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Sample records for glucocorticoid exposure alters

  1. Prenatal arsenic exposure alters the programming of the glucocorticoid signaling system during embryonic development

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    Caldwell, Katharine E.; Labrecque, Matthew T.; Solomon, Benjamin R.; Ali, Abdulmehdi; Allan, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid system, which plays a critical role in a host of cellular functions including mood disorders and learning and memory, has been reported to be disrupted by arsenic. In previous work we have developed and characterized a prenatal moderate arsenic exposure (50 ppb) model and identified several deficits in learning and memory and mood disorders, as well as alterations within the glucocorticoid receptor signaling system in the adolescent mouse. In these present studies we assessed the effects of arsenic on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) pathway in both the placenta and the fetal brain in response at two critical periods, embryonic days 14 and 18. The focus of these studies was on the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2) which play a key role in glucorticoid synthesis, as well as the expression and set point of the GR negative feedback regulation. Negative feedback regulation is established early in development. At E14 we found arsenic exposure significantly decreased expression of both protein and message in brain of GR and the 11β-HSD1, while 11β-HSD2 enzyme protein levels were increased but mRNA levels were decreased in the brain. These changes in brain protein continued into the E18 time point, but mRNA levels were no longer significantly altered. Placental HSD11B2 mRNA was not altered by arsenic treatment but protein levels were elevated at E14. GR placental protein levels were decreased at E18 in the arsenic exposed condition. This suggests that arsenic exposure may alter GR expression levels as a consequence of a prolonged developmental imbalance between 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 protein expression despite decreased 11HSDB2 mRNA. The suppression of GR and the failure to turn down 11β-HSD2 protein expression during fetal development may lead to an altered set point for GR signaling throughout adulthood. To our knowledge, these studies are the first to demonstrate that gestational exposure to moderate levels of

  2. Prenatal glucocorticoid exposure in the sheep alters renal development in utero: implications for adult renal function and blood pressure control.

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    Moritz, Karen M; De Matteo, Robert; Dodic, Miodrag; Jefferies, Andrew J; Arena, Debbie; Wintour, E Marelyn; Probyn, Megan E; Bertram, John F; Singh, Reetu R; Zanini, Simone; Evans, Roger G

    2011-08-01

    Treatment of the pregnant ewe with glucocorticoids early in pregnancy results in offspring with hypertension. This study examined whether glucocorticoids can reduce nephron formation or alter gene expression for sodium channels in the late gestation fetus. Sodium channel expression was also examined in 2-mo-old lambs, while arterial pressure and renal function was examined in adult female offspring before and during 6 wk of increased dietary salt intake. Pregnant ewes were treated with saline (SAL), dexamethasone (DEX; 0.48 mg/h) or cortisol (CORT; 5 mg/h) over days 26-28 of gestation (term = 150 days). At 140 days of gestation, glomerular number in CORT and DEX animals was 40 and 25% less, respectively, compared with SAL controls. Real-time PCR showed greater gene expression for the epithelial sodium channel (α-, β-, γ-subunits) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (α-, β-, γ-subunits) in both the DEX and CORT group fetal kidneys compared with the SAL group with some of these changes persisting in 2-mo-old female offspring. In adulthood, sheep treated with dexamethasone or cortisol in utero had elevated arterial pressure and an apparent increase in single nephron glomerular filtration rate, but global renal hemodynamics and excretory function were normal and arterial pressure was not salt sensitive. Our findings show that the nephron-deficit in sheep exposed to glucocorticoids in utero is acquired before birth, so it is a potential cause, rather than a consequence, of their elevated arterial pressure in adulthood. Upregulation of sodium channels in these animals could provide a mechanistic link to sustained increases in arterial pressure in cortisol- and dexamethasone-exposed sheep, since it would be expected to promote salt and water retention during the postnatal period.

  3. Mid-Childhood Bone Mass After Exposure to Repeat Doses of Antenatal Glucocorticoids: A Randomized Trial.

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    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of women at risk for preterm birth with repeat doses of glucocorticoids reduces neonatal morbidity, but could have adverse effects on skeletal development. We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone alters bone mass in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial of Repeat Doses of Corticosteroids. Women were randomized to a single dose of betamethasone or placebo, ≥7 days after an initial course of glucocorticoids, repeated each week that they remained at risk for preterm birth at glucocorticoids does not alter bone mass in mid-childhood. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Perinatal high fat diet alters glucocorticoid signaling and anxiety behavior in adulthood.

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    Sasaki, A; de Vega, W C; St-Cyr, S; Pan, P; McGowan, P O

    2013-06-14

    Maternal obesity carries significant health risks for offspring that manifest later in life, including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and affective disorders. Programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during development mediates both metabolic homeostasis and the response to psychosocial stress in offspring. A diet high in fat alters maternal systemic corticosterone levels, but effects in offspring on limbic brain areas regulating the HPA axis and anxiety behavior are poorly understood. In addition to their role in the response to psychosocial stress, corticosteroid receptors form part of the glucocorticoid signaling pathway comprising downstream inflammatory processes. Increased systemic inflammation is a hallmark of high-fat diet exposure, though altered expression of these genes in limbic brain areas has not been examined. We studied the influence of high-fat diet exposure during pre-weaning development in rats on gene expression in the amygdala and hippocampus by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), anxiety behavior in the Open field, elevated plus maze and light-dark transition tasks, and corticosterone levels in response to stress by radioimmunoassay. As adults, offspring exposed to perinatal high-fat diet show increased expression of corticosterone receptors in the amygdala and altered pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory expression in the hippocampus and amygdala in genes known to be regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor. These changes were associated with increased anxiety behavior, decreased basal corticosterone levels and a slower return to baseline levels following a stress challenge. The data indicate that the dietary environment during development programs glucocorticoid signaling pathways in limbic areas relevant for the regulation of HPA function and anxiety behavior. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Maternal high-fat diet alters anxiety behavior and glucocorticoid signaling in adolescent offspring.

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    Sasaki, A; de Vega, W; Sivanathan, S; St-Cyr, S; McGowan, P O

    2014-07-11

    Maternal obesity and overconsumption of saturated fats during pregnancy have profound effects on offspring health, ranging from metabolic to behavioral disorders in later life. The influence of high-fat diet (HFD) exposure on the development of brain regions implicated in anxiety behavior is not well understood. We previously found that maternal HFD exposure is associated with an increase in anxiety behavior and alterations in the expression of several genes involved in inflammation via the glucocorticoid signaling pathway in adult rat offspring. During adolescence, the maturation of feedback systems mediating corticosteroid sensitivity is incomplete, and therefore distinct from adulthood. In this study, we examined the influence of maternal HFD on several measures of anxiety behavior and gene expression in adolescent offspring. We examined the expression of corticosteroid receptors and related inflammatory processes, as corticosteroid receptors are known to regulate circulating corticosterone levels during basal and stress conditions in addition to influencing inflammatory processes in the hippocampus and amygdala. We found that adolescent animals perinatally exposed to HFD generally showed decreased anxiety behavior accompanied by a selective alteration in the expression of the glucocorticoid receptor and several downstream inflammatory genes in the hippocampus and amygdala. These data suggest that adolescence constitutes an additional period when the effects of developmental programming may modify mental health trajectories. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetics of glucocorticoid exposure in developing zebrafish: A tracer study.

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    Steenbergen, Peter Johannes; Bardine, Nabila; Sharif, Faiza

    2017-09-01

    In the current study the dynamics of glucocorticoid uptake by zebrafish chorionated embryos from the surrounding medium were studied, using 2.5 μM cortisol or dexamethasone solutions complemented with their tritiated variant. We measured the uptake of radioactive cortisol by embryos during a 1 h submersion. Interestingly, the signal in chorionated embryos was 85% (exposure: 1-2 hpf) or 78% (exposure: 48-49 hpf) of the signal present in an equal volume medium. By comparing embryos measured without chorion, we found that 18-20% of the radioactivity present in chorionated embryos is actually bound to the chorion or located in the perivitelline space. Consequently, embryonic tissue contains radioactivity levels of 60% of a similar volume of medium after 1 h incubation. During early developmental stages (1-48 hpf) exposure of more than 24 h in cortisol was needed to achieve radioactivity levels similar to an equal volume of medium within the embryonic tissue and more than 48 h for dexamethasone. In glucocorticoid-free medium, radioactivity dropped rapidly below 10% for both glucocorticoids, suggesting that the major portion of the embryonic radioactivity was a result of simple diffusion. During later developmental stages (48-96 hpf) initial uptake dynamics were similar, but showed a decrease of tissue radioactivity to 20% of an equal volume of medium after hatching, probably due to development and activation of the hypothalamic pituitary interrenal axis. Uptake is dependent on the developmental stage of the embryo. Furthermore, the presence of the chorion during exposure should be taken into account even when small lipophilic molecules are being tested. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Glucocorticoid augmentation of prolonged exposure therapy: rationale and case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pratchett

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Prolonged exposure (PE therapy has been found to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; however, it is difficult for many patients to engage fully in the obligatory retelling of their traumatic experiences. This problem is compounded by the fact that habituation and cognitive restructuring – the main mechanisms through which PE is hypothesized to work – are not instantaneous processes, and often require several weeks before the distress associated with imaginal exposure abates. Case reports: Two cases are described that respectively illustrate the use of hydrocortisone and placebo, in combination with PE, for the treatment of combat-related PTSD. Based on known effects of glucocorticoids on learning and memory performance, we hypothesized that augmentation with hydrocortisone would improve the therapeutic effects of PE by hastening “new” learning and facilitating decreases in the emotional impact of fear memories during the course of treatment. The veteran receiving hydrocortisone augmentation of PE displayed an accelerated and ultimately greater decline in PTSD symptoms than the veteran receiving placebo. Conclusions: While no general conclusion can be derived from comparison of two patients, the findings are consistent with the rationale for augmentation. These case reports support the potential for an appropriately designed and powered clinical trial to examine the efficacy of glucocorticoids in augmenting the effects of psychotherapy for PTSD.

  8. Maternal distress in late pregnancy alters obstetric outcomes and the expression of genes important for placental glucocorticoid signalling.

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    Togher, Katie L; Treacy, Eimear; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Kenny, Louise C

    2017-09-01

    The experience of maternal distress in pregnancy is often linked with poorer obstetric outcomes for women as well as adverse outcomes for offspring. Alterations in placental glucocorticoid signalling and subsequent increased fetal exposure to cortisol have been suggested to underlie this relationship. In the current study, 121 pregnant women completed the Perceived Stress Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in the third trimester of pregnancy. Placental samples were collected after delivery. Maternal history of psychiatric illness and miscarriage were significant predictors of poorer mental health in pregnancy. Higher anxiety was associated with an increase in women delivering via elective Caesarean Section, and an increase in bottle-feeding. Birth temperature was mildly reduced among infants of women with high levels of depressive symptomology. Babies of mothers who scored high in all stress (cumulative distress) measures had reduced 5-min Apgar scores. High cumulative distress reduced the expression of placental HSD11B2 mRNA and increased the expression of placental NR3C1 mRNA. These data support a role for prenatal distress as a risk factor for altered obstetric outcomes. The alterations in placental gene expression support a role for altered placental glucocorticoid signalling in the relationship between maternal prenatal distress and adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Altered placental development in undernourished rats: role of maternal glucocorticoids

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    Chen Chun-Hung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maternal undernutrition (MUN during pregnancy may lead to fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, which itself predisposes to adult risk of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. IUGR may stem from insufficient maternal nutrient supply or reduced placental nutrient transfer. In addition, a critical role for maternal stress-induced glucocorticoids (GCs has been suggested to contribute to both IUGR and the ensuing risk of adult metabolic syndrome. While GC-induced fetal organ defects have been examined, there have been few studies on placental responses to MUN-induced maternal stress. Therefore, we hypothesize that 50% MUN associates with increased maternal GC levels and decreased placental HSD11B. This in turn leads to decreased placental and fetal growth, hence the need to investigate nutrient transporters. We measured maternal serum levels of corticosterone, and the placental basal and labyrinth zone expression of glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B 1 (HSD11B-1 predominantly activates cortisone to cortisol and 11-dehydrocorticosterone (11-DHC to corticosterone, although can sometimes drive the opposing (inactivating reaction, and HSD11B-2 (only inactivates and converts corticosterone to 11-DHC in rodents in control and MUN rats at embryonic day 20 (E20. Moreover, we evaluated the expression of nutrient transporters for glucose (SLC2A1, SLC2A3 and amino acids (SLC38A1, 2, and 4. Our results show that MUN dams displayed significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels compared to control dams. Further, a reduction in fetal and placental weights was observed in both the mid-horn and proximal-horn positions. Notably, the placental labyrinth zone, the site of feto-maternal exchange, showed decreased expression of HSD11B1-2 in both horns, and increased HSD11B-1 in proximal-horn placentas, but no change in NR3C1. The reduced placental GCs catabolic capacity was accompanied by downregulation of SLC2A3, SLC

  10. Influence of sex and glucocorticoid exposure on preterm placental pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance.

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    Stark, M J; Hodyl, N A; Wright, I M R; Clifton, V L

    2011-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are known to influence fetal ROS production and anti-oxidant defences yet little attention has focused on the potential for effects in the placenta. We hypothesised that antenatal GC exposure alters placental pro-oxidant-anti-oxidant balance sex-specifically, based upon the known relationship between male sex and poor pregnancy outcome. Placentae were collected from 60 women who delivered between 24 and 31 completed weeks gestation and placental oxidative and nitrative stress (protein carbonyl, lipid hydroperoxide, and nitrotyrosine concentration) and anti-oxidant enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidase, thioredoxin reductase, and superoxide dismutase) measured. A pro-oxidant state was observed in placentae of male compared to female infants born within 72 h of antenatal GC exposure, with higher levels of protein carbonyl content (p = 0.04), lipid hydroperoxide (p pro-oxidant state continued to be observed in placentae of males compared to females born outside of 72 h, with higher protein carbonyl content (p = 0.04) and lower glutathione peroxidase activity (p = 0.01) than females, however no differences in placental lipid hydroperoxide and nitrotyrosine content were observed. These sex-specific alterations in products of placental oxidative stress could not purely be explained by differences in clinical illness severity (CRIB2 score). Therefore, these sex-specific alterations in placental pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance in response to antenatal betamethasone exposure, independent of illness severity, could contribute to the patho-physiologic processes underlying oxygen radical diseases of the newborn, conditions known to exhibit a male excess. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucocorticoids enhance in vivo exposure-based therapy of spider phobia.

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    Soravia, Leila M; Heinrichs, Markus; Winzeler, Livia; Fisler, Melanie; Schmitt, Wolfgang; Horn, Helge; Dierks, Thomas; Strik, Werner; Hofmann, Stefan G; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2014-05-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies indicate that the administration of glucocorticoids may promote fear extinction processes. In particular, it has been shown that glucocorticoids enhance virtual reality based exposure therapy of fear of heights. Here, we investigate whether glucocorticoids enhance the outcome of in vivo exposure-based group therapy of spider phobia. In a double blind, block-randomized, placebo-controlled, between-subject study design, 22 patients with specific phobia of spiders were treated with two sessions of in vivo exposure-based group therapy. Cortisol (20 mg) or placebo was orally administered 1 hr before each therapy session. Patients returned for a follow-up assessment one month after therapy. Exposure-based group therapy led to a significant decrease in phobic symptoms as assessed with the Fear of Spiders Questionnaire (FSQ) from pretreatment to immediate posttreatment and to follow-up. The administration of cortisol to exposure therapy resulted in increased salivary cortisol concentrations and a significantly greater reduction in fear of spiders (FSQ) as compared to placebo at follow-up, but not immediately posttreatment. Furthermore, cortisol-treated patients reported significantly less anxiety during standardized exposure to living spiders at follow-up than placebo-treated subjects. Notably, groups did not differ in phobia-unrelated state-anxiety before and after the exposure sessions and at follow-up. These findings indicate that adding cortisol to in vivo exposure-based group therapy of spider phobia enhances treatment outcome. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects of nicotine exposure in oral contraceptive-induced insulin resistance are glucocorticoid-independent.

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    Olatunji, Lawrence Aderemi; Michael, Olugbenga Samuel; Adeyanju, Oluwaseun Aremu; Areola, Emmanuel Damilare; Soladoye, Ayodele Olufemi

    2017-06-01

    Reports showed that estrogen-progestin oral contraceptive (COC) or tobacco smoking causes increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in premenopausal women. Studies also suggest that nicotine, a major tobacco alkaloid, may worsen or improve atherothrombotic CVD. Altered hemorheology, prothrombotic and pro-inflammatory biomarkers, have been implicated in the development of atherothrombotic CVD events. However, the effect of non-smoking nicotine exposure on these biomarkers during COC treatment is not yet established. We therefore sought to determine the effects of nicotine exposure during COC treatment on these biomarkers, and also tested the hypothesis that the nicotine effects would be glucocorticoid-dependent. Female Sprague-Dawley rats aged 10 weeks were given (po) vehicle, low-dose nicotine (0.1mg/kg) or high-dose nicotine (1.0mg/kg) with or without COC steroids (5.0μg/kg ethinylestradiol and 25.0μg/kg levonorgestrel) daily for 6 weeks. COC treatment or nicotine exposure led to increased insulin resistance (IR), hemorheological (blood viscosity, hematocrit and plasma viscosity), prothrombotic (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1), pro-inflammatory (uric acid, C-reactive protein, neutrophil/lymphocyte and platelet/lymphocyte ratios) biomarkers and corticosterone. However, these effects except that on corticosterone were abrogated by nicotine exposure during COC treatment. Our study indicates that nicotine- or COC-induced IR may be mediated via inflammatory/thrombotic pathway. The results imply that nicotine exposure could impact negatively on atherothrombotic biomarkers in COC non-users, whereas the impact in COC users could be positive. The results also suggest that the anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic and blood viscosity-lowering effects of nicotine exposure during COC use is circulating glucocorticoid-independent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  13. Effects of formaldehyde exposure on anxiety-like and depression-like behavior, cognition, central levels of glucocorticoid receptor and tyrosine hydroxylase in mice.

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    Li, Yani; Song, Zhuoyi; Ding, Yujuan; Xin, Ye; Wu, Tong; Su, Tao; He, Rongqiao; Tai, Fadao; Lian, Zhenmin

    2016-02-01

    Formaldehyde exposure is toxic to the brains of mammals, but the mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the effects of inhaled formaldehyde on anxiety, depression, cognitive capacity and central levels of glucocorticoid receptor and tyrosine hydroxylase in mice. After exposure to 0, 1 or 2 ppm gaseous formaldehyde for one week, we measured anxiety-like behavior using open field and elevated plus-maze tests, depression-like behavior using a forced swimming test, learning and memory using novel object recognition tests, levels of glucocorticoid receptors in the hippocampus and tyrosine hydroxylase in the Arc, MPOA, ZI and VTA using immuhistochemistry. We found that inhalation of 1 ppm formaldehyde reduced levels of anxiety-like behavior. Inhalation of 2 ppm formaldehyde reduced body weight, but increased levels of depression-like behavior, impaired novel object recognition, and lowered the numbers of glucocorticoid receptor immonureactive neurons in the hippocampus and tyrosine hydroxylase immonureactive neurons in the ventral tegmental area and the zona incerta, medial preoptic area. Different concentrations of gaseous formaldehyde result in different effects on anxiety, depression-like behavior and cognition ability which may be associated with alterations in hippocampal glucocorticoid receptors and brain tyrosine hydroxylase levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Glucocorticoid exposure in preterm babies predicts saliva cortisol response to immunization at 4 months.

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    Glover, Vivette; Miles, Rachel; Matta, Simon; Modi, Neena; Stevenson, James

    2005-12-01

    Preterm babies are exposed to multiple stressors and this may have long-term effects. In particular, high levels of endogenous cortisol might have a programming effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as may administered glucocorticoids. In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis that the level of endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoid exposure during the neonatal period predicts the saliva cortisol response to immunization at 4 mo of age. We followed 45 babies born below 32 wk gestation. We showed that their concentration of plasma cortisol during the first 4 wk was 358, 314, 231, and 195 nmol/L cortisol, respectively (geometric mean). This is four to seven times higher than fetal levels at the same gestational age range. We used routine immunization at 4 mo and 12 mo as a stressor and measured the change in saliva cortisol as the stress response. Mean circulating cortisol in the first 4 wk predicted the cortisol response at 4 but not at 12 mo. Path analysis showed that birthweight for gestational age, therapeutic antenatal steroids, and therapeutic postnatal steroids also contributed to the magnitude of the saliva cortisol response at 4 mo. This provides evidence that the magnitude of glucocorticoid exposure, both endogenous and exogenous, may have an effect on later stress responses.

  15. Neuropsychology of trauma-exposure: emotional learning, stress responsivity and the glucocorticoid receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Liebscher, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    In the present dissertation the aim was to identify correlates of trauma-exposure in persons who developed symptoms of a posttraumatic stress disorder and in those who were trauma-exposed but do not suffer from PTSD as well as in persons without trauma-exposure. In the first part of the dissertation, mechanisms of context conditioning and the release of glucocorticoids by the Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis were investigated in trauma-exposed and non-exposed persons. In the second ...

  16. Islet-cell dysfunction induced by glucocorticoid treatment: potential role for altered sympathovagal balance?

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    van Raalte, Daniël H; Kwa, Kelly A A; van Genugten, Renate E; Tushuizen, Maarten E; Holst, Jens J; Deacon, Carolyn F; Karemaker, John M; Heine, Robert J; Mari, Andrea; Diamant, Michaela

    2013-04-01

    Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, dose-response intervention study was conducted in 32 healthy males (age: 21±2years; BMI: 21.9±1.7kg/m(2)). Participants were allocated to prednisolone 7.5mg once daily (n=12), prednisolone 30mg once daily (n=12), or placebo (n=8) for two weeks. Beta-cell function was measured by hyperglycemic clamp with arginine stimulation, glucagon levels were measured following a standardized meal test. We found that prednisolone treatment dose-dependently reduced C-peptide secretion following arginine stimulation on top of hyperglycemia (ASI-iAUCCP): -2.8 (-5.2;0.2) and -3.1 (-8.8; -1.0) nmolL(-1)min(-1) for prednisolone 7.5mg and prednisolone 30mg, respectively (P=0.035 vs. placebo). Fasting glucagon levels increased dose-dependently (vs. placebo; P=0.001), whereas postprandial glucagon levels were only increased by prednisolone 30mg. Changes in parasympathetic activity related with changes in fasting glucose levels (r=-0.407; P=0.03) and showed a trend towards correlation with fasting glucagon concentrations (r=-0.337; P=0.07). The change in sympathovagal balance was inversely related to ASI-iAUCCP (r=-0.365; P=0.05). We conclude that in addition to inducing insulin resistance, prednisolone treatment dose-dependently impaired islet-cell function. Altered sympathovagal balance may be related to these effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Glucocorticoids, bone and energy metabolism.

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    Cooper, Mark S; Seibel, Markus J; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to excessive levels of endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoids is associated with serious clinical features including altered body composition and the development of insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. It had been assumed that these adverse effects were mediated by direct effects of glucocorticoids on tissues such as adipose or liver. Recent studies have however indicated that these effects are, at least in part, mediated through the actions of glucocorticoids on bone and specifically the osteoblast. In mice, targeted abrogation of glucocorticoid signalling in osteoblasts significantly attenuated the changes in body composition and systemic fuel metabolism seen during glucocorticoid treatment. Heterotopic expression of osteocalcin in the liver of normal mice was also able to protect against the metabolic changes induced by glucocorticoids indicating that osteocalcin was the likely factor connecting bone osteoblasts to systemic fuel metabolism. Studies are now needed in humans to determine the extent to which glucocorticoid induced changes in body composition and systemic fuel metabolism are mediated through bone. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Bone and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. House sparrows mitigate growth effects of post-natal glucocorticoid exposure at the expense of longevity.

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    Grace, Jacquelyn K; Froud, Louise; Meillère, Alizée; Angelier, Frédéric

    2017-11-01

    Acute, short-term effects of early-life stress and associated glucocorticoid upregulation on physiology and survival are widely documented across vertebrates. However, the persistence and severity of these effects are largely unknown, especially through the adult stage and for natural systems. Here, we investigate physiological, morphological, and survival effects of post-natal glucocorticoid upregulation across the nestling, juvenile, and adult life stages in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). We manipulate circulating corticosterone concentration in wild, free-living house sparrow nestlings and monitor body size, size-corrected mass, two measures of health (hematocrit and phytohemagglutinin-induced skin swelling), and survival in a captive environment until adulthood. We find that early-life corticosterone exposure depresses nestling size-corrected mass in both sexes, with no strong effect of the treatment on body size or our two measures of health. Birds are able to compensate for negative effects of high early-life corticosterone exposure in the long-term and this effect largely disappears by the juvenile and adult stages. However, treatment has a negative effect on survival through one year of age, suggesting that long-term compensation comes at a price. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Internal exposure dynamics drive the Adverse Outcome Pathways of synthetic glucocorticoids in fish

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    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Owen, Stewart F.; Huerta, Belinda; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Kugathas, Subramanian; Barceló, Damià; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; Sumpter, John P.

    2016-02-01

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework represents a valuable conceptual tool to systematically integrate existing toxicological knowledge from a mechanistic perspective to facilitate predictions of chemical-induced effects across species. However, its application for decision-making requires the transition from qualitative to quantitative AOP (qAOP). Here we used a fish model and the synthetic glucocorticoid beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) to investigate the role of chemical-specific properties, pharmacokinetics, and internal exposure dynamics in the development of qAOPs. We generated a qAOP network based on drug plasma concentrations and focused on immunodepression, skin androgenisation, disruption of gluconeogenesis and reproductive performance. We showed that internal exposure dynamics and chemical-specific properties influence the development of qAOPs and their predictive power. Comparing the effects of two different glucocorticoids, we highlight how relatively similar in vitro hazard-based indicators can lead to different in vivo risk. This discrepancy can be predicted by their different uptake potential, pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles. We recommend that the development phase of qAOPs should include the application of species-species uptake and physiologically-based PK/PD models. This integration will significantly enhance the predictive power, enabling a more accurate assessment of the risk and the reliable transferability of qAOPs across chemicals.

  20. Midlife stress alters memory and mood-related behaviors in old age: Role of locally activated glucocorticoids.

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    Wheelan, Nicola; Kenyon, Christopher J; Harris, Anjanette P; Cairns, Carolynn; Al Dujaili, Emad; Seckl, Jonathan R; Yau, Joyce L W

    2018-03-01

    Chronic exposure to stress during midlife associates with subsequent age-related cognitive decline and may increase the vulnerability to develop psychiatric conditions. Increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity has been implicated in pathogenesis though any causative role for glucocorticoids is unestablished. This study investigated the contribution of local glucocorticoid regeneration by the intracellular enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), in persisting midlife stress-induced behavioral effects in mice. Middle-aged (10 months old) 11β-HSD1-deficient mice and wild-type congenic controls were randomly assigned to 28 days of chronic unpredictable stress or left undisturbed (non-stressed). All mice underwent behavioral testing at the end of the stress/non-stress period and again 6-7 months later. Chronic stress impaired spatial memory in middle-aged wild-type mice. The effects, involving a wide spectrum of behavioral modalities, persisted for 6-7 months after cessation of stress into early senescence. Enduring effects after midlife stress included impaired spatial memory, enhanced contextual fear memory, impaired fear extinction, heightened anxiety, depressive-like behavior, as well as reduced hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression. In contrast, 11β-HSD1 deficient mice resisted both immediate and enduring effects of chronic stress, despite similar stress-induced increases in systemic glucocorticoid activity during midlife stress. In conclusion, chronic stress in midlife exerts persisting effects leading to cognitive and affective dysfunction in old age via mechanisms that depend, at least in part, on brain glucocorticoids generated locally by 11β-HSD1. This finding supports selective 11β-HSD1 inhibition as a novel therapeutic target to ameliorate the long-term consequences of stress-related psychiatric disorders in midlife. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Programming Effects of Prenatal Glucocorticoid Exposure with a Postnatal High-Fat Diet in Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Hsieh, Chih-Sung; Tain, You-Lin; Li, Shih-Wen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Miao-Meng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-04-08

    Increasing evidence has shown that many chronic diseases originate from early life, even before birth, through what are termed as fetal programming effects. Glucocorticoids are frequently used prenatally to accelerate the maturation of the lungs of premature infants. High-fat diets are associated with insulin resistance, but the effects of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure plus a postnatal high-fat diet in diabetes mellitus remain unclear. We administered pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats' intraperitoneal dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle at gestational days 14-20. Male offspring were administered a normal or high-fat diet starting from weaning. We assessed the effects of prenatal steroid exposure plus postnatal high-fat diet on the liver, pancreas, muscle and fat at postnatal day 120. At 15 and 30 min, sugar levels were higher in the dexamethasone plus high-fat diet (DHF) group than the vehicle plus high-fat diet (VHF) group in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Serum insulin levels at 15, 30 and 60 min were significantly higher in the VHF group than in the vehicle and normal diet group. Liver insulin receptor and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase mRNA expressions and protein levels were lower in the DHF group. Insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 mRNA expressions were lower in the epididymal adipose tissue in the VHF and DHF groups. "Programming" of liver or epididymal adipose tissue resulted from prenatal events. Prenatal steroid exposure worsened insulin resistance in animals fed a high-fat diet.

  2. In utero glucocorticoid exposure reduced fetal skeletal muscle mass in rats independent of effects on maternal nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal stress and undernutrition can occur together and expose the fetus to high glucocorticoid (GLC) levels during this vulnerable period. To determine the consequences of GLC exposure on fetal skeletal muscle independently of maternal food intake, groups of timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (n ...

  3. Glucocorticoids regulation of FosB/ΔFosB expression induced by chronic opiate exposure in the brain stress system.

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    Daniel García-Pérez

    Full Text Available Chronic use of drugs of abuse profoundly alters stress-responsive system. Repeated exposure to morphine leads to accumulation of the transcription factor ΔFosB, particularly in brain areas associated with reward and stress. The persistent effects of ΔFosB on target genes may play an important role in the plasticity induced by drugs of abuse. Recent evidence suggests that stress-related hormones (e.g., glucocorticoids, GC may induce adaptations in the brain stress system that is likely to involve alteration in gene expression and transcription factors. This study examined the role of GC in regulation of FosB/ΔFosB in both hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic brain stress systems during morphine dependence. For that, expression of FosB/ΔFosB was measured in control (sham-operated and adrenalectomized (ADX rats that were made opiate dependent after ten days of morphine treatment. In sham-operated rats, FosB/ΔFosB was induced after chronic morphine administration in all the brain stress areas investigated: nucleus accumbens(shell (NAc, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST, central amygdala (CeA, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN and nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic cell group (NTS-A(2. Adrenalectomy attenuated the increased production of FosB/ΔFosB observed after chronic morphine exposure in NAc, CeA, and NTS. Furthermore, ADX decreased expression of FosB/ΔFosB within CRH-positive neurons of the BNST, PVN and CeA. Similar results were obtained in NTS-A(2 TH-positive neurons and NAc pro-dynorphin-positive neurons. These data suggest that neuroadaptation (estimated as accumulation of FosB/ΔFosB to opiates in brain areas associated with stress is modulated by GC, supporting the evidence of a link between brain stress hormones and addiction.

  4. The Association of Prenatal Exposure to Perfluorinated Chemicals with Glucocorticoid and Androgenic Hormones in Cord Blood Samples: The Hokkaido Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Houman; Araki, Atsuko; Itoh, Sachiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Mitsui, Takahiko; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Katsuya; Kishi, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) disrupt cholesterol homeostasis. All steroid hormones are derived from cholesterol, and steroid hormones such as glucocorticoids and androgenic hormones mediate several vital physiologic functions. However, the in utero effects of PFCs exposure on the homeostasis of these steroid hormones are not well understood in humans. We examined the relationship between prenatal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)/perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and cord blood levels of glucocorticoid and androgenic hormones. We conducted a hospital-based birth cohort study between July 2002 and October 2005 in Sapporo, Japan (n = 514). In total, 185 mother-infant pairs were included in the present study. Prenatal PFOS and PFOA levels in maternal serum samples were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Cord blood levels of glucocorticoid (cortisol and cortisone) and androgenic hormones [dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione] were also measured in the same way. We found a dose-response relationship of prenatal PFOS, but not PFOA, exposure with glucocorticoid levels after adjusting for potential confounders. Cortisol and cortisone concentrations were -23.98-ng/mL (95% CI: -0.47.12, -11.99; p for trend = 0.006) and -63.21-ng/mL (95% CI: -132.56, -26.72; p for trend blood. Citation: Goudarzi H, Araki A, Itoh S, Sasaki S, Miyashita C, Mitsui T, Nakazawa H, Nonomura K, Kishi R. 2017. The association of prenatal exposure to perfluorinated chemicals with glucocorticoid and androgenic hormones in cord blood samples: the Hokkaido Study. Environ Health Perspect 125:111-118; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP142.

  5. Prenatal alcohol exposure modifies glucocorticoid receptor subcellular distribution in the medial prefrontal cortex and impairs frontal cortex-dependent learning.

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    Andrea M Allan

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE has been shown to impair learning, memory and executive functioning in children. Perseveration, or the failure to respond adaptively to changing contingencies, is a hallmark on neurobehavioral assessment tasks for human fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD. Adaptive responding is predominantly a product of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and is regulated by corticosteroids. In our mouse model of PAE we recently reported deficits in hippocampal formation-dependent learning and memory and a dysregulation of hippocampal formation glucocorticoid receptor (GR subcellular distribution. Here, we examined the effect of PAE on frontal cortical-dependent behavior, as well as mPFC GR subcellular distribution and the levels of regulators of intracellular GR transport. PAE mice displayed significantly reduced response flexibility in a Y-maze reversal learning task. While the levels of total nuclear GR were reduced in PAE mPFC, levels of GR phosphorylated at serines 203, 211 and 226 were not significantly changed. Cytosolic, but not nuclear, MR levels were elevated in the PAE mPFC. The levels of critical GR trafficking proteins, FKBP51, Hsp90, cyclophilin 40, dynamitin and dynein intermediate chain, were altered in PAE mice, in favor of the exclusion of GR from the nucleus, indicating dysregulation of GR trafficking. Our findings suggest that there may be a link between a deficit in GR nuclear localization and frontal cortical learning deficits in prenatal alcohol-exposed mice.

  6. Pulmonary biochemical alterations resulting from ozone exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafa, M.G.; Lee, S.D.

    1976-07-01

    Metabolic response of lung tissue to ozone was studied in rats and monkeys after exposure of animals to various levels of ozone (0.1 to 0.8 ppM) for 1 to 30 days. In rats, 0.8 ppM ozone exposure resulted in a 40 to 50 percent augmentation of oxygen utilization in lung homogenate in the presence of an added substrate (e.g., succinate or 2-oxoglutarate). Activities of marker enzymes, viz. mitochondrial succinate-cytochrome c reductase; microsomal NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, increased maximally (40 to 70 percent over control) after 3 to 4 days of exposure, and remained elevated throughout the 0.8 ppM ozone exposure for 30 days. In monkeys, the observations were the same except that the magnitude of biochemical changes was relatively smaller. Exposure of animals to lower levels of ozone resulted in proportionately smaller biochemical changes in the lung, and ozone effects were detectable up to the 0.2 ppM level. While 0.1 ppM ozone exposure was ineffective, dietary deficiency of vitamin E, a natural antioxidant, increased the sensitivity of rat lungs to this concentration of ozone. The results suggest that low-level ozone exposures may cause metabolic alterations in the lung, and that dietary supplementation of vitamin E may offer protection against oxidant stress.

  7. Effects of exposure, diet, and thermoregulation on fecal glucocorticoid measures in wild bears.

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    Jeff Stetz

    Full Text Available We examined fecal glucocorticoid (fGC measures of nutrition and thermoregulatory demands on wild bears in Glacier National Park, Montana, and assessed how these measures changed in samples left in the field. Both ambient temperature and exposure can impact thermoregulation and sample degradation. Bear diets vary markedly with season, affecting body condition and thus fGC. We collected fecal samples during September and October, 2001, when ambient temperatures ranged from 30°C to -5°C. We collected half of each sample immediately and left the other half in its original location for 1-28 days. We used generalized linear models (GLM to first predict fGC concentrations in fresh samples based on proxies of nutrition, ambient temperature, thermal exposure, and precipitation. These same covariates were then used to predict degradation-based differences in fGC concentrations between the paired sample halves. Variation in fGC was predicted by diet, Julian date, aspect, and the interaction between Julian date and aspect in both fresh and exposed samples. Cumulative precipitation was also a significant predictor of fGC concentrations in the exposed samples, independent of time, indicating that precipitation contributes to sample degradation but not enough to mask effects of other environmental factors on fGC concentrations. Differences between sample halves were only predicted by cumulative precipitation and exposure time; cumulative precipitation decreased, whereas exposure time increased, fGC concentrations in the exposed sample halves. Results indicate that fGC can provide reliable indices of nutrition and thermoregulatory demands in bears and that sample degradation impacts on these relations are minimal and can be virtually eliminated by controlling for cumulative precipitation over the estimated exposure times.

  8. Critical disease windows shaped by stress exposure alter allocation trade-offs between development and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschman, Lucas J; Crespi, Erica J; Warne, Robin W

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous environmental stressors are often thought to alter animal susceptibility to pathogens and contribute to disease emergence. However, duration of exposure to a stressor is likely critical, because while chronic stress is often immunosuppressive, acute stress can temporarily enhance immune function. Furthermore, host susceptibility to stress and disease often varies with ontogeny; increasing during critical developmental windows. How the duration and timing of exposure to stressors interact to shape critical windows and influence disease processes is not well tested. We used ranavirus and larval amphibians as a model system to investigate how physiological stress and pathogenic infection shape development and disease dynamics in vertebrates. Based on a resource allocation model, we designed experiments to test how exposure to stressors may induce resource trade-offs that shape critical windows and disease processes because the neuroendocrine stress axis coordinates developmental remodelling, immune function and energy allocation in larval amphibians. We used wood frog larvae (Lithobates sylvaticus) to investigate how chronic and acute exposure to corticosterone, the dominant amphibian glucocorticoid hormone, mediates development and immune function via splenocyte immunohistochemistry analysis in association with ranavirus infection. Corticosterone treatments affected immune function, as both chronic and acute exposure suppressed splenocyte proliferation, although viral replication rate increased only in the chronic corticosterone treatment. Time to metamorphosis and survival depended on both corticosterone treatment and infection status. In the control and chronic corticosterone treatments, ranavirus infection decreased survival and delayed metamorphosis, although chronic corticosterone exposure accelerated rate of metamorphosis in uninfected larvae. Acute corticosterone exposure accelerated metamorphosis increased survival in infected larvae. Interactions

  9. Extensive Regulation of Diurnal Transcription and Metabolism by Glucocorticoids.

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    Benjamin D Weger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Altered daily patterns of hormone action are suspected to contribute to metabolic disease. It is poorly understood how the adrenal glucocorticoid hormones contribute to the coordination of daily global patterns of transcription and metabolism. Here, we examined diurnal metabolite and transcriptome patterns in a zebrafish glucocorticoid deficiency model by RNA-Seq, NMR spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-based methods. We observed dysregulation of metabolic pathways including glutaminolysis, the citrate and urea cycles and glyoxylate detoxification. Constant, non-rhythmic glucocorticoid treatment rescued many of these changes, with some notable exceptions among the amino acid related pathways. Surprisingly, the non-rhythmic glucocorticoid treatment rescued almost half of the entire dysregulated diurnal transcriptome patterns. A combination of E-box and glucocorticoid response elements is enriched in the rescued genes. This simple enhancer element combination is sufficient to drive rhythmic circadian reporter gene expression under non-rhythmic glucocorticoid exposure, revealing a permissive function for the hormones in glucocorticoid-dependent circadian transcription. Our work highlights metabolic pathways potentially contributing to morbidity in patients with glucocorticoid deficiency, even under glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Moreover, we provide mechanistic insight into the interaction between the circadian clock and glucocorticoids in the transcriptional regulation of metabolism.

  10. Extensive Regulation of Diurnal Transcription and Metabolism by Glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Benjamin D; Weger, Meltem; Görling, Benjamin; Schink, Andrea; Gobet, Cédric; Keime, Céline; Poschet, Gernot; Jost, Bernard; Krone, Nils; Hell, Rüdiger; Gachon, Frédéric; Luy, Burkhard; Dickmeis, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Altered daily patterns of hormone action are suspected to contribute to metabolic disease. It is poorly understood how the adrenal glucocorticoid hormones contribute to the coordination of daily global patterns of transcription and metabolism. Here, we examined diurnal metabolite and transcriptome patterns in a zebrafish glucocorticoid deficiency model by RNA-Seq, NMR spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-based methods. We observed dysregulation of metabolic pathways including glutaminolysis, the citrate and urea cycles and glyoxylate detoxification. Constant, non-rhythmic glucocorticoid treatment rescued many of these changes, with some notable exceptions among the amino acid related pathways. Surprisingly, the non-rhythmic glucocorticoid treatment rescued almost half of the entire dysregulated diurnal transcriptome patterns. A combination of E-box and glucocorticoid response elements is enriched in the rescued genes. This simple enhancer element combination is sufficient to drive rhythmic circadian reporter gene expression under non-rhythmic glucocorticoid exposure, revealing a permissive function for the hormones in glucocorticoid-dependent circadian transcription. Our work highlights metabolic pathways potentially contributing to morbidity in patients with glucocorticoid deficiency, even under glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Moreover, we provide mechanistic insight into the interaction between the circadian clock and glucocorticoids in the transcriptional regulation of metabolism.

  11. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yansong; Xu, Dan; Feng, Jianghua; Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion

  12. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yansong [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Xu, Dan [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Feng, Jianghua, E-mail: jianghua.feng@xmu.edu.cn [Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin [Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Magdalou, Jacques [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Université, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China)

    2012-07-15

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine

  13. Glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David J; Spencer, Karen A

    2018-01-15

    Throughout life physiological systems strive to maintain homeostasis and these systems are susceptible to exposure to maternal or environmental perturbations, particularly during embryonic development. In some cases, these perturbations may influence genetic and physiological processes that permanently alter the functioning of these physiological systems; a process known as developmental programming. In recent years, the neuroimmune system has garnered attention for its fundamental interactions with key hormonal systems, such as the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The ultimate product of this axis, the glucocorticoid hormones, play a key role in modulating immune responses within the periphery and the CNS as part of the physiological stress response. It is well-established that elevated glucocorticoids induced by developmental stress exert profound short and long-term physiological effects, yet there is relatively little information of how these effects are manifested within the neuroimmune system. Pre and post-natal periods are prime candidates for manipulation in order to uncover the physiological mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid programming of neuroimmune responses. Understanding the potential programming role of glucocorticoids may be key in uncovering vulnerable windows of CNS susceptibility to stressful experiences during embryonic development and improve our use of glucocorticoids as therapeutics in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High-fat diet and glucocorticoid treatment cause hyperglycemia associated with adiponectin receptor alterations

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    Oller do Nascimento Cláudia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is the most abundant plasma protein synthesized for the most part in adipose tissue, and it is an insulin-sensitive hormone, playing a central role in glucose and lipid metabolism. In addition, it increases fatty acid oxidation in the muscle and potentiates insulin inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Two adiponectin receptors have been identified: AdipoR1 is the major receptor expressed in skeletal muscle, whereas AdipoR2 is mainly expressed in liver. Consumption of high levels of dietary fat is thought to be a major factor in the promotion of obesity and insulin resistance. Excessive levels of cortisol are characterized by the symptoms of abdominal obesity, hypertension, glucose intolerance or diabetes and dyslipidemia; of note, all of these features are shared by the condition of insulin resistance. Although it has been shown that glucocorticoids inhibit adiponectin expression in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the regulation of adiponectin receptors. The link between glucocorticoids and insulin resistance may involve the adiponectin receptors and adrenalectomy might play a role not only in regulate expression and secretion of adiponectin, as well regulate the respective receptors in several tissues. Results Feeding of a high-fat diet increased serum glucose levels and decreased adiponectin and adipoR2 mRNA expression in subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissues, respectively. Moreover, it increased both adipoR1 and adipoR2 mRNA levels in muscle and adipoR2 protein levels in liver. Adrenalectomy combined with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone treatment resulted in increased glucose and insulin levels, decreased serum adiponectin levels, reduced adiponectin mRNA in epididymal adipose tissue, reduction of adipoR2 mRNA by 7-fold in muscle and reduced adipoR1 and adipoR2 protein levels in muscle. Adrenalectomy alone increased adiponectin mRNA expression 3-fold in subcutaneous adipose

  15. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 2: Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    The lifelong health of an individual is shaped during critical periods of development. The fetus is particularly susceptible to internal and external stimuli, many of which can alter developmental trajectories and subsequent susceptibility to disease. Glucocorticoids are critical in normal development of the fetus, as they are involved in the growth and maturation of many organ systems. The surge in fetal glucocorticoid levels that occurs in most mammalian species over the last few days of pregnancy is an important developmental switch leading to fundamental changes in gene regulation in many organs, including the brain. These changes are important for the transition to postnatal life. Exposure of the fetus to increased levels of glucocorticoids, resulting from maternal stress or treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids, can lead to long-term 'programming' of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and behaviours. Glucocorticoids act at multiple levels within the fetal brain. Growing evidence indicates that they can exert powerful effects on the epigenome, including on DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA, to influence gene expression. Such influences probably represent a critical component of the 'programming' process, and might be partly responsible for the transgenerational effects of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure on neurologic, cardiovascular and metabolic function.

  16. Dual Role for Glucocorticoids in Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rongqin; Oakley, Robert H.; Cruz-Topete, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and their synthetic derivatives are known to alter cardiac function in vivo; however, the nature of these effects and whether glucocorticoids act directly on cardiomyocytes are poorly understood. To explore the role of glucocorticoid signaling in the heart, we used rat embryonic H9C2 cardiomyocytes and primary cardiomyocytes as model systems. Dexamethasone (100 nm) treatment of cardiomyocytes caused a significant increase in cell size and up-regulated the expression of cardiac hypertrophic markers, including atrial natriuretic factor, β-myosin heavy chain, and skeletal muscle α-actin. In contrast, serum deprivation and TNFα exposure triggered cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and these apoptotic effects were inhibited by dexamethasone. Both the hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic actions of glucocorticoids were abolished by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU486 and by short hairpin RNA-mediated GR depletion. Blocking the activity of the mineralocorticoid receptor had no effect on these glucocorticoid-dependent cardiomyocyte responses. Aldosterone (1 μm) activation of GR also promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell survival. To elucidate the mechanism of the dual glucocorticoid actions, a genome-wide microarray was performed on H9C2 cardiomyocytes treated with vehicle or dexamethasone in the absence or presence of serum. Serum dramatically influenced the transcriptome regulated by GR, revealing potential glucocorticoid signaling mediators in both cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis. These studies reveal a direct and dynamic role for glucocorticoids and GR signaling in the modulation of cardiomyocyte function. PMID:22989630

  17. Possible role of a hydrogen peroxide-mediated mechanism in glucocorticoid receptor functional alterations associated with moderate asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perišić Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that pathogenesis and maintenance of chronic asthma is associated with alterations of glucocorticoid receptor (GR function, and also with persistent pulmonary inflammation, the important mediators of which are reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In this paper, we tested a hypothesis that GR functional alterations in asthma result from the action of oxidants. To that end, we conducted a series of ex vivo treatments of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of healthy donors with oxidizing agents (3 morpholinosydnonimine, SIN1; S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine, SNAP; and hydrogen peroxide, H2O2 and compared the resulting GR modifications with those previously noticed in asthmatic patients. The results show that treatment of PBMCs by H2O2 provoked an increase in the level of GR protein, accompanied by a rise in the number of hormone-binding sites and a decline in the receptor's affinity for the hormone. The H2O2 induced changes, including a characteristic GR isoprotein expression pattern, were found to be very similar to the GR changes previously observed in PBMCs of moderate asthmatic patients, but not in mild asthmatics and healthy subjects. Treatment with the other oxidants applied herein produced different effects or exerted no influence on GR. Thus, this study provides preliminary data suggesting that functional alterations of the GR associated with moderate asthma may be mediated by redox mechanisms that are based on oxidative and regulatory actions of H2O2.

  18. The human placenta expresses multiple glucocorticoid receptor isoforms that are altered by fetal sex, growth restriction and maternal asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Z; Hodyl, N A; Hobbs, E; Tuck, A R; Butler, M S; Osei-Kumah, A; Clifton, V L

    2014-04-01

    We have previously identified sex-specific differences in the fetal-placental response to cortisol. Our recent studies suggest that this differential response to cortisol is driven by differences in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein function rather than through changes in gene transcription or protein expression. This study was designed to define whether the human placenta expresses different isoforms of the GR and whether expression was altered by fetal sex and maternal asthma. Asthma and non-asthma pregnant women were prospectively recruited at their first antenatal visit and placentae collected at delivery. Placental GR expression was examined in relation to maternal asthma, fetal sex and birthweight. Twelve specific bands for the GR were identified at molecular weights of 94, 91, 81, 74, 69, 68, 65, 60, 55, 50, 48 and 38 kDa. The 12 isoforms were localised to the placental trophoblast and expression varied in relation to cellular location in either the cytoplasm or nucleus, fetal sex, fetal size and the presence and absence of maternal asthma. This is the first study to identify the presence of several protein isoforms of the GR in the human placenta. The data suggest glucocorticoid resistance observed in male placentae may be mediated through increased GRβ, GR A and GR P localisation to the nucleus. While female placentae may be more sensitive to cortisol in the presence of maternal asthma through a decrease in GRβ and an enhancement GRα activity via an interaction with GRα D3 and GRα C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Perinatal TCDD exposure alters developmental neuroendocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, R G

    2011-06-01

    This study tested whether maternal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) may disrupt the development of neuroendocrine system of their offspring during the perinatal period. TCDD (0.2 or 0.4 μg/kg body weight) was orally administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1 to lactation day (LD) 30. Potential effects on neuroendocrine function were evaluated by measuring serum thyroid hormone levels in pregnant rats and their offspring and measuring some biochemical parameters in cerebellum of these offspring on GD 16 and 19, and LD 10, 20, and 30. In both treated groups, a decrease in serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and increase in thyrotropin (TSH) levels were noticed during the tested days in dams and offspring, as well as GH levels were decreased in offspring with respect to control group. In cerebellum of control offspring, the levels of monoamines, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) were found to be increased from GD 16 to LD 30. The hypothyroid conditions due to both maternal administrations of TCDD produced inhibitory effects on monoamines and AchE, and stimulatory actions on GABA in cerebellum of offspring. These alterations were dose and age dependent. Overall, these results suggest that TCDD may act as neuroendocrine disruptor. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Alterations in glucocorticoid negative feedback following maternal Pb, prenatal stress and the combination: A potential biological unifying mechanism for their corresponding disease profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi-George, A.; Virgolini, M.B.; Weston, D.; Cory-Slechta, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Combined exposures to maternal lead (Pb) and prenatal stress (PS) can act synergistically to enhance behavioral and neurochemical toxicity in offspring. Maternal Pb itself causes permanent dysfunction of the body's major stress system, the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The current study sought to determine the potential involvement of altered negative glucocorticoid feedback as a mechanistic basis of the effects in rats of maternal Pb (0, 50 or 150 ppm in drinking water beginning 2 mo prior to breeding), prenatal stress (PS; restraint on gestational days 16-17) and combined maternal Pb + PS in 8 mo old male and female offspring. Corticosterone changes were measured over 24 h following an i.p. injection stress containing vehicle or 100 or 300 μg/kg (females) or 100 or 150 μg/kg (males) dexamethasone (DEX). Both Pb and PS prolonged the time course of corticosterone reduction following vehicle injection stress. Pb effects were non-monotonic, with a greater impact at 50 vs. 150 ppm, particularly in males, where further enhancement occurred with PS. In accord with these findings, the efficacy of DEX in suppressing corticosterone was reduced by Pb and Pb + PS in both genders, with Pb efficacy enhanced by PS in females, over the first 6 h post-administration. A marked prolongation of DEX effects was found in males. Thus, Pb, PS and Pb + PS, sometimes additively, produced hypercortisolism in both genders, followed by hypocortisolism in males, consistent with HPA axis dysfunction. These findings may provide a plausible unifying biological mechanism for the reported links between Pb exposure and stress-associated diseases and disorders mediated via the HPA axis, including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, anxiety, schizophrenia and depression. They also suggest broadening of Pb screening programs to pregnant women in high stress environments

  1. Prenatal stress induces up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptors on lymphoid cells modifying the T-cell response after acute stress exposure in the adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascuan, Cecilia Gabriela; Rubinstein, Mara Roxana; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2014-04-10

    It has been demonstrated that a short-duration stress (acute stress) may result in immunopreparatory or immunoenhancing physiological conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exposure to prenatal restraint stress (PRS) influences the impact of acute stress on the T-cell response in the adult life. We found that female mice exposed to PRS (PS mice) did not exhibit changes in the T-cell-dependent IgG antibody production with respect to prenatally non-stressed mice (no-PS mice). However, no-PS mice exposed to acute stress showed an increase of antibody production after antigen stimulation. In contrast, PS mice exhibited a decreased response after an acute situation. Spleen catecholamines and plasma corticosterone levels were increased in acute stress in both PS and no-PS mice. Nevertheless, lymphocyte response to hormones was altered in PS mice. Particularly, inhibitory effect of corticosterone was higher on lymphocytes from PS mice. In addition, an increase in protein levels and mRNA expression of glucocorticoid receptor was found in lymphoid cells from PS mice. These results show that prenatal stress alters the immune intrinsic regulatory mechanism that in turn induces an increased vulnerability to any stressful situation able to modify immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spatial and temporal expression of glucocorticoid, retinoid, and thyroid hormone receptors is not altered in lungs of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajatapiti, Prapapan; Keijzer, Richard; Blommaart, Pietjan E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Visser, Theo J.; Tibboel, Dick; Rottier, Robbert

    2006-01-01

    The degree of associated pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension are major determination factors for survival in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) patients. Glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, and vitamin A have been shown to be involved in human lung development. To determine

  3. Antenatal endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids and their impact on immune ontogeny and long-term immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, María Emilia; Holmes, Megan C; Mittelstadt, Paul R; Chapman, Karen E; Tolosa, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Endogenous levels of glucocorticoids rise during pregnancy to warrant development and maturation of the fetal organs close to birth. However, during most of the gestation, the fetus is protected from excessive biologically active endogenous glucocorticoids by placental and fetal expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD2). Maternal stress, which may overwhelm placental 11β-HSD2 activity with high glucocorticoid levels, or administration of synthetic glucocorticoids to improve the survival chances of the premature newborn, are associated to postnatal increased risk for immune diseases. Fetal exposure to excessive glucocorticoids may underlie this altered postnatal immunity. Here, we revise the role that placental and fetal 11β-HSD2, fetal glucocorticoid exposure, and programming of the offspring's the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis play on concerted steps in immune fetal development. We could identify gaps in knowledge about glucocorticoid-induced programming of immune diseases. Finally, based on current evidence about glucocorticoid and HPA axis-mediated immune regulation, we hypothesize on mechanisms that could drive the enhanced risk for atopies, infections, and type I diabetes in offspring that were prenatally exposed to glucocorticoids.

  4. Altered calcium handling and increased contraction force in human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes following short term dexamethasone exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosmidis, Georgios; Bellin, Milena; Ribeiro, Marcelo C.; Meer, Berend van; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Passier, Robert [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); MIRA, University of Twente (Netherlands); Tertoolen, Leon G.J.; Mummery, Christine L. [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Casini, Simona, E-mail: s.casini@amc.uva.nl [Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-11-27

    One limitation in using human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) for disease modeling and cardiac safety pharmacology is their immature functional phenotype compared with adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we report that treatment of human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, activated glucocorticoid signaling which in turn improved their calcium handling properties and contractility. L-type calcium current and action potential properties were not affected by dexamethasone but significantly faster calcium decay, increased forces of contraction and sarcomeric lengths, were observed in hESC-CMs after dexamethasone exposure. Activating the glucocorticoid pathway can thus contribute to mediating hPSC-CMs maturation. - Highlights: • Dexamethasone accelerates Ca{sup 2+} transient decay in hESC-CMs. • Dexamethasone enhances SERCA and NCX function in hESC-CMs. • Dexamethasone increases force of contraction and sarcomere length in hESC-CMs. • Dexamethasone does not alter I{sub Ca,L} and action potential characteristics in hESC-CMs.

  5. Aging, glucocorticoids and developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, E; Reyes-Castro, L A; Nathanielsz, P W

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids are pleiotropic regulators of multiple cell types with critical roles in physiological systems that change across the life-course. Although glucocorticoids have been associated with aging, available data on the aging trajectory in basal circulating glucocorticoids are conflicting. A literature search reveals sparse life-course data. We evaluated (1) the profile of basal circulating corticosterone across the life-course from weaning (postnatal day-PND 21), young adult PND 110, adult PND 450, mature adult PND 650 to aged phase PND 850 in a well-characterized homogeneous rat colony to determine existence of significant changes in trajectory in the second half of life; (2) sex differences; and (3) whether developmental programming of offspring by exposure to maternal obesity during development alters the later-life circulating corticosterone trajectory. We identified (1) a fall in corticosterone between PND 450 and 650 in both males and females (p age but from higher levels in male and female offspring of obese mothers. In all four groups studied, there was a second half of life fall in corticosterone. Higher corticosterone levels in offspring of obese mothers may play a role in their shorter life-span, but the age-associated fall occurs at a similar time to control offspring. Although even more life-course time-points would be useful, a five life-course time-point analysis provides important new information on normative and programmed aging of circulating corticosterone.

  6. Altered lipid partitioning and glucocorticoid availability in CBG-deficient male mice with diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulfo, José; Ledda, Angelo; Serra, Elisabet; Cabot, Cristina; Esteve, Montserrat; Grasa, Mar

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate how deficiency in corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), the specific carrier of glucocorticoids, affects glucocorticoid availability and adipose tissue in obesity. C57BL/6 (WT) and CBG-deficient (KO) male mice were fed during 12 weeks with standard or hyperlipidic diet (HL). Glucocorticoid availability and metabolic parameters were assessed. Body weight and food intake were increased in KO compared with WT mice fed a standard diet and were similar when fed a HL diet. Expression of CBG was found in white adipose tissue by immunochemistry, real-time PCR, and Western blot. In obesity, the subcutaneous depot developed less in KO mice compared with WT, which was associated with a minor adipocyte area and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression. Conversely, the epididymal depot displayed higher weight and adipocyte area in KO than in WT mice. CBG deficiency caused a fall of hepatic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression and an increase in epidymal adipose tissue, particularly in HL mice. Deficiency in CBG drives lipid partitioning from subcutaneous to visceral adipose depot under a context of lipid excess and differentially modulates 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  7. Mechanisms of Brain Glucocorticoid Resistance in Stress-Induced Psychopathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkulov, V M; Merkulova, T I; Bondar, N P

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and leads to increased levels of glucocorticoid (GC) hormones. Prolonged elevation of GC levels causes neuronal dysfunction, decreases the density of synapses, and impairs neuronal plasticity. Decreased sensitivity to glucocorticoids (glucocorticoid resistance) that develops as a result of chronic stress is one of the characteristic features of stress-induced psychopathologies. In this article, we reviewed the published data on proposed molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of glucocorticoid resistance in brain, including changes in the expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, biosynthesis of GR isoforms, and GR posttranslational modifications. We also present data on alterations in the expression of the FKBP5 gene encoding the main component of cell ultra-short negative feedback loop of GC signaling regulation. Recent discoveries on stress- and GR-induced changes in epigenetic modification patterns as well as normalizing action of antidepressants are discussed. GR and FKBP5 gene polymorphisms associated with stress-induced psychopathologies are described, and their role in glucocorticoid resistance is discussed.

  8. Nutritional Omega-3 Deficiency Alters Glucocorticoid Receptor-Signaling Pathway and Neuronal Morphology in Regionally Distinct Brain Structures Associated with Emotional Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Larrieu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive evidence suggests that long term dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs deficiency results in altered emotional behaviour. We have recently demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs deficiency induces emotional alterations through abnormal corticosterone secretion which leads to altered dendritic arborisation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Here we show that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis feedback inhibition was not compromised in n-3 deficient mice. Rather, glucocorticoid receptor (GR signaling pathway was inactivated in the PFC but not in the hippocampus of n-3 deficient mice. Consequently, only dendritic arborisation in PFC was affected by dietary n-3 PUFAs deficiency. In addition, occlusion experiment with GR blockade altered GR signaling in the PFC of control mice, with no further alterations in n-3 deficient mice. In conclusion, n-3 PUFAs deficiency compromised PFC, leading to dendritic atrophy, but did not change hippocampal GR function and dendritic arborisation. We argue that this GR sensitivity contributes to n-3 PUFAs deficiency-related emotional behaviour deficits.

  9. Prenatal exposure to dexamethasone in the mouse alters cardiac growth patterns and increases pulse pressure in aged male offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee O'Sullivan

    Full Text Available Exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids during development can result in later cardiovascular and renal disease in sheep and rats. Although prenatal glucocorticoid exposure is associated with impaired renal development, less is known about effects on the developing heart. This study aimed to examine the effects of a short-term exposure to dexamethasone (60 hours from embryonic day 12.5 on the developing mouse heart, and cardiovascular function in adult male offspring. Dexamethasone (DEX exposed fetuses were growth restricted compared to saline treated controls (SAL at E14.5, but there was no difference between groups at E17.5. Heart weights of the DEX fetuses also tended to be smaller at E14.5, but not different at E17.5. Cardiac AT1aR, Bax, and IGF-1 mRNA expression was significantly increased by DEX compared to SAL at E17.5. In 12-month-old offspring DEX exposure caused an increase in basal blood pressure of ~3 mmHg. In addition, DEX exposed mice had a widened pulse pressure compared to SAL. DEX exposed males at 12 months had an approximate 25% reduction in nephron number compared to SAL, but no difference in cardiomyocyte number. Exposure to DEX in utero appears to adversely impact on nephrogenesis and heart growth but is not associated with a cardiomyocyte deficit in male mice in adulthood, possibly due to compensatory growth of the myocardium following the initial insult. However, the widened pulse pressure may be indicative of altered vascular compliance.

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency in BALB/c Mouse Pregnancy Increases Placental Transfer of Glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesic, Dijana; Hawes, Jazmin E; Zosky, Graeme R; Wyrwoll, Caitlin S

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is increasing and implicated in adverse consequences for the health of offspring in later life. The aim of this study was to determine whether vitamin D deficiency increases fetal exposure to glucocorticoids, which are known to alter fetal development and result in adverse adult health outcomes. Female BALB/c mice were placed on either a vitamin D control (2195 IU/kg) or deficient (0 IU/kg) diet for 5 weeks before and during pregnancy. Maternal serum, placentas and fetal brains were collected at embryonic day 14.5 or 17.5 for morphological and gene expression analysis. Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy increased maternal corticosterone concentrations and reduced placental weight. Maternal vitamin D deficiency decreased placental expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II, which inactivates glucocorticoids thereby protecting the fetus from inappropriate glucocorticoid exposure. There was a corresponding increase in placental and fetal expression of the highly glucocorticoid-sensitive factor glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper. Furthermore, placental expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A was reduced in vitamin D-deficient pregnancies, with a corresponding decline in fetal capillary volume within the placenta. Overall, we show that prenatal vitamin D deficiency leads to an increase in maternal corticosterone, alterations in genes indicative of increased fetal glucocorticoid exposure and impairment in placental vascular development. Thus, the long-term adverse health consequences of vitamin D deficiency during early development may not just be due to alteration in direct vitamin D-related pathways but also altered fetal glucocorticoid exposure.

  11. Enduring, Sexually Dimorphic Impact of In Utero Exposure to Elevated Levels of Glucocorticoids on Midbrain Dopaminergic Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda E. Gillies

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs released from the fetal/maternal glands during late gestation are required for normal development of mammalian organs and tissues. Accordingly, synthetic glucocorticoids have proven to be invaluable in perinatal medicine where they are widely used to accelerate fetal lung maturation when there is risk of pre-term birth and to promote infant survival. However, clinical and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that inappropriate exposure of the developing brain to elevated levels of GCs, either as a result of clinical over-use or after stress-induced activation of the fetal/maternal adrenal cortex, is linked with significant effects on brain structure, neurological function and behaviour in later life. In order to understand the underlying neural processes, particular interest has focused on the midbrain dopaminergic systems, which are critical regulators of normal adaptive behaviours, cognitive and sensorimotor functions. Specifically, using a rodent model of GC exposure in late gestation (approximating human brain development at late second/early third trimester, we demonstrated enduring effects on the shape and volume of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc (origins of the mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways on the topographical organisation and size of the dopaminergic neuronal populations and astrocytes within these nuclei and on target innervation density and neurochemical markers of dopaminergic transmission (receptors, transporters, basal and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release at striatal and prefrontal cortical sites that impact on the adult brain. The effects of antenatal GC treatment (AGT were both profound and sexually-dimorphic, not only in terms of quantitative change but also qualitatively, with several parameters affected in the opposite direction in males and females. Although such substantial neurobiological changes might presage marked

  12. Alterations in cognitive and psychological functioning after organic solvent exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, L.A.; Ryan, C.M.; Hodgson, M.J.; Robin, N. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Exposure to organic solvents has been linked repeatedly to alterations in both personality and cognitive functioning. To assess the nature and extent of these changes more thoroughly, 32 workers with a history of exposure to mixtures of organic solvents and 32 age- and education-matched blue-collar workers with no history of exposure were assessed with a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. Although both groups were comparable on measures of general intelligence, significant differences were found in virtually all other cognitive domains tested (Learning and Memory, Visuospatial, Attention and Mental Flexibility, Psychomotor Speed). In addition, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventories of exposed workers indicated clinically significant levels of depression, anxiety, somatic concerns and disturbances in thinking. The reported psychological distress was unrelated to degree of cognitive deficit. Finally, several exposure-related variables were associated with poorer performance on tests of memory and visuospatial ability.

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Fang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from five participants and each sample was subjected to 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2.5 Gy, and 5 Gy of cobalt 60 radiation, followed by array-based expression profiling. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the immune system and cancer development pathways appeared to be the major affected targets by radiation exposure. Therefore, 1 Gy radioactive exposure seemed to be a critical threshold dosage. In fact, after 1 Gy radiation exposure, expression levels of several genes including FADD, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF8, TNFRSF10A, TNFSF10, TNFSF8, CASP1, and CASP4 that are associated with carcinogenesis and metabolic disorders showed significant alterations. Our results suggest that exposure to low-dose radiation may elicit changes in metabolic and immune pathways, potentially increasing the risk of immune dysfunctions and metabolic disorders.

  14. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  15. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20-60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3-65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Cigarette smoke exposure-associated alterations to noncoding RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Alan Maccani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental exposures vary by timing, severity, and frequency and may have a number of deleterious effects throughout the life course. The period of in utero development, for example, is one of the most crucial stages of development during which adverse environmental exposures can both alter the growth and development of the fetus as well as lead to aberrant fetal programming, increasing disease risk. During fetal development and beyond, the plethora of exposures, including nutrients, drugs, stress, and trauma, influence health, development, and survival. Recent research in environmental epigenetics has investigated the roles of environmental exposures in influencing epigenetic modes of gene regulation during pregnancy and at various stages of life. Many relatively common environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use, may have consequences for the expression and function of noncoding RNA (ncRNA, important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. A number of ncRNA have been discovered, including microRNA (miRNA, Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA, and long noncoding RNA (long ncRNA. The best-characterized species of ncRNA are miRNA, the mature forms of which are ~22 nucleotides in length and capable of post-transcriptionally regulating target mRNA utilizing mechanisms based largely on the degree of complementarity between miRNA and target mRNA. Because miRNA can still negatively regulate gene expression when imperfectly base-paired with a target mRNA, a single miRNA can have a large number of potential mRNA targets and can regulate many different biological processes critical for health and development. The following review analyzes the current literature detailing links between cigarette smoke exposure and aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNA, assesses how such alterations may have consequences throughout the life course, and proposes future directions for this intriguing field of

  17. Occurrence of glucocorticoids discharged from a sewage treatment plant in Japan and the effects of clobetasol propionate exposure on the immune responses of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kei; Sato, Kentaro; Shibano, Takazumi; Isobe, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Go; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-04-01

    The present study evaluated the environmental risks to common carp (Cyprinus carpio) posed by glucocorticoids present in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent. To gather information on the seasonal variations in glucocorticoid concentration, the authors sampled the effluent of a Japanese STP every other week for 12 mo. Six of 9 selected glucocorticoids were detected in the effluent, with clobetasol propionate and betamethasone 17-valerate detected at the highest concentrations and frequencies. The present study's results indicated that effluent glucocorticoid concentration may depend on water temperature, which is closely related to the removal efficiency of the STP or to seasonal variations in the public's use of glucocorticoids. In a separate experiment, to clarify whether glucocorticoids in environmental water increase susceptibility to bacterial infection in fish, the authors examined the responses to bacterial infection (Aeromonas veronii) of common carp exposed to clobetasol propionate. Clobetasol propionate exposure did not affect bacterial infection-associated mortality. In fish infected with A. veronii but not exposed to clobetasol propionate, head kidney weight and number of leukocytes in the head kidney were significantly increased (p glucocorticoids at environmentally relevant concentrations. © 2015 SETAC.

  18. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  19. Glucocorticoids accelerate maturation of the heme pathway in fetal liver through effects on transcription and DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khulan, Batbayar; Liu, Lincoln; Rose, Catherine M; Boyle, Ashley K; Manning, Jonathan R; Drake, Amanda J

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely used in threatened preterm labor to promote maturation in many organ systems in preterm babies and have significant beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality. We performed transcriptional profiling in fetal liver in a rat model of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure and identified marked gene expression changes in heme biosynthesis, utilization, and degradation pathways in late gestation. These changes in gene expression associated with alterations in DNA methylation and with a reduction in hepatic heme concentration. There were no persistent differences in gene expression, DNA methylation, or heme concentrations at 4 weeks of age, suggesting that these are transient effects. Our findings are consistent with glucocorticoid-induced accelerated maturation of the haematopoietic system and support the hypothesis that glucocorticoids can drive changes in gene expression in association with alterations in DNA methylation.

  20. [Mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejean, C; Richard, D

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids exert their actions at nuclear levels through genomic mechanisms including both transcriptional activation (transactivation) and gene expression repression (transrepression). Transactivation mechanisms are mediated by transcription factors, the main one being the activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These mechanisms contribute to both powerful therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids on inflammatory and immune diseases, and adverse effects than can be harmful on vital functions. Non-genomic mechanisms, which act faster than genomic ones, have also been explored. They also involve the GR in different membranous and cytosolic sites. The phenomenon of glucocorticoid resistance is also complex and several different mechanisms may mediate this phenomenon. Among them are alterations in number, binding affinity or phosphorylation status of the GR, changes in capacity of cellular apoptosis, polymorphic changes or expression of proteins involved in the genomic actions of glucocorticoids. Finally, some proteins, which mediate glucocorticoid activity could be therapeutic targets for reducing glucocorticoid-induced adverse effects. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Altering user' acceptance of automation through prior automation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekier, Marek; Molesworth, Brett R C

    2017-06-01

    Air navigation service providers worldwide see increased use of automation as one solution to overcome the capacity constraints imbedded in the present air traffic management (ATM) system. However, increased use of automation within any system is dependent on user acceptance. The present research sought to determine if the point at which an individual is no longer willing to accept or cooperate with automation can be manipulated. Forty participants underwent training on a computer-based air traffic control programme, followed by two ATM exercises (order counterbalanced), one with and one without the aid of automation. Results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation ('tipping point') decreased; suggesting it is indeed possible to alter automation acceptance. Practitioner Summary: This paper investigates whether the point at which a user of automation rejects automation (i.e. 'tipping point') is constant or can be manipulated. The results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation decreased; suggesting it is possible to alter automation acceptance.

  2. Alteration of gingival exposure and its aesthetic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Gong, Hani; Tian, Weidong; Tang, Wei; Bai, Ding

    2011-05-01

    This study analyzed the computerized variations of gingival exposure (GE) in unattractive smiles and evaluate the aesthetic effect to determine the acceptable range of GE for attractiveness. Images of the frontal posed smile of 50 juvenile women were evaluated in terms of attractiveness by doctors and laypersons separately to select the most unaesthetic one. And the most unaesthetic smile was modified with Photoshop in 2 ways-lowering upper lip and lifting lower lip-and the same evaluators were asked to reevaluate the changed images. We found that the smile with the most significant GE was selected as the most unaesthetic one. The attractiveness ratings were significantly lower in the doctors' group than in the laypersons' group (P smile, GE alteration is the principal one, but not the only, and although 0- to 2.3-mm GE is just an acceptable range; there is an attractive GE degree or point for every individual. Gingival exposure alteration must be balanced against the others in clinical treatment, especially in maxillofacial surgery for the gummy smile.

  3. AMPK regulates metabolic actions of glucocorticoids by phosphorylating the glucocorticoid receptor through p38 MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Nancy; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Lambrou, George I; Pervanidou, Panagiota; Wang, Yonghong; Chrousos, George P; Kino, Tomoshige

    2010-09-01

    Glucocorticoids play central roles in the regulation of energy metabolism by shifting it toward catabolism, whereas AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is the master regulator of energy homeostasis, sensing energy depletion and stimulating pathways of increasing fuel uptake and saving on peripheral supplies. We showed here that AMPK regulates glucocorticoid actions on carbohydrate metabolism by targeting the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and modifying transcription of glucocorticoid-responsive genes in a tissue- and promoter-specific fashion. Activation of AMPK in rats reversed glucocorticoid-induced hepatic steatosis and suppressed glucocorticoid-mediated stimulation of glucose metabolism. Transcriptomic analysis in the liver suggested marked overlaps between the AMPK and glucocorticoid signaling pathways directed mostly from AMPK to glucocorticoid actions. AMPK accomplishes this by phosphorylating serine 211 of the human GR indirectly through phosphorylation and consequent activation of p38 MAPK and by altering attraction of transcriptional coregulators to DNA-bound GR. In human peripheral mononuclear cells, AMPK mRNA expression positively correlated with that of glucocorticoid-responsive glucocorticoid-inducible leucine zipper protein, which correlated also positively with the body mass index of subjects. These results indicate that the AMPK-mediated energy control system modulates glucocorticoid action at target tissues. Because increased action of glucocorticoids is associated with the development of metabolic disorders, activation of AMPK could be a promising target for developing pharmacological interventions to these pathologies.

  4. Primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance and hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia

    2011-01-01

    The human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) is a ubiquitously expressed intracellular, ligand-dependent transcription factor, which mediates the action of glucocorticoids and influences physiological functions essential for life. Alterations in the molecular mechanisms of hGR action impair glucocorticoid signal transduction and alter tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. This review summarizes the pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms and clinical aspects of primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance (PGGR) and hypersensitivity (PGGH). A systematic review of the published, peer-reviewed medical literature (PubMed: 1975 through May 2011) was conducted to identify original articles and reviews on this topic. Evidence synthesis was relied upon the experience of a number of experts in the field, including our extensive personal experience. The molecular basis of PGGR and PGGH has been ascribed to mutations in the hGR gene, which alter tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. The stochastic nature of glucocorticoid signaling pathways in association with the variable effect that hGR gene mutations/polymorphisms might have on glucocorticoid signal transduction indicates that alterations in hGR action may have important implications for many critical biological processes, such as the behavioral and physiological responses to stress, the immune and inflammatory reaction, as well as growth and reproduction. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Sex-dependent effects of developmental arsenic exposure on methylation capacity and methylation regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor system in the embryonic mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that prenatal moderate arsenic exposure (50 ppb disrupts glucocorticoid receptor (GR programming and that these changes continue into adolescence in males. However, it was not clear what the molecular mechanisms were promoting these GR programming changes or if these changes occurred in arsenic-exposed females. In the present studies, we assessed the effects of arsenic on protein and mRNA of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (Hsd isozymes and compared the levels of methylation within the promoters of the Nr3c1 and Hsd11b1 genes in female fetal brain at embryonic days (E 14 and 18. Prenatal arsenate exposure produced sex specific effects on the glucocorticoid system. Compared to males, females were resistant to arsenic induced changes in GR, 11β-Hsd-1 and 11β-Hsd-2 protein levels despite observed elevations in Nr3c1 and Hsd11b2 mRNA. This sex-specific effect was not due to differences in the methylation of the GR promoter as methylation of the Nr3c1 gene was either unchanged (region containing the egr-1 binding site or similarly reduced (region containing the SP-1 transcription factor binding site in both males and females exposed to arsenic. Arsenic did produce sex and age-specific changes in the methylation of Hsd11b1 gene, producing increased methylation in females at E14 and decreased methylation at E18.These changes were not attributed to changes in DNMT levels. Since arsenate metabolism could interfere with the generation of methyl donor groups, we assessed glutathione (GSH, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM and As 3 methyltransferase (As3MT. Exposed males and females had similar levels of As3MT and SAM; however, females had higher levels of GSH/GSSH. It is possible that this greater anti-oxidative capacity within the females provides protection against low to moderate arsenate. Our data suggest that the GR signaling system in female offspring was not as affected by prenatal arsenic

  6. Alteration of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 and Glucocorticoid Receptor by Ethanol in Rat Liver and Mouse Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojie Meng

    2013-01-01

    for 3 months and 100 mM for 48 h, respectively. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests in vivo were performed, and protein levels of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR in liver and Hepa 1–6 cells were measured. Alterations of key enzymes of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and glucose 6 phosphatase (G6Pase, as well as glycogen synthase kinase 3a (GSK3α, were also examined. The results revealed that glucose levels were increased, and insulin sensitivity was impaired accompanied with liver injury in rats exposed to ethanol compared with controls. The 11β-HSD1, GR, PEPCK, G6Pase, and GSK3α proteins were increased in the liver of rats treated with ethanol compared with controls. Ethanol-exposed Hepa 1–6 cells also showed higher expression of 11β-HSD1, GR, PEPCK, G6Pase, and GSK3α proteins than control cells. After treatment of Hepa 1–6 cells exposed to ethanol with the GR inhibitor RU486, the expression of 11β-HSD1 and GR was significantly decreased. At the same time the increases in PEPCK, G6Pase, and GSK3α levels induced by ethanol in Hepa 1–6 cells were also attenuated by RU486. The results indicate that ethanol causes glucose intolerance by increasing hepatic expression of 11β-HSD1 and GR, which leads to increased expression of gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic enzymes.

  7. Glucocorticoids as mediators of developmental programming effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khulan, Batbayar; Drake, Amanda J

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to an adverse environment in early life is associated with an increased risk of cardio-metabolic and behavioral disorders in adulthood, a phenomenon termed 'early life programming'. One major hypothesis for early life programming is fetal glucocorticoid overexposure. In animal studies, prenatal glucocorticoid excess as a consequence of maternal stress or through exogenous administration to the mother or fetus is associated with programming effects on cardiovascular and metabolic systems and on the brain. These effects can be transmitted to subsequent generations. Studies in humans provide some evidence that prenatal glucocorticoid exposure may exert similar programming effects on glucose/insulin homeostasis, blood pressure and neurodevelopment. The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids mediate these effects are unclear but may include a role for epigenetic modifications. This review discusses the evidence for glucocorticoid programming in animal models and in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exposure to buffer solution alters tendon hydration and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Babak N; Meadows, Kyle D; Szczesny, Spencer E; Elliott, Dawn M

    2017-08-16

    A buffer solution is often used to maintain tissue hydration during mechanical testing. The most commonly used buffer solution is a physiological concentration of phosphate buffered saline (PBS); however, PBS increases the tissue's water content and decreases its tensile stiffness. In addition, solutes from the buffer can diffuse into the tissue and interact with its structure and mechanics. These bathing solution effects can confound the outcome and interpretation of mechanical tests. Potential bathing solution artifacts, including solute diffusion, and their effect on mechanical properties, are not well understood. The objective of this study was to measure the effects of long-term exposure of rat tail tendon fascicles to several concentrations (0.9-25%) of NaCl, sucrose, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and SPEG (NaCl+PEG) solutions on water content, solute diffusion, and mechanical properties. We found that with an increase in solute concentration the apparent water content decreased for all solution types. Solutes diffused into the tissue for NaCl and sucrose, however, no solute diffusion was observed for PEG or SPEG. The mechanical properties changed for both NaCl solutions, in particular after long-term (8h) incubation the modulus and equilibrium stress decreased compared to short-term (15min) for 25% NaCl, and the cross sectional area increased for 0.9% NaCl. However, the mechanical properties were unchanged for both PEG and SPEG except for minor alterations in stress relaxation parameters. This study shows that NaCl and sucrose buffer solutions are not suitable for long-term mechanical tests. We therefore propose using PEG or SPEG as alternative buffer solutions that after long-term incubation can maintain tissue hydration without solute diffusion and produce a consistent mechanical response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER FLASH OR PATTERN REVERSAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Visual disturbances are often reported following exposure to xenobiotics, and cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds have been reported to alter visual functi...

  10. Glucocorticoid programming of intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, A L; Valenzuela, O A; Vaughan, O R; Jellyman, J K; Forhead, A J

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important environmental and maturational signals during intrauterine development. Toward term, the maturational rise in fetal glucocorticoid receptor concentrations decreases fetal growth and induces differentiation of key tissues essential for neonatal survival. When cortisol levels rise earlier in gestation as a result of suboptimal conditions for fetal growth, the switch from tissue accretion to differentiation is initiated prematurely, which alters the phenotype that develops from the genotype inherited at conception. Although this improves the chances of survival should delivery occur, it also has functional consequences for the offspring long after birth. Glucocorticoids are, therefore, also programming signals that permanently alter tissue structure and function during intrauterine development to optimize offspring fitness. However, if the postnatal environmental conditions differ from those signaled in utero, the phenotypical outcome of early-life glucocorticoid receptor overexposure may become maladaptive and lead to physiological dysfunction in the adult. This review focuses on the role of GCs in developmental programming, primarily in farm species. It examines the factors influencing GC bioavailability in utero and the effects that GCs have on the development of fetal tissues and organ systems, both at term and earlier in gestation. It also discusses the windows of susceptibility to GC overexposure in early life together with the molecular mechanisms and long-term consequences of GC programming with particular emphasis on the cardiovascular, metabolic, and endocrine phenotype of the offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain function and glucocorticoids in obesity and type 2 diabetes including effects of lifestyle interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Stomby, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and associated metabolic dysregulation are linked to impaired cognitive function and alterations in brain structure, which increases the risk of age-related dementia. Increased glucocorticoid (GC) exposure may be a potential mediator of these negative effects on the brain. Methods and results In paper 1, we tested the relationship between cortisol levels, brain morphology and cognitive function in 200 women and men. Salivary cortisol levels were negatively related to cortic...

  12. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsted, Sara K; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B; Uldall, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used in treatment of paediatric diseases, but evidence of associated adverse cerebral effects is accumulating. The various pharmacokinetic profiles of the exogenous glucocorticoids and the changes in pharmacodynamics during childhood, result in different exposure of nervous tissue to exogenous glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids activate two types of intracellular receptors, the mineralocorticoid receptor and the glucocorticoid receptor. The two receptors differ in cerebral distribution, affinity and effects. Exogenous glucocorticoids favor activation of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported. Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular structures involved in axonal transport, long-term potentiation and neuronal plasticity. Significant maturation of the brain continues throughout childhood and we hypothesize that exposure to exogenous glucocorticoids during preschool and school age causes adverse cerebral effects. It is our opinion that studies of associations between exposure to glucocorticoids during childhood and impaired neurodevelopment are highly relevant. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology

  13. Glucocorticoid excess and the developmental origins of disease: two decades of testing the hypothesis--2012 Curt Richter Award Winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2013-01-01

    Low birthweight, a marker of an adverse in utero environment, is associated with cardiometabolic disease and brain disorders in adulthood. The adaptive changes made by the fetus in response to the intra-uterine environment result in permanent changes in physiology, structure and metabolism, a phenomenon termed early life programming. One of the key hypotheses to explain programming, namely over exposure of the developing fetus to glucocorticoids, was proposed nearly two decades ago, following the observation that the fetus was protected from high glucocorticoid levels in the mother by the actions of the placental barrier enzyme, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which converts active glucocorticoids into inactive products. Numerous mechanistic studies in animal models have been carried out to test this hypothesis using manipulations to increase maternal glucocorticoids. Overall, these have resulted in offspring of lower birthweight, with an activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and an adverse metabolic profile and behavioural phenotype in adulthood. Altered glucocorticoid activity or action is a good candidate mechanism in humans to link low birthweight with cardiometabolic and brain disorders. We have carried out detailed studies in men and women showing that high levels of endogenous glucocorticoids, or treatment with exogenous glucocorticoids, is associated with an adverse metabolic profile, increased cardiovascular disease and altered mood and cognitive decline. Our laboratory carried out the first translational studies in humans to test the glucocorticoid hypothesis, firstly demonstrating in studies of adult men and women, that low birthweight was associated with high fasting cortisol levels. We went on to dissect the mechanisms underlying the high fasting cortisol, demonstrating activation of the HPA axis, with increased cortisol responses to stimulation with exogenous adrenocorticotrophin hormone, lack of habituation to the stress of

  14. ROLE OF THE ENDOCANNABINOID SYSTEM IN REGULATING GLUCOCORTICOID EFFECTS ON MEMORY FOR EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsak, P.; Roozendaal, B.; Campolongo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex, have potent modulatory effects on emotional memory. Whereas early studies focused mostly on the detrimental effects of chronic stress and glucocorticoid exposure on cognitive performance and the classic genomic pathways that mediate

  15. Role of the endocannabinoid system in regulating glucocorticoid effects on memory for emotional experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsak, P.; Roozendaal, B.; Campolongo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, stress hormones released from the adrenal cortex, have potent modulatory effects on emotional memory. Whereas early studies focused mostly on the detrimental effects of chronic stress and glucocorticoid exposure on cognitive performance and the classic genomic pathways that mediate

  16. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) for 18–96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36 μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96 h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18 h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. - Highlights: • Genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth. • Genistein exposure alters expression of cell cycle regulators. • Genistein exposure alters sex steroid hormones. • Genistein exposure alters expression of steroidogenic enzymes.

  17. UV exposure alters respiratory allergic responses in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loveren, van H.; Boonstra, A.; Dijk, van M.; Fluitman, A.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Garssen, J.

    2000-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that exposure to ultraviolet light would inhibit T helper-1 (Th1) responses and stimulate T helper-2 (Th2) responses, and that thus in a mouse model of allergic (i.e. extrinsic) asthma (using ovalbumin [OVA] as the allergen) increased symptoms would be observed, while

  18. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  19. Neuropsychological alterations in mercury intoxication persist several years after exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Cristina Zachi

    Full Text Available Abstract Elemental mercury is a liquid toxic metal widely used in industry. Occupational exposure occurs mainly via inhalation. Previously, neuropsychological assessment detected deficits in former workers of a fluorescent lamp plant who had been exposed to elemental mercury vapor and were away from exposure for several years at the time of examination. Objectives: The purpose of this work was to reexamine these functions after 18 months in order to evaluate their progression. Methods: Thirteen participants completed tests of attention, inhibitory control, verbal/visual memory, psychomotor speed, verbal fluency, visuomotor ability, executive function, semantic knowledge, and depression and anxiety inventories on 2 separate occasions. Results: At baseline, the former workers indicated slower psychomotor and information processing speed, verbal spontaneous recall memory impairment, and increased depression and anxiety symptoms compared to controls (P<0.05. Paired comparisons of neuropsychological functioning within the exposed group at baseline and 1.5 years later showed poorer immediate memory performance (P<0.05. There were no differences on other measures. Conclusions: Although the literature show signs of recovery of functions, the neuropsychological effects related to mercury exposure are found to persist for many years.

  20. Developmental exposure to xenoestrogens at low doses alters femur length and tensile strength in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelch, Katherine E; Carleton, Stephanie M; Phillips, Charlotte L; Nagel, Susan C

    2012-03-01

    Developmental exposure to high doses of the synthetic xenoestrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been reported to alter femur length and strength in adult mice. However, it is not known if developmental exposure to low, environmentally relevant doses of xenoestrogens alters adult bone geometry and strength. In this study we investigated the effects of developmental exposure to low doses of DES, bisphenol A (BPA), or ethinyl estradiol (EE(2)) on bone geometry and torsional strength. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DES, 0.1 μg/kg/day, BPA, 10 μg/kg/day, EE(2), 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0 μg/kg/day, or vehicle from Gestation Day 11 to Postnatal Day 12 via a mini-osmotic pump in the dam. Developmental Xenoestrogen exposure altered femoral geometry and strength, assessed in adulthood by micro-computed tomography and torsional strength analysis, respectively. Low-dose EE(2), DES, or BPA increased adult femur length. Exposure to the highest dose of EE(2) did not alter femur length, resulting in a nonmonotonic dose response. Exposure to EE(2) and DES but not BPA decreased tensile strength. The combined effect of increased femur length and decreased tensile strength resulted in a trend toward decreased torsional ultimate strength and energy to failure. Taken together, these results suggest that exposure to developmental exposure to environmentally relevant levels of xenoestrogens may negatively impact bone length and strength in adulthood.

  1. Diet-induced weight loss has chronic tissue-specific effects on glucocorticoid metabolism in overweight postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomby, A; Simonyte, K; Mellberg, C; Ryberg, M; Stimson, R H; Larsson, C; Lindahl, B; Andrew, R; Walker, B R; Olsson, T

    2015-05-01

    Tissue-specific glucocorticoid metabolism is altered in obesity, and may increase cardiovascular risk. This dysregulation is normalized by short-term calorie restriction and weight loss, an effect that varies with dietary macronutrient composition. However, tissue-specific glucocorticoid metabolism has not been studied during long-term (>6 months) dietary interventions. Therefore our aim was to test whether long-term dietary interventions, either a paleolithic-type diet (PD) or a diet according to Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR) could normalize tissue-specific glucocorticoid metabolism in overweight and obese women. Forty-nine overweight/obese postmenopausal women were randomized to a paleolithic diet or a diet according to NNR for 24 months. At baseline, 6 and 24 months anthropometric measurements, insulin sensitivity, excretion of urinary glucocorticoid metabolites in 24-hour collections, conversion of orally administered cortisone to plasma cortisol and transcript levels of 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) in subcutaneous adipose tissue were studied. Both diet groups achieved significant and sustained weight loss. Weight loss with the PD was greater than on NNR diet after 6 months (Pweight loss in postmenopausal women has tissue-specific and time-dependent effects on glucocorticoid metabolism. This may alter local-tissue cortisol exposure contributing to improved metabolic function during weight loss.

  2. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can

  3. Exposure to bisphenol A in young adult mice does not alter ovulation but does alter the fertilization ability of oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Ambriz, Teresita Rocio; Acuña-Hernández, Deyanira Guadalupe; Ramos-Robles, Brenda; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Santacruz-Márquez, Ramsés; Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo; Piña-Guzmán, Belem; Shibayama, Mineko; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel

    2015-12-15

    Follicle growth culminates in ovulation, which allows for the expulsion of fertilizable oocytes and the formation of corpora lutea. Bisphenol A (BPA) is present in many consumer products, and it has been suggested that BPA impairs ovulation; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Therefore, this study first evaluated whether BPA alters ovulation by affecting folliculogenesis, the number of corpora lutea or eggs shed to the oviduct, ovarian gonadotropin responsiveness, hormone levels, and estrous cyclicity. Because it has been suggested (but not directly confirmed) that BPA exerts toxic effects on the fertilization ability of oocytes, a second aim was to evaluate whether BPA impacts the oocyte fertilization rate using an in vitro fertilization assay and mating. The possible effects on early zygote development were also examined. Young adult female C57BL/6J mice (39 days old) were orally dosed with corn oil (vehicle) or 50 μg/kgbw/day BPA for a period encompassing the first three reproductive cycles (12-15 days). BPA exposure did not alter any parameters related to ovulation. Moreover, BPA exposure reduced the percentage of fertilized oocytes after either in vitro fertilization or mating, but it did not alter the zygotic stages. The data indicate that exposure to the reference dose of BPA does not impact ovulation but that it does influence the oocyte quality in terms of its fertilization ability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Constitutive differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress are related to variation in aggression and anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sophie E; Zanoletti, Olivia; Guillot de Suduiraut, Isabelle; Sandi, Carmen

    2017-10-01

    Glucocorticoids coordinate responses that enable an individual to cope with stressful challenges and, additionally, mediate adaptation following cessation of a stressor. There are important individual differences in the magnitude of glucocorticoid responsiveness to stressors. However, whether individual differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress are linked to different behavioral strategies in coping with social and non-social challenges is not easily studied, owing to the lack of appropriate animal models. To address this, we generated three lines of Wistar rats selectively bred for the magnitude of their glucocorticoid responses following exposure to a variety of stressors over three consecutive days at juvenility. Here, we present findings following observations of a high level of variation in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress in outbred Wistar rats, and the strong response to selection for this trait over a few generations. When challenged with different stressful challenges, rats from the three lines differed in their coping behaviors. Strikingly, the line with high glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress displayed enhanced aggression and anxiety-like behaviors. In addition, these rats also showed alterations in the expression of genes within both central and peripheral nodes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and enhanced reactivity to acute stress exposure. Together, these findings strongly link differences in glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress with marked differences in coping styles. The developed rat lines are thus a promising model with which to examine the relationship between variation in reactivity of the HPA axis and stress-related pathophysiology and could be employed to assess the therapeutic potential of treatments modulating stress habituation to ameliorate psychopathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of sex and stress exposure across the lifespan on endophenotypes of depression: focus on behavior, glucocorticoids and hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarthi Raksha Gobinath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences exist in vulnerability, symptoms and treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. In this review we discuss both preclinical and clinical research that investigates how sex influences depression endophenotypes at the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neural levels across the lifespan. Chronic exposure to stress is a risk factor for depression and we discuss how stress during the prenatal, postnatal, and adolescent periods differentially affects males and females depending on the method of stress and metric examined. Given that the integrity of the hippocampus is compromised in depression, we specifically focus on sex differences in how hippocampal plasticity is affected by stress and depression across the lifespan. In addition, we examine how female physiology predisposes depression in adulthood, specifically in postpartum and perimenopausal periods. Finally, we discuss the underrepresentation of women in both preclinical and clinical research and how this limits our understanding of sex differences in vulnerability, presentation, and treatment of depression.

  6. Cocaine exposure prior to pregnancy alters the psychomotor response to cocaine and transcriptional regulation of the dopamine D1 receptor in adult male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Aya; Constantinof, Andrea; Pan, Pauline; Kupferschmidt, Dave A; McGowan, Patrick O; Erb, Suzanne

    2014-05-15

    There is evidence that maternal experience prior to pregnancy can play an important role in behavioral, physiological, and genetic programming of offspring. Likewise, exposure to cocaine in utero can result in marked changes in central nervous system function of offspring. In this study, we examined whether exposure of rat dams to cocaine prior to pregnancy subsequently alters indices of behavior, physiology, and gene expression in offspring. Multiple outcome measures were examined in adult male offspring: (1) behavioral expression of cocaine-induced psychomotor activation; (2) levels of corticosterone in response to immobilization stress; and (3) expression of multiple genes, including dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) and D2 (DRD2), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), in functionally relevant brain regions. Adult Sprague-Dawley females were exposed to cocaine (15-30 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 10 days, and were then mated to drug naïve males of the same strain. Separate groups of adult male offspring were tested for their acute psychomotor response to cocaine (0, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), corticosterone responsivity to 20 min of immobilization stress, and expression of multiple genes using quantitative PCR. Offspring of dams exposed to cocaine prior to conception exhibited increased psychomotor sensitivity to cocaine, and upregulated gene expression of DRD1 in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Neither stress-induced corticosterone levels nor gene expression of GR or CRF genes were altered. These data suggest that cocaine exposure before pregnancy can serve to enhance psychomotor sensitivity to cocaine in offspring, possibly via alterations in dopamine function that include upregulation of the DRD1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Exposure to bisphenol A in young adult mice does not alter ovulation but does alter the fertilization ability of oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore-Ambriz, Teresita Rocio; Acuña-Hernández, Deyanira Guadalupe; Ramos-Robles, Brenda; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Santacruz-Márquez, Ramsés; Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo; Piña-Guzmán, Belem

    2015-01-01

    Follicle growth culminates in ovulation, which allows for the expulsion of fertilizable oocytes and the formation of corpora lutea. Bisphenol A (BPA) is present in many consumer products, and it has been suggested that BPA impairs ovulation; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Therefore, this study first evaluated whether BPA alters ovulation by affecting folliculogenesis, the number of corpora lutea or eggs shed to the oviduct, ovarian gonadotropin responsiveness, hormone levels, and estrous cyclicity. Because it has been suggested (but not directly confirmed) that BPA exerts toxic effects on the fertilization ability of oocytes, a second aim was to evaluate whether BPA impacts the oocyte fertilization rate using an in vitro fertilization assay and mating. The possible effects on early zygote development were also examined. Young adult female C57BL/6J mice (39 days old) were orally dosed with corn oil (vehicle) or 50 μg/kg bw/day BPA for a period encompassing the first three reproductive cycles (12–15 days). BPA exposure did not alter any parameters related to ovulation. Moreover, BPA exposure reduced the percentage of fertilized oocytes after either in vitro fertilization or mating, but it did not alter the zygotic stages. The data indicate that exposure to the reference dose of BPA does not impact ovulation but that it does influence the oocyte quality in terms of its fertilization ability. - Highlights: • Bisphenol A targets the fertilization ability of oocytes. • Bisphenol A does not alter ovulation. • Young adult females may be susceptible to the effects of bisphenol A on fertilization.

  8. Exposure to high ambient temperatures alters embryology in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M. L.; Argente, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    High ambient temperatures are a determining factor in the deterioration of embryo quality and survival in mammals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress on embryo development, embryonic size and size of the embryonic coats in rabbits. A total of 310 embryos from 33 females in thermal comfort zone and 264 embryos of 28 females in heat stress conditions were used in the experiment. The traits studied were ovulation rate, percentage of total embryos, percentage of normal embryos, embryo area, zona pellucida thickness and mucin coat thickness. Traits were measured at 24 and 48 h post-coitum (hpc); mucin coat thickness was only measured at 48 hpc. The embryos were classified as zygotes or two-cell embryos at 24 hpc, and 16-cells or early morulae at 48 hpc. The ovulation rate was one oocyte lower in heat stress conditions than in thermal comfort. Percentage of normal embryos was lower in heat stress conditions at 24 hpc (17.2%) and 48 hpc (13.2%). No differences in percentage of zygotes or two-cell embryos were found at 24 hpc. The embryo development and area was affected by heat stress at 48 hpc (10% higher percentage of 16-cells and 883 μm2 smaller, respectively). Zona pellucida was thicker under thermal stress at 24 hpc (1.2 μm) and 48 hpc (1.5 μm). No differences in mucin coat thickness were found. In conclusion, heat stress appears to alter embryology in rabbits.

  9. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Zhang, Yuanzhen; Feng, Jianghua; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal metabonome

  10. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Yuanzhen [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Jianghua, E-mail: jianghua.feng@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal

  11. Glucocorticoids facilitate the retention of acquired immobility during forced swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H D; De Korte, C C; De Kloet, E R

    1985-01-01

    The adrenalectomy-induced decrease in the level of immobility during a 5 min retest period in the Porsolt swimming test could be reversed by glucocorticoids administered s.c. 15 min after the initial forced swimming exposure. The synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and RU 28362 were active in

  12. Prenatal cocaine exposure alters alpha2 receptor expression in adolescent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvers Janelle M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prenatal cocaine exposure produces attentional deficits which to persist through early childhood. Given the role of norepinephrine (NE in attentional processes, we examined the forebrain NE systems from prenatal cocaine exposed rats. Cocaine was administered during pregnancy via the clinically relevant intravenous route of administration. Specifically, we measured α2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR density in adolescent (35-days-old rats, using [3H]RX821002 (5 nM. Results Sex-specific alterations of α2-AR were found in the hippocampus and amygdala of the cocaine-exposed animals, as well as an upregulation of α2-AR in parietal cortex. Conclusion These data suggest that prenatal cocaine exposure results in a persistent alteration in forebrain NE systems as indicated by alterations in receptor density. These neurochemical changes may underlie behavioral abnormalities observed in offspring attentional processes following prenatal exposure to cocaine.

  13. Immune regulation by glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Derek W; Cidlowski, John A

    2017-04-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids are crucial to various physiological processes, including metabolism, development and inflammation. Since 1948, synthetic glucocorticoids have been used to treat various immune-related disorders. The mechanisms that underlie the immunosuppressive properties of these hormones have been intensely scrutinized, and it is widely appreciated that glucocorticoids have pleiotropic effects on the immune system. However, a clear picture of the cellular and molecular basis of glucocorticoid action has remained elusive. In this Review, we distil several decades of intense (and often conflicting) research that defines the interface between the endocrine stress response and the immune system.

  14. Glucocorticoids as regulatory signals during intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, Abigail L; Forhead, Alison J

    2015-12-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review discusses the role of the glucocorticoids as regulatory signals during intrauterine development. It examines the functional significance of these hormones as maturational, environmental and programming signals in determining offspring phenotype. What advances does it highlight? It focuses on the extensive nature of the regulatory actions of these hormones. It highlights the emerging data that these actions are mediated, in part, by the placenta, other endocrine systems and epigenetic modifications of the genome. Glucocorticoids are important regulatory signals during intrauterine development. They act as maturational, environmental and programming signals that modify the developing phenotype to optimize offspring viability and fitness. They affect development of a wide range of fetal tissues by inducing changes in cellular expression of structural, transport and signalling proteins, which have widespread functional consequences at the whole organ and systems levels. Glucocorticoids, therefore, activate many of the physiological systems that have little function in utero but are vital at birth to replace the respiratory, nutritive and excretory functions previously carried out by the placenta. However, by switching tissues from accretion to differentiation, early glucocorticoid overexposure in response to adverse conditions can programme fetal development with longer term physiological consequences for the adult offspring, which can extend to the next generation. The developmental effects of the glucocorticoids can be direct on fetal tissues with glucocorticoid receptors or mediated by changes in placental function or other endocrine systems. At the molecular level, glucocorticoids can act directly on gene transcription via their receptors or indirectly by epigenetic modifications of the genome. In this review, we examine the role and functional significance of glucocorticoids as regulatory signals during intrauterine

  15. Glucocorticoids and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that once bound to their receptor interact with the DNA binding domain. Almost 1000-2000 genes are sensitive to their effects, including immune/inflammatory response genes. However, their role in pathophysiology and therapy is still debated. We performed a literature survey using the key words glucocorticoids, inflammation, autoimmune disease, rheumatology and adrenal glands in order to define important targets for this review on glucocorticoids. Considering endogenous/exogenous glucocorticoids in chronic inflammatory diseases brought up five major points for discussion: inadequately low production of endogenous cortisol relative to systemic inflammation (the disproportion principle); changes of the systemic and local cortisol-to-cortisone shuttle (reactivation and degradation of cortisol); inflammation-induced glucocorticoid resistance; highlights of present glucocorticoid therapy; and the role of circadian rhythms in action of cortisol. Much of this information becomes understandable in the context of neurohormonal energy regulation as recently summarized. The optimization of long-term low-dose glucocorticoid therapy in chronic inflammatory diseases arises from the understanding of the above mentioned aspects. Since glucocorticoid resistance is a consequence of inflammation, adequate anti-inflammatory therapy is mandatory. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    structures involved in axonal transport, long-term potentiation and neuronal plasticity. Significant maturation of the brain continues throughout childhood and we hypothesize that exposure to exogenous glucocorticoids during preschool and school age causes adverse cerebral effects. It is our opinion...... of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...... reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported...

  17. Glucocorticoids and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Unlike other steroid hormone receptors, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is not considered an oncogene. In breast cancer, the estrogen receptor (ER) drives cell growth, proliferation, and metastasis, and the androgen receptor (AR) plays a similar role in prostate cancer. Accordingly, treatment of these diseases has focused on blocking steroid hormone receptor function. In contrast, glucocorticoids (GCs) work through GR to arrest growth and induce apoptosis in lymphoid tissue. Glucocorticoids are amazingly effective in this role, and have been deployed as the cornerstone of lymphoid cancer treatment for decades. Unfortunately, not all patients respond to GCs and dosage is restricted by immediate and long term side effects. In this chapter we review the treatment protocols that employ glucocorticoids as a curative agent, elaborate on what is known about their mechanism of action in these cancers, and also summarize the palliative uses of glucocorticoids for other cancers. PMID:26216001

  18. Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver D.B. Johnson, 1 W.O. Ward, 2 V.L. Bass, 2 M.C.J. Schladweiler, 2A.D. Ledbetter, 2 D. Andrews, and U.P. Kodavanti 2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, Cha...

  19. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Linda S M

    2017-03-15

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent advances in the molecular mechanisms determining tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids: novel mutations, circadian rhythm and ligand-induced repression of the human glucocorticoid receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are pleiotropic hormones, which are involved in almost every cellular, molecular and physiologic network of the organism, and regulate a broad spectrum of physiologic functions essential for life. The cellular response to glucocorticoids displays profound variability both in magnitude and in specificity of action. Tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids differs among individuals, within tissues of the same individual and within the same cell. The actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, a ubiquitously expressed intracellular, ligand-dependent transcription factor. Multiple mechanisms, such as pre-receptor ligand metabolism, receptor isoform expression, and receptor-, tissue-, and cell type-specific factors, exist to generate diversity as well as specificity in the response to glucocorticoids. Alterations in the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor action impair glucocorticoid signal transduction and alter tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms determining tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids with particular emphasis on novel mutations and new information on the circadian rhythm and ligand-induced repression of the glucocorticoid receptor. PMID:25155432

  1. Recent advances in the molecular mechanisms determining tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids: novel mutations, circadian rhythm and ligand-induced repression of the human glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, Nicolas C; Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P; Kino, Tomoshige

    2014-08-25

    Glucocorticoids are pleiotropic hormones, which are involved in almost every cellular, molecular and physiologic network of the organism, and regulate a broad spectrum of physiologic functions essential for life. The cellular response to glucocorticoids displays profound variability both in magnitude and in specificity of action. Tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids differs among individuals, within tissues of the same individual and within the same cell. The actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, a ubiquitously expressed intracellular, ligand-dependent transcription factor. Multiple mechanisms, such as pre-receptor ligand metabolism, receptor isoform expression, and receptor-, tissue-, and cell type-specific factors, exist to generate diversity as well as specificity in the response to glucocorticoids. Alterations in the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor action impair glucocorticoid signal transduction and alter tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms determining tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids with particular emphasis on novel mutations and new information on the circadian rhythm and ligand-induced repression of the glucocorticoid receptor.

  2. Time dependent effect of chronic embryonic exposure to ethanol on zebrafish: Morphology, biochemical and anxiety alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Nurul Farhana; Sata, Nurul Syafida Asma Mohd; Hassan, Siti Norhidayah; Bakar, Noraini Abu; Ahmad, Syahida; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir; Abdullah, Che Azurahanim Che; Ibrahim, Wan Norhamidah Wan

    2017-08-14

    Exposure to ethanol during critical period of development can cause severe impairments in the central nervous system (CNS). This study was conducted to assess the neurotoxic effects of chronic embryonic exposure to ethanol in the zebrafish, taking into consideration the time dependent effect. Two types of exposure regimen were applied in this study. Withdrawal exposure group received daily exposure starting from gastrulation until hatching, while continuous exposure group received daily exposure from gastrulation until behavioural assessment at 6dpf (days post fertilization). Chronic embryonic exposure to ethanol decreased spontaneous tail coiling at 24hpf (hour post fertilization), heart rate at 48hpf and increased mortality rate at 72hpf. The number of apoptotic cells in the embryos treated with ethanol was significantly increased as compared to the control. We also measured the morphological abnormalities and the most prominent effects can be observed in the treated embryos exposed to 1.50% and 2.00%. The treated embryos showed shorter body length, larger egg yolk, smaller eye diameter and heart edema as compared to the control. Larvae received 0.75% continuous ethanol exposure exhibited decreased swimming activity and increased anxiety related behavior, while withdrawal ethanol exposure showed increased swimming activity and decreased anxiety related behavior as compared to the respective control. Biochemical analysis exhibited that ethanol exposure for both exposure regimens altered proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids of the zebrafish larvae. Our results indicated that time dependent effect of ethanol exposure during development could target the biochemical processes thus leading to induction of apoptosis and neurobehavioral deficits in the zebrafish larvae. Thus it raised our concern about the safe limit of alcohol consumption for pregnant mother especially during critical periods of vulnerability for developing nervous system. Copyright © 2017

  3. Inorganic mercury exposure in drinking water alters essential metal homeostasis in pregnant rats without altering rat pup behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cláudia S; Oliveira, Vitor A; Costa, Lidiane M; Pedroso, Taíse F; Fonseca, Mariana M; Bernardi, Jamile S; Fiuza, Tiago L; Pereira, Maria E

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of HgCl 2 exposure in the doses of 0, 10 and 50μg Hg 2+ /mL in drinking water during pregnancy on tissue essential metal homeostasis, as well as the effects of HgCl 2 exposure in utero and breast milk on behavioral tasks. Pregnant rats exposed to both inorganic mercury doses presented high renal Hg content and an increase in renal Cu and hepatic Zn levels. Mercury exposure increased fecal Hg and essential metal contents. Pups exposed to inorganic Hg presented no alterations in essential metal homeostasis or in behavioral task markers of motor function. In conclusion, this work showed that the physiologic pregnancy and lactation states protected the offspring from adverse effects of low doses of Hg 2+ . This protection is likely to be related to the endogenous scavenger molecule, metallothionein, which may form an inert complex with Hg 2+ . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 1: Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Fetal development is a critical period for shaping the lifelong health of an individual. However, the fetus is susceptible to internal and external stimuli that can lead to adverse long-term health consequences. Glucocorticoids are an important developmental switch, driving changes in gene regulation that are necessary for normal growth and maturation. The fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is particularly susceptible to long-term programming by glucocorticoids; these effects can persist throughout the life of an organism. Dysfunction of the HPA axis as a result of fetal programming has been associated with impaired brain growth, altered behaviour and increased susceptibility to chronic disease (such as metabolic and cardiovascular disease). Moreover, the effects of glucocorticoid-mediated programming are evident in subsequent generations, and transmission of these changes can occur through both maternal and paternal lineages.

  5. Genomic effects of glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbesa, Ivana; Hakim, Ofir

    2017-05-01

    Glucocorticoids and their receptor (GR) have been an important area of research because of their pleiotropic physiological functions and extensive use in the clinic. In addition, the association between GR and glucocorticoids, which is highly specific, leads to rapid nuclear translocation where GR associates with chromatin to regulate gene transcription. This simplified model system has been instrumental for studying the complexity of transcription regulation processes occurring at chromatin. In this review we discuss our current understanding of GR action that has been enhanced by recent developments in genome wide measurements of chromatin accessibility, histone marks, chromatin remodeling and 3D chromatin structure in various cell types responding to glucocorticoids.

  6. Hurricane Sandy Exposure Alters the Development of Neural Reactivity to Negative Stimuli in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Ellen M; Nelson, Brady D; Kujawa, Autumn; Hajcak, Greg; Kotov, Roman; Bromet, Evelyn J; Carlson, Gabrielle A; Klein, Daniel N

    2018-03-01

    This study examined whether exposure to Hurricane Sandy-related stressors altered children's brain response to emotional information. An average of 8 months (M age  = 9.19) before and 9 months after (M age  = 10.95) Hurricane Sandy, 77 children experiencing high (n = 37) and low (n = 40) levels of hurricane-related stress exposure completed a task in which the late positive potential, a neural index of emotional reactivity, was measured in response to pleasant and unpleasant, compared to neutral, images. From pre- to post-Hurricane Sandy, children with high stress exposure failed to show the same decrease in emotional reactivity to unpleasant versus neutral stimuli as those with low stress exposure. Results provide compelling evidence that exposure to natural disaster-related stressors alters neural emotional reactivity to negatively valenced information. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  7. Context Modulates Outcome of Perinatal Glucocorticoid Action in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo Ronald ede Kloet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prematurely born infants may be at risk, because of inadequate maturation of tissues. If there are signs of preterm birth, it has become common practice therefore to treat either antenatally the mother or postnatally the infant with glucocorticoids to accelerate tissue development, particularly of the lung. However, this life-saving early glucocorticoid treatment was found to increase the risk of adverse outcome in later life. In one animal study the authors reported a 25% shorter lifespan of rats treated as newborns with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, but sofar this finding has not been replicated. After a brief clinical introduction, we discuss studies in rodents designed to examine how perinatal glucocorticoid action affects the developing brain. It appears that the perinatal action of the glucocorticoid depends on the context and the timing as well as the type of administered steroid. The type of steroid is important because the endogenous glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone bind to two distinct receptor populations, i.e. mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid receptors (GR, while synthetic glucocorticoids predominantly bind to the GR. In addition, if given antenatally hydrocortisone is inactivated in the placenta by 11β-HSD type 2, and dexamethasone is not. With respect to timing, the outcome of glucocorticoid effects is different in early vs late phases of brain development. The context refers to the environmental input that can affect the susceptibility to glucocorticoid action in the newborn rodent brain; early handling of pups and maternal care obliterate effects of postnatal dexamethasone treatment. Context also refers to coping with environmental conditions in later life, for which the individual may have been programmed epigenetically by early life experience. This knowledge of determinants affecting the outcome of perinatal glucocorticoid exposure may have clinical implications for the treatment of

  8. Context modulates outcome of perinatal glucocorticoid action in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, E Ronald; Claessens, Sanne E F; Kentrop, Jiska

    2014-01-01

    Prematurely born infants may be at risk, because of inadequate maturation of tissues. If there are signs of preterm birth, it has become common practice therefore to treat either antenatally the mother or postnatally the infant with glucocorticoids to accelerate tissue development, particularly of the lung. However, this life-saving early glucocorticoid treatment was found to increase the risk of adverse outcome in later life. In one animal study, the authors reported a 25% shorter lifespan of rats treated as newborns with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, but so far this finding has not been replicated. After a brief clinical introduction, we discuss studies in rodents designed to examine how perinatal glucocorticoid action affects the developing brain. It appears that the perinatal action of the glucocorticoid depends on the context and the timing as well as the type of administered steroid. The type of steroid is important because the endogenous glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone bind to two distinct receptor populations, i.e., mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors (GR), while synthetic glucocorticoids predominantly bind to the GR. In addition, if given antenatally hydrocortisone is inactivated in the placenta by 11β-HSD type 2, and dexamethasone is not. With respect to timing, the outcome of glucocorticoid effects is different in early vs. late phases of brain development. The context refers to the environmental input that can affect the susceptibility to glucocorticoid action in the newborn rodent brain; early handling of pups and maternal care obliterate effects of post-natal dexamethasone treatment. Context also refers to coping with environmental conditions in later life, for which the individual may have been programed epigenetically by early-life experience. This knowledge of determinants affecting the outcome of perinatal glucocorticoid exposure may have clinical implications for the treatment of prematurely born infants.

  9. Developmental Exposure to Pesticides Alters Motor Activity and Coordination in Rats: Sex Differences and Underlying Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Giménez, B; Felipo, V; Cabrera-Pastor, A; Agustí, A; Hernández-Rabaza, V; Llansola, M

    2018-02-01

    It has been proposed that developmental exposure to pesticides contributes to increasing prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders in children, such as attention deficit with hyperactivity (ADHD) and to alterations in coordination skills. However, the mechanisms involved in these alterations remain unclear. We analyzed the effects on spontaneous motor activity and motor coordination of developmental exposure to a representative pesticide of each one of the four main chemical families: organophosphates (chlorpyrifos), carbamates (carbaryl), organochlorines (endosulfan), and pyrethroids (cypermethrin). Pesticides were administered once a day orally, in a sweet jelly, from gestational day 7 to post natal day 21. Spontaneous motor activity was assessed by an actimeter and motor coordination using the rotarod, when rats were adults. The effects were analyzed separately in males and females. Extracellular GABA in cerebellum and NMDA receptor subunits in hippocampus were assessed as possible underlying mechanisms of motor alterations. Motor coordination was impaired by developmental exposure to endosulfan, cypermethrin, and chlorpyrifos in females but not in males. The effect of endosulfan and cypermethrin would be due to increased extracellular GABA in cerebellum, which remains unaltered in male rats. Chlorpyrifos increased motor activity in males and females. Cypermethrin decreased motor activity mainly in males. In male rats, but not in females, expression of the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor in hippocampus correlated with motor activity. These results show sex-specific effects of different pesticides on motor activity and coordination, associated with neurotransmission alterations. These data contribute to better understand the relationship between developmental exposure to the main pesticide families and motor disorders in children.

  10. Voluntary alcohol intake after noise exposure in adolescent rats: Hippocampal-related behavioral alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, M; Molina, S J; Forcada, A; Acosta, G B; Guelman, L R

    2018-01-15

    Different physical or chemical agents, such as noise or alcohol, can induce diverse behavioral and biochemical alterations. Considering the high probability of young people to undergo consecutive or simultaneous exposures, the aim of the present work was to investigate in an animal model if noise exposure at early adolescence could induce hippocampal-related behavioral changes that might be modified after alcohol intake. Male Wistar rats (28-days-old) were exposed to noise (95-97 dB, 2 h). Afterwards, animals were allowed to voluntarily drink alcohol (10% ethanol in tap water) for three consecutive days, using the two-bottle free choice paradigm. After that, hippocampal-related memory and anxiety-like behavior tests were performed. Results show that whereas noise-exposed rats presented deficits in habituation memory, those who drank alcohol exhibited impairments in associative memory and anxiety-like behaviors. In contrast, exposure to noise followed by alcohol intake showed increases in exploratory and locomotor activities as well as in anxiety-like behaviors, unlike what was observed using each agent separately. Finally, lower levels of alcohol intake were measured in these animals when compared with those that drank alcohol and were not exposed to noise. Present findings demonstrate that exposure to physical and chemical challenges during early adolescence might induce behavioral alterations that could differ depending on the schedule used, suggesting a high vulnerability of rat developing brain to these socially relevant agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rat hippocampal alterations could underlie behavioral abnormalities induced by exposure to moderate noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uran, S L; Aon-Bertolino, M L; Caceres, L G; Capani, F; Guelman, L R

    2012-08-30

    Noise exposure is known to affect auditory structures in living organisms. However, it should not be ignored that many of the effects of noise are extra-auditory. Previous findings of our laboratory demonstrated that noise was able to induce behavioral alterations that are mainly related to the cerebellum (CE) and the hippocampus (HC). Therefore, the aim of this work was to reveal new data about the vulnerability of developing rat HC to moderate noise levels through the assessment of potential histological changes and hippocampal-related behavioral alterations. Male Wistar rats were exposed to noise (95-97 dB SPL, 2h daily) either for 1 day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or between postnatal days 15 and 30 (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal histological evaluation as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) habituation and recognition memory assessments were performed. Results showed a mild disruption in the different hippocampal regions after ANE and SANE schemes, along with significant behavioral abnormalities. These data suggest that exposure of developing rats to noise levels of moderate intensity is able to trigger changes in the HC, an extra-auditory structure of the Central Nervous System (CNS), that could underlie the observed behavioral effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diesel exhaust particle exposure in vitro alters monocyte differentiation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Chaudhuri

    Full Text Available Air pollution by diesel exhaust particles is associated with elevated mortality and increased hospital admissions in individuals with respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. During active inflammation monocytes are recruited to the airways and can replace resident alveolar macrophages. We therefore investigated whether chronic fourteen day exposure to low concentrations of diesel exhaust particles can alter the phenotype and function of monocytes from healthy individuals and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Monocytes were purified from the blood of healthy individuals and people with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in the presence or absence of diesel exhaust particles and their phenotypes studied through investigation of their lifespan, cytokine generation in response to Toll like receptor agonists and heat killed bacteria, and expression of surface markers. Chronic fourteen day exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to concentrations of diesel exhaust particles >10 µg/ml caused mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction, and a gradual loss of cells over time both in healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease individuals. Chronic exposure to lower concentrations of diesel exhaust particles impaired CXCL8 cytokine responses to lipopolysaccharide and heat killed E. coli, and this phenotype was associated with a reduction in CD14 and CD11b expression. Chronic diesel exhaust particle exposure may therefore alter both numbers and function of lung macrophages differentiating from locally recruited monocytes in the lungs of healthy people and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. Environmentally realistic exposure to the herbicide atrazine alters some sexually selected traits in male guppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Kausalya

    2012-01-01

    Male mating signals, including ornaments and courtship displays, and other sexually selected traits, like male-male aggression, are largely controlled by sex hormones. Environmental pollutants, notably endocrine disrupting compounds, can interfere with the proper functioning of hormones, thereby impacting the expression of hormonally regulated traits. Atrazine, one of the most widely used herbicides, can alter sex hormone levels in exposed animals. I tested the effects of environmentally relevant atrazine exposures on mating signals and behaviors in male guppies, a sexually dimorphic freshwater fish. Prolonged atrazine exposure reduced the expression of two honest signals: the area of orange spots (ornaments) and the number of courtship displays performed. Atrazine exposure also reduced aggression towards competing males in the context of mate competition. In the wild, exposure levels vary among individuals because of differential distribution of the pollutants across habitats; hence, differently impacted males often compete for the same mates. Disrupted mating signals can reduce reproductive success as females avoid mating with perceptibly suboptimal males. Less aggressive males are at a competitive disadvantage and lose access to females. This study highlights the effects of atrazine on ecologically relevant mating signals and behaviors in exposed wildlife. Altered reproductive traits have important implications for population dynamics, evolutionary patterns, and conservation of wildlife species.

  14. Environmentally realistic exposure to the herbicide atrazine alters some sexually selected traits in male guppies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kausalya Shenoy

    Full Text Available Male mating signals, including ornaments and courtship displays, and other sexually selected traits, like male-male aggression, are largely controlled by sex hormones. Environmental pollutants, notably endocrine disrupting compounds, can interfere with the proper functioning of hormones, thereby impacting the expression of hormonally regulated traits. Atrazine, one of the most widely used herbicides, can alter sex hormone levels in exposed animals. I tested the effects of environmentally relevant atrazine exposures on mating signals and behaviors in male guppies, a sexually dimorphic freshwater fish. Prolonged atrazine exposure reduced the expression of two honest signals: the area of orange spots (ornaments and the number of courtship displays performed. Atrazine exposure also reduced aggression towards competing males in the context of mate competition. In the wild, exposure levels vary among individuals because of differential distribution of the pollutants across habitats; hence, differently impacted males often compete for the same mates. Disrupted mating signals can reduce reproductive success as females avoid mating with perceptibly suboptimal males. Less aggressive males are at a competitive disadvantage and lose access to females. This study highlights the effects of atrazine on ecologically relevant mating signals and behaviors in exposed wildlife. Altered reproductive traits have important implications for population dynamics, evolutionary patterns, and conservation of wildlife species.

  15. Embryo-larval exposure to atrazine reduces viability and alters oxidative stress parameters in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Fernanda Hernandes; Aguiar, Lais Mattos de; Rosa, Carlos Eduardo da

    2017-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine has been used worldwide with subsequent residual contamination of water and food, which may cause adverse effects on non-target organisms. Animal exposure to this herbicide may affect development, reproduction and energy metabolism. Here, the effects of atrazine regarding survival and redox metabolism were assessed in the fruit fly D. melanogaster exposed during embryonic and larval development. The embryos (newly fertilized eggs) were exposed to different atrazine concentrations (10μM and 100μM) in the diet until the adult fly emerged. Pupation and emergence rates, developmental time and sex ratio were determined as well as oxidative stress parameters and gene expression of the antioxidant defence system were evaluated in newly emerged male and female flies. Atrazine exposure reduced pupation and emergence rates in fruit flies without alterations to developmental time and sex ratio. Different redox imbalance patterns were observed between males and females exposed to atrazine. Atrazine caused an increase in oxidative damage, reactive oxygen species generation and antioxidant capacity and decreased thiol-containing molecules. Further, atrazine exposure altered the mRNA expression of antioxidant genes (keap1, sod, sod2, cat, irc, gss, gclm, gclc, trxt, trxr-1 and trxr-2). Reductions in fruit fly larval and pupal viability observed here are likely consequences of the oxidative stress induced by atrazine exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate induces morphological alterations in suprachiasmatic nucleus of adult rat.

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    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Rojas, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Rojas, Carolina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate (MSG) induces circadian disorders in several physiological and behavioural processes regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of neonatal exposure to MSG on locomotor activity, and on morphology, cellular density and expression of proteins, as evaluated by optical density (OD), of vasopressin (VP)-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells in the SCN. Male Wistar rats were used: the MSG group was subcutaneously treated from 3 to 10 days of age with 3.5 mg/g/day. Locomotor activity was evaluated at 90 days of age using 'open-field' test, and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical studies. MSG exposure induced a significant decrease in locomotor activity. VP- and VIP-immunoreactive neuronal densities showed a significant decrease, while the somatic OD showed an increase. Major axes and somatic area were significantly increased in VIP neurons. The cellular and optical densities of GFAP-immunoreactive sections of SCN were significantly increased. These results demonstrated that newborn exposure to MSG induced morphological alterations in SCN cells, an alteration that could be the basis for behavioural disorders observed in the animals. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2016 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  17. Cholinergic Synaptic Transmissions Were Altered after Single Sevoflurane Exposure in Drosophila Pupa

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    Rongfa Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Sevoflurane, one of the most used general anesthetics, is widely used in clinical practice all over the world. Previous studies indicated that sevoflurane could induce neuron apoptosis and neural deficit causing query in the safety of anesthesia using sevoflurane. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on electrophysiology in Drosophila pupa whose excitatory neurotransmitter is acetylcholine early after sevoflurane exposure using whole brain recording technique. Methods. Wide types of Drosophila (canton-s flies were allocated to control and sevoflurane groups randomly. Sevoflurane groups (1% sevoflurane; 2% sevoflurane; 3% sevoflurane were exposed to sevoflurane and the exposure lasted 5 hours, respectively. All flies were subjected to electrophysiology experiment using patch clamp 24 hours after exposure. Results. The results showed that, 24 hours after sevoflurane exposure, frequency but not the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs was significantly reduced P<0.05. Furthermore, we explored the underlying mechanism and found that calcium currents density, which partially regulated the frequency of mEPSCs, was significantly reduced after sevoflurane exposure P<0.05. Conclusions. All these suggested that sevoflurane could alter the mEPSCs that are related to synaptic plasticity partially through modulating calcium channel early after sevoflurane exposure.

  18. Cholinergic synaptic transmissions were altered after single sevoflurane exposure in Drosophila pupa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongfa; Zhang, Tao; Kuang, Liting; Chen, Zhen; Ran, Dongzhi; Niu, Yang; Xu, Kangqing; Gu, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01

    . Sevoflurane, one of the most used general anesthetics, is widely used in clinical practice all over the world. Previous studies indicated that sevoflurane could induce neuron apoptosis and neural deficit causing query in the safety of anesthesia using sevoflurane. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on electrophysiology in Drosophila pupa whose excitatory neurotransmitter is acetylcholine early after sevoflurane exposure using whole brain recording technique. Wide types of Drosophila (canton-s flies) were allocated to control and sevoflurane groups randomly. Sevoflurane groups (1% sevoflurane; 2% sevoflurane; 3% sevoflurane) were exposed to sevoflurane and the exposure lasted 5 hours, respectively. All flies were subjected to electrophysiology experiment using patch clamp 24 hours after exposure. The results showed that, 24 hours after sevoflurane exposure, frequency but not the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) was significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we explored the underlying mechanism and found that calcium currents density, which partially regulated the frequency of mEPSCs, was significantly reduced after sevoflurane exposure (P < 0.05). All these suggested that sevoflurane could alter the mEPSCs that are related to synaptic plasticity partially through modulating calcium channel early after sevoflurane exposure.

  19. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  20. Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ivy N; Zee, Phyllis C; Shalman, Dov; Malkani, Roneil G; Kang, Joseph; Reid, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism.

  1. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

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    Anis Rageh Al-Maleki

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV] to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk, ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis.

  2. Effects of prenatal and postnatal depression, and maternal stroking, at the glucocorticoid receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgatroyd, C; Quinn, J P; Sharp, H M; Pickles, A; Hill, J

    2015-05-05

    In animal models, prenatal and postnatal stress is associated with elevated hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) reactivity mediated via altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene expression. Postnatal tactile stimulation is associated with reduced HPA reactivity mediated via increased GR gene expression. In this first study in humans to examine the joint effects of prenatal and postnatal environmental exposures, we report that GR gene (NR3C1) 1-F promoter methylation in infants is elevated in the presence of increased maternal postnatal depression following low prenatal depression, and that this effect is reversed by self-reported stroking of the infants by their mothers over the first weeks of life.

  3. Intrauterine ethanol exposure results in hypothalamic oxidative stress and neuroendocrine alterations in adult rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Korami; Yao, Xing-Hai; Chen, Li; Nyomba, B L Grégoire

    2006-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol (EtOH) exposure is associated with low birth weight, followed by increased appetite, catch-up growth, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose tolerance in the rat offspring. Because EtOH can induce oxidative stress, which is a putative mechanism of insulin resistance, and because of the central role of the hypothalamus in the regulation of energy homeostasis and insulin action, we investigated whether prenatal EtOH exposure causes oxidative damage to the hypothalamus, which may alter its function. Female rats were given EtOH by gavage throughout pregnancy. At birth, their offspring were smaller than those of non-EtOH rats. Markers of oxidative stress and expression of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) were determined in hypothalami of postnatal day 7 (PD7) and 3-mo-old (adult) rat offspring. In both PD7 and adult rats, prenatal EtOH exposure was associated with decreased levels of glutathione and increased expression of MnSOD. The concentrations of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls were normal in PD7 EtOH-exposed offspring, but were increased in adult EtOH-exposed offspring. Both PD7 and adult EtOH-exposed offspring had normal neuropeptide Y and POMC mRNA levels, but the adult offspring had reduced POMC protein concentration. Thus only adult offspring preexposed to EtOH had increased hypothalamic tissue damage and decreased levels of POMC, which could impair melanocortin signaling. We conclude that prenatal EtOH exposure causes hypothalamic oxidative stress, which persists into adult life and alters melanocortin action during adulthood. These neuroendocrine alterations may explain weight gain and insulin resistance in rats exposed to EtOH early in life.

  4. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

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    Herring, M.J.; Putney, L.F.; St George, J.A. [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States); Avdalovic, M.V. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Schelegle, E.S.; Miller, L.A. [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States); Hyde, D.M., E-mail: dmhyde@ucdavis.edu [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O{sub 3}) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O{sub 3}) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O{sub 3} alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  5. DEVELOPMENTAL CIGARETTE SMOKE EXPOSURE: LIVER PROTEOME PROFILE ALTERATIONS IN LOW BIRTH WEIGHT PUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Lorena; Chen, Jing; Kelty, Elizabeth; Musah, Sadiatu; Webb, Cindy; Pisano, M. Michele; Neal, Rachel E.

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is composed of over 4000 chemicals many of which are strong oxidizing agents and chemical carcinogens. Chronic cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) induces mild alterations in liver histology indicative of toxicity though the molecular pathways underlying these alterations remain to be explored. Utilizing a mouse model of ‘active’ developmental CSE (gestational day (GD) 1 through postnatal day (PD) 21; cotinine > 50 ng/mL) characterized by low birth weight offspring, the impact of developmental CSE on liver protein abundances was determined. On PD21, liver tissue was collected from pups for 2D SDS-PAGE based proteome analysis with statistical analysis by Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). Protein spots of interest were identified by ESI-MS/MS with impacted molecular pathways identified by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Developmental CSE decreased the abundance of proteins associated with the small molecule biochemistry (includes glucose metabolism), lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and inflammatory response pathways. Decreased gluconeogenic enzyme activity and lysophosphatidylcholine availability following developmental CSE were found and supports the impact of CSE on these pathways. Proteins with increased abundance belonged to the cell death and drug metabolism networks. Liver antioxidant enzyme abundances [Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) and Peroxiredoxins] were also altered by CSE, but GST enzymatic activity was unchanged. In summary, cigarette smoke exposure spanning pre- and post-natal development resulted in persistent decreased offspring weights, decreased abundances of liver metabolic proteins, decreased gluconeogenic activity, and altered lipid metabolism. The companion paper details the kidney proteome alterations in the same offspring. PMID:22609517

  6. Perinatal exposure to genistein alters reproductive development and aggressive behavior in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Amy B; Cernetich, Amy; Gearhart, John P; Klein, Sabra L

    2005-02-15

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals adversely affects reproductive development and behavior in males. The goal of this study was to determine if exposure to genistein, an isoflavone found in soy, during early periods of sex differentiation alters reproductive development and behavior in male mice. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed a phytoestrogen-free diet supplemented with 0, 5 or 300 mg/kg of genistein throughout gestation and lactation. Anogenital distance (AGD) and body mass of male offspring was measured weekly from postnatal days 2-21, timing of preputial separation was assessed at puberty, and in adulthood, reproductive organ masses, sperm and testosterone production, and reproductive and aggressive behaviors were assessed. Exposure to genistein resulted in smaller AGD are reduced body mass, with the low-dose diet exerting a greater effect. Timing of preputial separation, adult reproductive behavior, sperm concentrations and testosterone production were not influenced by genistein treatment at either dose. Aggressive behaviors were decreased, whereas defensive behaviors were increased, in males that received the low-dose genistein diet. Exposure to genistein during critical periods of sex differentiation results in concurrent and persistent demasculinization in male mice. Phenotypic and behavioral abnormalities induced by genistein showed a non-monotonic response, where treatment with a low dose exerted a greater effect than treatment with a high dose of genistein. Given the popularity of soy infant formulas, the influence isoflavone exposure on reproductive and behavioral health in boys and men should be considered.

  7. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology

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    Brian R. Mullen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors—reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon—gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology.

  8. Environmental Enrichment Alters Neurotrophin Levels After Fetal Alcohol Exposure in Rats

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    Parks, Elizabeth A.; McMechan, Andrew P.; Hannigan, John H.; Berman, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure causes abnormal brain development, leading to behavioral deficits, some of which can be ameliorated by environmental enrichment. As both environmental enrichment and prenatal alcohol exposure can individually alter neurotrophin expression, we studied the interaction of prenatal alcohol and postweaning environmental enrichment on brain neurotrophin levels in rats. Methods Pregnant rats received alcohol by gavage, 0, 4, or 6 g / kg / d (Zero, Low, or High groups), or no treatment (Naïve group), on gestational days 8 to 20. After weaning on postnatal day 21, offspring were housed for 6 weeks in Isolated, Social, or Enriched conditions. Levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were then measured in frontal cortex, occipital cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar vermis. Results Prenatal alcohol exposure increased NGF levels in frontal cortex (High-dose group) and cerebellar vermis (High- and Low-dose groups); increased BDNF in frontal cortex, occipital cortex and hippocampus (Low-dose groups), and increased NT-3 in hippocampus and cerebellar vermis (High-dose). Environmental enrichment resulted in lower NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 levels in occipital cortex and lower NGF in frontal cortex. The only significant interaction between prenatal alcohol treatment and environment was in cerebellar vermis where NT-3 levels were higher for enriched animals after prenatal alcohol exposure, but not for animals housed under Isolated or Social conditions. Conclusions Both prenatal alcohol exposure and postweaning housing conditions alter brain neurotrophin levels, but the effects appear to be largely independent. Although environmental enrichment can improve functional outcomes, these results do not provide strong support for the hypothesis that rearing in a complex environment ameliorates prenatal alcohol effects on brain neurotrophin levels in rats. PMID:18652597

  9. Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Alterations in Newborns with Prenatal Exposure to Cigarette Smoke

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    Francesca Pirini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborns exposed to maternal cigarette smoke (CS in utero have an increased risk of developing chronic diseases, cancer, and acquiring decreased cognitive function in adulthood. Although the literature reports many deleterious effects associated with maternal cigarette smoking on the fetus, the molecular alterations and mechanisms of action are not yet clear. Smoking may act directly on nuclear DNA by inducing mutations or epigenetic modifications. Recent studies also indicate that smoking may act on mitochondrial DNA by inducing a change in the number of copies to make up for the damage caused by smoking on the respiratory chain and lack of energy. In addition, individual genetic susceptibility plays a significant role in determining the effects of smoking during development. Furthermore, prior exposure of paternal and maternal gametes to cigarette smoke may affect the health of the developing individual, not only the in utero exposure. This review examines the genetic and epigenetic alterations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA associated with smoke exposure during the most sensitive periods of development (prior to conception, prenatal and early postnatal and assesses how such changes may have consequences for both fetal growth and development.

  10. Histopathological alterations of white seabass, Lates calcarifer, in acute and subchronic cadmium exposure

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    Thophon, S.; Kruatrachue, M.; Upatham, E.S.; Pokethitiyook, P.; Sahaphong, S.; Jaritkhuan, S.

    2003-01-01

    White seabass responded differently to cadmium at chronic and subchronic levels. - Histopathological alterations to white seabass, Lates calcarifer aged 3 months in acute and subchronic cadmium exposure were studied by light and scanning electron microscopy. The 96-h LC 50 values of cadmium to L. calcarifer was found to be 20.12±0.61 mg/l and the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) was 7.79 mg/l. Fish were exposed to 10 and 0.8 mg/l of Cd (as CdCl 2 H 2 O) for 96 h and 90 days, respectively. The study showed that gill lamellae and kidney tubules were the primary target organs for the acute toxic effect of cadmium while in the subchronic exposure, the toxic effect to gills was less than that of kidney and liver. Gill alterations included edema of the epithelial cells with the breakdown of pillar cell system, aneurisms with some ruptures, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of epithelial and chloride cells. The liver showed blood congestion in sinusoids and hydropic swelling of hepatocytes, vacuolation and dark granule accumulation. Lipid droplets and glycogen content were observed in hepatocytes at the second and third month of subchronic exposure. The kidney showed hydropic swelling of tubular cell vacuolation and numerous dark granule accumulation in many tubules. Tubular degeneration and necrosis were seen in some areas

  11. Prenatal choline supplementation mitigates behavioral alterations associated with prenatal alcohol exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jennifer D; Idrus, Nirelia M; Monk, Bradley R; Dominguez, Hector D

    2010-10-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can alter physical and behavioral development, leading to a range of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Despite warning labels, pregnant women continue to drink alcohol, creating a need to identify effective interventions to reduce the severity of alcohol's teratogenic effects. Choline is an essential nutrient that influences brain and behavioral development. Recent studies indicate that choline supplementation can reduce the teratogenic effects of developmental alcohol exposure. The present study examined whether choline supplementation during prenatal ethanol treatment could mitigate the adverse effects of ethanol on behavioral development. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were intubated with 6 g/kg/day ethanol in a binge-like manner from gestational days 5-20; pair-fed and ad libitum chow controls were included. During treatment, subjects from each group were intubated with either 250 mg/kg/day choline chloride or vehicle. Spontaneous alternation, parallel bar motor coordination, Morris water maze, and spatial working memory were assessed in male and female offspring. Subjects prenatally exposed to alcohol exhibited delayed development of spontaneous alternation behavior and deficits on the working memory version of the Morris water maze during adulthood, effects that were mitigated with prenatal choline supplementation. Neither alcohol nor choline influenced performance on the motor coordination task. These data indicate that choline supplementation during prenatal alcohol exposure may reduce the severity of fetal alcohol effects, particularly on alterations in tasks that require behavioral flexibility. These findings have important implications for children of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Developmental alcohol exposure impairs synaptic plasticity without overtly altering microglial function in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elissa L; Lutz, Nina M; Hogan, Victoria A; Lamantia, Cassandra E; McMurray, Helene R; Myers, Jason R; Ashton, John M; Majewska, Ania K

    2018-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), caused by gestational ethanol (EtOH) exposure, is one of the most common causes of non-heritable and life-long mental disability worldwide, with no standard treatment or therapy available. While EtOH exposure can alter the function of both neurons and glia, it is still unclear how EtOH influences brain development to cause deficits in sensory and cognitive processing later in life. Microglia play an important role in shaping synaptic function and plasticity during neural circuit development and have been shown to mount an acute immunological response to EtOH exposure in certain brain regions. Therefore, we hypothesized that microglial roles in the healthy brain could be permanently altered by early EtOH exposure leading to deficits in experience-dependent plasticity. We used a mouse model of human third trimester high binge EtOH exposure, administering EtOH twice daily by subcutaneous injections from postnatal day 4 through postnatal day 9 (P4-:P9). Using a monocular deprivation model to assess ocular dominance plasticity, we found an EtOH-induced deficit in this type of visually driven experience-dependent plasticity. However, using a combination of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and in vivo two-photon microscopy to assay microglial morphology and dynamics, as well as fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and RNA-seq to examine the microglial transcriptome, we found no evidence of microglial dysfunction in early adolescence. We also found no evidence of microglial activation in visual cortex acutely after early ethanol exposure, possibly because we also did not observe EtOH-induced neuronal cell death in this brain region. We conclude that early EtOH exposure caused a deficit in experience-dependent synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex that was independent of changes in microglial phenotype or function. This demonstrates that neural plasticity can remain impaired by developmental ethanol exposure even in

  13. Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ivy N.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Shalman, Dov; Malkani, Roneil G.; Kang, Joseph; Reid, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism. PMID:27191727

  14. Exercício físico previne alterações cardiometabólicas induzidas pelo uso crônico de glicocorticóides Ejercicio físico previene alteraciones cardiometabólicas inducidas por el uso crónico de glucocorticoides Exercise prevents cardiometabolic alterations induced by chronic use of glucocorticoids

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    Carlos Hermano da Justa Pinheiro

    2009-10-01

    , diabetes, dislipidemia, esteatosis hepática e hipertensión arterial. OBJETIVOS: Evaluar el efecto de la práctica regular de ejercicio físico aeróbico sobre las alteraciones cardiometabólicas inducidas por administración crónica de dexametasona (Dex - 0,5 mg/kg/día i.p en ratones. MÉTODOS: Se dividieron ratones Wistar machos (n = 24 en cuatro grupos: Grupo control; Grupo entrenado; Grupo tratado con Dex y Grupo tratado con Dex y entrenado. El entrenamiento físico (iniciado 72 horas después de la primera dosis de Dex se realizó 3 veces por semana, hasta el final del tratamiento. Al final de ese período, se realizaron las siguientes evaluaciones bioquímicas: glicemia en ayunas, test de tolerancia a la glucosa y análisis del perfil lipídico en sangre que incluyó colesterol total (CT, LDL-c, HDL-c, VLDL-c y triglicéridos (TG. También se evaluaron, el peso del músculo gastrocnemio, análisis histopatológico del hígado y los índices cardiometabólicos (CT/HDL-c, LDL-c/HDL-c y TG/HDL-c. RESULTADOS: Se observó hiperglicemia, menor tolerancia a la glucosa, elevación de CT, LDL-c, VLDL-c y TG, disminución del HDL-c, presencia de esteatosis hepática, hipotrofia muscular y elevación de los índices CT/HDL-c, LDL-c/HDL-c y TG/HDL-c en los animales tratados con Dex. El ejercicio físico redujo la hiperglicemia, mejoró la tolerancia a la glucosa, redujo la dislipidemia y previno la esteatosis hepática, la hipotrofia muscular y redujo los índices CT/HDL-c, LDL-c/ HDL-c ye TG/HDL-c. Con todo, no hubo efecto significativo del entrenamiento físico sobre el HDL-c. CONCLUSIÓN: El ejercicio físico aeróbico tiene efecto protector con las alteraciones cardiometabólicas inducidas por el uso crónico de glucocorticoides.BACKGROUND: Chronically, glucocorticoids induce adverse cardiometabolic alterations including insulin resistance, diabetes, dyslipidemia, liver steatosis and arterial hypertension. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of regular practice of aerobic

  15. In vitro exposure of Ulva lactuca Linnaeus (Chlorophyta) to gasoline - Biochemical and morphological alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilatti, Fernanda Kokowicz; Ramlov, Fernanda; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Kreusch, Marianne; Pereira, Débora Tomazi; Costa, Christopher; de Oliveira, Eva Regina; Bauer, Cláudia M; Rocha, Miguel; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    Refined fuels have considerable share of pollution of marine ecosystems. Gasoline is one of the most consumed fuel worldwide, but its effects on marine benthic primary producers are poorly investigated. In this study, Ulva lactuca was chosen as a biological model due to its cosmopolitan nature and tolerance to high levels and wide range of xenobiotics and our goal was to evaluate the effects of gasoline on ultrastructure and metabolism of that seaweed. The experimental design consisted of in vitro exposure of U. lactuca to four concentrations of gasoline (0.001%, 0.01%, 0.1%, and 1.0%, v/v) over 30 min, 1 h, 12 h, and 24 h, followed by cytochemical, SEM, and biochemical analysis. Increase in the number of cytoplasmic granules, loss of cell turgor, cytoplasmic shrinkage, and alterations in the mucilage were some of the ultrastructural alterations observed in thalli exposed to gasoline. Decrease in carotenoid and polyphenol contents, as well as increase of soluble sugars and starch contents were associated with the time of exposure to the xenobiotic. In combination, the results revealed important morphological and biochemical alterations in the phenotype of U. lactuca upon acute exposure to gasoline. This seaweed contain certain metabolites assigned as candidates to biomarkers of the environmental stress investigated and it is thought to be a promise species for usage in coastal ecosystems perturbation monitoring system. In addition, the findings suggest that U. lactuca is able to metabolize gasoline hydrocarbons and use them as energy source, acting as bioremediator of marine waters contaminated by petroleum derivatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C → A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C → T, two C → A, one C → G, and one A → T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Synthetic Glucocorticoids and Early Variations of Blood Pressure: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Laurence; Nazareth, Irwin; Petersen, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids are known to increase blood pressure, but very little is known about the early effects of synthetic glucocorticoids (eg, prednisone, dexamethasone) on blood pressure. To assess longitudinal variations of blood pressure before and after initiation of systemic glucocorticoid therapy. Adult patients prescribed synthetic glucocorticoid therapy for at least 3 months and registered between 2004 and 2012 in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure as measured in primary care. Among the 16,351 patients prescribed antihypertensive drug within the year before glucocorticoid initiation (women, 57.1%; age [mean ± SD], 72.0 ± 11.4 y), the mean (SD) blood pressure within the year before glucocorticoid initiation was 140 (18)/78 (9) mm Hg. It was 139 (19)/77 (11), 139 (19)/77 (10), and 139 (19)/77 (11) mm Hg during the first, second, and third months of exposure, respectively. We did not find any evidence of the effects of glucocorticoids on blood pressure in these patients. Among the 6914 patients not prescribed antihypertensive drug within the year before glucocorticoid initiation (women, 64.9%; age, 60.0 ± 17.8 y), the figures were 133 (17)/78 (10), 135 (20)/79 (11), 133 (19)/78 (11), and 133 (19)/78 (11) mm Hg before exposure and during the first, second, and third months of exposure, respectively. In this group of patients, glucocorticoid exposure was associated with a slight (glucocorticoid initiation. Prednisone/prednisolone use was associated with a higher risk of extreme increase in systolic blood pressure than the other synthetic glucocorticoids (odds ratio, 4.9 [95% confidence interval, 1.9-12.6]; P = .001). Contrary to what is usually thought, the increase of blood pressure during the first months of exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids seems clinically nonsignificant.

  18. Moderate prenatal alcohol exposure alters behavior and neuroglial parameters in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolese, Giovana; Lunardi, Paula; Broetto, Núbia; Engelke, Douglas S; Lírio, Franciane; Batassini, Cristiane; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol consumption by women during gestation has become increasingly common. Although it is widely accepted that exposure to high doses of ethanol has long-lasting detrimental effects on brain development, the case for moderate doses is underappreciated, and benchmark studies have demonstrated structural and behavioral defects associated with moderate prenatal alcohol exposure in humans and animal models. This study aimed to investigate the influence of in utero exposure to moderate levels of ethanol throughout pregnancy on learning/memory, anxiety parameters and neuroglial parameters in adolescent offspring. Female rats were exposed to an experimental protocol throughout gestation up to weaning. After mating, the dams were divided into three groups and treated with only water (control), non-alcoholic beer (vehicle) or 10% (vv) beer solution (moderate prenatal alcohol exposure - MPAE). Adolescent male offspring were subjected to the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task to evaluate learning/memory and anxiety-like behavior. Hippocampi were dissected and slices were obtained for immunoquantification of GFAP, NeuN, S100B and the NMDA receptor. The MPAE group clearly presented anxiolytic-like behavior, even though they had learned how to avoid the aversive arm. S100B protein was increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the group treated with alcohol, and alterations in GFAP expression were also shown. This study indicates that moderate ethanol doses administered during pregnancy could induce anxiolytic-like effects, suggesting an increase in risk-taking behavior in adolescent male offspring. Furthermore, the data show the possibility that glial cells are involved in the altered behavior present after prenatal ethanol treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bisphenol A exposure alters developmental gene expression in the fetal rhesus macaque uterus.

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    Kathryn C Calhoun

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA exposure results in numerous developmental and functional abnormalities in reproductive organs in rodent models, but limited data are available regarding BPA effects in the primate uterus. To determine if maternal oral BPA exposure affects fetal uterine development in a non-human primate model, pregnant rhesus macaques carrying female fetuses were exposed orally to 400 µg/kg BPA or vehicle control daily from gestation day (GD 50-100 or GD100-165. Fetal uteri were collected at the completion of treatment (GD100 or GD165; tissue histology, cell proliferation, and expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and progesterone receptor (PR were compared to that of controls. Gene expression analysis was conducted using rhesus macaque microarrays. There were no significant differences in histology or in the percentage of cells expressing the proliferation marker Ki-67, ERα, or PR in BPA-exposed uteri compared to controls at GD100 or GD165. Minimal differences in gene expression were observed between BPA-exposed and control GD100 uteri. However, at GD165, BPA-exposed uteri had significant differences in gene expression compared to controls. Several of the altered genes, including HOXA13, WNT4, and WNT5A, are critical for reproductive organ development and/or adult function. We conclude that second or third trimester BPA exposure does not significantly affect fetal uterus development based on morphological, proliferation, and steroid hormone receptor assessments. However, differences in expression of key developmental genes after third trimester exposure suggest that BPA could alter transcriptional signals influencing uterine function later in life.

  20. Is gene transcription in mussel gills altered after exposure to Ag nanoparticles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebianno, M J; Gonzalez-Rey, M; Gomes, T; Mattos, J J; Flores-Nunes, F; Bainy, A C D

    2015-11-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapid field of development with the enhancement of the production of different types of nanoparticles (NPs) applied in several industrial and commercial applications which increase the risk of their presence in the aquatic environment. Ag NPs have a wide application in everyday life products. However, there is concern about the exposure effects on aquatic organisms to these NPs. Therefore, this study aims to assess gene transcription alterations in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis gills exposed for 2 weeks to Ag NPs (42 ± 10 nm, 10 μg.L(-1)). The genes were selected based on previous biomarkers and proteomic results and included superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione transferase (GST), caspase 3/7-1 (CAS), cathepsin L (CATH), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP 70), cytochrome P450 4YA (CYP 4YA), the elongation factor (EF1), actin and α- tubulin. No significant changes in gene transcription profiles were observed after exposure of M. galloprovincialis to Ag NPs for 15 days. The lack of significant gene transcription responses is in light with previous results obtained for mussels exposed to these NPs and may be related to the fact that enzyme kinetics and relative abundance of proteins (increase of antioxidant enzymes and metalllothioneins (MTs) with the time of exposure) do not always directly reflect their relative mRNA levels. Nevertheless, their overall expression maintenance may signify that, at end of the exposure period (15 days), the transcription of the respective genes is no longer required, pointing out to a possible adaptation effect to nanoparticles or due to the levels of Ag NPs accumulated in this tissue at this exposure time. This study highlights that gene transcription application and role as an additional and/or alternative end point approach is important to understand the mode of action of these emergent contaminants in aquatic organisms. However, in future studies, the time window needs to be adjusted, as

  1. Common behaviors alterations after extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field exposure in rat animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Najafi Abedi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Naturally, the presence of electromagnetic waves in our living environment affects all components of organisms, particularly humans and animals, as the large part of their body consists of water. In the present study, we tried to investigate the relation between exposure to the extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and common behaviors such as body weight, food and water intake, anorexia (poor appetite), plasma glucose concentration, movement, rearing and sniffing in rats. For this purpose, rats were exposed to 40  Hz ELF-EMF once a day for 21 days, then at days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after exposure, any changes in the above-mentioned items were assessed in the exposed rats and compared to the non-exposed group as control. Body weight of irradiated rats significantly increased only a week after exposure and decreased after that. No significant change was observed in food and water intake of irradiated rats compared to the control, and the anorexia parameter in the group exposed to ELF-EMF was significantly decreased at one and two weeks after irradiation. A week after exposure, the level of glucose was significantly increased but at other days these changes were not significant. Movements, rearing and sniffing of rats at day 1 after exposure were significantly decreased and other days these changes did not follow any particular pattern. However, the result of this study demonstrated that exposure to ELF-EMF can alter the normal condition of animals and may represent a harmful impact on behavior.

  2. Exposure of rainbow trout milt to mercury and cadmium alters sperm motility parameters and reproductive success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Grzegorz J., E-mail: dietrich@pan.olsztyn.pl [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Dietrich, Mariola; Kowalski, R.K. [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Dobosz, Stefan [Department of Salmonid Research, Inland Fisheries Institute, Rutki 83-330 Zukowo (Poland); Karol, Halina; Demianowicz, Wieslaw; Glogowski, Jan [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland)

    2010-05-10

    In the current work, seminal plasma was used for the first time as an incubation medium for monitoring short-time exposure effects of sublethal concentrations of mercury and cadmium ions on rainbow trout sperm. Sperm motility parameters (CASA) and hatching rates were used as gamete quality markers. Additionally live/dead sperm viability test and comet assay of DNA fragmentation were performed. We demonstrated that computer-assisted sperm motility analysis (CASA) may serve as a predictor of reproductive success, when milt contaminated with heavy metals is used. Results presented in this study demonstrate that mercury ions altered sperm motility characteristics at 1-10 mg Hg{sup 2+}/l and 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/l and hatching rates at 10 mg Hg{sup 2+}/l and 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/l after 4 h of exposure. Although mercury ions affected sperm motility parameters immediately after dilution with milt as well as at 4 h of exposure, no differences in sperm motility parameters were found between intact and mercury-treated milt after 24 h of exposure. Our results suggest that rainbow trout seminal plasma has a protective role against the toxic effects of mercury ions of rainbow trout sperm motility.

  3. MicroRNA Expression Profiling Altered by Variant Dosage of Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Fang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various biological effects are associated with radiation exposure. Irradiated cells may elevate the risk for genetic instability, mutation, and cancer under low levels of radiation exposure, in addition to being able to extend the postradiation side effects in normal tissues. Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE is the focus of rigorous research as it may promote the development of cancer even at low radiation doses. Alterations in the DNA sequence could not explain these biological effects of radiation and it is thought that epigenetics factors may be involved. Indeed, some microRNAs (or miRNAs have been found to correlate radiation-induced damages and may be potential biomarkers for the various biological effects caused by different levels of radiation exposure. However, the regulatory role that miRNA plays in this aspect remains elusive. In this study, we profiled the expression changes in miRNA under fractionated radiation exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. By utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and performing cross validations with our previous gene expression profiling under the same radiation condition, we identified various miRNA-gene interactions specific to different doses of radiation treatment, providing new insights for the molecular underpinnings of radiation injury.

  4. Parental diuron-exposure alters offspring transcriptome and fitness in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachère, Evelyne; Barranger, Audrey; Bruno, Roman; Rouxel, Julien; Menard, Dominique; Piquemal, David; Akcha, Farida

    2017-08-01

    One of the primary challenges in ecotoxicology is to contribute to the assessment of the ecological status of ecosystems. In this study, we used Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to explore the effects of a parental exposure to diuron, a herbicide frequently detected in marine coastal environments. The present toxicogenomic study provides evidence that exposure of oyster genitors to diuron during gametogenesis results in changes in offspring, namely, transcriptomic profile alterations, increased global DNA methylation levels and reduced growth and survival within the first year of life. Importantly, we highlighted the limitations to identify particular genes or gene expression signatures that could serve as biomarkers for parental herbicide-exposure and further for multigenerational and transgenerational effects of specific chemical stressors. By analyzing samples from two independent experiments, we demonstrated that, due to complex confounding effects with both tested solvent vehicles, diuron non-specifically affected the offspring transcriptome. These original results question the potential development of predictive genomic tools for detecting specific indirect impacts of contaminants in environmental risk assessments. However, our results indicate that chronic environmental exposure to diuron over several generations may have significant long term impacts on oyster populations with adverse health outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Developmental and lactational exposure to dieldrin alters mammary tumorigenesis in Her2/neu transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Cameron

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Western women and while its precise etiology is unknown, environmental factors are thought to play a role. The organochlorine pesticide dieldrin is a persistent environmental toxicant thought to increase the risk of breast cancer and reduce survival in the human population. The objective of this study was to define the effect of developmental exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of dieldrin, on mammary tumor development in the offspring. Sexually mature FVB-MMTV/neu female mice were treated with vehicle (corn oil, or dieldrin (0.45, 2.25, and 4.5 microg/g body weight daily by gavage for 5 days prior to mating and then once weekly throughout gestation and lactation until weaning. Dieldrin concentrations were selected to produce serum levels representative of human background body burdens, occupational exposure, and overt toxicity. Treatment had no effect on litter size, birth weight or the number of pups surviving to weaning. The highest dose of dieldrin significantly increased the total tumor burden and the volume and number of tumors found in the thoracic mammary glands. Increased mRNA and protein expression of the neurotrophin BDNF and its receptor TrkB was increased in tumors from the offspring of dieldrin treated dams. This study indicates that developmental exposure to the environmental contaminant dieldrin causes increased tumor burden in genetically predisposed mice. Dieldrin exposure also altered the expression of BNDF and TrkB, novel modulators of cancer pathogenesis.

  6. Prenatal androgen exposure alters girls' responses to information indicating gender-appropriate behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Melissa; Pasterski, Vickie; Spencer, Debra; Neufeld, Sharon; Patalay, Praveetha; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo L

    2016-02-19

    Individual variability in human gender-related behaviour is influenced by many factors, including androgen exposure prenatally, as well as self-socialization and socialization by others postnatally. Many studies have looked at these types of influences in isolation, but little is known about how they work together. Here, we report that girls exposed to high concentrations of androgens prenatally, because they have the genetic condition congenital adrenal hyperplasia, show changes in processes related to self-socialization of gender-related behaviour. Specifically, they are less responsive than other girls to information that particular objects are for girls and they show reduced imitation of female models choosing particular objects. These findings suggest that prenatal androgen exposure may influence subsequent gender-related behaviours, including object (toy) choices, in part by changing processes involved in the self-socialization of gendered behaviour, rather than only by inducing permanent changes in the brain during early development. In addition, the findings suggest that some of the behavioural effects of prenatal androgen exposure might be subject to alteration by postnatal socialization processes. The findings also suggest a previously unknown influence of early androgen exposure on later processes involved in self-socialization of gender-related behaviour, and thus expand understanding of the developmental systems regulating human gender development. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Developmental exposure to terbutaline alters cell signaling in mature rat brain regions and augments the effects of subsequent neonatal exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J.; Aldridge, Justin E.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to apparently unrelated neurotoxicants can nevertheless converge on common neurodevelopmental events. We examined the long-term effects of developmental exposure of rats to terbutaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist used to arrest preterm labor, and the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) separately and together. Treatments mimicked the appropriate neurodevelopmental stages for human exposures: terbutaline on postnatal days (PN) 2-5 and CPF on PN11-14, with assessments conducted on PN45. Although neither treatment affected growth or viability, each elicited alterations in CNS cell signaling mediated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), a transduction pathway shared by numerous neuronal and hormonal signals. Terbutaline altered signaling in the brainstem and cerebellum, with gender differences particularly notable in the cerebellum (enhanced AC in males, suppressed in females). By itself, CPF exposure elicited deficits in AC signaling in the midbrain, brainstem, and striatum. However, sequential exposure to terbutaline followed by CPF produced larger alterations and involved a wider spectrum of brain regions than were obtained with either agent alone. In the cerebral cortex, adverse effects of the combined treatment intensified between PN45 and PN60, suggesting that exposures alter the long-term program for development of synaptic communication, leading to alterations in AC signaling that emerge even after adolescence. These findings indicate that terbutaline, like CPF, is a developmental neurotoxicant, and reinforce the idea that its use in preterm labor may create a subpopulation that is sensitized to long-term CNS effects of organophosphorus insecticides

  8. Alteration to Dopaminergic Synapses Following Exposure to Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS, in Vitro and in Vivo

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    Rahul Patel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the contribution exposure to environmental toxicants has on neurological disease continues to evolve. Of these, Parkinson’s disease (PD has been shown to have a strong environmental component to its etiopathogenesis. However, work is still needed to identify and characterize environmental chemicals that could alter the expression and function of the nigrostriatal dopamine system. Of particular interest is the neurotoxicological effect of perfluorinated compounds, such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, which has been demonstrated to alter aspects of dopamine signaling. Using in vitro approaches, we have elaborated these initial findings to demonstrate the neurotoxicity of PFOS to the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line and dopaminergic primary cultured neurons. Using an in vivo model, we did not observe a deficit to dopaminergic terminals in the striatum of mice exposed to 10 mg/kg PFOS for 14 days. However, subsequent exposure to the selective dopaminergic neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP significantly reduced the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, and resulted in an even greater reduction in DAT expression in animals previously exposed to PFOS. These findings suggest that PFOS is neurotoxic to the nigrostriatal dopamine circuit and this neurotoxicity could prime the dopamine terminal to more extensive damage following additional toxicological insults.

  9. Evaluation of biochemical alterations produced by combined exposure of fenvalerate and nitrate in Bubalus bubalis

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    Kamalpreet Kaur Gill

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluation of combined effect of fenvalerate and nitrate on biochemical parameters in buffalo calves. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male buffalo calves were divided into four groups of four calves each. Group I receiving no treatment served as the control. Group II and III animals were orally administered with fenvalerate (1.0 mg/kg/day and sodium nitrate (20 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 21 consecutive days and were kept as positive control. Group IV animals were co-administered with fenvalerate and sodium nitrate at the above dose rates for 21 consecutive days. Biochemical parameters including Aspartate aminotransferase (AST, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, Glucose, Total protein, Albumin, Cholesterol, Blood urea nitrogen (BUN and Creatinine were determined on 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 day of treatment. Estimation of these parameters was also done on 7th day of post-treatment period. Results: Co-administration of fenvalerate and sodium nitrate produced significant increase in the plasma levels of AST, ALP, GGT, LDH, glucose, BUN, cholesterol and creatinine while significant decrease in the plasma levels of total proteins was observed. No significant alteration was observed in albumin levels. Extent of organ damage as evidenced by biochemical alterations was more pronounced in calves exposed to combination of fenvalerate and sodium nitrate as compared to their individual exposures. Conclusion: Fenvalerate and sodium nitrate co-administration potentiates the toxicological injury produced, in comparison to their individual exposure.

  10. Association between lead exposure from electronic waste recycling and child temperament alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junxiao; Xu, Xijin; Wu, Kusheng; Piao, Zhongxian; Huang, Jinrong; Guo, Yongyong; Li, Weiqiu; Zhang, Yuling; Chen, Aimin; Huo, Xia

    2011-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the dose-dependent effects of lead exposure on temperament alterations in children from a primitive e-waste (obsolete electrical and electronic devices) recycling area in Guiyu of China and a control area (Chendian, China). Blood lead levels (BLL) might be correlated with temperament, health, and relevant factors that were evaluated through Parent Temperament Questionnaire (PTQ), physical examination, and residential questionnaires. We collected venipuncture blood samples from 303 children (aged 3-7 years old) between January and February 2008. Child BLL were higher in Guiyu than in Chendian (median 13.2 μg/dL, range 4.0-48.5 μg/dL vs. 8.2 μg/dL, 0-21.3 μg/dL) (Pchildren (all Pchildren with low BLL (BLLchildren by increasing BLL and altering children temperament, although the exposure to other toxicants needs to be examined in future studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Does exposure to testosterone significantly alter endogenous metabolism in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Denise; Navarro, Juan Carlos; Riva, Consuelo; Bordonali, Silvia; Porte, Cinta

    2010-11-15

    Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were exposed to different concentrations of testosterone (T: 20, 200 and 2000ng/L) in a semi-static water regime (1-day dosing intervals) for up to 5 days in an attempt to see whether endogenous steroid levels and steroid metabolism were altered by exogenous exposure to testosterone. Whole tissue levels of total testosterone (free+esterified) sharply increased in a concentration-dependent manner, from 2ng/g in controls to 290ng/g in organisms exposed to the highest concentration. In contrast, levels of free testosterone were only significantly elevated at the high-exposure group (5-fold increase with respect to controls). Increased activity of palmitoyl-CoA:testosterone acyltransferase (ATAT) was detected in organisms exposed to the highest concentration of testosterone, while those exposed to low and medium concentrations showed significant alterations in their polyunsaturated fatty acid profiles. The obtained results suggest that esterification of the excess of T with fatty acids might act as a homeostatic mechanism to maintain endogenous levels of free T stable. Interestingly, a decrease in CYP3A-like activity was detected in T-exposed mussels together with a significant decrease in the metabolism of the androgen precursor androstenedione to dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT). Overall, the work contributes to the better knowledge of androgen metabolism in mussels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Developmental Exposure to Xenoestrogens at Low Doses Alters Femur Length and Tensile Strength in Adult Mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelch, Katherine E.; Carleton, Stephanie M.; Phillips, Charlotte L.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Developmental exposure to high doses of the synthetic xenoestrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been reported to alter femur length and strength in adult mice. However, it is not known if developmental exposure to low, environmentally relevant doses of xenoestrogens alters adult bone geometry and strength. In this study we investigated the effects of developmental exposure to low doses of DES, bisphenol A (BPA), or ethinyl estradiol (EE2) on bone geometry and torsional strength. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DES, 0.1 μg/kg/day, BPA, 10 μg/kg/day, EE2, 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0 μg/kg/day, or vehicle from Gestation Day 11 to Postnatal Day 12 via a mini-osmotic pump in the dam. Developmental Xenoestrogen exposure altered femoral geometry and strength, assessed in adulthood by micro-computed tomography and torsional strength analysis, respectively. Low-dose EE2, DES, or BPA increased adult femur length. Exposure to the highest dose of EE2 did not alter femur length, resulting in a nonmonotonic dose response. Exposure to EE2 and DES but not BPA decreased tensile strength. The combined effect of increased femur length and decreased tensile strength resulted in a trend toward decreased torsional ultimate strength and energy to failure. Taken together, these results suggest that exposure to developmental exposure to environmentally relevant levels of xenoestrogens may negatively impact bone length and strength in adulthood. PMID:22088916

  13. Alcohol Exposure Alters Mouse Lung Inflammation in Response to Inhaled Dust

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    Jill A. Poole

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol exposure is associated with increased lung infections and decreased mucociliary clearance. Occupational workers exposed to dusts from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs are at risk for developing chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Agricultural worker co-exposure to alcohol and organic dust has been established, although little research has been conducted on the combination effects of alcohol and organic dusts on the lung. Previously, we have shown in a mouse model that exposure to hog dust extract (HDE collected from a CAFO results in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC, elevated lavage fluid cytokines/chemokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6, and the development of significant lung pathology. Because alcohol blocks airway epithelial cell release of IL-6 in vitro, we hypothesized that alcohol exposure would alter mouse lung inflammatory responses to HDE. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were fed 20% alcohol or water ad libitum for 6 weeks and treated with 12.5% HDE by intranasal inhalation method daily during the final three weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, tracheas and lungs were collected. HDE stimulated a 2–4 fold increase in lung and tracheal PKCε (epsilon activity in mice, but no such increase in PKCε activity was observed in dust-exposed mice fed alcohol. Similarly, alcohol-fed mice demonstrated significantly less IL-6 in lung lavage in response to dust than that observed in control mice instilled with HDE. TNFα levels were also inhibited in the alcohol and HDE-exposed mouse lung tissue as compared to the HDE only exposed group. HDE-induced lung inflammatory aggregates clearly present in the tissue from HDE only exposed animals were not visually detectable in the HDE/alcohol co-exposure group. Statistically significant weight reductions and 20% mortality were also observed in the mice co-exposed to HDE and alcohol. These data suggest that alcohol exposure depresses the ability

  14. Postnatal choline supplementation selectively attenuates hippocampal microRNA alterations associated with developmental alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaraman, Sridevi; Idrus, Nirelia M; Miranda, Rajesh C; Thomas, Jennifer D

    2017-05-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can result in a range of physical, neuropathological, and behavioral alterations, collectively termed fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). We have shown that supplementation with the nutrient choline reduces the severity of developmental alcohol-associated deficits in hippocampal-dependent behaviors and normalizes some aspects of hippocampal cholinergic development and DNA methylation patterns. Alcohol's developmental effects may also be mediated, in part, by altering microRNAs (miRNAs) that serve as negative regulators of gene translation. To determine whether choline supplementation alters ethanol's long-lasting effects on miRNAs, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 5.25 g/kg/day ethanol from postnatal days (PD) 4-9 via intubation; controls received sham intubations. Subjects were treated with choline chloride (100 mg/kg/day) or saline vehicle subcutaneously (s.c.) from PD 4-21. On PD 22, subjects were sacrificed, and RNA was isolated from the hippocampus. MiRNA expression was assessed with TaqMan Human MicroRNA Panel Low-Density Arrays. Ethanol significantly increased miRNA expression variance, an effect that was attenuated with choline supplementation. Cluster analysis of stably expressed miRNAs that exceeded an ANOVA p < 0.05 criterion indicated that for both male and female offspring, control and ethanol-exposed groups were most dissimilar from each other, with choline-supplemented groups in between. MiRNAs that expressed an average 2-fold change due to ethanol exposure were further analyzed to identify which ethanol-sensitive miRNAs were protected by choline supplementation. We found that at a false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted criterion of p < 0.05, miR-200c was induced by ethanol exposure and that choline prevented this effect. Collectively, our data show that choline supplementation can normalize disturbances in miRNA expression following developmental alcohol exposure and can protect specific miRNAs from induction by

  15. Effects of suspension on tissue levels of glucocorticoid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Differential muscle responses can be simulated by hypokinetic/hypodynamic (H/H) suspension of rats with complete unloading of the hindlimb muscles. Since mechanism(s) underlying these atrophic effects were not clearly elucidated, experiments were initiated to investigate a possible role for glucocorticoids in the physiological and biochemical responses to H/H. The principal objective was to assess the potential for alterations in peripheral responsiveness to glucocorticoids in response to H/H. Studies have initially focused on the determination of tissue levels of glucocorticoid receptors as one index of hormonal sensitivity at the cellular level. Four hindlimb muscles (soleus, gastrocnemius, plantaris and EDL), previously demonstrated to exhibit differential responses to H/H, were investigated. Receptor levels in other glucocorticoid sensitive tissues (heart, liver, and kidney) were determined. Male rats (180-200g) were suspended for 7 or 14 days, sacrificed by cervical dislocation, and the tissues excised.

  16. Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Predominant Alterations in Lipid Metabolism Following Light Exposure in Broccoli Sprouts

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    Mariateresa Maldini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of vegetables belonging to the family Brassicaceae (e.g., broccoli and cauliflower is linked to a reduced incidence of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The molecular composition of such plants is strongly affected by growing conditions. Here we developed an unbiased metabolomics approach to investigate the effect of light and dark exposure on the metabolome of broccoli sprouts and we applied such an approach to provide a bird’s-eye view of the overall metabolic response after light exposure. Broccoli seeds were germinated and grown hydroponically for five days in total darkness or with a light/dark photoperiod (16 h light/8 h dark cycle. We used an ultra-performance liquid-chromatography system coupled to an ion-mobility, time-of-flight mass spectrometer to profile the large array of metabolites present in the sprouts. Differences at the metabolite level between groups were analyzed using multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component analysis and correlation analysis. Altered metabolites were identified by searching publicly available and in-house databases. Metabolite pathway analyses were used to support the identification of subtle but significant changes among groups of related metabolites that may have gone unnoticed with conventional approaches. Besides the chlorophyll pathway, light exposure activated the biosynthesis and metabolism of sterol lipids, prenol lipids, and polyunsaturated lipids, which are essential for the photosynthetic machinery. Our results also revealed that light exposure increased the levels of polyketides, including flavonoids, and oxylipins, which play essential roles in the plant’s developmental processes and defense mechanism against herbivores. This study highlights the significant contribution of light exposure to the ultimate metabolic phenotype, which might affect the cellular physiology and nutritional value of broccoli sprouts. Furthermore, this study highlights the

  17. Prenatal phthalate exposure and altered patterns of DNA methylation in cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Olivia; Yousefi, Paul; Huen, Karen; Gunier, Robert B; Escudero-Fung, Maria; Barcellos, Lisa F; Eskenazi, Brenda; Holland, Nina

    2017-07-01

    Epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation may be a molecular mechanism through which environmental exposures affect health. Phthalates are known endocrine disruptors with ubiquitous exposures in the general population including pregnant women, and they have been linked with a number of adverse health outcomes. We examined the association between in utero phthalate exposure and altered patterns of cord blood DNA methylation in 336 Mexican-American newborns. Concentrations of 11 phthalate metabolites were analyzed in maternal urine samples collected at 13 and 26 weeks gestation as a measure of fetal exposure. DNA methylation was assessed using the Infinium HumanMethylation 450K BeadChip adjusting for cord blood cell composition. To identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that may be more informative than individual CpG sites, we used two different approaches, DMRcate and comb-p. Regional assessment by both methods identified 27 distinct DMRs, the majority of which were in relation to multiple phthalate metabolites. Most of the significant DMRs (67%) were observed for later pregnancy (26 weeks gestation). Further, 51% of the significant DMRs were associated with the di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites. Five individual CpG sites were associated with phthalate metabolite concentrations after multiple comparisons adjustment (FDR), all showing hypermethylation. Genes with DMRs were involved in inflammatory response (IRAK4 and ESM1), cancer (BRCA1 and LASP1), endocrine function (CNPY1), and male fertility (IFT140, TESC, and PRDM8). These results on differential DNA methylation in newborns with prenatal phthalate exposure provide new insights and targets to explore mechanism of adverse effects of phthalates on human health. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:398-410, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Leukocyte activity is altered in a ground based murine model of microgravity and proton radiation exposure.

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    Jenine K Sanzari

    Full Text Available Immune system adaptation during spaceflight is a concern in space medicine. Decreased circulating leukocytes observed during and after space flight infer suppressed immune responses and susceptibility to infection. The microgravity aspect of the space environment has been simulated on Earth to study adverse biological effects in astronauts. In this report, the hindlimb unloading (HU model was employed to investigate the combined effects of solar particle event-like proton radiation and simulated microgravity on immune cell parameters including lymphocyte subtype populations and activity. Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell critical for adaptive immune responses and T lymphocytes are regulators of cell-mediated immunity, controlling the entire immune response. Mice were suspended prior to and after proton radiation exposure (2 Gy dose and total leukocyte numbers and splenic lymphocyte functionality were evaluated on days 4 or 21 after combined HU and radiation exposure. Total white blood cell (WBC, lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts are reduced by approximately 65%, 70%, 55%, and 70%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control group at 4 days after combined exposure. Splenic lymphocyte subpopulations are altered at both time points investigated. At 21 days post-exposure to combined HU and proton radiation, T cell activation and proliferation were assessed in isolated lymphocytes. Cell surface expression of the Early Activation Marker, CD69, is decreased by 30% in the combined treatment group, compared to the non-treated control group and cell proliferation was suppressed by approximately 50%, compared to the non-treated control group. These findings reveal that the combined stressors (HU and proton radiation exposure result in decreased leukocyte numbers and function, which could contribute to immune system dysfunction in crew members. This investigation is one of the first to report on combined proton radiation and

  19. Opt2 mediates the exposure of phospholipids during cellular adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Saori; Obara, Keisuke; Uchibori, Kenya; Kamimura, Akiko; Azumi, Kaoru; Kihara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane lipid asymmetry is important for various membrane-associated functions and is regulated by membrane proteins termed flippases and floppases. The Rim101 pathway senses altered lipid asymmetry in the yeast plasma membrane. The mutant lem3Δ cells, in which lipid asymmetry is disturbed owing to the inactivation of the plasma membrane flippases, showed a severe growth defect when the Rim101 pathway was impaired. To identify factors involved in the Rim101-pathway-dependent adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry, we performed DNA microarray analysis and found that Opt2 induced by the Rim101 pathway plays an important role in the adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry. Biochemical investigation of Opt2 revealed its localization to the plasma membrane and the Golgi, and provided several lines of evidence for the Opt2-mediated exposure of phospholipids. In addition, Opt2 was found to be required for the maintenance of vacuolar morphology and polarized cell growth. These results suggest that Opt2 is a novel factor involved in cell homeostasis by regulating lipid asymmetry. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Exposure to low-dose rotenone precipitates synaptic plasticity alterations in PINK1 heterozygous knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, G; Madeo, G; Maltese, M; Vanni, V; Puglisi, F; Ferraro, E; Schirinzi, T; Valente, E M; Bonanni, L; Shen, J; Mandolesi, G; Mercuri, N B; Bonsi, P; Pisani, A

    2016-07-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene are considered a susceptibility factor to develop early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD), as supported by dopamine hypometabolism in asymptomatic mutation carriers and subtle alterations of dopamine-dependent striatal synaptic plasticity in heterozygous PINK1 knockout (PINK1(+/-)) mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exposure to low-dose rotenone of heterozygous PINK1(+/-) mice, compared to their wild-type PINK1(+/+) littermates, could impact on dopamine-dependent striatal synaptic plasticity, in the absence of apparent structural alterations. Mice were exposed to a range of concentrations of rotenone (0.01-1mg/kg). Chronic treatment with concentrations of rotenone up to 0.8mg/kg did not cause manifest neuronal loss or changes in ATP levels both in the striatum or substantia nigra of PINK1(+/-) and PINK1(+/+) mice. Moreover, rotenone (up to 0.8mg/kg) treatment did not induce mislocalization of the mitochondrial membrane protein Tom20 and release of cytochrome c in PINK1(+/-) striata. Accordingly, basic electrophysiological properties of nigral dopaminergic and striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) were normal. Despite the lack of gross alterations in neuronal viability in chronically-treated PINK1(+/-), a complete loss of both long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) was recorded in MSNs from PINK1(+/-) mice treated with a low rotenone (0.1mg/kg) concentration. Even lower concentrations (0.01mg/kg) blocked LTP induction in heterozygous PINK1(+/-) MSNs compared to PINK1(+/+) mice. Of interest, chronic pretreatment with the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol and Trolox, a water-soluble analog of vitamin E and powerful antioxidant, rescued synaptic plasticity impairment, confirming that, at the doses we utilized, rotenone did not induce irreversible alterations. In this model, chronic exposure to low-doses of rotenone was not sufficient to alter mitochondrial integrity and ATP production, but

  1. Does prenatal exposure to vitamin D-fortified margarine and milk alter birth weight?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla B; Berentzen, Tina L; Gamborg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether exposure to vitamin D from fortified margarine and milk during prenatal life influenced mean birth weight and the risk of high or low birth weight. The study was based on the Danish vitamin D fortification programme, which was a societal intervention with mandat...... margarine and milk altered birth weight, but the effect was small and inconsistent, reaching the conclusion that vitamin D fortification seems to be clinically irrelevant in relation to fetal growth.......The present study examined whether exposure to vitamin D from fortified margarine and milk during prenatal life influenced mean birth weight and the risk of high or low birth weight. The study was based on the Danish vitamin D fortification programme, which was a societal intervention...... with mandatory fortification of margarine during 1961-1985 and voluntary fortification of low-fat milk between 1972 and 1976. The influence of prenatal vitamin D exposure on birth weight was investigated among 51 883 Danish children, by comparing birth weight among individuals born during 2 years before or after...

  2. Exposure to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid alters glucose metabolism in immature rat Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M G; Neuhaus-Oliveira, A; Moreira, P I; Socorro, S; Oliveira, P F

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 2,4-D, an herbicide used worldwide also known as endocrine disruptor, in Sertoli cell (SC) metabolism. Immature rat SCs were maintained 50h under basal conditions or exposed to 2,4-D (100nM, 10μM and 1mM). SCs exposed to 10μM and 1mM of 2,4-D presented lower intracellular glucose and lactate content. Exposure to 10μM of 2,4-D induced a significant decrease in glucose transporter-3 mRNA levels and phosphofructokinase-1 mRNA levels decreased in cells exposed to 100nM and 10μM of 2,4-D. Exposure to 100nM and 10μM also induced a decrease in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) mRNA levels while the LDH protein levels were only decreased in cells exposed to 1mM of 2,4-D. Exposure to 2,4-D altered glucose uptake and metabolization in SCs, as well as lactate metabolism and export that may result in impaired spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment with Glucocorticoids or Calcineurin Inhibitors in Primary FSGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Louis-Philippe; Gasim, Adil M; Poulton, Caroline J; Hogan, Susan L; Jennette, J Charles; Falk, Ronald J; Foster, Bethany J; Nachman, Patrick H

    2016-03-07

    In primary FSGS, calcineurin inhibitors have primarily been studied in patients deemed resistant to glucocorticoid therapy. Few data are available about their use early in the treatment of FSGS. We sought to estimate the association between choice of therapy and ESRD in primary FSGS. We used an inception cohort of patients diagnosed with primary FSGS by kidney biopsy between 1980 and 2012. Factors associated with initiation of therapy were identified using logistic regression. Time-dependent Cox models were performed to compare time to ESRD between different therapies. In total, 458 patients were studied (173 treated with glucocorticoids alone, 90 treated with calcineurin inhibitors with or without glucocorticoids, 12 treated with other agents, and 183 not treated with immunosuppressives). Tip lesion variant, absence of severe renal dysfunction (eGFR≥30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), and hypoalbuminemia were associated with a higher likelihood of exposure to any immunosuppressive therapy. Only tip lesion was associated with initiation of glucocorticoids alone over calcineurin inhibitors. With adjusted Cox regression, immunosuppressive therapy with glucocorticoids and/or calcineurin inhibitors was associated with better renal survival than no immunosuppression (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.28 to 0.86). Calcineurin inhibitors with or without glucocorticoids were not significantly associated with a lower likelihood of ESRD compared with glucocorticoids alone (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.15 to 1.18). The use of immunosuppressive therapy with calcineurin inhibitors and/or glucocorticoids as part of the early immunosuppressive regimen in primary FSGS was associated with improved renal outcome, but the superiority of calcineurin inhibitors over glucocorticoids alone remained unproven. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Prenatal Exposure to Paint Thinner Alters Postnatal Development and Behavior in Mice

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    Hanaa Malloul

    2017-09-01

    revealed only in the prenatally treated offspring by 600 ppm of thinner. Based on these results, we can conclude that prenatally exposure to paint thinner causes a long-lasting developmental neurotoxicity and alters a wide range of behavioral functions in mice. This shows the risk that mothers who abuse thinner paint expose their offspring.

  5. Effects of glucocorticoids on glioma cells in culture. Minireview on cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshney, R I

    1984-01-01

    In vitro studies have shown that glucocorticoids have a cytostatic effect on glioma cells at high cell densities but enhance cell survival and proliferation at low cell densities. The cytostatic effect is not cytotoxic and may be mediated via a membrane modification altering cell-cell interaction. Cell interaction is also implicated in differentiation in glial cells and the inducing effect of glucocorticoids may be mediated in part by their effect on cell interaction. Induction of differentiation by glucocorticoids is accompanied by a reduction in malignancy-associated properties and the possibility has emerged that glucocorticoids may be an essential component in attempts to modify the malignant behaviour of glioma cells.

  6. Asthmatics exhibit altered oxylipin profiles compared to healthy individuals after subway air exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Susanna L; Levänen, Bettina; Nording, Malin; Klepczynska-Nyström, Anna; Sköld, Magnus; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Grunewald, Johan; Svartengren, Magnus; Hammock, Bruce D; Larsson, Britt-Marie; Eklund, Anders; Wheelock, Åsa M; Wheelock, Craig E

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Air pollutants such as particulate matter (PM) and oxidants are important factors in causing exacerbations in asthmatics, and the source and composition of pollutants greatly affects pathological implications. This randomized crossover study investigated responses of the respiratory system to Stockholm subway air in asthmatics and healthy individuals. Eicosanoids and other oxylipins were quantified in the distal lung to provide a measure of shifts in lipid mediators in association with exposure to subway air relative to ambient air. Sixty-four oxylipins representing the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways were screened using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)-fluid. Validations through immunocytochemistry staining of BAL-cells were performed for 15-LOX-1, COX-1, COX-2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Multivariate statistics were employed to interrogate acquired oxylipin and immunocytochemistry data in combination with patient clinical information. Asthmatics and healthy individuals exhibited divergent oxylipin profiles following exposure to ambient and subway air. Significant changes were observed in 8 metabolites of linoleic- and α-linolenic acid synthesized via the 15-LOX pathway, and of the COX product prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Oxylipin levels were increased in healthy individuals following exposure to subway air, whereas asthmatics evidenced decreases or no change. Several of the altered oxylipins have known or suspected bronchoprotective or anti-inflammatory effects, suggesting a possible reduced anti-inflammatory response in asthmatics following exposure to subway air. These observations may have ramifications for sensitive subpopulations in urban areas.

  7. Asthmatics exhibit altered oxylipin profiles compared to healthy individuals after subway air exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna L Lundström

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Air pollutants such as particulate matter (PM and oxidants are important factors in causing exacerbations in asthmatics, and the source and composition of pollutants greatly affects pathological implications.This randomized crossover study investigated responses of the respiratory system to Stockholm subway air in asthmatics and healthy individuals. Eicosanoids and other oxylipins were quantified in the distal lung to provide a measure of shifts in lipid mediators in association with exposure to subway air relative to ambient air.Sixty-four oxylipins representing the cyclooxygenase (COX, lipoxygenase (LOX and cytochrome P450 (CYP metabolic pathways were screened using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL-fluid. Validations through immunocytochemistry staining of BAL-cells were performed for 15-LOX-1, COX-1, COX-2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. Multivariate statistics were employed to interrogate acquired oxylipin and immunocytochemistry data in combination with patient clinical information.Asthmatics and healthy individuals exhibited divergent oxylipin profiles following exposure to ambient and subway air. Significant changes were observed in 8 metabolites of linoleic- and α-linolenic acid synthesized via the 15-LOX pathway, and of the COX product prostaglandin E(2 (PGE(2. Oxylipin levels were increased in healthy individuals following exposure to subway air, whereas asthmatics evidenced decreases or no change.Several of the altered oxylipins have known or suspected bronchoprotective or anti-inflammatory effects, suggesting a possible reduced anti-inflammatory response in asthmatics following exposure to subway air. These observations may have ramifications for sensitive subpopulations in urban areas.

  8. Early Phthalates Exposure in Pregnant Women Is Associated with Alteration of Thyroid Hormones.

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    Po-Chin Huang

    Full Text Available Previous studies revealed that phthalate exposure could alter thyroid hormones during the last trimester of pregnancy. However, thyroid hormones are crucial for fetal development during the first trimester. We aimed to clarify the effect of phthalate exposure on thyroid hormones during early pregnancy.We recruited 97 pregnant women who were offered an amniocentesis during the early trimester from an obstetrics clinic in southern Taiwan from 2013 to 2014. After signing an informed consent form, we collected amniotic fluid and urine samples from pregnant women to analyze 11 metabolites, including mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP, mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate (MECPP, mono-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP, mono-butyl phthalate (MnBP, of 9 phthalates using liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry. We collected blood samples from each subject to analyze serum thyroid hormones including thyroxine (T4, free T4, and thyroid-binding globulin (TBG.Three phthalate metabolites were discovered to be >80% in the urine samples of the pregnant women: MEP (88%, MnBP (81% and MECPP (86%. Median MnBP and MECPP levels in pregnant Taiwanese women were 21.5 and 17.6 μg/g-creatinine, respectively, that decreased after the 2011 Taiwan DEHP scandal. Results of principal component analysis suggested two major sources (DEHP and other phthalates of phthalates exposure in pregnant women. After adjusting for age, gestational age, TBG, urinary creatinine, and other phthalate metabolites, we found a significantly negative association between urinary MnBP levels and serum T4 (β = -5.41; p-value = 0.012; n = 97 in pregnant women using Bonferroni correction.We observed a potential change in the thyroid hormones of pregnant women during early pregnancy after DnBP exposure. Additional study is necessitated to clarify these associations.

  9. Does switching to reduced ignition propensity cigarettes alter smoking behavior or exposure to tobacco smoke constituents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Richard J; Rees, Vaughan W; Norton, Kaila J; Cummings, K Michael; Connolly, Gregory N; Alpert, Hillel R; Sjödin, Andreas; Romanoff, Lovisa; Li, Zheng; June, Kristie M; Giovino, Gary A

    2010-10-01

    Since 2004, several jurisdictions have mandated that cigarettes show reduced ignition propensity (RIP) in laboratory testing. RIP cigarettes may limit fires caused by smoldering cigarettes, reducing fire-related deaths and injury. However, some evidence suggests that RIP cigarettes emit more carbon monoxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and smokers may alter their smoking patterns in response to RIP cigarettes. Both of these could increase smokers' exposures to harmful constituents in cigarettes. An 18-day switching study with a comparison group was conducted in Boston, MA (N = 77), and Buffalo, NY (N = 83), in 2006-2007. Current daily smokers completed 4 laboratory visits and two 48-hr field data collections. After a 4-day baseline, Boston participants switched to RIP cigarettes for 14 days, whereas Buffalo participants smoked RIP cigarettes throughout. Outcome measures included cigarettes smoked per day; smoking topography; salivary cotinine; breath CO; and hydroxylated metabolites of pyrene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluorene. Because the groups differed demographically, analyses adjusted for race, age, and sex. We observed no significant changes in smoking topography or CO exposure among participants who switched to RIP cigarettes. Cigarette use decreased significantly in the switched group (37.7 cigarettes/48 hr vs. 32.6 cigarettes/48 hr, p = .031), while hydroxyphenanthrenes increased significantly (555 ng/g creatinine vs. 669 ng/g creatinine, p = .007). No other biomarkers were significantly affected. Small increases in exposure to phenanthrene among smokers who switched to RIP versions were observed, while other exposures and smoking topography were not significantly affected. Toxicological implications of these findings are unclear. These findings should be weighed against the potential public health benefits of adopting RIP design standards for cigarette products.

  10. Neonatal exposure to a glyphosate based herbicide alters the development of the rat uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero Schimpf, Marlise; Milesi, María M; Ingaramo, Paola I; Luque, Enrique H; Varayoud, Jorgelina

    2017-02-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are extensively used to control weeds on both cropland and non-cropland areas. No reports are available regarding the effects of GBHs exposure on uterine development. We evaluated if neonatal exposure to a GBH affects uterine morphology, proliferation and expression of proteins that regulate uterine organogenetic differentiation in rats. Female Wistar pups received saline solution (control, C) or a commercial formulation of glyphosate (GBH, 2mg/kg) by sc injection every 48h from postnatal day (PND) 1 to PND7. Rats were sacrificed on PND8 (neonatal period) and PND21 (prepubertal period) to evaluate acute and short-term effects, respectively. The uterine morphology was evaluated in hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. The epithelial and stromal immunophenotypes were established by assessing the expression of luminal epithelial protein (cytokeratin 8; CK8), basal epithelial proteins (p63 and pan cytokeratin CK1, 5, 10 and 14); and vimentin by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To investigate changes on proteins that regulate uterine organogenetic differentiation we evaluated the expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR), Hoxa10 and Wnt7a by IHC. The GBH-exposed uteri showed morphological changes, characterized by an increase in the incidence of luminal epithelial hyperplasia (LEH) and an increase in the stromal and myometrial thickness. The epithelial cells showed a positive immunostaining for CK8, while the stromal cells for vimentin. GBH treatment increased cell proliferation in the luminal and stromal compartment on PND8, without changes on PND21. GBH treatment also altered the expression of proteins involved in uterine organogenetic differentiation. PR and Hoxa10 were deregulated both immediately and two weeks after the exposure. ERα was induced in the stromal compartment on PND8, and was downregulated in the luminal epithelial cells of gyphosate-exposed animals on PND21. GBH treatment also increased

  11. Altered Parietal Activation during Non-symbolic Number Comparison in Children with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri J. Woods

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Number processing is a cognitive domain particularly sensitive to prenatal alcohol exposure, which relies on intact parietal functioning. Alcohol-related alterations in brain activation have been found in the parietal lobe during symbolic number processing. However, the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the neural correlates of non-symbolic number comparison and the numerical distance effect have not been investigated. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we examined differences in brain activation associated with prenatal alcohol exposure in five parietal regions involved in number processing during a non-symbolic number comparison task with varying degrees of difficulty. fMRI results are presented for 27 Cape Colored children (6 fetal alcohol syndome (FAS/partial FAS, 5 heavily exposed (HE non-sydromal, 16 controls; mean age ± SD = 11.7 ± 1.1 years. Fetal alcohol exposure was assessed by interviewing mothers using a timeline follow-back approach. Separate subject analyses were performed in each of five regions of interest, bilateral horizontal intraparietal sulci (IPS, bilateral posterior superior parietal lobules (PSPL, and left angular gyrus (left AG, using the general linear model with predictors for number comparison and difficulty level. Mean percent signal change for each predictor was extracted for each subject for each region to examine group differences and associations with continuous measures of alcohol exposure. Although groups did not differ in performance, controls activated the right PSPL more during non-symbolic number comparison than exposed children, but this was not significant after controlling for maternal smoking, and the right IPS more than children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS or partial FAS. More heavily exposed children recruited the left AG to a greater extent as task difficulty increased, possibly to compensate, in part, for impairments in function in the PSPL and IPS. Notably, in non

  12. Primary generalized familial and sporadic glucocorticoid resistance (Chrousos syndrome) and hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Kino, Tomoshige; Chrousos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Familial or sporadic primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance or Chrousos syndrome is a rare genetic condition characterized by generalized, partial, target-tissue insensitivity to glucocorticoids and a consequent hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Primary generalized glucocorticoid hypersensitivity (PGGH) represents the mirror image of the former, and is characterized by generalized, partial, target-tissue hypersensitivity to glucocorticoids, and compensatory hypoactivation of the HPA axis. The molecular basis of both conditions has been ascribed to mutations in the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) gene, which impair the molecular mechanisms of hGR action and alter tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. This review summarizes the pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms and clinical aspects of Chrousos syndrome and PGGH. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Exposure to seismic air gun signals causes physiological harm and alters behavior in the scallop Pecten fumatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ryan D; McCauley, Robert D; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Hartmann, Klaas; Semmens, Jayson M

    2017-10-03

    Seismic surveys map the seabed using intense, low-frequency sound signals that penetrate kilometers into the Earth's crust. Little is known regarding how invertebrates, including economically and ecologically important bivalves, are affected by exposure to seismic signals. In a series of field-based experiments, we investigate the impact of exposure to seismic surveys on scallops, using measurements of physiological and behavioral parameters to determine whether exposure may cause mass mortality or result in other sublethal effects. Exposure to seismic signals was found to significantly increase mortality, particularly over a chronic (months postexposure) time scale, though not beyond naturally occurring rates of mortality. Exposure did not elicit energetically expensive behaviors, but scallops showed significant changes in behavioral patterns during exposure, through a reduction in classic behaviors and demonstration of a nonclassic "flinch" response to air gun signals. Furthermore, scallops showed persistent alterations in recessing reflex behavior following exposure, with the rate of recessing increasing with repeated exposure. Hemolymph (blood analog) physiology showed a compromised capacity for homeostasis and potential immunodeficiency, as a range of hemolymph biochemistry parameters were altered and the density of circulating hemocytes (blood cell analog) was significantly reduced, with effects observed over acute (hours to days) and chronic (months) scales. The size of the air gun had no effect, but repeated exposure intensified responses. We postulate that the observed impacts resulted from high seabed ground accelerations driven by the air gun signal. Given the scope of physiological disruption, we conclude that seismic exposure can harm scallops.

  14. Sexual Abuse Exposure Alters Early Processing of Emotional Words: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Grégoire

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the time course of emotional information processing between trauma-exposed and control participants, using electrophysiological measures. We conceived an emotional Stroop task with two types of words: trauma-related emotional words and neutral words. We assessed the evoked cerebral responses of sexual abuse victims without post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and no abuse participants. We focused particularly on an early wave (C1/P1, the N2pc, and the P3b. Our main result indicated an early effect (55–165 ms of emotionality, which varied between non-exposed participants and sexual abuse victims. This suggests that potentially traumatic experiences modulate early processing of emotional information. Our findings showing neurobiological alterations in sexual abuse victims (without PTSD suggest that exposure to highly emotional events has an important impact on neurocognitive function even in the absence of psychopathology.

  15. DNA methylation alterations induced by transient exposure of MCF-7 cells to maghemite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadio, Raphael S; Arcanjo, Ana Carolina; Lima, Emilia Cd; Vasconcelos, Alline T; Silva, Renata C; Horst, Frederico H; Azevedo, Ricardo B; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio José; F Longo, João Paulo

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the DNA methylation profile of MCF-7 cells during and after the treatment with maghemite nanoparticles (MNP-CIT). Noncytotoxic MNP-CIT concentrations and cell morphology were evaluated by standard methods. DNA methylation was assessed by whole genome bisulfite sequencing. DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) genes expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR. A total of 30 and 60 µgFeml -1 MNP-CIT accumulated in cytoplasm but did not present cytotoxic effects. The overall percentage of DNA methylation was not affected, but 58 gene-associated regions underwent DNA methylation reprogramming, including genes related to cancer onset. DNMT transcript levels were also modulated. Transient exposure to MNP-CIT promoted epigenomic changes and altered the DNMT genes regulation in MCF-7 cells. These events should be considered for biomedical applications.

  16. Subchronic Arsenic Exposure Through Drinking Water Alters Lipid Profile and Electrolyte Status in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghe, Prashantkumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Kandasamy, Kannan; Choudhury, Soumen; Gupta, Priyanka; Harikumar, Sankarankutty; Mishra, Santosh Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic is a groundwater pollutant and can cause various cardiovascular disorders in the exposed population. The aim of the present study was to assess whether subchronic arsenic exposure through drinking water can induce vascular dysfunction associated with alteration in plasma electrolytes and lipid profile. Rats were exposed to arsenic as 25, 50, and 100 ppm of sodium arsenite through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. On the 91st day, rats were sacrificed and blood was collected. Lipid profile and the levels of electrolytes (sodium, potassium, and chloride) were assessed in plasma. Arsenic reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and HDL-C/LDL-C ratio, but increased the levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and electrolytes. The results suggest that the arsenic-mediated dyslipidemia and electrolyte retention could be important mechanisms in the arsenic-induced vascular disorder.

  17. Glucocorticoid hyper- and hypofunction: stress effects on cognition and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeansok J; Haller, József

    2007-10-01

    It is now well documented that both increased and decreased stress responses can profoundly affect cognition and behavior. This mini review presents possible neural mechanisms subserving stress effects on memory and aggression, particularly focusing on glucocorticoid (GC) hyper- and hypofunction. First, uncontrollable stress impedes hippocampal memory and long-term potentiation (LTP). Because the hippocampus is important for the stability of long-term memory and because LTP has qualities desirable of an information storage mechanism, it has been hypothesized that stress-induced alterations in LTP contribute to memory impairments. Recent evidence suggests a neural-endocrine network comprising amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and glucocorticoids may be involved in regulating stress effects on hippocampal mnemonic functioning. Second, antisocial aggressiveness correlates with chronically decreased glucocorticoid production, and this condition leads in rats to behavioral-autonomic deficits reminiscent of the human disorder. Glucocorticoid deficiency-induced antisocial aggressiveness results from functional changes in the PFC, medial and central amygdala, and altered serotonin and substance P neurotransmissions. Accordingly, a neurobiological understanding of how stress and glucocorticoid deficiency alter brain, cognition, and behavior is an important challenge facing modern neuroscience with broad implications for individual and social well-being.

  18. Triclosan exposure alters postembryonic development in a Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (TREEMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlatt, Vicki L.; Veldhoen, Nik; Lo, Bonnie P.; Bakker, Dannika; Rehaume, Vicki; Vallée, Kurtis; Haberl, Maxine; Shang, Dayue; Aggelen, Graham C. van; Skirrow, Rachel C.; Elphick, James R.; Helbing, Caren C.

    2013-01-01

    The Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA), developed for Xenopus laevis, is designed to identify chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated biological processes. We adapted the AMA for use on an ecologically-relevant North American species, the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), and applied molecular endpoints to evaluate the effects of the antibacterial agent, triclosan (TCS). Premetamorphic (Gosner stage 26–28) tadpoles were immersed for 21 days in solvent control, 1.5 μg/L thyroxine (T 4 ), 0.3, 3 and 30 μg/L (nominal) TCS, or combined T 4 /TCS treatments. Exposure effects were scored by morphometric (developmental stage, wet weight, and body, snout-vent and hindlimb lengths) and molecular (mRNA abundance using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction) criteria. T 4 treatment alone accelerated development concomitant with altered levels of TH receptors α and β, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and gelatinase B mRNAs in the brain and tail. We observed TCS-induced perturbations in all of the molecular and morphological endpoints indicating that TCS exposure disrupts coordination of postembryonic tadpole development. Clear alterations in molecular endpoints were evident at day 2 whereas the earliest morphological effects appeared at day 4 and were most evident at day 21. Although TCS alone (3 and 30 μg/L) was protective against tadpole mortality, this protection was lost in the presence of T 4 . The Pacific tree frog is the most sensitive species examined to date displaying disruption of TH-mediated development by a common antimicrobial agent.

  19. Triclosan exposure alters postembryonic development in a Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (TREEMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlatt, Vicki L. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Veldhoen, Nik [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada); Lo, Bonnie P. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Bakker, Dannika; Rehaume, Vicki; Vallee, Kurtis [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada); Haberl, Maxine; Shang, Dayue; Aggelen, Graham C. van; Skirrow, Rachel C. [Pacific and Yukon Laboratory for Environmental Testing, Emergencies Operational Analytical Laboratories and Research Support Division, Environment Canada, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, B.C. V7H 1B1 (Canada); Elphick, James R. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Helbing, Caren C., E-mail: chelbing@uvic.ca [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA), developed for Xenopus laevis, is designed to identify chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated biological processes. We adapted the AMA for use on an ecologically-relevant North American species, the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), and applied molecular endpoints to evaluate the effects of the antibacterial agent, triclosan (TCS). Premetamorphic (Gosner stage 26-28) tadpoles were immersed for 21 days in solvent control, 1.5 {mu}g/L thyroxine (T{sub 4}), 0.3, 3 and 30 {mu}g/L (nominal) TCS, or combined T{sub 4}/TCS treatments. Exposure effects were scored by morphometric (developmental stage, wet weight, and body, snout-vent and hindlimb lengths) and molecular (mRNA abundance using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction) criteria. T{sub 4} treatment alone accelerated development concomitant with altered levels of TH receptors {alpha} and {beta}, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and gelatinase B mRNAs in the brain and tail. We observed TCS-induced perturbations in all of the molecular and morphological endpoints indicating that TCS exposure disrupts coordination of postembryonic tadpole development. Clear alterations in molecular endpoints were evident at day 2 whereas the earliest morphological effects appeared at day 4 and were most evident at day 21. Although TCS alone (3 and 30 {mu}g/L) was protective against tadpole mortality, this protection was lost in the presence of T{sub 4}. The Pacific tree frog is the most sensitive species examined to date displaying disruption of TH-mediated development by a common antimicrobial agent.

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL CIGARETTE SMOKE EXPOSURE: KIDNEY PROTEOME PROFILE ALTERATIONS IN LOW BIRTH WEIGHT PUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, J; Chen, Jing; Canales, Lorena; Birtles, Todd; Pisano, M. Michele; Neal, Rachel E.

    2012-01-01

    The Brenner hypothesis states that a congenital reduction in nephron number predisposes to adult-onset hypertension and renal failure. The reduction in nephron number induced by proportionally smaller kidney mass may predispose offspring to glomerular hyperfiltration with maturity onset obesity. Developmental cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) results in intrauterine growth retardation with a predisposition to obesity and cardiovascular disease at maturity. Utilizing a mouse model of ‘active’ developmental CSE (gestational day [GD] 1-postnatal day [PD] 21; cotinine>50 ng/mL) characterized by persistently smaller offspring with proportionally decreased kidney mass, the present study examined the impact of developmental CSE on the abundance of proteins associated with cellular metabolism in the kidney. Following cessation of CSE on PD21, kidney tissue was collected from CSE and Sham exposed pups for 2D-SDS-PAGE based proteome profiling with statistical analysis by Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) with affected molecular pathways identified by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Proteins whose expression in the kidney were affected by developmental CSE belonged to the inflammatory disease, cell to cell signaling/interaction, lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, cell cycle, respiratory disease, nucleic acid and carbohydrate metabolism networks. The present findings indicate that developmental CSE alters the kidney proteome. The companion paper details the liver proteome alterations in the same offspring. PMID:22595367

  1. In utero exposure to chloroquine alters sexual development in the male fetal rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clewell, Rebecca A.; Pluta, Linda; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), a drug that has been used extensively for the prevention and treatment of malaria, is currently considered safe for use during pregnancy. However, CQ has been shown to disrupt steroid homeostasis in adult rats and similar compounds, such as quinacrine, inhibit steroid production in the Leydig cell in vitro. To explore the effect of in utero CQ exposure on fetal male sexual development, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a daily dose of either water or chloroquine diphosphate from GD 16-18 by oral gavage. Chloroquine was administered as 200 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16, followed by two maintenance doses of 100 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16 and 18. Three days of CQ treatment resulted in reduced maternal and fetal weight on GD 19 and increased necrosis and steatosis in the maternal liver. Fetal livers also displayed mild lipid accumulation. Maternal serum progesterone was increased after CQ administration. Fetal testes testosterone, however, was significantly decreased. Examination of the fetal testes revealed significant alterations in vascularization and seminiferous tubule development after short-term CQ treatment. Anogenital distance was not altered. Microarray and RT-PCR showed down-regulation of several genes associated with cholesterol transport and steroid synthesis in the fetal testes. This study indicates that CQ inhibits testosterone synthesis and normal testis development in the rat fetus at human relevant doses.

  2. Chronic scream sound exposure alters memory and monoamine levels in female rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lili; Zhao, Xiaoge; Yang, Juan; Wang, Lumin; Yang, Yang; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2014-10-01

    Chronic scream sound alters the cognitive performance of male rats and their brain monoamine levels, these stress-induced alterations are sexually dimorphic. To determine the effects of sound stress on female rats, we examined their serum corticosterone levels and their adrenal, splenic, and thymic weights, their cognitive performance and the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the brain. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats, with and without exposure to scream sound (4h/day for 21 day) were tested for spatial learning and memory using a Morris water maze. Stress decreased serum corticosterone levels, as well as splenic and adrenal weight. It also impaired spatial memory but did not affect the learning ability. Monoamines and metabolites were measured in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus. The dopamine (DA) levels in the PFC decreased but the homovanillic acid/DA ratio increased. The decreased DA and the increased 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels were observed in the striatum. Only the 5-HIAA level increased in the hypothalamus. In the hippocampus, stress did not affect the levels of monoamines and metabolites. The results suggest that scream sound stress influences most physiologic parameters, memory, and the levels of monoamine neurotransmitter and their metabolites in female rats. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Prenatal exposure to urban air nanoparticles in mice causes altered neuronal differentiation and depression-like responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Davis

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that excessive exposure to traffic-derived air pollution during pregnancy may increase the vulnerability to neurodevelopmental alterations that underlie a broad array of neuropsychiatric disorders. We present a mouse model for prenatal exposure to urban freeway nanoparticulate matter (nPM. In prior studies, we developed a model for adult rodent exposure to re-aerosolized urban nPM which caused inflammatory brain responses with altered neuronal glutamatergic functions. nPMs are collected continuously for one month from a local freeway and stored as an aqueous suspension, prior to re-aerosolization for exposure of mice under controlled dose and duration. This paradigm was used for a pilot study of prenatal nPM impact on neonatal neurons and adult behaviors. Adult C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to re-aerosolized nPM (350 µg/m(3 or control filtered ambient air for 10 weeks (3×5 hour exposures per week, encompassing gestation and oocyte maturation prior to mating. Prenatal nPM did not alter litter size, pup weight, or postnatal growth. Neonatal cerebral cortex neurons at 24 hours in vitro showed impaired differentiation, with 50% reduction of stage 3 neurons with long neurites and correspondingly more undifferentiated neurons at Stages 0 and 1. Neuron number after 24 hours of culture was not altered by prenatal nPM exposure. Addition of exogenous nPM (2 µg/ml to the cultures impaired pyramidal neuron Stage 3 differentiation by 60%. Adult males showed increased depression-like responses in the tail-suspension test, but not anxiety-related behaviors. These pilot data suggest that prenatal exposure to nPM can alter neuronal differentiation with gender-specific behavioral sequelae that may be relevant to human prenatal exposure to urban vehicular aerosols.

  4. Clinical aspects of glucocorticoid sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lamberts, Steven; Huizenga, Nannette; Lange, Pieter; Jong, Frank; Koper, Jan

    1996-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies demonstrate that primary (hereditary) abnormalities in the glucocorticoid receptor gene make 6.6% of the normal population relatively 'hypersensitive' to glucocorticoids, while 2.3% are relatively 'resistant.' These abnormalities might explain why some individuals develop severe adverse effects during low dose glucocorticoid therapy, while others do not develop side effects even during long-term therapy with a much higher dose. Awareness of this heterogeneity in glu...

  5. Brief Exposure to Turbulence Permanently Alters Development of Sand Dollar Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferner, M. C.; Hodin, J.; Ng, G.; Lowe, C. J.; Gaylord, B.

    2016-02-01

    Fluid motion underlies interactions between animals and their environment through effects on locomotion, food capture, respiration, information transfer, and other processes. Recent studies of marine invertebrates indicate that metamorphosis and settlement can be altered when swimming larvae experience a change in turbulence intensity, possibly increasing the likelihood that larvae will settle in appropriate habitat. For example, brief exposure to levels of turbulence characteristic of wave-swept coasts causes echinoderm larvae to quickly transition from a non-responsive "pre-competent" stage into a "competent" stage, thereby allowing the larvae to respond to local cues and settle. However, responding to one's entry into the nearshore environment isn't enough, as many such species live as adults in a narrower range of highly specific benthic habitat that is even more rarely encountered. Here we provide an account for this apparent mismatch between larval responses to broadly distributed cues and their need for more specialized settlement locations: turbulence exposure seems to cause larval sand dollars (Dendraster excentricus) to permanently shift from pre-competence to competence. This observation suggests a scenario where turbulence can activate a temporally extensive search image in larvae over a broad habitat range, a seemingly adaptive feature for larvae entering dynamic coastal environments.

  6. Repeated stimulus exposure alters the way sound is encoded in the human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Tremblay

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Auditory training programs are being developed to remediate various types of communication disorders. Biological changes have been shown to coincide with improved perception following auditory training so there is interest in determining if these changes represent biologic markers of auditory learning. Here we examine the role of stimulus exposure and listening tasks, in the absence of training, on the modulation of evoked brain activity. Twenty adults were divided into two groups and exposed to two similar sounding speech syllables during four electrophysiological recording sessions (24 hours, one week, and up to one year later. In between each session, members of one group were asked to identify each stimulus. Both groups showed enhanced neural activity from session-to-session, in the same P2 latency range previously identified as being responsive to auditory training. The enhancement effect was most pronounced over temporal-occipital scalp regions and largest for the group who participated in the identification task. The effects were rapid and long-lasting with enhanced synchronous activity persisting months after the last auditory experience. Physiological changes did not coincide with perceptual changes so results are interpreted to mean stimulus exposure, with and without being paired with an identification task, alters the way sound is processed in the brain. The cumulative effect likely involves auditory memory; however, in the absence of training, the observed physiological changes are insufficient to result in changes in learned behavior.

  7. Alterations of rat corticostriatal synaptic plasticity after chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jian Xun; Li, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Xiao Hu; Ge, Yin Bing; Ru Yuan, Xiao

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic ethanol exposure (CEE) and withdrawal on corticostriatal plasticity in rats. We established an animal model of alcoholism using the method of Turchan et al. (1999). A synaptic model of long-term memory (long-term depression, LTD) was used as an index and the striatum, which is related to habit learning, was selected as a target region in the present study. The effects of CEE and withdrawal on the LTD were studied in striatal slices of ethanol-dependent rats using the extracellular recording method. A stable LTD can be induced after high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in the slices of control rats. Chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal suppressed the induction of corticostriatal LTD to different extents, with the strongest suppressive effects on LTD occurring in the slices of rats exposed to ethanol for 10 days and in those withdrawn from ethanol for 1 day. Notably, 3 days of withdrawal resulted in the shift of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity from LTD to long-term potentiation, and the peak latencies of the population spikes were obviously shortened compared with those of control rats. After 7 days of withdrawal, ethanol's effects tended to disappear. These results suggest that the alterations of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity produced by CEE and withdrawal may play a prominent role in alcohol abuse and alcoholism.

  8. Premature estrogen exposure alters endometrial gene expression to disrupt pregnancy in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jason W; Ashworth, Morgan D; White, Frankie J; Johnson, Greg A; Ayoubi, Patricia J; DeSilva, Udaya; Whitworth, Kristin M; Prather, Randall S; Geisert, Rodney D

    2007-10-01

    Establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in the pig involve intricate communication between the developing conceptuses and maternal endometrium. Conceptus synthesis and release of estrogen during trophoblastic elongation are essential factors involved with establishing conceptus-uterine communication. The present study identified endometrial changes in gene expression associated with implantation failure and complete pregnancy loss after premature exposure of pregnant gilts to exogenous estrogen. Gilts were treated with either 5 mg estradiol cypionate (EC) or corn oil on d-9 and -10 gestation, which was associated with complete conceptus degeneration by d-17 gestation. Microarray analysis of gene expression revealed that a total of eight, 32, and five genes were up-regulated in the EC endometrium, whereas one, 39, and 16 genes were down-regulated, on d 10, 13, and 15, respectively. Four endometrial genes altered by EC, aldose reductase (AKR1B1), secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1), CD24 antigen (CD24), and neuromedin B (NMB), were evaluated using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. In situ hybridization localized gene expression for NMB, CD24, AKR1B1, and SPP1 in the luminal epithelium, and confirmed the expression patterns from RT-PCR analysis. The aberrant expression patterns of endometrial AKR1B1, SPP1, CD24, and NMB 3-4 d after premature estrogen exposure to pregnant gilts may be involved with conceptus attachment failure to the uterine surface epithelium and induction of endometrial responses that disrupt the establishment of a viable pregnancy.

  9. Does exposure to very high levels of natural radiation induce hematological alterations in humans?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiassi-Nejad, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: It has long been known that total body exposure to moderate doses decrease the number of circulating erythrocytes, platelets, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. However, data on hematopoietic effects of exposure to very low doses of ionizing radiation in humans are scarce. Recently it has been reported that hematological parameters have significant positive associations with the radiation dose received by residents lived near a nuclear power plant. Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, has some inhabited areas with the highest levels of natural radiation studied so far. A population of about 2000 is exposed to average annual radiation levels of 10.2 mGy y -1 and the highest recorded external gamma dose rates are about 130 mGy y -1 . In this study, hematological parameters such as counts of leukocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, PLT, and MPV were measured in the inhabitants. The results of this study indicated that there was no any statistically significant alteration in hematological parameters of the inhabitants of very high background radiation areas of Ramsar compared to those of a neighboring control area

  10. Developmental ethanol exposure alters the morphology of mouse prefrontal neurons in a layer-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louth, Emma L; Luctkar, Hanna D; Heney, Kayla A; Bailey, Craig D C

    2018-01-01

    Chronic developmental exposure to ethanol can lead to a wide variety of teratogenic effects, which in humans are known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Individuals affected by FASD may exhibit persistent impairments to cognitive functions such as learning, memory, and attention, which are highly dependent on medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) circuitry. The objective of this study was to determine long-term effects of chronic developmental ethanol exposure on mPFC neuron morphology, in order to better-understand potential neuronal mechanisms underlying cognitive impairments associated with FASD. C57BL/6-strain mice were exposed to ethanol or an isocaloric/isovolumetric amount of sucrose (control) via oral gavage, administered both to the dam from gestational day 10-18 and directly to pups from postnatal day 4-14. Brains from male mice were collected at postnatal day 90 and neurons were stained using a modified Golgi-Cox method. Pyramidal neurons within layers II/III, V and VI of the mPFC were imaged, traced in three dimensions, and assessed using Sholl and branch structure analyses. Developmental ethanol exposure differentially impacted adult pyramidal neuron morphology depending on mPFC cortical layer. Neurons in layer II/III exhibited increased size and diameter of dendrite trees, whereas neurons in layer V were not affected. Layer VI neurons with long apical dendrites had trees with decreased diameter that extended farther from the soma, and layer VI neurons with short apical dendrite trees exhibited decreased tree size overall. These layer-specific alterations to mPFC neuron morphology may form a novel morphological mechanism underlying long-term mPFC dysfunction and resulting cognitive impairments in FASD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prenatal exposure to modafinil alters behavioural response to methamphetamine in adult male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda-Kucerova, Jana; Pistovcakova, Jana; Amchova, Petra; Sulcova, Alexandra; Machalova, Alena

    2018-03-20

    Modafinil is a psychostimulant drug prescribed for treatment of narcolepsy. However, it is used as a "smart drug" especially by young adults to increase wakefulness, concentration and mental performance. Therefore, it can also be used by women with childbearing potential and its developmental effects can become a concern. The aim of this study was to assess behavioural and immune effects of prenatal modafinil exposure in mice and to evaluate the reaction to methamphetamine exposure on these animals in adult age. Pregnant female mice were given either saline or modafinil (50 mg/kg orally) from gestation day (GD) 3 to GD 10 and then a challenge dose on GD 17. The male offspring were treated analogously at the age of 10 weeks with methamphetamine (2.5 mg/kg orally). Changes in the spontaneous locomotor/exploratory behaviour and anxiogenic profile in the open field test were assessed in naïve animals, after an acute and 8th modafinil dose and the challenge dose following a 7-day wash-out period. One month after completion of the behavioural study, the leukocyte phagocytosis was examined by zymosan induced and luminol-aided chemiluminiscence assay in vitro. The modafinil prenatally exposed mice showed basal hypolocomotion, increased anxiety, lower locomotor effect of acute methamphetamine and increased vulnerability to behavioural sensitization. The leukocyte activity did not show significant differences. Prenatal modafinil exposure alters basal behavioural profile, decreases acute effect of methamphetamine and enhances vulnerability to development of behavioural sensitization at adulthood. This may lead to higher vulnerability to development of addiction. Copyright © 2018 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dietary exposure to the PCB mixture aroclor 1254 may compromise osmoregulation by altering central vasopressin release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coburn, C.G. [Environmental Toxicology, Univ. of California at Riverside, CA (United States); Gillard, E.; Curras-Collazo, M. [Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Univ. of California at Riverside, CA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Despite the importance of systemic osmoregulation, the potential deleterious effects of persistent organochlorines, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), on body fluid regulation has not been thoroughly investigated. In an effort to ameliorate this deficit, the current study explores the toxic effects of PCBs on osmoregulation, and in particular, on the activity of the magnocellular neuroendocrine cell (MNC) system of the hypothalamus. MNCs of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) release oxytocin (OXY) and vasopressin (VP) from terminals in the neurohypophysis in response to dehydration. The latter is released to effect water conservation in response to dehydration via its action upon the kidney and through extra-renal actions. MNCs also secrete VP from their cell bodies and dendrites locally i.e., into the extracellular space of the SON. Although it has been shown that both intranuclear and systemic release rise in response to dehydration the physiological significance of intranuclear release has not been fully elucidated. We chose to use voluntary ingestion as the route of PCB exposure since it is more reflective of natural exposure compared to ip injection. One unexpected observation that resulted from pilot studies using ip injection of PCBs was the deleterious effects of the vehicle (corn oil) resulting in pooling of lipid within the abdominal cavity, mottling of the liver, fatty liver and general discoloration of all abdominal viscera at time of sacrifice. Therefore, all work described in this series of experiments have employed voluntary ingestion of the toxin. Work described in this paper suggests that PCBs in concentrations reflecting realistic lifetime exposure levels may negatively impact homeostatic mechanisms responsible for body water balance by altering somatodendritic (intranuclear) VP secretion in response to dehydration in vivo. The downstream consequences of such influence is currently under investigation, and preliminary evidence suggests that the

  13. Prenatal chlorpyrifos exposure alters motor behavior and ultrasonic vocalization in CD-1 mouse pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerosi, Aldina; Ricceri, Laura; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Calamandrei, Gemma

    2009-03-30

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a non-persistent organophosphate (OP) largely used as pesticide. Studies from animal models indicate that CPF is a developmental neurotoxicant able to target immature central nervous system at dose levels well below the threshold of systemic toxicity. So far, few data are available on the potential short- and long-term adverse effects in children deriving from low-level exposures during prenatal life and infancy. Late gestational exposure [gestational day (GD) 14-17] to CPF at the dose of 6 mg/kg was evaluated in CD-1 mice during early development, by assessment of somatic and sensorimotor maturation [reflex-battery on postnatal days (PNDs) 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15] and ultrasound emission after isolation from the mother and siblings (PNDs 4, 7 and 10). Pups' motor skills were assessed in a spontaneous activity test on PND 12. Maternal behavior of lactating dams in the home cage and in response to presentation of a pup previously removed from the nest was scored on PND 4, to verify potential alterations in maternal care directly induced by CPF administration. As for the effects on the offspring, results indicated that on PND 10, CPF significantly decreased number and duration of ultrasonic calls while increasing latency to emit the first call after isolation. Prenatal CPF also reduced motor behavior on PND 12, while a tendency to hyporeflexia was observed in CPF pups by means of reflex-battery scoring. Dams administered during gestation with CPF showed baseline levels of maternal care comparable to those of controls, but higher levels of both pup-directed (licking) and explorative (wall rearing) responses. Overall our results are consistent with previous epidemiological data on OP neurobehavioral toxicity, and also indicate ultrasonic vocalization as an early marker of CPF exposure during development in rodent studies, with potential translational value to human infants.

  14. Prenatal chlorpyrifos exposure alters motor behavior and ultrasonic vocalization in cd-1 mouse pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calamandrei Gemma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorpyrifos (CPF is a non-persistent organophosphate (OP largely used as pesticide. Studies from animal models indicate that CPF is a developmental neurotoxicant able to target immature central nervous system at dose levels well below the threshold of systemic toxicity. So far, few data are available on the potential short- and long-term adverse effects in children deriving from low-level exposures during prenatal life and infancy. Methods Late gestational exposure [gestational day (GD 14–17] to CPF at the dose of 6 mg/kg was evaluated in CD-1 mice during early development, by assessment of somatic and sensorimotor maturation [reflex-battery on postnatal days (PNDs 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15] and ultrasound emission after isolation from the mother and siblings (PNDs 4, 7 and 10. Pups' motor skills were assessed in a spontaneous activity test on PND 12. Maternal behavior of lactating dams in the home cage and in response to presentation of a pup previously removed from the nest was scored on PND 4, to verify potential alterations in maternal care directly induced by CPF administration. Results As for the effects on the offspring, results indicated that on PND 10, CPF significantly decreased number and duration of ultrasonic calls while increasing latency to emit the first call after isolation. Prenatal CPF also reduced motor behavior on PND 12, while a tendency to hyporeflexia was observed in CPF pups by means of reflex-battery scoring. Dams administered during gestation with CPF showed baseline levels of maternal care comparable to those of controls, but higher levels of both pup-directed (licking and explorative (wall rearing responses. Conclusion Overall our results are consistent with previous epidemiological data on OP neurobehavioral toxicity, and also indicate ultrasonic vocalization as an early marker of CPF exposure during development in rodent studies, with potential translational value to human infants.

  15. Exposure to the endocrine disruptor nonylphenol alters structure and function of thyroid gland in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yue; Li, Dehua; San, Wei

    2013-08-10

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an estrogenic-like compound which can induce vitellogenin synthesis in males and immature teleostean species. Known as an endocrine disruptor, it has been reported to affect endocrine glands; however, little is known about its effects on thyroid function. The present study aimed to evaluate whether exposure to NP alters the structure and function of the thyroid gland of rats and/or the underlying mechanisms. Rats were gavaged with NP (40, 80 and 200 mg/kg/d) for 15 days. Serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone were determined by radioimmunoassay. Ultramicroscopic structure of follicular cells was examined by a transmission electron microscope. Histopathology was conducted with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. We found that NP exposure induced a decrease in serum levels of free tetraiodothyronine (FT) 3 and FT4 while it induced an increase in serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in a dose-dependent manner. There was a negative correlation between different doses of NP with serum levels of FT3 and FT4 (FT4 r=-0.932; FT3 r=-0.926) and a positive correlation with serum levels of TSH (r=0.967). Histological and morphometric study in the NP-exposed group revealed dilation of endoplasmic reticulum into cystic in thyroid follicular cells. Mitochondrion was damaged in the 80 and 200 mg/kg/d groups. Exposure to NP may lead to thyroid dysfunction. It may be a potential contributor to thyroid disruption. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. CO-occurring exposure to perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate alters thyroid function in healthy pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Megan K.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Wapner, Ronald; Whyatt, Robin; Gennings, Chris; Factor-Litvak, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adequate maternal thyroid function during pregnancy is necessary for normal fetal brain development, making pregnancy a critical window of vulnerability to thyroid disrupting insults. Sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) inhibitors, namely perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate, have been shown individually to competitively inhibit uptake of iodine by the thyroid. Several epidemiologic studies examined the association between these individual exposures and thyroid function. Few studies have examined the effect of this chemical mixture on thyroid function during pregnancy Objectives: We examined the cross sectional association between urinary perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate concentrations and thyroid function among healthy pregnant women living in New York City using weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression. Methods: We measured thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FreeT4) in blood samples; perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate and iodide in urine samples collected from 284 pregnant women at 12 (±2.8) weeks gestation. We examined associations between urinary analyte concentrations and TSH or FreeT4 using linear regression or WQS adjusting for gestational age, urinary iodide and creatinine. Results: Individual analyte concentrations in urine were significantly correlated (Spearman's r 0.4–0.5, p<0.001). Linear regression analyses did not suggest associations between individual concentrations and thyroid function. The WQS revealed a significant positive association between the weighted sum of urinary concentrations of the three analytes and increased TSH. Perchlorate had the largest weight in the index, indicating the largest contribution to the WQS. Conclusions: Co-exposure to perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate may alter maternal thyroid function, specifically TSH, during pregnancy. - Highlights: • Perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate and iodide measured in maternal urine. • Thyroid function (TSH and Free T4) measured in maternal blood.

  17. Neonatal exposure to sucralose does not alter biochemical markers of neuronal development or adult behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viberg, Henrik; Fredriksson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Sucralose, a high-intensity sweetener, has been approved as a general-purpose sweetener in all food since the late 1990s. Due to its good taste and physiochemical profile, its use has increased and sucralose is considered a way of managing health and an option to improve the quality of life in the diabetic population. Recently high concentrations of sucralose have been found in the environment. Other environmental pollutants have been shown to induce neurotoxic effects when administered during a period of rapid brain growth and development. This period of rapid brain growth and development is postnatal in mice and rats, spanning the first 3-4 wk of life, reaching its peak around postnatal day 10, whereas in humans, brain growth and development is perinatal. The proteins calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, growth-associated protein-43, synaptophysin, and tau play important roles during brain growth and development. In the present study, mice were orally exposed to 5-125 mg of sucralose per kilogram of body weight per day during postnatal days 8-12. Twenty-four hours after last exposure, brains were analyzed for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, growth-associated protein-43, synaptophysin, and tau, and at the age of 2 mo the animals were tested for spontaneous behavior. The protein analysis showed no alterations in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, growth-associated protein-43, synaptophysin, or tau. Furthermore, there were no disturbances in adult behavior or habituation after neonatal sucralose exposure. The present study shows that repeated neonatal exposure to the artificial sweetener sucralose does not result in neurotoxicity, which supports that sucralose seems to be a safe alternative for people who want or need to reduce or substitute glucose in their diet. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue Alterations in Oreochromis niloticus Following Chronic Exposure to Metal Complex Dark Green Azo Acid Dye and Anionic Surfactant Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilma Rantilla Amwele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gill, liver and kidney tissues in Oreochromis niloticus underwent histological alterations during a 90-day chronic exposure to metal complex dark green azo acid dye; anionic surfactant oil or mixtures of the two substances. Gill alterations following these chronic exposures included primary lamellae lifting, epithelial hypertrophy, secondary lamellae hyperplasia, secondary lamellae tip fusion, lamellae aneurysm and fusion, edema and blood congestion, all reflective of impaired metabolism and ion exchange. Liver alterations included cytoplasm degeneration, dilated sinusoid blood vessels, pyknotic nuclei, karyolysis, cytoplasm vacuolation and blood congestion suggesting reduced detoxification function. Kidney changes included tubule degeneration, dilation of glomeruli capillaries and Bowman’s space indicating excretory difficulties. Necrotic kidney tissue was found in fish exposed to 6 mg/L metal complex dark green azo acid dye. Histological examination of tissues following chronic exposures to toxic substances facilitates early diagnosis and understanding of the mechanisms by which substances impose harmful effects on organisms.

  19. Glucocorticoid inhibition of cellular proliferation in rat hepatoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticoids were shown to inhibit the growth rate of Fu5 rat hepatoma cells cultured in the presence or absence of serum and thus, induced a more stringent dependence on serum for growth in this cell line. Fu5 cells, made quiescent at low cell density by continuous exposure to glucocorticoid in the absence of serum, were induced with serum and insulin, which subsequently caused a rapid reinitiation of cellular proliferation. Analysis of total RNA isolated from hormone treated Fu5 cells undergoing serum/insulin induction of DNA synthesis revealed a sequential expression of cellular proto-oncogene products in the absence of any immediate changes in intracellular Ca ++ levels. Introduction of functional glucocorticoid receptor genes into both classes of dexamethasone resistant variants restored glucocorticoid responsiveness and suppression of cell growth. The BDS1 rat hepatoma cell line, an Fu5 derived subclone hypersensitive to the antiprofliferation effects of glucocorticoid, was observed to externalize a glucocorticoid suppressible mitogen (GSM) activity capable of mimicking EGF and insulin induced stimulation of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into serum starved, competant Balb/c 3T3 cells

  20. Perinatal exposure to low-dose of bisphenol A causes anxiety-like alteration in adrenal axis regulation and behaviors of rat offspring: a potential role for metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Chen, Fang; Feng, Xuejiao; Zhou, Libin; Li, Yingchun; Chen, Ling

    2015-05-01

    The present study focuses on detecting anxiety-like behavior and associated neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats exposed perinatally to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking endocrine disrupter and investigating the possible involvement of metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptors (mGlu2/3 receptors) in BPA-induced anxiogenic effects. When female breeders were administered orally with BPA (40 μg/kg/d) during pregnancy and lactation, their pups (here named 'BPA-exposed offspring') developed an anxiety-like phenotype, characterized by the hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated negative feedback regulation of the HPA axis, altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity and increased anxiety-like behaviors. BPA-exposed offspring also showed a reduced expression of mGlu2/3 receptors in the hippocampus. BPA-exposed offspring further subjected to systemic administration of mGlu2/3 receptor agonist (LY379268, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or antagonist (LY341495, 1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) twice per day for 6 days. The results indicated that chronic LY379268 treatment corrected the anxiety-like behaviors and associated neurochemical and endocrinological alterations in BPA-exposed offspring. Our data demonstrate for the first time that the perinatal BPA exposure induces an anxiety-like phenotype in behaviors and -related neuroendocrinology, and suggest that the changes in mGlu2/3 receptor might lie at the core of the pathological reprogramming triggered by early-life adversity. mGlu2/3 receptor may serve as a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for anxiety disorders associated with adverse early-life agents including perinatal BPA exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exposure to the insecticide endosulfan induces liver morphology alterations and oxidative stress in fruit-eating bats (Artibeus lituratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jerusa Maria; Brinati, Alessandro; Miranda, Liany Divina Lima; Morais, Danielle Barbosa; Zanuncio, José Cola; Gonçalves, Reggiani Vilela; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia; Freitas, Mariella Bontempo

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to pesticides may increase the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to oxidation of cell membrane lipids and proteins. Although fruit bats are potentially exposed to pesticides during their entire lifespan, the impacts of this exposure are still poorly investigated. We examined the effects of low, commercially recommended concentrations (0, 1.05 and 2.1 g/l) of an organochlorine insecticide endosulfan (EDS) formulation on oxidative responses in the liver and kidneys of Neotropical fruit bats (Artibeus lituratus), as well as possible liver morphological alterations following a 35-day oral exposure. Superoxide dismutase activity was significantly decreased upon exposure to 1.05 g/l of EDS in the liver and kidneys, catalase was decreased in the liver of 2.1 g/l EDS-exposed bats, while glutathione S-transferase was increased in the liver of 2.1 g/l EDS-exposed bats. Protein carbonyls increased following the exposure to the highest EDS dose tested. Endosulfan-induced morphological alterations in the liver included cell degeneration and cell death, with apparent cytoplasm lipid accumulation (steatosis) and pyknotic nuclei, karyolysis and deposit of collagen fibres. Our findings suggest that exposure to low concentrations of EDS induced a certain extent of oxidative damage in fruit bats, which may have led to liver morphological alterations. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2017 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid action and selective glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahn, Cindy; Löwenberg, Mark; Hommes, Daniel W; Buttgereit, Frank

    2007-09-15

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are the most common used anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs in the treatment of rheumatic and other inflammatory diseases. Their therapeutic effects are considered to be mediated by four different mechanisms of action: the classical genomic mechanism of action caused by the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor (cGCR); secondary non-genomic effects which are also initiated by the cGCR; membrane-bound glucocorticoid receptor (mGCR)-mediated non-genomic effects; non-specific, non-genomic effects caused by interactions with cellular membranes. The classical, genomic mechanism of GC-action can be divided into two processes: "transrepression", which is responsible for a large number of desirable anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects, and "transactivation" which is associated with frequently occurring side effects as well as with some immunosuppressive activities [Ehrchen, J., Steinmuller, L., Barczyk, K., Tenbrock, K., Nacken, W., Eisenacher, M., Nordhues, U., Sorg, C., Sunderkotter, C., Roth, J., 2007. Glucocorticoids induce differentiation of a specifically activated, anti-inflammatory subtype of human monocytes. Blood 109, 1265-1274]. Great efforts have been made to diminish glucocorticoid-induced adverse effects, but the improvement of conventional glucocorticoids has almost reached its limits. As a consequence, new variations of the conventional "good old drugs" are being tested and nitro-steroids and long circulating liposomal glucocorticoids indeed show promising results. Nevertheless, crux of the matter should be the design of qualitatively new drugs, such as selective glucocorticoid receptor agonists (SEGRAs). These innovative steroidal or non-steroidal molecules induce transrepression, while transactivation processes are less affected. First reports on two different GCR ligands, A276575 and ZK216348, show promising results. Here, we review the above-mentioned mechanisms of glucocorticoid action and give particular attention

  3. Glucocorticoids, chronic stress, and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallman, Mary F.; Pecoraro, Norman C.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Warne, James P.; Ginsberg, Abigail B.; Akana, Susan F.; Laugero, Kevin C.; Houshyar, Hani; Strack, Alison M.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Bell, Mary E.

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids either inhibit or sensitize stress-induced activity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, depending on time after their administration, the concentration of the steroids, and whether there is a concurrent stressor input. When there are high glucocorticoids together with a

  4. Clinical aspects of glucocorticoid sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); N.A.T.M. Huizenga (Nannette); P. de Lange (Pieter); F.H. de Jong (Frank); J.W. Koper (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies demonstrate that primary (hereditary) abnormalities in the glucocorticoid receptor gene make 6.6% of the normal population relatively 'hypersensitive' to glucocorticoids, while 2.3% are relatively 'resistant.' These abnormalities might explain why some individuals develop

  5. Long-term programing of psychopathology-like behaviors in male rats by peripubertal stress depends on individual's glucocorticoid responsiveness to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sophie E; Sandi, Carmen

    2018-02-07

    Experience of adversity early in life and dysregulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity are risk factors often independently associated with the development of psychopathological disorders, including depression, PTSD and pathological aggression. Additional evidence suggests that in combination these factors may interact to shape the development and expression of psychopathology differentially, though little is known about underlying mechanisms. Here, we studied the long-term consequences of early life stress exposure on individuals with differential constitutive glucocorticoid responsiveness to repeated stressor exposure, assessing both socio-affective behaviors and brain activity in regions sensitive to pathological alterations following stress. Two rat lines, genetically selected for either low or high glucocorticoid responsiveness to repeated stress were exposed to a series of unpredictable, fear-inducing stressors on intermittent days during the peripuberty period. Results obtained at adulthood indicated that having high glucocorticoid responses to repeated stress and having experience of peripuberty stress independently enhanced levels of psychopathology-like behaviors, as well as increasing basal activity in several prefrontal and limbic brain regions in a manner associated with enhanced behavioral inhibition. Interestingly, peripuberty stress had a differential impact on aggression in the two rat lines, enhancing aggression in the low-responsive line but not in the already high-aggressive, high-responsive rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that aberrant HPA axis activity around puberty, a key period in the development of social repertoire in both rats and humans, may alter behavior such that it becomes anti-social in nature.

  6. Exposure to synthetic gray water inhibits amoeba encystation and alters expression of Legionella pneumophila virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Pesticide Exposure Alters Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Levels in Mexican Agricultural Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, Rogelio; Ocampo-Gómez, Guadalupe; Morán-Martínez, Javier; Borja-Aburto, Victor; López-Cervantes, Malaquías; Uribe, Marisela; Torres-Sánchez, Luisa; Cebrián, Mariano E.

    2005-01-01

    Organophosphorous pesticides (OPs) are suspected of altering reproductive function by reducing brain acetylcholinesterase activity and monoamine levels, thus impairing hypothalamic and/or pituitary endocrine functions and gonadal processes. Our objective was to evaluate in a longitudinal study the association between OP exposure and serum levels of pituitary and sex hormones. Urinary OP metabolite levels were measured by gas–liquid chromatography, and serum pituitary and sex hormone levels by enzymatic immunoassay and radioimmunoassay in 64 men. A total of 147 urine and blood samples were analyzed for each parameter. More than 80% of the participants had at least one OP metabolite in their urine samples. The most frequent metabolite found was diethylthiophosphate (DETP; 55%), followed by diethylphosphate (DEP; 46%), dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP; 32%), and dimethyldithiophosphate (DMDTP; 31%). However, the metabolites detected at higher concentrations were DMTP, DEP, DMDTP, and dimethylphosphate. There was a high proportion of individuals with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations outside the range of normality (48%). The average FSH serum levels were higher during the heavy pesticide spraying season. However, a multivariate analysis of data collected in all periods showed that serum FSH levels were negatively associated with urinary concentrations of both DMTP and DMDTP, whereas luteinizing hormone (LH) was negatively associated with DMTP. We observed no significant associations between estradiol or testosterone serum levels with OP metabolites. The hormonal disruption in agricultural workers presented here, together with results from experimental animal studies, suggests that OP exposure disrupts the hypothalamic–pituitary endocrine function and also indicates that FSH and LH are the hormones most affected. PMID:16140621

  8. Benzoylecgonine exposure induced oxidative stress and altered swimming behavior and reproduction in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Marco; De Felice, Beatrice; Ferrario, Claudia; Salgueiro-González, Noelia; Castiglioni, Sara; Finizio, Antonio; Tremolada, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Several monitoring studies have shown that benzoylecgonine (BE) is the main illicit drug residue commonly measured in the aquatic system worldwide. Few studies have investigated the potential toxicity of this molecule towards invertebrate and vertebrate aquatic non-target organisms focusing on effects at low levels of the biological organization, but no one has assessed the consequences at higher ones. Thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the toxicity of a 48-h exposure to two concentrations of BE, similar to those found in aquatic ecosystems (0.5 μg/L and 1.0 μg/L), on the cladoceran Daphnia magna at different levels of the ecological hierarchy. We relied on a multi-level approach focusing on the effects at biochemical/biomolecular (biomarkers), individual (swimming activity) and population (reproduction) levels. We measured the amount of reactive oxygen species and of the activity of antioxidant (SOD, CAT, and GPx) and detoxifying (GST) enzymes to assess if BE exposure can alter the oxidative status of D. magna specimens, while the lipid peroxidation (TBARS) was measured as a marker of oxidative damage. Moreover, we also measured the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity because it is strictly related to behavioral changes in aquatic organisms. Changes in swimming behavior were investigated by a video tracking analysis, while the consequences on reproduction were assessed by a chronic toxicity test. Our results showed that BE concentrations similar to those found in aquatic ecosystems induced oxidative stress and inhibited AChE activity, affecting swimming behavior and the reproduction of Daphnia magna individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sucrose exposure in early life alters adult motivation and weight gain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristianne R M Frazier

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The cause of the current increase in obesity in westernized nations is poorly understood but is frequently attributed to a 'thrifty genotype,' an evolutionary predisposition to store calories in times of plenty to protect against future scarcity. In modern, industrialized environments that provide a ready, uninterrupted supply of energy-rich foods at low cost, this genetic predisposition is hypothesized to lead to obesity. Children are also exposed to this 'obesogenic' environment; however, whether such early dietary experience has developmental effects and contributes to adult vulnerability to obesity is unknown. Using mice, we tested the hypothesis that dietary experience during childhood and adolescence affects adult obesity risk. We gave mice unlimited or no access to sucrose for a short period post-weaning and measured sucrose-seeking, food consumption, and weight gain in adulthood. Unlimited access to sucrose early in life reduced sucrose-seeking when work was required to obtain it. When high-sugar/high-fat dietary options were made freely-available, however, the sucrose-exposed mice gained more weight than mice without early sucrose exposure. These results suggest that early, unlimited exposure to sucrose reduces motivation to acquire sucrose but promotes weight gain in adulthood when the cost of acquiring palatable, energy dense foods is low. This study demonstrates that early post-weaning experience can modify the expression of a 'thrifty genotype' and alter an adult animal's response to its environment, a finding consistent with evidence of pre- and peri-natal programming of adult obesity risk by maternal nutritional status. Our findings suggest the window for developmental effects of diet may extend into childhood, an observation with potentially important implications for both research and public policy in addressing the rising incidence of obesity.

  10. Sucrose exposure in early life alters adult motivation and weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Cristianne R M; Mason, Peggy; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Beeler, Jeff A

    2008-09-17

    The cause of the current increase in obesity in westernized nations is poorly understood but is frequently attributed to a 'thrifty genotype,' an evolutionary predisposition to store calories in times of plenty to protect against future scarcity. In modern, industrialized environments that provide a ready, uninterrupted supply of energy-rich foods at low cost, this genetic predisposition is hypothesized to lead to obesity. Children are also exposed to this 'obesogenic' environment; however, whether such early dietary experience has developmental effects and contributes to adult vulnerability to obesity is unknown. Using mice, we tested the hypothesis that dietary experience during childhood and adolescence affects adult obesity risk. We gave mice unlimited or no access to sucrose for a short period post-weaning and measured sucrose-seeking, food consumption, and weight gain in adulthood. Unlimited access to sucrose early in life reduced sucrose-seeking when work was required to obtain it. When high-sugar/high-fat dietary options were made freely-available, however, the sucrose-exposed mice gained more weight than mice without early sucrose exposure. These results suggest that early, unlimited exposure to sucrose reduces motivation to acquire sucrose but promotes weight gain in adulthood when the cost of acquiring palatable, energy dense foods is low. This study demonstrates that early post-weaning experience can modify the expression of a 'thrifty genotype' and alter an adult animal's response to its environment, a finding consistent with evidence of pre- and peri-natal programming of adult obesity risk by maternal nutritional status. Our findings suggest the window for developmental effects of diet may extend into childhood, an observation with potentially important implications for both research and public policy in addressing the rising incidence of obesity.

  11. REDD1 functions at the crossroads between the therapeutic and adverse effects of topical glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baida, Gleb; Bhalla, Pankaj; Kirsanov, Kirill; Lesovaya, Ekaterina; Yakubovskaya, Marianna; Yuen, Kit; Guo, Shuchi; Lavker, Robert M; Readhead, Ben; Dudley, Joel T; Budunova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous atrophy is the major adverse effect of topical glucocorticoids; however, its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we identify stress-inducible mTOR inhibitor REDD1 (regulated in development and DNA damage response 1) as a major molecular target of glucocorticoids, which mediates cutaneous atrophy. In REDD1 knockout (KO) mice, all skin compartments (epidermis, dermis, subcutaneous fat), epidermal stem, and progenitor cells were protected from atrophic effects of glucocorticoids. Moreover, REDD1 knockdown resulted in similar consequences in organotypic raft cultures of primary human keratinocytes. Expression profiling revealed that gene activation by glucocorticoids was strongly altered in REDD1 KO epidermis. In contrast, the down-regulation of genes involved in anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid response was strikingly similar in wild-type and REDD1 KO mice. Integrative bioinformatics analysis of our and published gene array data revealed similar changes of gene expression in epidermis and in muscle undergoing glucocorticoid-dependent and glucocorticoid-independent atrophy. Importantly, the lack of REDD1 did not diminish the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids in preclinical model. Our findings suggest that combining steroids with REDD1 inhibitors may yield a novel, safer glucocorticoid-based therapies. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. Role of corticosteroid binding globulin in the fast actions of glucocorticoids on the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, M P; Minni, A M; Dominguez, G; Helbling, J C; Foury, A; Henkous, N; Dorey, R; Béracochéa, D

    2014-03-01

    Corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) is a glycoprotein synthesized in liver and secreted in the blood where it binds with a high affinity but low capacity glucocorticoid hormones, cortisol in humans and corticosterone in laboratory rodents. In mammals, 95% of circulating glucocorticoids are bound to either CBG (80%) or albumin (15%) and only the 5% free fraction is able to enter the brain. During stress, the concentration of glucocorticoids rises significantly and the free fraction increases even more because CBG becomes saturated. However, glucocorticoids unbound to CBG are cleared from the blood more quickly. Our studies on mice totally devoid of CBG (Cbg k.o.) showed that during stress these mutant mice display a lower rise of glucocorticoids than the wild-type controls associated with altered emotional reactivity. These data suggested that CBG played a role in the fast actions of glucocorticoids on behavior. Further analyses demonstrated that stress-induced memory retrieval impairment, an example of the fast action of glucocorticoids on the brain is abolished in the Cbg k.o. mice. This effect of stress on memory retrieval could be restored in the Cbg k.o. mice by infusing corticosterone directly in the hippocampus. The mechanisms explaining these effects involved an increased clearance but no difference in corticosterone production. Thus, CBG seems to have an important role in maintaining in blood a glucocorticoid pool that will be able to access the brain for the fast effects of glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy, placental expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid and serotonin function and infant regulatory behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räikkönen, K; Pesonen, A-K; O'Reilly, J R; Tuovinen, S; Lahti, M; Kajantie, E; Villa, P; Laivuori, H; Hämäläinen, E; Seckl, J R; Reynolds, R M

    2015-11-01

    Glucocorticoids and serotonin may mediate the link between maternal environment, fetal brain development and 'programming' of offspring behaviors. The placenta regulates fetal exposure to maternal hormonal signals in animal studies, but few data address this in humans. We measured prospectively maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy and mRNAs encoding key gene products determining glucocorticoid and serotonin function in term human placenta and explored associations with infant regulatory behaviors. Bi-weekly self-ratings of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale from 12th to 13th gestational week onwards and term placental mRNAs of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD2B11), type 1 (HSD1B11), glucocorticoid (NR3C1), mineralocorticoid receptors (NR3C2) and serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) were obtained from 54 healthy mothers aged 32.2 ± 5.3 years with singleton pregnancies and without pregnancy complications. Infant regulatory behaviors (crying, feeding, spitting, elimination, sleeping and predictability) were mother-rated at 15.6 ± 4.2 days. Higher placental mRNA levels of HSD2B11 [0.41 standard deviation (s.d.) unit increase per s.d. unit increase; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13-0.69, p = 0.005], HSD1B11 (0.30, 0.03-0.57, p = 0.03), NR3C1 (0.44, 0.19-0.68, p = 0.001) and SLC6A4 (0.26, 0.00-0.53, p = 0.05) were associated with more regulatory behavioral challenges of the infant. Higher placental NR3C1 mRNA partly mediated the association between maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy and infant regulatory behaviors (p serotonin exposure is characteristic of infants with more regulatory behavioral challenges. Maternal depression acts, at least partly, via altering glucocorticoid action in the placenta to impact on offspring regulatory behaviors.

  14. Prenatal exposure to valproic acid alters the development of excitability in the postnatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueta, Yukiko; Sekino, Yuko; Yoshida, Sachiko; Kanda, Yasunari; Ueno, Susumu

    2018-03-01

    Prenatal valproic acid (VPA) exposure is a well-known animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that produces alterations in embryonic and adult neurogenesis as well as adolescent/adulthood neurobehavioral phenotypes. However, the effects of prenatal VPA exposure on neural network excitability, especially during the synaptogenic period around eye opening, are not fully understood. In this study, we orally administered VPA (300 mg/kg) to pregnant Wistar rats on gestation day 15 and subsequently performed field potential recording in the CA1 area of hippocampal slices obtained from control (saline-exposed) and VPA-exposed rat pups between postnatal day (PND) 13 and PND18. In control slices, we observed an abrupt enhancement of stimulation-dependent responses including population spike (PS) amplitudes and field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) slopes at PND16, which coincided with the average day of eye opening. In contrast, VPA-exposed pups exhibited delayed eye opening (PND17) and gradual rather than abrupt increases in PS amplitudes and fEPSP slopes over the duration of the synaptogenic period. We next investigated the involvement of ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) in PS generation using bicuculline methiodide (BMI), a GABA type A (GABA A ) receptor antagonist. In control slices, BMI enhanced PS amplitudes during PND14-15 (before eye opening) and had little effect thereafter during PND16-17; a subsequent regression model analysis of BMI ratios (the ratio of PS amplitudes in the presence and absence of BMI) indicated a possible developmental change between these periods. In contrast, almost identical regression models were obtained for BMI ratios during PND14-15 and PND16-17 in the VPA-exposed group, indicating the absence of a developmental change. Our results suggest that prenatal VPA exposure accelerates the development of hippocampal excitability before eye opening. Moreover, our experimental model can be used as a novel approach for the

  15. Acute exposure to pure cylindrospermopsin results in oxidative stress and pathological alterations in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto, María; Jos, Angeles; Pichardo, Silvia; Moyano, Rosario; Blanco, Alfonso; Cameán, Ana M

    2014-04-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is increasingly recognized as a potential threat to drinking water safety, due to its ubiquity. This cyanotoxin has been found to cause toxic effects in mammals, and although fish could be in contact with this toxin, acute toxicity studies on fish are nonexistent. This is the first study showing that single doses of CYN pure standard (200 or 400 μg CYN/kg fish bw) by oral route (gavage) generate histopathological effects in fish (Tilapia-Oreochromis niloticus) exposed to the toxin under laboratory condition. Among the morphological changes, disorganized parenchymal architecture in the liver, dilated Bowman's space in the kidney, fibrolysis in the heart, necrotic enteritis in the intestines, and hemorrhages in the gills, were observed. Moreover, some oxidative stress biomarkers in the liver and kidney of tilapias were altered. Thus, CYN exposure induced increased protein oxidation products in both organs, NADPH oxidase activity was significantly increased with the kidney being the most affected organ, and decreased GSH contents were also detected in both organs, at the higher dose assayed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Prenatal exposure to gamma/neutron irradiation: Sensorimotor alterations and paradoxical effects on learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Cicco, D.; Antal, S.; Ammassari-Teule, M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of prenatal exposure on gamma/neutron radiations (0.5 Gy at about the 18th day of fetal life) were studied in a hybrid strain of mice (DBA/Cne males x C57BL/Cne females). During ontogeny, measurements of sensorimotor reflexes revealed in prenatally irradiated mice (1) a delay in sensorial development, (2) deficits in tests involving body motor control, and (3) a reduction of both motility and locomotor activity scores. In adulthood, the behaviour of prenatally irradiated and control mice was examined in the open field test and in reactivity to novelty. Moreover, their learning performance was compared in several situations. The results show that, in the open field test, only rearings were more frequent in irradiated mice. In the presence of a novel object, significant sex x treatment interactions were observed since ambulation and leaning against the novel object increased in irradiated females but decreased in irradiated males. Finally, when submitted to different learning tasks, irradiated mice were impaired in the radial maze, but paradoxically exhibited higher avoidance scores than control mice, possibly because of their low pain thresholds. Taken together, these observations indicate that late prenatal gamma/neutron irradiation induces long lasting alterations at the sensorimotor level which, in turn, can influence learning abilities of adult mice

  17. Prolonged cannabinoid exposure alters GABAA receptor mediated synaptic function in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; Blair, Robert. E.; DeLorenzo, Robert. J.

    2011-01-01

    Developing cannabinoid based medication along with marijuana’s recreational use makes it important to investigate molecular adaptations the endocannabinoid system undergoes following prolonged use and withdrawal. Repeated cannabinoid administration results in development of tolerance and produces withdrawal symptoms that may include seizures. Here we employed electrophysiological and immunochemical techniques to investigate the effects of prolonged CB1 receptor agonist exposure on cultured hippocampal neurons. Approximately 60% of CB1 receptors colocalize to GABAergic terminals in hippocampal cultures. Prolonged treatment with the cannabinamimetic WIN 55,212-2 (+WIN, 1μM, 24-h) caused profound CB1 receptor downregulation accompanied by neuronal hyperexcitability. Furthermore, prolonged +WIN treatment resulted in increased GABA release as indicated by increased mIPSC frequency, a diminished GABAergic inhibition as indicated by reduction in mIPSC amplitude and a reduction in GABAA channel number. Additionally, surface staining for the GABAA β2/3 receptor subunits was decreased, while no changes in staining for the presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter were observed, indicating that GABAergic terminals remained intact. These findings demonstrate that agonist-induced downregulation of the CB1 receptor in hippocampal cultures results in neuronal hyperexcitability that may be attributed, in part, to alterations in both presynaptic GABA release mechanisms and postsynaptic GABAA receptor function demonstrating a novel role for cannabinoid-dependent presynaptic control of neuronal transmission. PMID:21324315

  18. Nonuniform alteration of dendritic development in the cerebral cortex following prenatal cocaine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L; Fischer, I; Levitt, P

    1996-01-01

    reached a nadir of 50% in the cocaine-exposed animals, indicative of a change in the organization of the apical dendrites compared to the control animals. Dendritic profiles of anterior cingulate neurons, filled by 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine percholate (Dil), confirmed that in the cocaine offspring, the dendrites coursed in an irregular, wavy manner from deep to superficial layers, suggestive of dendrites that were longer than normal, although cortical thickness was unchanged. The altered dendritic profiles also were seen in Golgi-impregnated neurons. The data indicate that prenatal exposure to cocaine can lead to specific alterations of neuronal growth that are long lasting. The lack of dendritic changes in visual cortex suggests that the drug does not modify development of cortical regions uniformly. This study also provides a new focus on the anterior cingulate cortex as a site in which aberrant structure-function relationships following prenatal cocaine exposure should be examined in both animal models and clinically.

  19. Fructose consumption enhances glucocorticoid action in rat visceral adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursać, Biljana N; Djordjevic, Ana D; Vasiljević, Ana D; Milutinović, Danijela D Vojnović; Veličković, Nataša A; Nestorović, Nataša M; Matić, Gordana M

    2013-06-01

    The rise in consumption of refined sugars high in fructose appears to be an important factor for the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Fructose has been shown to be involved in genesis and progression of the syndrome through deregulation of metabolic pathways in adipose tissue. There is evidence that enhanced glucocorticoid regeneration within adipose tissue, mediated by the enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 (11βHSD1), may contribute to adiposity and metabolic disease. 11βHSD1 reductase activity is dependent on NADPH, a cofactor generated by hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH). We hypothesized that harmful effects of long-term high fructose consumption could be mediated by alterations in prereceptor glucocorticoid metabolism and glucocorticoid signaling in the adipose tissue of male Wistar rats. We analyzed the effects of 9-week drinking of 10% fructose solution on dyslipidemia, adipose tissue histology and both plasma and tissue corticosterone level. Prereceptor metabolism of glucocorticoids was characterized by determining 11βHSD1 and H6PDH mRNA and protein levels. Glucocorticoid signaling was examined at the level of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and compartmental redistribution, as well as at the level of expression of its target genes (GR, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase and hormone-sensitive lipase). Fructose diet led to increased 11βHSD1 and H6PDH expression and elevated corticosterone level within the adipose tissue, which was paralleled with enhanced GR nuclear accumulation. Although the animals did not develop obesity, nonesterified fatty acid and plasma triglyceride levels were elevated, indicating that fructose, through enhanced prereceptor metabolism of glucocorticoids, could set the environment for possible later onset of obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor polymorphism in obesity and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer-Łobodzińska, Agnieszka; Adamiec-Mroczek, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity plays a significant role in the etiology of obesity and is essential for glucose homeostasis, the development of hyperinsulinaemia and subsequent increased fat deposition. Several polymorphisms in the GR gene have been described, and at least three of them seem to be associated with altered glucocorticoid sensitivity and changes in glucose homeostasis, and other metabolic parameters. The N363S polymorphism has been associated with increased sensitivity to glucocorticoides, increased insulin response to dexamethasone and increased plasma glucose level. BclI polymorphism is associated with increased abdominal obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and increased insulin resistance. Another polymorphism, ER22/23EK, in contrast to the others, is associated with relative resistance to glucocoricides actions and more beneficial metabolic profile-lower insulin resistance level, decreased lower cardiovascular risk and subseuent prolongation of life time. More research is still needed to understand the mechanisms behind these associations at the molecular level.

  1. Acute Exposure to Microcystin-Producing Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Alters Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio Swimming Performance Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Wilges Kist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are toxins produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae, primarily Microcystis aeruginosa, forming water blooms worldwide. When an organism is exposed to environmental perturbations, alterations in normal behavioral patterns occur. Behavioral repertoire represents the consequence of a diversity of physiological and biochemical alterations. In this study, we assessed behavioral patterns and whole-body cortisol levels of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio exposed to cell culture of the microcystin-producing cyanobacterium M. aeruginosa (MC-LR, strain RST9501. MC-LR exposure (100 μg/L decreased by 63% the distance traveled and increased threefold the immobility time when compared to the control group. Interestingly, no significant alterations in the number of line crossings were found at the same MC-LR concentration and time of exposure. When animals were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/L, MC-LR promoted a significant increase (around 93% in the time spent in the bottom portion of the tank, suggesting an anxiogenic effect. The results also showed that none of the MC-LR concentrations tested promoted significant alterations in absolute turn angle, path efficiency, social behavior, or whole-body cortisol level. These findings indicate that behavior is susceptible to MC-LR exposure and provide evidence for a better understanding of the ecological consequences of toxic algal blooms.

  2. Glucocorticoid programming of the fetal male hippocampal epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crudo, Ariann; Suderman, Matthew; Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Petropoulos, Sophie; Kostaki, Alisa; Hallett, Michael; Szyf, Moshe; Matthews, Stephen G

    2013-03-01

    The late-gestation surge in fetal plasma cortisol is critical for maturation of fetal organ systems. As a result, synthetic glucocorticoids (sGCs) are administered to pregnant women at risk of delivering preterm. However, animal studies have shown that fetal exposure to sGC results in increased risk of behavioral, endocrine, and metabolic abnormalities in offspring. Here, we test the hypothesis that prenatal GC exposure resulting from the fetal cortisol surge or after sGC exposure results in promoter-specific epigenetic changes in the hippocampus. Fetal guinea pig hippocampi were collected before (gestational day [GD52]) and after (GD65) the fetal plasma cortisol surge (Term∼GD67) and 24 hours after (GD52) and 14 days after (GD65) two repeat courses of maternal sGC (betamethasone) treatment (n = 3-4/gp). We identified extensive genome-wide alterations in promoter methylation in late fetal development (coincident with the fetal cortisol surge), whereby the majority of the affected promoters exhibited hypomethylation. Fetuses exposed to sGC in late gestation exhibited substantial differences in DNA methylation and histone h3 lysine 9 (H3K9) acetylation in specific gene promoters; 24 hours after the sGC treatment, the majority of genes affected were hypomethylated or hyperacetylated. However, 14 days after sGC exposure these differences did not persist, whereas other promoters became hypermethylated or hyperacetylated. These data support the hypothesis that the fetal GC surge is responsible, in part, for significant variations in genome-wide promoter methylation and that prenatal sGC treatment profoundly changes the epigenetic landscape, affecting both DNA methylation and H3K9 acetylation. This is important given the widespread use of sGC in the management of women in preterm labor.

  3. Prenatal nicotine exposure evokes alterations of cell structure in hippocampus and somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tara Sankar; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2002-01-01

    Offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy show behavioral abnormalities, including increased incidence of attentional deficit, learning disabilities, and cognitive dysfunction. Animal models indicate that nicotine elicits changes in neural cell replication and differentiation, leading to deficits in synaptic neurochemistry and behavioral performance, many of which first emerge at adolescence. We evaluated cellular morphology and regional architecture in the juvenile and adolescent hippocampus and the somatosensory cortex in rats exposed to nicotine prenatally. Pregnant rats were given nicotine throughout gestation via minipump infusion of 2 mg/kg/day, a regimen that elicits nicotine plasma levels comparable with those found in smokers. On postnatal days 21 and 30, brains were perfusion-fixed, coronal slices were taken between the anterior commissure and median eminence, and the morphology of the dorsal hippocampus and somatosensory cortex was characterized. In the hippocampal CA3 region and dentate gyrus, we found a substantial decrease in cell size, with corresponding decrements in cell layer thickness, and increments in cell packing density. Smaller, transient changes were seen in CA1. In layer 5 of the somatosensory cortex, although there was no significant decrement in the average cell size, there was a reduction in the proportion of medium-sized pyramidal neurons, and an increase in the proportion of smaller, nonpyramidal cells. All regions showed elevated numbers of glia. Taken together with previous work on neurochemical and functional defects, these data demonstrate that prenatal nicotine exposure compromises neuronal maturation, leading to long-lasting alterations in the structure of key brain regions involved in cognition, learning, and memory.

  4. Bacillus subtilis alters the proportion of major membrane phospholipids in response to surfactin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttlová, Petra; Pinkas, Dominik; Bechyňková, Olga; Fišer, Radovan; Svobodová, Jaroslava; Seydlová, Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Surfactin, an anionic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis, is an antimicrobial that targets the cytoplasmic membrane. Nowadays it appears increasingly apparent that the mechanism of resistance against these types of antibiotics consists of target site modification. This prompted us to investigate whether the surfactin non-producing strain B. subtilis 168 changes its membrane composition in response to a sublethal surfactin concentration. Here we show that the exposure of B. subtilis to surfactin at concentrations of 350 and 650 μg/ml (designated as SF350 and SF650, respectively) leads to a concentration-dependent growth arrest followed by regrowth with an altered growth rate. Analysis of the membrane lipid composition revealed modifications both in the polar head group and the fatty acid region. The presence of either surfactin concentration resulted in a reduction in the content of the major membrane phospholipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and increase in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), which was accompanied by elevated levels of phosphatidic acid (PA) in SF350 cultures. The fatty acid analysis of SF350 cells showed a marked increase in non-branched high-melting fatty acids, which lowered the fluidity of the membrane interior measured as the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of DPH. The liposome leakage of carboxyfluorescein-loaded vesicles resembling the phospholipid composition of surfactin-adapted cells showed that the susceptibility to surfactin-induced leakage is strongly reduced when the PG/PE ratio decreases and/or PA is included in the target bilayer. We concluded that the modifications of the phospholipid content of B. subtilis cells might provide a self-tolerance of the membrane active surfactin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Exposure to Forced Swim Stress Alters Local Circuit Activity and Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Maroun

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that, depending on its severity and context, stress can affect neural plasticity. Most related studies focused on synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation (LTP of principle cells. However, evidence suggests that following high-frequency stimulation, which induces LTP in principal cells, modifications also take place at the level of complex interactions with interneurons within the dentate gyrus, that is, at the local circuit level. So far, the possible effects of stress on local circuit activity and plasticity were not studied. Therefore, we set out to examine the possible alterations in local circuit activity and plasticity following exposure to stress. Local circuit activity and plasticity were measured by using frequency dependant inhibition (FDI and commissural modulation protocols following exposure to a 15 minute-forced swim trial. Exposure to stress did not alter FDI. The application of theta-burst stimulation (TBS reduced FDI in both control and stressed rats, but this type of plasticity was greater in stressed rats. Commissural-induced inhibition was significantly higher in stressed rats both before and after applying theta-burst stimulation. These findings indicate that the exposure to acute stress affects aspects of local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus. It is possible that these alterations underlie some of the behavioral consequences of the stress experience.

  6. Exposure to Forced Swim Stress Alters Local Circuit Activity and Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarom, Orli; Maroun, Mouna; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that, depending on its severity and context, stress can affect neural plasticity. Most related studies focused on synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation (LTP) of principle cells. However, evidence suggests that following high-frequency stimulation, which induces LTP in principal cells, modifications also take place at the level of complex interactions with interneurons within the dentate gyrus, that is, at the local circuit level. So far, the possible effects of stress on local circuit activity and plasticity were not studied. Therefore, we set out to examine the possible alterations in local circuit activity and plasticity following exposure to stress. Local circuit activity and plasticity were measured by using frequency dependant inhibition (FDI) and commissural modulation protocols following exposure to a 15 minute-forced swim trial. Exposure to stress did not alter FDI. The application of theta-burst stimulation (TBS) reduced FDI in both control and stressed rats, but this type of plasticity was greater in stressed rats. Commissural-induced inhibition was significantly higher in stressed rats both before and after applying theta-burst stimulation. These findings indicate that the exposure to acute stress affects aspects of local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus. It is possible that these alterations underlie some of the behavioral consequences of the stress experience. PMID:18301720

  7. The glucocorticoid/aggression relationship in animals and humans: an analysis sensitive to behavioral characteristics, glucocorticoid secretion patterns, and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, József

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids control a wide array of biological processes from glucose homeostasis to neuronal function. The mechanisms mediating their effects are similarly varied and include rapid and transient nongenomic effects on calcium trafficking, various neurotransmitter receptors, and other membrane/cytoplasmic proteins, as well as slowly developing but durable genomic effects that are mediated by a large number of glucocorticoid-sensitive genes that are affected after variable lag-times. Given this complexity, we suggest that the aggression/glucocorticoid relationship cannot be reduced to the simple "stimulation/inhibition" question. Here, we review the effects of glucocorticoids on aggression by taking into account the complexities of glucocorticoid actions. Acute and chronic effects were differentiated because these are mediated by different mechanisms. The effects of chronic increases and decreases in glucocorticoid production were discussed separately, because the activation of mechanisms that are not normally activated and the loss of normal functions should not be confounded. Findings in healthy/normal subjects and those obtained in subjects that show abnormal forms of behavior or psychopathologies were also differentiated, because the effects of glucocorticoids are indirect, and largely depend on the properties of neurons they act upon, which are altered in subjects with psychopathologies. In addition, the conditions of glucocorticoid measurements were also thoroughly evaluated. Although the role of glucocorticoids in aggression is perceived as controversial by many investigators, a detailed analysis that is sensitive to glucocorticoid and behavioral measure as well as to the mediating mechanism suggests that this role is rather clear-cut; moreover, there is a marked similarity between animal and human findings.

  8. [Glucocorticoids in rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziurla, R; Buttgereit, F

    2008-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are effective drugs which are often used in rheumatology. However, they have a considerable potential for frequent and sometimes serious side effects that restrict their use. Their mechanisms of action are either receptor dependent (specific) or independent (unspecific) on the genomic as well as the non-genomic level. Many adverse effects are predominantly caused by transactivation while the desired effects are mostly mediated by transrepression. Treatment strategies are sub-classified into low, medium, high, very high dose and pulse therapy based on criteria such as dose, indication, duration of treatment and potential risk of adverse events. The musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, neuro-endocrino-immunological, opthalmological and neuropsychiatric systems are examples where adverse effects may occur.

  9. Early developmental exposure to benzodiazepine ligands alters brain 31P-NMR spectra in young adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, R; Ceckler, T; Guillet, R; Kellogg, C

    1990-01-01

    Alterations in brain high energy phosphate compounds, using 31P-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, were measured in vivo in young adult (3-4 months) rats following prenatal exposure to ligands acting specifically at benzodiazepine (BDZ) binding sites. The exposure induced a decrease in intracellular pH that indicated a predominant interaction of the drugs in utero with central-type BDZ receptor sites. Late gestational exposure to BDZ ligands also induced changes in brain phosphocreatine (PCr) utilization. Exposure to the lowest dose of DZ (1.0 mg/kg) but not the higher dose (2.5 mg/kg) induced a significant change in PCr utilization. Exposure to the central-type BDZ receptor antagonist RO15-1788 alone clearly altered PCr utilization in adult offspring, and DZ (2.5 mg/kg) when administered concurrently was not able to prevent this effect. Though exposure to a peripheral-type ligand (PK11195) had no effect by itself, it converted the effect of the high dose of DZ to that of the low dose. Together, these results indicate an interaction during development between the central and peripheral-type BDZ binding sites on organization and/or regulation of cellular energy metabolism. Normalized ATP levels were not changed by any prenatal treatment indicating adequate buffering of intracellular ATP by phosphocreatine. The dopaminergic antagonist haloperidol did not alter intracellular pH or any index of phosphate metabolism indicating a selective receptor mediated role for BDZ ligands in influences on the long term organization of intracellular phosphate metabolism.

  10. The role of glucocorticoids in emotional memory reconsolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir Drexler, Shira; Wolf, Oliver T

    2017-07-01

    Glucocorticoids are secreted following exposure to stressful events. Their modulating role on memory reconsolidation, a post-retrieval process of re-stabilization, has been investigated only recently, at times with conflicting results. The goal of this review is twofold. First, to establish the modulating role of glucocorticoids on memory reconsolidation. Second, to point the potential factors and confounds that might explain the seemingly paradoxical findings. Here we review recent pharmacological studies, conducted in rodents and humans, which suggest a critical role of glucocorticoids in this post-retrieval process. In particular, the activation of glucocorticoid receptors in the amygdala and hippocampus is suggested to be involved in emotional memories reconsolidation, pointing to a similarity between post-retrieval reconsolidation and initial memory consolidation. In addition, based on the general reconsolidation literature, we suggest several factors that might play a role in determining the direction and strength of the reconsolidation effect following glucocorticoids treatment: memory-related factors, manipulation-related factors, and individual differences. We conclude that only when taking these additional factors into account can the paradox be resolved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prior mucosal exposure to heterologous cells alters the pathogenesis of cell-associated mucosal feline immunodeficiency virus challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavell Sarah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lines of research suggest that exposure to cellular material can alter the susceptibility to infection by HIV-1. Because sexual contact often includes exposure to cellular material, we hypothesized that repeated mucosal exposure to heterologous cells would induce an immune response that would alter the susceptibility to mucosal infection. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV model of HIV-1 mucosal transmission, the cervicovaginal mucosa was exposed once weekly for 12 weeks to 5,000 heterologous cells or media (control and then cats were vaginally challenged with cell-associated or cell-free FIV. Results Exposure to heterologous cells decreased the percentage of lymphocytes in the mucosal and systemic lymph nodes (LN expressing L-selectin as well as the percentage of CD4+ CD25+ T cells. These shifts were associated with enhanced ex-vivo proliferative responses to heterologous cells. Following mucosal challenge with cell-associated, but not cell-free, FIV, proviral burden was reduced by 64% in cats previously exposed to heterologous cells as compared to media exposed controls. Conclusions The pathogenesis and/or the threshold for mucosal infection by infected cells (but not cell-free virus can be modulated by mucosal exposure to uninfected heterologous cells.

  12. Impact of glucocorticoid on neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Odaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is currently an area of great interest in neuroscience. It is closely linked to brain diseases, including mental disorders and neurodevelopmental disease. Both embryonic and adult neurogeneses are influenced by glucocorticoids secreted from the adrenal glands in response to a variety of stressors. Moreover, proliferation/differentiation of the neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs is affected by glucocorticoids through intracellular signaling pathways such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt, hedgehog, and Wnt. Our review presents recent evidence of the impact of glucocorticoids on NSPC behaviors and the underlying molecular mechanisms; this provides important information for understanding the pathological role of glucocorticoids on neurogenesis-associated brain diseases.

  13. Glucocorticoids maintain human osteoclasts in the active mode of their resorption cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    that glucocorticoids deeply modify this resorptive behavior. First, glucocorticoids gradually induce excavations with a trenchlike morphology while reducing the time-dependent increase in excavation numbers. This indicates that glucocorticoids make osteoclasts elongate the excavations they initiated rather than...... migrating to a new resorption site, as in control conditions. Second, the round excavations in control conditions contain undegraded demineralized collagen as repeatedly reported earlier, whereas the excavations with a trenchlike morphology generated under glucocorticoid exposure appear devoid of leftovers...... of demineralized collagen. This indicates that collagenolysis proceeds generally at a lower rate than demineralization under control conditions, whereas collagenolysis rates are increased up to the level of demineralization rates in the presence of glucocorticoids. Taking these observations together leads...

  14. Juvenile obesity enhances emotional memory and amygdala plasticity through glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitard, Chloé; Maroun, Mouna; Tantot, Frédéric; Cavaroc, Amandine; Sauvant, Julie; Marchand, Alain; Layé, Sophie; Capuron, Lucile; Darnaudery, Muriel; Castanon, Nathalie; Coutureau, Etienne; Vouimba, Rose-Marie; Ferreira, Guillaume

    2015-03-04

    In addition to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, obesity is associated with adverse cognitive and emotional outcomes. Its growing prevalence during adolescence is particularly alarming since recent evidence indicates that obesity can affect hippocampal function during this developmental period. Adolescence is a decisive period for maturation of the amygdala and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, both required for lifelong cognitive and emotional processing. However, little data are available on the impact of obesity during adolescence on amygdala function. Herein, we therefore evaluate in rats whether juvenile high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity alters amygdala-dependent emotional memory and whether it depends on HPA axis deregulation. Exposure to HFD from weaning to adulthood, i.e., covering adolescence, enhances long-term emotional memories as assessed by odor-malaise and tone-shock associations. Juvenile HFD also enhances emotion-induced neuronal activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), which correlates with protracted plasma corticosterone release. HFD exposure restricted to adulthood does not modify all these parameters, indicating adolescence is a vulnerable period to the effects of HFD-induced obesity. Finally, exaggerated emotional memory and BLA synaptic plasticity after juvenile HFD are alleviated by a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. Altogether, our results demonstrate that juvenile HFD alters HPA axis reactivity leading to an enhancement of amygdala-dependent synaptic and memory processes. Adolescence represents a period of increased susceptibility to the effects of diet-induced obesity on amygdala function. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354092-12$15.00/0.

  15. Recent advances in the molecular mechanisms causing primary generalized glucocorticoid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, Nicolas; Lamprokostopoulou, Agaristi; Sertedaki, Amalia; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2016-01-01

    Primary Generalized Glucocorticoid Resistance is a rare condition characterized by generalized, partial, target tissue insensitivity to glucocorticoids owing to inactivating mutations, insertions or deletions in the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) gene (NR3C1). Recent advances in molecular and structural biology have enabled us to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action of the mutant receptors and to understand how certain conformational alterations of the defective hGRs result in generalized glucocorticoid resistance. Furthermore, our ever-increasing understanding of the molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid action indicates that the glucocorticoid signaling pathway is a stochastic system that plays a fundamental role in maintaining both basal and stress-related homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the clinical manifestations and molecular pathogenesis of Primary Generalized Glucocorticoid Resistance, we present our recent findings from the functional characterization of three novel heterozygous point mutations in the NR3C1 gene, and we discuss the diagnostic approach and therapeutic management of the condition. When the condition is suspected, we recommend sequencing analysis of the NR3C1 gene as well as of other genes encoding proteins involved in the glucocorticoid signal transduction. The tremendous progress of next-generation sequencing will undoubtedly uncover novel hGR partners or cofactors.

  16. Glucocorticoid action in human corneal epithelial cells establishes roles for corticosteroids in wound healing and barrier function of the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmiel, Mahita; Janoshazi, Agnes; Xu, Xiaojiang; Cidlowski, John A

    2016-11-01

    Glucocorticoids play diverse roles in almost all physiological systems of the body, including both anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive roles. Synthetic glucocorticoids are one of the most widely prescribed drugs and are used in the treatment of conditions such as autoimmune diseases, allergies, ocular disorders and certain types of cancers. In the interest of investigating glucocorticoid actions in the cornea of the eye, we established that multiple cell types in mouse corneas express functional glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with corneal epithelial cells having robust expression. To define glucocorticoid actions in a cell type-specific manner, we employed immortalized human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell line to define the glucocorticoid transcriptome and elucidated its functions in corneal epithelial cells. Over 4000 genes were significantly regulated within 6 h of dexamethasone treatment, and genes associated with cell movement, cytoskeletal remodeling and permeability were highly regulated. Real-time in vitro wound healing assays revealed that glucocorticoids delay wound healing by attenuating cell migration. These functional alterations were associated with cytoskeletal remodeling at the wounded edge of a scratch-wounded monolayer. However, glucocorticoid treatment improved the organization of tight-junction proteins and enhanced the epithelial barrier function. Our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids profoundly alter corneal epithelial gene expression and many of these changes likely impact both wound healing and epithelial cell barrier function. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Associations between personal exposures to VOCs and alterations in cardiovascular physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) - presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007...

  18. Associations between Personal Exposures to VOCs and Alterations in Cardiovascular Physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007 (5 seas...

  19. Intravenous prenatal nicotine exposure alters METH-induced hyperactivity, conditioned hyperactivity, and BDNF in adult rat offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Lacy, Ryan T.; Brown, Russell W.; Morgan, Amanda J.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Harrod, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 15% of women smoked tobacco cigarettes during pregnancy. In utero tobacco smoke exposure produces somatic growth deficits like intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight in offspring, but it can also negatively influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in later stages of life, such as an increased incidence of obesity and drug abuse. Animal models demonstrate that prenatal nicotine (PN) alters development of the mesocorticolimbic system, which is impo...

  20. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Zhu

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS - nitric oxide (NO pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  1. The Different Roles of Glucocorticoids in the Hippocampus and Hypothalamus in Chronic Stress-Induced HPA Axis Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Han, Zhou; Wu, Hai-Yin; Jing, Xing; Zhou, Hai-Hui; Suh, Hoonkyo; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS) - nitric oxide (NO) pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression. PMID:24831808

  2. Altered Adipogenesis in Zebrafish Larvae Following High Fat Diet and Chemical Exposure Is Visualised by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjo J. den Broeder

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Early life stage exposure to environmental chemicals may play a role in obesity by altering adipogenesis; however, robust in vivo methods to quantify these effects are lacking. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of developmental exposure to chemicals on adipogenesis in the zebrafish (Danio rerio. We used label-free Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS microscopy for the first time to image zebrafish adipogenesis at 15 days post fertilization (dpf and compared standard feed conditions (StF to a high fat diet (HFD or high glucose diet (HGD. We also exposed zebrafish embryos to a non-toxic concentration of tributyltin (TBT, 1 nM or Tris(1,3-dichloroisopropylphosphate (TDCiPP, 0.5 µM from 0–6 dpf and reared larvae to 15 dpf under StF. Potential molecular mechanisms of altered adipogenesis were examined by qPCR. Diet-dependent modulation of adipogenesis was observed, with HFD resulting in a threefold increase in larvae with adipocytes, compared to StF and HGD. Developmental exposure to TBT but not TDCiPP significantly increased adipocyte differentiation. The expression of adipogenic genes such as pparda, lxr and lepa was altered in response to HFD or chemicals. This study shows that SRS microscopy can be successfully applied to zebrafish to visualize and quantify adipogenesis, and is a powerful approach for identifying obesogenic chemicals in vivo.

  3. Maternal PTSD associates with greater glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring of Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrner, Amy; Bierer, Linda M; Passarelli, Vincent; Pratchett, Laura C; Flory, Janine D; Bader, Heather N; Harris, Iris R; Bedi, Aarti; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; Makotkine, Iouri; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Intergenerational effects of trauma have been observed clinically in a wide range of populations, and parental PTSD has been associated with an increased risk for psychopathology in offspring. In studies of Holocaust survivor offspring, parental PTSD, and particularly maternal PTSD, has been associated with increased risk for PTSD, low basal urinary cortisol excretion and enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone. Such findings implicate maternally derived glucocorticoid programming in the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related consequences, potentially resulting from in utero influences or early life experiences. This study investigated the relative influence of Holocaust exposure and PTSD in mothers and fathers on glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring. Eighty Holocaust offspring and 15 offspring of non-exposed Jewish parents completed evaluations and provided blood and urine samples. Glucocorticoid sensitivity was evaluated using the lysozyme suppression test (LST), an in vitro measure of glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity in a peripheral tissue, the dexamethasone suppression test (DST), and 24-h urinary cortisol excretion. Maternal PTSD was associated with greater glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring across all three measures of glucocorticoid function. An interaction of maternal and paternal PTSD on the DST and 24-h urinary cortisol showed an effect of decreased glucocorticoid sensitivity in offspring with paternal, but not maternal, PTSD. Although indirect, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that epigenetic programming may be involved in the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related effects on glucocorticoid regulation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Maternal exposure to diluted diesel engine exhaust alters placental function and induces intergenerational effects in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentino, Sarah A; Tarrade, Anne; Aioun, Josiane; Mourier, Eve; Richard, Christophe; Dahirel, Michèle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Fournier, Natalie; Aubrière, Marie-Christine; Lallemand, Marie-Sylvie; Camous, Sylvaine; Guinot, Marine; Charlier, Madia; Aujean, Etienne; Al Adhami, Hala; Fokkens, Paul H; Agier, Lydiane; Boere, John A; Cassee, Flemming R; Slama, Rémy; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airborne pollution is a rising concern in urban areas. Epidemiological studies in humans and animal experiments using rodent models indicate that gestational exposure to airborne pollution, in particular diesel engine exhaust (DE), reduces birth weight, but effects depend on exposure

  5. Acrolein inhalation alters myocardial synchrony and performance at and below exposure concentrations that cause ventilatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acrolein is an irritating aldehyde generated during combustion of organic compounds. Altered autonomic activity has been documented following acrolein inhalation, possibly impacting myocardial synchrony and function. Given the ubiquitous nature of acrolein in the environment, we ...

  6. From gastroprotective to ulcerogenic effects of glucocorticoids: role of long-term glucocorticoid action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaretova, Ludmila; Podvigina, Tatiana; Bagaeva, Tatiana; Morozova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids may have dual action on the gastric mucosa: gastroprotective and ulcerogenic. In this article, we review the data which suggested that an initial action of endogenous glucocorticoids, including stress-produced ones as well as exogenous glucocorticoids is gastroprotective and consider possible mechanisms of the conversion of physiological gastroprotective action of glucocorticoid hormones to their pathological ulcerogenic effect.

  7. Synovial DKK1 expression is regulated by local glucocorticoid metabolism in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Rowan; Juarez, Maria; Naylor, Amy; Tu, Jinwen; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Filer, Andrew; Stewart, Paul M; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-10-18

    Inflammatory arthritis is associated with increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. The Wnt antagonist dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is secreted by synovial fibroblasts in response to inflammation and this protein has been proposed to be a master regulator of bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Local glucocorticoid production is also significantly increased during joint inflammation. Therefore, we investigated how locally derived glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines regulate DKK1 synthesis in synovial fibroblasts during inflammatory arthritis. We examined expression and regulation of DKK1 in primary cultures of human synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with inflammatory arthritis. The effect of TNFα, IL-1β and glucocorticoids on DKK1 mRNA and protein expression was examined by real-time PCR and ELISA. The ability of inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of the glucocorticoid-activating enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) to sensitise fibroblasts to endogenous glucocorticoids was explored. Global expression of Wnt signalling and target genes in response to TNFα and glucocorticoids was assessed using a custom array. DKK1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts was directly regulated by glucocorticoids but not proinflammatory cytokines. Glucocorticoids, but not TNFα, regulated expression of multiple Wnt agonists and antagonists in favour of inhibition of Wnt signalling. However, TNFα and IL-1β indirectly stimulated DKK1 production through increased expression of 11β-HSD1. These results demonstrate that in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, DKK1 expression is directly regulated by glucocorticoids rather than TNFα. Consequently, the links between synovial inflammation, altered Wnt signalling and bone remodelling are not direct but are dependent on local activation of endogenous glucocorticoids.

  8. Novel aspects of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation and glucocorticoid actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Aguilera, Greti; Herman, James P.; Fiedler, Jenny L.; Deak, Terrence; Cordeiro de Sousa, Maria Bernardete

    2014-01-01

    conserved, being present in the earliest vertebrates. Understanding these basic mechanisms may lead to novel approaches for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for disorders related to stress and alterations of glucocorticoid secretion. PMID:24724595

  9. Glucocorticoid-induced reversal of interleukin-1β-stimulated inflammatory gene expression in human oviductal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Backman

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC, the most common epithelial ovarian carcinoma histotype, originates from the fallopian tube epithelium (FTE. Risk factors for this cancer include reproductive parameters associated with lifetime ovulatory events. Ovulation is an acute inflammatory process during which the FTE is exposed to follicular fluid containing both pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-1 (IL1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF, and cortisol. Repeated exposure to inflammatory cytokines may contribute to transforming events in the FTE, with glucocorticoids exerting a protective effect. The global response of FTE cells to inflammatory cytokines or glucocorticoids has not been investigated. To examine the response of FTE cells and the ability of glucocorticoids to oppose this response, an immortalized human FTE cell line, OE-E6/E7, was treated with IL1β, dexamethasone (DEX, IL1β and DEX, or vehicle and genome-wide gene expression profiling was performed. IL1β altered the expression of 47 genes of which 17 were reversed by DEX. DEX treatment alone altered the expression of 590 genes, whereas combined DEX and IL1β treatment altered the expression of 784 genes. Network and pathway enrichment analysis indicated that many genes altered by DEX are involved in cytokine, chemokine, and cell cycle signaling, including NFκΒ target genes and interacting proteins. Quantitative real time RT-PCR studies validated the gene array data for IL8, IL23A, PI3 and TACC2 in OE-E6/E7 cells. Consistent with the array data, Western blot analysis showed increased levels of PTGS2 protein induced by IL1β that was blocked by DEX. A parallel experiment using primary cultured human FTE cells indicated similar effects on PTGS2, IL8, IL23A, PI3 and TACC2 transcripts. These findings support the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory signaling is induced in FTE cells by inflammatory mediators and raises the possibility that

  10. Continuous exposure to the deterrents cis-jasmone and methyl jasmonate does not alter the behavioural responses of Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Barbara; Spangl, Bernhard; Koschier, Elisabeth Helene

    2016-01-01

    Behavioural responses of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), a generalist, cell sap-feeding insect species with piercing-sucking mouthparts, after continuous exposure to two deterrent secondary plant compounds are investigated. We compared in choice assays on bean leaf discs, the settling, feeding, and oviposition preferences of F. occidentalis females that had no experience with the two fatty acid derivatives methyl jasmonate and cis -jasmone before testing (naïve thrips) vs. females that had been exposed to the deterrent compounds before testing (experienced thrips). The thrips were exposed to the deterrents at low or high concentrations for varied time periods and subsequently tested on bean leaf discs treated with the respective deterrent at either a low or a high concentration. Frankliniella occidentalis females avoided settling on the deterrent-treated bean leaf discs for an observation period of 6 h, independent of their previous experience. Our results demonstrate that feeding and oviposition deterrence of the jasmonates to the thrips were not altered by continuous exposure of the thrips to the jasmonates. Habituation was not induced, neither by exposure to the low concentration of the deterrents nor by exposure to the high concentration. These results indicate that the risk of habituation to two volatile deterrent compounds after repeated exposure is not evident in F. occidentalis . This makes the two compounds potential candidates to be integrated in pest management strategies.

  11. VANADIUM EXPOSURE ALTERS SPONTANEOUS BEAT RATE AND GENE EXPRESSION OF CULTURED CARDIAC MYOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recent toxicological studies report PM-induced changes in a number of cardiac parameters, including heart rate variability, arrhythmias, repolarization, and internal defib...

  12. Prenatal exposure to BPA alters the epigenome of the rat mammary gland and increases the propensity to neoplastic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Dhimolea

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens may play a causal role in the increased breast cancer incidence which has been observed in Europe and the US over the last 50 years. The xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA leaches from plastic food/beverage containers and dental materials. Fetal exposure to BPA induces preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in the adult rat mammary gland. Previous results suggest that BPA acts through the estrogen receptors which are detected exclusively in the mesenchyme during the exposure period by directly altering gene expression, leading to alterations of the reciprocal interactions between mesenchyme and epithelium. This initiates a long sequence of altered morphogenetic events leading to neoplastic transformation. Additionally, BPA induces epigenetic changes in some tissues. To explore this mechanism in the mammary gland, Wistar-Furth rats were exposed subcutaneously via osmotic pumps to vehicle or 250 µg BPA/kg BW/day, a dose that induced ductal carcinomas in situ. Females exposed from gestational day 9 to postnatal day (PND 1 were sacrificed at PND4, PND21 and at first estrus after PND50. Genomic DNA (gDNA was isolated from the mammary tissue and immuno-precipitated using anti-5-methylcytosine antibodies. Detection and quantification of gDNA methylation status using the Nimblegen ChIP array revealed 7412 differentially methylated gDNA segments (out of 58207 segments, with the majority of changes occurring at PND21. Transcriptomal analysis revealed that the majority of gene expression differences between BPA- and vehicle-treated animals were observed later (PND50. BPA exposure resulted in higher levels of pro-activation histone H3K4 trimethylation at the transcriptional initiation site of the alpha-lactalbumin gene at PND4, concomitantly enhancing mRNA expression of this gene. These results show that fetal BPA exposure triggers changes in the postnatal and adult mammary gland epigenome and alters gene

  13. Alteration of Blood Parameters and Histoarchitecture of Liver and Kidney of Silver Barb after Chronic Exposure to Quinalphos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golam Mohammod Mostakim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinalphos (QP is commonly used for pest control in the agricultural fields surrounding freshwater reservoirs. This study was conducted to evaluate the chronic toxicity of this pesticide on blood parameters and some organs of silver barb, Barbonymus gonionotus. Fish were exposed to two sublethal concentrations, 0.47 ppm and 0.94 ppm, of QP for a period of 28 days. All the blood parameters (red blood cell, hematocrit, and hemoglobin and blood glucose except for white blood cells decreased with increasing concentration of toxicant and become significantly lower (p<0.05 at higher concentration when compared with control. The derived hematological indices of mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were equally altered compared to control. Histoarchitectural changes of liver and kidney were observed after exposure to the QP. Hypertrophy of hepatocytes, mild to severe necrosis, ruptured central vein, and vacuolation were observed in the liver of treated groups. Highly degenerated kidney tubules and hematopoietic tissue, degeneration of renal corpuscle, vacuolization, and necrosis were evident in the kidney of treated groups. In conclusion, chronic exposure to QP at sublethal concentrations induced hematological and histological alterations in silver barb and offers a simple tool to evaluate toxicity derived alterations.

  14. Pathway interactions between MAPKs, mTOR, PKA, and the glucocorticoid receptor in lymphoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson E Brad

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids are frequently used as a primary chemotherapeutic agent in many types of human lymphoid malignancies because they induce apoptosis through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor, with subsequent alteration of a complex network of cellular mechanisms. Despite clinical usage for over fifty years, the complete mechanism responsible for glucocorticoid-related apoptosis or resistance remains elusive. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is a signal transduction network that influences a variety of cellular responses through phosphorylation of specific target substrates, including the glucocorticoid receptor. In this study we have evaluated the pharmaceutical scenarios which converge on the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway to alter glucocorticoid sensitivity in clones of human acute lymphoblastic CEM cells sensitive and refractory to apoptosis in response to the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Results The glucocorticoid-resistant clone CEM-C1-15 displays a combination of high constitutive JNK activity and dexamethasone-induced ERK activity with a weak induction of p38 upon glucocorticoid treatment. The cells become sensitive to glucocorticoid-evoked apoptosis after: (1 inhibition of JNK and ERK activity, (2 stimulation of the cAMP/PKA pathway with forskolin, or (3 inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin. Treatments 1–3 in combination with dexamethasone alter the intracellular balance of phospho-MAPKs by lowering JNK phosphorylation and increasing the level of glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylated at serine 211, a modification known to enhance receptor activity. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that mitogen-activated protein kinases influence the ability of certain malignant lymphoid cells to undergo apoptosis when treated with glucocorticoid. Activated/phosphorylated JNK and ERK appear to counteract corticoid-dependent apoptosis. Inhibiting these MAPKs restores corticoid sensitivity

  15. Maternal exposure to diluted diesel engine exhaust alters placental function and induces intergenerational effects in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Sarah A; Tarrade, Anne; Aioun, Josiane; Mourier, Eve; Richard, Christophe; Dahirel, Michèle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Fournier, Natalie; Aubrière, Marie-Christine; Lallemand, Marie-Sylvie; Camous, Sylvaine; Guinot, Marine; Charlier, Madia; Aujean, Etienne; Al Adhami, Hala; Fokkens, Paul H; Agier, Lydiane; Boere, John A; Cassee, Flemming R; Slama, Rémy; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2016-07-26

    Airborne pollution is a rising concern in urban areas. Epidemiological studies in humans and animal experiments using rodent models indicate that gestational exposure to airborne pollution, in particular diesel engine exhaust (DE), reduces birth weight, but effects depend on exposure duration, gestational window and nanoparticle (NP) concentration. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of gestational exposure to diluted DE on feto-placental development in a rabbit model. Pregnant females were exposed to diluted (1 mg/m(3)), filtered DE (NP diameter ≈ 69 nm) or clean air (controls) for 2 h/day, 5 days/week by nose-only exposure (total exposure: 20 days in a 31-day gestation). DE exposure induced early signs of growth retardation at mid gestation with decreased head length (p = 0.04) and umbilical pulse (p = 0.018). Near term, fetal head length (p = 0.029) and plasma insulin and IGF1 concentrations (p = 0.05 and p = 0.019) were reduced. Placental function was also affected, with reduced placental efficiency (fetal/placental weight) (p = 0.049), decreased placental blood flow (p = 0.009) and fetal vessel volume (p = 0.002). Non-aggregated and "fingerprint" NP were observed at various locations, in maternal blood space, in trophoblastic cells and in the fetal blood, demonstrating transplacental transfer. Adult female offspring were bred with control males. Although fetoplacental biometry was not affected near term, second generation fetal metabolism was modified by grand-dam exposure with decreased plasma cholesterol (p = 0.008) and increased triglyceride concentrations (p = 0.015). Repeated daily gestational exposure to DE at levels close to urban pollution can affect feto-placental development in the first and second generation.

  16. Paternal BPA exposure in early life alters Igf2 epigenetic status in sperm and induces pancreatic impairment in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhenxing; Xia, Wei; Chang, Huailong; Huo, Wenqian; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Shunqing

    2015-11-04

    Exposure to endocrine disruptors in utero appears to alter epigenetics in the male germ-line and subsequently promote adult-onset disease in subsequent generations. Fetal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a highly prevalent endocrine disruptor in environment, has been shown to alter epigenetic modification and result in glucose intolerance in adulthood. However, whether fetal exposure to BPA can induce epigenetic modification and phenotypic changes in their subsequent offspring are still unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether exposure to BPA in early life induced glucose intolerance in the offspring through male germ line, and the underlying epigenetic molecular basis. F0 pregnant SD rats were received corn oil or 40 μg/kg/day of BPA during gestation and lactation. F1 male rats were maintained to generate F2 offspring by mating with untreated female rats. Both the F1 rats after weaning and the F2 offspring were not received any other treatments. Our results showed that male F2 offspring in the BPA group exhibited glucose intolerance and β-cell dysfunction. Decreased expression of Igf2 and associated hypermethylation of Igf2 were observed in islets of male F2 offspring. In addition, similar effects were observed in female F2 animals, but the effects were more pronounced in males. Moreover, abnormal expression and methylation of Igf2 was observed in sperm of adult F1 male rats, indicating that epigenetic modification in germ cells can be partly progressed to the next generation. Overall, our study suggests that BPA exposure during early life can result in generational transmission of glucose intolerance and β-cell dysfunction in the offspring through male germ line, which is associated with hypermethylation of Igf2 in islets. The changes of epigenetics in germ cells may contribute to this generational transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transforming growth factor-β impairs glucocorticoid activity in the A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, S; Harris, T; Mok, J S L; Li, M Y S; Keenan, C R; Schuliga, M J; Stewart, A G

    2012-08-01

    The lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549, undergoes epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT) in response to TGF-β. Glucocorticoids do not prevent the EMT response, but TGF-β induced resistance to the cytokine-regulatory action of glucocorticoids. We sought to characterize the impairment of glucocorticoid response in A549 cells. A549 cells were exposed to TGF-β for up to 96 h before glucocorticoid treatment and challenge with IL-1α to assess glucocorticoid regulation of IL-6 and CXCL8 production. Nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) was ascertained by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Transactivation of the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) was measured with a transfected GRE-secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase reporter. TGF-β (40-400 pM) reduced the maximum inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on IL-1α-induced IL-6 and CXCL8 production. The impaired glucocorticoid response was detected with 4 h of TGF-β (40 pM) exposure (and 4 h IL-1α to induce CXCL8 expression) and therefore was not secondary to EMT, a process that requires longer incubation periods and higher concentrations of TGF-β. TGF-β also impaired dexamethasone regulation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in thrombin-stimulated BEAS-2B epithelial cells. Impaired regulation of CXCL8 was associated with markedly reduced GRE transactivation and reduced induction of mRNA for IκBα, the glucocorticoid-inducible leucine zipper and the epithelial sodium channel (SCNN1A). The expression, cellular levels and nuclear localization of GRα were reduced by TGF-β. We have identified mechanisms underlying the impairment of responses to glucocorticoids by TGF-β in the A549 and BEAS-2B cell lines. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Grapevine Plasticity in Response to an Altered Microclimate: Sauvignon Blanc Modulates Specific Metabolites in Response to Increased Berry Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R; Eyeghe-Bickong, Hans A; du Plessis, Kari; Alexandersson, Erik; Jacobson, Dan A; Coetzee, Zelmari; Deloire, Alain; Vivier, Melané A

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the metabolic and physiological impacts of an altered microclimate on quality-associated primary and secondary metabolites in grape (Vitis vinifera) 'Sauvignon Blanc' berries was determined in a high-altitude vineyard. The leaf and lateral shoot removal in the bunch zones altered the microclimate by increasing the exposure of the berries. The physical parameters (berry diameter and weight), primary metabolites (sugars and organic acids), as well as bunch temperature and leaf water potential were predominantly not affected by the treatment. The increased exposure led to higher levels of specific carotenoids and volatile terpenoids in the exposed berries, with earlier berry stages reacting distinctly from the later developmental stages. Plastic/nonplastic metabolite responses could be further classified to identify metabolites that were developmentally controlled and/or responded to the treatment in a predictable fashion (assessed over two consecutive vintages). The study demonstrates that grapevine berries exhibit a degree of plasticity within their secondary metabolites and respond physiologically to the increased exposure by increasing metabolites with potential antioxidant activity. Taken together, the data provide evidence that the underlying physiological responses relate to the maintenance of stress pathways by modulating antioxidant molecules in the berries. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Grapevine Plasticity in Response to an Altered Microclimate: Sauvignon Blanc Modulates Specific Metabolites in Response to Increased Berry Exposure1

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Kari; Jacobson, Dan A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the metabolic and physiological impacts of an altered microclimate on quality-associated primary and secondary metabolites in grape (Vitis vinifera) ‘Sauvignon Blanc’ berries was determined in a high-altitude vineyard. The leaf and lateral shoot removal in the bunch zones altered the microclimate by increasing the exposure of the berries. The physical parameters (berry diameter and weight), primary metabolites (sugars and organic acids), as well as bunch temperature and leaf water potential were predominantly not affected by the treatment. The increased exposure led to higher levels of specific carotenoids and volatile terpenoids in the exposed berries, with earlier berry stages reacting distinctly from the later developmental stages. Plastic/nonplastic metabolite responses could be further classified to identify metabolites that were developmentally controlled and/or responded to the treatment in a predictable fashion (assessed over two consecutive vintages). The study demonstrates that grapevine berries exhibit a degree of plasticity within their secondary metabolites and respond physiologically to the increased exposure by increasing metabolites with potential antioxidant activity. Taken together, the data provide evidence that the underlying physiological responses relate to the maintenance of stress pathways by modulating antioxidant molecules in the berries. PMID:26628747

  20. Embryonic-only arsenic exposure in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) reduces growth and alters muscle IGF levels one year later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymkowicz, Dana B; Sims, Kaleigh C; Castro, Noemi M; Bridges, William C; Bain, Lisa J

    2017-05-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant of drinking water and crops in many parts of the world. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure is linked to decreased birth weight, weight gain, and proper skeletal muscle function. The goal of this study was to use killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) as a model to determine the long-term effects of embryonic-only arsenic exposure on muscle growth and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway. Killifish embryos were exposed to 0, 50, 200 or 800ppb As III from fertilization until hatching. Juvenile fish were reared in clean water and muscle samples were collected at 16, 28, 40 and 52 weeks of age. There were significant reductions in condition factors, ranging from 12 to 17%, in the fish exposed to arsenic at 16, 28 and 40 weeks of age. However, by 52 weeks, no significant changes in condition factors were seen. Alterations in IGF-1R and IGF-1 levels were assessed as a potential mechanism by which growth was reduced. While there no changes in hepatic IGF-1 transcripts, skeletal muscle cells can also produce their own IGF-1 and/or alter IGF-1 receptor levels to help enhance growth. After a 200 and 800ppb embryonic exposure, fish grown in clean water for 16 weeks had IGF-1R transcripts that were 2.8-fold and 2-fold greater, respectively, than unexposed fish. Through 40 weeks of age, IGF1-R remained elevated in the 200ppb and 800ppb embryonic exposure groups by 1.8-3.9-fold, while at 52 weeks of age, IGF-1R levels were still significantly increased in the 800ppb exposure group. Skeletal muscle IGF-1 transcripts were also significantly increased by 1.9-5.1 fold through the 52 weeks of grow-out in clean by water in the 800ppb embryonic exposure group. Based on these results, embryonic arsenic exposure has long-term effects in that it reduces growth and increases both IGF-1 and IGF-1R levels in skeletal muscle even 1year after the exposure has ended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Perinatal Lead Exposure Alters Gut Microbiota Composition and Results in Sex-specific Bodyweight Increases in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Wen, Xiaoquan William; Faulk, Christopher; Boehnke, Kevin; Zhang, Huapeng; Dolinoy, Dana C; Xi, Chuanwu

    2016-06-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a principle source of environmental contamination. Epidemiological and animal data suggest that early life lead (Pb) exposure results in critical effects on epigenetic gene regulation and child and adult weight trajectories. Using a mouse model of human-relevant exposure, we investigated the effects of perinatal Pb exposure on gut microbiota in adult mice, and the link between gut microbiota and bodyweight changes. Following Pb exposure during gestation and lactation via maternal drinking water, bodyweight in A(vy) strain wild-type non-agouti (a/a) offspring was tracked through adulthood. Gut microbiota of adult mice were characterized by deep DNA sequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Data analyses were stratified by sex and adjusted for litter effects. A Bayesian variable selection algorithm was used to analyze associations between bacterial operational taxonomic units and offspring adult bodyweight. Perinatal Pb exposure was associated with increased adult bodyweight in male (P compositions were significantly different (analysis of molecular variance, P gut microbiota were highly associated with adult bodyweight (P = .028; effect size = 2.59). Thus, perinatal Pb exposure results in altered adult gut microbiota regardless of sex, and these changes are highly correlated with increased bodyweight in males. Adult gut microbiota can be shaped by early exposures and may contribute to disease risks in a sex-specific manner. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Investigations of Glucocorticoid Action in GN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppe, C.; Roeyen, C. van; Leuchtle, K.; Kabgani, N.; Vogt, M.; Zandvoort, M. Van; Smeets, B.; Floege, J.; Grone, H.J.; Moeller, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    For several decades, glucocorticoids have been used empirically to treat rapid progressive GN. It is commonly assumed that glucocorticoids act primarily by dampening the immune response, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In this study, we inactivated the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)

  3. A maternal high-fat, high-sucrose diet has sex-specific effects on fetal glucocorticoids with little consequence for offspring metabolism and voluntary locomotor activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Eunice H; Schmidt, Kim L; Martel, Kaitlyn M; Wong, Chi Kin; Hamden, Jordan E; Gibson, William T; Soma, Kiran K; Christians, Julian K

    2017-01-01

    Maternal overnutrition and obesity during pregnancy can have long-term effects on offspring physiology and behaviour. These developmental programming effects may be mediated by fetal exposure to glucocorticoids, which is regulated in part by placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) type 1 and 2. We tested whether a maternal high-fat, high-sucrose diet would alter expression of placental 11β-HSD1 and 2, thereby increasing fetal exposure to maternal glucocorticoids, with downstream effects on offspring physiology and behaviour. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet or a nutrient-matched low-fat, no-sucrose control diet prior to and during pregnancy and lactation. At day 17 of gestation, HFHS dams had ~20% lower circulating corticosterone levels than controls. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction between maternal diet and fetal sex for circulating corticosterone levels in the fetuses, whereby HFHS males tended to have higher corticosterone than control males, with no effect in female fetuses. However, placental 11β-HSD1 or 11β-HSD2 expression did not differ between diets or show an interaction between diet and sex. To assess potential long-term consequences of this sex-specific effect on fetal corticosterone, we studied locomotor activity and metabolic traits in adult offspring. Despite a sex-specific effect of maternal diet on fetal glucocorticoids, there was little evidence of sex-specific effects on offspring physiology or behaviour, although HFHS offspring of both sexes had higher circulating corticosterone at 9 weeks of age. Our results suggest the existence of as yet unknown mechanisms that mitigate the effects of altered glucocorticoid exposure early in development, making offspring resilient to the potentially negative effects of a HFHS maternal diet.

  4. A maternal high-fat, high-sucrose diet has sex-specific effects on fetal glucocorticoids with little consequence for offspring metabolism and voluntary locomotor activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice H Chin

    Full Text Available Maternal overnutrition and obesity during pregnancy can have long-term effects on offspring physiology and behaviour. These developmental programming effects may be mediated by fetal exposure to glucocorticoids, which is regulated in part by placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD type 1 and 2. We tested whether a maternal high-fat, high-sucrose diet would alter expression of placental 11β-HSD1 and 2, thereby increasing fetal exposure to maternal glucocorticoids, with downstream effects on offspring physiology and behaviour. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS diet or a nutrient-matched low-fat, no-sucrose control diet prior to and during pregnancy and lactation. At day 17 of gestation, HFHS dams had ~20% lower circulating corticosterone levels than controls. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction between maternal diet and fetal sex for circulating corticosterone levels in the fetuses, whereby HFHS males tended to have higher corticosterone than control males, with no effect in female fetuses. However, placental 11β-HSD1 or 11β-HSD2 expression did not differ between diets or show an interaction between diet and sex. To assess potential long-term consequences of this sex-specific effect on fetal corticosterone, we studied locomotor activity and metabolic traits in adult offspring. Despite a sex-specific effect of maternal diet on fetal glucocorticoids, there was little evidence of sex-specific effects on offspring physiology or behaviour, although HFHS offspring of both sexes had higher circulating corticosterone at 9 weeks of age. Our results suggest the existence of as yet unknown mechanisms that mitigate the effects of altered glucocorticoid exposure early in development, making offspring resilient to the potentially negative effects of a HFHS maternal diet.

  5. High psychosis liability is associated with altered autonomic balance during exposure to Virtual Reality social stressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Counotte, Jacqueline; Pot-Kolder, Roos; van Roon, Arie M.; Hoskam, Olivier; van der Gaag, Mark; Veling, Wim

    Background: Social stressors are associated with an increased risk of psychosis. Stress sensitisation is thought to be an underlying mechanismand may be reflected in an altered autonomic stress response. Using an experimental Virtual Reality design, the autonomic stress response to social

  6. Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from Common Mobile Phone Jammers Alters the Pattern of Muscle Contractions: an Animal Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, A; Rahimi, S; Talebi, A; Soleimani, A; Haghani, M; Mortazavi, S M J

    2015-09-01

    The rapid growth of wireless communication technologies has caused public concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic radiations on human health. Some early reports indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians such as the alterations of the pattern of muscle extractions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phone jammers on the pulse height of contractions, the time interval between two subsequent contractions and the latency period of frog's isolated gastrocnemius muscle after stimulation with single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz). Frogs were kept in plastic containers in a room. Animals in the jammer group were exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from a common Jammer at a distance of 1m from the jammer's antenna for 2 hours while the control frogs were only sham exposed. Then animals were sacrificed and isolated gastrocnemius muscles were exposed to on/off jammer radiation for 3 subsequent 10 minute intervals. Isolated gastrocnemius muscles were attached to the force transducer with a string. Using a PowerLab device (26-T), the pattern of muscular contractions was monitored after applying single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz) as stimuli. The findings of this study showed that the pulse height of muscle contractions could not be affected by the exposure to electromagnetic fields. However, the latency period was effectively altered in RF-exposed samples. However, none of the experiments could show an alteration in the time interval between two subsequent contractions after exposure to electromagnetic fields. These findings support early reports which indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians including the effects on the pattern of muscle extractions.

  7. Secretion of Interferon gamma (IFNγ) from Human Immune Cells is Altered by Exposure to Tributyltin (TBT) and Dibutyltin (DBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Shanieek; Reid, Jacqueline; Whalen, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) are widespread environmental contaminants found in food, beverages, and human blood samples. Both of these butyltins (BTs) interfere with the ability of human natural killer (NK) cells to lyse target cells and also alter secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) from human immune cells in vitro. The capacity of BTs to interfere with secretion of other pro-inflammatory cytokines has not been examined. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a modulator of adaptive and innate immune responses, playing an important role in overall immune competence. This study shows that both TBT and DBT alter secretion of IFNγ from human immune cells. Peripheral blood cell preparations that were increasingly reconstituted were used to determine if exposures to either TBT or DBT affected IFNγ secretion and how the makeup of the cell preparation influenced that effect. IFNγ secretion was examined after 24 h, 48 h and 6 day exposures to TBT (200- 2.5 nM) and DBT (5- 0.05 μM) in highly enriched human NK cells, a monocyte-depleted preparation of PBMCs, and monocyte-containing PBMCs. Both BTs altered IFNγ secretion from NK cells at most of the conditions tested (either increasing or decreasing secretion). However, there was significant variability among donors as to the concentrations and time points that showed changes as well as the baseline secretion of IFNγ. The majority of donors showed an increase in IFNγ secretion in response to at least one concentration of TBT or DBT at a minimum of one length of exposure. PMID:24357260

  8. Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from Common Mobile Phone Jammers Alters the Pattern of Muscle Contractions: an Animal Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafati A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The rapid growth of wireless communication technologies has caused public concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic radiations on human health. Some early reports indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians such as the alterations of the pattern of muscle extractions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF radiation emitted from mobile phone jammers on the pulse height of contractions, the time interval between two subsequent contractions and the latency period of frog’s isolated gastrocnemius muscle after stimulation with single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz. Materials and Methods: Frogs were kept in plastic containers in a room. Animals in the jammer group were exposed to radiofrequency (RF radiation emitted from a common Jammer at a distance of 1m from the jammer’s antenna for 2 hours while the control frogs were only sham exposed. Then animals were sacrificed and isolated gastrocnemius muscles were exposed to on/off jammer radiation for 3 subsequent 10 minute intervals. Isolated gastrocnemius muscles were attached to the force transducer with a string. Using a PowerLab device (26-T, the pattern of muscular contractions was monitored after applying single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz as stimuli. Results: The findings of this study showed that the pulse height of muscle contractions could not be affected by the exposure to electromagnetic fields. However, the latency period was effectively altered in RF-exposed samples. However, none of the experiments could show an alteration in the time interval between two subsequent contractions after exposure to electromagnetic fields. Conclusion: These findings support early reports which indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians including the effects on the pattern of muscle extractions.

  9. Exposure to Silver Nanospheres Leads to Altered Respiratory Mechanics and Delayed Immune Response in an in Vivo Murine Model

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    Danielle Botelho

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we examine the organ level toxicology of both carbon black (CB and silver nanoparticles (AgNP. We aim to determine metal-specific effects to respiratory function, inflammation and potential interactions with lung lining fluid (LLF. C57Bl6/J male mice were intratracheally instilled with saline (control, low (0.05 μg/g or high (0.5 μg/g doses of either AgNP or CB 15 nm nanospheres. Lung histology, cytology, surfactant composition and function, inflammatory gene expression, and pulmonary function were measured at 1, 3, and 7 days post-exposure. Acutely, high dose CB resulted in an inflammatory response, increased neutrophilia and cytokine production, without alteration in surfactant composition or respiratory mechanics. Low dose CB had no effect. Neither low nor high dose AgNPs resulted in an acute inflammatory response, but there was an increase in work of breathing. Three days post-exposure with CB, a persistent neutrophilia was noted. High dose AgNP resulted in an elevated number of macrophages and invasion of lymphocytes. Additionally, AgNP treated mice displayed increased expression of IL1B, IL6, CCL2, and IL10. However, there were no significant changes in respiratory mechanics. At day 7, inflammation had resolved in AgNP-treated mice, but tissue stiffness and resistance were significantly decreased, which was accompanied by an increase in surfactant protein D (SP-D content. These data demonstrate that the presence of metal alters the response of the lung to nanoparticle exposure. AgNP-surfactant interactions may alter respiratory function and result in a delayed immune response, potentially due to modified airway epithelial cell function.

  10. Early life stress determines the effects of glucocorticoids and stress on hippocampal function: Electrophysiological and behavioral evidence respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anup G; Arp, Marit; Velzing, Els; Lesuis, Sylvie L; Schmidt, Mathias V; Holsboer, Florian; Joëls, Marian; Krugers, Harm J

    2018-05-01

    Exposure to early-life adversity may program brain function to prepare individuals for adaptation to matching environmental contexts. In this study we tested this hypothesis in more detail by examining the effects of early-life stress - induced by raising offspring with limited nesting and bedding material from postnatal days 2-9 - in various behavioral tasks and on synaptic function in adult mice. Early-life stress impaired adult performance in the hippocampal dependent low-arousing object-in-context recognition memory task. This effect was absent when animals were exposed to a single stressor before training. Early-life stress did not alter high-arousing context and auditory fear conditioning. Early-life stress-induced behavioral modifications were not associated with alterations in the dendritic architecture of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons or principal neurons of the basolateral amygdala. However, early-life stress reduced the ratio of NMDA to AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and glutamate release probability specifically in hippocampal CA1 neurons, but not in the basolateral amygdala. These ex vivo effects in the hippocampus were abolished by acute glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings support that early-life stress can hamper object-in-context learning via pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms that affect hippocampal function but these effects are counteracted by acute stress or elevated glucocorticoid levels. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Quintupling Inhaled Glucocorticoids to Prevent Childhood Asthma Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; Bacharier, Leonard B; Mauger, David T; Boehmer, Susan; Beigelman, Avraham; Chmiel, James F; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Morgan, Wayne J; Peters, Stephen P; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Sheehan, William J; Cabana, Michael D; Holguin, Fernando; Martinez, Fernando D; Pongracic, Jacqueline A; Baxi, Sachin N; Benson, Mindy; Blake, Kathryn; Covar, Ronina; Gentile, Deborah A; Israel, Elliot; Krishnan, Jerry A; Kumar, Harsha V; Lang, Jason E; Lazarus, Stephen C; Lima, John J; Long, Dayna; Ly, Ngoc; Marbin, Jyothi; Moy, James N; Myers, Ross E; Olin, J Tod; Raissy, Hengameh H; Robison, Rachel G; Ross, Kristie; Sorkness, Christine A; Lemanske, Robert F

    2018-03-08

    Asthma exacerbations occur frequently despite the regular use of asthma-controller therapies, such as inhaled glucocorticoids. Clinicians commonly increase the doses of inhaled glucocorticoids at early signs of loss of asthma control. However, data on the safety and efficacy of this strategy in children are limited. We studied 254 children, 5 to 11 years of age, who had mild-to-moderate persistent asthma and had had at least one asthma exacerbation treated with systemic glucocorticoids in the previous year. Children were treated for 48 weeks with maintenance low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids (fluticasone propionate at a dose of 44 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) and were randomly assigned to either continue the same dose (low-dose group) or use a quintupled dose (high-dose group; fluticasone at a dose of 220 μg per inhalation, two inhalations twice daily) for 7 days at the early signs of loss of asthma control ("yellow zone"). Treatment was provided in a double-blind fashion. The primary outcome was the rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids. The rate of severe asthma exacerbations treated with systemic glucocorticoids did not differ significantly between groups (0.48 exacerbations per year in the high-dose group and 0.37 exacerbations per year in the low-dose group; relative rate, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 2.1; P=0.30). The time to the first exacerbation, the rate of treatment failure, symptom scores, and albuterol use during yellow-zone episodes did not differ significantly between groups. The total glucocorticoid exposure was 16% higher in the high-dose group than in the low-dose group. The difference in linear growth between the high-dose group and the low-dose group was -0.23 cm per year (P=0.06). In children with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma treated with daily inhaled glucocorticoids, quintupling the dose at the early signs of loss of asthma control did not reduce the rate of severe asthma

  12. Histological alterations in the liver of rats induced by different gold nanoparticle sizes, doses and exposure duration

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    Abdelhalim Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticles (NPs can potentially cause adverse effects on organ, tissue, cellular, subcellular and protein levels due to their unusual physicochemical properties. Advances in nanotechnology have identified promising candidates for many biological and biomedical applications. Since the properties of NPs differ from that of their bulk materials, they are being increasingly exploited for medical uses and other industrial applications. The aim of the present study was to investigate the particle-size effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs on the hepatic tissue in an attempt to cover and understand the toxicity and the potential threat of their therapeutic and diagnostic use. Methods To investigate particle-size effect of GNPs on the hepatic tissue, a total of 70 healthy male Wistar-Kyoto rats were exposed to GNPs received 50 or 100 ul of GNPs infusion of size (10, 20 and 50 nm for 3 or 7 days. Results In comparison with respective control rats, exposure to GNPs doses has produced alterations in the hepatocytes, portal triads and the sinusoids. The alterations in the hepatocytes were mainly summarized as hydropic degeneration, cloudy swelling, fatty degeneration, portal and lobular infiltrate by chronic inflammatory cells and congestive dilated central veins. Conclusions The induced histological alterations might be an indication of injured hepatocytes due to GNPs toxicity that became unable to deal with the accumulated residues resulting from metabolic and structural disturbances caused by these NPs. These alterations were size-dependent with smaller ones induced the most effects and related with time exposure of GNPs. The appearance of hepatocytes cytoplasmic degeneration and nuclear destruction may suggest that GNPs interact with proteins and enzymes of the hepatic tissue interfering with the antioxidant defense mechanism and leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS generation which in turn may induce stress in the hepatocytes to

  13. Exposure to an urban environment alters the local bias of a remote culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparos, Serge; Ahmed, Lubna; Bremner, Andrew J; de Fockert, Jan W; Linnell, Karina J; Davidoff, Jules

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that populations in the Western world exhibit a local bias compared to East Asian populations that is widely ascribed to a difference between individualistic and collectivist societies. However, we report that traditional Himba - a remote interdependent society - exhibit a strong local bias compared to both Japanese and British participants in the Ebbinghaus illusion and in a similarity-matching task with hierarchical figures. Critically, we measured the effect of exposure to an urban environment on local bias in the Himba. Even a brief exposure to an urban environment caused a shift in processing style: the local bias was reduced in traditional Himba who had visited a local town and even more reduced in urbanised Himba who had moved to that town on a permanent basis. We therefore propose that exposure to an urban environment contributes to the global bias found in Western and Japanese populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Laser exposure induced alteration of WS2 monolayers in the presence of ambient moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, P.; Lau, D. W. M.; Zhang, Q.; Zheng, C.; Berean, K. J.; Field, M. R.; Ou, J. Z.; Cole, I. S.; Daeneke, T.; Kalantar-Zadeh, K.

    2018-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) emergence in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) such as WS2, has been one of the key attractions of such materials. However, there have been many observational contradictions in PL measurements presented in the past literature. This work addresses such issues. Firstly, the observational changes of the flakes’ PL patterns under exposure to various intensities of radiant exposure via laser sources are presented. These experiments show that these changes are a function of radiant exposure. Interestingly, it is observed that PL loss is accompanied by a change of the profile height for WS2 monolayers. In order to explore the fundamental mechanism for PL and height variations, laser irradiation was applied to monolayer WS2 flakes with varying radiant exposure to obtain PL maps, under the absence and presence of oxygen, H2O and nitrogen molecules in the atmosphere. It was seen that, after relatively high radiant exposure (>15 mJ µm‑2), the PL pattern loss occurs only in the presence of atmospheric H2O molecules (45% humidity) and is also accompanied by an increase in height. Compositional analysis determined that this height increase was due to the substitution of surface S atoms with sulphate groups. This discovery represents an important step forward in understanding the necessary precautions when investigating optical properties of 2D TMDs in atmospheric conditions, and highlights the need for precise evaluation of the thresholds for radiant exposure at which specific reactions begin to occur. This knowledge is crucial for efficient and effective control of ambient operating conditions for optical characterisation of monolayer WS2 and TMDs in general.

  15. Glucocorticoids Suppress Selected Components of the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Remi-Martin; Zhou, Lili; Sarantos, Melissa R.; Rodier, Francis; Freund, Adam; de Keizer, Peter L.J.; Liu, Su; Demaria, Marco; Cong, Yu-Sheng; Kapahi, Pankaj; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Hughes, Robert E.; Campisi, Judith

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting the proliferation of cells at risk for malignant transformation. Recently, senescent cells were shown to secrete numerous cytokines, growth factors and proteases that can alter the tissue microenvironment and may promote age-related pathology. To identify small molecules that suppress the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), we developed a screening protocol using normal human fibroblasts and a library of compounds that are approved for human use. Among the promising library constituents was the glucocorticoid corticosterone. Both corticosterone and the related glucocorticoid cortisol decreased the production and secretion of selected SASP components, including several pro-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, the glucocorticoids suppressed the SASP without reverting the tumor suppressive growth arrest, and were efficacious whether cells were induced to senesce by ionizing radiation or strong mitogenic signals delivered by oncogenic RAS or MAP kinase kinase 6 overexpression. Suppression of the prototypical SASP component IL-6 required the glucocorticoid receptor, which, in the presence of ligand, inhibited IL-1α signaling and NF-κB transactivation activity. Accordingly, co-treatments combining glucocorticoids with the glucocorticoid antagonist RU-486 or recombinant IL-1α efficiently reestablished NF-κB transcriptional activity and IL-6 secretion. Our findings demonstrate feasibility of screening for compounds that inhibit the effects of senescent cells. They further show that glucocorticoids inhibit selected components of the SASP, and suggest that corticosterone and cortisol, two FDA-approved drugs, might exert their effects in part by suppressing senescence-associated inflammation. PMID:22404905

  16. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid action and selective glucocorticoid receptor agonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahn, Cindy; Löwenberg, Mark; Hommes, Daniel W.; Buttgereit, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are the most common used anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs in the treatment of rheumatic and other inflammatory diseases. Their therapeutic effects are considered to be mediated by four different mechanisms of action: the classical genomic mechanism of action caused

  17. Acute chlorine gas exposure produces transient inflammation and a progressive alteration in surfactant composition with accompanying mechanical dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Christopher B; Scott, Pamela; Abramova, Elena; Gardner, Carol; Laskin, Debra L; Gow, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Acute Cl2 exposure following industrial accidents or military/terrorist activity causes pulmonary injury and severe acute respiratory distress. Prior studies suggest that antioxidant depletion is important in producing dysfunction, however a pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated. We propose that acute Cl2 inhalation leads to oxidative modification of lung lining fluid, producing surfactant inactivation, inflammation and mechanical respiratory dysfunction at the organ level. C57BL/6J mice underwent whole-body exposure to an effective 60ppm-hour Cl2 dose, and were euthanized 3, 24 and 48h later. Whereas pulmonary architecture and endothelial barrier function were preserved, transient neutrophilia, peaking at 24h, was noted. Increased expression of ARG1, CCL2, RETLNA, IL-1b, and PTGS2 genes was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells with peak change in all genes at 24h. Cl2 exposure had no effect on NOS2 mRNA or iNOS protein expression, nor on BAL NO3(-) or NO2(-). Expression of the alternative macrophage activation markers, Relm-α and mannose receptor was increased in alveolar macrophages and pulmonary epithelium. Capillary surfactometry demonstrated impaired surfactant function, and altered BAL phospholipid and surfactant protein content following exposure. Organ level respiratory function was assessed by forced oscillation technique at 5 end expiratory pressures. Cl2 exposure had no significant effect on either airway or tissue resistance. Pulmonary elastance was elevated with time following exposure and demonstrated PEEP refractory derecruitment at 48h, despite waning inflammation. These data support a role for surfactant inactivation as a physiologic mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction following Cl2 inhalation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Air pollution exposure during critical time periods in gestation and alterations in cord blood lymphocyte distribution: a cohort of livebirths

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    Herr Caroline EW

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxic exposures have been shown to influence maturation of the immune system during gestation. This study investigates the association between cord blood lymphocyte proportions and maternal exposure to air pollution during each gestational month. Methods Cord blood was analyzed using a FACSort flow cytometer to determine proportions of T lymphocytes (CD3+ cells and their subsets, CD4+ and CD8+, B lymphocytes (CD19+ and natural killer (NK cells. Ambient air concentrations of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH and particulate matter 2.5 were measured using fixed site monitors. Arithmetic means of these pollutants, calculated for each gestational month, were used as exposure metrics. Data on covariates were obtained from medical records and questionnaires. Multivariable linear regression models were fitted to estimate associations between monthly PAH or PM2.5 and cord blood lymphocytes, adjusting for year of birth and district of residence and, in further models, gestational season and number of prior live births. Results The adjusted models show significant associations between PAHs or PM2.5 during early gestation and increases in CD3+ and CD4+ lymphocytes percentages and decreases in CD19+ and NK cell percentages in cord blood. In contrast, exposures during late gestation were associated with decreases in CD3+ and CD4+ fractions and increases in CD19+ and NK cell fractions. There was no significant association between alterations in lymphocyte distribution and air pollution exposure during the mid gestation. Conclusions PAHs and PM2.5 in ambient air may influence fetal immune development via shifts in cord blood lymphocytes distributions. Associations appear to differ by exposure in early versus late gestation.

  19. Alteration of Tight and Adherens Junctions on 50-Hz Magnetic Field Exposure in Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK Cells

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    Zoltán Somosy

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherens (AJ and tight junctions (TJ, as integrated parts of the junctional complex, are multifunctional specialized regions of the cell membrane in epithelial cells. They are responsible for cell-to-cell interactions and also have great importance in cellular signaling processes including Wnt protein-mediated signals. As electromagnetic field (EMF exposure is known to cause alterations in the function as well as supramolecular organization of different cell contacts, our goal was to investigate the effect of 50-Hz magnetic field (MF exposures on the subcellular distribution of some representative structural proteins (occludin, β-catenin, and cadherin found in AJ and TJ. Additionally, cellular β-catenin content was also quantified by Western blot analysis. 50-Hz MF exposures seemed to increase the staining intensity (amount of occludin, cadherins, and β-catenin in the junctional area of MDCK cells, while Western blot data indicated the quantity of b-catenin was found significantly decreased at both time points after EM exposures. Our results demonstrate that MF are able to modify the distribution of TJ and AJ structural proteins, tending to stabilize these cell contacts. The quantitative changes of β-catenin suggest a causative relationship between MF effects on the cell junctional complex and the Wnt signaling pathway.

  20. Alteration of the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition in the Martian Surface Rocks Due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    C-13/C-12 and N-15/N-14 isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce C-13 and N-15 isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both C-13 and N-15 due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is rocks with relatively short exposure ages (e.g., 100 million years), cosmogenic changes in N-15/N-14 ratio are still very significant. We also show that a short exposure to cosmic rays of Allan Hills 84001 while on Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (N-15/N-14). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  1. Alterations in gills of Lepomis gibbosus, after acute exposure to several xenobiotics (pesticide, detergent and pharmaceuticals): morphometric and biochemical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sara; Correia, Alberto T; Antunes, Sara C; Nunes, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, scientific research about the effects of anthropogenic xenobiotics on non-target organisms has increased. Among the likely effects, some studies reported the evaluation of biochemical and morphological changes in specific tissues or organs of fishes, such as gills, which are key organs for the direct action of pollutants in the aquatic environment. This work intended to assess biochemical [oxidative stress/phase II conjugation isoenzymes glutathione S-transferase (GSTs)] and morphological [secondary lamellar length (SLL), secondary lamellar width (SLW), interlamellar distance (ID), basal epithelial thickness (BET) and proportion of the secondary lamellae available for gas exchange (PAGE)] changes in gills, after acute exposure to the pesticide chlorfenvinphos, the detergent sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and to the anticholinesterasic pharmaceuticals (neostigmine and pyridostigmine). Our results point to a significant, eventually hormetic, effect in the activity of GSTs following exposure to chlorfenvinphos that significantly increased the activity of GSTs at concentration of 0.2 mg/L. The activity of GSTs increased significantly after exposure to 100 mg/L of neostigmine. Considering the morphometric analysis of the gills, the data obtained showed that chlorfenvinphos exerted mainly minor architectural alterations in gills, with the exception of the highest tested concentration of chlorfenvinphos that produced also a slight decrease of the PAGE. The overall conclusions point to a null or negligible toxicity of the selected toxicants towards L. gibbosus, which may be reverted if exposure is withdrawn.

  2. Neuroprotective Effect of Ginseng against Alteration of Calcium Binding Proteins Immunoreactivity in the Mice Hippocampus after Radiofrequency Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Maskey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium binding proteins (CaBPs such as calbindin D28-k, parvalbumin, and calretinin are able to bind Ca2+ with high affinity. Changes in Ca2+ concentrations via CaBPs can disturb Ca2+ homeostasis. Brain damage can be induced by the prolonged electromagnetic field (EMF exposure with loss of interacellular Ca2+ balance. The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of ginseng in regard to CaBPs immunoreactivity (IR in the hippocampus through immunohistochemistry after one-month exposure at 1.6 SAR value by comparing sham control with exposed and ginseng-treated exposed groups separately. Loss of dendritic arborization was noted with the CaBPs in the Cornu Ammonis areas as well as a decrease of staining intensity of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus after exposure while no loss was observed in the ginseng-treated group. A significant difference in the relative mean density was noted between control and exposed groups but was nonsignificant in the ginseng-treated group. Decrease in CaBP IR with changes in the neuronal staining as observed in the exposed group would affect the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit by alteration of the Ca2+ concentration which could be prevented by ginseng. Hence, ginseng could contribute as a radioprotective agent against EMF exposure, contributing to the maintenance of Ca2+ homeostasis by preventing impairment of intracellular Ca2+ levels in the hippocampus.

  3. Acute and chronic glucocorticoid treatments regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in multiple brain regions in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S. Carter

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have primarily interpreted gene expression regulation by glucocorticoids in the brain in terms of impact on neurons; however, less is known about the corresponding impact of glucocorticoids on glia and specifically astrocytes in vivo. Recent microarray experiments have identified glucocorticoid-sensitive mRNAs in primary astrocyte cell culture, including a number of mRNAs that have reported astrocyte-enriched expression patterns relative to other brain cell types. Here, we have tested whether elevations of glucocorticoids regulate a subset of these mRNAs in vivo following acute and chronic corticosterone exposure in adult mice. Acute corticosterone exposure was achieved by a single injection of 10 mg/kg corticosterone, and tissue samples were harvested two hours post-injection. Chronic corticosterone exposure was achieved by administering 10 mg/mL corticosterone via drinking water for two weeks. Gene expression was then assessed in two brain regions associated with glucocorticoid action (prefrontal cortex and hippocampus by qPCR and by in situ hybridization. The majority of measured mRNAs regulated by glucocorticoids in astrocytes in vitro were similarly regulated by acute and/or chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vivo. In addition, the expression levels for mRNAs regulated in at least one corticosterone exposure condition (acute/chronic demonstrated moderate positive correlation between the two conditions by brain region. In situ hybridization analyses suggest that select mRNAs are regulated by chronic corticosterone exposure specifically in astroctyes based on (1 similar general expression patterns between corticosterone-treated and vehicle-treated animals and (2 similar expression patterns to the pan-astrocyte marker Aldh1l1. Our findings demonstrate that glucocorticoids regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in vivo and suggest that glucocorticoids regulate gene expression in the brain in a cell type-dependent fashion.

  4. Serum vitamin D levels are not altered after controlled diesel exhaust exposures in healthy human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past research has suggested that exposure to urban air pollution may be associated with vitamin D deficiency in human populations. Vitamin D is widely known for its importance in bone growth/remodeling, muscle metabolism, and its ability to promote calcium absorption in the gut; ...

  5. C60 exposure induced tissue damage and gene expression alterations in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der M.J.C.; Handy, R.D.; Heckmann, L.H.; Hout, van der A.; Brink, van den N.W.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of C60 exposure (0, 15 or 154 mg/kg soil) on the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus were assessed at the tissue and molecular level, in two experiments. In the first experiment, earthworms were exposed for four weeks, and in the second lifelong. In both experiments, gene expression of heat shock

  6. Exposure of fluid milk to LED light negatively affects consumer perception and alters underlying sensory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole; Carey, Nancy; Murphy, Steven; Kent, David; Bang, Jae; Stubbs, Tim; Wiedmann, Martin; Dando, Robin

    2016-06-01

    Fluid milk consumption per capita in the United States has been steadily declining since the 1940s. Many factors have contributed to this decline, including the increasing consumption of carbonated beverages and bottled water. To meet the challenge of stemming the decline in consumption of fluid milk, the dairy industry must take a systematic approach to identifying and correcting for factors that negatively affect consumers' perception of fluid milk quality. To that end, samples of fluid milk were evaluated to identify factors, with a particular focus on light-emitting diode (LED) light exposure, which negatively affect the perceived sensory quality of milk, and to quantify their relative effect on the consumer's experience. Fluid milk samples were sourced from 3 processing facilities with varying microbial postprocessing contamination patterns based on historical testing. The effect of fat content, light exposure, age, and microbiological content were assayed across 23 samples of fluid milk, via consumer, descriptive sensory, and instrumental analyses. Most notably, light exposure resulted in a broad negative reaction from consumers, more so than samples with microbiological contamination exceeding 20,000 cfu/mL on days approaching code. The predominant implication of the study is that a component of paramount importance in ensuring the success of the dairy industry would be to protect fluid milk from all sources of light exposure, from processing plant to consumer. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exposure to the Abused Inhalant Toluene Alters Medial Prefrontal Cortex Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayman, Wesley N; Woodward, John J

    2018-03-01

    Inhalants, including toluene, target the addiction neurocircuitry and are often one of the first drugs of abuse tried by adolescents. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in regulating goal-directed/reward-motivated behaviors and different mPFC sub-regions have been proposed to promote (prelimbic, PRL) or inhibit (infralimbic, IL) these behaviors. While this dichotomy has been studied in the context of other drugs of abuse, it is not known whether toluene exposure differentially affects neurons within PRL and IL regions. To address this question, we used whole-cell electrophysiology and determined the intrinsic excitability of PRL and IL pyramidal neurons in adolescent rats 24 h following a brief exposure to air or toluene vapor (10 500 p.p.m.). Prior to exposure, fluorescent retrobeads were injected into the NAc core (NAcc) or shell (NAcs) sub-regions to identify projection-specific mPFC neurons. In toluene treated adolescent rats, layer 5/6 NAcc projecting PRL (PRL5/6) neurons fired fewer action potentials and this was associated with increased rheobase, increased spike duration, and reductions in membrane resistance and amplitude of the I h current. No changes in excitability were observed in layer 2/3 NAcc projecting PRL (PRL2/3) neurons. In contrast to PRL neurons, layer 5 IL (IL5) and layer 2/3 (IL2/3) NAcc projecting neurons showed enhanced firing in toluene-exposed animals and in IL5 neurons, this was associated with a reduction in rheobase and AHP. For NAcs projecting neurons, toluene exposure significantly decreased firing of IL5 neurons and this was accompanied by an increased rheobase, increased spike duration, and reduced I h amplitude. The intrinsic excitability of PRL5, PRL2/3, and IL2/3 neurons projecting to the NAcs was not affected by exposure to toluene. The changes in excitability observed 24 h after toluene exposure were not observed when recordings were performed 7 days after the exposure. Finally, there were no changes in

  8. Alteration of cellular immune responses in the seastar Asterias rubens following dietary exposure to cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coteur, G.; Gillan, D.; Pernet, Ph.; Dubois, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    Several parameters of cellular immunity in seastars fed Cd-contaminated mussels were analyzed. The accumulation of cadmium in the seastars did not alter the concentration of amoebocytes in the coelomic fluid. On the contrary, the immune cells showed a reduced phagocytic activity and an increased production of reactive oxygen species. These effects may lead to an inability of the seastars to cope with bacterial infections and to oxidative damages to self tissue that could threaten the survival of the animals

  9. Actions and interactions of estradiol and glucocorticoids in cognition and the brain: Implications for aging women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ycaza Herrera, Alexandra; Mather, Mara

    2015-08-01

    Menopause involves dramatic declines in estradiol production and levels. Importantly, estradiol and the class of stress hormones known as glucocorticoids exert countervailing effects throughout the body, with estradiol exerting positive effects on the brain and cognition, glucocorticoids exerting negative effects on the brain and cognition, and estradiol able to mitigate negative effects of glucocorticoids. Although the effects of these hormones in isolation have been extensively studied, the effects of estradiol on the stress response and the neuroprotection offered against glucocorticoid exposure in humans are less well known. Here we review evidence suggesting that estradiol-related protection against glucocorticoids mitigates stress-induced interference with cognitive processes. Animal and human research indicates that estradiol-related mitigation of glucocorticoid damage and interference is one benefit of estradiol supplementation during peri-menopause or soon after menopause. The evidence for estradiol-related protection against glucocorticoids suggests that maintaining estradiol levels in post-menopausal women could protect them from stress-induced declines in neural and cognitive integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Actions and interactions of estradiol and glucocorticoids in cognition and the brain: Implications for aging women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alexandra Ycaza; Mather, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Menopause involves dramatic declines in estradiol production and levels. Importantly, estradiol and the class of stress hormones known as glucocorticoids exert countervailing effects throughout the body, with estradiol exerting positive effects on the brain and cognition, glucocorticoids exerting negative effects on the brain and cognition, and estradiol able to mitigate negative effects of glucocorticoids. Although the effects of these hormones in isolation have been extensively studied, the effects of estradiol on the stress response and the neuroprotection offered against glucocorticoid exposure in humans are less well known. Here we review evidence suggesting that estradiol-related protection against glucocorticoids mitigates stress-induced interference with cognitive processes. Animal and human research indicates that estradiol-related mitigation of glucocorticoid damage and interference is one benefit of estradiol supplementation during peri-menopause or soon after menopause. The evidence for estradiol-related protection against glucocorticoids suggests that maintaining estradiol levels in post-menopausal women could protect them from stress-induced declines in neural and cognitive integrity. PMID:25929443

  11. Acute chlorine gas exposure produces transient inflammation and a progressive alteration in surfactant composition with accompanying mechanical dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, Christopher B.; Scott, Pamela; Abramova, Elena; Gardner, Carol; Laskin, Debra L.; Gow, Andrew J., E-mail: Gow@rci.rutgers.edu

    2014-07-01

    Acute Cl{sub 2} exposure following industrial accidents or military/terrorist activity causes pulmonary injury and severe acute respiratory distress. Prior studies suggest that antioxidant depletion is important in producing dysfunction, however a pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated. We propose that acute Cl{sub 2} inhalation leads to oxidative modification of lung lining fluid, producing surfactant inactivation, inflammation and mechanical respiratory dysfunction at the organ level. C57BL/6J mice underwent whole-body exposure to an effective 60 ppm-hour Cl{sub 2} dose, and were euthanized 3, 24 and 48 h later. Whereas pulmonary architecture and endothelial barrier function were preserved, transient neutrophilia, peaking at 24 h, was noted. Increased expression of ARG1, CCL2, RETLNA, IL-1b, and PTGS2 genes was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells with peak change in all genes at 24 h. Cl{sub 2} exposure had no effect on NOS2 mRNA or iNOS protein expression, nor on BAL NO{sub 3}{sup −} or NO{sub 2}{sup −}. Expression of the alternative macrophage activation markers, Relm-α and mannose receptor was increased in alveolar macrophages and pulmonary epithelium. Capillary surfactometry demonstrated impaired surfactant function, and altered BAL phospholipid and surfactant protein content following exposure. Organ level respiratory function was assessed by forced oscillation technique at 5 end expiratory pressures. Cl{sub 2} exposure had no significant effect on either airway or tissue resistance. Pulmonary elastance was elevated with time following exposure and demonstrated PEEP refractory derecruitment at 48 h, despite waning inflammation. These data support a role for surfactant inactivation as a physiologic mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction following Cl{sub 2} inhalation. - Highlights: • Effect of 60 ppm*hr Cl{sub 2} gas on lung inflammation and mechanical function examined. • Pulmonary inflammation is transient and minor.

  12. Glucocorticoids in nephrology II: indications and dosage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Pajek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Present article describes glucocorticoid prescriptions in nephrology and renal transplantation, the dosages in induction and maintenance treatment phases and discontinuation. Key evidence and landmark trials are referenced, to establish the basis for modern glucocorticoid application in specific kidney disease indications. The glucocorticoid regimens in IgA glomerulonephritis, major primary glomerular diseases with nephrotic syndrome, vasculitides and tubulointerstitial nephritis are described. Various schemes for glucocorticoid dosage in lupus nephritis are given. The evolution of glucocorticoid usage in kidney transplantation is delineated and the modern role of these drugs in renal transplantation is defined. There are attempts to replace glucocorticoids with adrenocorticotrophic hormone in some glomerular diseases. Despite being relatively old drugs and having numerous side effects, glucocorticoids still function as major therapeutic agents for specific immunosuppressive treatment in nephrology.

  13. Mechanisms of Glucocorticoid Action During Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busada, Jonathan T; Cidlowski, John A

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are primary stress hormones produced by the adrenal cortex. The concentration of serum glucocorticoids in the fetus is low throughout most of gestation but surge in the weeks prior to birth. While their most well-known function is to stimulate differentiation and functional development of the lungs, glucocorticoids also play crucial roles in the development of several other organ systems. Mothers at risk of preterm delivery are administered glucocorticoids to accelerate fetal lung development and prevent respiratory distress. Conversely, excessive glucocorticoid signaling is detrimental for fetal development; slowing fetal and placental growth and programming the individual for disease later in adult life. This review explores the mechanisms that control glucocorticoid signaling during pregnancy and provides an overview of the impact of glucocorticoid signaling on fetal development. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The mother or the fetus? 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 null mice provide evidence for direct fetal programming of behavior by endogenous glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Megan C; Abrahamsen, Christian T; French, Karen L; Paterson, Janice M; Mullins, John J; Seckl, Jonathan R

    2006-04-05

    Low birth weight associates with increased susceptibility to adult cardiometabolic and affective disorders spawning the notion of fetal "programming." Prenatal exposure to excess glucocorticoids may be causal. In support, maternal stress or treatment during pregnancy with dexamethasone (which crosses the placenta) or inhibitors of fetoplacental 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11beta-HSD2), the physiological "barrier" to maternal glucocorticoids, reduces birth weight and programs permanent offspring hypertension, hyperglycemia, and anxiety behaviors. It remains uncertain whether such effects are mediated indirectly via altered maternal function or directly on the fetus and its placenta. To dissect this critical issue, we mated 11beta-HSD2(+/-) mice such that each pregnant female produces +/+, +/-, and -/- offspring and compared them with offspring of homozygous wild-type and -/- matings. We show that 11beta-HSD2(-/-) offspring of either +/- or -/- mothers have lower birth weight and exhibit greater anxiety than 11beta-HSD2(+/+) littermates. This provides clear evidence for the key role of fetoplacental 11beta-HSD2 in prenatal glucocorticoid programming.

  15. Does prenatal exposure to vitamin D-fortified margarine and milk alter birth weight?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla B; Berentzen, Tina L; Gamborg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether exposure to vitamin D from fortified margarine and milk during prenatal life influenced mean birth weight and the risk of high or low birth weight. The study was based on the Danish vitamin D fortification programme, which was a societal intervention with mandat......The present study examined whether exposure to vitamin D from fortified margarine and milk during prenatal life influenced mean birth weight and the risk of high or low birth weight. The study was based on the Danish vitamin D fortification programme, which was a societal intervention...... the initiation and termination of vitamin D fortification programmes. In total, four sets of analyses were performed. Information on birth weight was available in the Copenhagen School Health Record Register for all school children in Copenhagen. The mean birth weight was lower among the exposed than non...

  16. Sublethal Lead Exposure Alters Movement Behavior in Free-Ranging Golden Eagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecke, Frauke; Singh, Navinder J; Arnemo, Jon M; Bignert, Anders; Helander, Björn; Berglund, Åsa M M; Borg, Hans; Bröjer, Caroline; Holm, Karin; Lanzone, Michael; Miller, Tricia; Nordström, Åke; Räikkönen, Jannikke; Rodushkin, Ilia; Ågren, Erik; Hörnfeldt, Birger

    2017-05-16

    Lead poisoning of animals due to ingestion of fragments from lead-based ammunition in carcasses and offal of shot wildlife is acknowledged globally and raises great concerns about potential behavioral effects leading to increased mortality risks. Lead levels in blood were correlated with progress of the moose hunting season. Based on analyses of tracking data, we found that even sublethal lead concentrations in blood (25 ppb, wet weight), can likely negatively affect movement behavior (flight height and movement rate) of free-ranging scavenging Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos). Lead levels in liver of recovered post-mortem analyzed eagles suggested that sublethal exposure increases the risk of mortality in eagles. Such adverse effects on animals are probably common worldwide and across species, where game hunting with lead-based ammunition is widespread. Our study highlights lead exposure as a considerably more serious threat to wildlife conservation than previously realized and suggests implementation of bans of lead ammunition for hunting.

  17. Cholinergic Synaptic Transmissions Were Altered after Single Sevoflurane Exposure in Drosophila Pupa

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Rongfa; Zhang, Tao; Kuang, Liting; Chen, Zhen; Ran, Dongzhi; Niu, Yang; Xu, Kangqing; Gu, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Sevoflurane, one of the most used general anesthetics, is widely used in clinical practice all over the world. Previous studies indicated that sevoflurane could induce neuron apoptosis and neural deficit causing query in the safety of anesthesia using sevoflurane. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on electrophysiology in Drosophila pupa whose excitatory neurotransmitter is acetylcholine early after sevoflurane exposure using whole brain recordin...

  18. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Alters Cortisol Stress Reactivity in 11 Year Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Barry M.; LaGasse, Linda L.; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta S.; Bauer, Charles R.; Lin, Richard; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    Objective Determine the association between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal environmental adversity on salivary cortisol stress reactivity in school aged children. Study design Subjects included 743 11 year old children (n=320 cocaine exposed; 423 comparison) followed since birth in a longitudinal prospective multisite study. Saliva samples were collected to measure cortisol at baseline and after a standardized procedure to induce psychological stress. Children were divided into those who showed an increase in cortisol from baseline to post stress and those who showed a decrease or blunted cortisol response. Covariates measured included site, birthweight, maternal pre and postnatal use of alcohol, tobacco or marijuana, social class, changes in caretakers, maternal depression and psychological symptoms, domestic and community violence, child abuse and quality of the home. Results With adjustment for confounding variables, cortisol reactivity to stress was more likely to be blunted in children with prenatal cocaine exposure. Cocaine exposed children exposed to domestic violence showed the strongest effects. Conclusion The combination of prenatal cocaine exposure and an adverse postnatal environment could down regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) resulting in the blunted cortisol response to stress possibly increasing risk for later psychopathology and adult disease. PMID:20400094

  19. Exposure to Low-Dose X-Ray Radiation Alters Bone Progenitor Cells and Bone Microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Florence; Swift, Joshua M; Greene, Elisabeth S; Allen, Matthew R; Cunningham, David A; Braby, Leslie A; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation during medical treatment exerts well-documented deleterious effects on bone health, reducing bone density and contributing to bone growth retardation in young patients and spontaneous fracture in postmenopausal women. However, the majority of human radiation exposures occur in a much lower dose range than that used in the radiation oncology clinic. Furthermore, very few studies have examined the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on bone integrity and results have been inconsistent. In this study, mice were irradiated with a total-body dose of 0.17, 0.5 or 1 Gy to quantify the early (day 3 postirradiation) and delayed (day 21 postirradiation) effects of radiation on bone microarchitecture and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Female BALBc mice (4 months old) were divided into four groups: irradiated (0.17, 0.5 and 1 Gy) and sham-irradiated controls (0 Gy). Micro-computed tomography analysis of distal femur trabecular bone from animals at day 21 after exposure to 1 Gy of X-ray radiation revealed a 21% smaller bone volume (BV/TV), 22% decrease in trabecular numbers (Tb.N) and 9% greater trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) compared to sham-irradiated controls (P X-rays, whereas osteoclastogenesis was enhanced. A better understanding of the effects of radiation on osteoprogenitor cell populations could lead to more effective therapeutic interventions that protect bone integrity for individuals exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  20. Neonatal diethylstilbestrol exposure alters the metabolic profile of uterine epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yin

    2012-11-01

    Developmental exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES causes reproductive tract malformations, affects fertility and increases the risk of clear cell carcinoma of the vagina and cervix in humans. Previous studies on a well-established mouse DES model demonstrated that it recapitulates many features of the human syndrome, yet the underlying molecular mechanism is far from clear. Using the neonatal DES mouse model, the present study uses global transcript profiling to systematically explore early gene expression changes in individual epithelial and mesenchymal compartments of the neonatal uterus. Over 900 genes show differential expression upon DES treatment in either one or both tissue layers. Interestingly, multiple components of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ-mediated adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, including PPARγ itself, are targets of DES in the neonatal uterus. Transmission electron microscopy and Oil-Red O staining further demonstrate a dramatic increase in lipid deposition in uterine epithelial cells upon DES exposure. Neonatal DES exposure also perturbs glucose homeostasis in the uterine epithelium. Some of these neonatal DES-induced metabolic changes appear to last into adulthood, suggesting a permanent effect of DES on energy metabolism in uterine epithelial cells. This study extends the list of biological processes that can be regulated by estrogen or DES, and provides a novel perspective for endocrine disruptor-induced reproductive abnormalities.

  1. Subacute microcystin-LR exposure alters the metabolism of thyroid hormones in juvenile zebrafish (Danio Rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zidong; Tang, Rong; Li, Dapeng; Hu, Qing; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-30

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) has been detected extensively in the aquatic environment and has the potential to disturb the thyroid endocrine system. However, limited information is available on the effects of subacute MC-LR exposure on fish thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism. In the present study, juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 5, and 25 μg/L) for 28 days. Whole-body TH content and thyroid follicle histology were used as direct endpoints to assess thyroid disruption. The activities of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) and the transcription of selected genes associated with TH synthesis were also investigated to study the underlying mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Exposure of zebrafish to MC-LR significantly increased whole-body thyroxine (T4) content but decreased whole-body triiodothyronine (T3) content. We also observed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid follicle epithelial cells, as well as up-regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and transthyretin (TTR) genes. The decreases in ID1 and ID2 activities coupled with an increase in ID3 activity were observed in MC-LR treatment groups. These results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR at environmental concentrations results in the disturbance of TH homeostasis by disrupting the synthesis and conversion of THs.

  2. Subacute Microcystin-LR Exposure Alters the Metabolism of Thyroid Hormones in Juvenile Zebrafish (Danio Rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystin-LR (MC-LR has been detected extensively in the aquatic environment and has the potential to disturb the thyroid endocrine system. However, limited information is available on the effects of subacute MC-LR exposure on fish thyroid hormone (TH metabolism. In the present study, juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio were exposed to MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations (0, 1, 5, and 25 μg/L for 28 days. Whole-body TH content and thyroid follicle histology were used as direct endpoints to assess thyroid disruption. The activities of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs and the transcription of selected genes associated with TH synthesis were also investigated to study the underlying mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Exposure of zebrafish to MC-LR significantly increased whole-body thyroxine (T4 content but decreased whole-body triiodothyronine (T3 content. We also observed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid follicle epithelial cells, as well as up-regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, thyroid peroxidase (TPO, and transthyretin (TTR genes. The decreases in ID1 and ID2 activities coupled with an increase in ID3 activity were observed in MC-LR treatment groups. These results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR at environmental concentrations results in the disturbance of TH homeostasis by disrupting the synthesis and conversion of THs.

  3. The role of endogenous glucocorticoids in glucose metabolism and immune status of MIF-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Ivana; Vujicic, Milica; Saksida, Tamara; Berki, Timea; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava; Stojanovic, Ivana

    2013-08-15

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)-deficient mice develop glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia, but remain entirely responsive to exogenous insulin in adult age. Furthermore, as a consequence of MIF deficiency, the immune response in these mice is predominantly anti-inflammatory. Since MIF is a natural counter-regulator of glucocorticoid action, and it is known that excessive concentration of glucocorticoids contribute both to beta cell dysfunction and immunosuppression, we hypothesized that MIF absence enables elevation of glucocorticoids which in turn caused the observed condition. Our results confirm that MIF-knockout (MIF-KO) mice possess higher levels of circulating corticosterone, but lower expression of glucocorticoid receptor in pancreatic islets, liver and adipose tissue to the one observed in wild type (WT) mice. A significant up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor expression was however noticed in MIF-deficient lymph node cells. The inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor by RU486 improved tolerance to glucose in MIF-KO mice and restored euglycemia. Although RU486 treatment did not alter the level of glucose receptor GLUT2, it enhanced insulin secretion and up-regulated insulin-triggered Akt phosphorylation within hepatic tissue. Finally, inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor changed anti-inflammatory phenotype of MIF-KO lymphocytes toward a physiological profile. Our results indicate that deregulated glucocorticoid secretion and glucocorticoid receptor expression in the absence of MIF possibly contributes to the development of glucose intolerance and immunosuppression in MIF-KO mice. However, since MIF-KO mice respond normally to insulin and their beta cell function is within physiological range, additional cause for glucose intolerance could be sought in the possible malfunction of their insulin. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Alterations in cancer cell mechanical properties after fluid shear stress exposure: a micropipette aspiration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chivukula VK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Venkat Keshav Chivukula,1 Benjamin L Krog,1,2 Jones T Nauseef,2 Michael D Henry,2 Sarah C Vigmostad1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: Over 90% of cancer deaths result not from primary tumor development, but from metastatic tumors that arise after cancer cells circulate to distal sites via the circulatory system. While it is known that metastasis is an inefficient process, the effect of hemodynamic parameters such as fluid shear stress (FSS on the viability and efficacy of metastasis is not well understood. Recent work has shown that select cancer cells may be able to survive and possibly even adapt to FSS in vitro. The current research seeks to characterize the effect of FSS on the mechanical properties of suspended cancer cells in vitro. Nontransformed prostate epithelial cells (PrEC LH and transformed prostate cancer cells (PC-3 were used in this study. The Young's modulus was determined using micropipette aspiration. We examined cells in suspension but not exposed to FSS (unsheared and immediately after exposure to high (6,400 dyn/cm2 and low (510 dyn/cm2 FSS. The PrEC LH cells were ~140% stiffer than the PC-3 cells not exposed to FSS. Post-FSS exposure, there was an increase of ~77% in Young's modulus after exposure to high FSS and a ~47% increase in Young's modulus after exposure to low FSS for the PC-3 cells. There was no significant change in the Young's modulus of PrEC LH cells post-FSS exposure. Our findings indicate that cancer cells adapt to FSS, with an increased Young's modulus being one of the adaptive responses, and that this adaptation is specific only to PC-3 cells and is not seen in PrEC LH cells. Moreover, this adaptation appears to be graded in response to the magnitude of FSS experienced by the cancer cells. This is the first study

  5. The effects of a single memantine treatment on behavioral alterations associated with binge alcohol exposure in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Nirelia M; McGough, Nancy N H; Spinetta, Michael J; Thomas, Jennifer D; Riley, Edward P

    2011-01-01

    The third trimester in human fetal development represents a critical time of brain maturation referred to as the "brain growth spurt". This period occurs in rats postnatally, and exposure to ethanol during this time can increase the risk of impairments on a variety of cognitive and motor tasks. It has been proposed that one potential mechanism for the teratogenic effects of ethanol is NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity during periods of ethanol withdrawal. In neonatal rats, antagonism of NMDA receptors during ethanol withdrawal, with drugs such as MK-801 and eliprodil, has been shown to mitigate some of the behavioral deficits induced by developmental ethanol exposure. The current study examined whether memantine, an NMDA receptor antagonist and a drug used clinically in Alzheimer's patients, would attenuate impairments associated with binge ethanol exposure in neonatal rats. On postnatal day 6, rats were exposed to 6 g/kg ethanol via intubation with controls receiving an isocaloric maltose dextrin solution. Twenty-one hours following the ethanol binge, rats received intraperitoneal injections of memantine at 0, 10, 15, or 20 mg/kg. Ethanol's teratogenic effects were assessed using multiple behavioral tasks: open field activity, parallel bars and spatial discrimination reversal learning. Ethanol-treated rats were overactive in the open field and were impaired on both reversal learning and motor performance. Administration of 15 or 20 mg/kg memantine during withdrawal significantly attenuated ethanol's adverse effects on motor coordination, but did not significantly alter activity levels or improve the spatial learning deficits associated with neonatal alcohol exposure. These results indicate that a single memantine administration during ethanol withdrawal can mitigate motor impairments but not spatial learning impairments or overactivity observed following a binge ethanol exposure during development in the rat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alteration of the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition in the Martian Surface Rocks Due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    C-13/C-12 and N-15/N-14 isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce C-13 and N-15 isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both C-13 and N-15 due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is <10 ppm, then the "light," potentially "biological" C-13/C-12 ratio would be effectively erased by cosmic rays over 3.5 billion years of exposure. We found that for the rocks with relatively short exposure ages (e.g., 100 million years), cosmogenic changes in N-15/N-14 ratio are still very significant. We also show that a short exposure to cosmic rays of Allan Hills 84001 while on Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (N-15/N-14). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  7. Oral exposure to inorganic mercury alters T lymphocyte phenotypes and cytokine expression in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hyun; Johnson, Victor J; Sharma, Raghubir P

    2003-11-01

    Mercury is a well-recognized health hazard and an environmental contaminant. Mercury modulates immune responses ranging from immune suppression to autoimmunity but the mechanisms responsible for these effects are still unclear. Male BALB/c mice were exposed continuously to 0, 0.3, 1.5, 7.5, or 37.5 ppm mercury in drinking water for 14 days. Body weight was reduced at the highest dose of mercury whereas the relative kidney and spleen weights were significantly increased. The dose range of mercury used did not cause hepatotoxicity as indicated by circulating alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Circulating blood leukocytes were elevated in mice treated with the highest dose of mercury. Mercury ranging from 1.5 to 37.5 ppm dose-dependently decreased CD3(+) T lymphocytes in spleen; both CD4(+) and CD8(+) single-positive lymphocyte populations were decreased. Exposure to 7.5 and 37.5 ppm mercury decreased the CD8(+) T lymphocyte population in the thymus, whereas double-positive CD4(+)/CD8(+) and CD4(+) thymocytes were not altered. Mercury altered the expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma, and interleukin-12), c-myc, and major histocompatibility complex II, in various organs. Results indicated that a decrease in T lymphocyte populations in immune organs and altered cytokine gene expression may contribute to the immunotoxic effects of inorganic mercury.

  8. Effect of suspension hypokinesia/hypodynamia on glucocorticoid receptor levels in rat hindlimb muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ilyina-Kakueva et. al. (1976) conducted an investigation in which rats were exposed to weightlessness during the Cosmos program. An examination of the rats revealed a marked atrophy of hindlimb muscles. A suspension model has been developed to simulate these weightlessness-induced alterations. In agreement with the Cosmos studies, suspension hypokinesia/hypodynamia (H/H) results in differential atrophy of hindlimb muscles in rats. Recent studies have demonstrated elevated glucocorticoid receptor numbers in the gastrocnemius muscle following immobilization and denervation. One of the objectives of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of suspension H/H on glucocorticoid receptor levels in rat hindlimb muscles. Another objective was to ascertain whether altered receptor levels reflect the differential nature of hindlimb muscle atrophy during suspension H/H. The obtained findings suggest that differential muscle atrophy resulting from H/H may result from differential alterations of glucocorticoid receptor levels.

  9. Pro-inflammatory cytokines: cellular and molecular drug targets for glucocorticoid-induced-osteoporosis via osteocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiantian; Yu, Xijie; He, Chengqi

    2018-04-04

    Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat varieties of allergic and autoimmune diseases, however, long-term application results in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). Inflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) play important regulatory roles in bone metabolism, but their roles in GIOP remain largely unknown. Osteocytes can modulate the formation and function of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, directly via gap junctions, or indirectly by transferring molecule signaling. Apoptotic osteocytes release RANKL, HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, osteocytes can secrete FGF23 to regulate bone metabolism. Exposure to high levels of GCs can drive osteocyte apoptosis and influence gap junctions, leading to bone loss. GCs treatment is regarded to produce more FGF23 to inhibit bone mineralization. GCs also disrupt the vascular to decrease osteocyte feasibility and mineral appositional rate, resulting in a decline in bone strength. Apoptotic bodies from osteocytes induced by GCs treatment can enhance production of TNF-α and IL-6. On the other hand, TNF-α and IL-6 show synergistic effects by altering osteocytes signaling towards osteoclasts and osteoblasts. In addition, TNF-α can induce osteocyte apoptosis and attribute to a worsened bone quality in GCs. IL-6 and osteocytes may interact with each other. Therefore, we hypothesize that GCs regulate osteocyteogenesis through TNF-α and IL-6, which are highly expressed around osteocyte undergoing apoptosis. In the present review, we summarized the roles of osteocytes in regulating osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Furthermore, the mechanism of GCs altered relationship between osteocytes and osteoblasts/osteoclasts. In addition, we discussed the roles of TNF-α and IL-6 in GIOP by modulating osteocytes. Lastly, we discussed the possibility of using pro-inflammatory signaling pathway as therapeutic targets to develop drugs for GIOP. Copyright

  10. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela L Buscariollo

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg or vehicle (0.09% NaCl i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  11. Embryonic Caffeine Exposure Acts via A1 Adenosine Receptors to Alter Adult Cardiac Function and DNA Methylation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Victoria; Xue, Huiling; Rivkees, Scott A.; Wendler, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.09% NaCl) i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2–4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8–10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation. PMID:24475304

  12. Exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide during pregnancy and lactation induces neurobehavioral alterations in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Cristina E; Bartos, Mariana; Bras, Cristina; Gumilar, Fernanda; Antonelli, Marta C; Minetti, Alejandra

    2016-03-01

    The impact of sub-lethal doses of herbicides on human health and the environment is a matter of controversy. Due to the fact that evidence particularly of the effects of glyphosate on the central nervous system of rat offspring by in utero exposure is scarce, the purpose of the present study was to assess the neurobehavioral effects of chronic exposure to a glyphosate-containing herbicide during pregnancy and lactation. To this end, pregnant Wistar rats were exposed through drinking water to 0.2% or 0.4% of a commercial formulation of glyphosate (corresponding to a concentration of 0.65 or 1.30g/L of glyphosate, respectively) during pregnancy and lactation and neurobehavioral alterations in offspring were analyzed. The postnatal day on which each pup acquired neonatal reflexes (righting, cliff aversion and negative geotaxis) and that on which eyes and auditory canals were fully opened were recorded for the assessment of sensorimotor development. Locomotor activity and anxiety levels were monitored via open field test and plus maze test, respectively, in 45- and 90-day-old offspring. Pups exposed to a glyphosate-based herbicide showed early onset of cliff aversion reflex and early auditory canal opening. A decrease in locomotor activity and in anxiety levels was also observed in the groups exposed to a glyphosate-containing herbicide. Findings from the present study reveal that early exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide affects the central nervous system in rat offspring probably by altering mechanisms or neurotransmitter systems that regulate locomotor activity and anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Skin alterations induced by long-term exposure to uranium and their effect on permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubios, A.M.; Marzorati, M.; Cabrini, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The skin is a probable route of incorporation of uranium by percutaneous absorption. The changes in epidermal thickness and their effect on skin permeability after uranium exposure are reported herein. Two experiments (A and B) were performed in Wistar rats weighing 60 g. In experiment A the animals were exposed to U 3 O 8 (0.012 g d - 1 ) in 30 daily topical applications. In experiment B the animals were treated as in experiment A, followed by a period of non-exposure of 60 d. Samples of the treated area of skin were taken for histologic studies and for the study of the skin permeability. The epidermal thickness was measured on the histological sections. Epidermis was thinner in experimental than in control animals in both experiments. The values in the control groups were 41.05 ± 14.03 μm (A) and 38.92 ± 16.50 μm (B) and 21.35 ± 10.29 μm (A) and 24.06 ± 16.50 μm (B) in the experimental groups, the differences being statistically significant. Skin permeability was measured placing skin samples in a diffusion cell, in which the upper compartment was filled with a staining solution. The determinations were made with a spectrophotometer. The results revealed that the skin permeability in both experimental groups was higher than in the respective controls, 65% in experiment A and 77% in experiment B. The results revealed that a long term uranium exposure leads to an epidermal atrophy which in turn results in an increased permeability of the skin. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. Alterations of cognitive function and 5-HT system in rats after long term microwave exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Juan; Peng, Rui-Yun; Wang, Chang-Zhen; Qiao, Si-Mo; Yong, Zou; Gao, Ya-Bing; Xu, Xin-Ping; Wang, Shao-Xia; Dong, Ji; Zuo, Hong-Yan; Li, Zhao; Zhou, Hong-Mei; Wang, Li-Feng; Hu, Xiang-Jun

    2015-03-01

    The increased use of microwaves raises concerns about its impact on health including cognitive function in which neurotransmitter system plays an important role. In this study, we focused on the serotonin system and evaluated the long term effects of chronic microwave radiation on cognition and correlated items. Wistar rats were exposed or sham exposed to 2.856GHz microwaves with the average power density of 5, 10, 20 or 30mW/cm(2) respectively for 6min three times a week up to 6weeks. At different time points after the last exposure, spatial learning and memory function, morphology structure of the hippocampus, electroencephalogram (EEG) and neurotransmitter content (amino acid and monoamine) of rats were tested. Above results raised our interest in serotonin system. Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) and monoamine oxidase (MAO), two important rate-limiting enzymes in serotonin synthesis and metabolic process respectively, were detected. Expressions of serotonin receptors including 5-HT1A, 2A, 2C receptors were measured. We demonstrated that chronic exposure to microwave (2.856GHz, with the average power density of 5, 10, 20 and 30mW/cm(2)) could induce dose-dependent deficit of spatial learning and memory in rats accompanied with inhibition of brain electrical activity, the degeneration of hippocampus neurons, and the disturbance of neurotransmitters, among which the increase of 5-HT occurred as the main long-term change that the decrease of its metabolism partly contributed to. Besides, the variations of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT2CR expressions were also indicated. The results suggested that in the long-term way, chronic microwave exposure could induce cognitive deficit and 5-HT system may be involved in it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exposure to a PBDE/OH-BDE mixture alters juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Laura J; Chernick, Melissa; Chen, Albert; Hinton, David E; Bailey, Jordan M; Kullman, Seth W; Levin, Edward D; Stapleton, Heather M

    2017-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their metabolites (e.g., hydroxylated BDEs [OH-BDEs]) are contaminants frequently detected together in human tissues and are structurally similar to thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones partially mediate metamorphic transitions between life stages in zebrafish, making this a critical developmental window that may be vulnerable to chemicals disrupting thyroid signaling. In the present study, zebrafish were exposed to 6-OH-BDE-47 (30 nM; 15 μg/L) alone, or to a low-dose (30 μg/L) or high-dose (600 μg/L) mixture of PentaBDEs, 6-OH-BDE-47 (0.5-6 μg/L), and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (5-100 μg/L) during juvenile development (9-23 d postfertilization) and evaluated for developmental endpoints mediated by thyroid hormone signaling. Fish were sampled at 3 time points and examined for developmental and skeletal morphology, apical thyroid and skeletal gene markers, and modifications in swimming behavior (as adults). Exposure to the high-dose mixture resulted in >85% mortality within 1 wk of exposure, despite being below reported acute toxicity thresholds for individual congeners. The low-dose mixture and 6-OH-BDE-47 groups exhibited reductions in body length and delayed maturation, specifically relating to swim bladder, fin, and pigmentation development. Reduced skeletal ossification was also observed in 6-OH-BDE-47-treated fish. Assessment of thyroid and osteochondral gene regulatory networks demonstrated significantly increased expression of genes that regulate skeletal development and thyroid hormones. Overall, these results indicate that exposures to PBDE/OH-BDE mixtures adversely impact zebrafish maturation during metamorphosis. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:36-48. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  16. Maternal E-Cigarette Exposure in Mice Alters DNA Methylation and Lung Cytokine Expression in Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Li, Gerard; Chan, Yik Lung; Chapman, David G; Sukjamnong, Suporn; Nguyen, Tara; Annissa, Tiara; McGrath, Kristine C; Sharma, Pawan; Oliver, Brian G

    2018-03-01

    E-cigarette usage is increasing, especially among the young, with both the general population and physicians perceiving them as a safe alternative to tobacco smoking. Worryingly, e-cigarettes are commonly used by pregnant women. As nicotine is known to adversely affect children in utero, we hypothesized that nicotine delivered via e-cigarettes would negatively affect lung development. To test this, we developed a mouse model of maternal e-vapor (nicotine and nicotine-free) exposure and investigated the impact on the growth and lung inflammation in both offspring and mothers. Female Balb/c mice were exposed to e-fluid vapor containing nicotine (18 mg/ml nicotine E-cigarette [E-cig18], equivalent to two cigarettes per treatment, twice daily,) or nicotine free (E-cig0 mg/ml) from 6 weeks before mating until pups weaned. Male offspring were studied at Postnatal Day (P) 1, P20, and at 13 weeks. The mothers were studied when the pups weaned. In the mothers' lungs, e-cigarette exposure with and without nicotine increased the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. In adult offspring, TNF-α protein levels were increased in both E-cig18 and E-cig0 groups, whereas IL-1β was suppressed. This was accompanied by global changes in DNA methylation. In this study, we found that e-cigarette exposure during pregnancy adversely affected maternal and offspring lung health. As this occurred with both nicotine-free and nicotine-containing e-vapor, the effects are likely due to by-products of vaporization rather than nicotine.

  17. Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) alters sexual differentiation in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandegian, Caitlin M.; Deem, Sharon L.; Bhandari, Ramji K.; Holliday, Casey M.; Nicks, Diane; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S.; Selcer, Kyle; Tillitt, Donald E.; vom Saal, Fredrick S.; Velez, Vanessa; Yang, Ying; Holliday, Dawn K.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental chemicals can disrupt endocrine signaling and adversely impact sexual differentiation in wildlife. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic chemical commonly found in a variety of habitats. In this study, we used painted turtles (Chrysemys picta), which have temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), as an animal model for ontogenetic endocrine disruption by BPA. We hypothesized that BPA would override TSD and disrupt sexual development. We incubated farm-raised turtle eggs at the male-producing temperature (26 °C), randomly assigned individuals to treatment groups: control, vehicle control, 17β-estradiol (E2, 20 ng/g-egg) or 0.01, 1.0, 100 μg BPA/g-egg and harvested tissues at hatch. Typical female gonads were present in 89% of the E2-treated “males”, but in none of the control males (n = 35). Gonads of BPA-exposed turtles had varying amounts of ovarian-like cortical (OLC) tissue and disorganized testicular tubules in the medulla. Although the percentage of males with OLCs increased with BPA dose (BPA-low = 30%, BPA-medium = 33%, BPA-high = 39%), this difference was not significant (p = 0.85). In all three BPA treatments, SOX9 patterns revealed disorganized medullary testicular tubules and β-catenin expression in a thickened cortex. Liver vitellogenin, a female-specific liver protein commonly used as an exposure biomarker, was not induced by any of the treatments. Notably, these results suggest that developmental exposure to BPA disrupts sexual differentiation in painted turtles. Further examination is necessary to determine the underlying mechanisms of sex reversal in reptiles and how these translate to EDC exposure in wild populations.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of epigenomic alterations in fetal mouse forebrain after exposure to low doses of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Takeshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Nakamura, Keiko; Ogi, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Fushiki, Shinji

    2008-11-21

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of endocrine disrupting chemicals, being distributed widely in the environment. We have been studying the low dose effects of BPA on murine forebrain development. Here, we have investigated the genome-wide effect of maternal exposure to BPA on the epigenome in mouse forebrain at E12.5 and at E14.5. We scanned CpG methylation status in 2500 NotI loci, representing 48 (de)methylated unique loci. Methylation status in most of them was primarily developmental stage-dependent. Each of almost all cloned NotI loci was located in a CpG island (CGI) adjacent to 5' end of the transcriptional unit. The mRNA expression of two functionally related genes changed with development as well as the exposure to BPA. In both genes, changes at the transcriptional level correlated well with the changes in NotI methylation status. Taken together, epigenetic alterations in promoter-associated CGIs after exposure to BPA may underlie some effects on brain development.

  19. Chronic cigarette smoke exposure adversely alters 14C-arachidonic acid metabolism in rat lungs, aortas and platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubawy, W.C.; Valentovic, M.A.; Atkinson, J.E.; Gairola, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    Male rats were exposed to freshly generated cigarette smoke once daily, 5 times a week for 10 weeks. Inhalation of smoke was verified by elevated carboxyhemoglobin in blood sampled immediately after smoke exposure and by increased lung aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity 24 hours after the last smoke exposure. Aortic rings isolated from smoke-exposed rats synthesized less prostacyclin (PGI2) from 14 C-arachidonic acid than rings from sham rats. Platelets from smoke-exposed rats synthesized more thromboxane (TXA2) from 14 C-arachidonic acid than platelets from room controls but not those from sham rats. Lung microsomes from smoke-exposed rats synthesized more TXA2 and had a lower PGI2/TXA2 ratio than lung microsomes from room controls and shams. It is concluded that chronic cigarette smoke exposure alters arachidonic acid metabolism in aortas, platelets and lungs in a manner resulting in decreased PGI2 and increased TXA2, thereby creating a condition favoring platelet aggregation and a variety of cardiovascular diseases

  20. Short-term exposure of arsenite disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Li, Hong-Bo; Xiang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution in aquatic environment may adversely impact fish health by disrupting their thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, we explored the effect of short-term exposure of arsenite (AsIII) on thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish. We measured As concentrations, As speciation, and thyroid hormone thyroxine levels in whole zebrafish, oxidative stress (H2O2) and damage (MDA) in the liver, and gene transcription in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in the brain and liver tissues of zebrafish after exposing to different AsIII concentrations for 48 h. Result indicated that exposure to AsIII increased inorganic As in zebrafish to 0.46-0.72 mg kg(-1), induced oxidative stress with H2O2 being increased by 1.4-2.5 times and caused oxidative damage with MDA being augmented by 1.6 times. AsIII exposure increased thyroxine levels by 1.3-1.4 times and modulated gene transcription in HPT axis. Our study showed AsIII caused oxidative damage, affected thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in HPT axis in zebrafish. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of Immunological Alterations Following Prenatal Exposure to Marijuana Cannabinoids and its Long Term Consequences in Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E.; Sido, Jessica M.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Use of marijuana during pregnancy is fairly commonplace and can be expected increase in frequency as more states legalize its recreational use. The cannabinoids present in marijuana have been shown to be immunosuppressive, yet the effect of prenatal exposure to cannabinoids on the immune system of the developing fetus, its long term consequences during adult stage of life, and transgenerational effects have not been well characterized. Confounding factors such as coexisting drug use make the impact of cannabis use on progeny inherently difficult to study in a human population. Data from various animal models suggests that in utero exposure to cannabinoids results in profound T cell dysfunction and a greatly reduced immune response to viral antigens. Furthermore, evidence from animal studies indicates that the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids can be mediated through epigenetic mechanisms such as altered microRNA, DNA methylation and histone modification profiles. Such studies support the hypothesis that that parental or prenatal exposure to cannabis can trigger epigenetic changes that could have significant immunological consequences for offspring as well as long term transgenerational effects. PMID:25618446

  2. Cholinergic alterations by exposure to pesticides used in control vector: Guppies fish (Poecilia reticulta) as biological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Rodríguez-Sánchez, E J; Ventura-Ramón, H G; Díaz-Resendiz, K J G; Girón-Pérez, M I

    2018-02-01

    Spinosad and temephos are two of the most used pesticides in Mexico for the control of vector causing disease such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika. The aim of this study was to compare the neurotoxic effects of these two pesticides using guppy fish (Poecilia reticulata) as a model organism. Guppies were exposed for 7 and 21 days to technical grade temephos and spinosad at 1.0 and 0.07 g/L, respectively, (10 and 0.5 mg/L of active substance; concentrations recommended by the Ministery of Health of the State (Secretaría de Salud de Nayarit (SSN) Mexico)). Subsequently, acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and acetylcholine concentrations (ACh) in muscle tissue were determined. Temephos exposure decreased AChE activity and increased ACh concentration, whereas exposure to spinosad only increased ACh concentration. Though cholinergic alterations were more severe in fish exposed to temephos, both pesticides were equally lethal during the first seven days after exposure. Nonetheless, temephos was more lethal after 21 days.

  3. Postnatal development of rat pups is altered by prenatal methamphetamine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamberová, Romana; Pometlová, Marie; Charousová, Petra

    2006-01-01

    There are studies showing that drug abuse during pregnancy may have impairing effect on progeny of drug-abusing mothers. Methamphetamine (MA) is one of the most common illicit drugs throughout the world. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of prenatal MA exposure on postnatal development of rat pups before the time of separation from their mothers. Female rats were injected with MA (5 mg/kg daily) for the duration of their pregnancy. Pups were then tested throughout the lactation period. They were weighed daily and the ano-genital distance was measured on postnatal day (PD) 1. Development of postural motor reaction was tested by righting reflex on surface between PD 1 and 12, and righting reflex in mid-air after PD 12 until successfully accomplished. On PD 15 homing test was examined as a test of pup acute learning. On PD 23 sensory-motor coordination was examined using the rotarod and bar-holding tests. Additionally, the markers of physical maturation, such as eye opening, testes descent in males and vaginal opening in females were also recorded. The birth weight in prenatally MA-exposed pups was lower than in controls or saline-exposed pups regardless of sex. There were no changes induced by prenatal MA exposure in weight gain or in sexual maturation. In righting reflexes, we demonstrated that pups exposed prenatally to MA were slower in righting reflex on surface and that they accomplished the test of righting reflex in mid-air later than controls or saline-exposed pups. The performance of homing test was not affected by prenatal drug exposure. The sensory-motor coordination was impaired in prenatally MA-exposed pups when testing in the rotarod test. Also, the number of falls in the bar-holding test was higher in MA-exposed pups than in controls. There were no sex differences in any measures. Thus, the present study demonstrated that prenatal MA exposure impairs development of postural motor movements of rat pups during the first 3 weeks

  4. Expression of eight glucocorticoid receptor isoforms in the human preterm placenta vary with fetal sex and birthweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Z; Hodyl, N A; Stark, M J; Fuller, P J; Cole, T; Lu, N; Clifton, V L

    2015-07-01

    Administration of betamethasone to women at risk of preterm delivery is known to be associated with reduced fetal growth via alterations in placental function and possibly direct effects on the fetus. The placental glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is central to this response and recent evidence suggests there are numerous isoforms for GR in term placentae. In this study we have questioned whether GR isoform expression varies in preterm placentae in relation to betamethasone exposure, fetal sex and birthweight. Preterm (24-36 completed weeks of gestation, n = 55) and term placentae (>37 completed weeks of gestation, n = 56) were collected at delivery. Placental GR expression was examined using Western Blot and analysed in relation to gestational age at delivery, fetal sex, birthweight and betamethasone exposure. Data was analysed using non-parametric tests. Eight known isoforms of the GR were detected in the preterm placenta and include GRα (94 kDa), GRβ (91 kDa), GRα C (81 kDa) GR P (74 kDa) GR A (65 kDa), GRα D1-3 (50-55 kDa). Expression varied between preterm and term placentae with a greater expression of GRα C in preterm placentae relative to term placentae. The only sex differences in preterm placentae was that GRα D2 expression was higher in males than females. There were no alterations in preterm placental GR expression in association with betamethasone exposure. GRα C is the isoform involved in glucocorticoid induced apoptosis and suggests that its predominance in preterm placentae may contribute to the pathophysiology of preterm birth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Early valproic acid exposure alters functional organization in the primary visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl-Guimaraes, Fernanda; Krahe, Thomas E.; Medina, Alexandre E.

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders and affects 0.5 to 1% of pregnant women. The use of antiepileptic drugs, which is usually continued throughout pregnancy, can cause in offspring mild to severe sensory deficits. Neuronal selectivity to stimulus orientation is a basic functional property of the visual cortex that is crucial for perception of shapes and borders. Here we investigate the effects of early exposure to valproic acid (Val) and levetiracetam (Lev), commonly used antiepileptic drugs, on the development of cortical neuron orientation selectivity and organization of cortical orientation columns. Ferrets pups were exposed to Val (200 mg/kg), Lev (100 mg/kg) or saline every other day between postnatal day (P) 10 and P30, a period roughly equivalent to the third trimester of human gestation. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals or single-unit recordings were examined at P42–P84, when orientation selectivity in the ferret cortex has reached a mature state. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals revealed decreased contrast of orientation maps in Val-but not Lev- or saline-treated animals. Moreover, single-unit recordings revealed that early Val treatment also reduced orientation selectivity at the cellular level. These findings indicate that Val exposure during a brief period of development disrupts cortical processing of sensory information at a later age and suggest a neurobiological substrate for some types of sensory deficits in fetal anticonvulsant syndrome. PMID:21215743

  6. Antenatal exposure to antidepressants is associated with altered brain development in very preterm-born neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podrebarac, Samantha K; Duerden, Emma G; Chau, Vann; Grunau, Ruth E; Synnes, Anne; Oberlander, Tim F; Miller, Steven P

    2017-02-07

    Antenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with an enhanced risk of preterm birth. Very preterm-born neonates (brain development. To examine whether antenatal-SSRI exposure was associated with adverse neonatal brain microstructural and metabolic development using diffusion tensor and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Of 177 neonates enrolled, 14 (8%) were antenatally exposed to SSRIs. Neonates were scanned twice (median week 32; interquartile range [IQR]: 30.4-33.6) and again at term-equivalent age (40.1, IQR: 38.6-42.1). Using a region-of-interest approach, N-acetylaspartate to choline ratios (NAA/Cho), lactate to choline ratios, white and gray matter fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, axial, radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD) values were extracted from white and gray matter subcortical regions. Neurodevelopment was assessed at 18 months, corrected age. SSRI-exposed neonates exhibited increased FA and decreased MD, AD and RD values in the superior white matter (pbrain development requires further attention. Future research is directed at determining the mechanism of this relationship and the contribution of maternal mood. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of ex vivo tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity is not altered by chronic lead (Pb) exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasley, S.M.; Green, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that chronic Pb exposure results in impaired regulation of CNS dopamine (DA) synthesis in rats. The present study was designed to directly assess TH activity in exposed animals compared to controls, employing a pharmacological model that assesses the functional status of dopaminergic synthesis-modulating autoreceptors. At birth dams received 0.2% Pb acetate in drinking water. Offspring were weaned to and maintained on the same solution until termination at 60 or 120 days. Rats were given saline or a DA agonist (EMD 23448 or CGS 15855A) 45 min before sacrifice followed 15 min later by gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Regional TH activity was measured by a modification of the tritium release method. DA content was determined by liquid chromatography. The ability of EMD 23448 to prevent the GBL-induced increase in DA content was significantly diminished in caudate-putamen (C-P) of exposed rats compared to controls, similar to previous observations. However, an analogous effect of Pb on TH activity in this drug model was not observed using CGS 15855A in rats either 60 or 120 days of age. These findings suggest that chronic Pb exposure has no effect on autoreceptor-mediated regulation of TH in DA neurons when TH activity is measured ex vivo

  8. Short-duration exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation alters the chlorophyll fluorescence of duckweeds (Lemna minor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senavirathna, Mudalige Don Hiranya Jayasanka; Takashi, Asaeda; Kimura, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    Plants growing in natural environments are exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emitted by various communication network base stations. The environmental concentration of this radiation is increasing rapidly with the congested deployment of base stations. Although numerous scientific studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of EMR on the physiology of humans and animals, there have been few attempts to investigate the effects of EMR on plants. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of EMR on photosynthesis by investigating the chlorophyll fluorescence (ChF) parameters of duckweed fronds. During the experiment, the fronds were tested with 2, 2.5, 3.5, 5.5 and 8 GHz EMR frequencies, which are not widely studied even though there is a potentially large concentration of these frequencies in the environment. The duckweed fronds were exposed to EMR for 30 min, 1 h and 24 h durations with electric field strength of 45-50 V/m for each frequency. The results indicated that exposure to EMR causes a change in the non-photochemical quenching of the duckweeds. The changes varied with the frequency of the EMR and were time-varying within a particular frequency. The temperature remained unchanged in the duckweed fronds upon exposure to EMR, which confirms that the effect is non-thermal.

  9. Exposure to sublethal levels of waterborne lead alters reproductive behavior patterns in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, D N

    1993-01-01

    Lead (Pb) caused multiple effects on reproductive behavior and overall reproductive success. Adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were acclimated at a 16L:8D photoperiod to stimulate reproductive development. Reproductively mature adults were separated as male-female pairs and maintained for 4 weeks in either 0.0 or 0.5 ppm Pb. High lead accumulations occurred in testes and ovaries of treated fish; lead concentrations in control fish gonads were not detectable. Lead suppressed spermatocyte production and retarded ovarian development, although no lead-induced gonadosomatic index changes for either sex were noted. Lead decreased the number of eggs oviposited, increased interspawn periods and suppressed embryo development. Control males displayed maximum secondary sex characteristic development (banding, tubercle formation, head and eye darkening); lead-exposed fish displayed less. Control males spent more time in ceiling-directed behaviors associated with nest preparation and maintenance than lead-exposed. These variables were affected differentially with respect to stage of reproductive maturity at time of lead exposure, i.e., fish displaying greater secondary sex characteristic development before exposure were less affected by lead than those fish that showed less development.

  10. Epigenetic modification of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is linked to traumatic memory and post-traumatic stress disorder risk in genocide survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukojevic, V.; Kolassa, I.T.; Fastenrath, M.; Gschwind, L.; Spalek, K.; Milnik, A.; Heck, A.; Vogler, C.; Wilker, S.; Demougin, P.; Peter, F.; Atucha Trevino, E.; Stetak, A.; Roozendaal, B.; Elbert, T.; Papassotiropoulos, A.; Quervain, D.J. de

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that altered expression and epigenetic modification of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) are related to the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Because glucocorticoid receptor signaling is known to

  11. Mode of Glucocorticoid Actions in Airway Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ito

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic glucocorticoids are the most potent anti-inflammatory agents used to treat chronic inflammatory disease, such as asthma. However, a small number (<5% of asthmatic patients and almost all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD do not respond well, or at all, to glucocorticoid therapy. If the molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid insensitivity is uncovered, it may in turn provide insight into the key mechanism of glucocorticoid action and allow a rational way to implement treatment regimens that restore glucocorticoid sensitivity. Glucocorticoids exert their effects by binding to a cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which is subjected to post-translational modifications. Receptor phosphorylation, acetylation, nitrosylation, ubiquitinylation, and other modifications influence hormone binding, nuclear translocation, and protein half-life. Analysis of GR interactions to other molecules, such as coactivators or corepressors, may explain the genetic specificity of GR action. Priming with inflammatory cytokine or oxidative/nitrative stress is a mechanism for the glucocorticoid resistance observed in chronic inflammatory airway disease via reduction of corepressors or GR modification. Therapies targeting these aspects of the GR activation pathway may reverse glucocorticoid resistance in patients with glucocorticoid-insensitive airway disease and some patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Exposure and Figure Out of Climate Induced Alterations in the Wetlands of Banglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiquee, S. A.; Rahman, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Unique geographic location and geo-morphological conditions of Bangladesh have made the wetlands of this country one of the most vulnerable to climate change. Wetland plays a crucial role in maintaining the ecological balance of ecosystems and cultural figures and which occupy around 50% of the area. Drought, excessive temperature, mountain snowfields and glaciers melting, riverbank erosion, salinity intrusion, flashflood, storm surges, higher water temperatures, precipitation anomalies, coastal cyclones, seasonal anomalies and extremes are main threats to the wetland ecosystem. Enhanced UV-B radiation and increased summer precipitation will significantly increase dissolved organic carbon concentrations altering major biogeochemical cycles and also will result into the expansion of range for many invasive aquatic weeds. Generally, rising temperature will lower water quality through a fall in oxygen concentrations, release of phosphorus from sediments, increased thermal stability, and altered mixing patterns. As a result biodiversity is getting degraded, many species of flora and fauna are getting threatened, and wetland-based ecosystem is getting degenerated. At the same time, the living conditions of local people are deteriorating as livelihoods, socioeconomic institutions, and extensive cultural values as well. For conserving and managing wetlands technology, legislation, educational knowledge, action plan strategy and restoration practices are required. In order to address the human needs in the changing climate community-based adaptation approaches and wetland restoration, practices had been taken in almost every type of wetlands in Bangladesh. Therefore, Bangladesh now needs a comprehensive strategy and integrated system combining political, economic, social, technological approaches and institutional supports to address sustainable wetland restoration, conservation and the newly added crisis, climate change.

  13. Early ethanol exposure and vinpocetine treatment alter learning- and memory-related proteins in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Patricia C; Currin, Christopher B; Russell, Vivienne A; Dimatelis, Jacqueline J

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of early exposure to ethanol on cognitive function and neural plasticity-related proteins in the rat brain. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 12% ethanol solution (4 g/kg/day i.p.) or saline from P4 to P9. Vinpocetine, a phosphodiesterase type 1 inhibitor, was tested to determine whether it could reverse any changes induced by early ethanol exposure. Hence, from P25 to P31, ethanol-exposed male rats were injected with vinpocetine (20 mg/kg/day i.p.) or vehicle (DMSO) prior to undergoing behavioral testing in the open field and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Ethanol exposure did not adversely affect spatial memory in the MWM. A key finding in this study was a significant ethanol-induced change in the function of the phosphorylated extracellular signal-related kinase (P-ERK) signaling pathway in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) of rats that did not display overt behavioral deficits. The P-ERK/ERK ratio was decreased in the PFC and increased in the DH of ethanol-exposed rats compared with controls. Rats that received vinpocetine in addition to ethanol did not display any behavioral changes but did show alterations in neural plasticity-related proteins. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase was increased, whereas brain-derived neurotrophic factor was decreased, in the PFC of vinpocetine-treated ethanol-exposed rats, and phosphorylated-glycogen synthase kinase β and synaptophysin were increased in the DH of these rats. This study provides insight into the long-term effects of early ethanol exposure and its interaction with vinpocetine in the rat brain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Adolescent Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Exposure Alters WIN55,212-2 Self-Administration in Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherma, Maria; Dessì, Christian; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Lecca, Salvatore; Satta, Valentina; Luchicchi, Antonio; Pistis, Marco; Panlilio, Leigh V; Fattore, Liana; Goldberg, Steven R; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, and use is typically initiated during adolescence. The endocannabinoid system has an important role in formation of the nervous system, from very early development through adolescence. Cannabis exposure during this vulnerable period might lead to neurobiological changes that affect adult brain functions and increase the risk of cannabis use disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adolescent rats might enhance reinforcing effects of cannabinoids in adulthood. Male adolescent rats were treated with increasing doses of THC (or its vehicle) twice/day for 11 consecutive days (PND 45-55). When the animals reached adulthood, they were tested by allowing them to intravenously self-administer the cannabinoid CB1-receptor agonist WIN55,212-2. In a separate set of animals given the same THC (or vehicle) treatment regimen, electrophysiological and neurochemical experiments were performed to assess possible modifications of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which is critically involved in cannabinoid-induced reward. Behavioral data showed that acquisition of WIN55,212-2 self-administration was enhanced in THC-exposed rats relative to vehicle-exposed controls. Neurophysiological data showed that THC-exposed rats displayed a reduced capacity for WIN55,212-2 to stimulate firing of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area and to increase dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell. These findings-that early, passive exposure to THC can produce lasting alterations of the reward system of the brain and subsequently increase cannabinoid self-administration in adulthood-suggest a mechanism by which adolescent cannabis exposure could increase the risk of subsequent cannabis dependence in humans.

  15. Exposure to ultrafine particles, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes and altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Kim; Møller, Peter; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Olsen, Yulia; Bekö, Gabriel; Clausen, Geo; Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Loft, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to particles in the fine and ultrafine size range has been linked to induction of low-grade systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. Declining levels of endothelial progenitor cells within systemic circulation have likewise been linked to progression of cardiovascular diseases. The objective was to determine if exposure to fine and ultrafine particles from indoor and outdoor sources, assessed by personal and residential indoor monitoring, is associated with altered levels of endothelial progenitor cells, and whether such effects are related to leukocyte-mediated oxidative stress. The study utilized a cross sectional design performed in 58 study participants from a larger cohort. Levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, defined as either late (CD34(+)KDR(+) cells) or early (CD34(+)CD133(+)KDR(+) cells) subsets were measured using polychromatic flow cytometry. We additionally measured production of reactive oxygen species in leukocyte subsets (lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes) by flow cytometry using intracellular 2',7'-dichlorofluoroscein. The measurements encompassed both basal levels of reactive oxygen species production and capacity for reactive oxygen species production for each leukocyte subset. We found that the late endothelial progenitor subset was negatively associated with levels of ultrafine particles measured within the participant residences and with reactive oxygen species production capacity in lymphocytes. Additionally, the early endothelial progenitor cell levels were positively associated with a personalised measure of ultrafine particle exposure and negatively associated with both basal and capacity for reactive oxygen species production in lymphocytes and granulocytes, respectively. Our results indicate that exposure to fine and ultrafine particles derived from indoor sources may have adverse effects on human vascular health. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  16. Prenatal dexamethasone exposure does not alter blood pressure and nephron number in the young adult marmoset monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlage, Carsten Paul; Schlumbohm, Christina; Pryce, Christopher Robert; Mirza, Serkan; Schnell, Christian; Amann, Kerstin; Amstrong, Victor William; Eitner, Frank; Zapf, Antonia; Feldon, Joram; Oellerich, Michael; Fuchs, Eberhard; Müller, Gerhard Anton; Strutz, Frank

    2009-11-01

    The influence of prenatal factors on the development of arterial hypertension has gained considerable interest in recent years. Prenatal dexamethasone exposure was found to induce hypertension and to alter nephron number and size in rodents and sheep. However, it is not clear whether these findings are applicable to nonhuman primates. Thus, we examined the effects of prenatal dexamethasone treatment on blood pressure (BP) and nephron number in marmoset monkeys. Fifty-two marmosets were allotted to 3 groups according to the gestational stage during which their mothers were exposed to oral 5-mg/kg dexamethasone for 7 days (gestation period: 20 weeks): (1) the early dexamethasone group at week 7; (2) the late dexamethasone group at week 13; and (3) the control group. BP was determined by telemetric (n=12) or cuff measurements (n=30), along with cystatin C, proteinuria, and body weight. All of the animals were euthanized at the age of 24 months, and glomerular number and volume were determined. Prenatal exposure to dexamethasone did not lead to a significant difference between the groups with regard to BP, kidney morphology and function, or body weight. BP correlated significantly with body weight, relative kidney weight, and mean glomerular volume and the body weight with the glomerular volume regardless of dexamethasone treatment. In conclusion, prenatal exposure to dexamethasone in marmosets does not, in contrast to other mammals studied, result in hypertension or changes in kidney morphology. Our data support the role of body weight as a predictor of elevated glomerular volume and BP development rather than prenatal dexamethasone exposure.

  17. Altered Microbiota Contributes to Reduced Diet-Induced Obesity upon Cold Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziętak, Marika; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Markiewicz, Lidia H

    2016-01-01

    similar to that of germ-free mice. We observed a marked shift in the microbiome composition at the phylum and family levels within 1 day of acute cold exposure and after 4 weeks at 12°C. Gut microbiota was characterized by increased levels of Adlercreutzia, Mogibacteriaceae, Ruminococcaceae......, and Desulfovibrio and reduced levels of Bacilli, Erysipelotrichaceae, and the genus rc4-4. These genera have been associated with leanness and obesity, respectively. Germ-free mice fed a high-fat diet at room temperature gained less adiposity and improved glucose tolerance when transplanted with caecal microbiota...... of mice housed at 12°C compared to mice transplanted with microbiota from 29°C. Thus, a microbiota-liver-BAT axis may mediate protection against obesity at reduced temperature....

  18. Exposure to the BPA-Substitute Bisphenol S Causes Unique Alterations of Germline Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichang Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about the safety of Bisphenol A, a chemical found in plastics, receipts, food packaging and more, have led to its replacement with substitutes now found in a multitude of consumer products. However, several popular BPA-free alternatives, such as Bisphenol S, share a high degree of structural similarity with BPA, suggesting that these substitutes may disrupt similar developmental and reproductive pathways. We compared the effects of BPA and BPS on germline and reproductive functions using the genetic model system Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that, similarly to BPA, BPS caused severe reproductive defects including germline apoptosis and embryonic lethality. However, meiotic recombination, targeted gene expression, whole transcriptome and ontology analyses as well as ToxCast data mining all indicate that these effects are partly achieved via mechanisms distinct from BPAs. These findings therefore raise new concerns about the safety of BPA alternatives and the risk associated with human exposure to mixtures.

  19. Altered miRNA expression in the cervix during pregnancy associated with lead and mercury exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Alison P; Burris, Heather H; Just, Allan C; Motta, Valeria; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Svensson, Katherine; Oken, Emily; Solano-Gonzalez, Maritsa; Mercado-Garcia, Adriana; Pantic, Ivan; Schwartz, Joel; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Toxic metals including lead and mercury are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study aimed to assess the association between miRNA expression in the cervix during pregnancy with lead and mercury levels. Materials & methods: We obtained cervical swabs from pregnant women (n = 60) and quantified cervical miRNA expression. Women's blood lead, bone lead and toenail mercury levels were analyzed. We performed linear regression to examine the association between metal levels and expression of 74 miRNAs adjusting for covariates. Results: Seventeen miRNAs were negatively associated with toenail mercury levels, and tibial bone lead levels were associated with decreased expression of miR-575 and miR-4286. Conclusion: The findings highlight miRNAs in the human cervix as novel responders to maternal chemical exposure during pregnancy. PMID:26418635

  20. Alterations in biochemical markers due to mercury (Hg) exposure and its influence on infant's neurodevelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Elkhatib, Rola; Al-Rouqi, Reem; Abduljabbar, Mai; Eltabache, Chafica; Al-Rajudi, Tahreer; Nester, Michael

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the role of oxidative stress due to mercury (Hg) exposure on infant's neurodevelopmental performance. A total of 944 healthy Saudi mothers and their respective infants (aged 3-12 months) were recruited from 57 Primary Health Care Centers in Riyadh City. Total mercury (Hg) was measured in mothers and infants urine and hair samples, as well as mother's blood and breast milk. Methylmercury (MeHg) was determined in the mothers and infants' hair and mother's blood. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), malondialdehyde (MDA), and porphyrins were used to assess oxidative stress. The infant's neurodevelopment was evaluated using Denver Developmental Screening Test II (DDST-II) and Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status. The median total Hg levels in mother's urine, infant's urine, mother's hair, infant's hair, and mother's blood and breast milk were 0.995μg/l, 0.716μg/l, 0.118μg/g dw, 0.101μg/g dw, 0.635μg/l, and 0.884μg/l respectively. The median MeHg levels in mother's hair, infant's hair, and mother's blood were 0.132μg/g dw, 0.091μg/g dw, and 2.341μg/l respectively. A significant interrelationship between mothers and infants Hg measures in various matrices was noted. This suggests that mother's exposure to different forms of Hg (total and/or MeHg) from various sources contributed significantly to the metal body burden of their respective infants. Even though Hg exposure was low, it induced high oxidative stress in mothers and infants. The influence of multiplicative interaction terms between Hg measures and oxidative stress biomarkers was tested using multiple regression analysis. Significant interactions between the urinary Hg levels in mothers and infants and oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA) were noted. The MeHg levels in mother-infant hair revealed similar interaction patterns. The p-values for both were below 0.001. These observations suggest that the exposure of our infants to Hg via mothers either during

  1. Exposure to the BPA-Substitute Bisphenol S Causes Unique Alterations of Germline Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yichang; Qiu, Zhiqun; Lee, Dong Yeon; Telesca, Donatello; Yang, Xia; Allard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about the safety of Bisphenol A, a chemical found in plastics, receipts, food packaging and more, have led to its replacement with substitutes now found in a multitude of consumer products. However, several popular BPA-free alternatives, such as Bisphenol S, share a high degree of structural similarity with BPA, suggesting that these substitutes may disrupt similar developmental and reproductive pathways. We compared the effects of BPA and BPS on germline and reproductive functions using the genetic model system Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that, similarly to BPA, BPS caused severe reproductive defects including germline apoptosis and embryonic lethality. However, meiotic recombination, targeted gene expression, whole transcriptome and ontology analyses as well as ToxCast data mining all indicate that these effects are partly achieved via mechanisms distinct from BPAs. These findings therefore raise new concerns about the safety of BPA alternatives and the risk associated with human exposure to mixtures. PMID:27472198

  2. Repeated exposure to morphine alters surface expression of AMPA receptors in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Amanda L; Napier, T Celeste

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization describes the intensification of motor activity that results from repeated exposure to drugs of misuse, and the underlying neuronal adaptations are hypothesized to model aspects of the brain changes that occur in humans misusing such drugs. The α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor is an ionotropic glutamate receptor involved in the neuroplasticity that accompanies acute and repeated drug administration. Changing surface expression is one means to regulate AMPA receptor function, and the present study tested the hypothesis that behavioral sensitization to the μ-opioid receptor agonist morphine is accompanied by changes in the subcellular distribution of AMPA receptors in limbic brain regions. To test this hypothesis, we used a protein cross-linking assay to assess cell surface and intracellular levels of GluA1 and GluA2 subunits in the nucleus accumbens, medial prefrontal cortex and ventral pallidum. Repeated morphine treatment decreased surface expression of GluA1 in the medial prefrontal cortex without affecting levels of GluA2. In contrast, surface levels of GluA1 or GluA2 were unchanged in the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum, demonstrating that although AMPA receptors in accumbal and pallidal regions are critical mediators of behaviors induced by repeated opiate exposure, these effects are not accompanied by changes in surface expression. The findings reveal that the involvement of AMPA receptor trafficking in opiate-induced behavioral sensitization is relegated to selective regions and that AMPA receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex may be particularly sensitive to these actions. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Gestational exposure to low dose bisphenol A alters social behavior in juvenile mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T Wolstenholme

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a man-made compound used to make polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins; public health concerns have been fueled by findings that BPA exposure can reduce sex differences in brain and some behaviors. We asked if a low BPA dose, within the range measured in humans, ingested during pregnancy, would affect social behaviors in prepubertal mice. We noted sex differences in social interactions whereby females spent more time sitting side-by-side, while males engaged in more exploring and sitting alone. In addition BPA increased display of nose-to-nose contacts, play solicitations and approaches in both sexes. Interactions between sex and diet were found for self grooming, social interactions while sitting side-by-side and following the other mouse. In all these cases interactions were produced by differences between control and BPA females. We examined brains from embryos during late gestation to determine if gene expression differences might be correlated with some of the sexually dimorphic or BPA affected behaviors we observed. Because BPA treatments ended at birth we took the brains during embryogenesis to increase the probability of discovering BPA mediated effects. We also selected this embryonic age (E18.5 because it coincides with the onset of sexual differentiation of the brain. Interestingly, mRNA for the glutamate transporter, Slc1a1, was enhanced by exposure to BPA in female brains. Also we noted that BPA changed the expression of two of the three DNA methyltransferase genes, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a. We propose that BPA affects DNA methylation of Sc1a1 during neural development. Sex differences in juvenile social interactions are affected by BPA and in particular this compound modifies behavior in females.

  4. High psychosis liability is associated with altered autonomic balance during exposure to Virtual Reality social stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counotte, Jacqueline; Pot-Kolder, Roos; van Roon, Arie M; Hoskam, Olivier; van der Gaag, Mark; Veling, Wim

    2017-06-01

    Social stressors are associated with an increased risk of psychosis. Stress sensitisation is thought to be an underlying mechanism and may be reflected in an altered autonomic stress response. Using an experimental Virtual Reality design, the autonomic stress response to social stressors was examined in participants with different liability to psychosis. Fifty-five patients with recent onset psychotic disorder, 20 patients at ultra-high risk for psychosis, 42 siblings of patients with psychosis and 53 controls were exposed to social stressors (crowdedness, ethnic minority status and hostility) in a Virtual Reality environment. Heart rate variability parameters and skin conductance levels were measured at baseline and during Virtual Reality experiments. High psychosis liability groups had significantly increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability compared to low liability groups both at baseline and during Virtual Reality experiments. Both low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) power were reduced, while the LF/HF ratio was similar between groups. The number of virtual social stressors significantly affected heart rate, HF, LF/HF and skin conductance level. There was no interaction between psychosis liability and amount of virtual social stress. High liability to psychosis is associated with decreased parasympathetic activity in virtual social environments, which reflects generally high levels of arousal, rather than increased autonomic reactivity to social stressors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Developmental exposure to Passiflora incarnata induces behavioural alterations in the male progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, André D; Ponte, Bianca; Vieira, Milene L; de Paula, Jaqueline C C; Mesquita, Suzana F P; Gerardin, Daniela C C; Moreira, Estefânia G

    2013-01-01

    Passiflora incarnata is marketed in many countries as a phytomedicine and is prescribed mainly as a sedative and anxiolytic. Even though the directions of most marketed phytomedicines recommend them to be used under medical supervision, reproductive and developmental studies are sparse and not mandatory for regulatory purposes. To evaluate the reproductive and developmental toxicity of P. incarnata, Wistar female rats were gavaged with 30 or 300 mg kg(-1) of this herb from gestational Day (GD) 0 to postnatal Day (PND) 21. P. incarnata treatment did not influence dams' bodyweight or food intake or their reproductive performance (post-implantation loss, litter size, litter weight). There was also no influence on the physical development of pups (bodyweight gain, day of vaginal opening or preputial separation) or their behaviour in the open-field at PND 22, 35 and 75. Sexual behaviour was disrupted in adult male pups exposed to 300 mg kg(-1) of P. incarnata; in this group, only 3 out of 11 pups were sexually competent. This behavioural disruption was not accompanied by alterations in plasma testosterone levels, reproductive-related organs and glands weights or sperm count. It is hypothesised that aromatase inhibition may be involved in the observed effect.

  6. Histological alterations following short-term smokeless tobacco exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J B; Johnson, G K; Reinhardt, R A; Schmid, M

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the histological changes following short-term smokeless tobacco application in humans. Sixteen smokeless tobacco-using subjects participated in this trial. Each subject had used at least 3 cans of snuff per week for the previous 2 yr and had an existing lesion at the site of habitual snuff placement. The experimental design included subject placement of moist snuff (University of Kentucky reference tobacco brand 1S3) at a new site in the mandibular arch. At either 2 or 7 d, biopsies were taken from the new lesions and from a non-placement site in the opposing arch. The volume density of inflammatory cells was determined by point counting. Keratin and epithelial thickness were evaluated by digitizing morphometry. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance. In 7-d lesions, increased keratin thickness was observed at the new sites compared to the non-placement sites (p = 0.05). Increased volume density of fibroblasts (p = 0.027) and decreased volume densities of macrophages (p = 0.0083) and mast cells (p = 0.05) were observed at 2 d in new versus non-placement sites. Clinically, the new sites showed erythema, erythema plus ulceration, or white striations. This study demonstrated histological and clinical changes at new snuff placement sites in as few as 2-7 d, underscoring the rapidity of tissue alterations following snuff use.

  7. Mainstream cigarette smoke exposure alters cytochrome P4502G1 expression in F344 rat olfactory mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkiss, J.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Lewis, J.L.; Finch, G.L.; Belinsky, S.A.; Dahl, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Inhalation of mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) by rats results in multifocal rhinitis, mucous hypersecretion, nasal epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia, and focal olfactory mucosal atrophy. In humans, cigarette smoking causes long-term, dose-related alterations in olfactory function in both current and former smokers. An olfactory-specific cytochrome P450 has been identified in rabbits and rats. The presence of olfactory-specific P450s, as well as relatively high levels of other biotransformation enzymes, such as NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, in the olfactory neuroepithelium suggest that these enzyme systems may play a role in olfaction. This hypothesis is strengthened by the observation that, in rats, the temporal gene activation of P4502G1 coincides with the postnatal increase in the sensitivity of olfactory response to odorants. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of MCS exposure on P4502G1 protein expression

  8. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qing; Rise, Matthew L.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Hori, Tiago S.; Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven; McGraw, Joseph E.; Goetz, Giles; Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •First report of the effects of dietary TCDD in juvenile trout smaller than 20 g. •TCDD uptake was estimated using published models and confirmed by GC. •First report of dietary TCDD-induced lesions in nasal epithelium in any species. •Several useful biomarkers are identified from microarray-based transcriptomics analysis. -- Abstract: The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down

  9. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204 (United States); Rise, Matthew L. [Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1 Marine Lab Road, St. John' s, NL, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Spitsbergen, Jan M. [Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, 220 Nash Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Hori, Tiago S. [Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1 Marine Lab Road, St. John' s, NL, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven [Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 465 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McGraw, Joseph E. [School of Pharmacy, Concordia University Wisconsin, 12800 North Lake Shore Drive, Mequon, WI 53097 (United States); Goetz, Giles [School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, 1122 Northeast Boat Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Carvan, Michael J., E-mail: carvanmj@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •First report of the effects of dietary TCDD in juvenile trout smaller than 20 g. •TCDD uptake was estimated using published models and confirmed by GC. •First report of dietary TCDD-induced lesions in nasal epithelium in any species. •Several useful biomarkers are identified from microarray-based transcriptomics analysis. -- Abstract: The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down

  10. Prenatal exposure to aflatoxin B1: developmental, behavioral, and reproductive alterations in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriya, Ch.; Reddy, P. Sreenivasula

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) inhibits androgen biosynthesis as a result of its ability to form a high-affinity complex with the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The results of the present study demonstrate the postnatal effects of in utero exposure to AfB1 in the rat. Pregnant Wistar rats were given 10, 20, or 50 μg AfB1/kg body weight daily from gestation day (GD) 12 to GD 19. At parturition, newborns were observed for clinical signs and survival. All animals were born alive and initially appeared to be active. Male pups from control and AfB1-exposed animals were weaned and maintained up to postnatal day (PD) 100. Litter size, birth weight, sex ratio, survival rate, and crown-rump length of the pups were significantly decreased in AfB1-exposed rats when compared to controls. Elapsed time (days) for testes to descend into the scrotal sac was significantly delayed in experimental pups when compared to control pups. Behavioral observations such as cliff avoidance, negative geotaxis, surface rightening activity, ascending wire mesh, open field behavior, and exploratory and locomotory activities were significantly impaired in experimental pups. Body weights and the indices of testis, cauda epididymis, prostate, seminal vesicles, and liver were significantly reduced on PD 100 in male rats exposed to AfB1 during embryonic development when compared with controls. Significant reduction in the testicular daily sperm production, epididymal sperm count, and number of viable, motile, and hypo-osmotic tail coiled sperm was observed in experimental rats. The levels of serum testosterone and activity levels of testicular hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner with a significant increase in the serum follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in experimental rats. Deterioration in the testicular and cauda epididymal architecture was observed in experimental rats. The results of fertility

  11. New dimension of glucocorticoids in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai-Ti; Wang, Lu-Hai

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids have been used in clinical oncology for over half a century. The clinical applications of glucocorticoids in oncology are mainly dependent on their pro-apoptotic action to treat lymphoproliferative disorders, and also on alleviating side effects induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy in non-hematologic cancer types. Researches in the past few years have begun to unveil the profound complexity of glucocorticoids signaling and have contributed remarkably on therapeutic strategies. However, it remains striking and puzzling how glucocorticoids use different mechanisms in different cancer types and different targets to promote or inhibit tumor progression. In this review, we provide an update on glucocorticoids and its receptor, GR-mediated signaling and highlight some of the latest findings on the actions of glucocorticoids signaling during tumor progression and metastasis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Skeletal Effects of Inhaled Glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Stephanie A; Stein, Emily M

    2016-06-01

    The skeletal effects of inhaled glucocorticoids are poorly understood. Children with asthma treated with inhaled glucocorticoids have lower growth velocity, bone density, and adult height. Studies of adults with asthma have reported variable effects on BMD, although prospective studies have demonstrated bone loss after initiation of inhaled glucocorticoids in premenopausal women. There is a dose-response relationship between inhaled glucocorticoids and fracture risk in asthmatics; the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures is greater in subjects treated with the highest doses in the majority of studies. Patients with COPD have lower BMD and higher fracture rates compared to controls, however, the majority of studies have not found an additional detrimental effect of inhaled glucocorticoids on bone. While the evidence is not conclusive, it supports using the lowest possible dose of inhaled glucocorticoids to treat patients with asthma and COPD and highlights the need for further research on this topic.

  13. Antenatal glucocorticoids and neonatal inflammation-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Maheer; Holm, Mari; Allred, Elizabeth; Fichorova, Raina; Dammann, Olaf; Leviton, Alan

    2016-12-01

    To date, studies of the relationship between antenatal glucocorticoids (AGC) and neonatal inflammation in preterm newborns have been largely limited to umbilical cord blood specimens. To explore the association between exposure to antenatal glucocorticoids and concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in whole blood collected from very preterm newborns at multiple times during the first postnatal month. We measured the protein concentrations on postnatal day 1 (N=1118), day 7 (N=1138), day 14 (N=1030), day 21 (N=936) and day 28 (N=877) from infants born before the 28th week of gestation and explored the relationship between antenatal steroid receipt and protein concentrations in the highest and lowest quartiles. The creation of multinomial logistic regression models (adjusted for potential confounders) allowed us calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Twenty of 420 assessments [21 (proteins)×2 (exposure levels: partial and full)×2 (quartile levels: top and bottom)×5 (days)] were statistically significant without any cohesive pattern. Among infants born before 28 weeks of gestational age, neither full, nor partial courses of antenatal glucocorticoids have a sustained anti-inflammatory effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute illness-induced behavioral alterations are similar to those observed during withdrawal from acute alcohol exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Laura; Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L.; Buck, Hollin M.; Deak, Terrence

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to an immunogen results in a constellation of behavioral changes collectively referred to as “sickness behaviors,” with alterations in cytokine expression previously shown to contribute to this sickness response. Since behaviors observed during ethanol withdrawal are strikingly similar to sickness behaviors, we hypothesized that behavioral manifestations of ethanol withdrawal might be an expression of sickness behaviors induced by ethanol-related changes in peripheral and/or central cytokine expression. Accordingly, behaviors exhibited during a modified social investigation test were first characterized in male rats following an acute injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg). Subsequently, behavioral changes after either a high (4-g/kg; Experiment 2) or low dose (0.5 g/kg; Experiment 3) of ethanol were also examined in the same social investigation test, as well as in the forced-swim test (FST; Experiment 4). Results from these experiments demonstrated similar reductions in both exploration and social investigatory behavior during acute illness and ethanol withdrawal, while a seemingly paradoxical decrease in immobility was observed in the FST during acute ethanol withdrawal. In follow-up studies, neither indomethacin (Experiment 5) nor interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Experiment 6) pre-exposure reversed the ethanol withdrawal-induced behavioral changes observed in this social investigation test. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the behavioral sequelae of acute illness and ethanol withdrawal are similar in nature, while antagonist studies suggest that these behavioral alterations are not reversed by blockade of IL-1 receptors or inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Though a direct mechanistic link between cytokines and the expression of acute ethanol withdrawal-related behaviors has yet to be found, future studies examining the involvement of brain cytokines as potential mediators of ethanol effects are greatly needed. PMID

  15. Pik3r1 Is Required for Glucocorticoid-Induced Perilipin 1 Phosphorylation in Lipid Droplet for Adipocyte Lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Taiyi; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Rebecca A; Nguyen, Nguyen Huynh Thao; Broughton, Augusta E; Zhang, Danyun; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2017-06-01

    Glucocorticoids promote lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) to adapt to energy demands under stress, whereas superfluous lipolysis causes metabolic disorders, including dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis. Glucocorticoid-induced lipolysis requires the phosphorylation of cytosolic hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin 1 (Plin1) in the lipid droplet by protein kinase A (PKA). We previously identified Pik3r1 (also called p85α ) as a glucocorticoid receptor target gene. Here, we found that glucocorticoids increased HSL phosphorylation, but not Plin1 phosphorylation, in adipose tissue-specific Pik3r1 -null (AKO) mice. Furthermore, in lipid droplets, the phosphorylation of HSL and Plin1 and the levels of catalytic and regulatory subunits of PKA were increased by glucocorticoids in wild-type mice. However, these effects were attenuated in AKO mice. In agreement with reduced WAT lipolysis, glucocorticoid- initiated hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia were improved in AKO mice. Our data demonstrated a novel role of Pik3r1 that was independent of the regulatory function of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in mediating the metabolic action of glucocorticoids. Thus, the inhibition of Pik3r1 in adipocytes could alleviate lipid disorders caused by excess glucocorticoid exposure. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. Influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on epigenetic regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene in Holocaust survivor offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; Lehrner, Amy; Desarnaud, Frank; Bader, Heather N; Makotkine, Iouri; Flory, Janine D; Bierer, Linda M; Meaney, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Differential effects of maternal and paternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been observed in adult offspring of Holocaust survivors in both glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and vulnerability to psychiatric disorder. The authors examined the relative influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on DNA methylation of the exon 1F promoter of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR-1F) gene (NR3C1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and its relationship to glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity in Holocaust offspring. Adult offspring with at least one Holocaust survivor parent (N=80) and demographically similar participants without parental Holocaust exposure or parental PTSD (N=15) completed clinical interviews, self-report measures, and biological procedures. Blood samples were collected for analysis of GR-1F promoter methylation and of cortisol levels in response to low-dose dexamethasone, and two-way analysis of covariance was performed using maternal and paternal PTSD as main effects. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to permit visualization of maternal compared with paternal PTSD effects on clinical variables and GR-1F promoter methylation. A significant interaction demonstrated that in the absence of maternal PTSD, offspring with paternal PTSD showed higher GR-1F promoter methylation, whereas offspring with both maternal and paternal PTSD showed lower methylation. Lower GR-1F promoter methylation was significantly associated with greater postdexamethasone cortisol suppression. The clustering analysis revealed that maternal and paternal PTSD effects were differentially associated with clinical indicators and GR-1F promoter methylation. This is the first study to demonstrate alterations of GR-1F promoter methylation in relation to parental PTSD and neuroendocrine outcomes. The moderation of paternal PTSD effects by maternal PTSD suggests different mechanisms for the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related vulnerabilities.

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Soy Isoflavones Altered the Immunological Parameters in Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaid, Hala M; Elgawish, Rania Abdel Rahman; Abdelrazek, Heba M A; Gaffer, Ghada; Tag, Hend M

    2016-05-01

    Information on the effects of phytoestrogens on animals has increased recently; however, there were only few studies on prenatal exposure on cellular immune response. Pregnant rats were assigned to 3 groups (12 rats per group), the first was fed control diet, the second was fed low-dose (6.5 g/100 g of diet) soy isoflavones, while the third was fed high-dose (26 g/100 g of diet) soy isoflavones. The female offspring cell-mediated immune response was determined using phytohemagglutinin (PHA) injection, and intumesce index was calculated on postnatal day 50. After 24 hours of PHA injection, blood samples were collected for tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ (IFN-γ), and interleukin (IL)-12 determination. Spleen, thymus, and PHA-injected footpads were fixed for histopathology. Intumesce index was significantly (P prenatal period had immunosuppressive effect on female offspring after PHA stimulation. This effect was mediated through reduced IFN-γ that interplayed in IL-12 production pathway thus reducing its level. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Alteration of mice cerebral cortex development after prenatal exposure to cypermethrin and deltamethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junnan; Xu, Jinzhong; Zhang, Junshi; An, Lei

    2018-05-01

    Pyrethroids, a group of insecticides with high efficiency, low toxicity and wide spectrum, are used for pest control in agriculture. Here, we administered two representative pyrethroids (cypermethrin and deltamethrin) and an equal volume of vehicle (corn oil) to the pregnant ICR mice. This study investigated the effects of cypermethrin and deltamethrin on cerebral cortex development in mice as well as possible mechanisms in proliferation and differentiation. The results showed that histopathologic change did not occurred in the cerebral cortex using Hematoxylin and Eosin staining, however, the observation of fetuses exposed to cypermethrin and deltamethrin revealed reduction of neuronal proliferation, maturation and differentiation. Moreover, cypermethrin/deltamethrin-induced apoptosis of nerve cell was significantly higher in treated groups than that in control group by using flow cytometry, Western blot and TUNEL. It was worth mentioning that the newborns exposed to cypermethrin and deltamethrin did not showed abnormal neuronal distribution. These findings suggested that prenatal cypermethrin and deltamethrin exposure impaired corticogenesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional alterations of alveolar macrophages subjected to smoke exposure and antioxidant lazaroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Lantz, R C; Vermeulen, M W; Chen, G J; Breceda, V; Robledo, R F; Hays, A M; Young, S; Witten, M L

    1999-08-01

    Acute inhalation of diesel fuel-polycarbonate plastic (DFPP) smoke causes severe lung injury, leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and death. It has been reported that the initiation of acute lung injury is associated with the activation of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM). To further explore the pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages (AM) of New Zealand rabbits ventilated and exposed to a 60 tidal volume of DFPP smoke in vivo were recovered at 1 h post-smoke. Smoke exposure induced significant increases in both mRNA and protein levels for PAM tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), when compared to smoke control. Smoke also induced a biphasic response (inhibited at 2 h, enhanced at 24 h after cell isolation) in the production of superoxide (O2-) by PAM. However, aerosolized lazaroid, U75412E (1.6 mg/kg body weight), significantly attenuated smoke-induced expression in AM TNF-alpha at the protein level but not at the mRNA level, and smoke-induced changes in AM production of O2-. This study suggests that highly expressing AM TNF-alpha following smoke may be a key contributor to the cascade that establishes an acute injury process and exacerbates oxidant-derived cell injury. Whereas, the lazaroid may ameliorate smoke-induced lung injury by attenuating AM TNF-alpha release, in addition to its primary antioxidative mechanism.

  20. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene

  1. The effects of glucocorticoids on feeding behavior in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have major effects on food intake, however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This article highlights data on the changes that occur when glucocorticoids are removed by adrenalectomy, and the effects of central and systemic administered glucocorticoids on feeding

  2. Changes in capsular serotype alter the surface exposure of pneumococcal adhesins and impact virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Sanchez

    Full Text Available We examined the contribution of serotype on Streptococcus pneumoniae adhesion and virulence during respiratory tract infection using a panel of isogenic TIGR4 (serotype 4 mutants expressing the capsule types 6A (+6A, 7F (+7F and 23F (+23F as well as a deleted and restored serotype 4 (+4 control strain. Immunoblots, bacterial capture assays with immobilized antibody, and measurement of mean fluorescent intensity by flow cytometry following incubation of bacteria with antibody, all determined that the surface accessibility, but not total protein levels, of the virulence determinants Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA, Choline binding protein A (CbpA, and Pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein (PsrP changed with serotype. In vitro, bacterial adhesion to Detroit 562 pharyngeal or A549 lung epithelial cells was modestly but significantly altered for +6A, +7F and +23F. In a mouse model of nasopharyngeal colonization, the number of +6A, +7F, and +23F pneumococci in the nasopharynx was reduced 10 to 100-fold versus +4; notably, only mice challenged with +4 developed bacteremia. Intratracheal challenge of mice confirmed that capsule switch strains were highly attenuated for virulence. Compared to +4, the +6A, +7F, and +23F strains were rapidly cleared from the lungs and were not detected in the blood. In mice challenged intraperitoneally, a marked reduction in bacterial blood titers was observed for those challenged with +6A and +7F versus +4 and +23F was undetectable. These findings show that serotype impacts the accessibility of surface adhesins and, in particular, affects virulence within the respiratory tract. They highlight the complex interplay between capsule and protein virulence determinants.

  3. Physical habitat and its alteration: A common ground for exposure of amphibians to environmental stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine A.; Cunnington, David C.; Fellers, Gary M.; Gibbs, James P.; Pauli, Bruce D.; Rothermel, Betsie B.; Linder, Greg L.; Krest, Sherry K.; Sparling, Donald W.

    2003-01-01

    Amphibians as a class of vertebrates have persisted for hundreds of millions of years (Stebbins and Cohen 1995), but they are currently threatened by a variety of stressors, many resulting from human-related alterations of the environment. Most species of amphibians live closely associated with moist environments throughout their life and have evolved specialized adaptations that conserve water and reduce desiccation (Stebbins and Cohen 1995; Henry 2000; Chapter 2A). Amphibians are ectotherms, so their body temperatures fluctuate with the local environment. Latitude, elevation, and habitat affect environmental temperature and have a strong influence on amphibian distributions. Despite these physiological and habitat constraints, the 4750 species of amphibians in the world today have exploited a wide variety of habitats that range from dry deserts to tropical rain forests and from sea level to elevations above 4000 m (McDairmid and Mitchell 2000).The direct loss of suitable habitat has had a profound effect on amphibian populations (Johnson 1992), as it has on nearly all species of wildlife. In the U.S., 53% of wetlands have been lost to human development in the last 200 years (Dahl 1990). Similar loss of wetlands has occurred throughout much of the world, especially in developing countries (Miller 1993). In many regions, deforestation has reduced or eliminated suitable terrestrial habitats, and this may prove to be the largest global threat to amphibian populations (Johnson 1992). Eight thousand years ago, forests covered approximately 40% of the world’s land (6 billion hectares), but by 1997, the world’s forests had been reduced to 3.5 billion hectares, a 42% loss worldwide (CIDA 2001). The effect of habitat loss is generally both obvious and predictable; with increasing restriction of suitable habitat, amphibian populations will probably not survive. The anthropogenic effects on the quality of the habitat that remains are often less obvious.

  4. Altered epidermal lipid layers induced by long-term exposure to suberythemal-dose ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Hana; Hong, Seung-Phil; Jeong, Se-Kyoo; Choi, Eung-Ho; Lee, Sang E; Lee, Seung-Hun; Ahn, Sung-Ku

    2011-07-01

    Although several studies have reported on the biological effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, there have been only a few reports on the changes in epidermal lipids following long-term UV irradiation at suberythemal dose (SED), to which people are usually exposed during their lifetime. To investigate the changes of epidermal lipid properties after long-term UV radiation with SED. Hairless mice were irradiated three times weekly for 15 weeks at an SED of UV (UVB: 20 mJ/cm(2) ; UVA: 14 J/cm(2) ). Every three weeks, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured by a Tewameter. The morphological alterations of stratum corneum (SC) lipid lamellae were examined by electron microscopy (EM). Activities of three key enzymes for mRNA of serine palmitoyl transferase, fatty acid synthase, and HMG CoA reductase were analyzed with real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We also measured the amount of ceramide, cholesterol sulfate, and free fatty acid in the SC by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with exposed times. The SED UV-irradiated group showed increased TEWL after 12 weeks. Following the irradiation period, EM revealed incomplete and separated lamellae at SC intercellular space. mRNA of three key enzymes was increased until six weeks of UV irradiation and decreased thereafter. However, three major lipid amounts gradually decreased throughout the exposed period, with a notable decrease in ceramide. Long-term UV irradiation even with SED influences skin barrier function and structure with prominent ceramide decrease in SC intercellular lipid. © 2011 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. THE SURPRISING DUAL ACTION OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaretova, Ludmila; Makara, Gábor

    2014-03-30

    Glucocorticoid hormones may have dual action on the stomach: physiological gastroprotective and pathological proulcerogenic one. In physiological conditions, even in acute stress situations, glucocorticoids have an adaptive effect on the stomach and, therefore, are gastroprotective. The findings that we review in this article suggest that glucocorticoids released during acute stress are naturally occurring protective factors that play an important role in maintenance of the gastric mucosal integrity.

  6. Chronic Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Exposure Alters Corticotropin Releasing Factor Expression and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Female Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BNST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST. PMID:20537804

  7. Circadian Clock Protein Content and Daily Rhythm of Locomotor Activity Are Altered after Chronic Exposure to Lead in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Sabbar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead exposure has been reported to produce many clinical features, including parkinsonism. However, its consequences on the circadian rhythms are still unknown. Here we aimed to examine the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity following lead intoxication and investigate the mechanisms by which lead may induce alterations of circadian rhythms in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with lead or sodium acetate (10 mg/kg/day, i.p. during 4 weeks. Both groups were tested in the “open field” to quantify the exploratory activity and in the rotarod to evaluate motor coordination. Then, animals were submitted to continuous 24 h recordings of locomotor activity under 14/10 Light/dark (14/10 LD cycle and in complete darkness (DD. At the end of experiments, the clock proteins BMAL1, PER1-2, and CRY1-2 were assayed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN using immunohistochemistry. We showed that lead significantly reduced the number of crossing in the open field, impaired motor coordination and altered the daily locomotor activity rhythm. When the LD cycle was advanced by 6 h, both groups adjusted their daily locomotor activity to the new LD cycle with high onset variability in lead-intoxicated rats compared to controls. Lead also led to a decrease in the number of immunoreactive cells (ir- of BMAL1, PER1, and PER2 without affecting the number of ir-CRY1 and ir-CRY2 cells in the SCN. Our data provide strong evidence that lead intoxication disturbs the rhythm of locomotor activity and alters clock proteins expression in the SCN. They contribute to the understanding of the mechanism by which lead induce circadian rhythms disturbances.

  8. Trauma exposure relates to heightened stress, altered amygdala morphology and deficient extinction learning: Implications for psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciaglia, Raffaele; Nees, Frauke; Grimm, Oliver; Ridder, Stephanie; Pohlack, Sebastian T; Diener, Slawomira J; Liebscher, Claudia; Flor, Herta

    2017-02-01

    Stress exposure causes a structural reorganization in neurons of the amygdala. In particular, animal models have repeatedly shown that both acute and chronic stress induce neuronal hypertrophy and volumetric increase in the lateral and basolateral nuclei of amygdala. These effects are visible on the behavioral level, where stress enhances anxiety behaviors and provokes greater fear learning. We assessed stress and anxiety levels in a group of 18 healthy human trauma-exposed individuals (TR group) compared to 18 non-exposed matched controls (HC group), and related these measurements to amygdala volume. Traumas included unexpected adverse experiences such as vehicle accidents or sudden loss of a loved one. As a measure of aversive learning, we implemented a cued fear conditioning paradigm. Additionally, to provide a biological marker of chronic stress, we measured the sensitivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis using a dexamethasone suppression test. Compared to the HC, the TR group showed significantly higher levels of chronic stress, current stress and trait anxiety, as well as increased volume of the left amygdala. Specifically, we observed a focal enlargement in its lateral portion, in line with previous animal data. Compared to HC, the TR group also showed enhanced late acquisition of conditioned fear and deficient extinction learning, as well as salivary cortisol hypo-suppression to dexamethasone. Left amygdala volumes positively correlated with suppressed morning salivary cortisol. Our results indicate differences in trauma-exposed individuals which resemble those previously reported in animals exposed to stress and in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms through which traumatic stress might prompt vulnerability for psychopathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucocorticoid-induction of hypothalamic aromatase via its brain-specific promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, D C; Zhao, H; Yilmaz, M B; Coon V, J S; Bulun, S E

    2012-10-15

    In the brain, a 36-kb distal promoter (I.f) regulates the Cyp19a1 gene that encodes aromatase, the key enzyme for estrogen biosynthesis. Local estrogen production in the brain regulates critical functions such as gonadotropin secretion and sexual behavior. The mechanisms that control brain aromatase production are not well understood. Here we show that the glucocorticoid dexamethasone robustly increases aromatase mRNA and protein by up to 98-fold in mouse hypothalamic cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Using deletion mutants of the brain-specific promoter I.f and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR, we isolated a distinct region (-500/-200 bp) which becomes enriched in bound glucocorticoid receptor upon dexamethasone stimulation. A glucocorticoid antagonist or siRNA based knockdown of glucocorticoid receptor ablated dexamethasone stimulation of aromatase expression. Our findings demonstrate how glucocorticoids alter aromatase expression in the hypothalamus and might indicate a mechanism whereby glucocorticoid action modifies gonadotropin pulses and the menstrual cycle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Larval exposure to predator cues alters immune function and response to a fungal pathogen in post-metamorphic wood frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Maya L; Buck, Julia C; Gervasi, Stephanie; Blaustein, Andrew R; Reinert, Laura K; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Bier, Mark E; Hempel, John; Relyea, Rick A

    2013-09-01

    For the past several decades, amphibian populations have been decreasing around the globe at an unprecedented rate. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the fungal pathogen that causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians, is contributing to amphibian declines. Natural and anthropogenic environmental factors are hypothesized to contribute to these declines by reducing the immunocompetence of amphibian hosts, making them more susceptible to infection. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced in the granular glands of a frog's skin are thought to be a key defense against Bd infection. These peptides may be a critical immune defense during metamorphosis because many acquired immune functions are suppressed during this time. To test if stressors alter AMP production and survival of frogs exposed to Bd, we exposed wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles to the presence or absence of dragonfly predator cues crossed with a single exposure to three nominal concentrations of the insecticide malathion (0, 10, or 100 parts per billion [ppb]). We then exposed a subset of post-metamorphic frogs to the presence or absence of Bd zoospores and measured frog survival. Although predator cues and malathion had no effect on survival or size at metamorphosis, predator cues increased the time to metamorphosis by 1.5 days and caused a trend of a 20% decrease in hydrophobic skin peptides. Despite this decrease in peptides determined shortly after metamorphosis, previous exposure to predator cues increased survival in both Bd-exposed and unexposed frogs several weeks after metamorphosis. These results suggest that exposing tadpoles to predator cues confers fitness benefits later in life.

  11. Alteration of shell nacre micromorphology in blue mussel Mytilus edulis after exposure to free-ionic silver and silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuykov, Michael; Pelletier, Emilien; Belzile, Claude; Demers, Serge

    2011-07-01

    This study describes the morphology of inner shell surface (ISS) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis Linnaeus after short-term exposures to radiolabeled silver in free-ionic ((110m)Ag(+)) and engineered nanoparticulate ((110m)AgNPs, silver in starting solutions was used in a similar low concentration (∼15 Bq mL(-1)) for both treatments. After exposure experiments radiolabeled silver was leached from the ISS using HCl. It concentration for shells from both treatments was ∼0.5 Bq mL(-1). Whole ISS of young individuals and prismatic layer of adults showed no evidence of any major alteration process after silver uptake. However, the nacre portion of adult mussels exposed to both treatments revealed distinct doughnut shape structures (DSS) formed by calcium carbonate micrograins that covered the surface of aragonite tablets. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging revealed the existence of only minor differences in DSS morphology between mussels exposed to Ag(+) and AgNPs. From literature survey, DSS were also found in bivalves exposed to Cd(2+). The DSS occurring in a specimen of a field-collected bivalve is also shown. Formation of distinctive DSS can be explained by a disturbance of the shell calcification mechanism. Although the occurrence of DSS is not exclusively associated with metal bioavailability to the mussels, the morphology of DSS seems to be linked to the speciation of the metal used in the uptake experiments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental exposure of African catfish Clarias Gariepinus (Burchell, 1822 to phenol: Clinical evaluation, tissue alterations and residue assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai D. Ibrahem

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is lack of information regarding; the toxicological and pathological consequences of phenol stressed Clarias gariepinus; as well as; the susceptibility of the stressed fish to disease occurrence. Static renewal bioassay was experimentally conducted to evaluate the toxic effects of phenol on the African catfish C. gariepinus. Ninety-six-hour acute toxicity tests revealed that the median lethal concentration of phenol (LC50 is 35 mg/L by immersion. Four experimental fish groups were assigned for 3 weeks exposure test; three were exposed 20%, 50% and 70% LC50, the fourth control fish group received a vehicle of dechlorinated water. Abnormal signs including cessation of feeding, nervous manifestations; skin expressed perfuses mucous, black patches with skin erosion and ulcerations in the later stages. All observations were correlated to the time and dose of exposure. Post mortem examination revealed adhesion of the internal organs. For tissue alterations; Skin, gills, brain, liver and kidney showed variable degrees of degenerative changes and necrosis. Muscle residues shown in mean ± SE were 4.3 ± 0.05 and 6.65 ± 0.05 ppm in groups that received 20 and 50% LD50, respectively. Infection with Aeromonas hydrophila resulted in high percent of mortalities with a non significant difference between the challenged fish groups. The study cleared that phenol is toxic to C. gariepinus under experimental conditions.

  13. Repeated exposure of adult rats to transient oxidative stress induces various long-lasting alterations in cognitive and behavioral functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Iguchi

    Full Text Available Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates.

  14. Age at First Exposure to Football Is Associated with Altered Corpus Callosum White Matter Microstructure in Former Professional Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Julie M; Koerte, Inga K; Muehlmann, Marc; Pasternak, Ofer; Bourlas, Alexandra P; Baugh, Christine M; Giwerc, Michelle Y; Zhu, Anni; Coleman, Michael J; Bouix, Sylvain; Fritts, Nathan G; Martin, Brett M; Chaisson, Christine; McClean, Michael D; Lin, Alexander P; Cantu, Robert C; Tripodis, Yorghos; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-11-15

    Youth football players may incur hundreds of repetitive head impacts (RHI) in one season. Our recent research suggests that exposure to RHI during a critical neurodevelopmental period prior to age 12 may lead to greater later-life mood, behavioral, and cognitive impairments. Here, we examine the relationship between age of first exposure (AFE) to RHI through tackle football and later-life corpus callosum (CC) microstructure using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Forty retired National Football League (NFL) players, ages 40-65, were matched by age and divided into two groups based on their AFE to tackle football: before age 12 or at age 12 or older. Participants underwent DTI on a 3 Tesla Siemens (TIM-Verio) magnet. The whole CC and five subregions were defined and seeded using deterministic tractography. Dependent measures were fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. Results showed that former NFL players in the AFE <12 group had significantly lower FA in anterior three CC regions and higher radial diffusivity in the most anterior CC region than those in the AFE ≥12 group. This is the first study to find a relationship between AFE to RHI and later-life CC microstructure. These results suggest that incurring RHI during critical periods of CC development may disrupt neurodevelopmental processes, including myelination, resulting in altered CC microstructure.

  15. Long-term side effects of glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oray, Merih; Abu Samra, Khawla; Ebrahimiadib, Nazanin; Meese, Halea; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids represent the standard therapy for reducing inflammation and immune activation in various diseases. However, as with any potent medication, they are not without side effects. Glucocorticoid-associated side effects may involve most major organ systems. Musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, neuropsychiatric, dermatologic, ocular, and immunologic side effects are all possible. This article analyzes English-language literature and provides an update on the most recent literature regarding side effects of systemic glucocorticoid treatment. The risk/benefit ratio of glucocorticoid therapy can be improved by proper use. Careful monitoring and using appropriate preventive strategies can potentially minimize side effects.

  16. Estrogen-induced breast cancer: Alterations in breast morphology and oxidative stress as a function of estrogen exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mense, Sarah M.; Remotti, Fabrizio; Bhan, Ashima; Singh, Bhupendra; El-Tamer, Mahmoud; Hei, Tom K.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that prolonged lifetime exposure to estrogen is associated with elevated breast cancer risk in women. Oxidative stress and estrogen receptor-associated proliferative changes are suggested to play important roles in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. In the present study, we investigated changes in breast morphology and oxidative stress following estrogen exposure. Female ACI rats were treated with 17β-estradiol (E 2 , 3 mg, s.c.) for either 7, 15, 120 or 240 days. Animals were euthanized, tissues were excised, and portions of the tissues were either fixed in 10% buffered formalin or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Paraffin-embedded tissues were examined for histopathologic changes. Proliferative changes appeared in the breast after 7 days of E 2 exposure. Atypical ductal proliferation and significant reduction in stromal fat were observed following 120 days of E 2 exposure. Both in situ and invasive carcinomas were observed in the majority of the mammary glands from rats treated with E 2 for 240 days. Palpable breast tumors were observed in 82% of E 2 -treated rats after 228 days, with the first palpable tumor appearing after 128 days. No morphological changes were observed in the livers, kidneys, lungs or brains of rats treated with E 2 for 240 days compared to controls. Furthermore, 8-isoprostane (8-isoPGF 2α ) levels as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase, were quantified in the breast tissues of rats treated with E 2 for 7, 15, 120 and 240 days and compared to activity levels in age-matched controls. 8-isoPGF 2α levels displayed time-dependent increases upon E 2 treatment and were significantly higher than control levels at the 15, 120 and 240 day time-points. 8-isoPGF 2α observed in E 2 -induced mammary tumors were significantly higher than levels found in control mammary tissue from age-matched animals. Similarly, alterations in glutathione

  17. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Mepham, Kathryn; Sebag, Igal A.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5–14.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ► Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ► Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ► DES

  18. Exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) leads to altered selenoprotein synthesis in a primary human lung cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meno, Sarah R; Nelson, Rebecca; Hintze, Korry J; Self, William T

    2009-09-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a trivalent metabolite of arsenic, is highly cytotoxic and recent cell culture studies suggest that it might act as a carcinogen. The general consensus of studies indicates that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) is a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A longstanding relationship between arsenic and selenium metabolism has led to the use of selenium as a supplement in arsenic exposed populations, however the impact of organic arsenicals (methylated metabolites) on selenium metabolism is still poorly understood. In this study we determined the impact of exposure to MMA(III) on the regulation of expression of TrxR1 and its activity using a primary lung fibroblast line, WI-38. The promoter region of the gene encoding the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) contains an antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that has been shown to be activated in the presence of electrophilic compounds. Results from radiolabeled selenoproteins indicate that exposure to low concentrations of MMA(III) resulted in increased synthesis of TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, and lower incorporation of selenium into other selenoproteins. MMA(III) treatment led to increased mRNA encoding TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, while lower levels of mRNA coding for cellular glutathione peroxidase (cGpx) were detected in exposed cells. Luciferase activity of TrxR1 promoter fusions increased with addition of MMA(III), as did expression of a rat quinone reductase (QR) promoter fusion construct. However, MMA(III) induction of the TRX1 promoter fusion was abrogated when the ARE was mutated, suggesting that this regulation is mediated via the ARE. These results indicate that MMA(III) alters the expression of selenoproteins based on a selective induction of TrxR1, and this response to exposure to organic arsenicals that requires the ARE element.

  19. Developmental exposure to organophosphate flame retardants elicits overt toxicity and alters behavior in early life stage zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishaw, Laura V; Hunter, Deborah L; Padnos, Beth; Padilla, Stephanie; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-12-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are common replacements for the phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and have been detected at high concentrations in environmental samples. OPFRs are structurally similar to organophosphate pesticides and may adversely affect the developing nervous system. This study evaluated the overt toxicity, uptake, and neurobehavioral effects of tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), and tris (2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TDBPP) in early life stage zebrafish. Chlorpyrifos was used as a positive control. For overt toxicity and neurobehavioral assessments, zebrafish were exposed from 0 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf). Hatching, death, or malformations were evaluated daily. Teratogenic effects were scored by visual examination on 6 dpf. To evaluate uptake and metabolism, zebrafish were exposed to 1 µM of each organophosphate (OP) flame retardant and collected on 1 and 5 dpf to monitor accumulation. Larval swimming activity was measured in 6 dpf larvae to evaluate neurobehavioral effects of exposures below the acute toxicity threshold. TDBPP elicited the greatest toxicity at >1 µM. TDCPP and chlorpyrifos were overtly toxic at concentrations ≥10 µM, TCEP, and TCPP were not overtly toxic at the doses tested. Tissue concentrations increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the parent chemical after 24 h exposures. TDCPP and TDBPP and their respective metabolites were detected in embryos on 5 dpf. For all chemicals tested, developmental exposures that were not overtly toxic significantly altered larval swimming activity. These data indicate that OPFRs adversely affect development of early life stage zebrafish. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology.All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Exposure to a northern contaminant mixture (NCM alters hepatic energy and lipid metabolism exacerbating hepatic steatosis in obese JCR rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Mailloux

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, defined by the American Liver Society as the buildup of extra fat in liver cells that is not caused by alcohol, is the most common liver disease in North America. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are viewed as the major causes of NAFLD. Environmental contaminants have also been implicated in the development of NAFLD. Northern populations are exposed to a myriad of persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, flame retardants, and toxic metals, while also affected by higher rates of obesity and alcohol abuse compared to the rest of Canada. In this study, we examined the impact of a mixture of 22 contaminants detected in Inuit blood on the development and progression of NAFLD in obese JCR rats with or without co-exposure to 10% ethanol. Hepatosteatosis was found in obese rat liver, which was worsened by exposure to 10% ethanol. NCM treatment increased the number of macrovesicular lipid droplets, total lipid contents, portion of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver. This was complemented by an increase in hepatic total cholesterol and cholesterol ester levels which was associated with changes in the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. In addition, NCM treatment increased cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expression and decreased ubiquinone pool, and mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit ATP5A and Complex IV activity. Despite the changes in mitochondrial physiology, hepatic ATP levels were maintained high in NCM-treated versus control rats. This was due to a decrease in ATP utilization and an increase in creatine kinase activity. Collectively, our results suggest that NCM treatment decreases hepatic cholesterol export, possibly also increases cholesterol uptake from circulation, and promotes lipid accumulation and alters ATP homeostasis which exacerbates the existing hepatic steatosis in genetically obese JCR rats with

  1. Perinatal exposure to glyphosate-based herbicide alters the thyrotrophic axis and causes thyroid hormone homeostasis imbalance in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Janaina Sena; Kizys, Marina Malta Letro; da Conceição, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Glebocki, Gabriel; Romano, Renata Marino; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania Maria; Giannocco, Gisele; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Dias da Silva, Magnus Regios; Romano, Marco Aurélio; Chiamolera, Maria Izabel

    2017-02-15

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are widely used in agriculture. Recently, several animal and epidemiological studies have been conducted to understand the effects of these chemicals as an endocrine disruptor for the gonadal system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether GBHs could also disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Female pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to a solution containing GBH Roundup ® Transorb (Monsanto). The animals were divided into three groups (control, 5mg/kg/day or 50mg/kg/day) and exposed from gestation day 18 (GD18) to post-natal day 5 (PND5). Male offspring were euthanized at PND 90, and blood and tissues samples from the hypothalamus, pituitary, liver and heart were collected for hormonal evaluation (TSH-Thyroid stimulating hormone, T3-triiodothyronine and T4-thyroxine), metabolomic and mRNA analyses of genes related to thyroid hormone metabolism and function. The hormonal profiles showed decreased concentrations of TSH in the exposed groups, with no variation in the levels of the thyroid hormones (THs) T3 and T4 between the groups. Hypothalamus gene expression analysis of the exposed groups revealed a reduction in the expression of genes encoding deiodinases 2 (Dio2) and 3 (Dio3) and TH transporters Slco1c1 (former Oatp1c1) and Slc16a2 (former Mct8). In the pituitary, Dio2, thyroid hormone receptor genes (Thra1 and Thrb1), and Slc16a2 showed higher expression levels in the exposed groups than in the control group. Interestingly, Tshb gene expression did not show any difference in expression profile between the control and exposed groups. Liver Thra1 and Thrb1 showed increased mRNA expression in both GBH-exposed groups, and in the heart, Dio2, Mb, Myh6 (former Mhca) and Slc2a4 (former Glut4) showed higher mRNA expression in the exposed groups. Additionally, correlation analysis between gene expression and metabolomic data showed similar alterations as detected in hypothyroid rats. Perinatal exposure to

  2. NALP3 inflammasome upregulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor cause glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W. Paugh (Steven); E.J. Bonten (Erik J.); D. Savic (Daniel); L.B. Ramsey (Laura B.); W.E. Thierfelder (William E.); P. Gurung (Prajwal); R.K.S. Malireddi (R. K. Subbarao); M. Actis (Marcelo); A. Mayasundari (Anand); J. Min (Jaeki); D.R. Coss (David R.); L.T. Laudermilk (Lucas T.); J.C. Panetta (John); J.R. McCorkle (J. Robert); Y. Fan (Yiping); K.R. Crews (Kristine R.); G. Stocco (Gabriele); M.R. Wilkinson (Mark R.); A.M. Ferreira (Antonio M.); C. Cheng (Cheng); W. Yang (Wenjian); S.E. Karol (Seth E.); C.A. Fernandez (Christian A.); B. Diouf (Barthelemy); C. Smith (Colton); J.K. Hicks (J Kevin); A. Zanut (Alessandra); A. Giordanengo (Audrey); D.J. Crona; J.J. Bianchi (Joy J.); L. Holmfeldt (Linda); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Pieters (Rob); S. Jeha (Sima); T.L. Dunwell (Thomas L.); F. Latif (Farida); D. Bhojwani (Deepa); W.L. Carroll (William L.); C.-H. Pui (Ching-Hon); R.M. Myers (Richard M.); R.K. Guy (R Kiplin); T.-D. Kanneganti (Thirumala-Devi); M.V. Relling (Mary); W.E. Evans (William)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and resistance to glucocorticoids in leukemia cells confers poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the prednisolone sensitivity of primary leukemia

  3. Do the interactions between glucocorticoids and sex hormones regulate the development of the Metabolic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià eAlemany

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is basically a maturity-onset disease. Typically, its manifestations begin to flourish years after the initial dietary or environmental aggression began. Since most hormonal, metabolic or defense responses are practically immediate, the procrastinated response don't seem justified. Only in childhood, the damages of the metabolic syndrome appear with minimal delay. Sex affects the incidence of the metabolic syndrome, but this is more an effect of timing than absolute gender differences, females holding better than males up to menopause, when the differences between sexes tend to disappear. The metabolic syndrome is related to an immune response, countered by a permanent increase in glucocorticoids, which keep the immune system at bay but also induce insulin resistance, alter the lipid metabolism, favor fat deposition, mobilize protein and decrease androgen synthesis. Androgens limit the operation of glucocorticoids, which is also partly blocked by estrogens, since they decrease inflammation (which enhances glucocorticoid release. These facts suggest that the appearance of the metabolic syndrome symptoms depends on the strength (i.e. levels of androgens and estrogens. The predominance of glucocorticoids and the full manifestation of the syndrome in men are favored by decreased androgen activity. Low androgens can be found in infancy, maturity, advanced age, or because of their inhibition by glucocorticoids (inflammation, stress, medical treatment. Estrogens decrease inflammation and reduce the glucocorticoid response. Low estrogen (infancy, menopause again allow the predominance of glucocorticoids and the manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. It is postulated that the equilibrium between sex hormones and glucocorticoids may be a critical element in the timing of the manifestation of metabolic syndrome-related pathologies.

  4. Bone histomorphometric changes in children with rheumatic disorders on chronic glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Jennifer; Holmyard, Douglas; Silverman, Earl; Sochett, Etienne; Grynpas, Marc

    2016-11-10

    Rheumatic diseases are associated with an increased fracture risk. The tissue level characteristics of the bone involvement in children have not been well elucidated. Our objectives were to describe the bone micro-architectural characteristics in children with rheumatic diseases on chronic glucocorticoids, and to determine associations between micro-architectural findings with clinical and radiological variables. Children on chronic glucocorticoids for an underlying rheumatic disease were referred for evaluation of bone fragility given the presence of vertebral compression fractures. A trans-iliac bone biopsy was performed as part of the clinical assessment. Histomorphometric analysis and quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBSE) of the biopsy samples were undertaken. Data of 15 children (14.0 ± 3.2 years) with a duration of glucocorticoid exposure of 6.2 ± 4.1 years and average prednisone dose of 14.1 ± 6.2 mg/m 2 /day were assessed. Histomorphometric analyses demonstrated significant decrease in trabecular thickness (p = 0.01), osteoid thickness (p glucocorticoid dose, height and body mass index Z score, but not bone mineral density or measures of disease activity. Using qBSE to measure bone mineralization, the subjects were shown to have a heterogeneous and hypermineralized profile, with higher cumulative glucocorticoid dose being associated with greater mineralization (p glucocorticoid dose.

  5. Cross-talk between the glucocorticoid receptor and MyoD family inhibitor domain-containing protein provides a new mechanism for generating tissue-specific responses to glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Robert H; Busillo, John M; Cidlowski, John A

    2017-04-07

    Glucocorticoids are primary stress hormones that regulate many physiological processes, and synthetic derivatives of these molecules are widely used in the clinic. The molecular factors that govern tissue specificity of glucocorticoids, however, are poorly understood. The actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). To discover new proteins that interact with GR and modulate its function, we performed a yeast two-hybrid assay. The MyoD family inhibitor domain-containing protein (MDFIC) was identified as a binding partner for GR. MDFIC associated with GR in the cytoplasm of cells, and treatment with glucocorticoids resulted in the dissociation of the GR-MDFIC complex. To investigate the function of the GR-MDFIC interaction, we performed a genome-wide microarray in intact and MDFIC-deficient A549 cells that were treated with glucocorticoids. A large cohort of genes was differentially regulated by GR depending on the presence or absence of MDFIC. These gene changes were strongly associated with inflammation, and glucocorticoid regulation of the inflammatory response was altered in MDFIC-deficient cells. At a molecular level, the interaction of MDFIC with GR altered the phosphorylation status of the receptor. We demonstrate in COS-1 cells that changes in receptor phosphorylation underlie the ability of MDFIC to regulate the transcriptional activity of GR. Finally, we show that GR directly represses the MDFIC gene, revealing a negative feedback loop by which glucocorticoids limit MDFIC activity. These findings identify a new binding partner for cytoplasmic GR that modulates the receptor transcriptome and contributes to the tissue-specific actions of glucocorticoids. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Peripheral CLOCK regulates target-tissue glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity in a circadian fashion in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Charmandari

    Full Text Available Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the "master" circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral "slave" counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans.We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs as non-synchronized controls.GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo.Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night.

  7. Peripheral CLOCK Regulates Target-Tissue Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity in a Circadian Fashion in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.; Lambrou, George I.; Pavlaki, Aikaterini; Koide, Hisashi; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Kino, Tomoshige

    2011-01-01

    Context and Objective Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the “master” circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral “slave” counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. Design and Participants We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs) as non-synchronized controls. Results GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. Conclusions Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night. PMID:21980503

  8. Regulation of Hypothalamic Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Transcription by Elevated Glucocorticoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andrew N.; Liu, Ying; MacGregor, Robert; Huang, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Negative glucocorticoid feedback is essential for preventing the deleterious effects of excessive hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis axis activation, with an important target being CRH transcription in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. The aim of these studies was to determine whether glucocorticoids repress CRH transcription directly in CRH neurons, by examining glucocorticoid effects on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)–CRH promoter interaction and the activation of proteins required for CRH transcription. Immunoprecipitation of hypothalamic chromatin from intact or adrenalectomized rats subjected to either stress or corticosterone injections showed minor association of the proximal CRH promoter with the GR compared with that with phospho-CREB (pCREB). In contrast, the Period-1 (Per1, a glucocorticoid-responsive gene) promoter markedly recruited GR. Stress increased pCREB recruitment by the CRH but not the Per1 promoter, irrespective of circulating glucocorticoids. In vitro, corticosterone pretreatment (30 minutes or 18 hours) only slightly inhibited basal and forskolin-stimulated CRH heteronuclear RNA in primary hypothalamic neuronal cultures and CRH promoter activity in hypothalamic 4B cells. In 4B cells, 30 minutes or 18 hours of corticosterone exposure had no effect on forskolin-induced nuclear accumulation of the recognized CRH transcriptional regulators, pCREB and transducer of regulated CREB activity 2. The data show that inhibition of CRH transcription by physiological glucocorticoids in vitro is minor and that direct interaction of GR with DNA in the proximal CRH promoter may not be a major mechanism of CRH gene repression. Although GR interaction with distal promoter elements may have a role, the data suggest that transcriptional repression of CRH by glucocorticoids involves protein-protein interactions and/or modulation of afferent inputs to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. PMID:24065704

  9. Influenza virus-induced alterations of cytochrome P-450 enzyme activities following exposure of mice to coal and diesel particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabovsky, J; Judy, D J; Rodak, D J; Petersen, M

    1986-06-01

    We have investigated a relationship between two detoxication systems, metabolic detoxication through the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) pathway and resistance to infection through interferon (IFN), in mice infected with influenza virus following exposure to coal dust (CD) and diesel exhaust (DE) particulates. Mice were exposed by inhalation to filtered air (FA; control), CD, or DE for 1 month and then inoculated intranasally (IN) with influenza virus. During infection, 7-ethoxycoumarin deethylase (7ECdeEt'ase) and ethylmorphine demethylase (EMdeMe'ase) (monooxygenases), and NADPH cytochrome c reductase (NADPH c red'ase) were measured in liver microsomes. Temporal patterns of enzyme activities were observed with control animals. EMdeMe'ase and NADPH c red'ase exhibited peak values at Day 4 postinfection (27.6 and 482 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively), compared to initial activities (9.1 and 307 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively). 7ECdeEt'ase activity decreased between Days 1-3 postvirus infection and thereafter returned to the original value (1.7 nmole/min/mg protein). When the mice were first exposed to CD or DE particulates for 1 month prior to influenza infection, changes in enzyme temporal patterns were observed. The increased EMdeMe'ase activity at Day 4 was not observed in mice exposed to CD and was reduced in mice exposed to DE. Preexposure to either particulate resulted in the abolition of the increased Day 4 activity of NADPH c red'ase. The 7ECdeEt'ase postinfection temporal pattern was not affected by a preexposure to either particulate. Estimates of the enzyme activities after the 1-month exposure to FA, CD, or DE but before virus infection indicated no changes due to particulate exposure alone. Under these conditions of particulate exposure and virus infection, serum IFN levels in the mice used in this study peaked at Days 4-5 and were unaffected by the 1-month preexposure to CD or DE (Hahon et al., (1985). The data suggest the relationship that exists

  10. Alteration at translational but not transcriptional level of transferrin receptor expression following manganese exposure at the blood–CSF barrier in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Li, G. Jane; Zhao, Qiuqu; Zheng, Wei

    2005-01-01

    Manganese exposure alters iron homeostasis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), possibly by acting on iron transport mechanisms localized at the blood–brain barrier and/or blood–CSF barrier. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that manganese exposure may change the binding affinity of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) to mRNAs encoding transferrin receptor (TfR), thereby influencing iron transport at the blood–CSF barrier. A primary culture of choroidal epithelial cells was adapte...

  11. Thymus as a target tissue of glucocorticoid action: what are the consequences of glucocorticoids thymectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelaković, Gordana; Stojanovic, Ivana; Jevtovic-Stoimenov, Tatjana; Pavlović, Dusica; Kocić, Gordana; Kamenov, Borisav; Saranac, Ljiljana; Nikolić, Jelenka; Bjelaković, Bojko; Sokolović, Dusan; Basić, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids represent the most powerful endogenous anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effectors, interfering with virtually every step of immunoinflammatory responses. Glucocorticoids are often the most effective therapy in the prevention or suppression of inflammation and other immunologically mediated processes, but their use is limited by systemic side effects induced by the over-production of reactive oxygen species, causing dysregulation of physiological processes. The thymus is an organ with both endocrine and immune functions. Glucocorticoids induce thymocyte apoptosis, causing a profound reduction in thymic mass and volume and inducing hormonal thymectomy. The clinical aspects of glucocorticoid thymectomy are not under enough investigation. These unwanted systemic side effects may be the consequence of prolonged therapeutic application of glucocorticoids and prolonged or chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis, which may lead to increased and prolonged secretion of glucocorticoids. This review will discuss the metabolic effects of glucocorticoids in the context of thymic physiology asthe primary sex hormone-responsive organ.

  12. Glucocorticoid receptor gene inactivation in dopamine-innervated areas selectively decreases behavioral responses to amphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eParnaudeau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The meso-cortico-limbic system, via dopamine release, encodes the rewarding and reinforcing properties of natural rewards. It is also activated in response to abused substances and is believed to support drug-related behaviors. Dysfunctions of this system lead to several psychiatric conditions including feeding disorders and drug addiction. These disorders are also largely influenced by environmental factors and in particular stress exposure. Stressors activate the corticotrope axis ultimately leading to glucocorticoid hormone (GCs release. GCs bind the glucocorticoid receptor (GR a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed including within the meso-cortico-limbic tract. While the GR within dopamine-innervated areas drives cocaine’s behavioral responses, its implication in responses to other psychostimulants such as amphetamine has never been clearly established. Moreover, while extensive work has been made to uncover the role of this receptor in addicted behaviors, its contribution to the rewarding and reinforcing properties of food has yet to be investigated. Using mouse models carrying GR gene inactivation in either dopamine neurons or in dopamine-innervated areas, we found that GR in dopamine responsive neurones is essential to properly build amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization. c-Fos quantification in the nucleus accumbens further confirmed defective neuronal activation following amphetamine injection. These diminished neuronal and behavioral responses to amphetamine may involve alterations in glutamate transmission as suggested by the decreased MK801-elicited hyperlocomotion and by the hyporeactivity to glutamate of a subpopulation of medium spiny neurons. In contrast, GR inactivation did not affect rewarding and reinforcing properties of food suggesting that responding for natural reward under basal conditions is preserved in these mice.

  13. Children and adolescents previously treated with glucocorticoids display lower verbal intellectual abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara Krøis; Vestergaard, Martin; Madsen, Kathrine Skak

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Perinatal exposure to glucocorticoids has been associated with adverse cerebral effects, but little is known about their effect on cognitive development and exposure later in childhood. This study examined intellectual abilities, memory and behavioural problems in children previously treated....../kg (range 21-723) and the mean time that had elapsed since treatment was three-and-a-half (standard deviation 2.2) years. Intellectual abilities were assessed with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children and memory performance and behavioural problems with a pattern recognition memory task...... with glucocorticoids. METHODS: We evaluated 38 children aged from seven to 16 years, who had been treated with glucocorticoids for rheumatic disease or nephrotic syndrome, together with 42 healthy controls matched for age, gender and parental education. The median cumulative dose of prednisolone equivalents was 158 mg...

  14. Time trends for alendronate prescription practices in women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and women exposed to systemic glucocorticoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask-Lindemann, Dorthe; Eiken, P; Eskildsen, P

    2013-01-01

    Summary Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and systemic glucocorticoid exposure are well-known risk factors of osteoporosis. We evaluated alendronate prescription practices related to COPD and exposure to systemic corticosteroids from 1996 to 2008 and showed an increasing targeting...... of alendronate treatment in patients with COPD and patients with systemic corticosteroid exposure. Introduction COPD and systemic glucocorticoid exposure are well-known risk factors of osteoporosis and fragility fracture, but osteoporosis is often underdiagnosed and undertreated in these patients. This study...... aims to evaluate alendronate prescription practices related to COPD and/or to exposure to systemic glucocorticoids among Danish women. Methods A total of 388,314 female subjects >50 years old, 64,719 of whom initiated treatment with alendronate, and 323,595 age- and gender-matched controls were...

  15. Advances in Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Uyl, D.; Bultink, I.E.M.; Lems, W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is one of the most important side effects of glucocorticoid use, as it leads to an increased risk of fractures. Recently, many published studies have focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone metabolism, the pathophysiology of GIOP, and the

  16. Glucocorticoid pulsatility : implications for brain functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarabdjitsingh, Ratna Angela

    2010-01-01

    Pronounced ultradian and circadian rhythms in the hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (i.e. glucocorticoids), one of the body’s major neuroendocrine axes, were already demonstrated several decades ago. Until now, the clinical relevance of the pulsatile nature of glucocorticoids

  17. Low-dose BPA exposure alters the mesenchymal and epithelial transcriptomes of the mouse fetal mammary gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perinaaz R Wadia

    Full Text Available Exposure of rodent fetuses to low doses of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA causes subtle morphological changes in the prenatal mammary gland and results in pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions during adulthood. To examine whether the BPA-induced morphological alterations of the fetal mouse mammary glands are a associated with changes in mRNA expression reflecting estrogenic actions and/or b dependent on the estrogen receptor α (ERα, we compared the transcriptomal effects of BPA and the steroidal estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2 on fetal mammary tissues of wild type and ERα knock-out mice. Mammary glands from fetuses of dams exposed to vehicle, 250 ng BPA/kg BW/d or 10 ng EE2/kg BW/d from embryonic day (E 8 were harvested at E19. Transcriptomal analyses on the ductal epithelium and periductal stroma revealed altered expression of genes involved in the focal adhesion and adipogenesis pathways in the BPA-exposed stroma while genes regulating the apoptosis pathway changed their expression in the BPA-exposed epithelium. These changes in gene expression correlated with previously reported histological changes in matrix organization, adipogenesis, and lumen formation resulting in enhanced maturation of the fat-pad and delayed lumen formation in the epithelium of BPA-exposed fetal mammary glands. Overall similarities in the transcriptomal effects of BPA and EE2 were more pronounced in the epithelium, than in the stroma. In addition, the effects of BPA and EE2 on the expression of various genes involved in mammary stromal-epithelial interactions were suppressed in the absence of ERα. These observations support a model whereby BPA and EE2 act directly on the stroma, which expresses ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in fetal mammary glands, and that the stroma, in turn, affects gene expression in the epithelium, where ERα and ERβ are below the level of detection at this stage of development.

  18. Low-dose BPA exposure alters the mesenchymal and epithelial transcriptomes of the mouse fetal mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadia, Perinaaz R; Cabaton, Nicolas J; Borrero, Michael D; Rubin, Beverly S; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of rodent fetuses to low doses of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) causes subtle morphological changes in the prenatal mammary gland and results in pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions during adulthood. To examine whether the BPA-induced morphological alterations of the fetal mouse mammary glands are a) associated with changes in mRNA expression reflecting estrogenic actions and/or b) dependent on the estrogen receptor α (ERα), we compared the transcriptomal effects of BPA and the steroidal estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2) on fetal mammary tissues of wild type and ERα knock-out mice. Mammary glands from fetuses of dams exposed to vehicle, 250 ng BPA/kg BW/d or 10 ng EE2/kg BW/d from embryonic day (E) 8 were harvested at E19. Transcriptomal analyses on the ductal epithelium and periductal stroma revealed altered expression of genes involved in the focal adhesion and adipogenesis pathways in the BPA-exposed stroma while genes regulating the apoptosis pathway changed their expression in the BPA-exposed epithelium. These changes in gene expression correlated with previously reported histological changes in matrix organization, adipogenesis, and lumen formation resulting in enhanced maturation of the fat-pad and delayed lumen formation in the epithelium of BPA-exposed fetal mammary glands. Overall similarities in the transcriptomal effects of BPA and EE2 were more pronounced in the epithelium, than in the stroma. In addition, the effects of BPA and EE2 on the expression of various genes involved in mammary stromal-epithelial interactions were suppressed in the absence of ERα. These observations support a model whereby BPA and EE2 act directly on the stroma, which expresses ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in fetal mammary glands, and that the stroma, in turn, affects gene expression in the epithelium, where ERα and ERβ are below the level of detection at this stage of development.

  19. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Persistently Alters Endocannabinoid Signaling and Endocannabinoid-Mediated Excitatory Synaptic Plasticity in Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausknecht, Kathryn; Shen, Ying-Ling; Wang, Rui-Xiang; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Shen, Roh-Yu

    2017-06-14

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PE) leads to increased addiction risk which could be mediated by enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. Previous studies have shown that PE enhances excitatory synaptic strength by facilitating an anti-Hebbian form of long-term potentiation (LTP). In this study, we investigated the effect of PE on endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (eCB-LTD) in VTA DA neurons. Rats were exposed to moderate (3 g/kg/d) or high (6 g/kg/d) levels of ethanol during gestation. Whole-cell recordings were conducted in male offspring between 4 and 10 weeks old.We found that PE led to increased amphetamine self-administration. Both moderate and high levels of PE persistently reduced low-frequency stimulation-induced eCB-LTD. Furthermore, action potential-independent glutamate release was regulated by tonic eCB signaling in PE animals. Mechanistic studies for impaired eCB-LTD revealed that PE downregulated CB1 receptor function. Interestingly, eCB-LTD in PE animals was rescued by metabotropic glutamate receptor I activation, suggesting that PE did not impair the synthesis/release of eCBs. In contrast, eCB-LTD in PE animals was not rescued by increasing presynaptic activity, which actually led to LTP in PE animals, whereas LTD was still observed in controls. This result shows that the regulation of excitatory synaptic plasticity is fundamentally altered in PE animals. Together, PE leads to impaired eCB-LTD at the excitatory synapses of VTA DA neurons primarily due to CB1 receptor downregulation. This effect could contribute to enhanced LTP and the maintenance of augmented excitatory synaptic strength in VTA DA neurons and increased addiction risk after PE. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prenatal ethanol exposure (PE) is among many adverse developmental factors known to increase drug addiction risk. Increased excitatory synaptic strength in VTA DA neurons is a critical cellular mechanism for addiction risk. Our

  20. Effect of Bungee-carcass enrichment on behavior and fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in two species of zoo-housed Felids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskell, Amber D; Meiers, Susan T; Jenkins, Sean E; Santymire, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment can improve animal physiological and psychological well-being. This study sought to promote more natural felid behavior and prevent development or incidence of stereotypies through the use of a feeding enrichment. Our objectives are to use fecal glucocorticoid metabolites values and behavioral observations to quantify the effectiveness of the enrichment device for two species of large cats, Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris; n = 2) and cougar (Felis concolor; n = 2). The feeding enrichment, a white-tailed deer carcass flank securely attached to an AussieDog Products(©) Felid 120-cm bungee, was implemented twice for each individual separated by 1 month. Fecal samples were obtained from each felid and analyzed for pre- and post-enrichment fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGM) concentrations using a cortisol enzyme immunoassay. An ethogram with 12 mutual exclusive behavioral categories was utilized to record behavioral responses to the enrichment. Results demonstrate that: 1) there were no differences (P > 0.05) in FGMs for either species between pre- and post-enrichment; 2) pacing decreased (P = 0.025) and walking increased (P = 0.017) after exposure to enrichment in both cougars; and 3) tigers reduced (P = 0.025) 'other' behavioral category after the first enrichment exposure and laid down more (P = 0.025) after the second enrichment exposure. The neutral hormonal impact on the animals coupled with the behavioral changes indicates that this enrichment is successful at altering the animals' behavior without adding physiological stress to their environments. These findings, combined with the low cost and versatility of the enrichment, promote the use of this enrichment to enhance large felid enclosures. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Role of Adrenal Glucocorticoid Signaling in Prefrontal Cortex Gene Expression and Acute Behavioral Responses to Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Blair N.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Fitting, Sylvia; Shelton, Keith L.; Miles, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid hormones modulate acute and chronic behavioral and molecular responses to drugs of abuse including psychostimulants and opioids. There is growing evidence that glucocorticoids might also modulate behavioral responses to ethanol. Acute ethanol activates the HPA axis, causing release of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones. Our prior genomic studies suggest glucocorticoids play a role in regulating gene expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of DBA2/J (D2) mice following acute ethanol administration. However, few studies have analyzed the role of glucocorticoid signaling in behavioral responses to acute ethanol. Such work could be significant, given the predictive value for level of response to acute ethanol in the risk for alcoholism. Methods We studied whether the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, RU-486, or adrenalectomy (ADX) altered male D2 mouse behavioral responses to acute (locomotor activation, anxiolysis or loss-of-righting reflex (LORR)) or repeated (sensitization) ethanol treatment. Whole genome microarray analysis and bioinformatics approaches were used to identify PFC candidate genes possibly responsible for altered behavioral responses to ethanol following ADX. Results ADX and RU-486 both impaired acute ethanol (2 g/kg) induced locomotor activation in D2 mice without affecting basal locomotor activity. However, neither ADX nor RU-486 altered initiation of ethanol sensitization (locomotor activation or jump counts), ethanol-induced anxiolysis or LORR. ADX mice showed microarray gene expression changes in PFC that significantly overlapped with acute ethanol-responsive gene sets derived by our prior microarray studies. Q-rtPCR analysis verified that ADX decreased PFC expression of Fkbp5 while significantly increasing Gpr6 expression. In addition, high dose RU-486 pre-treatment blunted ethanol-induced Fkbp5 expression. Conclusions Our studies suggest that ethanol’s activation of adrenal glucocorticoid release and subsequent

  2. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  3. Optimal glucocorticoid replacement in adrenal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øksnes, Marianne; Ross, Richard; Løvås, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (glucocorticoid deficiency) comprises a group of rare diseases, including primary adrenal insufficiency, secondary adrenal insufficiency and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Lifesaving glucocorticoid therapy was introduced over 60 years ago, but since then a number of advances in treatment have taken place. Specifically, little is known about short- and long-term treatment effects, and morbidity and mortality. Over the past decade, systematic cohort and registry studies have described reduced health-related quality of life, an unfavourable metabolic profile and increased mortality in patients with adrenal insufficiency, which may relate to unphysiological glucocorticoid replacement. This has led to the development of new modes of replacement that aim to mimic normal glucocorticoid physiology. Here, evidence for the inadequacy of conventional glucocorticoid therapy and recent developments in treatment are reviewed, with an emphasis on primary adrenal insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exogenous Cushing's syndrome and glucocorticoid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Rachel L; Leinung, Matthew C

    2005-06-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy in various forms is extremely common for a wide range of inflammatory, autoimmune, and neoplastic disorders. It is therefore important for the physician to be aware of the possibility of both iatrogenic and factitious Cushing's syndrome. Although most common with oral therapy, it is also important to be alert to the fact that all forms of glucocorticoid delivery have the potential to cause Cushing's syndrome. Withdrawal from chronic glucocorticoid therapy presents significant challenges. These include the possibility of adrenal insufficiency after discontinuation of steroid therapy, recurrence of underlying disease as the glucocorticoid is being withdrawn, and the possibility of steroid withdrawal symptoms. Nonetheless, with patience and persistence, a reasonable approach to withdrawal of glucocorticoid therapy can be achieved.

  5. Anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids: changing concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert

    2014-02-05

    Despite being the most effective anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic inflammatory diseases, the mechanisms by which glucocorticoids (corticosteroids) effect repression of inflammatory gene expression remain incompletely understood. Direct interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) with inflammatory transcription factors to repress transcriptional activity, i.e. transrepression, represents one mechanism of action. However, transcriptional activation, or transactivation, by NR3C1 also represents an important mechanism of glucocorticoid action. Glucocorticoids rapidly and profoundly increase expression of multiple genes, many with properties consistent with the repression of inflammatory gene expression. For example: the dual specificity phosphatase, DUSP1, reduces activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases; glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (TSC22D3) represses nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcriptional responses; inhibitor of κBα (NFKBIA) inhibits NF-κB; tristraprolin (ZFP36) destabilises and translationally represses inflammatory mRNAs; CDKN1C, a cell cycle regulator, may attenuate JUN N-terminal kinase signalling; and regulator of G-protein signalling 2 (RGS2), by reducing signalling from Gαq-linked G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), is bronchoprotective. While glucocorticoid-dependent transrepression can co-exist with transactivation, transactivation may account for the greatest level and most potent repression of inflammatory genes. Equally, NR3C1 transactivation is enhanced by β2-adrenoceptor agonists and may explain the enhanced clinical efficacy of β2-adrenoceptor/glucocorticoid combination therapies in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Finally, NR3C1 transactivation is reduced by inflammatory stimuli, including respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus. This provides an explanation for glucocorticoid resistance. Continuing efforts to understand roles for glucocorticoid

  6. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for Society of Toxicology, March 22-25, 2015, San Diego, CAAcute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II DiabetesS.J. Snow1,3, D. Miller2, V. Bass2, M. Schladweiler3, A. Ledbetter3, J. Richards3, C...

  7. Exposure to TBT increases accumulation of lipids and alters fatty acid homeostasis in the ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janer, Gemma; Navarro, Juan Carlos; Porte, Cinta

    2007-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that organotin compounds affect lipid homeostasis in vertebrates, probably through interaction with RXR and/or PPARgamma receptors. Molluscs are sensitive species to the toxic effects of tributyltin (TBT), particularly to masculinization, and TBT has been recently shown to bind to molluscs RXR. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure to TBT could affect lipid homeostasis in the ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis. For comparative purposes, the synthetic androgen methyl-testosterone (MT) was included in the study due to its masculinization effects, but its lack of binding to the RXR receptor. M. cornuarietis was exposed to different concentrations of TBT (30, 125, 500 ng/L as Sn) and MT (30, 300 ng/L) for 100 days. Females exposed to 500 ng/L TBT showed increased percentage of lipids and increased levels of fatty acids in the digestive gland/gonad complex (2- to 3-fold). In addition, fatty acid profiles were altered in both males and females exposed to 125 and 500 ng/L TBT. These effects were not observed in females exposed to MT. Overall, this work suggest that TBT acts as a potent inducer of lipid and fatty acid accumulation in M. cornuarietis as shown in vertebrate studies earlier, and that sex differences in sensitivity do exist.

  8. Kidney injury and alterations of inflammatory cytokine expressions in mice following long-term exposure to cerium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xuezi; Ze, Xiao; Gui, Suxin; Wang, Xiaochun; Hong, Jie; Ze, Yuguan; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Lei; Sun, Qingqing; Yu, Xiaohong; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that the organic damages of animals can be caused by exposure to lanthanide oxides or compounds. However, the molecular mechanism of CeCl3 -induced kidney injury remains unclear. In this study, the mechanism of nephric damage in mice induced by an intragastric administration of CeCl3 was investigated. The results showed that Ce(3+) was accumulated in the kidney, which in turn led to oxidative stress, severe nephric inflammation, and dysfunction in mice. Furthermore, CeCl3 activated nucleic factor κB, which in turn increased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, interleukin-2, interleukin-4, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, interleukin-18, interleukin-1β, cross-reaction protein, transforming growth factor-β, interferon-γ, and CYP1A1, while suppressed heat shock protein 70 expression. These findings implied that Ce(3+) -induced kidney injury of mice might be associated with oxidative stress, alteration of inflammatory cytokine expression, and reduction of detoxification of CeCl3 . © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. DNA content alterations in Tetrahymena pyriformis macronucleus after exposure to food preservatives sodium nitrate and sodium benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Chasapis, C T; Terzoudi, Georgia I; Spiliopoulou, Chara A; Stefanidou, Maria E

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity, in terms of changes in the DNA content, of two food preservatives, sodium nitrate and sodium benzoate was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis using DNA image analysis technology. For this purpose, selected doses of both food additives were administered for 2 h to protozoa cultures and DNA image analysis of T. pyriformis nuclei was performed. The analysis was based on the measurement of the Mean Optical Density which represents the cellular DNA content. The results have shown that after exposure of the protozoan cultures to doses equivalent to ADI, a statistically significant increase in the macronuclear DNA content compared to the unexposed control samples was observed. The observed increase in the macronuclear DNA content is indicative of the stimulation of the mitotic process and the observed increase in MOD, accompanied by a stimulation of the protozoan proliferation activity is in consistence with this assumption. Since alterations at the DNA level such as DNA content and uncontrolled mitogenic stimulation have been linked with chemical carcinogenesis, the results of the present study add information on the toxicogenomic profile of the selected chemicals and may potentially lead to reconsideration of the excessive use of nitrates aiming to protect public health.

  10. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors are associated with IQ and behavior in young adults born very preterm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, B. van der; Pal, S.M. van der; Rotteveel, J.; Finken, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Preterm survivors exhibit neurodevelopmental impairments. Whether this association is influenced by antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and glucocorticoid sensitivity is unknown. Objectives: To study the effects of antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and

  11. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor inhibits the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids via glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huapeng; Kao, Wenping; Yang, Yuan H; Gu, Ran; Harris, James; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter; Bucala, Richard; Ngo, Devi; Beaulieu, Elaine; Morand, Eric F

    2014-08-01

    Glucocorticoids remain a mainstay in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Dose-dependent adverse effects highlight the need for therapies that regulate glucocorticoid sensitivity to enable dosage reduction. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory protein that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of RA; it impairs glucocorticoid sensitivity via MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) inhibition. The intracellular protein glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) mimics the effects of glucocorticoids in models of RA, but whether it represents a target for the modulation of glucocorticoid sensitivity remains unknown. We undertook this study to investigate whether GILZ is involved in the regulation of glucocorticoid sensitivity by MIF. GILZ expression was studied in the presence and absence of MIF, and the role of GILZ in the MIF-dependent regulation of the glucocorticoid sensitivity mediator MKP-1 was studied at the level of expression and function. GILZ expression was significantly inhibited by endogenous MIF, both basally and during responses to glucocorticoid treatment. The effects of MIF on GILZ were dependent on the expression and Akt-induced nuclear translocation of the transcription factor FoxO3A. GILZ was shown to regulate the expression of MKP-1 and consequent MAPK phosphorylation and cytokine release. MIF exerts its effects on MKP-1 expression and MAPK activity through inhibitory effects on GILZ. These findings suggest a previously unsuspected interaction between MIF and GILZ and identify GILZ as a potential target for the therapeutic regulation of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Estrogen inhibits glucocorticoid action via protein phosphatase 5 (PP5)-mediated glucocorticoid receptor dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Leung, Donald Y M; Nordeen, Steven K; Goleva, Elena

    2009-09-04

    Although glucocorticoids suppress proliferation of many cell types and are used in the treatment of certain cancers, trials of glucocorticoid therapy in breast cancer have been a disappointment. Another suggestion that estrogens may affect glucocorticoid action is that the course of some inflammatory diseases tends to be more severe and less responsive to corticosteroid treatment in females. To date, the molecular mechanism of cross-talk between estrogens and glucocorticoids is poorly understood. Here we show that, in both MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells, estrogen inhibits glucocorticoid induction of the MKP-1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1) and serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase genes. Estrogen did not affect glucocorticoid-induced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation but reduced ligand-induced GR phosphorylation at Ser-211, which is associated with the active form of GR. We show that estrogen increases expression of protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), which mediates the dephosphorylation of GR at Ser-211. Gene knockdown of PP5 abolished the estrogen-mediated suppression of GR phosphorylation and induction of MKP-1 and serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase. More importantly, after PP5 knockdown estrogen-promoted cell proliferation was significantly suppressed by glucocorticoids. This study demonstrates cross-talk between estrogen-induced PP5 and GR action. It also reveals that PP5 inhibition may antagonize estrogen-promoted events in response to corticosteroid therapy.

  13. Dynamic regulation of glucocorticoid signalling in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Biddie, Simon C.; Conway-Campbell, Becky L.; Lightman, Stafford L.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoids regulates hundreds of genes to control regulatory networks in development, metabolism, cognition and inflammation. Elucidation of the mechanisms that regulate glucocorticoid action has highlighted the dynamic nature of hormone signalling and provides novel insights into genomic glucocorticoid actions. The major factors that regulate GR function include chromatin structure, epigenetics, genetic variation...

  14. Longitudinal changes in glucocorticoid receptor exon 1(F) methylation and psychopathology after military deployment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schür, R. R.; Boks, M. P.; Rutten, B. P. F.; Daskalakis, N. P.; de Nijs, L.; van Zuiden, M.; Kavelaars, A.; Heijnen, C. J.; Joëls, M.; Kahn, R. S.; Geuze, E.; Vermetten, E.; Vinkers, C. H.

    2017-01-01

    Several cross-sectional studies have demonstrated the relevance of DNA methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor exon 1(F) region (GR-1(F)) for trauma-related psychopathology. We conducted a longitudinal study to examine GR-1(F) methylation changes over time in relation to trauma exposure and the

  15. Longitudinal changes in glucocorticoid receptor exon 1F methylation and psychopathology after military deployment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schür, R R; Boks, M P; Rutten, Bart P. F.; Daskalakis, N.P.; de Nijs, Laurence; van Zuiden, M.; Kavelaars, A; Heijnen, C J; Joëls, M; Kahn, R S; Geuze, E; Vermetten, E; Vinkers, C H

    2017-01-01

    Several cross-sectional studies have demonstrated the relevance of DNA methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor exon 1F region (GR-1F) for trauma-related psychopathology. We conducted a longitudinal study to examine GR-1F methylation changes over time in relation to trauma exposure and the

  16. Aqueous exposure to the progestin, levonorgestrel, alters anal fin development and reproductive behavior in the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Tyler E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Orlando, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    differences were not significant between the two treatments. LNG caused significant increases in the 4:6 anal fin ratio of males exposed to 100 ng/L, with no effects observed in the 10 ng/L treatment. In addition, the reproductive behavior of control males paired with female mosquitofish exposed to 100 ng/L LNG was also altered, for these males spent more time exhibiting no reproductive behavior, had decreased attending behavior, and a lower number of gonopodial thrusts compared to control males paired to control female mosquitofish. Given the rapid effects on both anal fin morphology and behavior observed in this study, the mosquitofish is an excellent sentinel species for the detection of exposure to LNG and likely other 19-nortestosterone derived contraceptive progestins in the environment.

  17. Glucocorticoid regulation of astrocytic fate and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Yu

    Full Text Available Glial loss in the hippocampus has been suggested as a factor in the pathogenesis of stress-related brain disorders that are characterized by dysregulated glucocorticoid (GC secretion. However, little is known about the regulation of astrocytic fate by GC. Here, we show that astrocytes derived from the rat hippocampus undergo growth inhibition and display moderate activation of caspase 3 after exposure to GC. Importantly, the latter event, observed both in situ and in primary astrocytic cultures is not followed by either early- or late-stage apoptosis, as monitored by stage I or stage II DNA fragmentation. Thus, unlike hippocampal granule neurons, astrocytes are resistant to GC-induced apoptosis; this resistance is due to lower production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and a greater buffering capacity against the cytotoxic actions of ROS. We also show that GC influence hippocampal cell fate by inducing the expression of astrocyte-derived growth factors implicated in the control of neural precursor cell proliferation. Together, our results suggest that GC instigate a hitherto unknown dialog between astrocytes and neural progenitors, adding a new facet to understanding how GC influence the cytoarchitecture of the hippocampus.

  18. Glucocorticoids, epigenetic control and stress resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M.H.M. Reul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones play a pivotal role in the response to stressful challenges. The surge in glucocorticoid hormone secretion after stress needs to be tightly controlled with characteristics like peak height, curvature and duration depending on the nature and severity of the challenge. This is important as chronic hyper- or hypo-responses are detrimental to health due to increasing the risk for developing a stress-related mental disorder. Proper glucocorticoid responses to stress are critical for adaptation. Therefore, the tight control of baseline and stress-evoked glucocorticoid secretion are important constituents of an organism's resilience. Here, we address a number of mechanisms that illustrate the multitude and complexity of measures safeguarding the control of glucocorticoid function. These mechanisms include the control of mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR occupancy and concentration, the dynamic control of free glucocorticoid hormone availability by corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, and the control exerted by glucocorticoids at the signaling, epigenetic and genomic level on gene transcriptional responses to stress. We review the beneficial effects of regular exercise on HPA axis and sleep physiology, and cognitive and anxiety-related behavior. Furthermore, we describe that, possibly through changes in the GABAergic system, exercise reduces the impact of stress on a signaling pathway specifically in the dentate gyrus that is strongly implicated in the behavioral response to that stressor. These observations underline the impact of life style on stress resilience. Finally, we address how single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affecting glucocorticoid action can compromise stress resilience, which becomes most apparent under conditions of childhood abuse.

  19. Altered ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to chemically distinct metal welding fume particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedan, Jeffrey S; Thompson, Janet A; Meighan, Terence G; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M

    2017-07-01

    Welding fume inhalation causes pulmonary toxicity, including susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized that airway epithelial ion transport is a target of fume toxicity, and investigated the effects of fume particulates from manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) on ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) cultured in air-interface. MMA-SS particles, more soluble than GMA-MS particles, contain Cr, Ni, Fe and Mn; GMA-MS particles contain Fe and Mn. MMA-SS or GMA-MS particles (0.0167-166.7μg/cm 2 ) were applied apically to NHBEs. After 18h transepithelial potential difference (V t ), resistance (R t ), and short circuit current (I sc ) were measured. Particle effects on Na + and Cl¯ channels and the Na + ,K + ,2Cl¯-cotransporter were evaluated using amiloride (apical), 5-nitro-2-[(3-phenylpropyl)amino]benzoic acid (NPPB, apical), and bumetanide (basolateral), respectively. MMA-SS (0.0167-16.7μg/cm 2 ) increased basal V t . Only 16.7μg/cm 2 GMA-MS increased basal V t significantly. MMA-SS or GMA-MS exposure potentiated I sc responses (decreases) to amiloride and bumetanide, while not affecting those to NPPB, GMA-MS to a lesser degree than MMA-SS. Variable effects on R t were observed in response to amiloride, and bumetanide. Generally, MMA-SS was more potent in altering responses to amiloride and bumetanide than GMA-MS. Hyperpolarization occurred in the absence of LDH release, but decreases in V t , R t , and I sc at higher fume particulate doses accompanied LDH release, to a greater extent for MMA-SS. Thus, Na + transport and Na + ,K + ,2Cl¯-cotransport are affected by fume exposure; MMA-MS is more potent than GMA-MS. Enhanced Na + absorption and decreased airway surface liquid could compromise defenses against infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Circumvention of glucocorticoid resistance in childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarman, E G; Kaspers, G J L; Pieters, R; Rottier, M M A; Veerman, A J P

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we determined if in vitro resistance to prednisolone and dexamethasone could be circumvented by cortivazol or methylprednisolone, or reversed by meta-iodobenzylguanidine in pediatric lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia. As there were strong correlations between the LC50 values (drug concentration inducing 50% leukemic cell kill, LCK) of the different glucocorticoids and median prednisolone/methylprednisolone, prednisolone/dexamethasone and prednisolone/cortivazol LC50 ratios did not differ between the leukemia subtypes, we conclude that none of the glucocorticoids had preferential anti-leukemic activity. Meta-iodobenzylguanidine however, partially reversed glucocorticoid resistance in 19% of the lymphoblastic leukemia samples.

  1. Timing of glucocorticoid therapy for liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENG Qinghua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There are still controversies over the use of glucocorticoids in the treatment of liver failure, and current guidelines for liver failure recommend that glucocorticoids should be used with great caution. However, some latest studies have shown that the use of glucocorticoid therapy in the early stage of liver failure can bring more benefits to patients. Age, disease progression rate and severity, and complications of liver failure may affect the treatment outcome. Further studies are still needed for the selection of right patients, drugs and dose, and treatment timing.

  2. Gender-specific behavioral and immunological alterations in an animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tomasz; Roman, Adam; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Kubera, Marta; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Schneider, Karolina; Przewłocki, Ryszard

    2008-07-01

    Autism is a severe behavioral disorder characterized by pervasive impairments in social interactions, deficits in verbal and non-verbal communication, and stereotyped behaviors, with a four times higher incidence in boys than in girls. The core symptoms are frequently accompanied by a spectrum of neurobehavioral and immunological derangements, including: aberrant sensitivity to sensory stimulation, anxiety, and decreased cellular immune capacity. Recently, a new potential rodent model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA rats) has been proposed. In order to determine if gender has an influence on alterations observed in VPA rats, male and female rats have been evaluated in a battery of behavioral, immunological, and endocrinological tests. A plethora of aberrations has been found in male VPA rats: lower sensitivity to pain, increased repetitive/stereotypic-like activity, higher anxiety, decreased level of social interaction, increased basal level of corticosterone, decreased weight of the thymus, decreased splenocytes proliferative response to concanavaline A, lower IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio, and increased production of NO by peritoneal macrophages. Female VPA rats exhibited only increased repetitive/stereotypic-like activity and decreased IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio. Sexual dimorphism characteristics for measured parameters have been observed in both groups of animals, except social interaction in VPA rats. Our results confirm existence of similarities between the observed pattern of aberrations in VPA rats and features of disturbed behavior and immune function in autistic patients, and suggest that they are gender-specific, which is intriguing in light of disproportion in boys to girls ratio in autism.

  3. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure alters hippocampal GABA(A) receptors and impairs spatial learning in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, U; Dringenberg, H C; Brien, J F; Reynolds, J N

    2004-04-02

    Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) can injure the developing brain, and may lead to the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Previous studies have demonstrated that CPEE upregulates gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor expression in the cerebral cortex, and decreases functional synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, in the adult guinea pig. This study tested the hypothesis that CPEE increases GABA(A) receptor expression in the hippocampus of guinea pig offspring that exhibit cognitive deficits in a hippocampal-dependent spatial learning task. Timed, pregnant guinea pigs were treated with ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight per day), isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding, or water throughout gestation. GABA(A) receptor subunit protein expression in the hippocampus was measured at two development ages: near-term fetus and young adult. In young adult guinea pig offspring, CPEE increased spontaneous locomotor activity in the open-field and impaired task acquisition in the Morris water maze. CPEE did not change GABA(A) receptor subunit protein expression in the near-term fetal hippocampus, but increased expression of the beta2/3-subunit of the GABA(A) receptor in the hippocampus of young adult offspring. CPEE did not change either [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding or GABA potentiation of [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding, but decreased the efficacy of allopregnanolone potentiation of [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding, to hippocampal GABA(A) receptors in adult offspring. Correlational analysis revealed a relationship between increased spontaneous locomotor activity and growth restriction in the hippocampus induced by CPEE. Similarly, an inverse relationship was found between performance in the water maze and the efficacy of allopregnanolone potentiation of [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding in the hippocampus. These data suggest that alterations in hippocampal GABA(A) receptor expression and pharmacological properties contribute to hippocampal-related behavioral and cognitive deficits

  4. Dietary exposure to technical hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) alters courtship, incubation and parental behaviors in American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Bird, David M; Letcher, Robert J; Sullivan, Katrina M; Ritchie, Ian J; Fernie, Kim J

    2012-11-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a high production volume brominated flame retardant that has been detected in the environment and wildlife at increasing concentrations. This study was designed to determine potential effects of dietary exposure to environmentally relevant levels of HBCD on behavior during reproduction in captive American kestrels. Twenty kestrel pairs were exposed to 0.51 μg technical HBCD g(-1) kestrel d(-1) from 4 weeks prior to pairing until chicks hatched (~75 d). Ten pairs of controls received the safflower oil vehicle only and were used for comparison. During the courtship period the chitter-calls were reduced in both sexes (p=0.038) and females performed fewer bonding displays (p=0.053). Both sexes showed a propensity to be less active than controls during courtship. The reduction in male courtship behavior was correlated with reduced courtship behaviors of females (p=0.008) as well as reduced egg mass (p=0.019). During incubation, nest temperatures of treatment pairs were lower at mid-incubation (p=0.038). HBCD-exposed males performed fewer key parental behaviors when rearing nestlings, including entering the nest-box, pair-bonding displays and food-retrievals. HBCD-exposed females appeared to compensate for the reduced parental behavior of their mates by performing these same behaviors more frequently than controls (p=0.004, p=0.027, p=0.025, respectively). This study demonstrates that HBCD affects breeding behavior in American kestrels throughout the reproductive season and behavioral alterations were linked to reproductive changes (egg size). This is the first study to report HBCD effects on reproductive behavior in any animal model. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. CB1 receptor mediates the effects of glucocorticoids on AMPK activity in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerif, Miski; Füzesi, Tamás; Thomas, Julia D; Kola, Blerina; Grossman, Ashley B; Fekete, Csaba; Korbonits, Márta

    2013-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of cellular and systemic energy homeostasis, can be influenced by several hormones. Tissue-specific alteration of AMPK activity by glucocorticoids may explain the increase in appetite, the accumulation of lipids in adipose tissues, and the detrimental cardiac effects of Cushing's syndrome. Endocannabinoids are known to mediate the effects of various hormones and to influence AMPK activity. Cannabinoids have central orexigenic and direct peripheral metabolic effects via the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). In our preliminary experiments, WT mice received implants of a corticosterone-containing pellet to establish a mouse model of Cushing's syndrome. Subsequently, WT and Cb1 (Cnr1)-knockout (CB1-KO) littermates were treated with corticosterone and AMPK activity in the hypothalamus, various adipose tissues, liver and cardiac tissue was measured. Corticosterone-treated CB1-KO mice showed a lack of weight gain and of increase in hypothalamic and hepatic AMPK activity. In adipose tissues, baseline AMPK activity was higher in CB1-KO mice, but a glucocorticoid-induced drop was observed, similar to that observed in WT mice. Cardiac AMPK levels were reduced in CB1-KO mice, but while WT mice showed significantly reduced AMPK activity following glucocorticoid treatment, CB1-KO mice showed a paradoxical increase. Our findings indicate the importance of the CB1 receptor in the central orexigenic effect of glucocorticoid-induced activation of hypothalamic AMPK activity. In the periphery adipose tissues, changes may occur independently of the CB1 receptor, but the receptor appears to alter the responsiveness of the liver and myocardial tissues to glucocorticoids. In conclusion, our data suggest that an intact cannabinoid pathway is required for the full metabolic effects of chronic glucocorticoid excess.

  6. Glucocorticoids Acutely Increase Brown Adipose Tissue Activity in Humans, Revealing Species-Specific Differences in UCP-1 Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, Lynne E; Akyol, Murat; Fletcher, Alison M; Forsythe, John; Nixon, Mark; Carter, Roderick N; van Beek, Edwin J R; Morton, Nicholas M; Walker, Brian R; Stimson, Roland H

    2016-07-12

    The discovery of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans presents a new therapeutic target for metabolic disease; however, little is known about the regulation of human BAT. Chronic glucocorticoid excess causes obesity in humans, and glucocorticoids suppress BAT activation in rodents. We tested whether glucocorticoids regulate BAT activity in humans. In vivo, the glucocorticoid prednisolone acutely increased (18)fluorodeoxyglucose uptake by BAT (measured using PET/CT) in lean healthy men during mild cold exposure (16°C-17°C). In addition, prednisolone increased supraclavicular skin temperature (measured using infrared thermography) and energy expenditure during cold, but not warm, exposure in lean subjects. In vitro, glucocorticoids increased isoprenaline-stimulated respiration and UCP-1 in human primary brown adipocytes, but substantially decreased isoprenaline-stimulated respiration and UCP-1 in primary murine brown and beige adipocytes. The highly species-specific regulation of BAT function by glucocorticoids may have important implications for the translation of novel treatments to activate BAT to improve metabolic health. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In utero and lactational exposure to PCB 118 and PCB 153 alter ovarian follicular dynamics and GnRH-induced luteinizing hormone secretion in female lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraugerud, Marianne; Aleksandersen, Mona; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2012-01-01

    The effects of in utero and lactational exposure to two structurally different polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners on follicular dynamics and the pituitary-gonadal axis in female lambs were investigated. Pregnant ewes received corn oil, PCB 118, or PCB 153, and offspring was maintained until...... 60 days postpartum. Ovarian follicles were quantified using stereology. Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured using radioimmunoassay before and after administration of a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analog. PCB 118 exposure increased numbers...... of transitional, secondary, and the sum of secondary, early antral, and antral (Σsecondary-antral) follicles, PCB 153 exposure only increased the number of primary follicles. GnRH-induced LH levels were significantly elevated in the PCB 153 exposure group. We conclude that PCB 153 and PCB 118 alter follicular...

  8. Influence of postnatal glucocorticoids on hippocampal-dependent learning varies with elevation patterns and administration methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claflin, Dragana I; Schmidt, Kevin D; Vallandingham, Zachary D; Kraszpulski, Michal; Hennessy, Michael B

    2017-09-01

    Recent interest in the lasting effects of early-life stress has expanded to include effects on cognitive performance. An increase in circulating glucocorticoids is induced by stress exposure and glucocorticoid effects on the hippocampus likely underlie many of the cognitive consequences. Here we review studies showing that corticosterone administered to young rats at the conclusion of the stress-hyporesponsiveness period affects later performance in hippocampally-mediated trace eyeblink conditioning. The nature and even direction of these effects varies with the elevation patterns (level, duration, temporal fluctuation) achieved by different administration methods. We present new time course data indicating that constant glucocorticoid elevations generally corresponded with hippocampus-mediated learning deficits, whereas acute, cyclical elevations corresponded with improved initial acquisition. Sensitivity was greater for males than for females. Further, changes in hippocampal neurogenesis paralleled some but not all effects. The findings demonstrate that specific patterns of glucocorticoid elevation produced by different drug administration procedures can have markedly different, sex-specific consequences on basic cognitive performance and underlying hippocampal physiology. Implications of these findings for glucocorticoid medications prescribed in childhood are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The tobacco smoke component acrolei