1 mRNA co-localized with Pomc mRNA in cells surrounding the proximal epithelium on GD 15.5 and 16.5. A transition in expression sites toward distal epithelial cells was observed between GD 15.5 and 17.5 for all the studied genes. CRH or ACTH stimulation of genes involved in the adrenal pathway of glucocorticoid synthesis was not observed in lung explants on GD 15.5, whereas CRH significantly increased expression of 21-hydroxylase (Cyp21a1 on GD 17.5. A deoxycorticosterone production by fetal lung explants was observed. Conclusions Temporal and spatial

  4. A zebrafish model of glucocorticoid resistance shows serotonergic modulation of the stress response

    Brian eGriffiths

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available One function of glucocorticoids is to restore homeostasis after an acute stress response by providing negative feedback to stress circuits in the brain. Loss of this negative feedback leads to elevated physiological stress and may contribute to depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. We investigated the early, developmental effects of glucocorticoid signaling deficits on stress physiology and related behaviors using a mutant zebrafish, grs357, with non-functional glucocorticoid receptors. These mutants are morphologically inconspicuous and adult-viable. A previous study of adult grs357 mutants showed loss of glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback and elevated physiological and behavioral stress markers. Already at five days post-fertilization, mutant larvae had elevated whole body cortisol, increased expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, the precursor of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, and failed to show normal suppression of stress markers after dexamethasone treatment. Mutant larvae had larger auditory-evoked startle responses compared to wildtype sibling controls (grwt, despite having lower spontaneous activity levels. Fluoxetine (Prozac treatment in mutants decreased startle responding and increased spontaneous activity, making them behaviorally similar to wildtype. This result mirrors known effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in modifying glucocorticoid signaling and alleviating stress disorders in human patients. Our results suggest that larval grs357 zebrafish can be used to study behavioral, physiological and molecular aspects of stress disorders. Most importantly, interactions between glucocorticoid and serotonin signaling appear to be highly conserved among vertebrates, suggesting deep homologies at the neural circuit level and opening up new avenues for research into psychiatric conditions.

  5. Behavioral neuroadaptation to alcohol : from glucocorticoids to histone acetylation

    Daniel Beracochea

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A prime mechanism that contributes to the development and maintenance of alcoholism is the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity and the release of glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans and primates, corticosterone in rodents from the adrenal glands. In the brain, sustained, local elevation of glucocorticoid concentration even long after cessation of chronic alcohol consumption compromises functional integrity of a circuit including the prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus and the amygdala. These structures are implicated in learning and memory processes as well as in orchestrating neuroadaptive responses to stress and anxiety responses. Thus, potentiation of anxiety-related neuroadaptation by alcohol is characterized by an abnormally amygdala hyperactivity coupled with a hypofunction of the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. This review describes research on molecular and epigenetic mechanisms by which alcohol causes distinct region-specific adaptive changes in gene expression patterns and ultimately, leads to a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments on prefrontal- and hippocampal-based tasks. Alcohol-induced neuroadaptations involve the dysregulation of numerous signaling cascades, leading to long-term changes in transcriptional profiles of genes, through the actions of transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP response element binding protein and chromatin remodeling due to post-translational modifications of histone proteins. We describe the role of prefrontal-hippocampus-amygdala circuit in mediating the effects of acute and chronic alcohol on learning and memory, and region-specific molecular and epigenetic mechanisms involved in this process. This review first discusses the importance of brain region-specific dysregulation of glucocorticoid concentration in the development of alcohol dependence and describes on how persistently increased glucocorticoid levels in prefrontal cortex may be involved in

  6. Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how sequential expression mediates soil carbon stabilization and turnover

    Firestone, Mary [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    It is now understood that most plant C is utilized or transformed by soil microorganisms en route to stabilization. Hence the composition of microbial communities that mediate decomposition and transformation of root C is critical, as are the metabolic capabilities of these communities. The change in composition and function of the C-transforming microbial communities over time in effect defines the biological component of soil C stabilization. Our research was designed to test 2 general hypotheses; the first two hypotheses are discussed first; H1: Root-exudate interactions with soil microbial populations results in the expression of enzymatic capacities for macromolecular, complex carbon decomposition; and H2: Microbial communities surrounding roots undergo taxonomic succession linked to functional gene activities as roots grow, mature, and decompose in soil. Over the term of the project we made significant progress in 1) quantifying the temporal pattern of root interactions with the soil decomposing community and 2) characterizing the role of root exudates in mediating these interactions.

  7. Induction of Zenk protein expression within the nucleus taeniae of the amygdala of pigeons following tone and shock stimulation

    I. Brito

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the expression of the Zenk protein within the nucleus taeniae of the pigeon’s amygdala (TnA after training in a classical aversive conditioning, in order to improve our understanding of its functional role in birds. Thirty-two 18-month-old adult male pigeons (Columba livia, weighing on average 350 g, were trained under different conditions: with tone-shock associations (experimental group; EG; with shock-alone presentations (shock group; SG; with tone-alone presentations (tone group; TG; with exposure to the training chamber without stimulation (context group; CG, and with daily handling (naive group; NG. The number of immunoreactive nuclei was counted in the whole TnA region and is reported as density of Zenk-positive nuclei. This density of Zenk-positive cells in the TnA was significantly greater for the EG, SG and TG than for the CG and NG (P < 0.05. The data indicate an expression of Zenk in the TnA that was driven by experience, supporting the role of this brain area as a critical element for neural processing of aversive stimuli as well as meaningful novel stimuli.

  8. Purification and characterization of recombinant human bile salt-stimulated lipase expressed in milk of transgenic cloned cows

    Ding, Fangrong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Wenjie; Lindquist, Susanne; Hernell, Olle; Wang, Jianwu; Li, Jing; Li, Ling; Zhao, Yaofeng; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) is a lipolytic digestive enzyme with broad substrate specificity secreted from exocrine pancreas into the intestinal lumen in all species and from the lactating mammary gland into the milk of some species, notably humans but not cows. BSSL in breast milk facilitates digestion and absorption of milk fat and promotes growth of small for gestational age preterm infants. Thus, purified recombinant human BSSL (rhBSSL) can be used for treatment of patients with fat malabsorption and expressing rhBSSL in the milk of transgenic cloned cows would therefore be a mean to meet a medical need. In the present study, a vector pBAC-hLF-hBSSL was constructed, which efficiently expressed active rhBSSL in milk of transgenic cloned cows to a concentration of 9.8 mg/ml. The rhBSSL purified from cow milk had the same enzymatic activity, N-terminal amino acid sequence, amino acid composition and isoelectric point and similar physicochemical characteristics as human native BSSL. Our study supports the use of transgenic cattle for the cost-competitive, large-scale production of therapeutic rhBSSL. PMID:28475629

  9. Glucocorticoids Enhance Muscle Proteolysis through a Myostatin-Dependent Pathway at the Early Stage.

    Wang, Ruxia; Jiao, Hongchao; Zhao, Jingpeng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Lin, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted proteins, is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle. It negatively regulates muscle mass and is associated with glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. However, it remains unclear whether myostatin is involved in glucocorticoid-induced muscle protein turnover. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of myostatin in protein metabolism during dexamethasone (DEX) treatment. Protein synthesis rates and the expression of the genes for myostatin, ubiquitin-proteasome atrogin-1, MuRF1, FoxO1/3a and mTOR/p70S6K were determined. The results show that DEX decreased (Pmyostatin. DEX increased (P0.05). The phosphorylation levels of mTOR and p70S6K were decreased by DEX treatment (Pmyostatin (P 0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that the myostatin signalling pathway is associated with glucocorticoid-induced muscle protein catabolism at the beginning of exposure. Myostatin is not a main pathway associated with the suppression of muscle protein synthesis by glucocorticoids.

  10. Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    2010-10-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with...SUBJECT TERMS Duchenne Muscular dystrophy , Glucocorticoids, Systems biology, Drug mechanism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION...better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant proposal is led by Dr. Eric Hoffman, and it

  11. On the retinal toxicity of intraocular glucocorticoids.

    Torriglia, Alicia; Valamanesh, Fatemeh; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2010-12-15

    Corticosteroids are hormones involved in many physiological responses such as stress, immune modulation, protein catabolism and water homeostasis. The subfamily of glucocorticoids is used systemically in the treatment of inflammatory diseases or allergic reactions. In the eye, glucocorticoides are used to treat macular edema, inflammation and neovascularization. The most commonly used glucocorticoid is triamcinolone acetonide (TA). The pharmaceutical formulation of TA is not adapted for intravitreal administration but has been selected by ophthalmologists because its very low intraocular solubility provides sustained effect. Visual benefits of intraocular TA do not clearly correlate with morpho-anatomical improvements, suggesting potential toxicity. We therefore studied, non-common, but deleterious effects of glucocorticoids on the retina. We found that the intravitreal administration of TA is beneficial in the treatment of neovascularization because it triggers cell death of endothelial cells of neovessels by a caspase-independent mechanism. However, this treatment is toxic for the retina because it induces a non-apoptotic, caspase-independent cell death related to paraptosis, mostly in the retinal pigmented epithelium cells and the Müller cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. From receptor balance to rational glucocorticoid therapy.

    de Kloet, E Ron

    2014-08-01

    Corticosteroids secreted as end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis act like a double-edged sword in the brain. The hormones coordinate appraisal processes and decision making during the initial phase of a stressful experience and promote subsequently cognitive performance underlying the management of stress adaptation. This action exerted by the steroids on the initiation and termination of the stress response is mediated by 2 related receptor systems: mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). The receptor types are unevenly distributed but colocalized in abundance in neurons of the limbic brain to enable these complementary hormone actions. This contribution starts from a historical perspective with the observation that phasic occupancy of GR during ultradian rhythmicity is needed to maintain responsiveness to corticosteroids. Then, during stress, initially MR activation enhances excitability of limbic networks that are engaged in appraisal and emotion regulation. Next, the rising hormone concentration occupies GR, resulting in reallocation of energy to limbic-cortical circuits with a role in behavioral adaptation and memory storage. Upon MR:GR imbalance, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs, which can enhance an individual's vulnerability. Imbalance is characteristic for chronic stress experience and depression but also occurs during exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Hence, glucocorticoid psychopathology may develop in susceptible individuals because of suppression of ultradian/circadian rhythmicity and depletion of endogenous corticosterone from brain MR. This knowledge generated from testing the balance hypothesis can be translated to a rational glucocorticoid therapy.

  13. Safety and tolerability of high doses of glucocorticoides

    Rakić Branislava D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia includes the use of high doses of glucocorticoides (prednisone and dexamethasone, which significantly increase the success of therapy due to lymphocytolitic effect. The aim: The aim of the study was to determine tolerability of high doses of prednisone and dexamethasone in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the structure and the intensity of adverse effects, occurred after application of these medicines. Subjects and methods: In a prospective study, we analyzed adverse effects of high doses of glucocorticoides in children suffering acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated in the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina, since December 2010. until October 2014, were analyzed. This study included 18 patients, aged from 2 to 15 years. Results: Hyperglycemia appeared in 89% of patients treated with prednisone and in 61% of patients treated with dexamethasone. In order to control the high blood glucose level (above 10 mmol /L, in 11% of patients insulin was used. Hypertension appeared in 28% patients treated with prednisone and dexamethasone. Antihypertensives were needed for regulation in 17% patients. Hypopotassemia and hypocalcaemia were significantly more expressed after the use of prednisone in comparison to dexamethasone. In 11% of patients, the treatment with dexamethasone caused depressive behavior, followed by agitation. Conclusion: Adverse effects of dexamethasone and prednisone, administered in high doses in children with ALL were known, expected and reversible. Adverse reactions usually disappeared spontaneously or after short-term symptomatic therapy.

  14. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA

  15. PPARβ/δ regulates glucocorticoid- and sepsis-induced FOXO1 activation and muscle wasting.

    Estibaliz Castillero

    Full Text Available FOXO1 is involved in glucocorticoid- and sepsis-induced muscle wasting, in part reflecting regulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF1. Mechanisms influencing FOXO1 expression in muscle wasting are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ upregulates muscle FOXO1 expression and activity with a downstream upregulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression during sepsis and glucocorticoid treatment and that inhibition of PPARβ/δ activity can prevent muscle wasting. We found that activation of PPARβ/δ in cultured myotubes increased FOXO1 activity, atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression, protein degradation and myotube atrophy. Treatment of myotubes with dexamethasone increased PPARβ/δ expression and activity. Dexamethasone-induced FOXO1 activation and atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression, protein degradation, and myotube atrophy were inhibited by PPARβ/δ blocker or siRNA. Importantly, muscle wasting induced in rats by dexamethasone or sepsis was prevented by treatment with a PPARβ/δ inhibitor. The present results suggest that PPARβ/δ regulates FOXO1 activation in glucocorticoid- and sepsis-induced muscle wasting and that treatment with a PPARβ/δ inhibitor may ameliorate loss of muscle mass in these conditions.

  16. BDNF and glucocorticoids regulate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) homeostasis in the hypothalamus.

    Jeanneteau, Freddy D; Lambert, W Marcus; Ismaili, Naima; Bath, Kevin G; Lee, Francis S; Garabedian, Michael J; Chao, Moses V

    2012-01-24

    Regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is critical for adaptation to environmental changes. The principle regulator of the HPA axis is corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is made in the parventricular nucleus and is an important target of negative feedback by glucocorticoids. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CRH are not fully understood. Disruption of normal HPA axis activity is a major risk factor of neuropsychiatric disorders in which decreased expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been documented. To investigate the role of the GR in CRH neurons, we have targeted the deletion of the GR, specifically in the parventricular nucleus. Impairment of GR function in the parventricular nucleus resulted in an enhancement of CRH expression and an up-regulation of hypothalamic levels of BDNF and disinhibition of the HPA axis. BDNF is a stress and activity-dependent factor involved in many activities modulated by the HPA axis. Significantly, ectopic expression of BDNF in vivo increased CRH, whereas reduced expression of BDNF, or its receptor TrkB, decreased CRH expression and normal HPA functions. We find the differential regulation of CRH relies upon the cAMP response-element binding protein coactivator CRTC2, which serves as a switch for BDNF and glucocorticoids to direct the expression of CRH.

  17. Clinical and Genomic Crosstalk between Glucocorticoid Receptor and Estrogen Receptor α In Endometrial Cancer

    Jeffery M. Vahrenkamp

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Steroid hormone receptors are simultaneously active in many tissues and are capable of altering each other’s function. Estrogen receptor α (ER and glucocorticoid receptor (GR are expressed in the uterus, and their ligands have opposing effects on uterine growth. In endometrial tumors with high ER expression, we surprisingly found that expression of GR is associated with poor prognosis. Dexamethasone reduced normal uterine growth in vivo; however, this growth inhibition was abolished in estrogen-induced endometrial hyperplasia. We observed low genomic-binding site overlap when ER and GR are induced with their respective ligands; however, upon simultaneous induction they co-occupy more sites. GR binding is altered significantly by estradiol with GR recruited to ER-bound loci that become more accessible upon estradiol induction. Gene expression responses to co-treatment were more similar to estradiol but with additional regulated genes. Our results suggest phenotypic and molecular interplay between ER and GR in endometrial cancer. : Estrogen receptor α (ER and glucocorticoid receptor (GR are expressed in the uterus and have differential effects on growth. Vahrenkamp et al. find that expression of both receptors is associated with poor outcome in endometrial cancer and that simultaneous induction of ER and GR leads to molecular interplay between the receptors. Keywords: estrogen receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, endometrial cancer

  18. Involvement of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in atrazine action on FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 expression in rat granulosa cells

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Glisic, Branka; Kaisarevic, Sonja; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide used herbicide atrazine is linked to reproductive dysfunction in females. In this study, we investigated the effects and the mechanism of atrazine action in the ovary using a primary culture of immature granulosa cells. In granulosa cells, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activates both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) cascades, with cAMP pathway being more important for luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNA expression. We report that 48 h after atrazine exposure the FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA expression and estradiol synthesis were decreased, with LHR mRNA being more sensitive to atrazine than CYP19A1 mRNA. Inadequate acquisition of LHR in the FSH-stimulated and atrazine-exposed granulosa cells renders human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) ineffective to stimulate amphiregulin (Areg), epiregulin (Ereg), and progesterone receptor (Pgr) mRNA expression, suggesting anti-ovulatory effect of atrazine. To dissect the signaling cascade involved in atrazine action in granulosa cells, we used U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of ERK1/2. U0126 prevents atrazine-induced decrease in LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in the FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. ERK1/2 inactivation restores the ability of hCG to induce expression of the ovulatory genes in atrazine-exposed granulosa cells. Cell-based ELISA assay revealed that atrazine does not change the FSH-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in granulosa cells. The results from this study reveal that atrazine does not affect but requires ERK1/2 phosphorylation to cause decrease in the FSH-induced LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in immature granulosa cells, thus compromising ovulation and female fertility. - Highlights: • Atrazine inhibits estradiol production in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine inhibits LHR and Cyp19a1 mRNA expression in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine

  19. Involvement of ERK1/2 signaling pathway in atrazine action on FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 expression in rat granulosa cells

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Glisic, Branka; Kaisarevic, Sonja; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa, E-mail: nebojsa.andric@dbe.uns.ac.rs

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide used herbicide atrazine is linked to reproductive dysfunction in females. In this study, we investigated the effects and the mechanism of atrazine action in the ovary using a primary culture of immature granulosa cells. In granulosa cells, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activates both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) cascades, with cAMP pathway being more important for luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNA expression. We report that 48 h after atrazine exposure the FSH-stimulated LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA expression and estradiol synthesis were decreased, with LHR mRNA being more sensitive to atrazine than CYP19A1 mRNA. Inadequate acquisition of LHR in the FSH-stimulated and atrazine-exposed granulosa cells renders human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) ineffective to stimulate amphiregulin (Areg), epiregulin (Ereg), and progesterone receptor (Pgr) mRNA expression, suggesting anti-ovulatory effect of atrazine. To dissect the signaling cascade involved in atrazine action in granulosa cells, we used U0126, a pharmacological inhibitor of ERK1/2. U0126 prevents atrazine-induced decrease in LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in the FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. ERK1/2 inactivation restores the ability of hCG to induce expression of the ovulatory genes in atrazine-exposed granulosa cells. Cell-based ELISA assay revealed that atrazine does not change the FSH-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in granulosa cells. The results from this study reveal that atrazine does not affect but requires ERK1/2 phosphorylation to cause decrease in the FSH-induced LHR and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and estradiol production in immature granulosa cells, thus compromising ovulation and female fertility. - Highlights: • Atrazine inhibits estradiol production in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine inhibits LHR and Cyp19a1 mRNA expression in FSH-stimulated granulosa cells. • Atrazine

  20. Glucocorticoid effect on melphalan cytotoxicity, cell-cycle position, cell size, and [3H]uridine incorporation in one of three human melanoma cell lines

    Benckhuijsen, C.; Osman, A.M.; Hillebrand, M.J.; Smets, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three human melanoma cell lines of known content of specific glucocorticoid-binding sites were studied for colony formation after a microM dose of glucocorticoid combined with melphalan. In one of the three cell lines, M-5A, subcloned from M-5 (formerly designated RPMI 8322), the effect of combined treatment was markedly increased compared to that of melphalan even if the glucocorticoid was applied for 1 h only, 10 h before the melphalan. Semilogarithmic dose-effect plots for a reduction of final plating efficiency by glucocorticoid were curvilinear, according to a receptor-mediated process. The effects of glucocorticoid, melphalan, and their combination were linearized by bilogarithmic median-effect plotting which allowed the quantitation of a synergism which was more marked in case of glucocorticoid pretreatment, for 1 or 24 h, than on simultaneous exposure. According to sequential DNA per cell cytophotometry, melphalan abolished in M-5A a glucocorticoid-induced arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The cytotoxic synergism correlated with an apparent stimulation by glucocorticoid of the rate of acid-insoluble incorporation of [ 3 H]uridine and [ 14 C]leucine and an increase in cell size and protein content in M-5A cells but not in the other two cell lines. The way in which glucocorticoids induce an enhanced susceptibility to melphalan is not clear. Our results appear compatible with a hypothesis that chromatin in a transcriptionally activated state is more vulnerable to cytotoxic attack by an alkylating agent than under average conditions

  1. Adrenal gland hypofunction in active polymyalgia rheumatica. effect of glucocorticoid treatment on adrenal hormones and interleukin 6.

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Straub, Rainer H; Foppiani, Luca; Prete, Camilla; Pulsatelli, Lia; Sulli, Alberto; Boiardi, Luigi; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Giusti, Massimo; Pizzorni, Carmen; Seriolo, Bruno; Salvarani, Carlo

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in patients with recent onset polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) not previously treated with glucocorticoids; and to detect possible correlations between adrenal hormone levels, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and other acute phase reactants at baseline and during 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment. Forty-one PMR patients of both sexes with recent onset disease and healthy sex and age matched controls were enrolled into a longitudinal study. Patients were monitored for serum cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (ASD), and clinical and laboratory measures of disease activity such as C-reactive protein and IL-6 concentrations at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment. To assess dynamic HPA axis function, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were evaluated in another 8 patients with recent onset PMR not treated with glucocorticoid in comparison to controls after challenge with ovine corticotropin releasing hormone (oCRH) test. In addition, serum cortisol and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) levels were evaluated after stimulation with low dose (1 microg) intravenous ACTH. Serum cortisol and ASD levels of all PMR patients at baseline did not differ from controls. During followup, cortisol levels dipped at one and 3 months. Serum DHEAS levels in all patients were significantly lower than in controls at baseline. In female PMR patients a significant correlation was found at baseline between cortisol levels and duration of disease. Serum concentrations of IL-6 at baseline were significantly higher in PMR patients than in controls. During 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment IL-6 levels dropped significantly at one month; thereafter they remained stable and did not increase again despite tapering of the glucocorticoid dose. After oCRH stimulation, a similar cortisol response was found in patients and controls. After ACTH

  2. Mechanical stimulation enhanced estrogen receptor expression and callus formation in diaphyseal long bone fracture healing in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic rats.

    Chow, S K H; Leung, K S; Qin, J; Guo, A; Sun, M; Qin, L; Cheung, W H

    2016-10-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture was reported to exhibit delayed expression. Mechanical stimulation enhanced ER-α expression in osteoporotic fracture callus at the tissue level. ER was also found to be required for the effectiveness of vibrational mechanical stimulation treatment in osteoporotic fracture healing. Estrogen receptor(ER) is involved in mechanical signal transduction in bone metabolism. Its expression was reported to be delayed in osteoporotic fracture healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles played by ER during osteoporotic fracture healing enhanced with mechanical stimulation. Ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic SD rats that received closed femoral fractures were divided into five groups, (i) SHAM, (ii) SHAM-VT, (iii) OVX, (iv) OVX-VT, and (v) OVX-VT-ICI, where VT stands for whole-body vibration treatment and ICI for ER antagonization by ICI 182,780. Callus formation and gene expression were assessed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks postfracture. In vitro osteoblastic differentiation, mineralization, and ER-α expression were assessed. The delayed ER expression was found to be enhanced by vibration treatment. Callus formation enhancement was shown by callus morphometry and micro-CT analysis. Enhancement effects by vibration were partially abolished when ER was modulated by ICI 182,780, in terms of callus formation capacity at 2-4 weeks and ER gene and protein expression at all time points. In vitro, ER expression in osteoblasts was not enhanced by VT treatment, but osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization were enhanced under estrogen-deprived condition. When osteoblastic cells were modulated by ICI 182,780, enhancement effects of VT were eliminated. Vibration was able to enhance ER expression in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture healing. ER was essential in mechanical signal transduction and enhancement in callus formation effects during osteoporotic fracture healing enhanced by vibration

  3. NF-κB Mediates the Stimulation of Cytokine and Chemokine Expression by Human Articular Chondrocytes in Response to Fibronectin Fragments1

    Pulai, Judit I.; Chen, Hong; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kumar, Sanjay; Hanning, Charles; Hegde, Priti S.; Loeser, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin fragments (FN-f) that bind to the α5β1 integrin stimulate chondrocyte-mediated cartilage destruction and could play an important role in the progression of arthritis. The objective of this study was to identify potential cytokine mediators of cartilage inflammation and destruction induced by FN-f and to investigate the mechanism of their stimulation. Human articular chondrocytes, isolated from normal ankle cartilage obtained from tissue donors, were treated with a 110-kDa FN-f in serum-free culture, and expression of various cytokine genes was analyzed by cDNA microarray and by a cytokine protein array. Compared with untreated control cultures, stimulation by FN-f resulted in a >2-fold increase in IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and growth-related oncogene β (GRO-β). Constitutive and FN-f-inducible expression of GRO-α and GRO-γ were also noted by RT-PCR and confirmed by immunoblotting. Previous reports of IL-1β expression induced by FN-f were also confirmed, while TNF expression was found to be very low. Inhibitor studies revealed that FN-f-induced stimulation of chondrocyte chemokine expression was dependent on NF-κB activity, but independent of IL-1 autocrine signaling. The ability of FN-f to stimulate chondrocyte expression of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines suggests that damage to the cartilage matrix is capable of inducing a proinflammatory state responsible for further progressive matrix destruction, which also includes the chemoattraction of inflammatory cells. Targeting the signaling pathways activated by FN-f may be an effective means of inhibiting production of multiple mediators of cartilage destruction. PMID:15843581

  4. Enhancement of high glucose-induced PINK1 expression by melatonin stimulates neuronal cell survival: Involvement of MT2 /Akt/NF-κB pathway.

    Onphachanh, Xaykham; Lee, Hyun Jik; Lim, Jae Ryong; Jung, Young Hyun; Kim, Jun Sung; Chae, Chang Woo; Lee, Sei-Jung; Gabr, Amr Ahmed; Han, Ho Jae

    2017-09-01

    Hyperglycemia is a representative hallmark and risk factor for diabetes mellitus (DM) and is closely linked to DM-associated neuronal cell death. Previous investigators reported on a genome-wide association study and showed relationships between DM and melatonin receptor (MT), highlighting the role of MT signaling by assessing melatonin in DM. However, the role of MT signaling in DM pathogenesis is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the role of mitophagy regulators in high glucose-induced neuronal cell death and the effect of melatonin against high glucose-induced mitophagy regulators in neuronal cells. In our results, high glucose significantly increased PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and LC-3B expressions; as well it decreased cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 expression and Mitotracker™ fluorescence intensity. Silencing of PINK1 induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and mitochondrial membrane potential impairment, increased expressions of cleaved caspases, and increased the number of annexin V-positive cells. In addition, high glucose-stimulated melatonin receptor 1B (MTNR1B) mRNA and PINK1 expressions were reversed by ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine pretreatment. Upregulation of PINK1 expression in neuronal cells is suppressed by pretreatment with MT 2 receptor-specific inhibitor 4-P-PDOT. We further showed melatonin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, which was followed by nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Silencing of PINK1 expression abolished melatonin-regulated mitochondrial ROS production, cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 expressions, and the number of annexin V-positive cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the melatonin stimulates PINK1 expression via an MT 2 /Akt/NF-κB pathway, and such stimulation is important for the prevention of neuronal cell apoptosis under high glucose conditions. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Pineal Research

  5. Effect of insulin and glucocorticoids on glucose transporters in rat adipocytes

    Carter-Su, C.; Okamoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of glucocorticoids to modify the effect of insulin on glucose (L-1- 3 H(N)]glucose and D-[ 14 C-U]glucose) transport was investigated in both intact isolated rat adipocytes and in membranes isolated from hormone-treated adipocytes. In intact adipocytes, dexamethasone, a potent synthetic glucocorticoid, inhibited insulin-stimulated 3-O-methylglucose transport at all concentrations of insulin tested. Insulin sensitivity, as well as the maximal response to insulin, was decreased by dexamethasone in the absence of a change in 125 I insulin binding. The inhibition was observed regardless of which hormone acted first, was blocked by actinomycin D, and resulted from a decrease in V/sub max/ rather than an increase in K/sub t/ of transport. In plasma membranes isolated from insulin-treated adipocytes, glucose transport activity and the amount of glucose transporter covalently labeled with [ 3 H]cytochalasin B were increased in parallel in a dose-dependent fashion. The amount of labeled transporter in a low-density microsomal fraction (LDMF) was decreased in a reciprocal fashion. In contrast, addition of dexamethasone to insulin-stimulated cells caused decreases in both transport activity and amount of labeled transporter in the plasma membranes. This was accompanied by a small increase in the amount of [ 3 H]cytochalasin B incorporated into the glucose transporter in the LDMF. These results are consistent with both insulin and glucocorticoids altering the distribution of glucose transporters between the plasma membrane and LDMF, in opposite directions

  6. A translational approach to clinical practice via stress-responsive glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

    Juruena, Mario F; Agustini, Bruno; Cleare, Anthony J; Young, Allan H

    2017-01-01

    A recent article by Kwan and colleagues could elegantly demonstrate the necessary interaction between neuronal serotonin (5-HT) systems and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis through glucocorticoid receptors (GR), producing an adequate stress response, in this case, responding to hypoxia with an increase in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). There is an intricate system connecting brain, body and mind and this exchange is only possible when all these systems-nervous, endocrine, and immune-have receptors on critical cells to receive information (via messenger molecules) from each of the other systems. There is evidence that the expression and function of GR in the hippocampus, mainly MR, is regulated by the stimulation of 5-HT receptors. Stressful stimuli increase 5-HT release and turnover in the hippocampus, and it seems reasonable to suggest that some of the changes in mineralocorticoid and GR expression may be mediated, in part at least, by the increase in 5-HT. Also serotonin and HPA axis dysfunctions have already been implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. Early life stress (ELS) can have profound impact on these systems and can predispose subjects to a variety of adult metabolic and psychiatric conditions. It is important to analyze the mechanisms of this complex interaction and its subsequent programming effects on the stress systems, so that we can find new ways and targets for treatment of psychiatric disorders. Different areas of research on basic biological sciences are now being integrated and this approach will hopefully provide several new insights, new pharmacological targets and improve our global understanding of these highly debilitating chronic conditions, that we now call mental disorders.

  7. Mechanical stimulation of C2C12 cells increases m-calpain expression and activity, focal adhesion plaque degradation and cell fusion

    Grossi, Alberto; Karlsson, Anders Hans; Lawson, Moira A.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Mechanical Stimulation of C2C12 Cells Increases m-calpain Expression and Activity, Focal Adhesion Plaque Degradation and Cell Fusion A. Grossi, A. H. Karlsson, M. A. Lawson; Department of Dairy and Food Science, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark...... Myogenesis is a complex sequence of events, including the irreversible transition from the proliferation-competent myoblast stage into fused, multinucleated myotubes. During embryonic development, myogenic differentiation is regulated by positive and negative signals from surrounding tissues. Stimulation due...... to the activity of ubiquitous proteolytic enzymes known as calpains has been reported. Whether there is a link between stretch- or load induced signaling and calpain expression and activation is not known. Using a magnetic bead stimulation assay and C2C12 mouse myoblasts cell population, we have demonstrated...

  8. Estrogen Replacement Therapy in Ovariectomized Nonpregnant Ewes Stimulates Uterine Artery Hydrogen Sulfide Biosynthesis by Selectively Up-Regulating Cystathionine β-Synthase Expression.

    Lechuga, Thomas J; Zhang, Hong-hai; Sheibani, Lili; Karim, Muntarin; Jia, Jason; Magness, Ronald R; Rosenfeld, Charles R; Chen, Dong-bao

    2015-06-01

    Estrogens dramatically dilate numerous vascular beds with the greatest response in the uterus. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a potent vasodilator and proangiogenic second messenger, which is synthesized from L-cysteine by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). We hypothesized that estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) selectively stimulates H2S biosynthesis in uterine artery (UA) and other systemic arteries. Intact and endothelium-denuded UA, mesenteric artery (MA), and carotid artery (CA) were obtained from ovariectomized nonpregnant ewes (n = 5/group) receiving vehicle or estradiol-17β replacement therapy (ERT). Total RNA and protein were extracted for measuring CBS and CSE, and H2S production was determined by the methylene blue assay. Paraffin-embedded UA rings were used to localize CBS and CSE proteins by immunofluorescence microscopy. ERT significantly stimulated CBS mRNA and protein without altering CSE mRNA or protein in intact and denuded UA. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopic analyses showed CBS and CSE protein localization in endothelium and smooth muscle and confirmed that ERT stimulated CBS but not CSE protein expression in UA endothelium and smooth muscle. ERT also stimulated CBS, but not CSE, mRNA and protein expression in intact and denuded MA but not CA in ovariectomized ewes. Concomitantly, ERT stimulated UA and MA but not CA H2S production. ERT-stimulated UA H2S production was completely blocked by a specific CBS but not CSE inhibitor. Thus, ERT selectively stimulates UA and MA but not CA H2S biosynthesis by specifically up-regulating CBS expression, implicating a role of H2S in estrogen-induced vasodilation and postmenopausal women's health.

  9. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulates cell proliferation, proteoglycan synthesis and expression of growth factor-related genes in human nucleus pulposus cell line

    Y Kobayashi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS stimulation has been shown to effect differentiation and activation of human chondrocytes. A study involving stimulation of rabbit disc cells with LIPUS revealed upregulation of cell proliferation and proteoglycan (PG synthesis. However, the effect of LIPUS on human nucleus pulposus cells has not been investigated. In the present study, therefore, we investigated whether LIPUS stimulation of a human nucleus pulposus cell line (HNPSV-1 exerted a positive effect on cellular activity. HNPSV-1 cells were encapsulated in 1.2% sodium alginate solution at 1x105 cells/ml and cultured at 10 beads/well in 6-well plates. The cells were stimulated for 20 min each day using a LIPUS generator, and the effects of LIPUS were evaluated by measuring DNA and PG synthesis. Furthermore, mRNA expression was analyzed by cDNA microarray using total RNA extracted from the cultured cells. Our study revealed no significant difference in cell proliferation between the control and the ultrasound treated groups. However, PG production was significantly upregulated in HNPSV cells stimulated at intensities of 15, 30, 60, and 120 mW/cm2 compared with the control. The results of cDNA array showed that LIPUS significantly stimulated the gene expression of growth factors and their receptors (BMP2, FGF7, TGFbetaR1 EGFRF1, VEGF. These findings suggest that LIPUS stimulation upregulates PG production in human nucleus pulposus cells by the enhancement of several matrix-related genes including growth factor-related genes. Safe and non-invasive stimulation using LIPUS may be a useful treatment for delaying the progression of disc degeneration.

  10. Independent association of glucocorticoids with damage accrual in SLE.

    Apostolopoulos, Diane; Kandane-Rathnayake, Rangi; Raghunath, Sudha; Hoi, Alberta; Nikpour, Mandana; Morand, Eric F

    2016-01-01

    To determine factors associated with damage accrual in a prospective cohort of patients with SLE. Patients with SLE who attended the Lupus Clinic at Monash Health, Australia, between 2007 and 2013 were studied. Clinical variables included disease activity (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index-2K, SLEDAI-2K), time-adjusted mean SLEDAI, cumulative glucocorticoid dose and organ damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI)). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with damage accrual. A total of 162 patients were observed over a median (IQR) 3.6 (2.0-4.7) years. Seventy-five per cent (n=121) of patients received glucocorticoids. Damage accrual was significantly more frequent in glucocorticoid-exposed patients (42% vs 15%, p<0.01). Higher glucocorticoid exposure was independently associated with overall damage accrual after controlling for factors including ethnicity and disease activity and was significant at time-adjusted mean doses above 4.42 mg prednisolone/day; the OR of damage accrual in patients in the highest quartile of cumulative glucocorticoid exposure was over 10. Glucocorticoid exposure was independently associated with damage accrual in glucocorticoid-related and non-glucocorticoid related domains of the SDI. Glucocorticoid use is independently associated with the accrual of damage in SLE, including in non-glucocorticoid related domains.

  11. Inflammation in Parkinson’s disease: Role of glucocorticoids

    Maria Trinidad eHerrero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a major characteristic feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Studies in PDpatients show evidence of augmented levels of potent pro-inflammatory molecules e.g. TNF-α, iNOS,IL-1β whereas in experimental Parkinsonism it has been consistently demonstrated that dopaminergicneurons are particularly vulnerable to activated glia releasing these toxic factors. Recent geneticstudies point to the role of immune system in the etiology of PD, thus in combination withenvironmental factors, both peripheral and CNS-mediated immune responses could play importantroles in onset and progression of PD. Whereas microglia, astrocytes and infiltrating T cells are knownto mediate chronic inflammation, the roles of other immune-competent cells are less well understood.Inflammation is a tightly controlled process. One major effector system of regulation is HPA axis.Glucocorticoids released from adrenal glands upon stimulation of HPA axis, in response to either cellinjury or presence of pathogen, activate their receptor, GR. GR regulates inflammation both throughdirect transcriptional action on target genes and by indirectly inhibiting transcriptional activities oftranscriptional factors such as NF-kB, AP-1 or interferon regulatory factors. In PD patients, the HPAaxis is unbalanced and the cortisol levels are significantly increased, implying a deregulation of GRfunction in immune cells. In experimental Parkinsonism, the activation of microglial GR has a crucialeffect in diminishing microglial cell activation and reducing dopaminergic degeneration. Moreover,glucocorticoids are also known to regulate human brain vasculature as well as blood brain barrierpermeability, any dysfunction in their actions may influence infiltration of cytotoxic moleculesresulting in increased vulnerability of dopamine neurons in PD. Overall, deregulation ofGR actions is likely important in dopamine neuron degeneration throughestablishment of chronic inflammation.

  12. Management of glucocorticoids-induced osteoporosis: role of teriparatide

    Silvia Migliaccio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Migliaccio1, Marina Brama1, Nazzarena Malavolta21Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medica, Policlinico Umberto I, Università degli Studi Sapienza di Roma, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Policlinico S Orsola Malpighi, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Glucocorticoids (GC-induced osteoporosis (GIOP is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis, which leads to an increased fracture risk in patients. The normal bone turnover depends on a balance between osteoblasts and osteoclasts activity and GC can cause a rapid bone loss, decreasing bone formation and increasing bone resorption. The decreased bone formation is mainly due to the GC-induced apoptosis of both osteoblasts and osteocytes, while the increased bone resorption is due to the increased life-span of pre-existing osteoclasts. Bisphosphonates are clearly effective in preventing and treating GIOP but anabolic therapeutic strategies are the new promising therapeutic alternative. Experimental and clinical studies indicate that teriparatide, the active (1–34 parathyroid hormone (PTH molecule, is efficacious for the treatment of GIOP, being able to induce an increase in bone mass in these patients. Intermittent administration of human PTH (1–34 stimulates bone formation by increasing osteoblast number. Additionally, human PTH (1–34 modulates the level and/or activity of locally produced growth factors and cytokines. Teriparatide has been demonstrated in several clinical studies to significantly decrease the incidence of fractures in patients affected by GIOP. It has recently received an indication for GIOP and its label indication has also been expanded.Keywords: glucocorticoids, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteoporosis, teriparatide

  13. Nano-hydroxyapatite modulates osteoblast lineage commitment by stimulation of DNA methylation and regulation of gene expression

    Ha, Shin-Woo; Jang, Hae Lin; Nam, Ki Tae; Beck, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the primary structural component of the skeleton and dentition. Under biological conditions, HA does not occur spontaneously and therefore must be actively synthesized by mineralizing cells such as osteoblasts. The mechanism(s) by which HA is actively synthesized by cells and deposited to create a mineralized matrix are not fully understood and the consequences of mineralization on cell function are even less well understood. HA can be chemically synthesized (HAp) and is therefore currently being investigated as a promising therapeutic biomaterial for use as a functional scaffold and implant coating for skeletal repair and dental applications. Here we investigated the biological effects of nano-HAp (10×100 nm) on the lineage commitment and differentiation of bone forming osteoblasts. Exposure of early stage differentiating osteoblasts resulted in dramatic and sustained changes in gene expression, both increased and decreased, whereas later stage osteoblasts were much less responsive. Analysis of the promoter region one of the most responsive genes, alkaline phosphatase, identified the stimulation of DNA methylation following cell exposure to nano-HAp. Collectively, the results reveal the novel epigenetic regulation of cell function by nano-HAp which has significant implication on lineage determination as well as identifying a novel potential therapeutic use of nanomaterials. PMID:26141836

  14. Haloperidol Abrogates Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression by Inhibition of NF-κB Activation in Stimulated Human Monocytic Cells

    Yueh-Lun Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Much evidence has indicated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs participate in the progression of neuroinflammatory disorders. The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effect and mechanism of the antipsychotic haloperidol on MMP activation in the stimulated THP-1 monocytic cells. Haloperidol exerted a strong inhibition on tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α-induced MMP-9 gelatinolysis of THP-1 cells. A concentration-dependent inhibitory effect of haloperidol was observed in TNF-α-induced protein and mRNA expression of MMP-9. On the other hand, haloperidol slightly affected cell viability and tissue inhibition of metalloproteinase-1 levels. It significantly inhibited the degradation of inhibitor-κB-α (IκBα in activated cells. Moreover, it suppressed activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB detected by a mobility shift assay, NF-κB reporter gene, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. Consistent with NF-κB inhibition, haloperidol exerted a strong inhibition of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced MMP-9 gelatinolysis but not of transforming growth factor-β1-induced MMP-2. In in vivo studies, administration of haloperidol significantly attenuated LPS-induced intracerebral MMP-9 activation of the brain homogenate and the in situ in C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, the selective anti-MMP-9 activation of haloperidol could possibly involve the inhibition of the NF-κB signal pathway. Hence, it was found that haloperidol treatment may represent a bystander of anti-MMP actions for its conventional psychotherapy.

  15. Putative outer membrane proteins of Leptospira interrogans stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECS) and express during infection.

    Gómez, Ricardo M; Vieira, Monica L; Schattner, Mirta; Malaver, Elisa; Watanabe, Monica M; Barbosa, Angela S; Abreu, Patricia A E; de Morais, Zenaide M; Cifuente, Javier O; Atzingen, Marina V; Oliveira, Tatiane R; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are surface receptors present in eukaryotic cells that mediate cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Vascular endothelium stimulation in vitro that lead to the upregulation of CAMs was reported for the pathogenic spirochaetes, including rLIC10365 of Leptospira interrogans. In this study, we report the cloning of LIC10507, LIC10508, LIC10509 genes of L. interrogans using Escherichia coli as a host system. The rational for selecting these sequences is due to their location in L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni genome that has a potential involvement in pathogenesis. The genes encode for predicted lipoproteins with no assigned functions. The purified recombinant proteins were capable to promote the upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin on monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECS). In addition, the coding sequences are expressed in the renal tubules of animal during bacterial experimental infection. The proteins are probably located at the outer membrane of the bacteria since they are detected in detergent-phase of L. interrogans Triton X-114 extract. Altogether our data suggest a possible involvement of these proteins during bacterial infection and provide new insights into the role of this region in the pathogenesis of Leptospira.

  16. Modulation of gene expression in small follicle porcine granulosa cells by human follicle stimulating hormone (hFSH)

    Calvo, F.O.; Ryan, R.J.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1986-03-01

    Small follicle (1-3 mm) porcine granulosa cells (SFPGF) were isolated by puncture, aspiration and cultured under standard conditions in DMEM, HEPES, BSA, MIX. At the start of culture, cells were stimulated with 100ng hFSH/ml. At various times afterwards total cellular RNA was prepared using guanidine-hydrochloride solubilization, phenol extraction and precipitation from 3M NaOAc, pH 6.0. RNA was 5'-end labelled with /sup 32/P in a kinase reaction and hybridized to an excess of clone-specific DNA immobilized on nitrocellulose filters using stringent hybridization and wash conditions. After autoradiography the RNA hybridized to the DNA blot filter were quantitated by microdensitometry. Hybridization to parent plasmid was negative. RNA derived from control cultures showed patterns of hybridization similar to those obtained from freshly obtained cells. Results of these experiments demonstrate hFSh induction of RNA specific for transferrin receptor, ..cap alpha..-interferon, H-ras, and K-ras. Increased RNA levels were apparent within 10 min of treatment and had declined by 180 min. Expression of actin, p53 and for RNAs declined by 10 min of hFSH addition but was enhanced by 160 min. Levels of ..beta..-interferon, myc, mos, abl and yb RNAs were not detectable under these conditions. These results demonstrate specific gene modulation in SFPGC cultured with hFSH.

  17. Overexpression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F stimulates renal Ace-2 gene expression and prevents TGF-β1-induced kidney injury in a mouse model of diabetes.

    Lo, Chao-Sheng; Shi, Yixuan; Chang, Shiao-Ying; Abdo, Shaaban; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) stimulates renal ACE-2 expression and prevents TGF-β1 signalling, TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene expression and induction of tubulo-fibrosis in an Akita mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Adult male Akita transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing specifically hnRNP F in their renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) were studied. Non-Akita littermates and Akita mice served as controls. Immortalised rat RPTCs stably transfected with plasmid containing either rat Hnrnpf cDNA or rat Ace-2 gene promoter were also studied. Overexpression of hnRNP F attenuated systemic hypertension, glomerular filtration rate, albumin/creatinine ratio, urinary angiotensinogen (AGT) and angiotensin (Ang) II levels, renal fibrosis and profibrotic gene (Agt, Tgf-β1, TGF-β receptor II [Tgf-βrII]) expression, stimulated anti-profibrotic gene (Ace-2 and Ang 1-7 receptor [MasR]) expression, and normalised urinary Ang 1-7 level in Akita Hnrnpf-Tg mice as compared with Akita mice. In vitro, hnRNP F overexpression stimulated Ace-2 gene promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and attenuated Agt, Tgf-β1 and Tgf-βrII gene expression. Furthermore, hnRNP F overexpression prevented TGF-β1 signalling and TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene expression. These data demonstrate that hnRNP F stimulates Ace-2 gene transcription, prevents TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene transcription and induction of kidney injury in diabetes. HnRNP F may be a potential target for treating hypertension and renal fibrosis in diabetes.

  18. Timing is critical for effective glucocorticoid receptor mediated repression of the cAMP-induced CRH gene.

    Siem van der Laan

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid negative feedback of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is mediated in part by direct repression of gene transcription in glucocorticoid receptor (GR expressing cells. We have investigated the cross talk between the two main signaling pathways involved in activation and repression of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH mRNA expression: cyclic AMP (cAMP and GR. We report that in the At-T20 cell-line the glucocorticoid-mediated repression of the cAMP-induced human CRH proximal promoter activity depends on the relative timing of activation of both signaling pathways. Activation of the GR prior to or in conjunction with cAMP signaling results in an effective repression of the cAMP-induced transcription of the CRH gene. In contrast, activation of the GR 10 minutes after onset of cAMP treatment, results in a significant loss of GR-mediated repression. In addition, translocation of ligand-activated GR to the nucleus was found as early as 10 minutes after glucocorticoid treatment. Interestingly, while both signaling cascades counteract each other on the CRH proximal promoter, they synergize on a synthetic promoter containing 'positive' response elements. Since the order of activation of both signaling pathways may vary considerably in vivo, we conclude that a critical time-window exists for effective repression of the CRH gene by glucocorticoids.

  19. Early Life Stress Effects on the Glucocorticoid - BDNF interplay in the Hippocampus

    Nikolaos P Daskalakis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Early life stress (ELS is implicated in the etiology of multiple psychiatric disorders. Important biological effects of ELS are manifested in stress-susceptible regions of the hippocampus and are partially mediated by long-term effects on glucocorticoid and/or neurotrophin signaling pathways. Glucocorticoid (GC signaling mediates the regulation of the stress response to maintain homeostasis, while neurotrophin signaling plays a key role in neuronal outgrowth and is crucial for axonal guidance and synaptic integrity. The neurotrophin and glucocorticoid signaling pathways co-exist throughout the central nervous system (CNS, particularly in the hippocampus, which has high expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors (GR and MR as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB. This review addresses the effects of ELS paradigms on GC- and BDNF- dependent mechanisms and their crosstalk in the hippocampus, including potential implications for the pathogenesis of common stress-related disorders.

  20. Endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate cholestasis-associated liver injury and hypercholesterolemia in mice

    Geest, Rick van der; Ouweneel, Amber B.; Sluis, Ronald J. van der; Groen, Albert K.; Van Eck, Miranda; Hoekstra, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by a disruption of bile flow, bile acid toxicity, liver injury, and hypercholesterolemia. Relatively high secretion of glucocorticoids by the adrenals has been observed under cholestatic conditions. Here we investigated a contribution of the rise in endogenous glucocorticoids to initial stage cholestasis pathology. Adrenalectomized or sham-operated control C57BL/6 mice were given an oral dose of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate to induce cholestasis. Adrenalectomy effectively lowered plasma corticosterone levels (18 ± 5 ng/ml vs 472 ± 58 ng/ml; P < 0.001) and disrupted the metabolic and anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid function. Adrenal removal did not exacerbate the cholestasis extent. In contrast, the cholestasis-associated liver injury was markedly lower in adrenalectomized mice as compared to controls as evidenced by a 84%–93% decrease in liver necrosis and plasma alanine aminotransferase and bile acid levels (P < 0.001 for all). Gene expression analysis on livers from adrenalectomized mice suggested the absence of bile acid toxicity-associated farnesoid X receptor signaling in the context of a 44% (P < 0.01) and 82% (P < 0.001) reduction in sodium/bile acid cotransporter member 1 transcript level as compared to respectively control and non-diseased mice. Adrenalectomy reduced the expression of the cholesterol synthesis gene HMG-CoA reductase by 70% (P < 0.05), which translated into a 73% lower plasma total cholesterol level (P < 0.05). Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486 recapitulated the protective effect of adrenalectomy on indices of liver injury and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, we have shown that endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate the liver injury and hypercholesterolemia associated with acute cholestasis in mice. - Highlights: • Cholestasis is associated with increased plasma glucocorticoid levels in mice. • Adrenalectomy lowers cholestasis-associated liver

  1. Endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate cholestasis-associated liver injury and hypercholesterolemia in mice

    Geest, Rick van der, E-mail: r.van.der.geest@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Ouweneel, Amber B., E-mail: a.b.ouweneel@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Sluis, Ronald J. van der, E-mail: r.vandersluis@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Groen, Albert K., E-mail: a.k.groen@umcg.nl [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Van Eck, Miranda, E-mail: m.eck@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Menno, E-mail: hoekstra@lacdr.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (Netherlands)

    2016-09-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by a disruption of bile flow, bile acid toxicity, liver injury, and hypercholesterolemia. Relatively high secretion of glucocorticoids by the adrenals has been observed under cholestatic conditions. Here we investigated a contribution of the rise in endogenous glucocorticoids to initial stage cholestasis pathology. Adrenalectomized or sham-operated control C57BL/6 mice were given an oral dose of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate to induce cholestasis. Adrenalectomy effectively lowered plasma corticosterone levels (18 ± 5 ng/ml vs 472 ± 58 ng/ml; P < 0.001) and disrupted the metabolic and anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid function. Adrenal removal did not exacerbate the cholestasis extent. In contrast, the cholestasis-associated liver injury was markedly lower in adrenalectomized mice as compared to controls as evidenced by a 84%–93% decrease in liver necrosis and plasma alanine aminotransferase and bile acid levels (P < 0.001 for all). Gene expression analysis on livers from adrenalectomized mice suggested the absence of bile acid toxicity-associated farnesoid X receptor signaling in the context of a 44% (P < 0.01) and 82% (P < 0.001) reduction in sodium/bile acid cotransporter member 1 transcript level as compared to respectively control and non-diseased mice. Adrenalectomy reduced the expression of the cholesterol synthesis gene HMG-CoA reductase by 70% (P < 0.05), which translated into a 73% lower plasma total cholesterol level (P < 0.05). Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486 recapitulated the protective effect of adrenalectomy on indices of liver injury and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, we have shown that endogenous glucocorticoids exacerbate the liver injury and hypercholesterolemia associated with acute cholestasis in mice. - Highlights: • Cholestasis is associated with increased plasma glucocorticoid levels in mice. • Adrenalectomy lowers cholestasis-associated liver

  2. Crocin Suppresses LPS-Stimulated Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase 4

    Ji-Hee Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crocin is a water-soluble carotenoid pigment that is primarily used in various cuisines as a seasoning and coloring agent, as well as in traditional medicines for the treatment of edema, fever, and hepatic disorder. In this study, we demonstrated that crocin markedly induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 which leads to an anti-inflammatory response. Crocin inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression and nitric oxide production via downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These effects were abrogated by blocking of HO-1 expression or activity. Crocin also induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular pools and phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CAMK4. CAMK4 knockdown and kinase-dead mutant inhibited crocin-mediated HO-1 expression, Nrf2 activation, and phosphorylation of Akt, indicating that HO-1 expression is mediated by CAMK4 and that Akt is a downstream mediator of CAMK4 in crocin signaling. Moreover, crocin-mediated suppression of iNOS expression was blocked by CAMK4 inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that crocin suppresses LPS-stimulated expression of iNOS by inducing HO-1 expression via Ca2+/calmodulin-CAMK4-PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling cascades. Our findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for the inhibitory effects of crocin against endotoxin-mediated inflammation.

  3. TGF-β-stimulated aberrant expression of class III β-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► TGF-β induces aberrant expression of βIII in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. ► TGF-β increases O-GlcNAc modification of βIII in RPE cells. ► Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-β. -- Abstract: The class III β-tubulin isotype (β III ) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III β-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-β on the aberrant expression of class III β-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-β-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III β-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-β also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-β-induced aberrant expression of class III β-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-β stimulated aberrant expression of class III β-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-β stimulation and provide useful information towards understanding the pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases.

  4. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  5. Increased Frequency of Peripheral B and T Cells Expressing Granulocyte Monocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Anastasia Makris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesGranulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is currently considered a crucial inflammatory mediator and a novel therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, despite the fact that its precise cellular sources remain uncertain. We studied the expression of GM-CSF in peripheral lymphocytes from RA patients and its change with antirheumatic therapies.MethodsIntracellular GM-CSF expression was assessed by flow cytometry in stimulated peripheral B (CD19+ and T (CD3+ cells from RA patients (n = 40, disease (n = 31 including osteoarthritis n = 15, psoriatic arthritis n = 10, and systemic rheumatic diseases n = 6 and healthy (n = 16 controls. The phenotype of GM-CSF+ B cells was assessed as well as longitudinal changes in GM-CSF+ lymphocytes during methotrexate (MTX, n = 10 or anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF, n = 10 therapy.ResultsAmong untreated RA patients with active disease (Disease Activity Score 28-C-reactive protein = 5.6 ± 0.89 an expanded population of peripheral GM-CSF+ B (4.1 ± 2.2% and T (3.4 ± 1.6% cells was detected compared with both disease (1.7 ± 0.9%, p < 0.0001 and 1.7 ± 1.3%, p < 0.0001, respectively and healthy (0.3 ± 0.2%, p < 0.0001 and 0.6 ± 0.6%, p < 0.0001 controls. RA GM-CSF+ B cells displayed more commonly a plasmablast or transitional phenotype (37.12 ± 18.34% vs. 14.26 ± 9.46%, p = 0.001 and 30.49 ± 15.04% vs. 2.45 ± 1.84%, p < 0.0001, respectively and less a memory phenotype (21.46 ± 20.71% vs. 66.99 ± 16.63%, p < 0.0001 compared to GM-CSF− cells. GM-CSF expression in RA patients did not correlate to disease duration, activity or serological status. Anti-TNF treatment led to a statistically significant decrease in GM-CSF+ B and T cells while MTX had no significant effect.DiscussionThis is the first study showing an expanded population of GM-CSF+ B and T lymphocytes

  6. Transcriptional effects of glucocorticoid receptors in the dentate gyrus increase anxiety-related behaviors.

    Nadège Sarrazin

    Full Text Available The Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR is a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in the brain. Activation of brain GRs by high levels of glucocorticoid (GC hormones modifies a large variety of physiological and pathological-related behaviors. Unfortunately the specific cellular targets of GR-mediated behavioral effects of GC are still largely unknown. To address this issue, we generated a mutated form of the GR called DeltaGR. DeltaGR is a constitutively transcriptionally active form of the GR that is localized in the nuclei and activates transcription without binding to glucocorticoids. Using the tetracycline-regulated system (Tet-OFF, we developed an inducible transgenic approach that allows the expression of the DeltaGR in specific brain areas. We focused our study on a mouse line that expressed DeltaGR almost selectively in the glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus. This restricted expression of the DeltaGR increased anxiety-related behaviors without affecting other behaviors that could indirectly influence performance in anxiety-related tests. This behavioral phenotype was also associated with an up-regulation of the MAPK signaling pathway and Egr-1 protein in the DG. These findings identify glutamatergic neurons in the DG as one of the cellular substrate of stress-related pathologies.

  7. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do, E-mail: ydjung@chonnam.ac.kr

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells

  8. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do

    2012-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H 2 O 2 increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells treated with nicotine

  9. Glucocorticoid Availability in Colonic Inflammation of Rat

    Ergang, Peter; Leden, Pavel; Bryndová, Jana; Žbánková, Šárka; Mikšík, Ivan; Kment, M.; Pácha, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 8 (2008), s. 2160-2167 ISSN 0163-2116 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR8576; GA ČR GA305/07/0328 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 77/2006C Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : glucocorticoids * 11beta hydroxisteroid dehydrogenase 1 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.583, year: 2008

  10. IGF-I, IGF-II, and Insulin Stimulate Different Gene Expression Responses through Binding to the IGF-I Receptor

    Versteyhe, Soetkin; Klaproth, Birgit; Borup, Rehannah

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and the insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II are closely related peptides important for regulation of metabolism, growth, differentiation, and development. The IGFs exert their main effects through the IGF-I receptor. Although the insulin receptor is the main physiological receptor...... for insulin, this peptide hormone can also bind at higher concentrations to the IGF-I receptor and exert effects through it. We used microarray gene expression profiling to investigate the gene expression regulated by IGF-I, IGF-II, and insulin after stimulation of the IGF-I receptor. Fibroblasts from mice......, knockout for IGF-II and the IGF-II/cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and expressing functional IGF-I but no insulin receptors, were stimulated for 4 h with equipotent saturating concentrations of insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II. Each ligand specifically regulated a group of transcripts...

  11. Biochemical endpoints of glucocorticoid hormone action

    Young, D.A.; Nicholson, M.L.; Guyette, W.A.; Giddings, S.J.; Mendelsohn, S.L.; Nordeen, S.K.; Lyons, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    Both the rapidly evolving metabolic effects of glucocorticoids and the more slowly developing lethal actions appear to be initiated via the synthesis of new mRNAs and proteins. The chronic suppression of cell growth may be the consequence of suppression of overall rates of protein synthesis (and probably RNA and DNA synthesis as well) that in turn may represent the cellular response to the small changes in ratios of adenine nucleotides that result from the suppression of oxidative ATP production. The inhibition of glucose transport may also play a role here to prevent a compensatory increase in glycolytic ATP production. Some other hormone actions, the decrease in the ability of cells to concentrate AIB and the increase in nuclear fragility are unrelated to, and evolve separately from, the hormonal inhibitions on energy production. Cell killing is not the result of suppression of protein synthesis, nor of hormone-induced increases in calcium uptake. While the mechanisms are unknown, the increase in nuclear fragility appears to be the earliest measure of their operation. In tumor cells resistance to lethal actions of glucocorticoids may emerge via the selection of cells with hardier membranes, that are better able to withstand the intracellular destructive events set in motion by high levels of glucocorticoids.

  12. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor action in metabolic and neuronal function [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Michael J. Garabedian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR have effects on a variety of cell types, eliciting important physiological responses via changes in gene expression and signaling. Although decades of research have illuminated the mechanism of how this important steroid receptor controls gene expression using in vitro and cell culture–based approaches, how GR responds to changes in external signals in vivo under normal and pathological conditions remains elusive. The goal of this review is to highlight recent work on GR action in fat cells and liver to affect metabolism in vivo and the role GR ligands and receptor phosphorylation play in calibrating signaling outputs by GR in the brain in health and disease. We also suggest that both the brain and fat tissue communicate to affect physiology and behavior and that understanding this “brain-fat axis” will enable a more complete understanding of metabolic diseases and inform new ways to target them.

  15. PAMPs and DAMPs stimulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro in a fibroblast cell-line from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Ossum, CarlobG.; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    The recognition of PAMPs by immune cells relies on conserved PRRs such as TLRs, NLRs and RLRs leading to activation of NFκB signalling pathways. These receptors are activated upon stimulation by different ligands such as bacterial or viral components. The binding of ligands to the receptors...... in this evolutionary lineage of the bony fishes. The expression of TLR-3 and -9 receptors were significantly up-regulated following physical damage of muscle tissue as well as in stimulated fibroblasts, where LPS induced both TLR-3 and -9, supernatant from sonicated cells only TLR-9 while debris caused no induction...

  16. Constitutive differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress are related to variation in aggression and anxiety-related behaviors.

    Walker, Sophie E; Zanoletti, Olivia; Guillot de Suduiraut, Isabelle; Sandi, Carmen

    2017-10-01

    Glucocorticoids coordinate responses that enable an individual to cope with stressful challenges and, additionally, mediate adaptation following cessation of a stressor. There are important individual differences in the magnitude of glucocorticoid responsiveness to stressors. However, whether individual differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress are linked to different behavioral strategies in coping with social and non-social challenges is not easily studied, owing to the lack of appropriate animal models. To address this, we generated three lines of Wistar rats selectively bred for the magnitude of their glucocorticoid responses following exposure to a variety of stressors over three consecutive days at juvenility. Here, we present findings following observations of a high level of variation in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress in outbred Wistar rats, and the strong response to selection for this trait over a few generations. When challenged with different stressful challenges, rats from the three lines differed in their coping behaviors. Strikingly, the line with high glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress displayed enhanced aggression and anxiety-like behaviors. In addition, these rats also showed alterations in the expression of genes within both central and peripheral nodes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and enhanced reactivity to acute stress exposure. Together, these findings strongly link differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress with marked differences in coping styles. The developed rat lines are thus a promising model with which to examine the relationship between variation in reactivity of the HPA axis and stress-related pathophysiology and could be employed to assess the therapeutic potential of treatments modulating stress habituation to ameliorate psychopathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Smad Response Elements in the Promoter of Goldfish FSHβ Gene and Evidence for Their Mediation of Activin and GnRH Stimulation of FSHβ Expression

    Man-Tat eLau

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As an essential hormone regulating gonads in vertebrates, the biosynthesis and secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH is controlled by a variety of endocrine and paracrine factors in both mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates. Activin was initially discovered in the ovary for its specific stimulation of FSH secretion by the pituitary cells. Our earlier studies in fish have shown that activin stimulates FSHβ but suppresses LHβ expression in both the goldfish and zebrafish. Further experiments showed that the regulation of FSHβ in fish occurred at the promoter level involving Smads, in particular Smad3. To further understand the mechanisms by which activin/Smad regulates FSHβ transcription, the present study was undertaken to analyze the promoter of goldfish FSHβ gene (fshb with the aim to identify potential cis-regulatory elements responsible for activin/Smad stimulation. Both serial deletion and site-directed mutagenesis were used, and the promoter activity was tested in the LβT2 cells, a murine gonadotroph cell line. The reporter constructs of goldfish FSHβ promoter-SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase were co-transfected with an expression plasmid for Smads (2 or 3 followed by measurement of SEAP activity in the medium. Two putative Smad responsive elements (SRE were identified in the promoter at distal and proximal regions, respectively. The distal site contained a consensus Smad binding element (SBE; AGAC, -1675/-1672 whereas the proximal site (GACCTTGA, -212/-205 was identical to an SF-1 binding site reported in humans, which was preceded by a sequence (AACACTGA highly conserved between fish and mammals. The proximal site also seemed to be involved in mediating stimulation of FSHβ expression by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH and its potential interaction with activin. In conclusion, we have identified two potential cis-regulatory elements in the promoter of goldfish FSHβ that are responsible for activin

  18. The expression of the ACTH receptor

    L.L.K. Elias

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal glucocorticoid secretion is regulated by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH acting through a specific cell membrane receptor (ACTH-R. The ACTH-R is a member of the G protein superfamily-coupled receptors and belongs to the subfamily of melanocortin receptors. The ACTH-R is mainly expressed in the adrenocortical cells showing a restricted tissue specificity, although ACTH is recognized by the other four melanocortin receptors. The cloning of the ACTH-R was followed by the study of this gene in human diseases such as familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD and adrenocortical tumors. FGD is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by glucocorticoid deficiency, elevated plasma ACTH levels and preserved renin/aldosterone secretion. This disorder has been ascribed to an impaired adrenal responsiveness to ACTH due to a defective ACTH-R, a defect in intracellular signal transduction or an abnormality in adrenal cortical development. Mutations of the ACTH-R have been described in patients with FGD in segregation with the disease. The functional characterization of these mutations has been prevented by difficulties in expressing human ACTH-R in cells that lack endogenous melanocortin receptor activity. To overcome these difficulties we used Y6 cells, a mutant variant of the Y1 cell line, which possesses a non-expressed ACTH-R gene allowing the functional study without any background activity. Our results demonstrated that the several mutations of the ACTH-R found in FGD result in an impaired cAMP response or loss of sensitivity to ACTH stimulation. An ACTH-binding study showed an impairment of ligand binding with loss of the high affinity site in most of the mutations studied.

  19. Melanogenesis stimulation in B16-F10 melanoma cells induces cell cycle alterations, increased ROS levels and a differential expression of proteins as revealed by proteomic analysis

    Cunha, Elizabeth S.; Kawahara, Rebeca [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Kadowaki, Marina K. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, Cascavel, PR (Brazil); Amstalden, Hudson G.; Noleto, Guilhermina R.; Cadena, Silvia Maria S.C.; Winnischofer, Sheila M.B. [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Martinez, Glaucia R., E-mail: grmartinez@ufpr.br [Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal do Parana, P.O. Box 19046, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-09-10

    Considering that stimulation of melanogenesis may lead to alterations of cellular responses, besides melanin production, our main goal was to study the cellular effects of melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Our results show increased levels of the reactive oxygen species after 15 h of melanogenesis stimulation. Following 48 h of melanogenesis stimulation, proliferation was inhibited (by induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase) and the expression levels of p21 mRNA were increased. In addition, melanogenesis stimulation did not induce cellular senescence. Proteomic analysis demonstrated the involvement of proteins from other pathways besides those related to the cell cycle, including protein disulfide isomerase A3, heat-shock protein 70, and fructose biphosphate aldolase A (all up-regulated), and lactate dehydrogenase (down-regulated). In RT-qPCR experiments, the levels of pyruvate kinase M2 mRNA dropped, whereas the levels of ATP synthase (beta-F1) mRNA increased. These data indicate that melanogenesis stimulation of B16-F10 cells leads to alterations in metabolism and cell cycle progression that may contribute to an induction of cell quiescence, which may provide a mechanism of resistance against cellular injury promoted by melanin synthesis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis stimulation by L-tyrosine+NH{sub 4}Cl in B16-F10 melanoma cells increases ROS levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melanogenesis inhibits cell proliferation, and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteomic analysis showed alterations in proteins of the cell cycle and glucose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RT-qPCR analysis confirmed alterations of metabolic targets after melanogenesis stimulation.

  20. Sustained Interleukin-1β Exposure Modulates Multiple Steps in Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling, Promoting Split-Resistance to the Transactivation of Prominent Anti-Inflammatory Genes by Glucocorticoids

    Pedro Escoll

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical treatment with glucocorticoids (GC can be complicated by cytokine-induced glucocorticoid low-responsiveness (GC-resistance, GCR, a condition associated with a homogeneous reduction in the expression of GC-receptor- (GR- driven anti-inflammatory genes. However, GR level and phosphorylation changes modify the expression of individual GR-responsive genes differently. As sustained IL-1β exposure is key in the pathogenesis of several major diseases with prevalent GCR, we examined GR signaling and the mRNA expression of six GR-driven genes in cells cultured in IL-1β and afterwards challenged with GC. After a GC challenge, sustained IL-1β exposure reduced the cytoplasmic GR level, GRSer203 and GRSer211 phosphorylation, and GR nuclear translocation and led to selective GCR in the expression of the studied genes. Compared to GC alone, in a broad range of GC doses plus sustained IL-1β, FKBP51 mRNA expression was reduced by 1/3, TTP by 2/3, and IRF8 was completely knocked down. In contrast, high GC doses did not change the expression of GILZ and DUSP1, while IGFBP1 was increased by 5-fold. These effects were cytokine-selective, IL-1β dose- and IL-1R1-dependent. The integrated gain and loss of gene functions in the “split GCR” model may provide target cells with a survival advantage by conferring resistance to apoptosis, chemotherapy, and GC.

  1. The relationships between IFNL4 genotype, intrahepatic interferon-stimulated gene expression and interferon treatment response differs in HCV-1 compared with HCV-3.

    Holmes, J A; Congiu, M; Bonanzinga, S; Sandhu, M K; Kia, Y H; Bell, S J; Nguyen, T; Iser, D M; Visvanathan, K; Sievert, W; Bowden, D S; Desmond, P V; Thompson, A J

    2015-08-01

    The biological mechanism underlying the association between IFNL4/IFNL3 polymorphism and peginterferon/ribavirin (PR) response in HCV-1 is thought to involve differential intrahepatic interferon-stimulated gene expression. HCV-3 is more sensitive to PR, but there are no studies of the association between IFNL4 polymorphism, PR treatment response and liver interferon-stimulated gene expression in HCV-3. We evaluated the association between IFNL4/IFNL3 genotypes, PR treatment outcomes and intrahepatic interferon-stimulated gene expression, according to HCV genotype. HCV-1 and HCV-3 patients who received PR therapy were identified. IFNL3 (rs12979860) and IFNL4 genotype (rs368234815) were determined. A second cohort with stored liver specimens was identified. Expression of ISGs was measured by rt-PCR. Two hundred and fifty-nine patients were identified: 55% HCV-1, 45% HCV-3. IFNL4 genotype frequency was TT/TT 44%, TT/ΔG 42% andΔG/ΔG 14%. Linkage disequilibrium with IFNL3 genotype was high (r(2) = 0.98). The association between IFNL4 genotype and PR response was attenuated in HCV-3 vs. HCV-1 (HCV-3: SVR 89% vs. 76% vs. 72% for TT/TT vs. TT/ΔG vs. ΔG/ΔG, P = 0.09; HCV-1: SVR: 82% vs. 29% vs. 24%, P < 0.001). Intrahepatic ISG expression was evaluated in 92 patients; 61% HCV-1. The association between IFNL4 genotype and liver ISG expression was significantly different for HCV-3 vs. HCV-1 (P-value for interaction = 0.046), with levels of interferon-stimulated gene expression being highest in HCV-1 patients who carried a poor-response IFNL4 genotype. The relationship between IFNL4 genotype and PR treatment response as well as intrahepatic interferon-stimulated gene expression differs between HCV-1 and HCV-3. These data suggest fundamental differences in host-virus interactions according to HCV genotype. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Glucocorticoid actions on L6 muscle cells in culture

    Max, S.R.; Konagaya, M.; Konagaya, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoids exert striking catabolic effects on skeletal muscle. The mechanism of these effects remains poorly understood. They employed L6 muscle cells in culture to ascertain whether intracellular glucocorticoid receptors are involved. Studies in vitro permit exploration of glucocorticoid effects in the absence of other hormonal influences. L6 myoblasts were induced to form differentiated myotubes by growth in 1% serum. L6 myotubes were found to possess a high-affinity, limited capacity intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (apparent K/sub D/ = 5 x 10 -10 M; B/sub max/ = 711 pmols/g protein) with ligand specificity similar to that of glucocorticoid receptors from classical glucocorticoid target tissues. Further, [ 3 H] triamcinolone acetonide specific binding to L6 cell homogenates was blocked by a glucocorticoid antagonist, RU38486 (11β-(4-dimethyl-aminophenyl)-17β-hydroxy-17α-(prop-l-ynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one). Dexamethasone (10 -5 M) caused a 10-fold increase in the activity of gluatmine synthetase in L6 myotubes; this increase was prevented by RU38486. Similarly, dexamethasone (10 -5 M) caused a 20% decrease in [ 12 C] leucine incorporation into protein. This effect also was blocked by RU38486. Thus, induction of glutamine synthetase and diminution of protein synthesis by dexamethasone require intracellular glucocorticoid receptors. L6 cells should prove particularly valuable for further studies of glucocorticoid actions on skeletal muscle

  3. Nelson`s syndrome associated with a somatic frame shift mutation in the glucocorticoid recepter gene

    Karl, M.; Stratakis, C.A.; Chrousos, G.P.; Katz, D.A.; Ali, I.U.; Oldfield, E.H. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Nelson`s syndrome is the appearance and/or progression of ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas in patients who had previously undergone bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing`s disease. Extremely high plasma ACTH levels and aggressive neoplastic growth might be explained by the lack of appropriate glucocorticoid negative feedback due to defective glucocorticoid signal transduction. To study the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in Nelson`s syndrome, DNA was extracted from pituitary adenomas and leukocytes of four patients with this condition and amplified by PCR for direct sequence analysis. In one of the tumors, a heterozygous mutation, consisting of an insertion of a thymine between complementary DNA nucleotides 1188 and 1189, was found in exon 2. This frame-shift mutation led to premature termination at amino acid residue 366 of the world-type coding sequence, excluding the expression of a functioning receptor protein from the defective allele. The mutation was not detected in the sequence of the GR gene in the patient`s leukocyte DNA, indicating a somatic origin. By lowering the receptor number in tumorous cells, this defect might have caused local resistance to negative glucocorticoid feedback similar to that caused by the presence of a null allele in a kindred with the generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome. P53 protein accumulation, previously reported in 60% of corticotropinomas, could not be detected in any of the four pituitary tumors examined by immunohistochemistry. We suggest that a somatic GR defect might have played a pathophysiological role in the tumorigenesis of the corticotropinoma bearing this mutation. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Stimulation of liver IGF-1 expression promotes peak bone mass achievement in growing rats: a study with pomegranate seed oil.

    Bachagol, Deepa; Joseph, Gilbert Stanley; Ellur, Govindraj; Patel, Kalpana; Aruna, Pamisetty; Mittal, Monika; China, Shyamsundar Pal; Singh, Ravendra Pratap; Sharan, Kunal

    2018-02-01

    Peak bone mass (PBM) achieved at adulthood is a strong determinant of future onset of osteoporosis, and maximizing it is one of the strategies to combat the disease. Recently, pomegranate seed oil (PSO) has been shown to have bone-sparing effect in ovariectomized mice. However, its effect on growing skeleton and its molecular mechanism remain unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of PSO on PBM in growing rats and associated mechanism of action. PSO was given at various doses to 21-day-old growing rats for 90 days by oral gavage. The changes in bone parameters were assessed by micro-computed tomography and histology. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to analyze the levels of serum insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1). Western blotting from bone and liver tissues was done. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was performed to study the histone acetylation levels at IGF-1 gene. The results of the study show that PSO treatment significantly increases bone length, bone formation rate, biomechanical parameters, bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture along with enhancing muscle and brown fat mass. This effect was due to the increased serum levels of IGF-1 and stimulation of its signaling in the bones. Studies focusing on acetylation of histones in the liver, the major site of IGF-1 synthesis, showed enrichment of acetylated H3K9 and H3K14 at IGF-1 gene promoter and body. Further, the increased acetylation at H3K9 and H3K14 was associated with a reduced HDAC1 protein level. Together, our data suggest that PSO promotes the PBM achievement via increased IGF-1 expression in liver and IGF-1 signaling in bone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcitonin impairs the anabolic effect of PTH in young rats and stimulates expression of sclerostin by osteocytes.

    Gooi, J H; Pompolo, S; Karsdal, M A; Kulkarni, N H; Kalajzic, I; McAhren, S H M; Han, B; Onyia, J E; Ho, P W M; Gillespie, M T; Walsh, N C; Chia, L Y; Quinn, J M W; Martin, T J; Sims, N A

    2010-06-01

    The therapeutic goal of increasing bone mass by co-treatment of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and an osteoclast inhibitor has been complicated by the undefined contribution of osteoclasts to the anabolic activity of PTH. To determine whether active osteoclasts are required at the time of PTH administration, we administered a low dose of the transient osteoclast inhibitor salmon calcitonin (sCT) to young rats receiving an anabolic PTH regimen. Co-administration of sCT significantly blunted the anabolic effect of PTH as measured by peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT) and histomorphometry in the femur and tibia, respectively. To determine gene targets of sCT, we carried out quantitative real time PCR and microarray analysis of metaphyseal samples 1.5, 4 and 6.5h after administration of a single injection of PTH, sCT or PTH+sCT. Known targets of PTH action, IL-6, ephrinB2 and RANKL, were not modified by co-administration with sCT. Surprisingly, at all time points, we noted a significant upregulation of sclerostin mRNA by sCT treatment, as well as down-regulation of two other osteocyte gene products, MEPE and DMP1. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that sCT administration increased the percentage of osteocytes expressing sclerostin, suggesting a mechanism by which sCT reduced the anabolic effect of PTH. Neither mRNA for CT receptor (Calcr) nor labeled CT binding could be detected in sclerostin-enriched cells differentiated from primary calvarial osteoblasts. In contrast, osteocytes freshly isolated from calvariae expressed a high level of Calcr mRNA. Furthermore immunohistochemistry revealed co-localization of CT receptor (CTR) and sclerostin in some osteocytes in calvarial sections. Taken together these data indicate that co-treatment with sCT can blunt the anabolic effect of PTH and this may involve direct stimulation of sclerostin production by osteocytes. These data directly implicate calcitonin as a negative regulator of bone formation through a previously

  6. A phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) pathway promotes Kv7.1 channel surface expression by inhibiting Nedd4-2 protein

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Krzystanek, Katarzyna; Petersen, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cell polarization involves several kinase signaling cascades that eventually divide the surface membrane into an apical and a basolateral part. One kinase, which is activated during the polarization process, is phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). In MDCK cells, the basolateral potassium...... channel Kv7.1 requires PI3K activity for surface-expression during the polarization process. Here, we demonstrate that Kv7.1 surface expression requires tonic PI3K activity as PI3K inhibition triggers endocytosis of these channels in polarized MDCK. Pharmacological inhibition of SGK1 gave similar results...... as PI3K inhibition, whereas overexpression of constitutively active SGK1 overruled it, suggesting that SGK1 is the primary downstream target of PI3K in this process. Furthermore, knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 overruled PI3K inhibition, whereas a Nedd4-2 interaction-deficient Kv7.1 mutant...

  7. Genetic, functional and molecular features of glucocorticoid receptor binding.

    Francesca Luca

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are key mediators of stress response and are widely used as pharmacological agents to treat immune diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease, and certain types of cancer. GCs act mainly by activating the GC receptor (GR, which interacts with other transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Here, we combined different functional genomics approaches to gain molecular insights into the mechanisms of action of GC. By profiling the transcriptional response to GC over time in 4 Yoruba (YRI and 4 Tuscans (TSI lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, we suggest that the transcriptional response to GC is variable not only in time, but also in direction (positive or negative depending on the presence of specific interacting transcription factors. Accordingly, when we performed ChIP-seq for GR and NF-κB in two YRI LCLs treated with GC or with vehicle control, we observed that features of GR binding sites differ for up- and down-regulated genes. Finally, we show that eQTLs that affect expression patterns only in the presence of GC are 1.9-fold more likely to occur in GR binding sites, compared to eQTLs that affect expression only in its absence. Our results indicate that genetic variation at GR and interacting transcription factors binding sites influences variability in gene expression, and attest to the power of combining different functional genomic approaches.

  8. Effects of glucocorticoid hormones on radiation induced and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate enhanced radiation transformation in vitro

    Kennedy, A.R.; Umans, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the interactions of glucocorticoid hormones with radiation in the induction of transformation in vitro in C3AH10T1/2 cells. We have observed that cortisone has its primary enhancing effect on radiation transformation when present after the radiation exposure during the ''expression period'', or the time after carcinogen exposure during which promoting agents have been shown to enhance radiation transformation in vitro, and that two different glucocorticoid hormones, dexamethasone and cortisone, have a suppressive effect on the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhancement of radiation transformation in vitro

  9. Altered placental development in undernourished rats: role of maternal glucocorticoids

    Chen Chun-Hung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maternal undernutrition (MUN during pregnancy may lead to fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, which itself predisposes to adult risk of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. IUGR may stem from insufficient maternal nutrient supply or reduced placental nutrient transfer. In addition, a critical role for maternal stress-induced glucocorticoids (GCs has been suggested to contribute to both IUGR and the ensuing risk of adult metabolic syndrome. While GC-induced fetal organ defects have been examined, there have been few studies on placental responses to MUN-induced maternal stress. Therefore, we hypothesize that 50% MUN associates with increased maternal GC levels and decreased placental HSD11B. This in turn leads to decreased placental and fetal growth, hence the need to investigate nutrient transporters. We measured maternal serum levels of corticosterone, and the placental basal and labyrinth zone expression of glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B 1 (HSD11B-1 predominantly activates cortisone to cortisol and 11-dehydrocorticosterone (11-DHC to corticosterone, although can sometimes drive the opposing (inactivating reaction, and HSD11B-2 (only inactivates and converts corticosterone to 11-DHC in rodents in control and MUN rats at embryonic day 20 (E20. Moreover, we evaluated the expression of nutrient transporters for glucose (SLC2A1, SLC2A3 and amino acids (SLC38A1, 2, and 4. Our results show that MUN dams displayed significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels compared to control dams. Further, a reduction in fetal and placental weights was observed in both the mid-horn and proximal-horn positions. Notably, the placental labyrinth zone, the site of feto-maternal exchange, showed decreased expression of HSD11B1-2 in both horns, and increased HSD11B-1 in proximal-horn placentas, but no change in NR3C1. The reduced placental GCs catabolic capacity was accompanied by downregulation of SLC2A3, SLC

  10. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX

  11. Glucocorticoids promote a glioma stem cell-like phenotype and resistance to chemotherapy in human glioblastoma primary cells

    Kostopoulou, Ourania N; Mohammad, Abdul-Aleem; Bartek, Jiri

    2018-01-01

    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are glioblastoma (GBM) cells that are resistant to therapy and can give rise to recurrent tumors. The identification of patient-related factors that support GSCs is thus necessary to design effective therapies for GBM patients. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used to treat GBM......-associated edema. However, glucocorticoids participate in the physiological response to psychosocial stress, which has been linked to poor cancer prognosis. This raises concern that glucocorticoids affect the tumor and GSCs. Here, we treated primary human GBM cells with dexamethasone and evaluated GC......-driven changes in cell morphology, proliferation, migration, gene expression, secretory activity and growth as neurospheres. Dexamethasone treatment of GBM cells appeared to promote the development of a GSC-like phenotype and conferred resistance to physiological stress and chemotherapy. We also analyzed...

  12. Expression levels of novel cytokine IL-32 in periodontitis and its role in the suppression of IL-8 production by human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Kazuhisa Ouhara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:IL-32 was recently found to be elevated in the tissue of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by polymicrobial infections that result in soft tissue destruction and alveolar bone loss. Although IL-32 is also thought to be associated with periodontal disease, its expression and possible role in periodontal tissue remain unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the expression patterns of IL-32 in healthy and periodontally diseased gingival tissue. The expression of IL-32 in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF as well as effects of autocrine IL-32 on IL-8 production from HGF were also examined.Methods:Periodontal tissue was collected from both healthy volunteers and periodontitis patients, and immunofluorescent staining was performed in order to determine the production of IL-32. Using real-time PCR and ELISA, mRNA expression and protein production of IL-32 in HGF, stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, were also investigated.Results:Contrary to our expectation, the production of IL-32 in the periodontitis patients was significantly lower than in the healthy volunteers. According to immunofluorescent microscopy, positive staining for IL-32 was detected in prickle and basal cell layers in the epithelium as well as fibroblastic cells in connective tissue. Addition of fixed Pg in vitro was found to suppress the otherwise constitutive expression of IL-32 mRNA and protein in HGF. However, recombinant IL-32 in vitro inhibited the expression of IL-8 mRNA by HGF stimulated with Pg. Interestingly, anti-IL-32 neutralizing antibody upregulated the IL-8 mRNA expression in non-stimulated HGF, indicating that constitutive expression of IL-32 in HGF suppressed IL-8 mRNA expression in the absence of bacterial stimulation.Conclusion:These results indicate that IL-32 is constitutively produced by HGF which can be suppressed by Pg and may play a role in the downregulation

  13. The Regulation of Muscle Mass by Endogenous Glucocorticoids

    Daniel L Marks

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are highly conserved fundamental regulators of energy homeostasis. In response to stress in the form of perceived danger or acute inflammation, glucocorticoids are released from the adrenal gland, rapidly mobilizing energy from carbohydrate, fat and protein stores. In the case of inflammation, mobilized protein is critical for the rapid synthesis of acute phase reactants and an efficient immune response to infection. While adaptive in response to infection, chronic mobilization can lead to a p rofound depletion of energy stores. Skeletal muscle represents the major body store of protein, and can become substantially atrophied under conditions of chronic inflammation. Glucocorticoids elicit the atrophy of muscle by increasing the rate of protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy lysosome system. Protein synthesis is also suppressed at the level of translational initiation, preventing the production of new myofibrillar protein. Glucocorticoids also antagonize the action of anabolic regulators such as insulin further exacerbating the loss of protein and muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass in the context of chronic disease is a key feature of cachexia and contributes substantially to morbidity and mortality. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that glucocorticoid signaling is a common mediator of wasting, irrespective of the underlying initiator or disease state. This review will highlight fundamental mechanisms of glucocorticoid signaling and detail the mechanisms of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. Additionally, the evidence for glucocorticoids as a driver of muscle wasting in numerous disease states will be discussed. Given the burden of wasting diseases and the nodal nature of glucocorticoid signaling, effective anti-glucocorticoid therapy would be a valuable clinical tool. Therefore, the progress and potential pitfalls in the development of glucocorticoid antagonists for muscle wasting will

  14. Enhanced expression of IL-8 in normal human keratinocytes and human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT in vitro after stimulation with contact sensitizers, tolerogens and irritants.

    Mohamadzadeh, M; Müller, M; Hultsch, T; Enk, A; Saloga, J; Knop, J

    1994-12-01

    To investigate the interleukin-8 production of keratinocytes after stimulation in vitro we have used various agents: (i) contact sensitizer (2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene, 3-n-pentadecylcatechol); (ii) tolerogen (5-methyl-3-n-pentadecylcatechol); (iii) irritant (sodium lauryl sulfate). Interleukin-8 gene expression was assessed by northern blot hybridization of the total cytoplasmic RNA extracted from subconfluent normal human keratinocyte cultures and the keratinocyte cell line HaCaT using a radiolabeled DNA probe specific for human interleukin-8. Interleukin-8 gene expression was markedly increased upon in vitro stimulation after 1-6 h with contact sensitizers, tolerogen and the irritant. In contrast, interleukin-8 production was not detectable in unstimulated normal human keratinocytes or the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line. These results suggest that the induction and production of interleukin-8 is a response to nonspecific stimuli and may play a critical role in the early response to immunogenic or inflammatory signals in man.

  15. BCR ligation induced by IgM stimulation results in gene expression and functional changes only in IgV H unmutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

    Guarini, Anna; Chiaretti, Sabina; Tavolaro, Simona; Maggio, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Citarella, Franca; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Santangelo, Simona; Marinelli, Marilisa; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Messina, Monica; Mauro, Francesca Romana; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Foà, Robert

    2008-08-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients exhibit a variable clinical course. To investigate the association between clinicobiologic features and responsiveness of CLL cells to anti-IgM stimulation, we evaluated gene expression changes and modifications in cell-cycle distribution, proliferation, and apoptosis of IgV(H) mutated (M) and unmutated (UM) samples upon BCR cross-linking. Unsupervised analysis highlighted a different response profile to BCR stimulation between UM and M samples. Supervised analysis identified several genes modulated exclusively in the UM cases upon BCR cross-linking. Functional gene groups, including signal transduction, transcription, cell-cycle regulation, and cytoskeleton organization, were up-regulated upon stimulation in UM cases. Cell-cycle and proliferation analyses confirmed that IgM cross-linking induced a significant progression into the G(1) phase and a moderate increase of proliferative activity exclusively in UM patients. Moreover, we observed only a small reduction in the percentage of subG(0/1) cells, without changes in apoptosis, in UM cases; contrariwise, a significant increase of apoptotic levels was observed in stimulated cells from M cases. These results document that a differential genotypic and functional response to BCR ligation between IgV(H) M and UM cases is operational in CLL, indicating that response to antigenic stimulation plays a pivotal role in disease progression.

  16. GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β chain (CD131 expression as a biomarker of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells

    Maric Dragan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon Ag-activation cytotoxic T cells (CTLs produce IFN-γ GM-CSF and TNF-α, which deliver simultaneously pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory signals to the surrounding microenvironment. Whether this secretion affects in an autocrine loop the CTLs themselves is unknown. Methods Here, we compared the transcriptional profile of Ag-activated, Flu-specific CTL stimulated with the FLU M1:58-66 peptide to that of convivial CTLs expanded in vitro in the same culture. PBMCs from 6 HLA-A*0201 expressing donors were expanded for 7 days in culture following Flu M1:58-66 stimulation in the presence of 300 IU/ml of interleukin-2 and than sorted by high speed sorting to high purity CD8+ expressing T cells gated according to FluM1:58-66 tetrameric human leukocyte antigen complexes expression. Results Ag-activated CTLs displayed higher levels of IFN-γ, GM-CSF (CSF2 and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β- chain (CD131 but lacked completely expression of IFN-γ receptor-II and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. This observation suggested that Ag-activated CTLs in preparation for the release of IFN-γ and GM-CSF shield themselves from the potentially apoptotic effects of the former entrusting their survival to GM-SCF. In vitro phenotyping confirmed the selective surface expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs and their increased proliferation upon exogenous administration of GM-CSF. Conclusion The selective responsiveness of Ag-activated CTLs to GM-CSF may provide an alternative explanation to the usefulness of this chemokine as an adjuvant for T cell aimed vaccines. Moreover, the selective expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs proposes CD131 as a novel biomarker of Ag-dependent CTL activation.

  17. Acupoint stimulation, massage therapy and expressive writing for breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Lee, Phoebe Lyssandra Tan; Tam, Ka-Wai; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Wu, Wei-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Researches have accumulated using non-pharmacologic interventions including acupoint stimulation, massage therapy and expressive writing to manage breast cancer-related symptoms. Results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) can get contradictory. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to determine the effects on the quality of life, negative emotions and disease-related symptoms among women with breast cancer. Two independent researchers performed a structured search using data sources including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PubMed and PsychINFO from the beginning of time until the first week of January 2015. A total of 23 acupoint stimulation, massage therapy and expressive writing RCTs were included in the review. The study showed that no single intervention could be put under the spotlight exhibiting an overall effective result on all measured outcomes; however, looking into each one in detail shows different results in specific outcomes. Among the three interventions, acupoint stimulation has a treatment effect for general pain (MD=-1.46, 95% CI=-2.38 to -0.53) and fatigue (MD=-2.22, 95% CI=-3.68 to -0.77), massage therapy has a treatment effect for anxiety (MD=-0.50, 95% CI=-0.77 to -0.24), and expressive writing has a treatment effect for quality of life (MD=7.18, 95% CI=0.38 to 13.98). The measurement other outcomes showed either ineffective or equivocal results. Non-pharmacologic interventions including acupoint stimulation, massage therapy and expressive writing have an effect on a middle-age woman with breast cancer. However, because of limitations, the seemingly promising results should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on Yongquan acupoint reduces CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia of rats via down-regulation of ERK2 phosphorylation and c-Fos expression.

    Yang, Lin; Yang, Lianxue; Gao, Xiulai

    2010-07-01

    Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and its involvement in regulating gene expression in spinal dorsal horn, cortical and subcortical neurons by peripheral noxious stimulation contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment used in physiotherapy practice to promote analgesia in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. In this study, a total number of 114 rats were used for three experiments. Effects of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain hypersensitivity and TENS analgesia on ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Fos protein expression were examined by using behavioral test, Western blot, and immunostaining methods. We found that CFA injection caused an area of localized swelling, erythema, hypersensitivity to thermal stimuli, the decreased response time of hind paw licking (HPL), as well as upregulation of c-Fos protein expression and ERK2 phosphorylation in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn and the contralateral primary somatosensory area of cortex and the amygdala of rats. TENS on Yongquan acupoint for 20 min produced obvious analgesic effects as demonstrated with increased HPL to thermal stimuli of CFA-treated rats. In addition, TENS application suppressed the CFA-induced ERK2 activation and c-Fos protein expression. These results suggest that down-regulation of ERK2 phosphorylation and c-Fos expression were involved in TENS inhibition on CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia of rats.

  19. The receptor for Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is expressed in radial glia during development of the nervous system

    Krüger Carola

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony-stimulating (G-CSF factor is a well-known hematopoietic growth factor stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Recently, we uncovered that G-CSF acts also as a neuronal growth factor in the brain, which promotes adult neural precursor differentiation and enhances regeneration of the brain after insults. In adults, the receptor for G-CSF is predominantly expressed in neurons in many brain areas. We also described expression in neurogenic regions of the adult brain, such as the subventricular zone and the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus. In addition, we found close co-localization of the G-CSF receptor and its ligand G-CSF. Here we have conducted a systematic expression analysis of G-CSF receptor and its ligand in the developing embryo. Results Outside the central nervous system (CNS we found G-CSF receptor expression in blood vessels, muscles and their respective precursors and neurons. The expression of the G-CSF receptor in the developing CNS was most prominent in radial glia cells. Conclusion Our data imply that in addition to the function of G-CSF and its receptor in adult neurogenesis, this system also has a role in embryonic neurogenesis and nervous system development.

  20. Age-related synthesis of glucocorticoids in thymocytes

    Qiao Shengjun; Chen Liying; Okret, Sam; Jondal, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are primarily synthesized in the adrenal glands but an ectopic production has also been reported in the brain, the gastrointestinal tract and in thymic epithelial cells (TEC). Here we show that thymocytes express genes encoding for all enzymes required for de novo GC synthesis and produce the hormone as demonstrated by both a GC specific reporter assay and a corticosterone specific ELISA assay. Interestingly, GC synthesis is detectable in cells from young mice (4 weeks) and thereafter increases during aging (14-22 weeks) together with an increased gene expression of the rate-limiting enzymes StAR and CYP11A1. Hormone production occurred at a thymocyte differentiation stage characterized by being double positive for the CD4 and CD8 surface markers but was found to be unrelated to CD69 expression, a marker for thymocytes undergoing positive selection. No GC synthesis was found in resting or anti-CD3 activated CD4 and CD8 positive T cells isolated from the spleen. Thymocyte-derived GC had an anti-proliferative effect on a GR-transfected cell line and induced apoptosis in thymocytes. The age- and differentiation stage-related GC synthesis in thymocytes may play a role in the involution process that the thymus gland undergoes

  1. FcγRIIIa expression on monocytes in rheumatoid arthritis: role in immune-complex stimulated TNF production and non-response to methotrexate therapy.

    Dawn L Cooper

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The expression of FcγRIIIa/CD16 may render monocytes targets for activation by IgG-containing immune complexes (IC. We investigated whether FcγRIIIa/CD16 was upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, associated with TNF production in response to IC-stimulation, and if this predicted response to methotrexate therapy. METHODS: FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14(low and CD14++ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry in healthy controls and RA patients (early and long-standing disease. Intracellular TNF-staining was carried out after in vitro LPS or heat-aggregated immunoglobulin (HAG activation. FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression pre- and post-steroid/methotrexate treatment was examined. RESULTS: Increased FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14++ monocytes in long-standing RA patients compared to controls was demonstrated (p = 0.002 with intermediate levels in early-RA patients. HAG-induced TNF-production in RA patients was correlated with the percentage of CD14++ monocytes expressing FcγRIIIa/CD16 (p<0.001. The percentage of CD14++ monocytes expressing FcγRIIIa/CD16 at baseline in early DMARD-naïve RA patients was negatively correlated with DAS28-ESR improvement 14-weeks post-methotrexate therapy (p = 0.003 and was significantly increased in EULAR non-responders compared to moderate (p = 0.01 or good responders (p = 0.003. FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression was not correlated with age, presence of systemic inflammation or autoantibody titers. CONCLUSION: Increased FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14++ monocytes in RA may result in a cell that has increased responsiveness to IC-stimulation. This monocyte subset may contribute to non-response to methotrexate therapy.

  2. FcγRIIIa Expression on Monocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Role in Immune-Complex Stimulated TNF Production and Non-Response to Methotrexate Therapy

    Cooper, Dawn L.; Martin, Stephen G.; Robinson, James I.; Mackie, Sarah L.; Charles, Christopher J.; Nam, Jackie; Consortium, YEAR; Isaacs, John D.; Emery, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The expression of FcγRIIIa/CD16 may render monocytes targets for activation by IgG-containing immune complexes (IC). We investigated whether FcγRIIIa/CD16 was upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), associated with TNF production in response to IC-stimulation, and if this predicted response to methotrexate therapy. Methods FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14low and CD14++ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry in healthy controls and RA patients (early and long-standing disease). Intracellular TNF-staining was carried out after in vitro LPS or heat-aggregated immunoglobulin (HAG) activation. FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression pre- and post-steroid/methotrexate treatment was examined. Results Increased FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14++ monocytes in long-standing RA patients compared to controls was demonstrated (p = 0.002) with intermediate levels in early-RA patients. HAG-induced TNF-production in RA patients was correlated with the percentage of CD14++ monocytes expressing FcγRIIIa/CD16 (p<0.001). The percentage of CD14++ monocytes expressing FcγRIIIa/CD16 at baseline in early DMARD-naïve RA patients was negatively correlated with DAS28-ESR improvement 14-weeks post-methotrexate therapy (p = 0.003) and was significantly increased in EULAR non-responders compared to moderate (p = 0.01) or good responders (p = 0.003). FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression was not correlated with age, presence of systemic inflammation or autoantibody titers. Conclusion Increased FcγRIIIa/CD16 expression on CD14++ monocytes in RA may result in a cell that has increased responsiveness to IC-stimulation. This monocyte subset may contribute to non-response to methotrexate therapy. PMID:22235253

  3. IL-33 stimulates expression of the GPR84 (EX33) fatty acid receptor gene and of cytokine and chemokine genes in human adipocytes.

    Zaibi, Mohamed S; Kępczyńska, Małgorzata A; Harikumar, Parvathy; Alomar, Suliman Y; Trayhurn, Paul

    2018-05-15

    Expression of GPCR fatty acid sensor/receptor genes in adipocytes is modulated by inflammatory mediators, particularly IL-1β. In this study we examined whether the IL-1 gene superfamily member, IL-33, also regulates expression of the fatty acid receptor genes in adipocytes. Human fat cells, differentiated from preadipocytes, were incubated with IL-33 at three different dose levels for 3 or 24 h and mRNA measured by qPCR. Treatment with IL-33 induced a dose-dependent increase in GPR84 mRNA at 3 h, the level with the highest dose being 13.7-fold greater than in controls. Stimulation of GPR84 expression was transitory; the mRNA level was not elevated at 24 h. In contrast to GPR84, IL-33 had no effect on GPR120 expression. IL-33 markedly stimulated expression of the IL1B, CCL2, IL6, CXCL2 and CSF3 genes, but there was no effect on ADIPOQ expression. The largest effect was on CSF3, the mRNA level of which increased 183-fold over controls at 3 h with the highest dose of IL-33; there was a parallel increase in the secretion of G-CSF protein into the medium. It is concluded that in human adipocytes IL-33, which is synthesised in adipose tissue, has a strong stimulatory effect on the expression of cytokine and chemokine genes, particularly CSF3, and on the expression of GPR84, a pro-inflammatory fatty acid receptor. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucocorticoids facilitate the retention of acquired immobility during forced swimming

    Veldhuis, H D; De Korte, C C; De Kloet, E R

    1985-01-01

    The adrenalectomy-induced decrease in the level of immobility during a 5 min retest period in the Porsolt swimming test could be reversed by glucocorticoids administered s.c. 15 min after the initial forced swimming exposure. The synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and RU 28362 were active in

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    Kroon, Jan; Kroon, Jan; Puhr, M.; Buijs, J.T.; van der Horst, G.; Hemmer, D.M.; Marijt, K.A.; Hwang, M.S.; Masood, M.; Grimm, S.; Storm, Gerrit; Metselaar, Josbert Maarten; Meijer, O.C.; Culig, Z.; van der Pluijm, M.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T.; Van Der Horst, Geertje; Lemhemmer, Daniël; Marijt, Koen A.; Hwang, Ming S.; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/244207690; Meijer, Onno C.; Culig, Zoran; Van Der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCA). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance.

  7. Using fecal glucocorticoids for stress assessment in Mourning Doves

    Washburn, Brian E.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Schulz, John H.; Jones, Susan B.; Mong, T.

    2003-01-01

    Fecal glucocorticoid assays provide a potentially useful, noninvasive means to study physiological responses of wildlife to various stressors. The objective of our study was to validate a method for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) feces. We validated the assay using standard procedures (e.g., parallelism, recovery of exogenous corticosterone) to demonstrate that the assay accurately and precisely measured glucocorticoid metabolites in Mourning Dove fecal extracts. We conducted adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) challenge experiments to validate the assay's ability to determine biologically important changes in fecal glucocorticoids. Fecal glucocorticoid levels increased significantly approximately 2-3 hr after administration of ACTH at 50 IU per kg body mass to wild Mourning Doves held in captivity. In contrast, fecal glucocorticoid metabolites did not increase in control birds, birds that received saline injections, or a lower dose of ACTH (1 IU per kg body mass). Variation in overall fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels may have been influenced by season and the length of time birds were held in captivity. Non-invasive fecal glucocorticoid metabolite analyses, in combination with demographic information, may have considerable utility for monitoring the effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on Mourning Dove populations.

  8. A putative role for hypothalamic glucocorticoid receptors in hypertension induced by prenatal undernutrition in the rat.

    Pérez, Hernán; Soto-Moyano, Rubén; Ruiz, Samuel; Hernández, Alejandro; Sierralta, Walter; Olivares, Ricardo; Núñez, Héctor; Flores, Osvaldo; Morgan, Carlos; Valladares, Luis; Gatica, Arnaldo; Flores, Francisco J

    2010-10-08

    Prenatal undernutrition induces hypertension later in life, possibly by disturbing the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis through programming decreased expression of hypothalamic glucocorticoid receptors. We examined the systolic blood pressure, heart rate and plasma corticosterone response to intra-paraventricular dexamethasone, mifepristone and corticosterone in eutrophic and prenatally undernourished young rats. Undernutrition was induced during fetal life by restricting the diet of pregnant mothers to 10 g daily (40% of diet consumed by well-nourished controls). At day 40 of postnatal life (i) intra-paraventricular administration of dexamethasone significantly reduced at least for 24h both the systolic pressure (-11.6%), the heart rate (-20.8%) and the plasma corticosterone (-40.0%) in normal animals, while producing lower effects (-5.5, -8.7, and -22.3%, respectively) on undernourished rats; (ii) intra-paraventricular administration of the antiglucocorticoid receptor ligand mifepristone to normal rats produced opposite effects (8.2, 20.3, and 48.0% increase, respectively) to those induced by dexamethasone, being these not significant in undernourished animals; (iii) intra-paraventricular corticosterone did not exert any significant effect. Results suggest that the low sensitivity of paraventricular neurons to glucocorticoid receptor ligands observed in prenatally undernourished rats could be due to the already reported glucocorticoid receptor expression, found in the hypothalamus of undernourished animals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...... reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  10. Catalase overexpression prevents nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 stimulation of renal angiotensinogen gene expression, hypertension, and kidney injury in diabetic mice.

    Abdo, Shaaban; Shi, Yixuan; Otoukesh, Abouzar; Ghosh, Anindya; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao Ling; Chan, John S D

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of catalase (Cat) overexpression in renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) on nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) stimulation of angiotensinogen (Agt) gene expression and the development of hypertension and renal injury in diabetic Akita transgenic mice. Additionally, adult male mice were treated with the Nrf2 activator oltipraz with or without the inhibitor trigonelline. Rat RPTCs, stably transfected with plasmid containing either rat Agt or Nrf2 gene promoter, were also studied. Cat overexpression normalized systolic BP, attenuated renal injury, and inhibited RPTC Nrf2, Agt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene expression in Akita Cat transgenic mice compared with Akita mice. In vitro, high glucose level, hydrogen peroxide, and oltipraz stimulated Nrf2 and Agt gene expression; these changes were blocked by trigonelline, small interfering RNAs of Nrf2, antioxidants, or pharmacological inhibitors of nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. The deletion of Nrf2-responsive elements in the rat Agt gene promoter abolished the stimulatory effect of oltipraz. Oltipraz administration also augmented Agt, HO-1, and Nrf2 gene expression in mouse RPTCs and was reversed by trigonelline. These data identify a novel mechanism, Nrf2-mediated stimulation of intrarenal Agt gene expression and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, by which hyperglycemia induces hypertension and renal injury in diabetic mice. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Combined Effects of Glucocorticoid and Noradrenergic Activity on Loss Aversion.

    Margittai, Zsofia; Nave, Gideon; Van Wingerden, Marijn; Schnitzler, Alfons; Schwabe, Lars; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Loss aversion is a well-known behavioral regularity in financial decision making, describing humans' tendency to overweigh losses compared to gains of the same amount. Recent research indicates that stress and associated hormonal changes affect loss aversion, yet the underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the causal influence of two major stress neuromodulators, cortisol and noradrenaline, on loss aversion during financial decision making. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled between-subject design, we orally administered either the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine (increasing noradrenergic stimulation), hydrocortisone, both substances, or a placebo to healthy young men. We tested the treatments' influence on a financial decision-making task measuring loss aversion and risk attitude. We found that both drugs combined, relative to either drug by itself, reduced loss aversion in the absence of an effect on risk attitude or choice consistency. Our data suggest that concurrent glucocorticoid and noradrenergic activity prompts an alignment of reward- with loss-sensitivity, and thus diminishes loss aversion. Our results have implications for the understanding of the susceptibility to biases in decision making.

  12. SF-1 (NR5A1) expression is stimulated by the PKA pathway and is essential for the PKA-induced activation of LIPE expression in Y-1 cells.

    Kulcenty, K; Holysz, M; Trzeciak, W H

    2015-10-01

    In the adrenal cortex, corticotropin induces the expression of several genes encoding proteins involved in the synthesis and intracellular transport of steroid hormones via the protein kinase A (PKA) signalling pathway, and this process is mediated by steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1). This study was designed to elucidate the influence of the PKA and PKC pathways on the expression of the SF-1 gene in mouse adrenocortical cells, line Y-1. It has also been attempted to answer the question whether or not SF-1 plays a role in the PKA-induced expression of LIPE gene encoding hormone-sensitive lipase/cholesteryl esterase, which supplies cholesterol for steroid hormone synthesis. In this study, we found that stimulation of the PKA pathway caused a significant increase in SF-1 expression, and that this effect was abolished by the PKA inhibitor, H89. Decreased SF-1 gene transcript levels were seen with the simultaneous activation of PKA and PKC, suggesting a possible interaction between the PKA and PKC pathways. It was also observed that SF-1 increased the transcriptional activity of the LIPE gene by interacting with the SF-1 response element located in promoter A. Moreover, transient silencing of SF-1 expression with specific siRNAs abolished PKA-stimulated transcription of the LIPE gene, indicating that SF-1 is an important regulator of LIPE expression in Y-1 cells and thus could play a role in the regulation of the cholesterol supply for adrenal steroidogenesis.

  13. Glucocorticoid treatment of MCMV infected newborn mice attenuates CNS inflammation and limits deficits in cerebellar development.

    Kate Kosmac

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV.

  14. Impaired glucocorticoid-mediated HPA axis negative feedback induced by juvenile social isolation in male rats.

    Boero, Giorgia; Pisu, Maria Giuseppina; Biggio, Francesca; Muredda, Laura; Carta, Gianfranca; Banni, Sebastiano; Paci, Elena; Follesa, Paolo; Concas, Alessandra; Porcu, Patrizia; Serra, Mariangela

    2018-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that socially isolated rats at weaning showed a significant decrease in corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, associated with an enhanced response to acute stressful stimuli. Here we shown that social isolation decreased levels of total corticosterone and of its carrier corticosteroid-binding globulin, but did not influence the availability of the free active fraction of corticosterone, both under basal conditions and after acute stress exposure. Under basal conditions, social isolation increased the abundance of glucocorticoid receptors, while it decreased that of mineralocorticoid receptors. After acute stress exposure, socially isolated rats showed long-lasting corticosterone, ACTH and corticotrophin releasing hormone responses. Moreover, while in the hippocampus and hypothalamus of group-housed rats glucocorticoid receptors expression increased with time and reached a peak when corticosterone levels returned to basal values, in socially isolated rats expression of glucocorticoid receptors did not change. Finally, social isolation also affected the hypothalamic endocannabinoid system: compared to group-housed rats, basal levels of anandamide and cannabinoid receptor type 1 were increased, while basal levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol were decreased in socially isolated rats and did not change after acute stress exposure. The present results show that social isolation in male rats alters basal HPA axis activity and impairs glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback after acute stress. Given that social isolation is considered an animal model of several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and schizophrenia, these data could contribute to better understand the alterations in HPA axis activity observed in these disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulation of central glucocorticoid receptors in short- and long-term experimental hyperthyroidism.

    Nikolopoulou, Elena; Mytilinaios, Dimitrios; Calogero, Aldo E; Kamilaris, Themis C; Troupis, Theodore; Chrousos, George P; Johnson, Elizabeth O

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with a significant increase in circulating glucocorticoid levels and hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The aim of this study was to examine whether the HPA axis hyperactivity observed in hyperthyroidism may be explained by a disturbed feedback inhibition of endogenous glucocorticoids through two specific intracellular receptors in the brain: the high affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the lower affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Cytosolic receptor binding and gene expression was assessed in rats with short (7 days) and long standing (60 days) eu- and hyperthyroidism. Glucocorticoid receptor number and binding affinity (Kd) in the hippocampus were measured using [(3)H2]-dexamethasone radioreceptor assay. In situ hybridization was employed to examine the effects of hyperthyroidism on the GR and MR mRNA levels in the hippocampus and the pituitary. Both short- and long-term hyperthyroid rats showed pronounced reduction in the concentration of cytosolic GR in the hippocampus, without changes in binding affinity or changes in GR expression. In contrast, GR mRNA in the pituitary increased after 7 days and decreased after 60 days of thyroxin treatment. MR mRNA was moderately affected. Hyperthyroidism is associated with significant decreases in hippocampal GR levels supporting the hypothesis that hyperactivity of the HPA axis observed in experimentally induced hyperthyroidism may be attributed, at least in part, to decreased negative feedback at the level of the hippocampus. These findings further support the notion that a central locus is principally responsible for the hyperactivity of the HPA axis observed in hyperthyroidism.

  16. Prelimbic Stimulation Ameliorates Depressive-Like Behaviors and Increases Regional BDNF Expression in a Novel Drug-Resistant Animal Model of Depression.

    Moshe, Hagar; Gal, Ram; Barnea-Ygael, Noam; Gulevsky, Tatiana; Alyagon, Uri; Zangen, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one third of all major depression patients fail to respond to conventional pharmacological antidepressants, and brain stimulation methods pose a promising alternative for this population. Recently, based on repeated multifactorial selective inbreeding of rats for depressive-like behaviors, we introduced a novel animal model for MDD. Rats from this Depressive Rat Line (DRL) exhibit inherent depressive-like behaviors, which are correlated with lower levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in specific brain regions. In addition, DRL rats do not respond to antidepressant medication but respond to electroconvulsive treatment, and they can thus be utilized to test the effectiveness of brain stimulation on hereditary, medication-resistant depressive-like behaviors. To test the effect of sub-convulsive electrical stimulation (SCES) of the prelimbic cortex, using TMS-like temporal pattern of stimulation, on depressive-like behaviors and regional BDNF levels in DRL rats. SCES sessions were administered daily for 10 days through chronically implanted electrodes. Temporal stimulation parameters were similar to those used in TMS for major depression in human patients. Depressive-like behaviors were assayed after treatment, followed by brain extraction and regional BDNF measurements. SCES normalized both the depressive-like behaviors and the reduced BDNF levels observed in DRL rats. Correlation analyses suggest that changes in specific behaviors are mediated, at least in part, by BDNF expression in reward-related brain regions. Brain stimulation is effective in a drug-resistant, inherited animal model for depression. BDNF alterations in specific regions may mediate different antidepressant effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical strain stimulates vasculogenesis and expression of angiogenesis guidance molecules of embryonic stem cells through elevation of intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide generation.

    Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; Behr, Sascha; Wartenberg, Maria; Sauer, Heinrich

    2016-12-01

    Differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells may be regulated by mechanical strain. Herein, signaling molecules underlying mechanical stimulation of vasculogenesis and expression of angiogenesis guidance cues were investigated in ES cell-derived embryoid bodies. Treatment of embryoid bodies with 10% static mechanical strain using a Flexercell strain system significantly increased CD31-positive vascular structures and the angiogenesis guidance molecules plexinB1, ephrin B2, neuropilin1 (NRP1), semaphorin 4D (sem4D) and robo4 as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) as evaluated by Western blot and real time RT-PCR. In contrast ephrin type 4 receptor B (EphB4) expression was down-regulated upon mechanical strain, indicating an arterial-type differentiation. Robo1 protein expression was modestly increased with no change in mRNA expression. Mechanical strain increased intracellular calcium as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Mechanical strain-induced vasculogenesis was abolished by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS2870, upon chelation of intracellular calcium by BAPTA as well as upon siRNA inactivation of ephrin B2, NRP1 and robo4. BAPTA blunted the strain-induced expression of angiogenic growth factors, the increase in NO and ROS as well as the expression of NRP1, sem4D and plexinB1, whereas ephrin B2, EphB4 as well as robo1 and robo4 expression were not impaired. Mechanical strain stimulates vasculogenesis of ES cells by the intracellular messengers ROS, NO and calcium as well as by upregulation of angiogenesis guidance molecules and the angiogenic growth factors VEGF, FGF-2 and PDGF-BB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Role of MKP-1 in the Anti-Proliferative Effects of Glucocorticoids in Primary Rat Pre-Osteoblasts.

    Micheline Sanderson

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid (GC-induced osteoporosis has been attributed to a GC-induced suppression of pre-osteoblast proliferation. Our previous work identified a critical role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 in mediating the anti-proliferative effects of GCs in immortalized pre-osteoblasts, but we subsequently found that MKP-1 null mice were not protected against the pathological effects of GCs on bone. In order to reconcile this discrepancy, we have assessed the effects of GCs on proliferation, activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 and MKP-1 expression in primary adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs and ADSC-derived pre-osteoblasts (ADSC-OBs. ADSCs were isolated by means of collagenase digestion from adipose tissue biopsies harvested from adult male Wistar rats. ADSC-OBs were prepared by treating ADSCs with osteoblast differentiation media for 7 days. The effects of increasing concentrations of the GC dexamethasone on basal and mitogen-stimulated cell proliferation were quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation. ERK1/2 activity was measured by Western blotting, while MKP-1 expression was quantified on both RNA and protein levels, using semi-quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. GCs were strongly anti-proliferative in both naïve ADSCs and ADSC-OBs, but had very little effect on mitogen-induced ERK1/2 activation and did not upregulate MKP-1 protein expression. These findings suggest that the anti-proliferative effects of GCs in primary ADSCs and ADSC-OBs in vitro do not require the inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by MKP-1, which is consistent with our in vivo findings in MKP-1 null mice.

  19. Localization of the aromatase enzyme expression in the human pituitary gland and its effect on growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone axis.

    Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Kapucu, Aysegul; Dar, Kadriye Akgun; Ozkaya, Hande Mefkure; Caglar, Erkan; Ince, Haluk; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate aromatase expression in prolactin (PRL), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and growth hormone (GH) secreting cells. Nontumoral human pituitary specimens were obtained from autopsy samples. Aromatase co-expression was determined by double immunohistochemical staining and assessed using H scores. H scores for GH-aromatase co-expression (GH-aromatase), TSH-aromatase co-expression (TSH-aromatase), and PRL-aromatase co-expression (PRL-aromatase) were 83.1 ± 13.1, 95.6 ± 16.1, and 83.7 ± 14.5, respectively. TSH producing cells exhibited the highest H score for co-expression of aromatase (p 0.05 for all). There was a negative correlation between the H scores for aromatase and PRL-aromatase, GH-aromatase and TSH-aromatase, respectively (r = -0.592, p 0.05 for all). Age was negatively correlated with PRL-aromatase H score (r = -0.373, p = 0.008). Our study demonstrated significant aromatase co-expression in PRL, GH, and TSH secreting cells of the human anterior pituitary gland. The mutual paracrinal regulation between aromatase and three adenohypophyseal hormones indicates that aromatase may have a regulatory role on the synthesis and secretion of these hormones.

  20. [Effect of deep electroacupuncture stimulation of "Huantiao" (GB 30) on changes of function and nerve growth factor expression of the injured sciatic nerve in rats].

    Liu, Yu-Li; Li, Ye; Ren, Lu; Dai, Li-Li; Bai, Zeng-Hua; Bai, Ru; Ma, Tie-Ming

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE; To observe the effect of deep electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation of "Huantiao"(GB 30) on the functional and pathological changes and nerve growth factor (NGF) expression of the damaged sciatic nerve in rats, so as to study its mechanisms underlying reliving sciatica. Forty-eight SD rats were randomly divided into normal, model, deep EA and shallow EA groups (n = 12 in each group). The sciatic nerve injury model was established by mechanical clamp of the sciatic nerve stem. For deep and shallow EA, the acupuncture needles were inserted into GB 30 about 16 mm and 7 mm, respectively. The EA treatment was given 20 min, once daily for 14 days. The evoked potentials of the injured sciatic nerve stem responding to electrical stimulation were recorded by using a biophysiological experimental system for calculating the motor conduction velocity. Pathological changes of the sciatic nerve were displayed by H. E. stain. The expression of NGF and Fos proteins was detected by immunohistochemistry. In comparison with the normal group, the conduction velocity and the amplitude of the evoked potentials of the sciatic nerve were significantly decreased in the model group (P 0.05), and no significant changes of latencies of the evoked potentials inthe four groups (P > 0.05). In the model group, the disorganized nerve fibers axons, myelin and Schwann cells of the damaged sciatic nerve were found, which became milder in the EA groups particularly in the deep EA group. In regard to the NGF and Fos immunoactivity of the injured sciatic nerve, the expression levels of both NGF and Fos proteins were obviously higher in the model group than in the normal group (P stimulation, NGF expression was further significantly up-regulated in both deep and shallow EA groups (P stimulation of GB 30 can improve the pathological changes and function of the injured sciatic nerve in the rat, which is closely associated with its effects in up-regulating NGF expression and down-regulating Fos

  1. Enhancement of delay eyelid conditioning by microcurrent electrical stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex is triggered by the expression of Fos protein in guinea pigs.

    Zheng, Ya-Juan; Dong, Yu-Chen; Zhu, Chao; Zhao, Mei-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Eyelid conditioning, including delay eyelid conditioning and trace eyelid conditioning, has been used extensively to study neural structures and mechanisms of learning and memory as a form of associative learning. In the present study, microcurrent electrical stimulation was used to stimulate the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to induce delay eyelid conditioning in guinea pigs. The acquisition rate and relative latency of the conditioned eyelid response (CR) and the startle eyelid response (SR) were analyzed. The mPFC sites in the guinea pigs were examined under a light microscope following Nissl staining. In addition, the expression of Fos protein in neurons was detected using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results indicated that the acquisition rates of CR and SR were increased significantly (Pmicrocurrent electrical stimulation of the mPFC in guinea pigs was triggered by the expression of Fos protein. The observations of the present study further expand the understanding of conditioned reflexes and may aid future investigations into the formation of eyelid conditioning and the mechanisms underlying the circuit in various conditions.

  2. High-fat diet and glucocorticoid treatment cause hyperglycemia associated with adiponectin receptor alterations

    Oller do Nascimento Cláudia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is the most abundant plasma protein synthesized for the most part in adipose tissue, and it is an insulin-sensitive hormone, playing a central role in glucose and lipid metabolism. In addition, it increases fatty acid oxidation in the muscle and potentiates insulin inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Two adiponectin receptors have been identified: AdipoR1 is the major receptor expressed in skeletal muscle, whereas AdipoR2 is mainly expressed in liver. Consumption of high levels of dietary fat is thought to be a major factor in the promotion of obesity and insulin resistance. Excessive levels of cortisol are characterized by the symptoms of abdominal obesity, hypertension, glucose intolerance or diabetes and dyslipidemia; of note, all of these features are shared by the condition of insulin resistance. Although it has been shown that glucocorticoids inhibit adiponectin expression in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the regulation of adiponectin receptors. The link between glucocorticoids and insulin resistance may involve the adiponectin receptors and adrenalectomy might play a role not only in regulate expression and secretion of adiponectin, as well regulate the respective receptors in several tissues. Results Feeding of a high-fat diet increased serum glucose levels and decreased adiponectin and adipoR2 mRNA expression in subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissues, respectively. Moreover, it increased both adipoR1 and adipoR2 mRNA levels in muscle and adipoR2 protein levels in liver. Adrenalectomy combined with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone treatment resulted in increased glucose and insulin levels, decreased serum adiponectin levels, reduced adiponectin mRNA in epididymal adipose tissue, reduction of adipoR2 mRNA by 7-fold in muscle and reduced adipoR1 and adipoR2 protein levels in muscle. Adrenalectomy alone increased adiponectin mRNA expression 3-fold in subcutaneous adipose

  3. 4-Phenylbutyrate stimulates Hsp70 expression through the Elp2 component of elongator and STAT-3 in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Suaud, Laurence; Miller, Katelyn; Panichelli, Ashley E; Randell, Rachel L; Marando, Catherine M; Rubenstein, Ronald C

    2011-12-30

    Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA) corrects trafficking of ΔF508-CFTR in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) epithelia, which is hypothesized to, at least in part, result from increased expression of Hsp70 (stress-induced 70 kDa heat shock protein). To identify other 4PBA-regulated proteins that may promote correction of ΔF508 trafficking, we performed differential display RT-PCR on mRNA from IB3-1 CF bronchiolar epithelial cells treated for 0-24 h with 1 mM 4PBA. In this screen, a STAT-3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription-3)-interacting protein, StIP-1 that regulates STAT-3 activation had transiently increased expression. StIP-1 is identical to Elongator protein 2 (Elp2), a component of the Elongator complex that regulates RNA polymerase II. Previous studies have suggested that Elongator regulates Hsp70 mRNA transcription, and that the Hsp70 promoter contains functional STAT-3-binding sites. We therefore tested the hypothesis that 4PBA increases Hsp70 expression by an Elongator- and STAT-3-dependent mechanism. 4PBA treatment of IB3-1 CF bronchiolar epithelial cells caused transiently increased expression of Hsp70 protein, as well as Elp2 protein and mRNA. Elp2 depletion by transfection of small interfering RNAs, reduced both Elp2 and Hsp70 protein expression. 4PBA also caused transient activation of STAT-3, and increased abundance of nuclear proteins that bind to the STAT-3-responsive element of the Hsp70 promoter. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that both Elp2 overexpression and 4PBA increase Hsp70 promoter activity, while Elp2 depletion blocked the ability of 4PBA to stimulate Hsp70 promoter activity. Together, these data suggest that Elp2 and STAT-3 mediate, at least in part, the stimulation of Hsp70 expression by 4PBA.

  4. Differential Influence of Inositol Hexaphosphate on the Expression of Genes Encoding TGF-β Isoforms and Their Receptors in Intestinal Epithelial Cells Stimulated with Proinflammatory Agents

    Małgorzata Kapral

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β is a multifunctional cytokine recognized as an important regulator of inflammatory responses. The effect of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6, a naturally occurring phytochemical, on the mRNA expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3 and TβRI, TβRII, and TβRIII receptors stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium and IL-1β in intestinal cells Caco-2 for 3 and 12 h was investigated. Real-time qRT-PCR was used to validate mRNAs level of examined genes. Bacterial endotoxin promoted differential expression of TGF-βs and their receptors in a time-dependent manner. IL-1β upregulated mRNA levels of all TGF-βs and receptors at both 3 h and 12 h. IP6 elicited the opposed to LPS effect by increasing downregulated transcription of the examined genes and suppressing the expression of TGF-β1 at 12 h. IP6 counteracted the stimulatory effect of IL-1β on TGF-β1 and receptors expression by decreasing their mRNA levels. IP6 enhanced LPS- and IL-1β-stimulated mRNA expression of TGF-β2 and -β3. Based on these studies it may be concluded that IP6 present in the intestinal milieu may exert immunoregulatory effects and chemopreventive activity on colonic epithelium under inflammatory conditions or during microbe-induced infection/inflammation by modulating the expression of genes encoding TGF-βs and their receptors at transcriptional level.

  5. High density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) inhibits macrophage apoptosis by stimulating STAT3 activity and survivin expression.

    Feuerborn, Renata; Becker, Susen; Potì, Francesco; Nagel, Petra; Brodde, Martin; Schmidt, Harmut; Christoffersen, Christina; Ceglarek, Uta; Burkhardt, Ralph; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2017-02-01

    Macrophage apoptosis is critically involved in atherosclerosis. We here examined the effect of anti-atherogenic high density lipoprotein (HDL) and its component sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on apoptosis in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. Mitochondrial or endoplasmic reticulum-dependent apoptosis was induced by exposure of macrophages to etoposide or thapsigargin/fukoidan, respectively. Cell death induced by these compounds was inhibited by S1P as inferred from reduced annexin V binding, TUNEL staining, and caspase 3, 9 and 12 activities. S1P induced expression of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family proteins cIAP1, cIAP2 and survivin, but only the inhibitor of survivin expression YM155 and not the cIAP1/2 blocker GDC0152 reversed the inhibitory effect of S1P on apoptosis. Moreover, S1P activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and the stimulatory effect of S1P on survivin expression and inhibitory effects on apoptosis were attenuated by STAT3 or JAK2 inhibitors, S3I-201 or AG490, respectively. The effects of S1P on STAT3 activation, survivin expression and macrophage apoptosis were emulated by HDL, HDL lipids, and apolipoprotein (apo) M-containing HDL, but not by apoA-I or HDL deprived of S1P or apoM. In addition, JTE013 and CAY10444, S1P receptor 2 and 3 antagonists, respectively, compromised the S1P and HDL capacities to stimulate STAT3 activation and survivin expression, and to inhibit apoptosis. HDL-associated S1P inhibits macrophage apoptosis by stimulating STAT3 activity and survivin expression. The suppression of macrophage apoptosis may represent a novel mechanism utilized by HDL to exert its anti-atherogenic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucocorticoid-like activity of propylparaben, butylparaben, diethylhexyl phthalate and tetramethrin mixtures studied in the MDA-kb2 cell line.

    Klopčič, Ivana; Kolšek, Katra; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2015-01-22

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds can interfere with the endocrine organs or hormone system and cause tumors, birth defects and developmental disorders in humans. The estrogen-like activity of compounds has been widely studied but little is known concerning their possible modulation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Steroidal (synthetic and natural) and non-steroidal endocrine-active compounds commonly occur as complex mixtures in human environments. Identification of such molecular species, which are responsible for modulating the glucocorticoid receptor are necessary to fully assess their risk. We have used the MDA-kb2 cell line, which expresses endogenous glucocorticoid receptor and a stably transfected luciferase reporter gene construct, to quantify the glucocorticoid-like activity of four compounds present in products in everyday use - propylparaben (PP), butylparaben (BP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and tetramethrin (TM). We tested all possible combinations of these compounds at two concentrations (1 μM and 10 nM) and compared their glucocorticoid-like activity. At the concentration of 1 μM seven mixtures were identified to have glucocorticoid-like activity except: DEHP+TM, BP+TM, DEHP+PP+TM, BP+PP+TM. At the concentration of 10 nM only three mixtures have glucocorticoid modulatory activity: DEHP+PP, BP+PP, DEHP+BP+PP+TM. Identified glucocorticoid-like activities were between 1.25 and 1.51 fold at the concentration of 1 μM and between 1.23 and 1.44 fold at the concentration of 10 nM in comparison with the solvent control. Individually BP, PP, and DEHP had glucocorticoid-like activity of 1.60, 1.57 and 1.50 fold over the solvent control at the concentration of 1 μM. On the other hand PP and DEHP, at the concentration of 10nM, showed no glucocorticoid-like activity, while BP showed 1.44 fold. The assertion that individual glucocorticoid-like compounds do not produce harm because they are present at low, ineffective levels in humans may be irrelevant when we

  7. Oxidative stress in the developing brain: effects of postnatal glucocorticoid therapy and antioxidants in the rat.

    Emily J Camm

    Full Text Available In premature infants, glucocorticoids ameliorate chronic lung disease, but have adverse effects on long-term neurological function. Glucocorticoid excess promotes free radical overproduction. We hypothesised that the adverse effects of postnatal glucocorticoid therapy on the developing brain are secondary to oxidative stress and that antioxidant treatment would diminish unwanted effects. Male rat pups received a clinically-relevant tapering course of dexamethasone (DEX; 0.5, 0.3, and 0.1 mg x kg(-1 x day(-1, with or without antioxidant vitamins C and E (DEXCE; 200 mg x kg(-1 x day(-1 and 100 mg x kg(-1 x day(-1, respectively, on postnatal days 1-6 (P1-6. Controls received saline or saline with vitamins. At weaning, relative to controls, DEX decreased total brain volume (704.4±34.7 mm(3 vs. 564.0±20.0 mm(3, the soma volume of neurons in the CA1 (1172.6±30.4 µm(3 vs. 1002.4±11.8 µm(3 and in the dentate gyrus (525.9±27.2 µm(3 vs. 421.5±24.6 µm(3 of the hippocampus, and induced oxidative stress in the cortex (protein expression: heat shock protein 70 [Hsp70]: +68%; 4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]: +118% and nitrotyrosine [NT]: +20%. Dexamethasone in combination with vitamins resulted in improvements in total brain volume (637.5±43.1 mm(3, and soma volume of neurons in the CA1 (1157.5±42.4 µm(3 and the dentate gyrus (536.1±27.2 µm(3. Hsp70 protein expression was unaltered in the cortex (+9%, however, 4-HNE (+95% and NT (+24% protein expression remained upregulated. Treatment of neonates with vitamins alone induced oxidative stress in the cortex (Hsp70: +67%; 4-HNE: +73%; NT: +22% and in the hippocampus (NT: +35%. Combined glucocorticoid and antioxidant therapy in premature infants may be safer for the developing brain than glucocorticoids alone in the treatment of chronic lung disease. However, antioxidant therapy in healthy offspring is not recommended.

  8. Enhanced heterologous expression of biologically active human granulocyte colony stimulating factor in transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells by localization to endoplasmic reticulum.

    Nair, Nisha R; Chidambareswaren, M; Manjula, S

    2014-09-01

    Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells, one of the best characterized cell lines is an attractive expression system for heterologous protein expression. However, the expression of foreign proteins is currently hampered by their low yield, which is partially the result of proteolytic degradation. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine. Recombinant hG-CSF is successfully being used for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in cancer patients. Here, we describe a simple strategy for producing biologically active hG-CSF in tobacco BY-2 cells, localized in the apoplast of BY-2 cells, as well as targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER targeting significantly enhanced recombinant production which scaled to 17.89 mg/l from 4.19 mg/l when expressed in the apoplasts. Southern blotting confirmed the stable integration of hG-CSF in the BY-2 nuclear genome, and the expression of hG-CSF was analysed by Western blotting. Total soluble protein containing hG-CSF isolated from positive calli showed proliferative potential when tested on HL-60 cell lines by MTT assay. We also report the potential of a Fluorescence-activated cell sorting approach for an efficient sorting of the hG-CSF-expressing cell lines, which will enable the generation of homogenous high-producing cell lines.

  9. Influences of AMY1 gene copy number and protein expression on salivary alpha-amylase activity before and after citric acid stimulation in splenic asthenia children.

    Yang, Zemin; Lin, Jing; Chen, Longhui; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiaorong; Chen, Weiwen

    2015-06-01

    To compare the correlations between salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) activity and amylase, alpha 1 (salivary) gene (AMYl) copy number or its gene expression between splenic asthenia and healthy children, and investigate the reasons of attenuated sAA activity ratio before and after citric acid stimulation in splenic asthenia children. Saliva samples from 20 splenic asthenia children and 29 healthy children were collected before and after citric acid stimulation. AMYl copy number, sAA activity, and total sAA and glycosylated sAA contents were determined, and their correlations were analyzed. Although splenic asthenia and healthy children had no differences in AMY1 copy number, splenic asthenia children had positive correlations between AMY1 copy number and sAA activity before or after citric acid stimulation. Splenic asthenia children had a higher sAA glycosylated proportion ratio and glycosylated sAA content ratio, while their total sAA content ratio and sAA activity ratio were lower compared with healthy children. The glycosylated sAA content ratio was higher than the total sAA content ratio in both groups. Splenic asthenia and healthy children had positive correlations between total sAA or glycosylated sAA content and sAA activity. However, the role played by glycosylated sAA content in sAA activity in healthy children increased after citric acid stimulation, while it decreased in splenic asthenia children. Genetic factors like AMY1 copy number variations, and more importantly, sAA glycosylation abnormalities leading to attenuated sAA activity after citric acid stimulation, which were the main reasons of the attenuated sAA activity ratio in splenic asthenia children compared with healthy children.

  10. Prenatal acoustic stimulation influences neuronal size and the expression of calcium-binding proteins (calbindin D-28K and parvalbumin) in chick hippocampus.

    Chaudhury, Sraboni; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2006-12-01

    Prenatal auditory enrichment by species-specific sounds and sitar music enhances the expression of immediate early genes, synaptic proteins and calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) as well as modifies the structural components of the brainstem auditory nuclei and auditory imprinting area in chicks. There is also facilitation of postnatal auditory preference of the chicks to maternal calls following both types of sound stimulation indicating prenatal perceptual learning. To examine whether the sound enrichment protocol also affects the areas related to learning and memory, we assessed morphological changes in the hippocampus at post-hatch day 1 of control and prenatally sound-stimulated chicks. Additionally, the proportions of neurons containing calbindin D-28K and parvalbumin immunoreactivity as well as their protein levels were determined. Fertilized eggs of domestic chick were incubated under normal conditions of temperature, humidity, forced draft of air as well as light and dark (12:12h) photoperiods. They were exposed to patterned sounds of species-specific and sitar music at 65 dB for 15 min per hour over a day/night cycle from day 10 of incubation till hatching. The hippocampal volume, neuronal nuclear size and total number of neurons showed a significant increase in the music-stimulated group as compared to the species-specific sound-stimulated and control groups. However, in both the auditory-stimulated groups the protein levels of calbindin and parvalbumin as well as the percentage of the immunopositive neurons were increased. The enhanced proportion of CaBPs in the sound-enriched groups suggests greater Ca(2+) influx, which may influence long-term potentiation and short-term memory.

  11. Glucocorticoids and Polyamine Inhibitors Synergize to Kill Human Leukemic CEM Cells1

    Miller, Aaron L; Johnson, Betty H; Medh, Rheem D; Townsend, Courtney M; Thompson, E Brad

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Glucocorticoids are well-known apoptotic agents in certain classes of lymphoid cell malignancies. Reduction of intracellular polyamine levels by use of inhibitors that block polyamine synthesis slows or inhibits growth of many cells in vitro. Several such inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials, though the toxicity of some compounds has limited their usefulness. We have tested the effects of combinations of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) and two polyamine inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methyl glyoxal bis guanylhydrazone (MGBG), on the clonal line of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, CEM-C7-14. Dex alone kills these cells, though only after a delay of at least 24 hours. We also evaluated a partially glucocorticoid-resistant c-Myc-expressing CEM-C7-14 clone. We show that Dex downregulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis. Pretreatment with the ODC inhibitor DFMO, followed by addition of Dex, enhances steroid-evoked kill slightly. The combination of pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of both DFMO and the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, MGBG, followed by addition of Dex, results in strong synergistic cell kill. Both the rapidity and extent of cell kill are enhanced compared to the effects of Dex alone. These results suggest that use of such combinations in vivo may result in apoptosis of malignant cells with lower overall toxicity. PMID:11922393

  12. Glucocorticoids and Polyamine Inhibitors Synergize to Kill Human Leukemic CEM Cells

    Aaron L. Miller

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are well-known apoptotic agents in certain classes of lymphoid cell malignancies. Reduction of intracellular polyamine levels by use of inhibitors that block polyamine synthesis slows or inhibits growth of many cells in vitro. Several such inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials, though the toxicity of some compounds has limited their usefulness. We have tested the effects of combinations of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. (20Dex and two polyamine inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine. (20DFMO and methyl glyoxal bis guanylhydrazone. (20MGBG, on the clonal line of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, CEM-C7-14. Dex alone kills these cells, though only after a delay of at least 24 hours. We also evaluated a partially glucocorticoid-resistant c-Myc-expressing CEM-C7-14 clone. We show that Dex downregulates ornithine decarboxylase. (20ODC, the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis. Pretreatment with the ODC inhibitor DFMO, followed by addition of Dex, enhances steroid-evoked kill slightly. The combination of pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of both DFMO and the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, MGBG, followed by addition of Dex, results in strong synergistic cell kill. Both the rapidity and extent of cell kill are enhanced compared to the effects of Dex alone. These results suggest that use of such combinations in vivo may result in apoptosis of malignant cells with lower overall toxicity.

  13. Dexras1 links glucocorticoids to insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling in adipogenesis

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Seok, Jo Woon; Choi, Yoonjeong; Yoon, Bo Kyung; Choi, Hyeonjin; Yu, Jung Hwan; Song, Su Jin; Kim, Ara; Lee, Hyemin; Kim, Daeun; Han, Ji Yoon; Kim, Jae-woo

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are associated with obesity, but the underlying mechanism by which they function remains poorly understood. Previously, we showed that small G protein Dexras1 is expressed by glucocorticoids and leads to adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored the mechanism by which Dexras1 mediates adipogenesis and show a link to the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway. Without Dexras1, the activation of MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is abolished, thereby inhibiting mitotic clonal expansion and further adipocyte differentiation. Dexras1 translocates to the plasma membrane upon insulin or IGF-1 treatment, for which the unique C-terminal domain (amino acids 223–276) is essential. Dexras1-dependent MAPK activation is selectively involved in the IGF-1 signaling, because another Ras protein, H-ras localized to the plasma membrane independently of insulin treatment. Moreover, neither epidermal growth factor nor other cell types shows Dexras1-dependent MAPK activation, indicating the importance of Dexras1 in IGF-1 signaling in adipogenesis. Dexras1 interacts with Shc and Raf, indicating that Dexras1-induced activation of MAPK is largely dependent on the Shc-Grb2-Raf complex. These results suggest that Dexras1 is a critical mediator of the IGF-1 signal to activate MAPK, linking glucocorticoid signaling to IGF-1 signaling in adipogenesis. PMID:27345868

  14. Role of the hinge region of glucocorticoid receptor for HEXIM1-mediated transcriptional repression

    Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Sano, Motoaki; Ohnuma, Kei; Iwata, Satoshi; Hosono, Osamu; Fukuda, Keiichi; Morimoto, Chikao

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that HEXIM1 (hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1), which suppresses transcription elongation via sequestration of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) using 7SK RNA as a scaffold, directly associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to suppress glucocorticoid-inducible gene activation. Here, we revealed that the hinge region of GR is essential for its interaction with HEXIM1, and that oxosteroid receptors including GR show sequence homology in their hinge region and interact with HEXIM1, whereas the other members of nuclear receptors do not. We also showed that HEXIM1 suppresses GR-mediated transcription in two ways: sequestration of P-TEFb by HEXIM1 and direct interaction between GR and HEXIM1. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-dependent gene expression is negatively modulated by HEXIM1 solely via sequestration of P-TEFb. We, therefore, conclude that HEXIM1 may act as a gene-selective transcriptional regulator via direct interaction with certain transcriptional regulators including GR and contribute to fine-tuning of, for example, glucocorticoid-mediated biological responses

  15. Leptin and glucocorticoid signaling pathways in the hypothalamus of female and male fructose-fed rats

    Vojnović-Milutinović Danijela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in leptin and glucocorticoid signaling pathways in the hypothalamus of male and female rats subjected to a fructose-enriched diet were studied. The level of expression of the key components of the leptin signaling pathway (neuropeptide Y /NPY/ and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 /SOCS3/, and the glucocorticoid signaling pathway (glucocorticoid receptor /GR/, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 /11βHSD1/ and hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase /H6PDH/ did not differ between fructose-fed rats and control animals of both genders. However, in females, a fructose-enriched diet provoked increases in the adiposity index, plasma leptin and triglyceride concentrations, and displayed a tendency to decrease the leptin receptor (ObRb protein and mRNA levels. In male rats, the fructose diet caused elevations in plasma non-esterified fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as in both plasma and hypothalamic leptin concentrations. Our results suggest that a fructose-enriched diet can induce hyperleptinemia in both female and male rats, but with a more pronounced effect on hypothalamic leptin sensitivity in females, probably contributing to the observed development of visceral adiposity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41009

  16. Experimental hyperthyroidism in rats increases the expression of the ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 and stimulates multiple proteolytic pathways in skeletal muscle.

    O'Neal, Patrick; Alamdari, Nima; Smith, Ira; Poylin, Vitaliy; Menconi, Michael; Hasselgren, Per-Olof

    2009-11-01

    Muscle wasting is commonly seen in patients with hyperthyroidism and is mainly caused by stimulated muscle proteolysis. Loss of muscle mass in several catabolic conditions is associated with increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1 but it is not known if atrogin-1 and MuRF1 are upregulated in hyperthyroidism. In addition, it is not known if thyroid hormone increases the activity of proteolytic mechanisms other than the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We tested the hypotheses that experimental hyperthyroidism in rats, induced by daily intraperitoneal injections of 100 microg/100 g body weight of triiodothyronine (T3), upregulates the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in skeletal muscle and stimulates lysosomal, including cathepsin L, calpain-, and caspase-3-dependent protein breakdown in addition to proteasome-dependent protein breakdown. Treatment of rats with T3 for 3 days resulted in an approximately twofold increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNA levels. The same treatment increased proteasome-, cathepsin L-, and calpain-dependent proteolytic rates by approximately 40% but did not influence caspase-3-dependent proteolysis. The expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 remained elevated during a more prolonged period (7 days) of T3 treatment. The results provide support for a role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle wasting during hyperthyroidism and suggest that other proteolytic pathways as well may be activated in the hyperthyroid state. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Addison disease in patients treated with glucocorticoid therapy.

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Acute adrenal crisis in patients with unrecognized chronic adrenocortical failure is difficult to diagnose and potentially fatal. We describe 2 patients with acute adrenal crisis whose diagnoses were hindered because of concomitant glucocorticoid treatment. Acute adrenal insufficiency is primarily a state of mineralocorticoid deficiency. Prednisolone and prednisone, the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory corticosteroid agents, have minimal mineralocorticoid activity. Several conditions that may be treated with pharmacological glucocorticoids are associated with an increased risk of Addison disease. An acute adrenal crisis, against which concurrent glucocorticoid therapy does not confer adequate protection, may develop in such patients.

  18. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...... and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy...... that in response to glucocorticoid administration, induced autophagy aids to maintain proliferation and prevent apoptosis of BMSCs. Thus, it is hypothesized that autophagy may be a novel target in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis....

  19. Neuropsychiatric findings in Cushing syndrome and exogenous glucocorticoid administration.

    Starkman, Monica N

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the neuropsychiatric presentations elicited by spontaneous hypercortisolism and exogenous supraphysiologic glucocorticoids. Patients with Cushing disease and syndrome develop a depressive syndrome: irritable and depressed mood, decreased libido, disrupted sleep and cognitive decrements. Exogenous short-term glucocorticoid administration may elicit a hypomanic syndrome with mood, sleep and cognitive disruptions. Treatment options are discussed. Brain imaging and neuropsychological studies indicate elevated cortisol and other glucocorticoids are especially deleterious to hippocampus and frontal lobe. The research findings also shed light on neuropsychiatric abnormalities in conditions that have substantial subgroups exhibiting elevated and dysregulated cortisol: aging, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Deposition of intranasal glucocorticoids--preliminary study.

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Sosnowski, Tomasz R; Sova, Jarosław; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice in the therapy of rhinitis. The differences in efficiency of particular medications proven by therapeutic index may result from differences in composition of particular formulations as well as from diverse deposition in nasal cavities. Intranasal formulations of glucocorticoids differ in volume of a single dose in addition to variety in density, viscosity and dispenser nozzle structure. The aim of this report was to analyze the deposition of most often used intranasal glucocorticoids in the nasal cavity and assessment of the usefulness of a nose model from a 3D printer reflecting anatomical features of a concrete patient. Three newest and most often used in Poland intranasal glucocorticoids were chosen to analysis; mometasone furoate (MF), fluticasone propionate (FP) and fluticasone furoate (FF). Droplet size distribution obtained from the tested formulations was determined by use of a laser aerosol spectrometer Spraytec (Malvern Instruments, UK). The model of the nasal cavity was obtained using a 3D printer. The printout was based upon a tridimensional reconstruction of nasal cavity created on the basis of digital processing of computed tomography of paranasal sinuses. The deposition of examined medications was established by a method of visualization combined with image analysis using commercial substance which colored itself intensively under the influence of water being the dominant ingredient of all tested preparations. On the basis of obtained results regions of dominating deposition of droplets of intranasal medication on the wall and septum of the nasal cavity were compared. Droplet size of aerosol of tested intranasal medications typically lies within the range of 25-150 µm. All tested medications deposited mainly on the anterior part of inferior turbinate. FP preparation deposited also on the anterior part of the middle nasal turbinate, marginally embracing a fragment of the central part of this

  1. The effects of irradiation on the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides in the rat liver

    Teshima, Teruki; Mori, Masaki; Honke, Yoshifumi

    1983-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on both the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides in the rat liver were investigated. The liver concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides were measured by radioimmunoassay before and after the irradiation of 1,000 rad/l fraction. The glucocorticoid receptor in the liver cytosol was determined by the measurement of the cytosol binding to 3 H-dexamethasone. The cytosol and nuclear corticosterone levels reached a peak 1 day after the irradiation of the rat liver and declined to the control levels after 2 days. The increase in corticosterone levels may be due to the direct stimulation of the right adrenal gland and/ or the stress induced by the irradiation. The binding capacity of the glucocorticoid receptor in rat liver cytosol decreased to the minimum 1 day after the irradiation, and the recovery occurred at 4 days. The Kd value of the glucocorticoid receptor remained unchanged from 1 hour until 4 days but was high at 4 and 7 days. The distinctly increased levels of cyclic GMP in the rat liver were found from 1 hour through 7 days after the irradiation, while cyclic AMP did not change. The inversed relationship between the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and corticosterone levels in cytosol and the nuclei indicates that the receptor-bound corticosterone in cytosol can be transferred to a nucleus and remain there in the presence of appropriate amounts of corticosterone in cytosol, after which the receptor is released from the nucleus into cytosol. The high Kd values observed 4 -- 7 days after the irradiation may be either due to the direct effect of irradiation or to the replenishment of the receptor with a low affinity. (author)

  2. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 expresses in mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and stimulates their proliferation

    Zhang, Fenxi; Wang, Congrui; Jing, Suhua; Ren, Tongming; Li, Yonghai; Cao, Yulin; Lin, Juntang

    2013-01-01

    The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) have been widely used in cell transplant therapy, and the proliferative ability of bmMSCs is one of the determinants of the therapy efficiency. Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) as a transmembrane protein is responsible for binding, internalizing and degrading oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). It has been identified that LOX-1 is expressed in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and monocytes. In these cells, low concentration of ox-LDL (<40 μg/mL) stimulates their proliferation via LOX-1 activation. However, it is poor understood that whether LOX-1 is expressed in bmMSCs and which role it plays. In this study, we investigated the status of LOX-1 expression in bmMSCs and its function on bmMSC proliferation. Our results showed that primary bmMSCs exhibiting a typical fibroblast-like morphology are positive for CD44 and CD90, but negative for CD34 and CD45. LOX-1 in both mRNA and protein levels is highly expressed in bmMSCs. Meanwhile, bmMSCs exhibit a strong potential to take up ox-LDL. Moreover, LOX-1 expression in bmMSCs is upregulated by ox-LDL with a dose- and time-dependent manner. Presence of ox-LDL also enhances the proliferation of bmMSCs. Knockdown of LOX-1 expression significantly inhibits ox-LDL-induced bmMSC proliferation. These findings indicate that LOX-1 plays a role in bmMSC proliferation. - Highlights: ► LOX-1 expresses in bmMSCs and mediates uptake of ox-LDL. ► Ox-LDL stimulates upregulation of LOX-1 in bmMSCs. ► Ox-LDL promotes bmMSC proliferation and expression of Mdm2, phosphor-Akt, phosphor-ERK1/2 and phosphor-NF-κB. ► LOX-1 siRNA inhibits ox-LDL-induced bmMSC proliferation and expression cell survival signals

  3. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 expresses in mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and stimulates their proliferation

    Zhang, Fenxi [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Stem Cell and Biotheraphy Technology Research Center, College of Lifescience and Technology, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Wang, Congrui [Stem Cell and Biotheraphy Technology Research Center, College of Lifescience and Technology, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Jing, Suhua [ICU Center, The Third Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Ren, Tongming [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Li, Yonghai; Cao, Yulin [Stem Cell and Biotheraphy Technology Research Center, College of Lifescience and Technology, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Lin, Juntang, E-mail: juntang.lin@googlemail.com [Stem Cell and Biotheraphy Technology Research Center, College of Lifescience and Technology, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003 (China)

    2013-04-15

    The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) have been widely used in cell transplant therapy, and the proliferative ability of bmMSCs is one of the determinants of the therapy efficiency. Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) as a transmembrane protein is responsible for binding, internalizing and degrading oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). It has been identified that LOX-1 is expressed in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and monocytes. In these cells, low concentration of ox-LDL (<40 μg/mL) stimulates their proliferation via LOX-1 activation. However, it is poor understood that whether LOX-1 is expressed in bmMSCs and which role it plays. In this study, we investigated the status of LOX-1 expression in bmMSCs and its function on bmMSC proliferation. Our results showed that primary bmMSCs exhibiting a typical fibroblast-like morphology are positive for CD44 and CD90, but negative for CD34 and CD45. LOX-1 in both mRNA and protein levels is highly expressed in bmMSCs. Meanwhile, bmMSCs exhibit a strong potential to take up ox-LDL. Moreover, LOX-1 expression in bmMSCs is upregulated by ox-LDL with a dose- and time-dependent manner. Presence of ox-LDL also enhances the proliferation of bmMSCs. Knockdown of LOX-1 expression significantly inhibits ox-LDL-induced bmMSC proliferation. These findings indicate that LOX-1 plays a role in bmMSC proliferation. - Highlights: ► LOX-1 expresses in bmMSCs and mediates uptake of ox-LDL. ► Ox-LDL stimulates upregulation of LOX-1 in bmMSCs. ► Ox-LDL promotes bmMSC proliferation and expression of Mdm2, phosphor-Akt, phosphor-ERK1/2 and phosphor-NF-κB. ► LOX-1 siRNA inhibits ox-LDL-induced bmMSC proliferation and expression cell survival signals.

  4. Investigating the Role of TNF-α and IFN-γ Activation on the Dynamics of iNOS Gene Expression in LPS Stimulated Macrophages.

    Taha Salim

    Full Text Available Macrophage produced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS is known to play a critical role in the proinflammatory response against intracellular pathogens by promoting the generation of bactericidal reactive nitrogen species. Robust and timely production of nitric oxide (NO by iNOS and analogous production of reactive oxygen species are critical components of an effective immune response. In addition to pathogen associated lipopolysaccharides (LPS, iNOS gene expression is dependent on numerous proinflammatory cytokines in the cellular microenvironment of the macrophage, two of which include interferon gamma (IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. To understand the synergistic effect of IFN-γ and TNF-α activation, and LPS stimulation on iNOS expression dynamics and NO production, we developed a systems biology based mathematical model. Using our model, we investigated the impact of pre-infection cytokine exposure, or priming, on the system. We explored the essentiality of IFN-γ priming to the robustness of initial proinflammatory response with respect to the ability of macrophages to produce reactive species needed for pathogen clearance. Results from our theoretical studies indicated that IFN-γ and subsequent activation of IRF1 are essential in consequential production of iNOS upon LPS stimulation. We showed that IFN-γ priming at low concentrations greatly increases the effector response of macrophages against intracellular pathogens. Ultimately the model demonstrated that although TNF-α contributed towards a more rapid response time, measured as time to reach maximum iNOS production, IFN-γ stimulation was significantly more significant in terms of the maximum expression of iNOS and the concentration of NO produced.

  5. Investigating the Role of TNF-α and IFN-γ Activation on the Dynamics of iNOS Gene Expression in LPS Stimulated Macrophages.

    Salim, Taha; Sershen, Cheryl L; May, Elebeoba E

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage produced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is known to play a critical role in the proinflammatory response against intracellular pathogens by promoting the generation of bactericidal reactive nitrogen species. Robust and timely production of nitric oxide (NO) by iNOS and analogous production of reactive oxygen species are critical components of an effective immune response. In addition to pathogen associated lipopolysaccharides (LPS), iNOS gene expression is dependent on numerous proinflammatory cytokines in the cellular microenvironment of the macrophage, two of which include interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). To understand the synergistic effect of IFN-γ and TNF-α activation, and LPS stimulation on iNOS expression dynamics and NO production, we developed a systems biology based mathematical model. Using our model, we investigated the impact of pre-infection cytokine exposure, or priming, on the system. We explored the essentiality of IFN-γ priming to the robustness of initial proinflammatory response with respect to the ability of macrophages to produce reactive species needed for pathogen clearance. Results from our theoretical studies indicated that IFN-γ and subsequent activation of IRF1 are essential in consequential production of iNOS upon LPS stimulation. We showed that IFN-γ priming at low concentrations greatly increases the effector response of macrophages against intracellular pathogens. Ultimately the model demonstrated that although TNF-α contributed towards a more rapid response time, measured as time to reach maximum iNOS production, IFN-γ stimulation was significantly more significant in terms of the maximum expression of iNOS and the concentration of NO produced.

  6. Reduction in cortical parvalbumin expression due to intermittent theta-burst stimulation correlates with maturation of the perineuronal nets in young rats.

    Mix, Annika; Hoppenrath, Kathrin; Funke, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) using transcranial magnetic stimulation strongly reduces the number of rat neocortical interneurons expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) and parvalbumin (PV), indicating changed activity of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. In advance of in vitro studies intended to characterize changes in electrical properties of FS interneurons under these conditions, we tested whether the iTBS effect is age-dependent. Conscious Sprague-Dawley rats aged between 28 and 90 days received three blocks of iTBS at 15 min intervals. We found that iTBS-related reduction in PV+ cells was absent up to an age of 32 days, then gradually increased, and approached a maximum of about 40% reduction at an age of about 40 days. The relative number of cells expressing PV (PV+, 8-9%) did not change with age in sham-controls and also the increase in cortical c-Fos expression induced by iTBS was not principally age-dependent. However, a prominent growth of the perineuronal nets, typically surrounding the PV+ cells, exactly paralleled the increase in the iTBS effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that the functional development of the inhibitory network of PV+ interneurons with regard to intracortical synaptic connectivity is not sufficiently matured in rats younger than 35 d to enable activity-dependent modifications during iTBS. Outgrowth of the perineuronal nets and associated maturation of excitatory cortical inputs, as is characteristic for the critical cortical period, may take place before PV+ interneurons can be sufficiently activated via repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, allowing plastic changes of molecular phenotype and likely also synaptic plasticity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cyclophilin B attenuates the expression of TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through the induction of B cell lymphoma-3.

    Marcant, Adeline; Denys, Agnès; Melchior, Aurélie; Martinez, Pierre; Deligny, Audrey; Carpentier, Mathieu; Allain, Fabrice

    2012-08-15

    Extracellular cyclophilin A (CyPA) and CyPB have been well described as chemotactic factors for various leukocyte subsets, suggesting their contribution to inflammatory responses. Unlike CyPA, CyPB accumulates in extracellular matrixes, from which it is released by inflammatory proteases. Hence, we hypothesized that it could participate in tissue inflammation by regulating the activity of macrophages. In the current study, we confirmed that CyPB initiated in vitro migration of macrophages, but it did not induce production of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, pretreatment of macrophages with CyPB attenuated the expression of inflammatory mediators induced by LPS stimulation. The expression of TNF-α mRNA was strongly reduced after exposure to CyPB, but it was not accompanied by significant modification in LPS-induced activation of MAPK and NF-κB pathways. LPS activation of a reporter gene under the control of TNF-α gene promoter was also markedly decreased in cells treated with CyPB, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism of inhibition. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that CyPB induced the expression of B cell lymphoma-3 (Bcl-3), which was accompanied by a decrease in the binding of NF-κB p65 to the TNF-α promoter. As expected, interfering with the expression of Bcl-3 restored cell responsiveness to LPS, thus confirming that CyPB acted by inhibiting initiation of TNF-α gene transcription. Finally, we found that CyPA was not efficient in attenuating the production of TNF-α from LPS-stimulated macrophages, which seemed to be due to a modest induction of Bcl-3 expression. Collectively, these findings suggest an unexpected role for CyPB in attenuation of the responses of proinflammatory macrophages.

  8. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) has been previously produced in tobacco cell suspension cultures. However, the amount of hGM-CSF accumulated in the culture medium dropped quickly from its maximum of 150 microg/L at 5 d after incubation. To overcome...... of recombinant hGM-CSF in transgenic rice cell suspension culture and protease activity of this culture medium was low compared to that of tobacco culture system....

  9. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modifies the expression of vesicular glutamate transporters in basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Favier, Mathieu; Carcenac, Carole; Drui, Guillaume; Boulet, Sabrina; El Mestikawy, Salah; Savasta, Marc

    2013-12-05

    It has been suggested that glutamatergic system hyperactivity may be related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) import glutamate into synaptic vesicles and are key anatomical and functional markers of glutamatergic excitatory transmission. Both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 have been identified as definitive markers of glutamatergic neurons, but VGLUT 3 is also expressed by non glutamatergic neurons. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are thought to be expressed in a complementary manner in the cortex and the thalamus (VL/VM), in glutamatergic neurons involved in different physiological functions. Chronic high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is the neurosurgical therapy of choice for the management of motor deficits in patients with advanced PD. STN-HFS is highly effective, but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. This study examines the effect of STN-HFS on VGLUT1-3 expression in different brain nuclei involved in motor circuits, namely the basal ganglia (BG) network, in normal and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats. Here we report that: 1) Dopamine(DA)-depletion did not affect VGLUT1 and VGLUT3 expression but significantly decreased that of VGLUT2 in almost all BG structures studied; 2) STN-HFS did not change VGLUT1-3 expression in the different brain areas of normal rats while, on the contrary, it systematically induced a significant increase of their expression in DA-depleted rats and 3) STN-HFS reversed the decrease in VGLUT2 expression induced by the DA-depletion. These results show for the first time a comparative analysis of changes of expression for the three VGLUTs induced by STN-HFS in the BG network of normal and hemiparkinsonian rats. They provide evidence for the involvement of VGLUT2 in the modulation of BG cicuits and in particular that of thalamostriatal and thalamocortical pathways suggesting their key role in its therapeutic effects for alleviating PD motor symptoms.

  10. High Expression of Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor Associates with Unfavorable Cancer-Specific Survival of Patients with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Yang, Liu; Liu, Yidong; An, Huimin; Chang, Yuan; Zhang, Weijuan; Zhu, Yu; Xu, Le; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-03-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R), a single-pass type III transmembrane tyrosine-protein kinase, is mainly involved in inflammation and immune regulation to facilitate the progression of solid tumors. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of CSF-1R expression on clinical outcome of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) after surgery. We retrospectively enrolled 268 patients with ccRCC undergoing nephrectomy between 2001 and 2004. Clinicopathologic features and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were collected. Western blot analysis was performed in the pairwise comparisons of CSF-1R expression in peritumor and tumor tissues of patients with ccRCC. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to determine CSF-1R expression level in tumor specimens. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the impact of prognostic factors on CSS. A concordance index was calculated to measure prognostic accuracy. A prognostic nomogram was constructed on the basis of the identified independent prognostic factors. CSF-1R expression in tumor tissues was higher than in peritumor tissues in 71.4% (5 of 7) patients. CSF-1R expression of tumor tissues was positively associated with metastasis, tumor, node, metastasis classification system (TNM) stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score and poor CSS. CSF-1R expression was determined as an independent prognostic factor for CSS in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, extension of the well-established prognostic models with CSF-1R expression presented significantly improved prognostic accuracy. An efficient prognostic nomogram was constructed on the basis of the independent prognostic factors. High CSF-1R expression is a potential independent adverse prognostic factor for CSS in patients with ccRCC.

  11. Inhibition of acrolein-stimulated MUC5AC expression by Platycodon grandiflorum root-derived saponin in A549 cells.

    Choi, Jae Ho; Hwang, Yong Pil; Han, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Park, Bong Hwan; Lee, Hyun Sun; Park, Byung Keun; Lee, Young Chun; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-09-01

    Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of chronic airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this study, we investigated the inhibition of acrolein-induced expression of mucin 5, subtypes A and C (MUC5AC) by Changkil saponin (CKS) in A549 cells. Acrolein, a known toxin in tobacco smoke and an endogenous mediator of oxidative stress, increases the expression of airway MUC5AC, a major component of airway mucus. CKS, a Platycodon grandiflorum root-derived saponin, inhibited acrolein-induced MUC5AC expression and activity, through the suppression of NF-κB activation. CKS also repressed acrolein-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38MAPK, which are upstream signaling molecules that control MUC5AC expression. In addition, the MAPK inhibitors PD98059 (ERK1/2), SP600125 (JNK1/2), and SB203580 (p38 MAPK), and a PKC delta inhibitor (rottlerin; PKCδ) inhibited acrolein-induced MUC5AC expression and activity. CKS repressed acrolein-induced phosphorylation of PKCδ. Moreover, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor, N-acetylcysteine, inhibited acrolein-induced MUC5AC expression and activity through the suppression of PKCδ and MAPK activation, and CKS repressed acrolein-induced ROS production. These results suggest that CKS suppresses acrolein-induced MUC5AC expression by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB via ROS-PKCδ-MAPK signaling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MicroRNA-302a suppresses influenza A virus-stimulated interferon regulatory factor-5 expression and cytokine storm induction.

    Chen, Xueyuan; Zhou, Li; Peng, Nanfang; Yu, Haisheng; Li, Mengqi; Cao, Zhongying; Lin, Yong; Wang, Xueyu; Li, Qian; Wang, Jun; She, Yinglong; Zhu, Chengliang; Lu, Mengji; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Shi

    2017-12-29

    During influenza A virus (IAV) infection, cytokine storms play a vital and critical role in clinical outcomes. We have previously reported that microRNA (miR)-302c regulates IAV-induced IFN expression by targeting the 3'-UTR of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-inducing kinase. In the current study, we found that miR-302a, another member of the miR-302 cluster, controls the IAV-induced cytokine storm. According to results from cell-based and knockout mouse models, IAV induces a cytokine storm via interferon regulatory factor-5 (IRF-5). We also found that IAV infection up-regulates IRF-5 expression and that IRF-5 in turn promotes IAV replication. Furthermore, we observed that IRF-5 is a direct target of miR-302a, which down-regulated IRF-5 expression by binding its 3'-UTR. Moreover, IAV increased IRF-5 expression by down-regulating miR-302a expression. Interestingly, miR-302a inhibited IAV replication. In IAV-infected patients, miR-302a expression was down-regulated, whereas IRF-5 expression was up-regulated. Taken together, our work uncovers and defines a signaling pathway implicated in an IAV-induced cytokine storm. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. A Study of the Differential Effects of Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) on Gene Expression Profiles of Stimulated Thp-1 Macrophages.

    Allam-Ndoul, Bénédicte; Guénard, Frédéric; Barbier, Olivier; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2017-04-25

    Background: An appropriate intake of omega-3 ( n -3) fatty acids (FAs) such as eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA/DHA) from marine sources is known to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, molecular mechanisms underlying their beneficial effects on health are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to characterize gene expression profiles of THP-1 macrophages, incubated in either EPA or DHA and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a pro-inflammatory agent. Methods: THP-1 macrophages were incubated into 10, 50 and 75 µM of EPA or DHA for 24 h, and 100 nM of LPS was added to the culture media for 18 h. Total mRNA was extracted and gene expression examined by microarray analysis using Illumina Human HT-12 expression beadchips (Illumina). Results: Pathway analysis revealed that EPA and DHA regulate genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, immune response and inflammation, oxidative stress and cancer pathways in a differential and dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: EPA and DHA appear to exert differential effects on gene expression in THP-1 macrophages. Specific effects of n -3 FAs on gene expression levels are also dose-dependent.

  14. Long-time treatment by low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine enhances proinflammatory cytokine expressions in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Tomokazu Ohnishi

    Full Text Available N-acetyl-L-cysteine is known to act as a reactive oxygen species scavenger and used in clinical applications. Previous reports have shown that high-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment inhibits the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in activated macrophages. Here, we have found that long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low-concentration increases phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT, which are essential for the induction of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment decreases expressions of protein phosphatases, catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase-2A and dual specificity phosphatase 1. On the other hand, we have found that short-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low dose increases p53 expression, which inhibits expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. These observations suggest that long-time low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment increases expressions of proinflammatory cytokines through enhancement of kinase phosphorylation.

  15. Stimulation of nuclear receptor REV-ERBs regulates tumor necrosis factor-induced expression of proinflammatory molecules in C6 astroglial cells

    Morioka, Norimitsu, E-mail: mnori@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Tomori, Mizuki; Zhang, Fang Fang; Saeki, Munenori; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-08

    Under physiological conditions, astrocytes maintain homeostasis in the CNS. Following inflammation and injury to the CNS, however, activated astrocytes produce neurotoxic molecules such as cytokines and chemokines, amplifying the initial molecular-cellular events evoked by inflammation and injury. Nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ (REV-ERBs) are crucial in the regulation of inflammation- and metabolism-related gene transcription. The current study sought to elucidate a role of REV-ERBs in rat C6 astroglial cells on the expression of inflammatory molecules following stimulation with the neuroinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Stimulation of C6 cells with TNF (10 ng/ml) significantly increased the mRNA expression of CCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9, but not fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and MMP-2. Treatment with either REV-ERB agonists GSK4112 or SR9009 significantly blocked TNF-induced upregulation of CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA, but not IL-6 mRNA and iNOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with RGFP966, a selective histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibitor, potently reversed the inhibitory effects of GSK4112 on TNF-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA, but not CCL2 mRNA. Expression of Rev-erbs mRNA in C6 astroglial cells, primary cultured rat cortical and spinal astrocytes was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Together, the findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating of MMP-9 and CCL2 transcription, of astroglial REV-ERBs activation through HDAC3-dependent and HDAC3-independent mechanisms. - Highlights: • Rev-erbα mRNA and Rev-erbβ mRNA are expressed in C6 astroglial cells. • TNF increases the expression of CCL2, IL-6, MMP-9 and iNOS mRNA. • REV-ERB activation inhibits CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA expression. • HDAC3 activity is involved in the inhibitory effect of REV-ERB on MMP-9 induction.

  16. Stimulation of nuclear receptor REV-ERBs regulates tumor necrosis factor-induced expression of proinflammatory molecules in C6 astroglial cells

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Tomori, Mizuki; Zhang, Fang Fang; Saeki, Munenori; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, astrocytes maintain homeostasis in the CNS. Following inflammation and injury to the CNS, however, activated astrocytes produce neurotoxic molecules such as cytokines and chemokines, amplifying the initial molecular-cellular events evoked by inflammation and injury. Nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ (REV-ERBs) are crucial in the regulation of inflammation- and metabolism-related gene transcription. The current study sought to elucidate a role of REV-ERBs in rat C6 astroglial cells on the expression of inflammatory molecules following stimulation with the neuroinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Stimulation of C6 cells with TNF (10 ng/ml) significantly increased the mRNA expression of CCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9, but not fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and MMP-2. Treatment with either REV-ERB agonists GSK4112 or SR9009 significantly blocked TNF-induced upregulation of CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA, but not IL-6 mRNA and iNOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with RGFP966, a selective histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibitor, potently reversed the inhibitory effects of GSK4112 on TNF-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA, but not CCL2 mRNA. Expression of Rev-erbs mRNA in C6 astroglial cells, primary cultured rat cortical and spinal astrocytes was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Together, the findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating of MMP-9 and CCL2 transcription, of astroglial REV-ERBs activation through HDAC3-dependent and HDAC3-independent mechanisms. - Highlights: • Rev-erbα mRNA and Rev-erbβ mRNA are expressed in C6 astroglial cells. • TNF increases the expression of CCL2, IL-6, MMP-9 and iNOS mRNA. • REV-ERB activation inhibits CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA expression. • HDAC3 activity is involved in the inhibitory effect of REV-ERB on MMP-9 induction.

  17. Stimulation of Na+/K+ ATPase activity and Na+ coupled glucose transport by β-catenin

    Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Wilmes, Jan; Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Lam, Rebecca S.; Koutsouki, Evgenia; Jakupi, Muharrem; Foeller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The oncogenic transcription factor β-catenin stimulates the Na + /K + -ATPase. → β-Catenin stimulates SGLT1 dependent Na + , glucose cotransport. → The effects are independent of transcription. → β-Catenin sensitive transport may contribute to properties of proliferating cells. -- Abstract: β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein stimulating as oncogenic transcription factor several genes important for cell proliferation. β-Catenin-regulated genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which is known to stimulate a variety of transport systems. The present study explored the possibility that β-catenin influences membrane transport. To this end, β-catenin was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGLT1 and electrogenic transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. As a result, expression of β-catenin significantly enhanced the ouabain-sensitive current of the endogeneous Na + /K + -ATPase. Inhibition of vesicle trafficking by brefeldin A revealed that the stimulatory effect of β-catenin on the endogenous Na + /K + -ATPase was not due to enhanced stability of the pump protein in the cell membrane. Expression of β-catenin further enhanced glucose-induced current (Ig) in SGLT1-expressing oocytes. In the absence of SGLT1 Ig was negligible irrespective of β-catenin expression. The stimulating effect of β-catenin on both Na + /K + ATPase and SGLT1 activity was observed even in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. The experiments disclose a completely novel function of β-catenin, i.e. the regulation of transport.

  18. Glucocorticoid suppression of human lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Influence of phytohemagglutinin concentration

    Segel, G.B.; Lukacher, A.; Gordon, B.R.; Lichtman, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to suppress lectin-stimulated lymphocyte DNA synthesis in some studies, whereas in other studies, the hormones have had little effect. We have found that the position on the PHA dose-response curve that is studied is the most important determinant of whether cortisol inhibits 3 H-thymidine incorporation into lymphocyte DNA. The proportion of monocytes in culture also influenced the cortisol effect, but it was quantitatively less important than PHA concentration. Cortisol (5 nM to 100 μM) had little effect on blastogenesis or thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures that contained both a high concentration (14% +- 2 (S.E.)) of monocytes and a concentration of PHA (0.6 to 1.2 μg/ml) that produced maximal stimulation of mitogenesis. When monocytes were reduced from 14 to 1.4%, cortisol (5 μM) caused a 30% reduction in thymidine incorporation in cultures stimulated by 0.6 to 1.2 μg/ml PHA. Much greater cortisol suppression of thymidine incorporation occurred if the concentration of PHA was reduced. For example, reduction of the PHA concentration from 1.2 to 0.075 μg/ml resulted in an increase in suppression by 5 μM cortisol from 5 to 90% even in the presence of 14% monocytes. These data indicate that the suppressive effects of glucocorticoids on blastogenesis and thymidine incorporation in vitro depend principally on the concentration of PHA used to stimulate blastogenesis and secondarily on the proportion of monocytes in the culture system