WorldWideScience

Sample records for global geochemistry corporation

  1. Global water cycle: geochemistry and environment

    Berner, Elizabeth Kay; Berner, Robert A

    1987-01-01

    .... The book provides an integrated approach to global geochemistry and environmental problems and introduces the reader to some fundamental concepts of geology, oceanography, meteorology, environmental...

  2. Corporate Stakeholding and Globalism

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    , the global warming, the disasters of global consumerism in terms of the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in the fashion industry, are examples of how the stakeholder concept cannot continue to be defined as narrow as corporations usually does. The butterfly effect of globalism has shown to be – yes, global....... Even the smallest company, the single consumer and the tiniest decision made by anyone may in the future – perhaps even tomorrow – affect stakeholders, we didn’t know existed. The future generation is also to be considered as stakeholders, which decisions made today may affect. Companies, consumers......, everyday people including children already know this even from the first day at school if not before. What we need is not knowledge about these phenomena – it is how to think globally when we decide locally: in companies, in daily households, in education of our future generations. This chapter discusses...

  3. BUSINESS GLOBALIZATION: TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS AND GLOBAL COMPETITION

    DIMA Stela

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to introduce business globalization and the main globalization factors which, under the current stage, are transnational corporations. Globalization is the result of the pressure put by companies which, in turn, are under the close “magnifier” of all the involved factors (the so-called “stakeholders”. The market and the determining forces are not influenced by a political attitude nowadays marking globalization, but rather the political decisions have followed the course of economic evolutions, a trend that has always been provided by multinational corporations. In order to successfully follow up their activity, companies initiate new businesses, selling or deleting from their portfolio businesses or divisions with a decreasing tendency. Also, companies give up old rules and structures adopting new decision-making processes, control systems and mental patterns. Corporations must learn to become dynamic just like the market, if they wish to maintain, on the long run, a superior rate of income.

  4. Corporate Strategies in Global Investment Business

    Tetiana Frolova

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with topical issues of the development of corporate strategies for businesses. We proposed the classification and defined the ways to implement corporate strategies. We also analysed the current trends in the development of global corporate strategies mainly implemented through mergers and acquisitions.

  5. Managing Corporate Responsibility Globally and Locally

    Brown, Dana; Knudsen, Jette Steen

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Responsibility (CR) is today an essential component of corporate global strategy. CR can bolster the institutional context for market expansion fill institutional voids or facilitate market entry as a component of non-market strategy. Yet, in fulfilling these functions, CR may need...... to be highly sensitive to local contexts. How can transnational firms organize CR so as to maximize efficiencies from globalization and to minimize the fragmentation of corporate organizational cultures? provide a framework for analyzing the way that corporations coordinate global and local functions. We build...... on this framework in a case study of Novo Nordisk and its approach to determining global and local CR policies and procedures with regard to its China and US subsidiaries. Our findings suggest that it is important for companies to define a common set of organizational norms. In addition, CR need to be sensitive...

  6. Rand Corporation Mean Monthly Global Snow Depth

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All available monthly snow depth climatologies were integrated by the Rand Corporation, in the early 1980s, into one global (excluding Africa and South America)...

  7. The network of global corporate control.

    Vitali, Stefania; Glattfelder, James B; Battiston, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the control network of transnational corporations affects global market competition and financial stability. So far, only small national samples were studied and there was no appropriate methodology to assess control globally. We present the first investigation of the architecture of the international ownership network, along with the computation of the control held by each global player. We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. This core can be seen as an economic "super-entity" that raises new important issues both for researchers and policy makers.

  8. Top management motivation in global corporations

    Dmytro Lukianenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article explores economic localization, socialization and development intellectualization processes. The research is focused on the relevant problem implying formation and development of human resources at organizations as a key factor of their competitiveness. Based on generalizing modern theoretical motivational models a comprehensive analysis of the motivation system for top management of corporations within the paradigm of global management has been carried out. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of global business personification and virtualization, as well as to the formation of new financial and nonfinancial incentives for top managers. Practices of effective incentives for the contemporary key corporate management actors have been studied. A comprehensive country-based comparative analysis of key tools for financial and non-financial corporate incentives for top managers within the system of long-term, short-term and regulatory criteria and parameters has been performed. Based on summarizing academic studies and empirical evidence of the leading multinational corporations a motivational model for top management of corporations has been grounded and suggested for practical implementation in Ukraine with the said model accounting for the corporations' basic needs, financial status and interests as well as for countryspecific and regional features.

  9. Taxes, Tariffs, and The Global Corporation

    James Levinsohn; Joel Slemrod

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we develop some simple models of optimal tax and tariff policy in the presence of global corporations that operate in an imperfectly competitive environment. The models emphasize two important differences in the practical application of tax and tariff policy - tax, but not tariff, policy can apply to offshore output and tariff, but not tax, policy can be industry-specific. Recognizing the multinationals' production decisions are endogenous to the tax and tariff policies they fac...

  10. Counterfeiting as corporate externality: intellectual property crime and global insecurity

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Corporate negative externalities occur when corporations place some of the costs of their profit-seeking activity onto society. This paper suggests that the current global problem of intellectual property crime is such an externality, and that it has not been recognised as such because corporations present product counterfeiting and piracy as crimes which reduce their revenue, rather than as predictable side effects of corporate production and merchandising, including bran...

  11. Corporate social responsibility in the new global economy

    Lindfelt, Lise-Lotte

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the rights and responsibilities of global corporations. Multinational and transnational corporations of the new economy face a serious difficulty in being ethical today. The environment is subject to the enormous influence of material monism and ethics becomes at times a question of profits. This paper discusses a few aspects on ethical marketing strategies, the use of ethical codes and corporate survival under the pressures of increasing globalization. The purpo...

  12. Establishment of the system of innovative management of global corporations

    Yevhen Panchenko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been highlighted the relevant issues of system establishment of the innovative management of global corporations and generalized the experience of the leading world corporations in the achievement and keeping leading positions on the highly technological segments of the global market. It shows the significance of the creative personal qualities of managers in the generation and implementation of effective innovative solutions in the global business, grounds the categorical and functional imperatives of the innovative development of global corporations. In the context of formation of the new knowledge economy there were highlighted contradictions and available instruments of reinforcement of leading positions among the leading global corporations in the innovative sphere. There was paid attention to the implementation of the new concepts of global corporations’ leadership of BRIC countries, in particular, Chinese highly technological companies. There has been made a conclusion about global institutionalization of the innovative activity.

  13. Global Corporate Communication and the Notion of Legitimacy

    Bülow, Anne Marie

    2011-01-01

    When international companies seek to establish legitimacy, it involves different stakeholders locally and globally. This paper analyses corporate communication in order to trace the discursive construction of the customers, investors, staff and authoritiess from whom legitimacy is sought...

  14. Global Oligopolistic Competition and Multinational Corporations

    Hansen, Michael W.; Hoenen, Anne Kristin

    2013-01-01

    The contemporary International Business (IB) literature has ’forgotten’ a key insight of the early foreign direct investment (FDI) literature, namely that FDI often is driven by strategic interaction of multinational corporations (MNCs) in oligopolistic industries. Instead, the IB literature has ...

  15. Global Leadership as a Driver of Corporate Coherence

    Minbaeva, Dana; Straub-Bauer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We advance our understanding of corporate coherence by specifically focusing on how coherence can be enacted by global leaders to support strategy implementation in a global organization. Based on our theorizing and our illustrative case study, we suggest five steps that may help managers design...

  16. The Convergence of Corporate Governance Practices in Global Firms

    Lindop, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    The matter of convergence in corporate governance practices has gained prominence in recent years as it becomes apparent that globalization in the capital markets has led to the expectation of transparency and accountability by investors, traits typically associated with firms based in the United Kingdom and United States. Whilst there is some argument for why there may be a persistence of diversity in corporate governance practices, there is more support for the view that there will be a con...

  17. Globalization, financial capitalism, and corporate social responsibility: Structural tensions

    David Barbosa Ramírez; Christian Medina López; Myriam Vargas López

    2014-01-01

    Globalization and financial capitalism keep a synergy in a global context whose problems such as environmental degradation, social inequity, economic crises and corruption are intensified. Corporate Social Responsibility emerges as a mechanism that seeks to mitigate some of these problems, although its effectiveness and impact today are challenged. The system which globalization, financial capitalism and social responsibility are a part of, is currently facing a number of structural tensions ...

  18. THE ROLE AND PLACE TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS IN GLOBALIZATION

    Lytvynenko Kristina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At present, transnational corporations (TNCs are leading the world economy. Each year, the number of TNCs increases, which increases their share in the global economy as a whole. The largest investment projects in the world are concentrated in such corporations, which are a major impetus for the development of countries in which all the capacities of transnational corporations are located. Through the structure of TNCs there are financial and commodity flows that are crucial for the development and improvement of the world economy. The above shows that the study and further research of transnational corporations in the globalization processes is an actual topic of the present. Purpose. The purpose of the paper is to study the peculiarities and trends of the activities of transnational corporations in the conditions of globalization of the world economy. Results. The basis of the new global economic system are TNCs that have large financial resources, implement advanced technologies, have significant spatial markets and conduct an active, globally, investment policy. Conclusions. A transnational corporation is part of the world economy, which is subject to the laws of the development of TNCs and reflects the reciprocal impact on the world economy, a product of globalization processes. The direct relationship between TNCs and the process of globalization comes from the study of the stages of the evolution of transnational corporations. The role of TNCs in the modern world is intensifying, in this connection, the role of national economies is falling, which leads to a conflict of interest between multinational corporations and states. Such conflicts can have a bad effect on the state of the economy and the stability of the state. Therefore, it is necessary to regulate the activities of TNCs. Modern activity of transnationalization has acquired many new features, it can affect not only the world economy, but also the country

  19. 76 FR 5834 - International Business Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services Business Unit, Integrated...

    2011-02-02

    ... Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services Business Unit, Integrated Technology Services, Cost and..., applicable to workers of International Business Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services Business... engaged in activities related to support for the Global Technology Services Business Unit. The company...

  20. The route of joint of the transnational corporations and globalization

    Luminiţa PISTOL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Today’s discussions on globalization are more alive and controversial. As is acknowledged as a fact, globalization is studied not only as an economic category but as a process, system, phenomenon. Currently, on international level, a variety of companies operate. From all of these, the transnational corporation represent particular interest, being designated as an "entity-key of global economic activity, a creative net worth to devote a large proportion of global resources needed to sustain economic growth processes. The new trend in the TNC’s sites emphasize, efforts to promote corporate social responsibility that contributes to change the attitude of many corporations and individuals working for them. Company efforts are visible in contributions to community development and environmental impact. Corporations want to impose their own standards of development, which reflects some positive attitude towards regulations that support behavioral codes, which they argue. Globalization has opened the way for limited progress, offered alternatives to local development, has generated deep changes, n dimensional complex with sometimes unpre-dictable consequences on economic and socio-institutional development.

  1. Corporate Social Responsibility in Global Value Chains

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Lindgreen, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We outline the drivers, main features, and conceptual underpinnings of the compliance paradigm. We then use a similar structure to investigate the drivers, main features, and conceptual underpinnings of the cooperative paradigm for working with CSR in global value chains. We argue that the measur...... paradigm, we summarize our findings, and we outline avenues for research: purchasing practices and labor standard noncompliance, CSR capacity building among local suppliers, and improved CSR monitoring by local resources in the developing world....

  2. Global corporate workplaces implementing new global workplace standards in a local context

    Hodulak, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, multinational corporations were increasingly engaged in the development of standardized global workplace models. For their implementation and feasibility, it is decisive as how these standards fit the diverse regional workplace cultures. This topic was pursued in the course of a research project, comparing established workplaces in Germany, USA and Japan against global workplace standards of multinational corporations. The analysis confirmed the expected differences among local workplaces and on the other hand a predominant mainstream among global corporate workplace standards. Conspicuous however, are the fundamental differences between local models and corporate standards. For the implementation of global standards in local context, this implies multiple challenges on cultural, organizational and spatial level. The analysis findings provide information for assessing current projects and pinpointing optimization measures. The analysis framework further provides a tool to uncover and assess n...

  3. Globalism and Corporate Identity in the Post-crisis Economy

    Diana Andreia HRISTACHE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The globalism of the post-crisis economy accentuates more and more the present risk and uncertainty condition. The normal corporate reactions in this situation can only arise starting from an “exploration” and understanding of the turbulence and chaos that manifest themselves increasingly clearly nowadays. The shift of the business environment towards what we could designate by the syntagm “the new normality” cannot marginalize the “communicational paradigm”. The latter is called to support the corporate identity and to assure the necessary framework for the construction of certain business scenarios and strategies meant to make the most of the capabilities of the modern organization.

  4. Globalization, financial capitalism, and corporate social responsibility: Structural tensions

    David Barbosa Ramírez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Globalization and financial capitalism keep a synergy in a global context whose problems such as environmental degradation, social inequity, economic crises and corruption are intensified. Corporate Social Responsibility emerges as a mechanism that seeks to mitigate some of these problems, although its effectiveness and impact today are challenged. The system which globalization, financial capitalism and social responsibility are a part of, is currently facing a number of structural tensions that contribute to the analysis, understanding and solving of the mentioned problems. This paper identifies and analyzes four of the aforementioned structural tensions.

  5. Presence of Corporate Frauds at a Global Level

    Vranješ Svjetlana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The legislative bodies of the countries, members of the accounting and auditing profession, various associations have taken a number of preventive measures and mechanisms for combating corporate criminal activities and financial frauds, but unfortunately, the fact is that even today they often happen in both undeveloped and the most developed market economies. It is therefore essential to pay significant attention to corporate criminal activity and financial frauds that are happening in the business world. The aim of this paper is to show the presence of different forms of corporate criminal activity at a global level, and to display a conceptual framework of criminal activity and motives for their doing. Concluding remarks of this paper provide guidelines for further research and recommendations on how to improve the mechanisms for preventing and detecting criminal activity.

  6. The China National Tobacco Corporation: From domestic to global dragon?

    Fang, Jennifer; Lee, Kelley; Sejpal, Nidhi

    2017-03-01

    The China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC), which produces one-third of the world's cigarettes, is the largest tobacco company in the world. Over the past 60 years, the CNTC has been focused on supplying a huge domestic market. As the market has become increasingly saturated, and potential foreign competition looms, the company has turned to expansion abroad. This paper examines the ambitions and prospects of the CNTC to 'go global'. Using Chinese and English language sources, this paper describes the globalisation ambitions of the CNTC, and its global business strategy focused on internal restructuring, brand development and expansion of overseas operations in selected markets. The paper concludes that the company has undergone substantial change over the past two decades and is consequently poised to become a new global player in the tobacco industry. This article is part of the special issue 'The Emergence of Asian Tobacco Companies: Implications for Global Health Governance'.

  7. Effective Office Ergonomics Awareness: Experiences from Global Corporates.

    Madhwani, Kishore P; Nag, P K

    2017-01-01

    Use of laptops and hand-held devices increase the risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). More time spent on this activity adopting faulty postures, higher the risk of developing such injuries. This study addresses training on office ergonomics with emphasis on sustainable behavior change among employees to work in safe postures, as this is a top priority in the corporate environment, today. To explore training intervention methods that ensure wider coverage of awareness on office ergonomics, thereby promoting safer working and suggesting sustainable programs for behavior change and job enrichment. A cross-sectional study was conducted (2012 - 2017), encompassing corporate office employees of multinational corporations selected from India, Dubai (U.A.E), Nairobi (East Africa), Durban (South Africa), South East Asian countries (Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and Sri Lanka).Participant employees ( n = 3503) were divided into two groups to study the effect of interventions'; i.e., (a) deep training: 40 minute lecture by the investigator with a power point presentation ( n = 1765) using a mock workstation and (b) quick training: live demonstrations of 10 minutes ( n = 1738) using a live workstation. While deep training enhanced awareness in 95.51% and quick training in 96.59% globally, the latterwas much appreciated and educated maximum employees. From statistical analysis, quick training was found superior in providing comprehensive training and influencing behavior modification in India, but all over the world it was found highly superior in knowledge enlargement, skills enrichment in addition to providing comprehensive training ( P office ergonomics program. This could lead to propose as a best practice for corporate offices globally.

  8. The China National Tobacco Corporation: From domestic to global dragon?

    Fang, Jennifer; Lee, Kelley; Sejpal, Nidhi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC), which produces one-third of the world’s cigarettes, is the largest tobacco company in the world. Over the past 60 years, the CNTC has been focused on supplying a huge domestic market. As the market has become increasingly saturated, and potential foreign competition looms, the company has turned to expansion abroad. This paper examines the ambitions and prospects of the CNTC to ‘go global’. Using Chinese and English language sources, this paper describes the globalisation ambitions of the CNTC, and its global business strategy focused on internal restructuring, brand development and expansion of overseas operations in selected markets. The paper concludes that the company has undergone substantial change over the past two decades and is consequently poised to become a new global player in the tobacco industry. This article is part of the special issue ‘The Emergence of Asian Tobacco Companies: Implications for Global Health Governance’. PMID:27737622

  9. Classical Corporation Tax as a Global Means of Tax Harmonization

    Kari, Seppo; Ylä-Liedenpoha, Jouko

    2002-01-01

    Classical corporation tax entails double taxation of corporate income. The alternative practice of imputing corporation tax to the domestic recipients of dividends is shown, in the case of a company with international owners, to effectively convert the imputation system back to a classical corporation tax. It also requires complex rules for exempting flow-through dividends from equalization tax to avoid the cumulation of corporation tax internationally. In contrast, classical corporation tax ...

  10. Interlocking Corporate Directorates and the Global City Hierarchy

    Jeffrey Kentor

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the direct and indirect economic linkages of the most prominent cities in the world, those commonly referred to as “global cities”, in terms of the direct and indirect linkages of the boards of directors of Fortune Global 500 firms headquartered in a given city with boards of directors of other firms. Specifically, we identify the interlocks of corporate boards located within these major cities with other Fortune 500 boards of directors by degrees of separation, and present a new ranking for selected global cities based upon these direct and indirect ties. We find that New York clearly dominates these economic linkages, followed by London and Paris. This is most pronounced for financial companies. Contrary to other global city rankings, we locate Tokyo below Frankfurt and Chicago on this dimension. We argue that these multiple levels of indirect relationships reflect a significant, and until now unexplored, dimension of what it means to be a “global” city.

  11. 75 FR 3251 - JP Morgan Chase and Company; JP Morgan Investment Banking, Global Corporate Financial Operations...

    2010-01-20

    ... Company; JP Morgan Investment Banking, Global Corporate Financial Operations, New York, NY; Notice of... Company, JP Morgan Investment Banking, Global Corporate Financial Operations, New York, New York. The... support operations to/from a foreign country. The subject firm did not import services like or directly...

  12. Global business management for sustainability and competitiveness: The role of corporate branding, corporate identity and corporate reputation

    Gupta, Suraksha; Melewar, T.C.; Czinkota, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of World Business is devoted to the role of intangibles of a firm in building sustainable business for success in competitive markets. The research articles included in this issue have contributed to the on-going academic knowledge about the ability of marketing and management practices to drive business sustainability. This special issue on business sustainabili- ty focuses on the role of corporate branding, corporate identity and corporate reputation.

  13. CORPORATE COMMUNICATION BIASES IN THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT UNDER GLOBALIZATION TRENDS

    Ramona-Elena, Chiţu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the private sector, employers’ requirements of specific communication skills, the economic field division into numberless branches of activity – finance and banks, management, human resources, accounting, international relations, tourism – the presence of a certain literature in the field by means of translations, all such aspects represent grounded reasons for the existence of a global economic vocabulary in the Romanian language. Finding its origins in the structuralism philosophic principles and associated with the structuralism linguistic trends, economic language’s globalisation becomes obvious nowadays through the occurrence of a large number of linguistic borrowings. Classified into either needless or necessary borrowed lexical units, lexical units borrowed and completely or at all assimilated in the target language, such borrowings lay the foundation of what specialists in the field call corporate language. Considering that the total or partial lack of knowledge on such language can become a real barrier in achieving communication, this study aims at analysing the level to which such words are known by the employees in the business environments involved in economic international partnerships and in multinational organisations.

  14. Fair Trade as a Solution for Inequality on the Global Market - Corporate Perspective

    Sandra Lovric

    2016-01-01

    New alternatives to free trade are evolving at the global market; their aim is to bring more ethics and morality into the relations between the trading parties (producers, corporations and buyers). This article analyses one of such alternatives i.e. Fair Trade from the perspective of influencing change of corporate politics. Due to the rising awareness of buyers about the origin of goods and the initiatives of forcing corporations into changing their practices based on unethica...

  15. Coca-Cola's Global Lessons: From Education for Corporate Globalization to Education for Global Justice

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2004-01-01

    Many critics do censure marketers of junk food for their part in inundating every private and public space with health-harming products and slick advertisements. The author focuses on one such company to illustrate how the dangerous influences of corporate ideology on schooling effect much more than public health--they also work to shape the ways…

  16. Business communication and globalized English: recent definitions and applications of a concept across the corporate world

    Fee-Alexandra HAASE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches ‘business communication’ as a multi-layered economic phenomenon of the corporate society of the globalized business world. In academic education systems and in the business world under the term ‘business communication’ various definitions exist, which are applied across the fields of academic studies and in the business world. After the comparison of definitions of ‘business communication’, we demonstrate the various layers of business communication in the contemporary corporate world based upon a model of the corporate world and these cases using examples of companies implementing ‘business communication’ into their corporate structure.

  17. Global Talent Management in Multinational Corporations and the Role of Social Networks

    Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Dresselhaus, Lena; Olivas-Lujan, M.R.; Bondarouk, T.V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose — Current global business challenges and circumstances are responsible for the need for global talent management (GTM) within multinational corporations (MNCs). Social media and networks are becoming key channels for global communication and collaboration. For GTM in MNCs, an effective usage

  18. The Social Construction of the Responsible Corporate Citizen: Sustainability Reports of the Global Automotive Firms

    Shinkle, George; Spencer, J. William

    2008-01-01

    The constitutive meanings of responsible corporate environmental citizenship are to be found in global discourses. We use Gubrium and Holstein‘s framework on interpretive practice to study the Corporate Sustainability Reports of multinational automotive companies regarding global warming. We observe three common themes – recognizing the issue of greenhouse gases, acknowledging stakeholders, and being role models for society. However, these themes take on unique meanings vis-à-vis each corpora...

  19. Human rights and global business: the evolving notion of corporate civil responsibility

    Bachmann, Sascha-Dominik

    2010-01-01

    Global market participation of corporations often leads to a conflict of duties: the duty to its customers and shareholder to “do business” vs. the duty to protect the populations affected by these business operations. Today, in a reality where gross human rights violations are not only committed by states and individuals but increasingly by multinational corporations (MNCs) by aiding and abetting the actual perpetrators in the states where MNCs operate, the global recession has aggravated th...

  20. A Review of the Stable Isotope Bio-geochemistry of the Global Silicon Cycle and Its Associated Trace Elements

    Jill N. Sutton

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is an important nutrient in the ocean. The global Si cycle plays a critical role in regulating primary productivity and carbon cycling on the continents and in the oceans. Development of the analytical tools used to study the sources, sinks, and fluxes of the global Si cycle (e.g., elemental and stable isotope ratio data for Ge, Si, Zn, etc. have recently led to major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and processes that constrain the cycling of Si in the modern environment and in the past. Here, we provide background on the geochemical tools that are available for studying the Si cycle and highlight our current understanding of the marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems. We place emphasis on the geochemistry (e.g., Al/Si, Ge/Si, Zn/Si, δ13C, δ15N, δ18O, δ30Si of dissolved and biogenic Si, present case studies, such as the Silicic Acid Leakage Hypothesis, and discuss challenges associated with the development of these environmental proxies for the global Si cycle. We also discuss how each system within the global Si cycle might change over time (i.e., sources, sinks, and processes and the potential technical and conceptual limitations that need to be considered for future studies.

  1. An exploratory study of global leaders' and Chinese managers' leadership constructs in multinational corporations in China

    Wang, Lake

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the leadership constructs of global leaders and Chinese managers in multi-national corporations (MNCs) in order to understand whether their constructs are misaligned, and if so, in what ways. To address these questions, data was gathered via repertory grid test interviews with 31 global leaders and 59 Chinese managers in six MNCs’ China organizations. Analysis subsequently revealed that global leaders rely upon twelve key constructs to define global leaders...

  2. The allianced enterprise : global strategies for corporate collaboration

    Duysters, G.M.; Man, de A.P.; Vasudevan, A.

    2001-01-01

    Firms all over the world are entering into strategic alliances. Successful alliance management, however, requires corporations to adapt their management models to the demands of this new mode of organization. New tools, techniques and ideas need to be introduced in order to fully benefit from the

  3. Improving global environmental management with standard corporate reporting

    Kareiva, Peter M.; McNally, Brynn W.; McCormick, Steve; Miller, Tom; Ruckelshaus, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Multinational corporations play a prominent role in shaping the environmental trajectory of the planet. The integration of environmental costs and benefits into corporate decision-making has enormous, but as yet unfulfilled, potential to promote sustainable development. To help steer business decisions toward better environmental outcomes, corporate reporting frameworks need to develop scientifically informed standards that consistently consider land use and land conversion, clean air (including greenhouse gas emissions), availability and quality of freshwater, degradation of coastal and marine habitats, and sustainable use of renewable resources such as soil, timber, and fisheries. Standardization by itself will not be enough—also required are advances in ecosystem modeling and in our understanding of critical ecological thresholds. With improving ecosystem science, the opportunity for realizing a major breakthrough in reporting corporate environmental impacts and dependencies has never been greater. Now is the time for ecologists to take advantage of an explosion of sustainability commitments from business leaders and expanding pressure for sustainable practices from shareholders, financial institutions, and consumers. PMID:26082543

  4. Improving global environmental management with standard corporate reporting.

    Kareiva, Peter M; McNally, Brynn W; McCormick, Steve; Miller, Tom; Ruckelshaus, Mary

    2015-06-16

    Multinational corporations play a prominent role in shaping the environmental trajectory of the planet. The integration of environmental costs and benefits into corporate decision-making has enormous, but as yet unfulfilled, potential to promote sustainable development. To help steer business decisions toward better environmental outcomes, corporate reporting frameworks need to develop scientifically informed standards that consistently consider land use and land conversion, clean air (including greenhouse gas emissions), availability and quality of freshwater, degradation of coastal and marine habitats, and sustainable use of renewable resources such as soil, timber, and fisheries. Standardization by itself will not be enough--also required are advances in ecosystem modeling and in our understanding of critical ecological thresholds. With improving ecosystem science, the opportunity for realizing a major breakthrough in reporting corporate environmental impacts and dependencies has never been greater. Now is the time for ecologists to take advantage of an explosion of sustainability commitments from business leaders and expanding pressure for sustainable practices from shareholders, financial institutions, and consumers.

  5. Fair Trade as a Solution for Inequality on the Global Market - Corporate Perspective

    Sandra Lovric

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available New alternatives to free trade are evolving at the global market; their aim is to bring more ethics and morality into the relations between the trading parties (producers, corporations and buyers. This article analyses one of such alternatives i.e. Fair Trade from the perspective of influencing change of corporate politics. Due to the rising awareness of buyers about the origin of goods and the initiatives of forcing corporations into changing their practices based on unethical treatment of workers in the 3rd world countries, alternative ways of trade are becoming part of traditional corporate environment in the free trade chain. By elaborating fundamental principles of certification process, the article gives an answer to the question of creation of added ethical value in the aspect of positioning corporations in the “new economy”.

  6. Subsidiary-level determinants of global initiatives in multinational corporations

    Williams, C.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines subsidiary-level factors that promote global initiatives in MNCs. Global initiatives are a key capability of MNCs that domestic firms do not possess, yet there has been little research on how MNCs promote initiatives on a global basis. I draw principally on the knowledge-based

  7. A reformed global legal architecture for corporate responsibility

    Turner, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers key features within the legal architecture of all jurisdictions that utilise the ‘corporation’ as a primary medium for business enterprise. Therefore it highlights the legal frameworks under which ‘corporations’ operate and the pressure that this places upon corporate directors to achieve specific financial outcomes. It then illustrates how this legal architecture can have certain negative effects for other stakeholders such as the environment and communities. The pape...

  8. Is the corporate loan market globally integrated? a pricing puzzle

    Mark S. Carey; Gregory P. Nini

    2004-01-01

    We offer evidence that interest rate spreads on syndicated loans to corporate borrowers are economically significantly smaller in Europe than in the U.S., other things equal. Differences in borrower, loan and lender characteristics associated with equilibrium mechanisms suggested in the literature do not appear to explain the phenomenon. Borrowers overwhelmingly issue in their natural home market and bank portfolios display significant home "bias." This may explain why pricing discrepancies a...

  9. THE SEMANTICS OF GOVERNANCE. (The common thread running through corporate, public, and global governance.)

    Rodolfo Apreda

    2003-01-01

    This paper argues that the semantics of governance illustrates connections and provides a unifying view from which to understand much better its natural branches: corporate, public and global governance. In this regard, governance is presented from the point of view of a distinctive field of learning and practice. Further, three levels of analysis are carried out to drive the subject home. Firstly, it highlights the extent of corporate governance within an institutional framework, and also gi...

  10. Global civil society: between nation states and transnational corporations

    S. A. Kvitka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Global civil society is the subject of the formation of a new world order and the modern humanitarian outlook, which is based on the primacy of justice and human rights. One of the actors head of global civil society is an international non-governmental organizations. But wrong to equate global civil society with the activities of these organizations only. Mostly they influence governments and their humanitarian and international politics. Meanwhile, the role of global civil and its society various institutions is much greater and significant. The article discusses the various aspects of the civil society from the position that it took place between transnational companies (TNCs and nation-states. The role of the latter is gradually reduced - economic regulation take on multinationals and public administration is a field of activity of various institutions and structures that scientists considered it as a manifestation of global civil society. In Ukraine, which is also involved in the process of globalization, global civil society is one of the main factors of its national civil society.

  11. The Global Compact. Corporate Leadership in the World Economy

    Annan, Kofi

    2002-01-01

    United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan first proposed the Global Compact in an address to The World Economic Forum on the 31st January 1999. The Global Compact’s operational phase was launched at UN Headquarters in New York on the 26th July 2000. The Secretary-General challenged business leaders to join an international initiative – the Global Compact – that would bring companies together with UN agencies, labour and civil society to support nine principles in the areas of human rights, ...

  12. Romanian Campaigns on Corporate Social Responsibility – Signs of Globalization

    Monica Patrut; Camelia Cmeciu

    2016-01-01

    Organizations play an important role in the development of the modern society since managers have become aware that financial profit highly depends on community involvement. The active participation of organizations in community life implies to adapt global strategies to local issues or to promote local issues at a global level. Actually this is the essence of glocalization. The means by which organizations can achieve these glocal objectives is CSR campaigns.  CSR represents an instrument us...

  13. Global business, global responsibilities : Corporate social responsibility orientations within a multinational bank

    van den Heuvel, G.G.A.; Soeters, J.M.M.L.; Goessling, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effects of culture, gender, and function on orientation toward corporate social responsibility (CSR) among 416 employees of an international financial service organization. The main objective of the study is to investigate the variation of corporate social responsibility

  14. In Search of a Network Organization for Innovation: A Multilevel Analysis on Transnational Corporations' Global Innovation

    Hu, Yimei

    2013-01-01

    4 explores how transnational corporations perceive and design an internal network organization to facilitate global innovation. Based on a multiple case study of three Danish transnational corporations’ global R&D organization, this paper shows three types of network organization design...... explores how an SME develops a network organization consisting of both interfirm innovation networks and an internal network organization to facilitate its global innovation strategy. Regarding the intraorganizational network organization, market mechanism is adopted to optimize internal resource...... corporations perceive/design a network organization to facilitate their global innovation? • To what extent and how can we manage a network organization? Research focus of the dissertation is on transnational corporations’ network organization for innovation. The first research question aims to clarify...

  15. Generating global brand equity through corporate social responsibility to key stakeholders

    Torres, Anna; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Tribo, Josep A.; Verhoef, Peter

    In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) to various stakeholders (customers, shareholders, employees, suppliers, and community) has a positive effect on global brand equity (BE). In addition, policies aimed at satisfying community interests help reinforce the credibility of

  16. 75 FR 20388 - International Business Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services Business Unit, Integrated...

    2010-04-19

    ... Machines Corporation, Global Technology Services Business Unit, Integrated Technology Services, Cost and... Technology Services Business Unit, Integrated Technology Services, Cost and Expense Team working from various... Technology Services Business Unit. The company reports that workers leased from Datrose, Inc., were employed...

  17. A Globalization Simulation to Teach Corporate Social Responsibility: Design Features and Analysis of Student Reasoning

    Bos, Nathan D.; Shami, N. Sadat; Naab, Sara

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing need for business students to be taught the ability to think through ethical dilemmas faced by corporations conducting business on a global scale. This article describes a multiplayer online simulation game, ISLAND TELECOM, that exposes students to ethical dilemmas in international business. Through role playing and…

  18. Generating Global Brand Equity through Corporate Social Responsibility to Key Stakeholders

    Torres Lacomba, Anna; Atribo, Jo; Bijmolt, Tammo H.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we argue that socially responsible policies have positive short-term and long-term impact on equity of global brands. We find that corporate social responsibility towards all stakeholders, whether primary (customers, shareholders, employees and suppliers) or secondary (community), have

  19. From Multilatina to Global Latina: Unveiling the corporate-level international strategy choices of Grupo Nutresa

    MARIA A DE VILLA

    Full Text Available Research on Multilatinas has underexplored multinationals from Colombia and their corporate-level international strategy choices to develop into Global Latinas. Building on interviews, documents, and archival data about Grupo Nutresa -Colombia's most international firm in manufactured goods-, this study unveils and discusses this firm's corporate-level international strategy choices between 1960 and 2014. A prevailing notion is that most multinationals from Latin America continue to target international operations to focus mainly on their home region through an export, multidomestic or transnational corporate-level international strategy. In contrast, data show that Grupo Nutresa chose to evolve through a sequential approach from an export to a transnational corporate-level international strategy while its international operations were able to transcend its home region to reach North America, Asia, Europe, Africa, and Oceania. These results add to international business research on emergent market multinational companies (EMNCs from Latin America by unveiling the corporate-level international strategy choices of a Colombian origin Multilatina that transformed into a Global Latina.

  20. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPON SIBILITY THROUGH THE GLOBAL COMPACT: BETWEEN BUSINESS AND SOCIETY

    EDUARDO GOMES

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social responsibility of business is becoming an increasingly relevant subject of research  in political science, sociology, economics and law. The social responsibility of business is becoming  the object of close attention of both governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and the  priority of its development is provided at the national, supranational and international levels. This  article considers the political and legal dimensions of the model of corporate social responsibility  implemented through the Global Compact as an unprecedented private initiative of the United  Nations. A study of the social consequences of the Global Compact offers the opportunity to  observe the development of an extremely important initiative: the dissemination of practices and  models of corporate social responsibility and the possible implications of this action for society, for  business and for the United Nations itself. Corporate social responsibility, having an internal and  external dimension, social and political content, goes far beyond the formal legal aspect. At the  same time, states, including the BRICS countries, interested in developing corporate social  responsibility practices, by legal means, in one way or another contribute to the development of  the most promising practices of the social responsibility of business from their point of view. The  United Nations pays special attention to the private sector as a promising tool for responding to new problems arising within the international environment. The principles formulated by the United Nations in the Global Compact are reflected and developed in the documents of other international  organizations, and then in the programs and regulatory documents of the participating countries,  and, of course, in the various codes of large and medium-sized corporations.

  1. Global business, global responsibilities: Corporate social responsibility orientations within a multinational bank

    van den Heuvel, G.G.A.; Soeters, J.M.M.L.; Goessling, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effects of culture, gender, and function on orientation toward corporate social responsibility (CSR) among 416 employees of an international financial service organization. The main objective of the study is to investigate the variation of corporate social responsibility orientation (CSRO) across national cultures. The authors draw on a theory of cultural value orientations to identify three culturally distinct transnational clusters: West Europe, the English speaking ...

  2. Romanian Campaigns on Corporate Social Responsibility – Signs of Globalization

    Monica Patrut

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizations play an important role in the development of the modern society since managers have become aware that financial profit highly depends on community involvement. The active participation of organizations in community life implies to adapt global strategies to local issues or to promote local issues at a global level. Actually this is the essence of glocalization. The means by which organizations can achieve these glocal objectives is CSR campaigns.  CSR represents an instrument used to solve diverse issues, such as: human rights, environment and climate change, education, support for vulnerable groups, sustainable development, or establishment of moral capitalism. Within the context of the ever-rising internet access of all audiences, CSR campaigns have become more visible and have capitalized on the advantages of collective intelligence, internet users’ participation and their user generated contents. The purpose of our study is to provide an insight into (1 the prominence of Romanian organizations which are the most socially responsible, (2 the domains in which Romanian organizations have invested; (3 the salience of CSR 1.0 and CSR 2.0 tools used in the promotion of CSR campaigns in Romania. 

  3. Pharmaceutical portfolio management: global disease burden and corporate performance metrics.

    Daems, Rutger; Maes, Edith; Mehra, Maneesha; Carroll, Benjamin; Thomas, Adrian

    2014-09-01

    Biopharmaceutical companies face multiple external pressures. Shareholders demand a profitable company while governments, nongovernmental third parties, and the public at large expect a commitment to improving health in developed and, in particular, emerging economies. Current industry commercial models are inadequate for assessing opportunities in emerging economies where disease and market data are highly limited. The purpose of this article was to define a conceptual framework and build an analytic decision-making tool to assess and enhance a company's global portfolio while balancing its business needs with broader social expectations. Through a case-study methodology, we explore the relationship between business and social parameters associated with pharmaceutical innovation in three distinct disease areas. The global burden of disease-based theoretical framework using disability-adjusted life-years provides an overview of the burden associated with particular diseases. The social return on investment is expressed as disability-adjusted life-years averted as a result of the particular pharmaceutical innovation. Simultaneously, the business return on investment captures the research and development costs and projects revenues in terms of a profitability index. The proposed framework can assist companies as they strive to meet the medical needs of populations around the world for decades to come. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aspects of Global Health Issues: Diseases, Natural Disasters, and Pharmaceutical Corporations and Medical Research.

    Brown, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Global health issues are concerns of all public health officials throughout the world. This entails reviewing aspects such as the impact of poverty and the lack of access to quality health care, ignored global killers such as Diseases (Infectious diseases-Malaria, HIV/AIDS), Natural Disasters (Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Floods, and Armed Conflict), Health in the Media, and the Involvement of Pharmaceutical Corporations and Medical Research. These issues are challenges to many needless deaths. Global initiatives are not advancing as they should, such as access to drugs and medications, which some are political.

  5. V Congress of Spanish Geochemistry

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings book present the lectures of V Spanish geochemistry Congress. The sessions were: 1.- Materials geochemistry and geologic process. 2.- Geochemistry prospection 3.- Environmental geochemistry 4.- Isotopic geochemistry 5.- Organic geochemistry 6.- Natural materials geochemistry for industry 7.- Hydrogeochemistry 8.- Mathematical models in geochemistry 9.- Analysis methods in geochemistry 10.-Training of geochemistry 11.-Cosmochemistry

  6. From Risks to Shared Value? Corporate Strategies in Building a Global Water Accounting and Disclosure Regime

    Marco A. Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The current debate on water accounting and accountability among transnational actors such as corporations and NGOs is likely to contribute to the emergence of a global water governance regime. Corporations within the food and beverage sector (F-B are especially vulnerable to water risks; therefore, in this article we analyse motivations and strategies of the major F-B corporations participating in the debate and developing different water accounting, disclosure and risk-assessment tools. Neo-institutionalism and neo-Gramscian regime theory provide the basis for our framework to analyse the discursive, material and organisational corporate water strategies. Findings based on an analysis of the chosen F-B corporations’ sustainability reports and interviews with key informants suggest that the corporations share similar goals and values with regard to the emerging regime. They seek a standardisation that is practical and supportive in improving their water efficiency and communication with stakeholders. This indicates that some harmonisation has taken place over time and new actors have been pursuing the path of the pioneering companies, but the lead corporations are also differentiating their strategies, thus engaging in hegemonic positioning. However, so far the plethora of NGO-driven accountability initiatives and tools has fragmented the field more than 'war of position' amongst the corporations. Furthermore, several companies claim to have proceeded from internal water-risk management to reducing risks throughout their value chains and watersheds. As a result they are 'creating shared value' with stakeholders, and potentially manifesting an emergent paradigm that goes beyond a private regime framework. Nevertheless, in the absence of verification schemes, questions of sustainability and legitimacy of such actions on the ground prevail and remain a topic for further research.

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility in Supply Chains of Global Brands: A Boundaryless Responsibility? Clarifications, Exceptions and Implications

    Amaeshi, K.; Nnodim, P.; Osuji, O.

    2008-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is increasingly becoming a popular business concept in developed economies. As typical of other business concepts, it is on its way to globalization through practices and structures of the globalized capitalist world order, typified in Multinational Corporations (MNCs). However, CSR often sits uncomfortably in this capitalist world order, as MNCs are often challenged by the global reach of their supply chains and the possible irresponsible practices inher...

  8. Global Competition and Learning Organizations: Goals and Motivations of Corporate Leaders and Employees Who Participate in Corporate/University Partnerships

    Zolfo, Elana; Mann, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine executive and employee attitudes regarding benefits and difficulties accruing to employees and their corporations who participate in on-site MBA programs for 11 corporate partners. Because so many corporations embrace partnerships with colleges to advance the knowledge base of their employees, it seems…

  9. Tailoring Global Data to Guide Corporate Investments in Biodiversity, Environmental Assessments and Sustainability

    Joseph Kiesecker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Companies make significant investments in environmental impacts assessments, biodiversity action plans, life-cycle assessments, and environmental management systems, but guidance on where and when these tools can be best used, and how they may scale-up to inform corporation-wide planning, is sorely lacking. A major barrier to informed environmental decision-making within companies, especially in data poor regions of the world, is the difficulty accessing, analyzing, and interpreting biodiversity information. To address this shortcoming, we analyzed nine publicly available environmental datasets, and created five globally-relevant metrics associated with biodiversity: habitat intactness, habitat protection, species richness (globally and biome normalized, and threatened species. We demonstrate how packaging these metrics within an open-source, web-based mapping tool can facilitate corporations in biodiversity prioritization of their sites (or their supply chains, ultimately guiding potential investments in the environment.

  10. 78 FR 52982 - Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate...

    2013-08-27

    ...,506R] Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate... Headquarters: Corporate Departments (finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate Marketing, Global Corporate Systems... (finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate Marketing, Global Corporate Systems, Legal & Regulatory, Risk...

  11. Ethical And Social Responsibility In Global Marketing: An Evaluation Of Corporate Commitment To Stakeholders

    Ephraim Okoro

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, globalization of markets and business organizations has increased the number of entrepreneurs and corporate executives involved in international and multinational joint ventures and strategic alliances. Others are interested in direct investments in foreign markets in an attempt to extend domestic operations, increase profit margins, and expand market shares. While these strategic business initiatives and efforts are increasingly attractive because of their potential ...

  12. Global instability of currencies: reasons and perspectives according to the state-corporation hegemonic stability theory

    DARIUSZ ELIGIUSZ STASZCZAK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses reasons of the instability of the world monetary system. The author considers this problem from historical and contemporary perspectives. According to presented point of view banknotes and electronic money which replaced gold and silver coins in popular circulation are the most important reason of the instability. There are also proven positive and negative consequences of money instability. Reforms of the world monetary system need agreement within the global collective hegemony of state-powers and transnational corporations.

  13. The grand illusion? corporate social responsibility in global garment production networks

    Starmanns, M

    2010-01-01

    This PhD aims to generate a better understanding of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in global production networks. CSR is an umbrella term that deals with voluntary activities undertaken by companies and that indicate an ethos to act responsibly in society. This research focuses on CSR practices that aim towards improving working conditions in outsourced production factories by implementing so-called social standards, which often derive from core norms of the International Labour Organi...

  14. 2013 Annual Global Tax Competitiveness Ranking: Corporate Tax Policy at a Crossroads

    Duanjie Chen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Canada is losing its appeal as a destination for business investment. Its ability to compete against other countries for investment slipped considerably this year in our global tax competitiveness ranking, down six spots among OECD countries, and down 11 spots among the 90 countries. While many governments around the world responded to the fallout of the global recession by significantly reducing corporate tax rates, certain policy moves in Canada have us headed in the opposite direction. Canada is in danger of repelling business investment, which can only worsen current economic and fiscal challenges. Canada’s fading advantage is the result of recent anti-competitive provincial tax policies that increased the cost of investment. This includes, most notably, British Columbia’s decision to reverse the harmonization of its provincial sales tax with the federal GST, as well as recent corporate income tax rate hikes in B.C. and New Brunswick. When economic calamity strikes, and workers and their families feel the pain of lost jobs and lost wealth, politicians know they can score populist points by targeting the corporate sector. After all, corporations do not vote and they do not have a human face. News stories about major multinational corporations using tax-avoidance techniques to minimize their tax bills, only feed the populism, leaving voters believing that companies are getting away without paying a “fair share” of taxes. But when the corporate sector is targeted, it is not only supposedly wealthy capitalists who pay, but also employees, through lost wages and jobs, and working-class people who have a stake in companies through pension plans and mutual funds. On a larger scale, it is the economy that suffers. The same profit-maximizing imperative that leads companies to seek ways to reduce their tax liabilities also motivates firms to redirect investment to competing, lower-tax jurisdictions. Populist policies aimed at squeezing

  15. Shifting corporate geographies in global cities of the South: Mexico City and Johannesburg as case studie

    Parnreiter, Christof

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Global city research links the expansion of advanced producer services in major cities to the internationalisation of real estate markets as well as to the spread of (mainly high-rise office complexes. This research, however, has based its findings mainly on cases of the Global North. This paper examines, based on Grant and Nijman’s (2002 suggestion that the “internal spatial organisation of gateway cities in the less-developed world” reflects “the city’s role in the global political economy”, which patterns occur in two metropoles of the Global South. In addition to this, the analysis focuses especially on the driving forces behind the changes in corporate geographies. The analysis is placed in Mexico City and Johannesburg and based on real estate market data (offices as well as background documents on urban development. The outcome shows that in these cities, local transformation processes of the real estate market and office space location are indeed considerably shaped by global market dynamics. However, the findings also indicate that there is no clear scale dependence of the territorial form. In order to comprehensively understand the changes in the corporate geographies therefore, it is necessary to direct more attention to local and national dynamics. The restructuring of the built environment in both cities can only be grasped fully by considering the particular role of local and national governments. This additional entry point to an understanding of shifting corporate geographies helps to put recent dynamics of global capitalism and politics of urban neoliberalism in perspective.

  16. Scaling up Corporate Social Investments in Education: Five Strategies That Work. Global Views. Policy Paper 2012-01

    van Fleet, Justin W.

    2012-01-01

    Scaling up good corporate social investment practices in developing countries is crucial to realizing the "Education for All" and "Millennium Development Goals". Yet very few corporate social investments have the right mix of vision, financing, cross-sector engagement and leadership to come to scale. Globally, 67 million…

  17. Perpetrators or Preventers? The Double Role of Corporations in Child Trafficking in a Global Context

    Silvia Rodríguez-López

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the engagement of corporations in child trafficking has become a matter of growing importance. Many corporations have adopted global subcontracting systems and complex structures that boost their productivity and profits, but might also create more opportunities for trafficking and exploitation of both adults and children. Taking this context into account, the ways in which corporations can commit child trafficking will be explored and exemplified to highlight their diversity. This paper also offers a brief overview of the response given by international and European anti-trafficking instruments concerning corporate criminal liability for child trafficking. Moreover, the mechanisms adopted by some companies to prevent trafficking and promote transparency within their supply chains will also be addressed. Overall, this paper aims to illustrate the pivotal role of corporations from two perspectives: as potential perpetrators of this serious crime, and as necessary actors to prevent it.  El compromiso empresarial sobre el tráfico infantil es un asunto de creciente importancia. Muchas corporaciones han adoptado sistemas globales de subcontrataciones y complejas estructuras que incrementan su productividad y sus beneficios, pero que también podrían crear más oportunidades para la trata y la explotación de adultos y niños. Partiendo de este contexto, se exploran y ejemplifican las diversas formas en que las corporaciones pueden cometer tráfico infantil. El artículo repasa brevemente la respuesta de los instrumentos internacionales y europeos en lo tocante a la responsabilidad penal de las corporaciones por la trata infantil, y aborda los mecanismos adoptados por algunas empresas para prevenir la trata y promover la transparencia en sus cadenas de suministro. En suma, se pretende ilustrar el rol crucial de las corporaciones desde dos puntos de vista: como potenciales perpetradores de este grave crimen y como actores necesarios

  18. Global Market, Colonial Economies and Trade Corporations: The consulates at Guadalajara and Buenos Aires

    Antonio Ibarra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to examine the global organization of two Spanish American colonial spaces during the era of free trade: the Hispanic North and Rio de la Plata. By studying the consular records on foreign trade, included in the derecho de avería records, I analyse how their economies were integrated into the circulation of silver, slaves, and imports. Moreover, I explain the institutional development of their trade communities, favored by the body of consulates in the cities of Guadalajara and Buenos Aires, viewed as institutional instruments of corporate negotiation, market administration, and interest organization against a backdrop of trade globalization.

  19. Pengaruh Corporate Governance Perception Index Terhadap Kinerja perusahaan dalam Masa Krisis Ekonomi Global

    Adi Suharna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the infl uence of corporate governance toward corporate performance, in this case market performance and fi nancial performance. The rating of corporate governance perception index (CGPI for 2008 until 2010 by The Indonesian Institute for Corporate Governance is used to measure the corporate governance implementation and Tobin’s Q as a market performance measurement  with  Return  on  Equity  (ROE  and  Return  on  Assets  (ROA  as fi nancial performance measurement. The control variables used are leverage, age,  type  of  industry  and  size  of  fi rm.  This  study  is  causal  research  which companies that scored CGPI and fi nancial statement during 2008-2010 were drawn using purposive sampling method. Research data are pooling data which combines time series and cross sectional data during the observation period 2008-2010. This research employs a multiple regression to test hypothesis that corporate governance and corporate performance are positively related.  From  the  fi rst  regression  equation,  the  result  of  this  study  shows  that  there is  influence  between  corporate  governance  perception  index  and  market performance  (Tobin’s  Q  during  crisis  while  the  control  variables  have  no effect  on  market  performance  unless  leverage  levels  negatively  affect  the market  performance  of  the  company  during  the  global  economic  crisis.  The second  regression  equation  shows  that  there  is  infl uence  between  corporate governance  perception  index  and  fi nancial  performance  (ROE  during  crisis while the control variables have no effect on fi nancial performance (ROE. The third regression equation shows that there has no infl uence between corporate governance  perception  index  (CGPI  and  the  control  variables  to  fi nancial performance (ROA during the

  20. Pengaruh Corporate Governance Perception Index Terhadap Kinerja perusahaan dalam Masa Krisis Ekonomi Global

    Adi Suharna

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the infl uence of corporate governance toward corporate performance, in this case market performance and fi nancial performance. The rating of corporate governance perception index (CGPI for 2008 until 2010 by The Indonesian Institute for Corporate Governance is used to measure the corporate governance implementation and Tobin’s Q as a market performance measurement  with  Return  on  Equity  (ROE  and  Return  on  Assets  (ROA  as fi nancial performance measurement. The control variables used are leverage, age,  type  of  industry  and  size  of  fi rm.  This  study  is  causal  research  which companies that scored CGPI and fi nancial statement during 2008-2010 were drawn using purposive sampling method. Research data are pooling data which combines time series and cross sectional data during the observation period 2008-2010. This research employs a multiple regression to test hypothesis that corporate governance and corporate performance are positively related.  From  the  fi rst  regression  equation,  the  result  of  this  study  shows  that  there is  influence  between  corporate  governance  perception  index  and  market performance  (Tobin’s  Q  during  crisis  while  the  control  variables  have  no effect  on  market  performance  unless  leverage  levels  negatively  affect  the market  performance  of  the  company  during  the  global  economic  crisis.  The second  regression  equation  shows  that  there  is  infl uence  between  corporate governance  perception  index  and  fi nancial  performance  (ROE  during  crisis while the control variables have no effect on fi nancial performance (ROE. The third regression equation shows that there has no infl uence between corporate governance  perception  index  (CGPI  and  the  control  variables  to  fi nancial performance (ROA during the

  1. An Analysis of the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism in the Context of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Buzar Stipe

    2015-01-01

    The author analyzes the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism in the context of corporate social responsibility and the need for discussing this topic in ethical codes within the business and tourism sector. The text first offers an overview of the fundamental ethical concepts in business ethics and corporate social responsibility and briefly conceptualizes the relationship between these two fields. At the end, the author analyzes the content of the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism with emphasis...

  2. An Analysis of the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism in the Context of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Buzar Stipe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The author analyzes the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism in the context of corporate social responsibility and the need for discussing this topic in ethical codes within the business and tourism sector. The text first offers an overview of the fundamental ethical concepts in business ethics and corporate social responsibility and briefly conceptualizes the relationship between these two fields. At the end, the author analyzes the content of the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism with emphasis on the elements pertaining to corporate social responsibility, after which he offers a critical opinion about the contribution of the aforemntioned code.

  3. Corporate responsibility reporting according to Global Reporting Initiative: an international comparison

    Ionela-Corina CHERSAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI is an organization that has managed to impose its reporting practices on corporate responsibility among large transnational companies. The model proposed by GRI is based on the supposed convergence between the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. This convergence can be presumed at macroeconomic level, but at the level of enterprises, the three dimensions are often divergent. By analyzing the structure of reports included in the GRI database, our article aims to identify the factors that impact on company’s behavior in the corporate responsibility reporting process. In addition, our research invites to answer the following question: is it not possible that these reports attempt to exaggerate company environmental and social performance, rather than to cause a change in their conduct?

  4. Corporate social responsibility, decent work and global framework agreements: a textile industry case study

    Caroline da Graça Jacques

    2016-11-01

    Organization (ILO is present on corporate social responsibility programs since the development of global commodity chains. Based on Economic Sociology Theory, discusses the formation of the International Framework Agreements (IFA involving the union leadership and enterprises to create decent work in the supply chains. The empirical focus was the multinational Inditex fast fashion retailier. Interviews have been made with social and economic actors in the production chain in Portugal and Brazil. In conclusion, it is emphasized that the new corporate social responsibility tools, such as IFAs, favor the guidelines of decent work. However, the survey revealed that if there are no changes in the management of productive fast fashion retalier chain, the IFA has little effectiveness in reducing sweatshops and precarious labour.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY UNDER AGGRAVATION OF THE CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES

    N. Grazhevska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the role and importance of corporate social responsibility as an important mechanism for overcoming the crisis of the welfare state and to mitigate the social problems caused by the world globalization processes. The experience of post-socialist countries, the Baltic States and Ukraine in this field is analyzed and barriers to effective implementation of CSR in the national economy are identified. The priority of the state policy to promote socially responsible business behavior in Ukraine is proved.

  6. Corporate social responsibility, decent work and global framework agreements: a textile industry case study

    Caroline da Graça Jacques; Maria João Nicolau dos Santos; Maria Soledad Etcheverry Orchard

    2016-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7984.2016v15n33p160 The article discusses how the notion of decent work proposed by the International Labour Organization (ILO) is present on corporate social responsibility programs since the development of global commodity chains. Based on Economic Sociology Theory, discusses the formation of the International Framework Agreements (IFA) involving the union leadership and enterprises to create decent work in the supply chains. The empirical focus was the...

  7. Introduction: corporate restructuring of the global energy industry, driving forces and implications

    Radetzki, M.

    2000-01-01

    The introductory note briefly summarizes the major aspects discussed in the following individual contributions to this issue of the International Journal of Global Energy Issues which comprises the proceedings of the 1999 SNS Energy Day. The main theme is the dramatic changes in the corporate structure of the energy industries worldwide, i.e the liberalization of investment flows and international trade in the energy sector, the explosive development of information technology, providing novel market opportunities, and the novel structures that have emerged since the deregulation of power industries. (orig./CB)

  8. Uncovering Offshore Financial Centers: Conduits and Sinks in the Global Corporate Ownership Network.

    Garcia-Bernardo, Javier; Fichtner, Jan; Takes, Frank W; Heemskerk, Eelke M

    2017-07-24

    Multinational corporations use highly complex structures of parents and subsidiaries to organize their operations and ownership. Offshore Financial Centers (OFCs) facilitate these structures through low taxation and lenient regulation, but are increasingly under scrutiny, for instance for enabling tax avoidance. Therefore, the identification of OFC jurisdictions has become a politicized and contested issue. We introduce a novel data-driven approach for identifying OFCs based on the global corporate ownership network, in which over 98 million firms (nodes) are connected through 71 million ownership relations. This granular firm-level network data uniquely allows identifying both sink-OFCs and conduit-OFCs. Sink-OFCs attract and retain foreign capital while conduit-OFCs are attractive intermediate destinations in the routing of international investments and enable the transfer of capital without taxation. We identify 24 sink-OFCs. In addition, a small set of five countries - the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Singapore and Switzerland - canalize the majority of corporate offshore investment as conduit-OFCs. Each conduit jurisdiction is specialized in a geographical area and there is significant specialization based on industrial sectors. Against the idea of OFCs as exotic small islands that cannot be regulated, we show that many sink and conduit-OFCs are highly developed countries.

  9. A Corporate Veto on Health Policy? Global Constitutionalism and Investor-State Dispute Settlement.

    Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The importance of trade and investment agreements for health is now widely acknowledged in the literature, with much attention now focused on the impact of investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanisms. However, much of the analysis of such agreements in the health field remains largely descriptive. We theorize the implications of ISDS mechanisms for health policy by integrating the concept of global constitutionalism with veto point theory. It is argued that attempts to constitutionalize investment law, through a proliferation of International Investment Agreements (IIAs), has created a series of new veto points at which corporations may seek to block new policies aimed at protecting or enhancing public health. The multiplicity of new veto points in this global "spaghetti bowl" of IIAs creates opportunities for corporations to venue shop; that is, to exploit the agreements, and associated veto points, through which they are most likely to succeed in blocking or deterring new regulation. These concepts are illustrated with reference to two case studies of investor-state disputes involving a transnational tobacco company, but the implications of the analysis are of equal relevance for a range of other industries and health issues. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  10. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection

    Lambert, J.

    1983-01-01

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results

  11. Innovations in Corporate Social Responsibility from Global Business Leaders at Panasonic, Thomson Reuters and Nanyang Business School

    Monica Thiel

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Due to current varied CSR models and how CSR is presently defined and practiced differently in business and society worldwide, global CSR standards are vital to creating best practices of CSR and to increase the competitive advantage of business and society. Approach: Because most CSR business units in global organizations tend to focus on specific and narrow corporate communications of social responsibility instead of broadening the scope to set global&...

  12. The persuasive strength of values, reputation, and interest arguments for promoting ethical behavior in a global corporate setting

    Trapp, Leila

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines survey results regarding staff evaluations of various company-issued arguments used to promote ethical behavior in a global corporate setting. The aim of this is to question the appropriateness of approaching business ethics communication from within a corporate communication...... or intercultural management framework. Indeed, the normative stances of these two frameworks are seen to differ with regard to how global companies should communicate with a culturally diverse staff. Staff responses from the Denmark, Sweden, Brazil, and USA affiliates of the global healthcare company, Novo Nordisk......, reveal that although there are some important differences between affiliates, there is also an impressive degree of agreement that corporate identity, values, and reputation are important sources of motivation for ethical behavior. These findings provide practical guidance for the development...

  13. Corporate social responsibility in global health: an exploratory study of multinational pharmaceutical firms.

    Droppert, Hayley; Bennett, Sara

    2015-04-09

    As pharmaceutical firms experience increasing civil society pressure to act responsibly in a changing globalized world, many are expanding and/or reforming their corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies. We sought to understand how multinational pharmaceutical companies currently engage in CSR activities in the developing world aimed at global health impact, their motivations for doing so and how their CSR strategies are evolving. We conducted a small-scale, exploratory study combining (i) an in-depth review of publicly available data on pharmaceutical firms' CSR with (ii) interviews of representatives from 6 firms, purposively selected, from the highest earning pharmaceutical firms worldwide. Corporate social responsibility differed for each firm particularly with respect to how CSR is defined, organizational structures for managing CSR, current CSR activities, and motivations for CSR. Across the firms studied, the common CSR activities were: differential pharmaceutical pricing, strengthening developing country drug distribution infrastructure, mHealth initiatives, and targeted research and development. Primary factors that motivated CSR engagement were: reputational benefits, recruitment and employee satisfaction, better rankings in sustainability indices, entrance into new markets, long-term economic returns, and improved population health. In terms of CSR strategy, firms were at different points on a spectrum ranging from philanthropic donations to integrated systemic shared value business models. CSR is of increasing importance for multinational pharmaceutical firms yet understanding of the array of CSR strategies employed and their effects is nascent. Our study points to the need to (i) develop clearer and more standardized definitions of CSR in global health (2) strengthen indices to track CSR strategies and their public health effects in developing countries and (iii) undertake more country level studies that investigate how CSR engages with

  14. A call to action on women's health: putting corporate CSR standards for workplace health on the global health agenda.

    Wofford, David; MacDonald, Shawn; Rodehau, Carolyn

    2016-11-04

    Business operates within a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) system that the global health community should harness to advance women's health and related sustainable development goals for workers and communities in low- and middle-income countries. Corporations and their vast networks of supplier companies, particularly in manufacturing and agribusiness, employ millions of workers, increasingly comprised of young women, who lack access to health information, products and services. However, occupational safety and health practices focus primarily on safety issues and fail to address the health needs, including reproductive health, of women workers. CSR policy has focused on shaping corporate policies and practices related to the environment, labor, and human rights, but has also ignored the health needs of women workers. The authors present a new way for global health to understand CSR - as a set of regulatory processes governed by civil society, international institutions, business, and government that set, monitor, and enforce emerging standards related to the role of business in society. They call this the CSR system. They argue that the global health community needs to think differently about the role of corporations in public health, which has been as "partners," and that the global health practitioners should play the same advocacy role in the CSR system for corporate health policies as it does for government and international health policies.

  15. School corporal punishment in global perspective: prevalence, outcomes, and efforts at intervention.

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T

    2017-03-01

    School corporal punishment continues to be a legal means of disciplining children in a third of the world's countries. Although much is known about parents' use of corporal punishment, there is less research about school corporal punishment. This article summarizes what is known about the legality and prevalence of school corporal punishment, about the outcomes linked to it, and about interventions to reduce and eliminate school corporal punishment around the world.

  16. Industry Issue Paper: Cross-Cultural Factors and Corporate Governance Transparency in Global Airline Strategic Alliances

    Giapponi, Catherine C.; Scheraga, Carl A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper argues that a critical dimension in understanding the factors that inhibit the effectiveness and benefits of airline alliances is corporate transparency. Specifically, the issue of transparency in corporate governance is considered. Corporate governance is the set of institutional arrangements affecting corporate decision making, and deals with the relationship among various participants in determining the direction and performance of corporations. However, airline strategic allian...

  17. Corporate social responsibility in global and local companies of Southeast Europe

    Čibukčić Fuad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the analysis of theoretical assumptions and empirical research to find the answer to the question on how the activities in the field of corporate social responsibility in the region of Southeast Europe are present in the business of global and local companies market. Whether and to what extent to implement socially responsible behavior of companies with a different ownership structure, the revenue volume, market share, market activities and markets where it operates, and if the objectives of the companies are in line with the goals of social communities. they offer other than legal, and more benefits for their employees and provide them extra protection, whether, and to what extent, the state helps in carrying out socially useful activities and the compliance of the company's positive legal norms and international standards? The result of the research offered the conclusion that social responsibility activities in companies market of SE Europe are present in an increasing scope, a CSR program contributes to the awareness of the importance and necessity of such activities in the construction of a positive corporate image and relations of the companies with communities and stakeholders in the region.

  18. The evolution of corporate governance in the global financial crisis: the case of Russian industrial firms

    Ichiro Iwasaki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, using a unique dataset of industrial firms obtained from enterprise surveys conducted across the Russian Federation in 2005 and 2009, we trace back structural changes in the corporate governance system before and after the global financial crisis. We also empirically examine the impacts of the crisis on the organization of boards of directors and audit systems. Our survey results reveal that, in the Russian industrial sector, the quality of corporate governance has been improved through the crisis. Furthermore, we found that, corresponding to the alignment hypothesis, in firms that decisively reformed their management and supervisory bodies in response to the 2008 financial shock, the total number of worker representative directors significantly declined, as did their proportion to all board members. On the other hand, we also found that, in firms that substantially reorganized their audit system to cope with the crisis, the independence of the audit system was undermined remarkably, corresponding to the expropriation hypothesis. Findings that management behaviors predicted by the two conflicting hypotheses are simultaneously detected—and that their targets are significantly different—deserve special mention.

  19. Assessing the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility Standards in Global Value Chains

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter

    This paper considers the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) standard impact assessment in global value chains. CSR standards have proliferated in recent years, and several studies have attempted to assess their effects on local producers, workers, and the environment in developing...... countries. However, much less attention has been paid to the “dark side” of impact assessment – the ethical and political dilemmas that arise in the process of carrying out impact studies. This paper addresses this gap in literature, arguing that impact assessments of CSR standards may do more harm than...... good to the intended beneficiaries - developing country firms, farmers, workers, and communities - unless these ethical and political dilemmas are given serious consideration....

  20. The Taiwan Tobacco and Liquor Corporation: To ‘join the ranks of global companies’

    Eckhardt, Jappe; Fang, Jennifer; Lee, Kelley

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Until the late 1990s, the Taiwan Tobacco and Liquor Corporation (TTL) focused almost exclusively on serving the domestic market as a highly protected monopoly. This paper describes how the company has adopted a more outward looking strategy since 2000, with ambitions to become a regional, and eventually global, business by 2021. Drawing on company documents and industry sources, the paper argues that this shift in strategy was a direct reaction to the decline in domestic market share following liberalisation of the Taiwanese tobacco market and adoption of tougher domestic tobacco control measures. Market opening occurred as a result of pressure from the U.S. Trade Representative in the 1980s, as well as World Trade Organization membership in 2002. It is argued that TTL’s efforts to globalise operations have been limited by bureaucratic company management and structures, and ongoing political tension between Taiwan and China. However, the relative success of TTL’s alcohol branch, and potential détente as the Taiwanese government reaches out to improve relations with China, may provide TTL with new opportunities to achieve its goal of becoming a regional player with global ambitions. This article is part of the special issue ‘The Emergence of Asian Tobacco Companies: Implications for Global Health Governance.’ PMID:28139964

  1. The Taiwan Tobacco and Liquor Corporation: To 'join the ranks of global companies'.

    Eckhardt, Jappe; Fang, Jennifer; Lee, Kelley

    2017-03-01

    Until the late 1990s, the Taiwan Tobacco and Liquor Corporation (TTL) focused almost exclusively on serving the domestic market as a highly protected monopoly. This paper describes how the company has adopted a more outward looking strategy since 2000, with ambitions to become a regional, and eventually global, business by 2021. Drawing on company documents and industry sources, the paper argues that this shift in strategy was a direct reaction to the decline in domestic market share following liberalisation of the Taiwanese tobacco market and adoption of tougher domestic tobacco control measures. Market opening occurred as a result of pressure from the U.S. Trade Representative in the 1980s, as well as World Trade Organization membership in 2002. It is argued that TTL's efforts to globalise operations have been limited by bureaucratic company management and structures, and ongoing political tension between Taiwan and China. However, the relative success of TTL's alcohol branch, and potential détente as the Taiwanese government reaches out to improve relations with China, may provide TTL with new opportunities to achieve its goal of becoming a regional player with global ambitions. This article is part of the special issue 'The Emergence of Asian Tobacco Companies: Implications for Global Health Governance.'

  2. United Nations Global Compact as a Corporate Social Responsibility Mechanism: A Case Study of Krüger A/S

    Bereng, Reitumetse Esther

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Over the years, copious research has been done on variety of voluntary sustainable development initiatives including Corporate Social Responsibility. This research takes a different route to Corporate Social Responsibility, by looking into this voluntary initiative through the spectrum of the United Nations Global Compact. It looks into the United Nations Global Compact as a mechanism for Corporate Social Responsibility in order to find out the true motives behind Krüger A/S engagin...

  3. On the effectiveness of private transnational governance regimes - evaluating corporate sustainability reporting according to the Global Reporting Initiative

    Barkemeyer, Ralf; Preuss, Lutz; Lee, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    The increasing involvement of multinational enterprises (MNEs) in global governance has been both applauded for its potential to make governance more effective and criticized for lacking democratic legitimization. Hence we investigate the effectiveness of one transnational governance regime, corporate sustainability reporting according to the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). We found that the GRI has been successful in terms of output effectiveness by promoting the dissemination of sustaina...

  4. An empirical study of the role of the corporate HR function in global talent management in professional and financial service firms in the global financial crisis

    Sparrow, P.; Farndale, E.; Scullion, H.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an empirical exploration of a theory-driven framework of corporate human resource (CHR) roles in global talent management (GTM). Specifically, it expands our knowledge of the process of GTM in two sectors: financial and professional services. Based on in-depth interview data from

  5. Taxation of Multinational Enterprises in a Global Market: Moving to Corporate Tax 2.0?

    Wilde, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHow countries tax the profits of multinational enterprises has become hopelessly outdated. The recent OECD/G20 Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Project has left the existing international corporate taxation framework essentially intact. Perhaps it is time to consider a truly fundamental reform of corporate tax systems, i.e. Corporate Tax 2.0.

  6. Selling Local Modernization through the Global Corporation: Coca-Cola Bottling in Colombia, 1927-1944

    Amanda Ciafone

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Coca-Cola Company sold drink concentrates and licensed rights to its trademarked brands to contracted bottlers who produced and sold bottled drinks in designated geographic areas around the world, including Colombia, beginning in 1927. The franchise system enabled international expansion without large corporate growth or direct local employment allowing the company to externalize liability and financial risk. The franchise system helped the company situate the production of Coca-Cola within local economies, conscripting local elites and workers into its industry, and negotiating its representational forms to fit local contexts. The Coca-Cola Company thus benefited from the economic and political power of both the U.S. and the Colombian elite as it established its business in the country beginning in 1927. Examining print advertising from the 1920s and 1940s, the papers of Coca-Cola executives, and publications of the U.S. multinational and its Colombian franchise bottler, this article argues that The Coca-Cola Company tenuously constructed its industry, products, and brands as simultaneously global and local. While localizing the Coca-Cola industry, products, and brand, the company alluded to its modernity and global popularity, available for purchase by enterprising merchants and thirsty consumers in Colombia.

  7. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: Creating a global corporate network to undermine public health

    Malone Ruth E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global tobacco epidemic claims 5 million lives each year, facilitated by the ability of transnational tobacco companies to delay or thwart meaningful tobacco control worldwide. A series of cross-company tobacco industry "issues management organizations" has played an important role in coordinating and implementing common strategies to defeat tobacco control efforts at international, national, and regional levels. This study examines the development and enumerates the activities of these organizations and explores the implications of continuing industry cooperation for global public health. Methods Using a snowball sampling strategy, we collected documentary data from tobacco industry documents archives and assembled them into a chronologically organized case study. Results The International Committee on Smoking Issues (ICOSI was formed in 1977 by seven tobacco company chief executives to create common anti-tobacco control strategies and build a global network of regional and national manufacturing associations. The organization's name subsequently changed to INFOTAB. The multinational companies built the organization rapidly: by 1984, it had 69 members operating in 57 countries. INFOTAB material, including position papers and "action kits" helped members challenge local tobacco control measures and maintain tobacco-friendly environments. In 1992 INFOTAB was replaced by two smaller organizations. The Tobacco Documentation Centre, which continues to operate, distributes smoking-related information and industry argumentation to members, some produced by cross-company committees. Agro-Tobacco Services, and now Hallmark Marketing Services, assists the INFOTAB-backed and industry supported International Tobacco Growers Association in advancing claims regarding the economic importance of tobacco in developing nations. Conclusion The massive scale and scope of this industry effort illustrate how corporate interests, when

  8. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: creating a global corporate network to undermine public health.

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Intinarelli, Gina; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-01-17

    The global tobacco epidemic claims 5 million lives each year, facilitated by the ability of transnational tobacco companies to delay or thwart meaningful tobacco control worldwide. A series of cross-company tobacco industry "issues management organizations" has played an important role in coordinating and implementing common strategies to defeat tobacco control efforts at international, national, and regional levels. This study examines the development and enumerates the activities of these organizations and explores the implications of continuing industry cooperation for global public health. Using a snowball sampling strategy, we collected documentary data from tobacco industry documents archives and assembled them into a chronologically organized case study. The International Committee on Smoking Issues (ICOSI) was formed in 1977 by seven tobacco company chief executives to create common anti-tobacco control strategies and build a global network of regional and national manufacturing associations. The organization's name subsequently changed to INFOTAB. The multinational companies built the organization rapidly: by 1984, it had 69 members operating in 57 countries. INFOTAB material, including position papers and "action kits" helped members challenge local tobacco control measures and maintain tobacco-friendly environments. In 1992 INFOTAB was replaced by two smaller organizations. The Tobacco Documentation Centre, which continues to operate, distributes smoking-related information and industry argumentation to members, some produced by cross-company committees. Agro-Tobacco Services, and now Hallmark Marketing Services, assists the INFOTAB-backed and industry supported International Tobacco Growers Association in advancing claims regarding the economic importance of tobacco in developing nations. The massive scale and scope of this industry effort illustrate how corporate interests, when threatened by the globalization of public health, sidestep competitive

  9. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: Creating a global corporate network to undermine public health

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Intinarelli, Gina; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-01-01

    Background The global tobacco epidemic claims 5 million lives each year, facilitated by the ability of transnational tobacco companies to delay or thwart meaningful tobacco control worldwide. A series of cross-company tobacco industry "issues management organizations" has played an important role in coordinating and implementing common strategies to defeat tobacco control efforts at international, national, and regional levels. This study examines the development and enumerates the activities of these organizations and explores the implications of continuing industry cooperation for global public health. Methods Using a snowball sampling strategy, we collected documentary data from tobacco industry documents archives and assembled them into a chronologically organized case study. Results The International Committee on Smoking Issues (ICOSI) was formed in 1977 by seven tobacco company chief executives to create common anti-tobacco control strategies and build a global network of regional and national manufacturing associations. The organization's name subsequently changed to INFOTAB. The multinational companies built the organization rapidly: by 1984, it had 69 members operating in 57 countries. INFOTAB material, including position papers and "action kits" helped members challenge local tobacco control measures and maintain tobacco-friendly environments. In 1992 INFOTAB was replaced by two smaller organizations. The Tobacco Documentation Centre, which continues to operate, distributes smoking-related information and industry argumentation to members, some produced by cross-company committees. Agro-Tobacco Services, and now Hallmark Marketing Services, assists the INFOTAB-backed and industry supported International Tobacco Growers Association in advancing claims regarding the economic importance of tobacco in developing nations. Conclusion The massive scale and scope of this industry effort illustrate how corporate interests, when threatened by the globalization of

  10. A critical perspective on corporate social responsibility: Towards a global governance framework

    Banerjee, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to argue that there are structural and functional limits to corporate social responsibility (CSR) that determine the boundary conditions of corporate social initiatives. The current preoccupation with win-win situations in CSR may not serve societal interests. For CSR to produce social outcomes that are not necessarily constrained by corporate rationality there needs to be a change in the normative framework of public decision making at the institutional ...

  11. The Global Oil and Gas Industry: the Market. Market Analysis - 2017-2020 Trends - Corporate Strategies

    2017-07-01

    This study presents: The medium-term and mega trends of the industry market developments and geographical segments; The competitive landscape and the main corporate rankings; The main conclusions of the report, summarised in 10 analytical slides. Content: 1. Market Fundamentals: Overview The Industry; 2. Market Environment and Prospects: Market Overview, Supply, Demand, Prices, Trade; 3. Corporate Strategies and Competition: Competitive Environment, Leaders' Recent Performances, Corporate Strategies; 4. Case Studies; 5. Statistical Appendix; 6. Sources; 7. Annexes

  12. The Global Renewable Energy Equipment Industry: the Market. Market Analysis - 2017-2035 Trends - Corporate Strategies

    2017-08-01

    This study presents: The medium-term and mega trends of the industry market developments and geographical segments; The competitive landscape and the main corporate rankings; The main conclusions of the report, summarised in 10 analytical slides. Content: 1. Market Fundamentals: Overview, The Industry; 2. Market Environment and Prospects: Market Overview, Demand, Supply; 3. Corporate Strategies and Competition: Competitive Forces, Structure of Competition, Corporate Strategies; 4. Case Studies; 5. Statistical Appendix; 6. Sources; 7. Annexes

  13. Road safety perspectives among employees of a multinational corporation in urban India: local context for global injury prevention.

    Jacoby, Sara F; Winston, Flaura K; Richmond, Therese S

    2017-12-01

    In rapidly developing economies, like urban India, where road traffic injury rates are among the world's highest, the corporate workplace offers a non-traditional venue for road safety interventions. In partnership with a major multinational corporation (MNC) with a large Indian workforce, this study aimed to elicit local employee perspectives on road safety to inform a global corporate health platform. The safety attitudes and behaviours of 75 employees were collected through self-report survey and focus groups in the MNC offices in Bangalore and Pune. Analysis of these data uncovered incongruity between employee knowledge of safety strategies and their enacted safety behaviours and identified local preference for interventions and policy-level actions. The methods modelled by this study offer a straightforward approach for eliciting employee perspective for local road safety interventions that fit within a global strategy to improve employee health. Study findings suggest that MNCs can employ a range of strategies to improve the road traffic safety of their employees in settings like urban India including: implementing corporate traffic safety policy, making local infrastructure changes to improve road and traffic conditions, advocating for road safety with government partners and providing employees with education and access to safety equipment and safe transportation options.

  14. Flexible mechanisms in the corporate greenhouse: implementation of the Kyoto Protocol and the globalization of the electric power industry

    Schreuder, Y.; Sherry, C. [University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy

    2001-07-01

    The contradictions and unresolved tensions between economic globalization and climate change negotiations have added urgency to the climate change debate. The paper argues that the declining role of the nation state in the global economy and the increasing reach of transnational corporations throughout the world present a serious challenge to the environmental integrity and success of international environmental treaties such as the Kyoto Protocol. In particular efficacy and equity of the flexible mechanism under the Kyoto Protocol are questioned as illustrated by the patterns of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) of the US electric power industry in the developing world. US FDI in the electric power sectors of developing countries supports continued carbon-intensive development patterns which will make the long-term goals of the Kyoto Protocol more difficult to achieve. Consequently, FDI raises questions about justifiability of giving credit to Annex I countries through CDM projects undertaken by transnational electric power corporations. 13 refs.

  15. The struggle for strategic alignment in multinational corporations: Managing readjustment during global expansion

    Rondinelli, Dennis; Rosen, Benson; Drori, Israel

    2001-01-01

    As corporations expand internationally, their ability to align their internal business strategies and management practices to conditions in external marketplaces becomes critical for sustaining growth and expanding market share. When international expansion decisions become 'unaligned' with business

  16. RELEVANCE OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE MODELS IN COMPANIES DEVELOPMENT, IN CONTEXT OF THE GLOBAL CRISIS

    LUMINIŢA CECILIA CRENICEAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the existing confusion regarding the concept of corporate governance persists, its role on sustainable maximize corporate values and providing high performance is undeniable. Moreover, the test of a corporate governance effectiveness model is the measurement in which it succeed to achieve the main objective, namely, that the company's perspective to maximize value to shareholders. In the economic crisis, it requires that by those systems in which companies are managed and controlled has to interact directly with social responsibility and business ethics held by those entities. It is expected that corporate managers have an efficient economic behavior, different from that of members of governments and economic decline that records do not meet current socio-economic situation

  17. The Global Petrochemical Industry: the market. Market Analysis - 2017-2023 Trends - Corporate Strategies

    2017-02-01

    This study presents: The medium-term and mega trends of the industry market developments and geographical segments; The competitive landscape and the main corporate rankings; The main conclusions of the report, summarised in 10 analytical slides. Content: 1. Market Fundamentals: Overview, The Industry; 2. Market Environment and Prospects: Market Environment, Demand, Supply, Trade; 3. Corporate Strategies and Competition: Competitive Environment, Structure of Competition, Business Strategies; 4. Case Studies; 5. Statistical Appendix; 6. Sources; 7. Annexes

  18. Wie können Corporate Citizens voneinander lernen? : Ordonomische Anregungen für inter-organisationales Lernen im Global Compact der Vereinten Nationen

    Hielscher, Stefan; Pies, Ingo; Beckmann, Markus

    2009-01-01

    "Der Global Compact der Vereinten Nationen versteht sich nicht als Regulierungsinitiative, sondern als freiwilliges Lern- und Dialogforum für Corporate Citizenship. Dieser Beitrag entwickelt Vorschläge, wie der Global Compact diesem Anspruch (noch besser) gerecht werden kann. Hier geht es um Strukturen in zweifacher Hinsicht: (a) Zum einen können Corporate Citizens besonders gut dann voneinander lernen, wenn sie sich über die strukturellen Bedingungen erfolgreicher - aber auch: fehlgeschlagen...

  19. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  20. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Gausonne, Nikolaus; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree; Heuser, Alexander; Wombacher, Frank; Dietzel, Martin; Tipper, Edward; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  1. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPON SIBILITY THROUGH THE GLOBAL COMPACT: BETWEEN BUSINESS AND SOCIETY

    EDUARDO GOMES; NADJA DE SOUZA; LARISA ZAITSEVA; OLGA ABAKUMOVA

    2017-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility of business is becoming an increasingly relevant subject of research  in political science, sociology, economics and law. The social responsibility of business is becoming  the object of close attention of both governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and the  priority of its development is provided at the national, supranational and international levels. This  article considers the political and legal dimensions of the model of corporate social responsi...

  2. A Framework to Support Global Corporate M-Learning: Learner Initiative and Technology Acceptance across Cultures

    Farrell, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Corporations are growing more and more international and accordingly need to train and develop an increasingly diverse and dispersed employee based. M-learning seems like it may be the solution if it can cross cultures. Learner initiative has been shown to be a disadvantage of distant learning environments, which would include m-learning.…

  3. "It's Pretty Simple and in Greek …": Global and Local Languages in the Greek Corporate Setting

    Mahili, Ifigenia

    2014-01-01

    Today's corporate world is in a state of flux. The globalisation of business activity and the escalating economic crises force even small/medium enterprises to become international. This impacts on the competitiveness, profitability and survival of organisations, and as a result the companies' recruitment strategies and language policies,…

  4. The future of public hospitals in a globalized world: corporate governance, corporatization or privatization?

    Mordelet, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to research in health systems and hospitals governance by examining the reasons and expected outcomes of the generalization of corporate governance rules in both public and private non-profit hospitals, all over the world, in order to achieve its clinical, quality and financial objectives.

  5. Taxation of Multinational Enterprises in a Global Market: Moving to Corporate Tax 2.0?

    M.F. de Wilde (Maarten)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHow countries tax the profits of multinational enterprises has become hopelessly outdated. The recent OECD/G20 Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Project has left the existing international corporate taxation framework essentially intact. Perhaps it is time to consider a truly fundamental

  6. The role of Imperial Oil Limited in the global priorities and local initiatives of Exxon Corporation R and D

    Seguin-Dulude, L.; Desranleau, C.; Fortier, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Research and development expenditures by Exxon Corporation, one of the major multi-national oil companies, was studied in an effort to demonstrate the manner in which research and development is planned, managed and financed on a global scale, and to discern the role played in the worldwide network of Exxon Corporation laboratories by Exxon's main Canadian affiliate, Imperial Oil Limited of Sarnia. The findings are based upon close examination of all public documents regarding Exxon and its affiliates since 1882 to 1975, and interviews with research personnel. It was described how in the 1920s, the Sarnia research centre of Imperial Oil began to develop its expertise in lubricant research, earning a world research mandate in 1967 with exclusive rights in this area for the entire Exxon Corporation. It is evident that by being able to concentrate in areas that took advantage of their technological competence and expertise while, on the other hand, ensuring that the processes and products generated by the whole network of laboratories were available and adapted to the Canadian context, the commercial impact of Imperial's research and development efforts have been greatly enhanced by its affiliation with the large multinational company. 27 refs

  7. Transnational Corporations in World Development – Still the Same Harmful Effects in an Increasingly Globalized World Economy?

    Mark Herkenrath

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transnational corporations (TNCs have reached historically unprecedented weight and power in the world’s political economy. Thus, the old question of how these corporations a?ect global development is nowadays more signi?cant than ever. While some scholars claim that corporate globalization will eventually close the worldwide development gap, many others contend that TNC activities lead to insu?cient exploitation of growth potentials within the host country, thereby hindering convergence of national income levels. The present study aims at assessing the validity of these controversial positions by confronting them with the results of past and present empirical research. In the ?rst part, we examine the e?ect of TNC presence on intra-national income inequality by reviewing the most recent cross-national studies dealing with this issue. In the second part, we present the results of our own research, which analyzes the e?ect of TNC presence on economic growth in a sample of 84 countries. The contemporary empirical evidence discussed in the ?rst part as well as the results of our own analyses tend to con?rm earlier ?ndings. They suggest that dependence on TNC activities increases inequality without adding to economic growth. However, the strong negative e?ect of TNC presence on growth found in analyses of data from the late 1960s cannot be reproduced in our contemporary analysis. In a signi?cant number of cases, the potentially harmful consequences of TNC activities seem to have been overcome by adequate countervailing state actions.

  8. Selling Local Modernization through the Global Corporation: Coca-Cola Bottling in Colombia, 1927-1944

    Ciafone, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The Coca-Cola Company sold drink concentrates and licensed rights to its trade-marked brands to contracted bottlers who produced and sold bottled drinks in designated geographic areas around the world, including Colombia, beginning in 1927. The franchise system enabled international expansion without large corporate growth or direct local employment allowing the company to externalize liability and financial risk. The franchise system helped the company situate the production of Coca...

  9. Selling Local Modernization through the Global Corporation: Coca-Cola Bottling in Colombia, 1927-1944

    Amanda Ciafone

    2018-01-01

    The Coca-Cola Company sold drink concentrates and licensed rights to its trademarked brands to contracted bottlers who produced and sold bottled drinks in designated geographic areas around the world, including Colombia, beginning in 1927. The franchise system enabled international expansion without large corporate growth or direct local employment allowing the company to externalize liability and financial risk. The franchise system helped the company situate the production of Coca-Cola with...

  10. Environmental and social pressure as drivers of corporate social responsibility in a globalizing world

    Haleem, Fazli; Farooq, Sami; Boer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Studies of drivers of corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices that also explore the influence of company size and location are rare. This paper fills this gap by showing the extent to which environmental and social pressures affect the efforts companies put into implementing internal...... and external CSR practices and how size and location affect this relationship. The paper is based on data collected in 2013 using the sixth release of the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey....

  11. Financial strategies for minimizing corporate income taxes under Brazil's new global tax system

    Limberg, Stephen T.; Robison, John R.; Schadewald, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996, Brazil adopted a worldwide income tax system for corporations. This system represents a fundamental change in how the Brazílian government treats multinational transactions and the tax minimizing strategies relevant to businesses. In this article, we describe the conceptual basis for worldwide tax systems and the problem of double taxation that they create. Responses to double taxation by both the governments and the priva te sector are considered. Namely, the imperfect mechanisms de...

  12. PERLINDUNGAN PEMODAL REKSADANA MELALUI GOOD CORPORATE GOVERNMENT (STUDI KASUS BANK GLOBAL

    Agam Sulaksono

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The capital market is a place of meeting sellers and buyers to trade securities such as stocks and bonds as a source of economic value of mutual funds. So that the value of mutual fund securities of the Investment Manager is high then the effect should be good in this case the issuer is required on an ongoing basis to spur business with the better through the application of the principles of good corporate governance.

  13. Establishing enforcement legitimacy in the pursuit of rule-breaking ‘global elites’: the case of transnational corporate bribery

    Lord, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    This article develops an analytical framework for analysing the legitimacy of law enforcement responses towards rule-breaking ‘global elites’, in particular multi-national corporations implicated in transnational corporate bribery. While international anti-bribery laws and norms converge cross-jurisdictionally, enforcement contexts and responses can diverge formally creating dilemmas over how to establish the relative legitimacy of different enforcement frameworks. This article draws on a...

  14. Problems of applied geochemistry

    Ovchinnikov, L N

    1983-01-01

    The concept of applied geochemistry was introduced for the first time by A. Ye. Fersman. He linked the branched and complicated questions of geochemistry with specific problems of developing the mineral and raw material base of our country. Geochemical prospecting and geochemistry of mineral raw materials are the most important sections of applied geochemistry. This now allows us the right to view applied geochemistry as a sector of science which applies geochemical methodology, set of geochemical methods of analysis, synthesis, geological interpretation of data based on laws governing theoretical geochemistry to the solution of different tasks of geology, petrology, tectonics, stratigraphy, science of minerals and other geological sciences, and also the technology of mineral raw materials, interrelationships of man and nature (ecogeochemistry, technogeochemistry, agrogeochemistry). The main problem of applied geochemistry, geochemistry of ore fields is the prehistory of ore formation. This is especially important for metallogenic and forecasting constructions, for an understanding of the reasons for the development of fields and the detection of laws governing their distribution, their genetic links with the general geological processes and the products of these processes.

  15. Investigating Food and Agribusiness Corporations as Global Water Security, Management and Governance Agents: The case of Nestlé, Bunge and Cargill

    Suvi Sojamo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the agency of the world’s largest food and agribusiness corporations in global water security via case studies of Nestlé, Bunge and Cargill by analysing their position in the political economy of the world agro-food system and the ways they intentionally and non-intentionally manage and govern water in their value chains and wider networks of influence. The concentrated power of a few corporations in global agro-food value chains and their ability to influence the agro-food market dynamics and networks throughout the world pose asymmetric conditions for reaching not only global food security but also water security. The article will analyse the different forms of power exercised by the corporations in focus in relation to global water security and the emerging transnational water governance regime, and the extent to which their value chain position and stakeholder interaction reflect or drive their actions. Due to their vast infrastructural and technological capacity and major role in the global agro-food political economy, food and agribusiness corporations cannot avoid increasingly engaging, for endogenous and exogenous reasons, in multi-stakeholder initiatives and partnerships to devise methods of managing the agro-food value chains and markets to promote global water security. However, their asymmetric position in relation to their stakeholders demands continuous scrutiny.

  16. THE EXPANSION OF THE TRANSNATIONAL AND MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

    Paul-Bogdan Zamfir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of transnationalisation and multinationalisation evokes just the differences between the two types of corporations. It can be said that a transnational company is above geographical boundaries, wich from the perspective of revolutionary technological communications and transport have been dimmed, but above the borders represented by language, culture, mentalities and technology. The transnational company operates spot transactions because it is listed on the various first rank Stock Exchanges and the financial, technical, image and brand results recorded by this, are public information that it is measuring the success or unsucces of the transnationalisations phenomenon. By comparison, the multinational company is listed either at stock exchanges of secondary importance, or it is a group or family bussines which has the active abroad. At the same time the multinational corporations effectively produce without to generate significant resources for the development of it's own research activities, so, having failed to impose an uniform structure and culture regardless of the assets location. Another significant difference is at the financing access. The transnational company is standing in attention of the rating firms having a low-risk investment that it allows to access the financing at low cost. In most cases, multinational society has limited financial funding in the country of origin, sometimes exclusive relying on the raised funds of the branches which it controls.

  17. A practical approach to implementing CSR in the electronics industry: global supply chain management focusing on corporate social responsibility

    Jamieson, S.; Rice, G. [Panasonic Mobile Communication Development of Europe (PMCDE) (United Kingdom); Hilbron, R. [Vodafone Group Plc (United Kingdom); Clift, R.; Wehrmeyer, W. [Centre for Environmental Strategy, Univ. of Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    This paper covers a co-operative investigation undertaken by Vodafone Plc and Panasonic Mobile Communications (PMC); applying Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) principles in an actual assessment of the supply chain. Together, we carried out an informal CSR assessment on a Panasonic mobile phone handset manufacturing facility in the Philippines. CSR issues vary with geographical and cultural region. By researching CSR concerns typically encountered in the region, focal points of business performance for the Philippines investigation were identified. These are detailed in the paper. A key benefit from this assessment was the increased understanding of the management of the indirect CSR issues within the supply chain. This understanding is essential when developing a system for CSR supply-chain management. This paper will describe this exercise and its findings and will suggest future steps necessary to successfully integrate CSR principles though the global supply chain. (orig.)

  18. The impact of financial globalization and financialization on the economy in the current crisis through banking corporate governance

    Juan Antonio Azkunaga

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the role of governance of financial entities in the current crisis. Neoliberal economic policies, deregulation and liberalization have characterized financial globalization, giving rise to the financialization of the economy. This paper, using the analysis-synthesis method, shows that the corporate governance of entities has adapted to the new social environment under the influence of the interests of the investors. The results of this paper suggest the need to monitor the over-emphasis on the maximization of short-term shareholder value without relativizing the risk taken to achieve it, as such, the emphasis on short-term shareholder value is considered a crucial contributing factor to the present crisis.

  19. Analisis Pengungkapan Corporate Social Responsibility Berdasarkan Global Reporting Initiatives (GRI:Studi Kasus Perusahaan Tambang Batubara Bukit Asam (Persero Tbk dan Timah (Persero Tbk.

    Nuraini Sari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide an overview of the disclosure of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in the mining company's corporate sustainability report. It is also to analyze the disclosure of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in corporate sustainability report with standard Global Reporting Initiatives (GRI 3.1. Research was conducted in Batubara Bukit Asam (Persero Tbk. and Timah (Persero Tbk. on their corporatesustainability report for the year of 2012. The analysis was conducted on the presentation of economic performance indicator, environmental performance indicator, performance indicators of employment and workplace practices, human rights performance indicator, public performance indicator and performance indicator reported products liability provisions established in the GRI 3.1. The result is the two companies havedisclosed CSR in accordance with GRI3.1. Batubara Bukit Asam (Persero Tbk and Timah (Persero Tbk have disclosed their performance indicators; and the average has exceeded 75%. However, the disclosure of each indicator and its aspects are not comprehensive.

  20. On models in the geochemistry of isotopes

    Wetzel, K.

    1978-01-01

    Models are playing an increasing role in the deepening of our understanding of the laws of occurrence of stable and radioactive isotopes in nature. The properties of concrete global and regional models of the geochemistry of isotopes are derived from a general model characterizing the cycling of chemical elements and their isotopes in nature. The importance of global models as well as the relationships between global and regional models are considered. The introduction of a parameter describing the velocity of both mass and isotope transfer, taking into consideration the global resources, renders possible the linkage of global models with regional ones. (author)

  1. Strategies for Corporate Global Expansion of Pakistani Companies in the Age of Technology

    Jawaid Ahmed Qureshi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to meticulously probe about the applications of cutting-edge strategies of globally expanding companies operative in several industrial sectors of Pakistan. Many companies craft and execute various strategies to globalize their operations and networks in several continents, which can not only benefit them but add value in the domestic cum global economy. Many researchers expounded that along with many other factors, capacity-building and competitive edges of business provide these companies the competitive strengths to excel in their global operations. Regarding such strengths, advancement in technology inclusive of research in business R&D (Research & Development, and marketing and business research, process design, automation, and e-commerce play a decisive role in providing them the core competitive edges that they leverage to advance their growth and expansion in the global market. This paper employs hybrid research techniques including qualitative and quantitative research. Semi-structured interviews have been taken for qualitative enquiry and structured survey has been undertaken for quantitative enquiry. The samples are drawn from multiple populations pertaining top-five export sectors of Pakistan by applying convenience sampling procedures for interviews and proportionate stratified sampling articulated with systematic sampling for survey. The findings uncover that after turning as retrenched domestic entities, many of the companies in Pakistan prefer global expansion. They usually resume from export operations in various countries especially where they develop a network of business associates, and then gradually move to open subsidiaries abroad. They avail technological edges to upgrade their processes, plants, products

  2. COUNTRIES VERSUS CORPORATIONS AND ECONOMIES VERSUS BUSINESSES...WHAT MAKES THE GLOBAL MECHANSIM WORK BETTER?

    BODISLAV DUMITRU ALEXANDRU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This research paper is a nexus of solutions brought in theory and real life situations in the frameworks ofcorporate governance, state governance and public administration. The approach on this paper was done by puttingtogether a 360 degree focus on real life situations that create the formal and informal mechanism that make the worldgo round and round, be it the through the rigorous eye of the private sector or the public sector.The first part of the paper slices the economic decision making pie in two halves, the global mechanismthrough the business’s vantage point and the global mechanism through the economy’s vantage point.

  3. Global Innovation in Foreign Subsidiaries: The Impact of Entrepreneurial Orientation and Corporate Networks

    Sidney Costa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to show the differentiated moderating role of integration between the headquarters and subsidiary companies to explain the potential of local innovations becoming global innovations. Throughout the framework and hypotheses, we propose two global innovation development processes. In order to test them, we analyzed a sample of 172 subsidiaries from the structural equations technique to test the hypotheses and multiple-groups comparison in order to evaluate the moderating effect of subsidiaries embeddedness. The results confirm the adherence of a presented process: entrepreneurial orientation is associated with local innovation when moderated by embeddedness. In turn, this local innovation has great potential to become a global innovation. Another result diverged from the one presented in the hypotheses, but it has an important contribution. The result shows that the entrepreneurial orientation is associated with the inclusion of the subsidiary in the network, which has the potential of developing global innovation, but to do so it would have to be a radical or disruptive innovation.

  4. Moving beyond the Wall(s): Theorizing Corporate Identity for Global Cultural Studies

    Elavsky, C. Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the set of research considerations that went into investigating the relationship between the Bertelsmann Music Group (BMG) and Czech music culture as a means of exploring alternative avenues and frameworks for understanding and doing global cultural studies. Outlining the theoretical and methodological trajectories, as well…

  5. Corporate Strategies and Global Competition: Odense Steel Shipyard, 1918-2012

    Poulsen, Rene Taudal; Jensen, Kristoffer; Christensen, Rene Schroder

    2017-01-01

    This article analyzes the competitive strategies of Odense Steel Shipyard between 1918 and 2012 and challenges existing scholarship on competition in global industries. Until the 1980s, the yard adopted typical strategies in shipbuilding, starting with cost leadership and subsequently adopting...

  6. Corporate restructuring of the global energy industry: an overview of events and issues

    Lillis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Before 1980, outside of the world's few major integrated oil companies, only a handful of energy companies could be considered multinational. In 1999, in addition to the scores of petroleum companies that can be classified as multinational, the scope of many electricity companies and natural gas transmission companies, has become increasingly global. Through mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures, and strategic alliances, many of the world's energy companies have also become more integrated - and most recently, much larger. Natural gas pipeline companies have become electricity companies; regional domestic electric utilities have become multinational electricity companies; electricity distribution and transmission companies have become generation companies; generation companies have become distribution and transmission companies; and big oil companies have become even bigger oil companies. What have been the driving forces behind these transformations? It is in part due to a number of policy and market related developments such as: deregulation, rising environmental concerns, privatization, technological advances, and an evolution in global finance. (orig.)

  7. Human rights in global supply chains: Corporate social responsibility and public procurement in the European Union

    Outhwaite, Opi; Martin-Ortega, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The global supply chains of multinational enterprises are complex and multi-tiered, often involving many stages of production and spanning several jurisdictions. Important questions remain about how to ensure that human rights are respected in these supply chains, including how multinational enterprises are to exercise the responsibility to respect human rights in their supply chains and the role that can be played by states in protecting human rights outside of their borders. This article fo...

  8. Marine geochemistry ocean circulation, carbon cycle and climate change

    Roy-Barman, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Marine geochemistry uses chemical elements and their isotopes to study how the ocean works. It brings quantitative answers to questions such as: What is the deep ocean mixing rate? How much atmospheric CO2 is pumped by the ocean? How fast are pollutants removed from the ocean? How do ecosystems react to the anthropogenic pressure? The book provides a simple introduction to the concepts (environmental chemistry, isotopes), the methods (field approach, remote sensing, modeling) and the applications (ocean circulation, carbon cycle, climate change) of marine geochemistry with a particular emphasis on isotopic tracers. Marine geochemistry is not an isolated discipline: numerous openings on physical oceanography, marine biology, climatology, geology, pollutions and ecology are proposed and provide a global vision of the ocean. It includes new topics based on ongoing research programs such as GEOTRACES, Global Carbon Project, Tara Ocean. It provides a complete outline for a course in marine geochemistry. To favor a...

  9. Transnational Corporations in a Global Monetary Theory of Production: A World-Systems Perspective

    Marc Pilkington

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I argue that it is possible to enrich world-systems analysis with a heterodox Keynesian monetary theory of production known as the Theory of Money Emissions, based on the views put forward by the French economist Bernard Schmitt. In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, I aim to rehabilitate and adapt the old Keynesian proposal of an international clearing union to the modern world-system by providing a rationale behind a common world currency and a renewed perspective on money and transnational production.

  10. The 'International' and the 'Global' as Complementary Power Strategies within Corporate Roman Catholicism

    Kenneth Houston

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The putative resurgence of religious belief and its reinvigorated socio-political importance – or at least prominence – has prompted critical reflection on religion, broadly defined, as a new force in politics. This paper examines the ‘global’ and ‘international’ role of Roman Catholicism. Roman Catholicism has manifested itself as an actor on the international stage and as a trans-national and global ‘community’. Frequently the conceptual dividing line between these is ambiguous. Vatican City and the Holy See have both been accorded international status, the former since the conclusion of the Lateran Treaty by Italy’s fascist leader, Benito Mussolini, in 1929, the latter since the mid nineteenth century following the absorption of the Papal States into the newly unified Italian Republic. The Holy See also enjoys a special status position within the United Nations system as a non-member observer state. Following revelations of clerical child abuse the Holy See was put on the defensive in several national contexts in a public controversy that resonated much more widely. This trans-nationally organised religion has mobilised both nationally and internationally to defend its institutional interests. Through an examination of empirical instances the study sidesteps the question of whether religions are ‘global’ or ‘international’ phenomena, and draws attention to the distinct power modalities operative at the level of both international politics and in transnational or global organisation.

  11. The strategic role of partnerships between universities and private corporations as a driver for increasing workforce competitiveness in a global economy

    Damoc Adrian-Ioan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A global economic context means increased competition as corporations face contenders from other countries, and there is a wider range of choices on the market available to consumers. This global competition drives economic actors to seek competitive edges to increase the efficiency of their operations; within this global economy, corporations seek these advantages, outsourcing their activities in order to make use of the opportunities of globalisation. The same situation can be encountered on the labour market. While the expansion of economic activities globally often means increased employment opportunities, it also means that job seekers from around the world need to become more competitive on the job market to attract better employment opportunities. Workforce competitiveness is determined by various factors, like availability and ease of access (i.e. job market legislation, level and quality of education, and cost. The level and quality of education are of particular concern, as it gauges the potential of the workforce, and is the cornerstone of the controversial “skills gap”, based on a common complaint of corporations regarding a shortage of skilled employees. Acknowledging the importance of this factor, numerous companies have concluded partnerships with local universities, leading to intimate connections between the business environment and education. Thus, in the same manner that supply and demand shape the markets for typical goods and determine the success of a market, these partnerships between universities and corporations influence the labour market, bringing together demand (i.e. the corporations seeking skilled employees and supply (universities and education centres training the future workforce. There are numerous long-term benefits that such partnerships can bring to a country’s education sector. As such, the present paper seeks to examine the strategic importance of partnerships between academia and industry as a key

  12. Toward a Phase-Model of Global Knowledge Management Systems in Multinational Corporations

    Nielsen, Bo Bernhard; Michailova, Snejina

    2004-01-01

    According to Heinrich v. Pierer, CEO at Siemens, `an e-business year is only three months long. Ifyou want to be a leader in this fast-paced world, you must be faster than the others. Just being onboard is by far not enough'. The ability to be faster than others, however, is only relevant...... if it islinked to management of key assets in the pursuit of continuous competitive advantage. The keyasset of the present is knowledge and in the future it is likely to be continuous and timelyinnovation based on effective management of knowledge assets. Most firms today, however, lack aneffective Knowledge......-outperform competition and becomeleaders of the e-conomy'. Using examples from a number of large multinational companies thispaper proposes a phase model for the development of a global Knowledge Management Systemwith attention to pertinent policy and management issues in each stage.Keywords: Knowledge management system...

  13. Brand as a challenge to corporate governance in the globalization process

    Milojević Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing expansion of globalization, largely changes and the current economic strategy and policy of companies. The aim of this paper is to show to the alarming the need to accede to the seriousness of the implementation of adequate marketing strategies, among which is dominant brand strategy and thus the strategic brand management. The pace of technological innovation and information technologies contribute to the intensity of communication and have an impact on competitiveness. Networking overcomes time and space and leads almost to the equalization consumer demands set by companies, or to brand loyalty. Modern conditions of market economy, changing business conditions and intense competition, dictate the lower limit of efficiency of business entities to survive in the market. Creation and development of the brand is the company's long-term investment because brand loyalty of consumers means focusing on achieving their satisfaction, which directly leads to strengthening competitiveness and thus improve financial results.

  14. Corporate against corporate management

    Runcev, Nikolce; Krstev, Boris; Golomeova, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    In contemporary economic performance, corporate governance is considered an essential prerequisite in building a successful system for creating an attractive investment climate, which is characterized by competing companies oriented and efficient financial markets. Good corporate governance is based on principles of transparency, bias, efficiency, timeliness, completeness and accuracy of information at all levels of management. Companies with good corporate governance and afford easier acc...

  15. An Investigation of Global Reporting Initiative Performance Indicators in Corporate Sustainability Reports: Greek, Italian and Spanish Evidence

    Lara Tarquinio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study has two main purposes. First, it explores the performance indicators disclosed in the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI-based Sustainability Reports (SRs produced by the companies of three different countries: Italy, Spain and Greece. Second, it verifies how some corporate variables, country of origin variables and “attributes” of the SRs can explain the disclosure of GRI indicators. To verify the quantity and type of the indicators disclosed, we performed a content analysis of the SRs. We use a regression trees technique to describe how the companies’ variables explain a different use of the indicators. The findings show that Spanish companies, on average, disclose the greatest number of indicators. The social indicators related to Labour are those more frequently reported in the SRs of the three countries. The least reported are social indicators related to Human Rights. The results show the central role that assurance, ROA and sector may have in classifying the disclosure level of indicators. The study contributes both theoretical and empirical literature on sustainability indicators. It also sheds further light on the determinants of the disclosure of indicators.

  16. Geochemistry and ore prospecting

    Le Caignec, R.

    1954-01-01

    Applied geochemistry is a new technique which helps the geologist in detecting ore deposits. Some deposits, even when they are covered with rather thick surface structures, form around these zones where the infinitesimal content of some elements of soils or waters is notably different. These 'anomalies' may be contemporaneous to the deposit-structure (primary dispersion) or may have occurred later (secondary dispersion). Various factors rule these anomalies: ore-stability, soil homogeneity, water conditions, topography, vegetation, etc... Applied geochemistry is in fact the study of analysis techniques of metal traces in soils as well as the geological interpretation of observed anomalies. This report gives practical data on sampling methods, yields, costs and also on special problems of uranium geochemistry. (author) [fr

  17. Geochemistry of silicon isotopes

    Ding, Tiping; Li, Yanhe; Gao, Jianfei; Hu, Bin [Chinese Academy of Geological Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Mineral Resources; Jiang, Shaoyong [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China).

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and silicon isotope geochemistry is important in identifying the silicon source for various geological bodies and in studying the behavior of silicon in different geological processes. This book starts with an introduction on the development of silicon isotope geochemistry. Various analytical methods are described and compared with each other in detail. The mechanisms of silicon isotope fractionation are discussed, and silicon isotope distributions in various extraterrestrial and terrestrial reservoirs are updated. Besides, the applications of silicon isotopes in several important fields are presented.

  18. Corporate Responsibility

    Waddock, Sandra; Rasche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We define and discuss the concept of corporate responsibility. We suggest that corporate responsibility has some unique characteristics, which makes it different from earlier conceptions of corporate social responsibility. Our discussion further shows commonalities and differences between corporate...... responsibility and related concepts, such as corporate citizenship and business ethics. We also outline some ways in which corporations have implemented corporate responsibility in practice....

  19. Web-based KAP Intervention on Office Ergonomics: A Unique Technique for Prevention of Musculoskeletal Discomfort in Global Corporate Offices.

    Madhwani, Kishore P; Nag, P K

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate web-based Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) intervention on office ergonomics - a unique method for prevention of musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) - in corporate offices that influences behavior modification. With the increasing use of computers, laptops and hand-held communication devices globally among office employees, creating awareness on office ergonomics has become a top priority. Emphasis needs to be given on maintaining ideal work postures, ergonomic arrangement of workstations, optimizing chair functions, as well as performing desk stretches to reduce MSD arising from the use of these equipment, thereby promoting safe work practices at offices and home, as in the current scenario many employees work from home with flexible work hours. Hence, this justifies the importance of our study. To promote safe working by exploring cost-effective communication methods to achieve behavior change at distant sites when an on-site visit may not be feasible. An invitation was sent by the Medical and Occupational Health Team of a multinational corporation to all employees at their offices in Sri Lanka, Singapore, and Malaysia to take up an online Nordic questionnaire, a screening tool for musculoskeletal symptoms, shared in local languages on two occasions - baseline evaluation ( n = 240) and a follow-up evaluation after 3 months ( n = 203). After completing the baseline questionnaire, employees were immediately trained on correct postures and office ergonomics with animation graphics. The same questionnaire was sent again after a 12-week gap only to those employees who responded to the baseline questionnaire on initial assessment. Data collected were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 software and variables were compared using odds ratio as well as Chi-square test. Of the 203 employees who responded, 47.35% had some musculoskeletal symptoms. Among them 58.7% had lower back pain

  20. Beyond the 100 acre wood : In which international human rights law finds new ways to tame global corporate power

    Augenstein, Daniel; Kinley, David

    2015-01-01

    States and corporations are being forced out of their comfort zones. A consensus is building among international human rights courts and committees that states can and will be held accountable for overseas human rights abuses by corporations domiciled in their respective territories. The authors

  1. SHELL ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

    ABSTRACT: The land snail Limicolaria kambeul chudeaui Germain was collected ... Key words/phrases: Ethiopia, isotope geochemistry, Lake Tilo, Limicolaria .... 1984), (c) 6'80 values of precipitation at Addis Ababa, with i 1 S.D. bars for the .... (breakfast cereal), deionised water and cuttlefish bone, the carbon and oxygen.

  2. The legalization of corporate social responsibility: towards a new doctrine of international legal status in a global governance context

    Bijlmakers, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    This thesis examines whether Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the responsibilities of business enterprises for human rights have been legally defined in international, European law and national law. This analysis, in turn, generates novel insights and impetus for reconsidering the

  3. Proceedings of the 3. Brazilian Congress on Geochemistry; 1. Congress on Geochemistry from Portuguese Language Countries - Abstracts

    1991-01-01

    This congress presents topics about geochemistry, including litho-geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, hydro-geochemistry and surface geochemistry. Works on geochronology and nuclear methods in rocks and minerals are also described. (C.G.C.)

  4. C. Walker-Said and J. D. Kelly (eds), Corporate Social Responsibility? Human Rights in the New Global Economy (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2015), 392 pp

    Whelan, Glen

    2017-01-01

    Book review of: Charlotte Walker-Said and John D. Kelly (eds), Corporate Social Responsibility? Human Rights in the New Global Economy (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2015), 392 pp.......Book review of: Charlotte Walker-Said and John D. Kelly (eds), Corporate Social Responsibility? Human Rights in the New Global Economy (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2015), 392 pp....

  5. The effect of corporate sustainability information on share returns: analysis of companies included in the Global Ranking 100 [doi: 10.21529/RECADM.2017010

    Nathállya Etyenne Figueira Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the effect of corporate returns after the disclosure of inclusion in the Global 100 ranking. For this purpose, the methodology of the Study of Events was used, based on the hypothesis of a semi-strong efficient market. The Global 100 rankings considered in this study were the ones released over 12 years, from 2005 to 2016. The survey sample composed of the shares of the companies that had data on the date of their inclusion, and thus consisting of 266 shares. The variable used was daily quotations of companies' shares during the estimation period (160 days and event window (21 days and the market indices of the countries in which the share was quoted, collected in the Thomson Reuters Database®. The results showed that the release of the Global 100 ranking did not cause significant positive or negative effect on the cumulative abnormal returns (CARs of the shares of listed companies.   Keywords Global 100; Corporate social responsibility; Sustainability; Financial performance.

  6. The genetics of geochemistry

    Croal, Laura R.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Malasarn, Davin; Newman, Dianne K.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria are remarkable in their metabolic diversity due to their ability to harvest energy from myriad oxidation and reduction reactions. In some cases, their metabolisms involve redox transformations of metal(loid)s, which lead to the precipitation, transformation, or dissolution of minerals. Microorganism/mineral interactions not only affect the geochemistry of modern environments, but may also have contributed to shaping the near-surface environment of the early Earth. For example, bacter...

  7. Corporation as climate ambassador

    Trapp, Leila

    2012-01-01

    At a time when corporations are addressing increasingly complex, global corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, this study examines and evaluates the strategies used in Vattenfall’s challenging and innovative CSR campaign which aimed at establishing the energy company as a credible climate...

  8. Sustainability Performance of Scandinavian Corporations and their Value Chains assessed by UN Global Compact and Global Reporting Initiative standards - a way to identify superior performers?

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a combination of the two most adopted multi- stakeholder standards for sustainability reporting as an alternate framework for assessing sustainability performance in Scandinavian corporations. This novel approach leverages numeric measures on the criteria...

  9. Rand Corporation

    ... Jobs at RAND Media Resources Congressional Resources Doing Business with RAND Supporting RAND Educational Opportunities Alumni Association Follow RAND Corporation on Facebook RAND Corporation on Twitter RAND Corporation on LinkedIn ...

  10. Corporate Branding and Corporate Reputation

    Karmark, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through o...... for corporate brands and corporate communication.......Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through...... organizational culture and identity, and how, although characterized by parallel developments, new ideas and models from a “third” wave of corporate branding challenge prevailing assumptions of corporate reputation particularly in terms of the assumptions that reputations emerge from authentic and transparent...

  11. Corporate finance

    P. Quiry; Y. Le Fur; A. Salvi; M. Dallocchio; P. Vernimmen

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition, the website www.vernimmen.com and the Vernimmen.com newsletter are all written and created by an author team who are both investment bankers/corporate financiers and academics. This book covers the theory and practice of Corporate Finance from a truly European perspective. It shows how to use financial theory to solve practical problems and is written for students of corporate finance and financial analysis and practising corporate financie...

  12. A Global Education Challenge: Harnessing Corporate Philanthropy to Educate the World's Poor. Center for Universal Education Working Paper 4

    van Fleet, Justin W.

    2011-01-01

    Major actors in the global education community are emerging with new education strategies, including the World Bank, U.S. Agency for International Development and U.K. Department for International Development. These strategies attempt to identify game-changing policies to make strides in global education in anticipation of the Millennium…

  13. Corporate Law and Corporate Governance

    Roberta Romano

    1998-01-01

    We have seen a revival in interest in corporate law and corporate governance since the 1980s, as researchers applied the tools of the new institutional economics and modern corporate finance to analyze the new transactions emerging in the 1980s takeover wave. This article focuses on three mechanisms of corporate governance to illustrate the analytical usefulness of transaction cost economics for corporate law. They are the board of directors; relational investing, a form of block ownership in...

  14. Geochemistry of Natural Redox Fronts

    Hofmann, B.A.

    1999-05-01

    Redox fronts are important geochemical boundaries which need to be considered in safety assessment of deep repositories for radioactive waste. In most cases, selected host-rock formations will be reducing due to the presence of ferrous minerals, sulphides, etc. During construction and operation of the repository, air will be introduced into the formation. After repository closure, oxidising conditions may persist locally until all oxygen is consumed. In the case of high-level waste, radiolysis of water may provide an additional source of oxidants. Oxidising conditions within a repository are thus possible and potentially have a strong influence on the mobility of many elements. The rate of movement of redox fronts, the boundary between oxidising and reducing environments, and their influence on migrating radionuclides are thus important factors influencing repository performance. The present report is a review of elemental behaviour at natural redox fronts, based on published information and work of the author. Redox fronts are geochemically and geometrically variable manifestations of a global interface between generally oxidising geochemical milieux in contact with the atmosphere and generally reducing milieux in contact with rocks containing ferrous iron, sulphide and/or organic carbon. A classification of redox fronts based on a subdivision into continental near-surface, marine near-surface, and deep environments is proposed. The global redox interface is often located close to the surface of rocks and sediments and, sometimes, within bodies of water. Temperature conditions are close to ambient. A deeper penetration of the global redox front to depths of several kilometres is found in basins containing oxidised sediments (red beds) and in some hydrothermal circulation systems. Temperatures at such deep redox fronts may reach 200 o C. Both near-surface and deep redox fronts are sites of formation of economic deposits of redox-sensitive elements, particularly of

  15. PERSONAL BRAND MARKETING, A NECESSITY FOR THE CORPORATE DIFFERENTIATION IN THE CONTEXT OF THE GLOBALIZATION OF SOCIETY

    Corina Anamaria IOAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Offering from the point of view of its characteristics and also interesting to analyze is what the specialists call ‘brand’. This term is relatively new in the area of marketing, and it stirs interest especially as far as its two components are concerned: the situation of the contemporary society, on the one hand, and the marketing, i.e. the efforts the corporation undertakes in order to be chosen by the clients, on the other. The peculiarities and, at the same time, the variables of each brand reside in the economic, social, educational, financial, political, religious or any other type of specificities, that are different first and foremost from one product to another, but also from country to country, and we could even add, from region to region.

  16. Corporate social responsibility, reputation, and moral communication: A constructivist view

    Schultz, F.; Carroll, C.

    2013-01-01

    Conditions and notions of corporate reputation underwent in the last years a fundamental change. Economic and technological processes of globalization, modernization, and rationalization enforced the institutionalization of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the corporate world. It is often

  17. CHALLENGES OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE ...

    its reports on corporate (social) responsibility have helped to focus global attention on ... dimensions of sustainable development – corporate financial responsibility, ..... and that only locals must be employed in junior and intermediate cadre.

  18. Local industry in global networks : changing competitiveness, corporate strategies and pathways of development in Singapore and Malaysia's garment industry

    Smakman, Floortje

    2004-01-01

    The garment industry in Singapore and Malaysia has been incorporated into global production networks and commodity chains - driven by large US and European garment companies - since the 1960s and 1970s respectively. The industry was an intricate part of the export led industrialisation strategies

  19. A Global Governance Shift in Development : A study on how transnational corporation´s CSR initiative can address Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining and how that can facilitate development

    Runesson, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Through globalization non-state actors including transnational corporations (TNC), have taken on a more important global governance role from the nation state, where they through their CSR initiatives, impact social issues surrounding development. There are however conflicting views whether CSR could contribute to development in the society. TNCs CSR engagement mainly concerns social issues at the workplace such as complying with labour rights. But workers right to organize and bargain collec...

  20. Local industry in global networks : changing competitiveness, corporate strategies and pathways of development in Singapore and Malaysia's garment industry

    Smakman, Floortje

    2004-01-01

    The garment industry in Singapore and Malaysia has been incorporated into global production networks and commodity chains - driven by large US and European garment companies - since the 1960s and 1970s respectively. The industry was an intricate part of the export led industrialisation strategies adopted by both countries. However, since incorporation, changing competitiveness due to both international, regional end local pressures, has meant local garment firms have had to implement a range ...

  1. Impact assessment on the performance of e-learning in corporate training programs in the context of globalization

    Gavril Roxana Maria; Kiehne Jan; Hell Christian Richard; Kirschner Carsten

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to identify the main criteria based on which e-Learning is used in organizational development with positive impact on business performance. Globalization has led to a multitude of changing markets, including learning and education. While quality production systems are implemented based on imposed standards, the business knowledge of employees varies in each country, mirroring the education system provided locally. The results are individually different knowledge gaps...

  2. Trends in Corporate Communication Strategies

    Constantin Milosteanu; Ionel Scaunasu; Alina Cornescu; Nicolae Popovic

    2011-01-01

    When business strategy is correlated with corporate communication strategy, this is reflected in the position and image of the organization on the market, leading to higher sales and increased profitability. The major changes caused by globalization, coupled with the new dynamic of the markets where consumers have access to more information in less time, require new forms of corporate communication. The new corporate communication concept involves major challenges for managers and can help de...

  3. The corporate security professional

    Petersen, Karen Lund

    2013-01-01

    In our age of globalization and complex threat environments, every business is called upon to manage security. This tendency is reflected in the fact that a wide range of businesses increasingly think about security in broad terms and strive to translate national security concerns into corporate...... speech. This article argues that the profession of the security manager has become central for understanding how the relationship between national and corporate security is currently negotiated. The national security background of most private sector security managers makes the corporate security...... professional inside the company a powerful hybrid agent. By zooming in on the profession and the practice of national security inside companies, the article raises questions about where to draw the line between corporate security and national security along with the political consequences of the constitution...

  4. Impact assessment on the performance of e-learning in corporate training programs in the context of globalization

    Gavril Roxana Maria

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to identify the main criteria based on which e-Learning is used in organizational development with positive impact on business performance. Globalization has led to a multitude of changing markets, including learning and education. While quality production systems are implemented based on imposed standards, the business knowledge of employees varies in each country, mirroring the education system provided locally. The results are individually different knowledge gaps which challenged the learning industry to develop new strategies embedded in e-learning solutions. Major contribution to theory and practice on combining vision and spoken learning is brought by the work of psychologists and professors of education (Allen, 2012; Mayer, 2009; Hattie, 2009. Their innovations offered solutions for easy access to knowledge and implementation methods, as well as the documentation of the inclusion of videos in e-learning modules (Halls, 2012, offering teachers and trainers the possibility to create a live experience to trainees engaged in e-learning programs. This paper is based on data collected internationally and our empirical research undertaken in Romania, which is Europe’s main cluster for various production industries and world’s second for IT. Based on a questionnaire, we interviewed 18 multinational companies which perform parts of their business activities in Romania. Research results show that with the implementation of an effective e-learning strategy a 40-60% cost reduction, a complete measurability of the learning process and a standardized input and outcome of trainings has been achieved. This paper aims to highlight the impact of e-learning applied for business trainings within global developing companies. This study may be applicable to state education and thus could help to reduce the gap between local education and global expectations.

  5. Corporate Awakening

    LaFrance, Julie; Lehmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Partnerships have become more common as corporation...... public-private partnerships. These theoretical perspectives are used to gain a deeper understanding of the corporate drivers that motivated TOTAL S.A. to approach UNESCO for cooperation on community development programs in Myanmar....

  6. Organic geochemistry of Czech amber

    Havelcová, Martina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Mach, K.; Dvořák, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2015), s. 146 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /67./. 07.09.2015-11.09.2015, Horný Smokovec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : fossil resin * amber * resinite Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  7. Molecular environmental geochemistry

    O'Day, Peggy A.

    1999-05-01

    The chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of contaminant species in the natural environment are controlled by reactions that occur in and among solid, aqueous, and gas phases. These reactions are varied and complex, involving changes in chemical form and mass transfer among inorganic, organic, and biochemical species. The field of molecular environmental geochemistry seeks to apply spectroscopic and microscopic probes to the mechanistic understanding of environmentally relevant chemical processes, particularly those involving contaminants and Earth materials. In general, empirical geochemical models have been shown to lack uniqueness and adequate predictive capability, even in relatively simple systems. Molecular geochemical tools, when coupled with macroscopic measurements, can provide the level of chemical detail required for the credible extrapolation of contaminant reactivity and bioavailability over ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of molecular chemistry and reaction mechanisms at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interfaces spurred by the application of new spectroscopies and microscopies. These methods, such as synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques, vibrational and resonance spectroscopies, and scanning probe microscopies, provide direct chemical information that can elucidate molecular mechanisms, including element speciation, ligand coordination and oxidation state, structural arrangement and crystallinity on different scales, and physical morphology and topography of surfaces. Nonvacuum techniques that allow examination of reactions in situ (i.e., with water or fluids present) and in real time provide direct links between molecular structure and reactivity and measurements of kinetic rates or thermodynamic properties. Applications of these diverse probes to laboratory model systems have provided fundamental insight into inorganic and organic reactions at

  8. Geochemistry of sedimentary carbonates

    Morse, John W; Mackenzie, Fred T

    1990-01-01

    .... The last major section is two chapters on the global cycle of carbon and human intervention, and the role of sedimentary carbonates as indicators of stability and changes in Earth's surface environment...

  9. Corporate Reporting on Farm Animal Welfare: An Evaluation of Global Food Companies’ Discourse and Disclosures on Farm Animal Welfare

    Rory Sullivan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The views that food companies hold about their responsibilities for animal welfare can strongly influence the lives and welfare of farm animals. If a company’s commitment is translated into action, it can be a major driver of animal welfare. The Business Benchmark on Farm Animal Welfare (BBFAW is an annual evaluation of farm animal welfare-related practices, reporting and performance of food companies. The framework evaluates how close, based on their disclosures, companies are to best practice in three areas: Management Commitment, Governance & Performance and Leadership & Innovation. The BBFAW analysed information published by 68 (2012 and 70 (2013 of the world’s largest food companies. Around 70% of companies acknowledged animal welfare as a business issue. Between 2012 and 2013, the mean BBFAW score increased significantly by 5% (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test. However, only 34% (2012 and 44% (2013 of companies published comprehensive animal welfare policies. This increase suggests that global food companies are increasingly aware that farm animal welfare is of interest to their stakeholders, but also that many companies have yet to acknowledge farm animal welfare as a business issue or to demonstrate their approach to farm animal welfare to stakeholders and society.

  10. Corporate Reporting on Farm Animal Welfare: An Evaluation of Global Food Companies' Discourse and Disclosures on Farm Animal Welfare.

    Sullivan, Rory; Amos, Nicky; van de Weerd, Heleen A

    2017-03-06

    The views that food companies hold about their responsibilities for animal welfare can strongly influence the lives and welfare of farm animals. If a company's commitment is translated into action, it can be a major driver of animal welfare. The Business Benchmark on Farm Animal Welfare (BBFAW) is an annual evaluation of farm animal welfare-related practices, reporting and performance of food companies. The framework evaluates how close, based on their disclosures, companies are to best practice in three areas: Management Commitment, Governance & Performance and Leadership & Innovation. The BBFAW analysed information published by 68 (2012) and 70 (2013) of the world's largest food companies. Around 70% of companies acknowledged animal welfare as a business issue. Between 2012 and 2013, the mean BBFAW score increased significantly by 5% ( p < 0.001, Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test). However, only 34% (2012) and 44% (2013) of companies published comprehensive animal welfare policies. This increase suggests that global food companies are increasingly aware that farm animal welfare is of interest to their stakeholders, but also that many companies have yet to acknowledge farm animal welfare as a business issue or to demonstrate their approach to farm animal welfare to stakeholders and society.

  11. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    Corporate entrepreneurship is often highlighted as being more relevant than ever, as a viable means for existing organizations to pursue creative new solutions to the complex challenges facing firms today. This includes continuously exploring and exploiting previously unexploited opportunities......, and thereby moving the organization to a new state of being. In spite of a general consensus on a strong interlinkage between the concepts of innovation and corporate entrepreneurship, the nature of this linkage is rarely addressed directly. This has made further research in the two areas problematic, mainly...... nature of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation by exploring the role played by innovation in corporate entrepreneurship. - Develop a framework of corporate entrepreneurial innovation which facilitates an understanding of challenges related hereto and practices applied to overcome these challenges...

  12. Corporate Foundations

    Herlin, Heidi; Thusgaard Pedersen, Janni

    2013-01-01

    action between business and NGOs through convening, translation, collaboration, and mediation. Our study provides valuable insights into the tri-part relationship of company foundation NGO by discussing the implications of corporate foundations taking an active role in the realm of corporate social...... responsibility (CSR). The paper hence illuminates the fascinating and overlooked role of corporate foundations as potential bridges between business and civil society. It also informs theory on boundary organizations by clarifying challenges and limits of such institutions.......This paper aims to explore the potential of Danish corporate foundations as boundary organizations facilitating relationships between their founding companies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Hitherto, research has been silent about the role of corporate foundations in relation to cross...

  13. Corporate Reporting on Farm Animal Welfare: An Evaluation of Global Food Companies’ Discourse and Disclosures on Farm Animal Welfare

    Sullivan, Rory; Amos, Nicky; van de Weerd, Heleen A.

    2017-01-01

    policies. This increase suggests that global food companies are increasingly aware that farm animal welfare is of interest to their stakeholders, but also that many companies have yet to acknowledge farm animal welfare as a business issue or to demonstrate their approach to farm animal welfare to stakeholders and society. PMID:28272316

  14. The compact AMS facility at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Zhu, Sanyuan; Ding, Ping; Wang, Ning; Shen, Chengde; Jia, Guodong; Zhang, Gan

    2015-10-01

    A compact 14C AMS facility manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) has been installed at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS). The system is based on a Model 1.5SDH-1 Pelletron accelerator with a maximum terminal volt 0.6 MV. This paper reports the performance and the operation of this machine in the first several months after installation.

  15. The compact AMS facility at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences

    Zhu, Sanyuan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ding, Ping; Wang, Ning; Shen, Chengde [State Key Laboratory of Isotopic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jia, Guodong [Key laboratory of Marginal Sea Geology, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, Gan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A compact {sup 14}C AMS facility manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) has been installed at Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIGCAS). The system is based on a Model 1.5SDH-1 Pelletron accelerator with a maximum terminal volt 0.6 MV. This paper reports the performance and the operation of this machine in the first several months after installation.

  16. Corporate Taxation and Corporate Governance

    Köthenbürger, Marko; Stimmelmayr, Michael

    2009-01-01

    if the corporate tax system exempts the normal return on investment from taxation. The optimal system may well use the full return on investment as a tax base. Hence, tax systems such as an Allowance for Corporate Equity (ACE) or a Cash-flow tax do not have the familiar efficiency-enhancing effects in the presence...

  17. Corporal punishment.

    Bauman, L J; Friedman, S B

    1998-04-01

    Pediatricians differ on the optimal ways to discipline children. The major controversy surrounds the use of corporal punishment. In an effort to resolve this controversy, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) cosponsored a conference entitled "The Short and Long-Term Consequences of Corporal Punishment" in February 1996. This article reviews scientific literature on corporal punishment and summarizes the proceedings from the conference. The authors conclude that, although the research data are inadequate to resolve the controversy, there are areas of consensus. Practitioners should assess the spanking practices of the parent they see and counsel parents to avoid those that are, by AAP consensus, dangerous, ineffective, or abusive.

  18. NRC nuclear waste geochemistry 1983

    Alexander, D.H.; Birchard, G.F.

    1984-05-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to present results from NRC-sponsored research and to identify regulatory research issues which need to be addressed prior to licensing a high-level waste repository. Important summaries of technical issues and recommendations are included with each paper. The issue reflect areas of technical uncertainty addressed by the NRC Research program in geochemistry. The objectives of the NRC Research Program in geochemistry are to provide a technical basis for waste management rulemaking, to provide the NRC Waste Management Licensing Office with information that can be used to support sound licensing decisions, and to identify investigations that need to be conducted by DOE to support a license application. Individual papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  19. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr{sup 2+} onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of {sup 152}Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO{sub 2} sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations

  20. Corporate Responsibility

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    Appeals to corporate responsibility often simply take for granted that businesses have ethical responsibilities that go beyond just respecting the law. This paper addresses arguments to the effect that businesses have no such responsibilities. The interesting claim is not that businesses have no ethical responsibility at all but that their primal responsibility is to increase their profits. The extent to which there is reason to take such arguments seriously delineates the limits of corporate...

  1. Globalization

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  2. Globalization

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-01-01

    There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  3. Understanding political responsibility in corporate citizenship

    Tempels, Tjidde; Blok, Vincent; Verweij, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we explore the debate on corporate citizenship and the role of business in global governance. In the debate on political corporate social responsibility it is assumed that under globalization business is taking up a greater political role. Apart from economic responsibilities

  4. Corporate strategic branding: How country and corporate brands come together

    Đorđević Bojan

    2008-01-01

    The concept of countries as brands has been increasingly recognized in the post-modern global world. A strong country brand can provide corporate brands with a unique set of values, which supports their positioning on the international market. Simultaneously, once corporate brands achieve worldwide success, they contribute actively to developing new features of the country brand. Consumers pay more and more attention to products' country of origin. When the name of a country is mentioned, the...

  5. Corporate Foresight at Cisco

    Rohrbeck, René; Bøe-Lillegraven, Siri

    Cisco Systems traditional innovation model is challenged. It is no longer possible to simply scout for promising start-ups, integrate them and grow them globally to succeed. This case describes the challenge faced by Cisco to create a comprehensive and systematic strategic foresight system...... that shall be tied into technology strategy and corporate business development. The case elaborates on the process and the best practices in the introduction of the Cisco Technology Radar approach....

  6. Globalization

    Andru?cã Maria Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The field of globalization has highlighted an interdependence implied by a more harmonious understanding determined by the daily interaction between nations through the inducement of peace and the management of streamlining and the effectiveness of the global economy. For the functioning of the globalization, the developing countries that can be helped by the developed ones must be involved. The international community can contribute to the institution of the development environment of the gl...

  7. Corporate Governance

    Dragoș-Mihail Daghie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze and understand the recently introduced form of managementof a company limited by shares. The Law no. 441/2006, which fundamentally amended Company Law,created this form of controlling the company, the corporate governance, but the legislation does not explicitlydefine what it wants to achieve through this instrument. This topic is recent in research as the theme ofgerman-roman commercial law systems (in French corporate governance system was introduced in 1966 andin Romania in 2006 but in terms of Anglo-Saxon law, the topic has been addressed years since 1776 (AdamSmith: The Wealth of Nations The concept of corporate governance would like, as a result, to establish somerules that companies must comply in order to achieve effective governance, transparent and beneficial forboth shareholders and for the minority. Corporate governance is a key element with an aim at improvingefficiency and economic growth in full accordance with the increase of investors’ confidence. Corporategovernance assumes a series of relationship between the company management, leadership, shareholders andthe other people concerned. Also corporate governance provides for that structure by means of which thecompany’s targets are set out and the means to achieve them and also the manner how to monitor such.

  8. Corporate Risk Disclosure and Corporate Governance

    Kaouthar Lajili

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, research which integrates corporate governance and risk management has been limited. Yet, risk exposure and management are increasingly becoming the core function of modern business enterprises in various sectors and industries domestically and globally. Risk identification and management are crucial in any business strategy design and implementation. From the investors’ point of view, knowledge of the risk profile, risk appetite and risk management are key elements in making sound portfolio investment decisions. This paper examines the relationships between corporate governance mechanisms and risk disclosure behavior using a sample of Canadian publicly-traded companies (TSX 230. Results show that Canadian public companies are more likely to disclose risk management information over and above the mandatory risk disclosures, if they are larger in size and if their boards of directors have more independent members. Minority voting control ownership structures appear to negatively impact risk disclosure and CEO incentive compensation shows mixed results. The paper concludes that more research is needed to further assess the impact of various governance mechanisms on corporate risk management and disclosure behavior.

  9. Corporate governance of the environment.

    Purvis, B.

    2005-01-01

    The global pursuit of a more sustainable future cannot be achieved without the active engagement of the business community. The challenge for business has been to strategically engage with and embed environmental responsibility within their wider corporate governance to create effective corporate governance of the environment. The assumption would appear to be, that we have already witnessed the construction of such governance, delivered through the attainment of a paradigmatic shift in corpo...

  10. Corporate social responsibility in hospitality

    Snježana Gagić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Responsible management of global hospitality companies increasingly recognizes how important are concerns about the society, the environment as well as all stakeholders in maintaining a good market position. In Serbia, the concept of corporate social responsibility is relatively unknown and insufficiently researched in all business areas, especially in the hospitality industry where small businesses are dominated. The papers task is to present particular activities that demonstrate social responsibility to employees, customers-guests, local communities as well as the environment. The paper aims to highlight the benefits of adopting the principles of corporate social responsibility and innovation applied in catering enterprises as an example of good corporate social responsibility practices.

  11. Corporal punishment.

    Zolotor, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Corporal punishment is used for discipline in most homes in the United States. It is also associated with a long list of adverse developmental, behavioral, and health-related consequences. Primary care providers, as trusted sources for parenting information, have an opportunity to engage parents in discussions about discipline as early as infancy. These discussions should focus on building parents' skills in the use of other behavioral techniques, limiting (or eliminating) the use of corporal punishment and identifying additional resources as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries.

  13. Corporate entrepreneurship

    Christensen, Karina

    2005-01-01

    Corporate entreprenørskab kan blive svaret på, hvordan Danmark fremmer en mere videnintensiv produktion. Begrebet er blevet anvendt til at forklare forskellige organisatoriske fænomener alt fra strategi over ledelse i al almindelighed til innovation, hvilket har medført en mangfoldighed af begreb...

  14. Corporate Venturing

    Vintergaard, Christian

    path of an entrepreneurial opportunity of the Danish corporate venture capitalist,Danfoss A/S. This paper distinguishes itself from previous research done on entrepreneurialopportunities by creating a holistic and conceptual framework, which broadens and expands theperception of the market participants...

  15. Corporate Awakening

    LaFrance, Julie; Lehmann, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Both the business community and public organisation...... for cooperation on community development programs in Myanmar....

  16. Transnational politics and translocal governance: The politics of corporate responsibility

    Banerjee, S. B.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I provide a critical analysis of the politics of corporate social responsibility. I argue that corporate social responsibility is a strategy that enables multinational corporations to exercise power in the global political economy. Using the global extractive industries as a context, I focus on conflicts between communities, the state and multinational corporations that arise owing to the negative social and environmental impacts of mining and extraction. In particular, I ana...

  17. A Case Study in Corporate Social Responsibility

    Sharon K. Kendrick

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This case study promotes analysis through a brief investigation into the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR in the operation of a multinational corporation as evidenced by Google, Inc. The study focuses on a transnational company in order to observe the impact of CSR practice on a global level. The study will present implications of CSR for corporate management, corporate employees, state regulators, shareholders, and customers in general. In addition, the study will discuss consequences of poor CSR compliance for a multinational corporation. Questions for analysis include implications of CSR, employee retention, development of corporate culture, and evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of different CSR approaches. Upon conclusion of the study, suggestions are made for future collaborative efforts in corporate social responsibility as applied to psychological, sociological, and economical motives. Recruiting and training possibilities also present partnership opportunities for best practice sharing in regards to community, civic, and service engagement.

  18. Globalization

    Plum, Maja

    Globalization is often referred to as external to education - a state of affair facing the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this paper it is examined as internal to curriculum; analysed as a problematization in a Foucaultian sense. That is, as a complex of attentions, worries, ways...... of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish Pre-school, and the way the curricular variable of the pre-school child comes into being through globalization as a problematization, carried forth by the comparative practices of PISA...

  19. Globalization

    F. Gerard Adams

    2008-01-01

    The rapid globalization of the world economy is causing fundamental changes in patterns of trade and finance. Some economists have argued that globalization has arrived and that the world is “flat†. While the geographic scope of markets has increased, the author argues that new patterns of trade and finance are a result of the discrepancies between “old†countries and “new†. As the differences are gradually wiped out, particularly if knowledge and technology spread worldwide, the t...

  20. Environmental performance and corporate captial structure

    Παπαγεωργόπουλος, Χρήστος

    2014-01-01

    In the modern globalized economies the corporations, as an institution, has proved to be the most influential societal driver. In this environment there are many who urge for a reexamination of the corporations’ role as corporate citizens. While the neoclassical shareholder theory regards a firm’s sole interest the maximization of the shareholder’s value, new theories have been proposed under the principle of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). These theories have incorporated into their d...

  1. PRACTICE OF GOOD GOVERNANCE AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Bălăceanu Cristina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance reforms are occurring in countries around the globe and potentially impacting the population of the entire planet. In developing countries, such reforms occur in a larger context that is primarily defined by previous attempts at promoting “development” and recent processes of economic globalization. In this context, corporate governance reforms (in combination with the liberalising reforms associated with economic globalization, in effect represent a new development strategy for third world countries. The most basic questions that arise with respect to this situation are what the prospects for this new development model are and whether alternatives should be considered. Keywords: governance, corporate governance, economic globalization, development.

  2. Corporate Universities and Corporation- University Partnerships in Thailand: Complimenting Education in Learning, Leadership and Change

    Oliver S. Crocco

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With an estimated workforce of 285 million and the establishment of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN Economic Community in 2015, ASEAN faces vast challenges in human resource development (HRD and higher education. These challenges in Thailand have resulted in the rise of corporate universities and corporation-university partnerships. Corporate partnerships in education adapt quickly to industry needs and are increasingly popular and complimentary to traditional higher education. This research looks at one corporate university and one corporation-university partnership to investigate how, if at all, corporate universities and partnerships address HRD issues such as adult learning, leadership development, organisational change, corporate social responsibility (CSR, as well as ethical and global issues. This research finds initial evidence that corporate educational strategies address a variety of HRD issues and have the potential to revolutionise and compliment higher education in Thailand in a way that drives the nation toward a more sustainable future.

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility in Afghanistan

    Azizi, Sameer

    This doctoral dissertation examines the business-development relations in Afghanistan by focusing on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and other related practices from corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. More concretely, the study aims to explore the characteristics...... provides a relevant empirical focus that can enrich the theoretical debates about CSR in developing countries. The study thereby stresses on the importance of context, and integrates both the societal and corporate dimensions to study CSR by corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry...... and drivers of the various CSR practices in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry in order to critically assess the relationship between CSR and development in such context. The thesis highlights that the national context of Afghanistan in combination with the global mobile telecommunications industry...

  4. The board of directors in listed companies under the corporate governance system in Saudi law as compared to English law and global standards

    Alamri, Khalid; Milman, David; Lawton, Philip

    2018-01-01

    Saudi Arabia has a unique environment in terms of its political, economic, legal and judicial aspects which have some anomalous characteristics that create challenges for corporate governance. Further challenges are presented by the current structure of listed companies and by Saudi Arabia’s Vision for 2030.1 This environment significantly influences the role of the board of directors in listed companies and increases its role in safeguarding the interests of different shareholders and stakeh...

  5. Corporate Language and Corporate Talk

    Zølner, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the case studies of two Danish based multinational companies (MNCs) which provides the an insight into the role of languages in organizational learning. It mentions that the studies focus on the sharing of the understanding and practices among their employees across the geogr......The article presents the case studies of two Danish based multinational companies (MNCs) which provides the an insight into the role of languages in organizational learning. It mentions that the studies focus on the sharing of the understanding and practices among their employees across...... the geographical borders by the medium of common corporate values for knowledge management, collection of data and analysis in these studies inspired by approach of ground theory and presents a usefulness of distinguishing between corporate language and talks to enable the headquarters learning. Also it concludes...... that both of the MNCs are of Danish origin but executives of both companies are proficient in English language....

  6. Going Corporate: Teaching English in the Workplace.

    Hayflich, Faith

    1998-01-01

    The accelerated globalization of business is one factor causing the growth of corporate English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) in North America (which provides increased opportunities for ESL teachers). This paper discusses challenges and changes in teaching ESL within corporations; creative class scheduling; instructional settings; diverse students,…

  7. Corporate contestability and corporate expropriation

    Abdul Hadi Zulkafli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents evidence on the role of ownership in dealing with corporate expropriation of listed companies in Malaysia. From the perspective of expropriation, a single controlling shareholder is always associated with such behavior due to their power and control at the expense of minority shareholder. However, subsequent individual or coalition of large shareholders can be an important corporate governance tool by providing effective monitoring that would lessen the possibility of expropriation by the controlling shareholder. Relating to that, this study evaluates the role of controlling and large shareholders in dealing with corporate expropriation. It is found that there is a negative relationship between single controlling shareholders and dividend payout ratio indicating that firms with only controlling shareholder will pay a lower dividend due to possible expropriation through profit diversion by controlling shareholder. Using Herfindahl Index as a proxy for ownership contestability, the presence of large shareholders along with controlling shareholder has a positive relationship with dividend payout implying that increased contestability helps to curb the power of controlling shareholder to expropriate fund for their own benefit. In accordance with agency theory, the outcome suggests that large shareholders play a monitoring role in minimizing the Type II agency problem. It is also verifying the argument made based on the Catering Theory of Dividend that the presence of large shareholder brings benefit to all shareholders as they are able to reduce profit diversion by demanding for higher dividend

  8. Applied Geochemistry Special Issue on Environmental geochemistry of modern mining

    Seal, Robert R.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Environmental geochemistry is an integral part of the mine-life cycle, particularly for modern mining. The critical importance of environmental geochemistry begins with pre-mining baseline characterization and the assessment of environmental risks related to mining, continues through active mining especially in water and waste management practices, and culminates in mine closure. The enhanced significance of environmental geochemistry to modern mining has arisen from an increased knowledge of the impacts that historical and active mining can have on the environment, and from new regulations meant to guard against these impacts. New regulations are commonly motivated by advances in the scientific understanding of the environmental impacts of past mining. The impacts can be physical, chemical, and biological in nature. The physical challenges typically fall within the purview of engineers, whereas the chemical and biological challenges typically require a multidisciplinary array of expertise including geologists, geochemists, hydrologists, microbiologists, and biologists. The modern mine-permitting process throughout most of the world now requires that potential risks be assessed prior to the start of mining. The strategies for this risk assessment include a thorough characterization of pre-mining baseline conditions and the identification of risks specifically related to the manner in which the ore will be mined and processed, how water and waste products will be managed, and what the final configuration of the post-mining landscape will be.In the Fall 2010, the Society of Economic Geologists held a short course in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver, Colorado (USA) to examine the environmental geochemistry of modern mining. The intent was to focus on issues that are pertinent to current and future mines, as opposed to abandoned mines, which have been the focus of numerous previous short courses. The geochemical

  9. Global Journal of Geological Sciences

    Global Journal of Geological Sciences is aimed at promoting research in all areas of Geological Sciences including geochemistry, geophysics, engineering geology, hydrogeology, petrology, mineralogy, geochronology, tectonics, mining, structural geology, marine geology, space science etc. Visit the Global Journal Series ...

  10. Going Corporate

    Kadre, Shailendra

    2011-01-01

    Going Corporate: A Geek's Guide shows technology workers how to gain the understanding and skills necessary for becoming an effective, promotable manager or sought-after consultant or freelancer. Technology professionals typically dive deeply into small pieces of technology - like lines of code or the design of a circuit. As a result, they may have trouble seeing the bigger picture and how their work supports an organization's goals. But ignoring or dismissing the business or operational aspects of projects and products can lead to career stagnation. In fact, understanding the larger business

  11. Corporate Foresight

    Rohrbeck, René; Gemünden, Hans Georg

    2011-01-01

    Although in the last three decades much knowledge has been produced on how best to conduct foresight exercises, but little is known on how foresight should be integrated with the innovation effort of a company. Drawing on empirical evidence from 19 case studies and 107 interviews, we identify three...... roles that corporate foresight should play to maximize the innovation capacity of a firm: (1) the strategist role, which explores new business fields; (2) the initiator role, which increases the number of innovation concepts and ideas; and (3) the opponent role, which challenges innovation projects...

  12. Corporate responsibility

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2007-01-01

    Is it legitimate for a business to concentrate on profits under respect for the law and ethical custom? On the one hand, there seems to be good reasons for claiming that a corporation has a duty to act for the benefit of all its stakeholders. On the other hand, this seems to dissolve the notion...... of a private business; but then again, a private business would appear to be exempted from ethical responsibility. This is what Kenneth Goodpaster has called the stakeholder paradox: either we have ethics without business or we have business without ethics. Through a different route, I reach the same solution...

  13. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Sørensen, Suna

    2006-01-01

    The recognition of the importance of entrepreneurial dynamics in corporate context is increasingly acknowledged in both entrepreneurship and strategic management literature, as firms today face a reality in which frame-breaking innovation is an important element of survival. From this understanding......, the concept of Strategic Entrepreneurship (SE) has arisen, arguing a logic of focusing on the intersections between the two fields. This paper sets out to explore the SE construct empirically. Through seven case studies evolving around radical technological innovations, evidence is found of the importance...

  14. Corporate Fictions

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  15. The State of the Corporation

    Hein Jessen, Mathias

    Today it has become commonplace to claim the demise of the power of the democratic nation-state due to globalization, neoliberal policies and the increasing power of transnational entities (UN, EU, IMF, WTO, World Bank) and multinational corporations. This view, however, prevalent in both public...

  16. Corporate Donations and Shareholder Value

    Liang, H.; Renneboog, Luc

    2017-01-01

    Do corporate donations enhance shareholder wealth or reflect agency problems? We address this question for a global sample of firms whereby we distinguish between charitable and political donations, as well as between donations in cash and in kind. We find that charitable donations are positively

  17. Rhetoric and realities of corporate social responsibility

    Smid, H.

    2014-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is often considered as an alternative for direct government regulation to internalize externalities on markets. Especially in a complex economically liberated and globalized world order, in which direct government regulation and centrally creating new markets

  18. TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS

    Mladen M. Ivic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the globalization of business has caused an increase in competition in the international market. Number of organizations different forms be increasing according to the development level of the business. Multinational companies are all companies that operate on the principle of equity investments from several countries and have control over the property for at least two or more countries. These organizations have a well-developed network of its own branches which are located around the world, through which they control the production, distribution of goods and services. Global companies - terminology under this name is first mentioned in literature in the early 90's. Global companies implement a global strategy that treats the whole world as one market and act in terms of strengthening the forces of global integration and national responsiveness pad.

  19. Corporate Governance, Sustainability and Capital Markets Orientation

    Daniela M. Salvioni; Francesca Gennari

    2014-01-01

    Generally accepted principles of effective corporate governance have taken hold in the context of different models of governance, whose implementation is also linked to the share structure of the companies and to the dynamics of risk’s capital markets. Global companies need a global approach in the acquisition of consensus and financial resources, first of all through a correct development of the corporate governance activities and promoting a market-driven management inspired by long-term su...

  20. Practice of good governance and corporate governance

    Bălăceanu Cristina; Predonu Andreea – Monica

    2010-01-01

    Corporate governance reforms are occurring in countries around the globe and potentially impacting the population of the entire planet. In developing countries, such reforms occur in a larger context that is primarily defined by previous attempts at promoting “development” and recent processes of economic globalization. In this context, corporate governance reforms (in combination with the liberalising reforms associated with economic globalization), in effect re...

  1. Globalisation, corporate governance and the construction industry

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available , corporate governance, ethics, globalisation Introduction One of the characteristics of globalisation is the ease of engaging in business transactions in global financial markets. The exploration of these markets has, however, exposed a high degree.... The search for core values is manifest in the inclusion of social issues like poverty alleviation, job creation, human rights, corporate governance, and ethics and spirituality onto the global agenda. The second struggle – determining a management model...

  2. Corporal Punishment in Schools: Theoretical Discussion and Personal Experience

    Alsaif, Omar Abdulaziz

    2015-01-01

    This paper ponders the lasting effects of corporal punishment on students. The paper first considers the benefits and faults of corporal punishment by comparing the experiences of two generations of students and teachers. Starting with the definition of corporal punishment as applied locally and globally, the paper analyzes the reasons for its…

  3. Exploring the Role of Leadership in Corporate Social Responsibility

    Strand, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Leadership as demonstrated by today's corporate leaders has been called into question. In the aftermath of corporate scandals and global financial crisis, many people today desire leadership that promotes the ideals of corporate social responsibility (CSR). At the present time there exists...

  4. Using Cartoons to Teach Corporate Social Responsibility: A Class Exercise

    Mills, Adam J.; Robson, Karen; Pitt, Leyland F.

    2013-01-01

    Changing curriculum content requirements, based on shifting global perspectives on corporate behavior and capitalism as well as business school accreditation requirements, mean that many marketing instructors have attempted to introduce discussions of organizational ethics, corporate social responsibility, and corporate governance into their…

  5. Radiogenic isotope geochemistry of sedimentary and aquatic systems

    Stille, P.; Shields, G.

    1997-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: Basic principles of isotopic geochemistry; weathering; isotopic geochemistry of river water; isotopic geochemistry in the environment; isotopic composition of seawater past and present (Sr, Nd, Pb, Os, Ce); isotope geochemistry of detrital and authigenic clay minerals in marine sediemnts (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, O); the Sm-N isotope system in detrital and authigenic argillaceous sediments. (SR), provided they are of exceptional interest and focused on a single topic. (orig./SR)

  6. Radiogenic isotope geochemistry of sedimentary and aquatic systems

    Stille, P.; Shields, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Centre de Sedimentologie et Geochimie de la Surface

    1997-12-31

    The following topics are discussed: Basic principles of isotopic geochemistry; weathering; isotopic geochemistry of river water; isotopic geochemistry in the environment; isotopic composition of seawater past and present (Sr, Nd, Pb, Os, Ce); isotope geochemistry of detrital and authigenic clay minerals in marine sediemnts (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, O); the Sm-N isotope system in detrital and authigenic argillaceous sediments. (SR), provided they are of exceptional interest and focused on a single topic. (orig./SR)

  7. Expanding educational access and opportunities: The globalization and foreign direct investment of multinational corporations and their influence on STEM, project-based learning and the national science and technology fair in schools in Costa Rica

    Valdez, Joaquin G.

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the influence of globalization and the foreign direct investment (FDI) of multinational corporations (MNCs) on the curriculum in schools in Costa Rica. The study focused primarily on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Project-Based Learning (PBL), 21st century skills, and the national science and technology fair. The high influx of MNCs such as Intel has changed the global and educational culture of the country increasing the number of knowledge-based workers in Costa Rica. As a result, policy changes have been instituted in education to mirror the demands of sustaining the country's global economy. This study was supported by the creation of three research questions that would attempt to answer 1) the extent that teachers implementing STEM curriculum trace their practices back to policy, globalization, and multinational corporations as well as the extent to which the economic growth of Costa Rica and STEM education are related, 2) how mandating the national science and technology fair has influenced 21st century skills through project-based learning and the use of technology by teachers and its impact on curriculum and instruction, and 3) how has the national science and technology fair policy changed the value of STEM education for students, teachers, and educational leaders. To further understand the outcome of this study, four theoretical frameworks were applied that included, Spring's theory of world educational culture, Friedman's world flatteners, Wagner's 21st century skills and partnerships for 21st century skills, and Slough and Milam's STEM project-based learning theoretical framework. Each framework was applied to support the changes to the educational system; survival skills necessary to compete in the global job market; application of 21st century skills in the classroom and in the science projects students created. A research team comprised of 14 doctoral students, led by Dr

  8. Strategi Pemberdayaan Perusahaan Waralaba Lokal Menuju Waralaba Global: Studi Kasus Good Corporate Governance oleh Eksekutif Puncak di J.Co, Es Teller 77, dan Pecel Lele Lela

    Lelo Yosep Laurentius

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is mainly intended for reviewing and strengthening leadership, corporate governance good practices and management philosophy in the concepts, systems, and human resources (HR of the company. A new progressive corporate leader should be able to quickly identify the strengths and weaknesses of his/her business, to increase the first and to reduce the pressures or to liquidate the later. Finally, he/she must be able to encourage his/her subordinates to achieve easily identified and highly attractive goals. The target is to build the 21st century company where all employees realize that they can make it different and that they will warmly welcome the managerial motivation. Thus, the chief executive officer assumes the responsibility for constructive managerial skills. Research used qualitative approach to disclose GCG in local franchise companies. Case study was done purposively with chief executive officer of the company. Data were gathered by observation and literature study. Analysis was conducted by data reduction, data presentation, and conclusion. 

  9. Uranium geochemistry of Orca Basin

    Weber, F.F. Jr.; Sackett, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Orca Basin, an anoxic, brine-filled depression at a depth of 2200 m in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope, has been studied with respect to its uranium geochemistry. Uranium concentration profiles for four cores from within the basin were determined by delayed-neutron counting. Uranium concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 4.1 ppm on a salt-free and carbonate-corrected basis. The highest uranium concentrations were associated with the lowest percentage and delta 13 C organic carbon values. For comparison, cores from the brine-filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Uranium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.6 ppm in the Suakin Deep and from 8.0 to 11.0 ppm in the Atlantis II Deep. No significant correlation was found between uranium concentrations and organic carbon concentrations and delta 13 C values for these cores. Although anoxic conditions are necessary for significant uranium uptake by non-carbonate marine sediments, other factors such as dilution by rapidly depositing materials and uranium supply via mixing and diffusion across density gradients may be as important in determining uranium concentrations in hypersaline basin sediments. (author)

  10. Geochemistry of radioactive waste disposal

    Bird, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Safe, permanent disposal of radioactive wastes requires isolation of a number of elements including Se, Tc, I, Sr, Cs, Pd, u, Np, Pu and Cm from the environment for a long period of time. The aquatic chemistry of these elements ranges from simple anionic (I - ,IO 3 - ) and cationic (Cs + ,Sr ++ ) forms to multivalent hydrolyzed complexes which can be anionic or cationic (Pu(OH) 2 + ,Pu(OH) 3 + , PuO 2 (CO 3 )(OH) - ,PuO 2 Cl - ,etc.) depending on the chemical environment. The parameters which can affect repository safety are rate of access and composition of grounwater, stability of the waste container, stability of the waste form, rock-water-waste interactons, and dilution and dispersion as the waste moves away from the repository site. Our overall research program on radioactive waste disposal includes corrosion studies of containment systems hydrothermal stability of various waste forms, and geochemical behaviour of various nuclides including solubilities, redox equilibria, hydrolysis, colloid fomation and transport ion exchange equilibria and adsorption on mineral surfaces and irreversible precipitation reactions. This paper discusses the geochemistry of I, Se, Tc, Cs, Sr and the actinide elements and potential mechanisms by which the mobility could be retarded if necessary

  11. The Global Value Chain

    Sørensen, Olav Jull

    The conference paper aims to develop the global value chain concept by including corporate internal value adding activities and competition to the basic framework in order to turn the global value chain into a strategic management tool......The conference paper aims to develop the global value chain concept by including corporate internal value adding activities and competition to the basic framework in order to turn the global value chain into a strategic management tool...

  12. Evolution of Corporate Essence

    Fomcenco, Alex

    2016-01-01

    that applies to a traditional limited liability company. Its main distinctive attributes are corporate purpose, accountability of its management, and transparency requirements. Although, a Public Benefit Corporation does not impose any revolutionary amendments to the way the traditional corporations are......, it offers a legal framework where public benefit is more important than profits. As a corporate entity, Public Benefit Corporation already exists in numerous jurisdictions and those jurisdictions that do not yet facilitate creation of this corporate form should most definitely consider it....

  13. Managing Corporate Reputation Through Corporate Branding

    Schultz, Majken; Hatch, Mary Jo; Adams, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This article, which concentrates on symbolic management by explaining the role of corporate branding in managing corporate reputation, using Novo Nordisk as a case study, presents three perspectives on corporate branding: the marketing perspective, the organisational perspective and the co...... is a way to influence corporate reputation. The Novo Nordisk management believes the data indicate that corporate branding influenced reputation more than the other way around. Formal brand management practices may work considerably better when they complement rather than try to control existing forces......-creation perspective. The three perspectives reviewed show the possibility of developing a multidisciplinary conceptualisation of corporate branding. They all offer insights important to managing organisations as corporate brands in a multi-stakeholder context and thus to the likelihood that corporate branding...

  14. Knowledge discovery based on experiential learning corporate culture management

    Tu, Kai-Jan

    2014-10-01

    A good corporate culture based on humanistic theory can make the enterprise's management very effective, all enterprise's members have strong cohesion and centripetal force. With experiential learning model, the enterprise can establish an enthusiastic learning spirit corporate culture, have innovation ability to gain the positive knowledge growth effect, and to meet the fierce global marketing competition. A case study on Trend's corporate culture can offer the proof of industry knowledge growth rate equation as the contribution to experiential learning corporate culture management.

  15. Building a Climate of Change with a link through Transformational Leadership and Corporate Culture: A Management key to a Global Environment

    Paul Llwellyn Flemming

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaders in the Caribbean Diaspora have argued that there is no documented evidence of the association between the three fundamental pillars of public sector organization: leadership, performance and culture. This cross-culture leadership concern has evoked a series of research which basic aim is to conceptualize the leadership culture phenomenon. The problem is that there is a high degree of dysfunctional leadership within the public sectors organizations in the Caribbean diaspora and there is limited empirical evidence that can be had to validate the reason for this inadequacy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the link between transformational leadership styles, corporate organizational culture types and performance in sixteen public sectors organizations. The methodology implemented in this research is the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ 5X, and the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI to collect data. Seventy-five executive directors completed measures of the MLQ 5x leadership traits and culture types. A total of 200 employees from   across sixteen public sector organizations completed the measures on leadership and culture. The responses were scaled and coded to enable the segmentation of the data into dependent and independent variables based on the leadership, performance and culture variables. The study utilized the multiple regression models and correlation statistical analyses to determine the degree of commonality among the components. The results indicate support for the hypotheses link between the traits of transformational leadership and organizational culture with performance being the mediating variable. Exploratory analysis showed that several executive leaders have leadership traits that support culture values. The study concluded that transformational leadership and corporate organizational culture have positive effects on facilitating performance and is best suited in managing change and

  16. Geochemistry of subduction zone serpentinites: A review

    Deschamps, Fabien; Godard, Marguerite; Guillot, Stéphane; Hattori, Kéiko

    2013-09-01

    Over the last decades, numerous studies have emphasized the role of serpentinites in the subduction zone geodynamics. Their presence and role in subduction environments are recognized through geophysical, geochemical and field observations of modern and ancient subduction zones and large amounts of geochemical database of serpentinites have been created. Here, we present a review of the geochemistry of serpentinites, based on the compilation of ~ 900 geochemical data of abyssal, mantle wedge and exhumed serpentinites after subduction. The aim was to better understand the geochemical evolution of these rocks during their subduction as well as their impact in the global geochemical cycle. When studying serpentinites, it is essential to determine their protoliths and their geological history before serpentinization. The geochemical data of serpentinites shows little mobility of compatible and rare earth elements (REE) at the scale of hand-specimen during their serpentinization. Thus, REE abundance can be used to identify the protolith for serpentinites, as well as magmatic processes such as melt/rock interactions before serpentinization. In the case of subducted serpentinites, the interpretation of trace element data is difficult due to the enrichments of light REE, independent of the nature of the protolith. We propose that enrichments are probably not related to serpentinization itself, but mostly due to (sedimentary-derived) fluid/rock interactions within the subduction channel after the serpentinization. It is also possible that the enrichment reflects the geochemical signature of the mantle protolith itself which could derive from the less refractory continental lithosphere exhumed at the ocean-continent transition. Additionally, during the last ten years, numerous analyses have been carried out, notably using in situ approaches, to better constrain the behavior of fluid-mobile elements (FME; e.g. B, Li, Cl, As, Sb, U, Th, Sr) incorporated in serpentine phases

  17. Proceedings of the national symposium on current trends in geochemistry, exploration and environment: abstract book

    2015-01-01

    The topics covered in this symposium are solid earth geochemistry and geochemical modeling, precambrian geology, geochemistry and petrogenesis, geochemistry, peterogenisis, sedimentology, chemostratigraphy and paleoclimate, atomic minerals, ferrous/non ferrous minerals, REE minerals, PGE and base metals, oil, hydrocarbons, industrial minerals and gem stones, hydrogeochemistry, environmental geochemistry, biogeochemistry and medical geology and analytical geochemistry and method development. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  18. Geochemistry Review Panel report on the SRP geochemistry program and draft geochemistry summary program plan (May, 1986) and discussion of panel recommendations

    1986-12-01

    The Geochemistry Review Panel (GRP) was established by the Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO) to help evaluate geochemistry-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The May 1986 meeting of the GRP reviewed the Salt Repository Program (SRP) geochemistry program developed by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI). This program is described in the Draft Geochemistry Plan of April 9, 1986. This report documents the GRP's comments and recommendations on this subject and the ONWI responses to the specific points raised by the GRP

  19. Historical foundations of chemical geology and geochemistry

    Manten, A.A.

    1966-01-01

    Roughly, the name chemical geology has been used for as long as chemistry has been applied in geology; the name geochemistry was introduced by Schönbein, in 1838. Whereas initially the names were often regarded as synonymous, in our century there is a tendency to make a distinction between the two

  20. Geochemistry of sulphur in petroleum systems

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Orr, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    A renaissance in the 1980s concerning geochemistry of sulfur in fossil fuels makes an update of the subject timely. Papers developed from the 1989 ACS Symposium in Dallas provide a cross-section of recent research and progress in our understanding of the abundance and nature of organically bound

  1. Urban environmental geochemistry of trace metals

    Wong, Coby S.C.; Li Xiangdong; Thornton, Iain

    2006-01-01

    As the world's urban population continues to grow, it becomes increasingly imperative to understand the dynamic interactions between human activities and the urban environment. The development of urban environmental geochemistry has yielded a significant volume of scientific information about geochemical phenomena found uniquely in the urban environment, such as the distribution, dispersion, and geochemical characteristics of some toxic and potentially toxic trace metals. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the development of urban environmental geochemistry as a field of scientific study and highlight major transitions during the course of its development from its establishment to the major scientific interests in the field today. An extensive literature review is also conducted of trace metal contamination of the urban terrestrial environment, in particular of urban soils, in which the uniqueness of the urban environment and its influences on trace metal contamination are elaborated. Potential areas of future development in urban environmental geochemistry are identified and discussed. - Urban environmental geochemistry as a scientific discipline provides valuable information on trace metal contamination of the urban environment and its associated health effects

  2. Analysis of the Main Access Municipal Project Free and Free Internet in Public Squares: Digital Inclusion in the Present Corporate Information Globalized

    Anderson Nogueira Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has as its theme the role of municipalities in the current global information society. So it has the general objective analysis on the free access to the internet in public places as a means of digital inclusion, with such spaces known as digital o hotspots squares. In this case we will present concepts, definitions and brief historical development of the objects of study of this research, namely, globalization, the information society and digital inclusion. We emphasize that this research will analyze recent data on internet access in Brazil, and will check the key municipal projects freely and free internet access in public squares. For this research we use the hypothetical-deductive method by the methodology of analysis of books, scientific papers and official data by renamed institutions to present a scientifically valid conclusion.

  3. Financialization and the Multinational Corporation

    Morgan, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    The terrain on which states, trade unions and social movements confront multinational corporations has changed dramatically over the last two decades as a result of two phenomena – the disaggregation of the supply chain and the financialization of corporations. Trade unions and social movements...... have increasingly challenged the inequalities and unfairnesses which have emerged from the globalization of supply chains. However, issues of financialization, although increasingly high profile since 2008, have generally been treated separately. This article argues that the two phenomena...... are integrally related within the same process of neoliberal globalization. It argues that trade unions and social movements need to connect together issues to do with the relocation and restructuring of employment with issues of financialization and the need for financial reform. Change will only be effective...

  4. Imageries of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Höllerer, Markus A.; Jancsary, Dennis; Meyer, Renate E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how corporations use visual artifacts to translate and recontextualize a globally theorized managerial concept (CSR) into a local setting (Austria). In our analysis of the field-level visual discourse, we analyze over 1,600 images in stand-alone CSR reports of publicly t...... ideational oppositions and reduce institutional complexity; and, finally, by connecting questionable claims with representations of authenticity, they aid in overcoming credibility gaps....

  5. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...... markets. However, NASDAQ OMX has introduced the First North Bond Market in December 2012 and new regulatory framework came into place in 2014, which may contribute to a Danish based corporate bond market. The purpose of this article is to present the regulatory changes in Denmark in relation to corporate...

  6. Transnational Corporations in Education: Filling the Governance Gap through New Social Norms and Market Multilateralism?

    Bhanji, Zahra

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the rising presence of transnational corporations (TNCs) in education and their mobilisation of global corporate social discourses to legitimise their private authority in education. The rising presence of TNCs is explored in the paper in two parts. First, through a taxonomy of global corporate social engagement (GCSE)…

  7. Putting the Corporation in its Place

    Guinnane, Timothy; Harris, Ron; Lamoreaux, Naomi R.; Rosenthal, Jean-Laurent

    2007-01-01

    This article challenges the idea that the corporation is a globally superior form of business organization and that the Anglo-American common-law is more conducive to economic development than the code-based legal systems characteristic of continental Europe. Although the corporation had important advantages over the main alternative form of organization (partnerships), it also had disadvantages that limited its appeal to small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). As a result, when businesse...

  8. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection[Study of Uranium geochemical prospection in Uruguay]; Proyecto Uranio. Prospeccion geoquimica

    Lambert, J

    1983-07-01

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results.

  9. Preparing the veterinary profession for corporate and trade issues in the Americas: proceedings of a conference on synergism and globalization, Santiago, Chile, May 6-8, 2001.

    Brown, C; Carbajal, I; Wagner, G

    2001-01-01

    The complex and rapid-paced development of international trade, coupled with increasing societal demands for the production not only of abundant and inexpensive food, but also of food that is safe and has been raised in a humane and environmentally friendly manner, demands immediate attention from the veterinary community. The new culture of global trade agreements, spurred by the development of the WTO, dictates massive changes and increasing integration of public and private sectors. This is a huge growth area for our profession and will require individuals with a skill set we do not yet provide in our educational framework. In North America, veterinary education is parochial and focused on specialization. This strong orientation toward companion animals fails to provide adequate training for those interested in acquiring the necessary skills for the emerging area of globalization and trade. In South America, curricula are less harmonized with one another and there is tremendous variation in degree programs, rendering it difficult to ascertain whether veterinarians are prepared to assume decision-making responsibilities regarding international transport of food. If we do not begin to prepare our graduates adequately for this emerging market demand, the positions will be filled by other professions. These other professions lack broad-based scientific knowledge about animal physiology and disease causation. Decisions made without adequate background could have devastating consequences for society, including incursions of unwelcome diseases, food safety problems, and public health issues. To prepare our new veterinary graduates for the future and this emerging market, it is important to nurture a global mindset within our academic communities and to promote communications, languages, and an interdependent team mentality. Areas of technical expertise that need a place, perhaps a parallel track, in the curriculum include production medicine, public health, food safety

  10. Fortune 500 Corporate Headquarters

    Department of Homeland Security — Large Corporate Headquarters in the United States This database is composed of 'an annual list of the 500 largest industrial corporations in the U.S., published by...

  11. Corporate governance codes and their contents : An analysis of Eastern European codes

    Hermes, Niels; Postma, Theo J. B. M.; Zivkov, Orestis

    2007-01-01

    Existing literature suggests that the contents of corporate governance codes are similar due to external forces, such as increased integration of countries in the global economy, the increased role of foreign institutional investors and recommendations on corporate governance practices of

  12. Geochemistry of subduction zone serpentinites: A review

    DESCHAMPS, Fabien; GODARD, Marguerite; GUILLOT, Stéphane; HATTORI, Kéiko

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades, numerous studies have emphasized the role of serpentinites in the subduction zone geodynamics. Their presence and role in subduction environments are recognized through geophysical, geochemical and field observations of modern and ancient subduction zones and large amounts of geochemical database of serpentinites have been created. Here, we present a review of the geochemistry of serpentinites, based on the compilation of ~ 900 geochemical data of abyssal, mantle wedge ...

  13. Development of the near field geochemistry model

    Arcos, D.; Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Grive, M.

    2000-01-01

    This report discusses in a quantitative manner the evolution of the near field geochemistry as a result of the interactions between two different introducing granitic groundwaters and the FEBEX bentonite as a buffer material. The two granitic groundwaters considered are: SR-5 water, sampled in a borehole at 500 m depth in Mina Ratones, and a mean composition of different granitic groundwaters from the iberian Massif. The steel canister has also been introduced by considering the iron corrosion in anoxic conditions. (Author)

  14. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate…

  15. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CORPORATE VOLUNTEERING AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: RESULTS OF AN EMPIRICAL STUDY

    Oscar Licandro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Volunteering (CV is a phenomenon that emerged in the second half of the 20th century and began to grow and globalize at the beginning of the 21st century. There seems to be a consensus that the recent growth of Corporate Volunteering is related to the development and growing legitimacy of the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. Nevertheless, the theoretical discussion on how the two concepts (Corporate Volunteering and Corporate Social Responsibility are related is just beginning, while empirical research on how this relationship operates in corporate practice is still incipient. This paper presents preliminary results of a research on this subject carried out in Uruguay in 2016. This is a statistical study that analyses the relationship between the application of corporate volunteering activities and the incorporation of a CSR approach to the management of companies. The incorporation of both types of practices is measured by a self-assessment questionnaire that includes 81 indicators (using a Likert scale to assess them, which were designed based on ISO 26000 Guidance of Social Responsibility. The questionnaire was administered to 96 companies, using a comparative analysis between those that practice Corporate Volunteering and those which do not. The results obtained allow us to support the hypothesis that the application of Corporate Volunteering is positively associated with the incorporation of CSR when managing the relationship between the company and its employees and also with the community. Moreover, these results contribute to a better understanding on how both concepts are related.

  16. Corporate strategic branding: How country and corporate brands come together

    Đorđević Bojan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of countries as brands has been increasingly recognized in the post-modern global world. A strong country brand can provide corporate brands with a unique set of values, which supports their positioning on the international market. Simultaneously, once corporate brands achieve worldwide success, they contribute actively to developing new features of the country brand. Consumers pay more and more attention to products' country of origin. When the name of a country is mentioned, they can have positive associations (high quality, modern design, product innovation, which means that the country itself has a powerful brand. However, there are opposite cases where we talk about the weak branding of a particular country. It is necessary to mobilize all the available forces of politicians, business people, artists, sportsmen and scientists to create a strategy for enhancing the image and reputation of a country on the international markets, i.e. for creating the national branding strategy.

  17. INTEGRATED CORPORATE STRATEGY MODEL

    CATALINA SORIANA SITNIKOV

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Corporations are at present operating in demanding and highly unsure periods, facing a mixture of increased macroeconomic need, competitive and capital market dangers, and in many cases, the prospect for significant technical and regulative gap. Throughout these demanding and highly unsure times, the corporations must pay particular attention to corporate strategy. In present times, corporate strategy must be perceived and used as a function of various fields, covers, and characters as well as a highly interactive system. For the corporation's strategy to become a competitive advantage is necessary to understand and also to integrate it in a holistic model to ensure sustainable progress of corporation activities under the optimum conditions of profitability. The model proposed in this paper is aimed at integrating the two strategic models, Hoshin Kanri and Integrated Strategy Model, as well as their consolidation with the principles of sound corporate governance set out by the OECD.

  18. CORPORATE IDENTITY SEJARAH DAN APLIKASINYA

    Christine Suharto Cenadi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent globalization era%2C and the developed market%2C many companies compete to attract consumers to buy their products. One of the keys to compete and survive in this developing market is by creating an image and graphic identity. This paper will discuss about corporate identity%2C image%2C its purpose and applications. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Dalam era globalisasi dewasa ini%2C dan dengan berkembangnya pasar (market%2C banyak perusahaan bersaing untuk menarik perhatian konsumen untuk membeli produknya. Salah satu cara untuk bersaing dan dapat bertahan di dalam pasar yang terus berkembang ini adalah dengan menciptakan suatu image dan identitas graphic. Tulisan ini akan membahas tentang corporate identity%2C image%2C fungsi dan aplikasinya

  19. The path to corporate responsibility.

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning".

  20. Level of Harmonization and ERP Architecture in Multinational Corporations

    Rahimi, Fatemeh; Møller, Charles

    2013-01-01

    multinational corporations. The ERP distribution decision in MNCs has been mainly associated with the corporate strategy and governance structure. As global ERP deployment benefits mainly come from business consolidation, and as there are significant costs and risks associated with centralized ERP...... to be more directly affected by the factors prohibiting further divergence, namely the corporate business process governance structure and the degree of similarity of its business models....

  1. Organic geochemistry of fossil resins from the Czech Republic

    Havelcová, Martina; Sýkorová, Ivana; Mach, K.; Dvořák, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, August (2014), s. 303-312 ISSN 1878-5220. [Geochemistry of the Earth's Surface (GES) Meeting /10./. Paris, 18.08.2014-23.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-18482S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : fossil resin * amber * resinite * TMAH-Py-GC/MS Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  2. Geochemistry of sediments of the eastern continental shelf of India

    Mascarenhas, A.; Paropkari, A.L.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The bulk and partition geochemistry of Al, Fe, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Cu have been investigated in sediments of the eastern continental shelf of India. The results show that (1) the bulk geochemistry varies from one shelf unit to the other, (2) all...

  3. Corporate Finance, Incomplete Contracts, and Corporate Control

    Patrick Bolton

    2014-01-01

    This essay in celebration of Grossman and Hart (GH) (Grossman, S., and H. Oliver. 1986. "The Costs and Benefits of Ownership: A Theory of Vertical and Lateral Integration," 94 Journal of Political Economy 691–719.) discusses how the introduction of incomplete contracts has fundamentally changed economists’ perspectives on corporate finance and control. Before GH, the dominant theory in corporate finance was the tradeoff theory pitting the tax advantages of debt (relative to equity) against ba...

  4. Dynamics of Corporates and Stakeholders Perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Case of Sports Goods Industry Meerut

    R. K. Tyagi

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The Corporate Social Responsibility concerns got global attention in large scale industries but the SMEs which are no less prone to create critical problems for the human, social and natural environments inimical to the society as a whole and survival at large, have not attracted the required attention. The case focuses on the dynamics of the corporate and stakeholder perspective on CSR in Sports Goods Industry Meerut. Approach: This study examined the corporate and stakeho...

  5. Characteristic corporate culture of the Telkom way 135

    Utami, D. A.; Noviyanti

    2018-01-01

    The corporate globalization brought an attention consequence related to the global perspective balancing against local flexibility. It also made local Organizations to keeps aware to both continuously and fast global changing and development in order to maintain its existences. One of the things need to be strengthened was the strong corporate culture, which is acceptable, understood and applied culture by every single member of the corporate. This study was aimed to describe characteristics of The Telkom Way 135 corporate culture and its implementation in PT. Telekomunikasi Indonesia Tbk., Regional Division V East Java. It was descriptive research with a qualitative approach and conducted it by observation, documentation, and documentation techniques. Data validity was conducted using credibility, transmittable, dependable and special criteria. Results of the study are as follows; the characteristic of The Telkom Way 135 corporate culture is an integral corporate culture. Also, by combination of this characteristic, corporate culture could classify into the strong and adaptive corporate culture so that it able to supports PT. Telkom to win the external adaptation and reached its internal integration if there is a harmonization between the corporate culture’s characteristics with the managerial practices.

  6. Multinational corporations and corporate social responsibility in the peace building in Colombia

    Jiménez Peña, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of the multinational corporations in the Colombian peace process. First a theoretical frame work is built which aims to shed light on the significance of multinationals in this process. The study then presents the specific Colombian experience with relation to the role of multinationals in the peace process. The penultimate section deals with the relation between peace, corporate social responsibility, and the UN Global Compact. Finally it offers a conclusion wi...

  7. Gendering Corporal Punishment: Beyond the Discourse of Human Rights

    Humphreys, Sara

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years the Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children has been gathering momentum, with a submission to "The United Nations Secretary General's study on violence against children" the most recent addition to the cause. Nevertheless, corporal punishment in schools is still condoned in many countries and…

  8. Contribution to uranium geochemistry in intrusive granites

    Coulomb, R.

    1959-01-01

    This work aims to define the position of a certain number of French granitic deposits within the field of the geochemistry of granites in general, and of the geochemistry of uranium in particular. The regions concerned are: - 3 French Hercynian ranges, in the Vendee, in Brittany and in the Morvan, - 1 African range, probably precambrian, of the Hoggar. For each range, the petrochemical framework is first of all determined and then the degree of chemical homogeneity of the rocks is evaluated. In the petrochemical groups thus obtained the geochemical behaviour of the uranium is studied. From a point of view of the geochemistry of the granites under investigation, a comparison of the laws of distribution of the major elements in the 4 ranges shows up a convergence of average composition which was not anticipated by geological and petrographic considerations alone. The statistical and geochemical distribution laws of the total uranium as a function of the petrochemical variations are established. A study of the chemical forms of uranium in the rocks has drawn an attention to the qualitative and quantitative importance of the fraction of this uranium soluble in dilute acids. We have therefore reconsidered on the one hand, the laws of distribution of the insoluble uranium, which represents essentially the uranium fixed in crystalline structures (zircon, allanite...), and we have justified on the other hand the interest presented by the soluble uranium: this, although more complex in character, presents a geochemical unity in post magmatic phenomena which makes possible to find a genetic connection between the uraniferous deposits and the intrusive massifs. Finally we have given a plan of the geochemical cycle of uranium, in which we hope to have provided some more accurate data on the igneous phase. (author) [fr

  9. Examining corporate reputation judgments with generalizability theory.

    Highhouse, Scott; Broadfoot, Alison; Yugo, Jennifer E; Devendorf, Shelba A

    2009-05-01

    The researchers used generalizability theory to examine whether reputation judgments about corporations function in a manner consistent with contemporary theory in the corporate-reputation literature. University professors (n = 86) of finance, marketing, and human resources management made repeated judgments about the general reputations of highly visible American companies. Minimal variability in the judgments is explained by items, time, persons, and field of specialization. Moreover, experts from the different specializations reveal considerable agreement in how they weigh different aspects of corporate performance in arriving at their global reputation judgments. The results generally support the theory of the reputation construct and suggest that stable estimates of global reputation can be achieved with a small number of items and experts. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  11. The Corporate Marketing Department

    Ritter, Thomas; Eggert, Andreas; Münkhoff, Eva

    Corporate marketing has been downsized or eliminated in many firms. At the same time, firms that still own a corporate marketing department struggle with organizing and positioning their commercial front‐end. The question arises whether firms need a corporate marketing department, and if so, how...... it can best add value to the firm. Based on a qualitative study among B2B companies, we develop a conceptual framework highlighting the various parental roles through which corporate marketing can contribute to overall firm and business unit performance. In addition, we identify five gaps that restrain...... successful outcomes of corporate marketing activities. In sum, our framework provides important insights on how to successfully organize corporate marketing activities....

  12. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporation and corporate information. 226.8 Section 226... RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation and corporate information. (a) If the applicant for a lease is a corporation, it shall file evidence of...

  13. CSR as Corporate Political Activity

    Morsing, Mette; Roepstorff, Anne

    2015-01-01

    –image dynamics of political CSR’. Concretely, we describe in two vignettes how IKEA’s declared ‘apolitical and neutral’ CSR identity becomes entangled with national and international socio-political events that critically challenge the corporate engagement prior national understandings of citizenship rights....... In this process, IKEA’s CSR identity becomes defined as a political and non-neutral activity. Our article contributes by bringing attention to the organizational level dynamics of political CSR by offering a conceptualization of how global and local socio-political events may disturb the alignment between CSR...

  14. Creating corporate advantage.

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum.

  15. Corporate Business Diplomacy

    Søndergaard, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    This article illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of the field of corporate business diplomacy using examples from academic disciplines, such as economics and political science, which can contribute to the understanding of corporate business diplomacy. Examples also show that corporate business...... diplomacy can complement business theories such as stakeholder theory and agency theory. Examples from practice show that in a broad sense, corporate business diplomacy is concerned with managing external stakeholders, while in a narrow sense, it is concerned with managing internal stakeholders....... The usefulness of an analytical research triangulation is illustrated....

  16. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Malaysia

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    This report assesses Ghana s corporate governance policy framework. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Ghana. It is an update of the 2005 Corporate Governance ROSC. Good corporate governance enhances investor trust, helps to protects mino...

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility of Multinational Oil Corporations to ...

    Corporate Social Responsibility of Multinational Oil Corporations to Host ... Exxon Mobil and Elf oil Nigeria Limited within their corporate-community relations strategy in the ... The paper concludes by exploring the implications for partnerships' ...

  18. Corporate social responsibility, governance and stakeholders: a bank in the upbeat of the crisis

    de Graaf, Frank Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Using the global financial crisis as a critical event and based on institutional theory and stakeholder theory, this paper aims to explore the relationship between corporate governance and corporate social responsibility (CSR). The question is how stakeholders can influence corporate

  19. Convergence of Corporate and Public Governance

    Gérard Hirigoyen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the differences between the corporate and public governance, theoretical and empirical research seems to indicate that the two domains of governance are far too different to share any common aspect. However, in this particular research, it has been argued that public governance is an application of corporate governance. Thus, the research question entails the description and analysis of this possible convergence of the two. Extensive research from literature on corporate governance has been undertaken to establish a relationship between the boards process and the roles that acts as a framework to bridge the gap separating corporate governance from public governance. Corporate governance, at a global level, exists in the for-profit as well as nonprofit organizations. Thus, the definition of this concept needs to be viewed from “an innovative” eye, considering the relationship between the process of the board and roles as characteristic of the public organization and private ones. As the private as well as public organizations are an application of corporate governance, the difference between the two gets narrowed. For the purpose of this research, the case of the French hospitals’ board has been taken into consideration. The members of the public board have been considered for the board process to perform their roles.

  20. Women on boards and corporate social responsibility

    Francesca Gennari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Data by EU Commission show a low representation of women on boards. The scope of this article is to read contemporary and according to a managerial approach the possible causes of this situation: the availability of skills possessed by women to cover top positions, the presence of binding or self-regulatory rules and the corporate culture towards CSR approach. Our research is focused on EU countries, where the gender equality on board is currently matter of attention and regulatory interventions. We conclude that the scarce presence of women in the boardrooms is not ascribable to a scarcity of expertise, but it is associated with a social background and a corporate culture not inspired by corporate global responsibility values. Regulatory interventions may accelerate the consciousness of gender balance on boards, but without companies’ commitment in CSR matters and without a clear vision of corporate global responsibility (including economic, social and environmental aspects, they tend to become additional tasks in the management of corporate compliance risk.

  1. Noble gas geochemistry to monitor CO2 geological storages

    Lafortune, St.

    2007-11-01

    According to the last IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report, a probability of 90 % can be now established for the responsibility of the anthropogenic CO 2 emissions for the global climate change observed since the beginning of the 20. century. To reduce these emissions and keep producing energy from coal, oil or gas combustions, CO 2 could be stored in geological reservoirs like aquifers, coal beds, and depleted oil or gas fields. Storing CO 2 in geological formations implies to control the efficiency and to survey the integrity of the storages, in order to be able to detect the possible leaks as fast as possible. Here, we study the feasibility of a geochemical monitoring through noble gas geochemistry. We present (1) the development of a new analytical line, Garodiox, developed to extract quantitatively noble gas from water samples, (2) the testing of Garodiox on samples from a natural CO 2 storage analogue (Pavin lake, France) and (3) the results of a first field work on a natural CO 2 accumulation (Montmiral, France). The results we obtain and the conclusions we draw, highlight the interest of the geochemical monitoring we suggest. (author)

  2. Strategic corporate sustainability

    Grewatsch, Sylvia; Rohrbeck, René; Madsen, Henning

    antecedents and outcomes. To overcome this limitation we propose an integrated typology which may facilitate more research on the link between corporate sustainability performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). Our expectation is that the strategy type might play a moderating or mediating...

  3. The Corporate Law Curriculum

    Mofsky, James S.

    1976-01-01

    On the premise that corporate counsel must be an able diagnostician before he can focus on highly specialized and interrelated issues of business law, the author suggests an approach to corporate law curriculum in which the basic course balances the quality and quantity of material designed to create the needed sensitivity. (JT)

  4. Corporate design management

    drs. Patrick van Thiel; drs. Wil Michels

    2006-01-01

    'Corporate designmanagement' is een vlot geschreven en zeer overzichtelijk standaardwerk op het gebied van corporate designmanagement. Een sterke visuele identiteit is voor een organisatie een doeltreffend middel om zich te positioneren en te profileren. Voorwaarde is wel dat de visuele identiteit

  5. Understanding Corporate Culture.

    Cluff, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Considers concept of corporate culture and discusses several values which can be considered when assessing corporate culture, and the "compatibility scales" used to measure them. Included are discussions of employee attitudes, work atmosphere, internal communications, management style, employment opportunity, stability, business ethics, corporate…

  6. Piercing the corporate veil

    Goodwin, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This article addresses the potential problems an economically troubled subsidiary can cause a parent company and offers strategies for insulating the trouble through good business practices and careful planning. The topics of the article include corporations and limited liability, piercing the corporate veil, environmental cleanup liabilities, and avoiding trouble

  7. Corporate Media Governance

    Kempen, Petrus Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    The media can make or break a reputation. This being said, it seems to be essential for companies, governments and institutions to pay specific attention to corporate media management in their daily operations. However, this thesis shows that they often neglect to pay adequate attention to corporate

  8. Reinventing Corporate Communications.

    Toth, Elizabeth L.; Trujillo, Nick

    1987-01-01

    Urges a "re-inventing" of corporate communications in today's organizations, and provides information about how corporations can change in new and positive ways during the current "information age." Discusses specific public relations and organizational communication concepts essential for a comprehensive understanding of…

  9. Global Mindset in Context

    Nielsen, Rikke Kristine

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the call for identification of organizational contingencies related to global mindset, exploration of different forms of global mindset and their relationship with global strategies (Osland, Bird, Mendenhall & Osland, 2006). To this end, this paper explores global mindset...... development in the context of a 3-year single case study of middle manager microfoundations of global mindset in a Danish multinational corporation working with deliberate global mindset capability development as a vehicle for strategy execution and facilitation of global performance. A force field analysis...

  10. Merging metagenomics and geochemistry reveals environmental controls on biological diversity and evolution.

    Alsop, Eric B; Boyd, Eric S; Raymond, Jason

    2014-05-28

    The metabolic strategies employed by microbes inhabiting natural systems are, in large part, dictated by the physical and geochemical properties of the environment. This study sheds light onto the complex relationship between biology and environmental geochemistry using forty-three metagenomes collected from geochemically diverse and globally distributed natural systems. It is widely hypothesized that many uncommonly measured geochemical parameters affect community dynamics and this study leverages the development and application of multidimensional biogeochemical metrics to study correlations between geochemistry and microbial ecology. Analysis techniques such as a Markov cluster-based measure of the evolutionary distance between whole communities and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the geochemical gradients between environments allows for the determination of correlations between microbial community dynamics and environmental geochemistry and provides insight into which geochemical parameters most strongly influence microbial biodiversity. By progressively building from samples taken along well defined geochemical gradients to samples widely dispersed in geochemical space this study reveals strong links between the extent of taxonomic and functional diversification of resident communities and environmental geochemistry and reveals temperature and pH as the primary factors that have shaped the evolution of these communities. Moreover, the inclusion of extensive geochemical data into analyses reveals new links between geochemical parameters (e.g. oxygen and trace element availability) and the distribution and taxonomic diversification of communities at the functional level. Further, an overall geochemical gradient (from multivariate analyses) between natural systems provides one of the most complete predictions of microbial taxonomic and functional composition. Clustering based on the frequency in which orthologous proteins occur among metagenomes

  11. Corporate Governance, between Classicism and Modernism

    Niculae Feleaga

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a complex concept, being an assembly of mechanisms used to set order into company leaders’ decisions. The rules of corporate governance are the ones keeping the score between the economic entity’s leaders and the third parties who invest their resources in the business. The corporate governance issue did not appear by hazard, but it resulted from the necessity to reconcile many business interests within a company (sometimes contradictory issues, especially the ones between the shareholders and the business leaders. The Anglo-Saxon view, in which the business power is given to the Equity items, is traditionally opposing the European (continental vision, where focus is being made on the Stakeholders’ interests. Within a world dominated by globalization issues, and where the financial markets evolve on an exponential curve, the two above mentioned corporate governance models ought to interact one with another in a constructive manner. Even if the corporate governance concept has developed recently, mainly during the last 25 years, its origins are rooted way back into the world history. Corporate governance is organically linked to the capitalist society and economy. After the 11 September attacks, many of the contemporary authors had the tendency to declare this date as the beginning of the XXIst century. If the ‘Twin Towers’ had hosted companies like: Tyco, Enron, Xerox, Wordcom and many other Stock Exchange-quoted businesses, it is likely that the financial crisis from 2000-2002 would have been differently perceived, and corporate governance had developed slightly different evolutionary mechanisms. A scientific article, based on the comparison between the classical and modern corporate governance experiences, would therefore suit the Romanian business environment.

  12. Corporate Governance, between Classicism and Modernism

    Cristina Vasile

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a complex concept, being an assembly of mechanisms used to set order into company leaders’ decisions. The rules of corporate governance are the ones keeping the score between the economic entity’s leaders and the third parties who invest their resources in the business. The corporate governance issue did not appear by hazard, but it resulted from the necessity to reconcile many business interests within a company (sometimes contradictory issues, especially the ones between the shareholders and the business leaders. The Anglo-Saxon view, in which the business power is given to the Equity items, is traditionally opposing the European (continental vision, where focus is being made on the Stakeholders’ interests. Within a world dominated by globalization issues, and where the financial markets evolve on an exponential curve, the two above mentioned corporate governance models ought to interact one with another in a constructive manner. Even if the corporate governance concept has developed recently, mainly during the last 25 years, its origins are rooted way back into the world history. Corporate governance is organically linked to the capitalist society and economy. After the 11 September attacks, many of the contemporary authors had the tendency to declare this date as the beginning of the XXIst century. If the ‘Twin Towers’ had hosted companies like: Tyco, Enron, Xerox, Wordcom and many other Stock Exchange-quoted businesses, it is likely that the financial crisis from 2000-2002 would have been differently perceived, and corporate governance had developed slightly different evolutionary mechanisms. A scientific article, based on the comparison between the classical and modern corporate governance experiences, would therefore suit the Romanian business environment.

  13. Corporate Language Policies

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    This paper offers a review of literature dealing with language policies in general and corporate language policies in particular. Based on a discussion of various definitions of these concepts within two research traditions, i.e. sociolinguistics and international management, a three......-level definition of corporate language policies is presented, emphasising that a corporate language policy is a context-specific policy about language use. The three-level definition is based on the argument that in order to acquire a complete understanding of what corporate language policies involve, one needs...... to consider three progressive questions; 1) what is a policy? 2) what is a language policy?, and ultimately, 3) what is a corporate language policy?...

  14. Corporate Language Policies

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a review of literature dealing with language policies in general and corporate language policies in particular. Based on a discussion of various definitions of these concepts within two research traditions, i.e. sociolinguistics and international management, a three......-level definition of corporate language policies is presented, emphasising that a corporate language policy is a context-specific policy about language use. The three-level definition is based on the argument that in order to acquire a complete understanding of what corporate language policies involve, one needs...... to consider three progressive questions; 1) what is a policy? 2) what is a language policy?, and ultimately, 3) what is a corporate language policy?...

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility and Labor Relations: a research agenda about internal stakeholders management in UN's global compact signatory corporationsResponsabilidade Social Empresarial e Relações de Trabalho: programa de pesquisa sobre gerenciamento dos stakeholders de empresas signatárias do pacto global da ONUResponsabilidad Social Corporativa y Relaciones Laborales: agenda de estudio sobre la gestión interna de los stakeholders en corporaciones signatarias del pacto mundial de la ONU

    TEODÓSIO, Armindo dos Santos de Sousa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTLiterature often presents the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in association with the idea of Business Ethics. In this article, we saw the need to ellaborate a theoretical model of Business Ethics that was capable of guiding research on Corporate Social Responsibility practices aimed at organizations’ internal public. To this end, we analyzed different Business Ethics fields – namely Responsibility Ethics, ethics that reaffirm the principle of humanity and ethics that generate conventional morality, so as to avoid automatic associations with the idea of Corporate Social Responsibility. The theoretical dialogue of these two major constructs (Business Ethics and CSR with the field of Labor Relations is dealt with in accordance with these three dimensions of ethics. To find out how a company that desires to be socially responsible relates to its employees, there are indicators that are strongly related to key aspects of labor relations, as shown by the UN’s Global Compact Agenda. This interface produced the methodological guidelines that conducted research data collection and analysis, pointing out important challenges in this agenda, as well as serving as a basis for further studies in this field.RESUMOA literatura muitas vezes apresenta o conceito de responsabilidade social empresarial (RSE em associação à noção de ética nos negócios. Neste artigo, vimos a necessidade de construir um modelo teórico de ética nos negócios que pudesse orientar a pesquisa sobre práticas de responsabilidade social empresarial voltadas ao público interno das organizações. Para tanto, analisam-se diferentes correntes da ética nos negócios, a saber: ética da responsabilidade, ética afirmativa do princípio da humanidade e ética que gera uma moralidade convencional, de forma a se evitar associações automáticas com a noção de responsabilidade social empresarial. O diálogo teórico desses dois grandes constructos (

  16. Income Outcome: Life in the Corporate University

    Robyn Ferrell

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Higher education on the corporate model imagines students as consumers, choosing between knowledge products and brands. It imagines itself liberating the university from the dictates of the State/tradition/aristocratic self-replication, and putting it in the hands of its democratic stakeholders. It therefore naturally subscribes to the general management principles and practices of global corporate culture. These principles – transparency, accountability, efficiency – are hard to argue with in principle. But an abstract argument in political economy comes down to earth in the challenges facing the arts and humanities, after the ‘Education Revolution’, to justify their modes of life.

  17. Delineation of the corporate use of Environmental Information Systems (EIS: Selected cases of the Corporate Organizations in Tanzania

    Felichesmi Selestine Lyakurwa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental information systems are essential platforms for the provision of adequate and relevant information necessary for the planning and decision making for greener production. Corporate use of Environmental Information Systems gained several benefits in the global and local markets. Nevertheless, there was no documentation to explain the extent to which corporate organizations utilize available Environmental Information Systems in Tanzania. This study used purposive sampling with informants being workers from the strategic, tactical and control functions of the corporate organization. Moreover, data collection involved survey of 50 corporate organizations in Dar es Salaam, Arusha, Moshi and Morogoro councils, with 71 respondents. The collected data includes exploration of the extent to which corporate management functions utilize available Environmental Information Systems in Tanzania. The study identified various corporate environmental management functions performed at all levels of the corporate organization, in which workers spends less than one hour on the environmental information systems available. The results also revealed that, there is adequate utilization of available Environmental Information Systems for environmental management. Therefore, the research outcomes provides inputs to corporate organization unit managers, corporate owners and other environmental stakeholders on the extent of the systems’ use as well as sharing experience on different environmental management systems used worldwide. Keywords: Environmental information system, corporate organization, Tanzania, management

  18. THE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF LIMITED SOUTH ASIAN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE STANDARDS AFTER FINANCIAL CRISIS

    Dinh Tran Ngoc Huy

    2015-01-01

    After the recent global crisis, corporate scandals and bankruptcy in US and Europe, there is some certain evidence on weak corporate governance, risk management and audit system. The 2009 India Code of Corporate Governance also revealed that during the crisis time, there are certain weaknesses although corporate structure is fairly durable. Hence, this paper chooses a different analytical approach and among its aims is to give some systematic opinions. First, it classifies limited South Asian...

  19. Geochemistry and distribution of sediments in the East Indian shelf ...

    29

    trace element geochemistry yielded interesting results about the sediment .... sediments and the core samples are as given in Table 1. ..... radioactive lead, thorium and uranium showed higher concentration in C3 than in C1 ...... Plant Soil, 267,.

  20. geochemistry of ekenkpon and nkporo shales, calabar flank, se

    incorporated in the clay minerals of the shales. Also the values of .... analyzed for major oxides, trace elements and rare earth element .... Trace, and rare earth elements geochemistry ..... bearing source material, Ca is leached rapidly than Na.

  1. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic rocks from ...

    Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic ... This study presents the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks located on the northern ... Frost and Frost 2013). ...... King P L, White A J R, Chappell B W and Allen C M 1997.

  2. Geochemistry and geochronology of the mafic dikes in the Taipusi ...

    25

    several large linear faults as dividing lines (Fig. 1b; Jahn ... activity between Bainaimiao city and Chifeng city (Stampfli and Borel, 2002). The formation ... In addition, previous studies in the area paid more attention to the geochemistry and.

  3. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

  4. An overview on geochemistry of Proterozoic massif-type ...

    A critical study of 311 published WR chemical analyses, isotopic and mineral chemistry of ... Keywords. Massif anorthosite complexes; overview; geochemistry; high-Al gabbro. J. Earth ...... (123–2920 ppm) unlike the experimental results of.

  5. Theoretical Foundations of Corporate Social Responsibility

    K.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article’s objective is to reveal theoretical foundations of corporate social responsibility. It is argued that the financial crisis and its implications for the global economy have demonstrated once and again that stability of the global market is conditional on the responsible behavior, models of balanced business operation, active management, impact of business (companies on the social life, and regulatory framework. The global corporate social responsibility depends on problems associated with change in the global climate and deepened social inequality. The demand for social policy is tremendous at global and sectoral level. Business needs to be engaged in social issues because a new global social contract between business, government and society is required to ensure long-term stabilization and reproduction of wealth. It has become even more obvious at corporate level. It is shown that the notion of “social” has many meanings, but in the legal context it means the need to account, apart from the literary meaning of this norm, for the social context in which this norm operates. The notion “social” is synonymous to society, referring to not only business operation target but also to the responsibility of a businessman. It is demonstrated that the corporate social responsibility will work effectively and help achieve the organizations’ objectives if it has the parameters of an open system interacting with the environment. At the same time, it should be remembered that in keeping with the system characteristic of modern management theories addressing a company as a homogenous and target-oriented system all the internal processes occurring in one component of this system will have effects for its other components.

  6. Geochemistry of natural technetium and plutonium

    Curtis, D.B.; Cappis, J.H.; Perrin, R.E.; Rokop, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium and plutonium in unprocessed nuclear reactor wastes are major concerns with regard to their containment in the geologic environment. Both nuclides have long half-lives; therefore, they will exist long after engineered barriers can be considered reliable. Consequently, strategies for the containment of these two elements depend on their retention in the geologic barrier until they have decayed to innocuous levels. Because these are the rarest elements in nature, there have been few direct observations of their geochemical behavior; predictions concerning their fate in the repository are based on properties that can be observed in the laboratory. The authors are attempting to complement the laboratory work by studying the geochemistry of natural plutonium and technetium. Ratios of anthropogenic to naturally occurring isotopes are discussed

  7. Progress in 1988 1990 with computer applications in the ``hard-rock'' arena: Geochemistry, mineralogy, petrology, and volcanology

    Rock, Nicholas M. S.

    This review covers rock, mineral and isotope geochemistry, mineralogy, igneous and metamorphic petrology, and volcanology. Crystallography, exploration geochemistry, and mineral exploration are excluded. Fairly extended comments on software availability, and on computerization of the publication process and of specimen collection indexes, may interest a wider audience. A proliferation of both published and commercial software in the past 3 years indicates increasing interest in what traditionally has been a rather reluctant sphere of geoscience computer activity. However, much of this software duplicates the same old functions (Harker and triangular plots, mineral recalculations, etc.). It usually is more efficient nowadays to use someone else's program, or to employ the command language in one of many general-purpose spreadsheet or statistical packages available, than to program a specialist operation from scratch in, say, FORTRAN. Greatest activity has been in mineralogy, where several journals specifically encourage publication of computer-related activities, and IMA and MSA Working Groups on microcomputers have been convened. In petrology and geochemistry, large national databases of rock and mineral analyses continue to multiply, whereas the international database IGBA grows slowly; some form of integration is necessary to make these disparate systems of lasting value to the global "hard-rock" community. Total merging or separate addressing via an intelligent "front-end" are both possibilities. In volcanology, the BBC's videodisk Volcanoes and the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Project use the most up-to-date computer technology in an exciting and innovative way, to promote public education.

  8. Geology and geochemistry of the Atacama Desert.

    Tapia, J; González, R; Townley, B; Oliveros, V; Álvarez, F; Aguilar, G; Menzies, A; Calderón, M

    2018-02-14

    The Atacama Desert, the driest of its kind on Earth, hosts a number of unique geological and geochemical features that make it unlike any other environment on the planet. Considering its location on the western border of South America, between 17 and 28 °S, its climate has been characterized as arid to hyperarid for at least the past 10 million years. Notably dry climatic conditions of the Atacama Desert have been related to uplift of the Andes and are believed to have played an important role in the development of the most distinctive features of this desert, including: (i) nitrates and iodine deposits in the Central Depression, (ii) secondary enrichment in porphyry copper deposits in the Precordillera, (iii) Li enrichment in salt flats of the Altiplano, and (iv) life in extreme habitats. The geology and physiography of the Atacama Desert have been largely shaped by the convergent margin present since the Mesozoic era. The geochemistry of surface materials is related to rock geochemistry (Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, V, and Zn), salt flats, and evaporite compositions in endorheic basins (As, B, and Li), in addition to anthropogenic activities (Cu, Mo, and Pb). The composition of surface water is highly variable, nonetheless in general it presents a circumneutral pH with higher conductivity and total dissolved solids in brines. Major water constituents, with the exception of HCO 3 - , are generally related to the increase of salinity, and despite the fact that trace elements are not well-documented, surface waters of the Atacama Desert are enriched in As, B, and Li when compared to the average respective concentrations in rivers worldwide.

  9. Corporate Blogging For Dummies

    Karr, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Establish a successful corporate blog to reach your customers. Corporate blogs require careful planning and attention to legal and corporate policies in order for them to be productive and effective. This fun, friendly, and practical guide walks you through using blogging as a first line of communication to customers and explains how to protect your company and employees through privacy, disclosure, and moderation policies. Blogging guru Douglas Karr demonstrates how blogs are an ideal way to offer a conversational and approachable relationship with customers. You'll discover how to prepare, e

  10. European Corporate Law

    Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Teichmann, Christoph; Werlauff, Erik

    , and the United Kingdom are taken into account; Italy is now included in this new edition. As in earlier editions, the authors demonstrate that analysis and comparison of national corporate laws yield highly valuable general principles and observations, not least because business organizations, wherever located...... initiatives in such aspects of the corporate environment as regulation of financial institutions and non-financial reporting obligations with a view to sustainability and other social responsibility concerns. The authors, all leading experts in European corporate law, describe current and emerging trends...

  11. Corporate income tax

    Popová, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    1 RESUMÉ Corporate Income Tax The aim of this diploma thesis on "Corporate Income Tax" is to outline the current legal background of the corporate income tax and asses and evaluate the most substantial changes regarding the Act no. 586/1992 Coll., Income Tax Act, as amended that have become effective as of January 1, 2014. The changes discussed in this thesis include especially, but are not limited to, the changes adopted in connection with the recodification of Czech Civil Law. This thesis c...

  12. The Russia Corporate Governance Manual : Part I. Corporate Governance Introduced

    International Finance Corporation; U.S. Department of Commerce

    2004-01-01

    The Russia corporate governance manual has been divided into and is published in six parts: (i) corporate governance introduced; (ii) good board practices; (iii) shareholder rights; (iv) information disclosure and transparency; (v) special focus section; and (vi) annexes model corporate governance documents. The first four parts contain chapters that focus on core corporate governance issu...

  13. Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Rights

    Buhmann, Karin

    2006-01-01

    rather than public regulation. The UN Global Compact and the UN Norms on human rights responsibilities for transnational and other corporations are discussed as examples of changes in international UN based regulation of corporations in relation to CSR topics, and as examples of network governance......Taking its point of departure in the aims of the United Nations, the article discusses challenges to international law making and the UN in the relatively immediate future in view of the increasing role and influence of corporations. This is done addressing challenges posed by globalisation......, in particular with regard to the appropriateness of past and present ideas of duty holders, modes of regulation, and law making, to deliver the aims of the UN; International law making and actors in this process; and a changing character of law and legal regulation, towards deregulation and private regulation...

  14. CSR – more than corporate storytelling?

    Udo Braendle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the subject of corporate social responsibility (CSR gained sufficient attention of the researchers over the last 25 years, numerous attempts were globally made to examine the nature of the relationship between the corporate social responsibility of company and its financial performance (FP. The literature in this area is scattered, the findings are heterogeneous and do not provide a clear answer if CSR goes beyond corporate storytelling. In our meta-analysis of more than 135 studies we try to bring a structure in this discussion. In analyzing the literature over the last decades we find a strong correlation between CSR and financial performance. Based on our findings we present implications in discussing how “good CSR” can be fostered. We focus on the financial sector.

  15. A RELATIONAL ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Gheorghe MINCULETE

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the realities brought forward by the financial crisis is that the corporate Governance, based until now mainly on self-regulation, has not been as effective as possible. A better management of organizations is important not only in order to reduce the possibility of occurrence of a new crisis in the future, but also for organizations to be more competitive. Currently we do not have a definition of corporate governance that is unanimously accepted. At global level, there are a variety of definitions for this term, depending on national, cultural or legislative characteristics. In this article we present the concept of corporate governance as being a complex process occurring at the level of the management of the organization, which integrates control, risk management and internal audit in a formula that is meant to determine the level of performance for the organizational achievements.

  16. Corporate Sustainable Development Assessment Base on the Corporate Social Responsibility

    Sun Mei; Nagata Katsuya; Onoda Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    With the resource exhaustion, bad affections of human activities and the awakening of the human rights, the corporate social responsibility became popular corporate strategy achieving sustainable development of both corporation and society. The issue of Guideline of Chinese Corporate Social Responsibility Report promotes greatly corporation to take social responsibility. This paper built the index system according to this guideline and takes the textile industry as an exa...

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance: Evidence from Korea

    Choi, Jong-Seo; Kwak, Young-Min; Choe, Chongwoo

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the empirical relation between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate financial performance in Korea using a sample of 1122 firm-years during 2002-2008. We measure corporate social responsibility by both an equal-weighted CSR index and a stakeholder-weighted CSR index suggested by Akpinar et al. (2008). Corporate financial performance is measured by ROE, ROA and Tobin’s Q. We find a positive and significant relation between corporate financial performance and t...

  18. Corporate Involvement in C AI

    Baker, Justine C.

    1978-01-01

    Historic perspective of computer manufacturers and their contribution to CAI. Corporate CAI products and services are mentioned, as is a forecast for educational involvement by computer corporations. A chart of major computer corporations shows gross sales, net earnings, products and services offered, and other corporate information. (RAO)

  19. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Uruguay

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of Uruguay's corporate governance policy framework, enforcement and compliance practices. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Uruguay. The report identifies several key next steps that focus on implementation including: Improving corporate information, particularly ownership disclosure, related party transac...

  20. Corporate Governance and Shareholder Litigation

    Kalchev, Georgi

    2009-01-01

    The probability for shareholder litigation is studied and how corporate governance characteristics and other factors explain it. Shareholder litigation results from failure of corporate governance. Thus a better quality of corporate governance is hypothesized to decrease the litigation probability. Corporate governance index is constructed based on principal components. It is found to be a significant predictor of shareholder litigation.

  1. Corporate risk management : an overview

    Oosterhof, Casper M.

    2001-01-01

    Corporate risk management and hedging are important activities within financial as well as non-financial corporations. Under the assumptions of Modigliani and Miller [1958], corporate risk management is a redundant activity. However, the existence of market imperfections can explain the corporate

  2. The Corporations Act 2001

    Bostock, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The author outlines reforms made in Australia in the area of company law with an analysis of the Corporations Act 2001, which along with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission Act 2001 comprises Corporations legislation in Australia. Article by Tom Bostock (a partner in the law firm Mallesons Stephen Jaques, Melbourne, Australia). Published in Amicus Curiae - Journal of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and its Society for Advanced Legal Studies. The Journal is produced by...

  3. Tax planning in corporation

    Nevodnicheva, Yulia

    2010-01-01

    This thesis "Tax planning in corporation" puts brain to legal entity income tax and it is looking for possible solutions in tax planning in corporation. The first part deals with the tax theory, the other part is the theory of tax planning, comparison of tax regimes and tax policy and tax revenue by optimizing both internationally and in the local aspect. The last part discusses options for optimizing tax

  4. Corporate Social Responsibility

    Kampf, Constance

    2007-01-01

    Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used to communic......Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used...

  5. Social responsibility of corporations

    Babić Jovan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue at stake in the article is corporate social responsibility. There are two rival theories regarding this issue. According to the classical theory managers are responsible to owners (stockholders and their obligation is to pursue the goal of maximizing the profit. According to the other, stakeholder theory, the interests of all corporate stakeholders, all those affected by business, not only stockholders, must be taken in consideration. In the paper these two theories are subject of thorough ethical analysis.

  6. Improving Corporate Governance Practices

    M. Huse; J. Gabrielsson; A. Minichilli

    2009-01-01

    Peak performing organizations may benefit from active value creating boards. Suggestions to improve board behaviour and corporate governance practices are presented in this article. The suggestions result from findings in the “Valued Creating Board” research programme. However, active boards working in a shareholder activism framework may destroy rather than support value creation processes within firms. In peak performing organizations corporate governance practices should be designed and de...

  7. Environmental management in the National Power Corporation

    Petel, M.R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental management in the National Power Corporation (NPC) is enshrined in the corporate charter. Environmental management practice can be traced back to the past purely hydroelectric power generation days, of the corporation. One good thing about nuclear power plant project of NPC, is that it required a formalization and documentation of environmental management, as part of the licensing procedure for the project. Thereafter, environmental management had been strengthened and institutionalized in the corporation. Succeeding years had also witnessed the escalation of the development and diversification of electricity generation sources, including the development of geothermal power, and to a small extent yet, renewable energy, such as wind power. The corporation has also intensified the installation of transmission lines of varying sizes in various locations and has gone, for now, for its internal needs, into telecommunications. With the anticipated further developments in the power sector, i.e., the ever increasing demand for power and the privitization of the power industry, new challenges loom in environmental management for the sector. The parallel developments in the environmental sciences and the collective experiences in power generation and environmental management, locally and abroad, will be very handy in meeting the challenges. The increasing stringency of environmental regulations and standards are also providing continuing challenges to all power utilities like NPC. Globally, the power scenario points towards challenging environmental management requirements, in view of the increasing complexity and gravity of environmental problems facing nations. NPC will still be a player in this scenario and therefore, will need to respond accordingly. (author)

  8. The end of corporate imperialism.

    Prahalad, C K; Lieberthal, Kenneth

    2003-08-01

    As they search for growth, multinational corporations will have no choice but to compete in the big emerging markets of China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. But while it is still common to question how such corporations will change life in those markets, Western executives would be smart to turn the question around and ask how multinationals themselves will be transformed by these markets. To be successful, MNCs will have to rethink every element of their business models, the authors assert in this seminal HBR article from 1998. During the first wave of market entry in the 1980s, multinationals operated with what might be termed an imperialist mind-set, assuming that the emerging markets would merely be new markets for their old products. But this mind-set limited their success: What is truly big and emerging in countries like China and India is a new consumer base comprising hundreds of millions of people. To tap into this huge opportunity, MNCs need to ask themselves five basic questions: Who is in the emerging middle class in these countries? How do the distribution networks operate? What mix of local and global leadership do you need to foster business opportunities? Should you adopt a consistent strategy for all of your business units within one country? Should you take on local partners? The transformation that multinational corporations must undergo is not cosmetic--simply developing greater sensitivity to local cultures will not do the trick, the authors say. To compete in the big emerging markets, multinationals must reconfigure their resources, rethink their cost structures, redesign their product development processes, and challenge their assumptions about who their top-level managers should be.

  9. Development of transnational corporations in the world: opportunities and threats

    Alexandra NICULA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transnational corporations (TNCs are incorporated or unincorporated enterprises comprising parent enterprises and their foreign affiliates. Transnational Corporations exert a great deal of power in the globalized world economy. Many corporations are richer and more powerful than the states that seek to regulate them. Through mergers and acquisitions corporations have been growing very rapidly and some of the largest TNCs now have annual profits exceeding the GDPs of many low and medium income countries. TNCs dominate the global economy and exert their influence over global policymaking. Worldwide companies start the trend in many domains having a big range of competitors. Trade is an important development tool. Trade between developing and industrialized countries has expanded and borrowing from rich countries to the poor areas of this world increased. The links between these differing groups of economies intensified subsequently and made these two groups increasingly dependent from each other. TNCs based their activity around this idea. In this paper, we try to emphasize the role of the TNCs in the worldwide economy, the advantages and disadvantages these corporations bring to the countries they activate in and even to the entire world and what effect they have on globalization. Some opportunities and threats of TNS activity are presented, exemplifying through some well known corporations which succeded in this competitive world. The authors wanted in this way to show the positive and negative aspects of their performance and give the reader the opportunity to develop the own opinion.

  10. Geochemistry of zinc in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India

    Murty, P.S.N.; Paropkari, A.L.; Rao, Ch.M.

    The bulk geochemistry of zinc in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India and also the partition geochemistry of the sediments of the shelf and slope regions between Ratnagiri and Mangalore have been studied. The studies...

  11. How to implement ‘access to medicine’ AND enhance economic performance:business model options for global access

    Peukert, J. (Jürgen); Fuggenthaler, T. (Thomas)

    2009-01-01

    ‘Access to medicine’ or ‘global access’ is at the core heart of corporate responsibility for pharmaceutical companies. Corporate responsibility, however, is not restricted to a philanthropic dimension (such as donations), which is often referred to as corporate citizenship. It also includes corporate social responsibility (in the narrower sense) and corporate governance and thereby paves the way for linking corporate citizenship – “to be a good corporate citizen and contribute to the communit...

  12. Managing CSR Globally and Locally

    L. Brown, Dana; Knudsen, Jette Steen

    Corporate Responsibility (CR) is today an essential component of corporate global strategy. CR can bolster the institutional context for market expansion (Porter and Kramer 2006); fill institutional voids (Tarun, et.al. 2005); or facilitate market entry as a component of non-market strategy (Baron...... 2006). Yet, in fulfilling these functions, CR may need to be highly sensitive to local contexts. How can transnational firms organize CR so as to maximize efficiencies from globalization and to minimize the fragmentation of corporate organizational cultures? Bartlett and Ghoshal (1989) provide...... a framework for analyzing the way that corporations coordinate global and local functions. We build on this framework in a case study of Novo Nordisk and its approach to determining global and local CR policies and procedures with regard to its China and United States subsidiaries. Our findings suggest...

  13. Project management – the way to performance among corporations

    Luminiţa PISTOL

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Project management has developed from a simple management philosophy restricted to a few functional areas into a business process that include various areas from global market. Nowadays, most of the corporations are using project management systems to achieve performance on the global market, and they realize that project management and productivity are related.

  14. Serving low-income markets : Rethinking multinational corporations' strategies

    Sadreghazi, S.; Duijsters, G.M.; Dolfsma, W.; Duysters, G.M.; Costa, I.

    2009-01-01

    The global economy is changing rapidly and multinational corporations (MNCs) are at the forefront of this transformation. This book provides novel and profound analyses of how MNCs and emerging economies are related, and how this relationship affects the dynamics of the global economy. In

  15. The Relationship of Corporate Governance, Corporate Social Responsibilities and Corporate Financial Performance in One Continuum

    Murwaningsari, Etty

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to identify the impact of Good Corporate Governance, represented by institutional ownership and managerial ownership, on Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance.It examines 126 manufacturing companies listed at the Indonesian Stock Exchange (IDX) and have issued audited financial statements for 2006. The statistical method used to test the hypothesis is Path Analysis. The main results suggest that Good Corporate Governance has effects on both Corpor...

  16. Hubungan Corporate Governance, Corporate Social Responsibilities dan Corporate Financial Performance Dalam Satu Continuum

    Etty Murwaningsari

    2009-01-01

    This research aims to identify the influence of Good Corporate Governance, represented by institutional ownership and managerial ownership, on Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance, and also to observe the possible influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Financial Performance. This research examines 126 manufacturing companies which are listed in Indonesian Stock Exchange (ISX) and have issued an audited financial statement for 2006. The statist...

  17. Atmospheric turbulence triggers pronounced diel pattern in karst carbonate geochemistry

    Roland, M.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Kowalski, A. S.; Goddéris, Y.; Sánchez-Cañete, E. P.; Ciais, P.; Domingo, F.; Cuezva, S.; Sanchez-Moral, S.; Longdoz, B.; Yakir, D.; Van Grieken, R.; Schott, J.; Cardell, C.; Janssens, I. A.

    2013-07-01

    CO2 exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is key to understanding the feedbacks between climate change and the land surface. In regions with carbonaceous parent material, CO2 exchange patterns occur that cannot be explained by biological processes, such as disproportionate outgassing during the daytime or nighttime CO2 uptake during periods when all vegetation is senescent. Neither of these phenomena can be attributed to carbonate weathering reactions, since their CO2 exchange rates are too small. Soil ventilation induced by high atmospheric turbulence is found to explain atypical CO2 exchange between carbonaceous systems and the atmosphere. However, by strongly altering subsurface CO2 concentrations, ventilation can be expected to influence carbonate weathering rates. By imposing ventilation-driven CO2 outgassing in a carbonate weathering model, we show here that carbonate geochemistry is accelerated and does play a surprisingly large role in the observed CO2 exchange pattern of a semi-arid ecosystem. We found that by rapidly depleting soil CO2 during the daytime, ventilation disturbs soil carbonate equilibria and therefore strongly magnifies daytime carbonate precipitation and associated CO2 production. At night, ventilation ceases and the depleted CO2 concentrations increase steadily. Dissolution of carbonate is now enhanced, which consumes CO2 and largely compensates for the enhanced daytime carbonate precipitation. This is why only a relatively small effect on global carbonate weathering rates is to be expected. On the short term, however, ventilation has a drastic effect on synoptic carbonate weathering rates, resulting in a pronounced diel pattern that exacerbates the non-biological behavior of soil-atmosphere CO2 exchanges in dry regions with carbonate soils.

  18. THE ROLE OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN TRANSITION ECONOMIES: CONTRIBUTION AND DEVELOPMENT

    OLIVERA GJORGIEVA-TRAJKOVSKA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With more evident process of globalization of the world market, the concept of corporate governance gains importance. The global economic crisis highlighted the problems of corporate governance both in developed countries and developing economies. Analyzing the effects of the global economic crisis, including striking collapse of many companies, the huge increase in unemployment and the increased number of people living on the poverty line and below, it can be concluded that some of these problems are result of various weaknesses and failures of corporate governance. Even though the introduction of a number of rules, codes and practices of corporate governance have been made, the global economic crisis has shown that more effective application of the standards of corporate governance is necessary. Corporate governance issues are especially important in transition economies, since these countries do not have the long-established financial institution infrastructure to deal with corporate governance issues. Before 1989 there was no need to discuss corporate governance issues, because all enterprises were owned by the state and there were no shareholders. All that has changed. This paper discusses the importance of corporate governance, with special reference to transition economies. Directors, owners and corporate managers have started to realize that there are benefits that can accrue from having a good corporate governance structure. Good corporate governance helps to increase share price and makes it easier to obtain capital. International investors are hesitant to lend money or buy shares in a corporation that does not subscribe to good corporate governance principles. Transparency, independent directors and a separate audit committee are especially important.

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility in China Apparel Industry

    Zhao Linfei; Gu Qingliang

    2009-01-01

    China apparel industry, which is deeply embedded in the global production network (GPN), faces the dual pressures of social upgrading and economic upgrading. Based on the survey in Ningbo apparel cluster, the paper shows the state of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in China apparel industry is better than before. And the investigation indicates that the firms who practice CSR actively perform better both socially and economically than those who inactively. The resea...

  20. Corporate targeting: Nike on the Russian market

    Sekulović Ana

    2006-01-01

    Nike Corporation is one of leading global players in sports apparel and footwear market. Strategic development of Nike Co has always been based on superior marketing and engagement of world-class sportspersons in its advertising campaigns. When USSR collapsed, Nike immediately started with penetration on Russian market. By relying on its outstanding innovativeness in product development and marketing, Nike has become one of three biggest players in the market. As its distributor for Russian m...

  1. APL: a corporate strategy.

    Fox, J; Nyatanga, L; Ringer, C; Greaves, J

    1992-06-01

    This paper is based on, and summarises, papers read at the second annual international conference of Nurse Education Tomorrow held at the University of Durham (UK) September 1991. To this end this paper will offer: Some Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) definition and process as reflected in the literature available. A distinction will be made between APL and Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) although the procedures and processes for assessing them will be shown to be the same. A brief outline of corporate strategy, as it applies to APL, will be given to form the basis for logical demonstration of how Derbyshire Institute of Health and Community Studies has employed such a corporate strategy. Insights developed and gained from APL research currently being undertaken through the college of nursing and midwifery will be used to inform the development and nature of corporate strategy. A flowchart of the operationalisation of the corporate strategy is offered as an integrative summary of how all the APL ideas have had a positive cumulative effect. The paper finishes by highlighting the possible strengths and limitations of APL corporate strategy.

  2. DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry

    1993-07-01

    A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries

  3. DOE workshop: Sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry

    1993-07-01

    A DOE workshop on sedimentary systems, aqueous and organic geochemistry was held July 15-16, 1993 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Papers were organized into several sections: Fundamental Properties, containing papers on the thermodynamics of brines, minerals and aqueous electrolyte solutions; Geochemical Transport, covering 3-D imaging of drill core samples, hydrothermal geochemistry, chemical interactions in hydrocarbon reservoirs, fluid flow model application, among others; Rock-Water Interactions, with presentations on stable isotope systematics of fluid/rock interaction, fluid flow and petotectonic evolution, grain boundary transport, sulfur incorporation, tracers in geologic reservoirs, geothermal controls on oil-reservoir evolution, and mineral hydrolysis kinetics; Organic Geochemistry covered new methods for constraining time of hydrocarbon migration, kinetic models of petroleum formation, mudstones in burial diagenesis, compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of petroleums, stability of natural gas, sulfur in sedimentary organic matter, organic geochemistry of deep ocean sediments, direct speciation of metal by optical spectroscopies; and lastly, Sedimentary Systems, covering sequence stratigraphy, seismic reflectors and diagenetic changes in carbonates, geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites, and evidence of large comet or asteroid impacts at extinction boundaries.

  4. Organic geochemistry and environmental instrumentation programs

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The areas of research of the Organic Geochemistry Group include (1) computer-assisted gas chromatrographic, qualitative, and quantitative analyses of coal-derived complex mixtures; (2) chemodynamic measurements in complex organic mixtures to study the transport and transformation processes of chemicals in the environment; (3) bioassay-directed characterization of mutagenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived materials; (4) chemical and toxicological evaluation of condensates from mild coal gasification processes; (5) development of rapid (high-pressure liquid chromatography) characterization techniques for primary aromatic amines in coal-derived liquids; (6) study of flame ionization detector response factors and chemical structure in gas chromatography; (7) development of a simple, portable device for preconcentrating airborne aromatic amines to be analyzed by portable liquid chromatography; (8) initial uptake and release studies of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene in pine needles; (9) application of stable carbon isotope techniques in tracing environmental pollutants; (10) development of control technology for hydrazine fuels by neutralization with hypochlorite II. The Environmental Instrumentation group is engaged in research to develop and build prototype field-portable devices and instruments for the detection, identification, and quantification of volatile hazardous gases in a variety of environmental and workplace settings

  5. Institutionalizing Global Governance

    Rasche, Andreas; Gilbert, Dirk Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Global Compact – which is a Global Public Policy Network advocating 10 universal principles in the areas of human rights, labor standards, environmental protection, and anticorruption – has turned into the world's largest corporate responsibility initiative. Although the Global...... Compact is often characterized as a promising way to address global governance gaps, it remains largely unclear why this is the case. To address this problem, we discuss to what extent the initiative represents an institutional solution to exercise global governance. We suggest that new governance modes...

  6. Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility to a Cynical Public

    Illia, Laura; Zyglidopoulos, Stelios C; Romenti, Stefania; Rodríguez-Canovas, Belen; González del Valle Brena, Almudena (UNIR)

    2013-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility, once seen as peripheral to companies’ main businesses, has been becoming standard practice, with an increasing number of businesses engaging in CSR activities. For example, in a 2007 global survey of corporate managers, the Economist Intelligence Unit found that the majority of respondents (55.2%) considered CSR a high or very high priority for their company, a significant increase from three years previously (33.9%). An even greater majority (68.9%) expected ...

  7. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN MONGOLIAN BUSINESS SECTOR

    Oyungerel Tudev; Lkhagvasuren Erhembayar

    2011-01-01

    The global aspirations regarding Corporate Social Responsibility remain far from being met in many developing countries today. More specifically, research regarding Mongolian companies´ social responsibility behaviour is missing and, from overall observation the performance is weak. This research is principally focused on explaining existing conflicts about the comprehension or understanding of just what Corporate Social Responsibility means from a theoretical perspective, and precisely, with...

  8. Taxing across Borders: Tracking Personal Wealth and Corporate Profits

    Gabriel Zucman

    2014-01-01

    This article attempts to estimate the magnitude of corporate tax avoidance and personal tax evasion through offshore tax havens. US corporations book 20 percent of their profits in tax havens, a tenfold increase since the 1980; their effective tax rate has declined from 30 to 20 percent over the last 15 years, and about two-thirds of this decline can be attributed to increased international tax avoidance. Globally, 8 percent of the world's personal financial wealth is held offshore, costing m...

  9. Turkey - Corporate Bond Market Development : Priorities and Challenges

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    The study is in response to a request by the Capital Markets Board of Turkey to assist them in developing the corporate bond market in line with best practices globally. The objective of this study is to carry out an assessment of the status of the corporate bond market in Turkey. The study identifies key impediments and solutions to sustainable development, and it presents a roadmap to ad...

  10. Beer production enteprises corporate social responsibility research in colleges

    Išoraitė, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the concept of corporate social responsibility, more importantly, corporate social responsibility in Lithuanian politics. Many references are given according to the main reasons why CSR issues are of strategic importance: it is a natural stage of development organizations in the light of changing public expectations; exhaustion of natural resources have become the limiting factor in the development activities; environmental problems have become global in scale; there is a...

  11. The Politicization of Corporations

    Garsten, Christina; Sörbom, Adrienne

    This paper departs from an interest in the involvement of business leaders in the sphere of politics, in the broad sense. At a general level, we are seeing a proliferation of usages of non-market corporate strategies, such as testimony, lobbying, interlocking of positions and other means...... that corporations find a strategically positioned amplifier for their non-market interests in the WEF. The WEF functions to enhance and gain leverage for their ideas and priorities in a highly selective and resourceful environment. In the long run, both the market priorities and the political interests of business...... as political. What is the role of business in the WEF, and how do business corporations advance their interests through the WEF? Empirically we depart from ethnographic field studies of the World Economic Forum, drawing on observations from WEF-events and interviews with participants and organizers. We propose...

  12. Corporate governance and liquidity

    Farooq, Omar; Derrabi, Mohamed; Naciri, Monir

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of corporate governance mechanisms on liquidity in the MENA region, i.e. Morocco, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Kuwait, and Bahrain. Using turnover as a proxy for liquidity, we document significant difference in liquidity between the pre......- and the post-crisis periods in the MENA region. In addition, our results show that bulk of this reduction in turnover can be explained due to weaknesses of corporate governance mechanisms. For example, that dividend payout ratio and choice of auditors – proxies for agency problems – can explain the entire...... difference in liquidity between the two periods. Furthermore, our results indicate that more than 50% of this difference between the two periods can be explained by operational and informational complexity of a firm – proxy for transparency. We argue that poor corporate governance mechanisms increase...

  13. The role of corporate governance in preventing economic crises

    Marek Matuszak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses the role of corporate governance in preventing economic crises, both in the enterprise and in the economy. The article is based on the research of literature. It presents the concept of corporate governance, crisis, and factors affecting the effectiveness of the supervisory board. In the final part, it presents the principles of effective corporate governance established by the OECD, and the recommendations for redefining of the rules resulting from the analysis of experiences of the last global financial crisis.

  14. The Ethics of Deontology in Corporate Communication

    Francis E.A. Owakah and Daniel R. Aswani

    Corporate communication, public relations, ethics, deontology, teleology. Introduction. Corporate .... function of a corporate communicator is necessary in strategy formulation and implementation. ..... Exploring Public Relations. Essex: Pearson.

  15. Iranian Corporations and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Hadi Chapardar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies have demonstrated that the themes for corporate social responsibility (CSR initiatives are different among nations and geographic regions based on their cultural, political, legal, social, and economic contexts. In this research, which was conducted on 56 corporations from IMI100 (100 Iranian companies with highest annual sales, ranked by Industrial Management Institute or IMI, CSR themes in priority have been identified. Data collected from a semistructured questionnaire and some complementary interviews were analyzed against the results of a reference study over 100 companies from developed countries. The resulted themes, some of which may have several subthemes, were developed in three economic, environmental, and social categories. Beside these qualitative findings, two indices are constructed for indicating the “importance” of and “contribution” to each theme. The results and discussions are supposed to help business leaders, international companies inside Iran, governmental authorities, and researchers to improve CSR discussions and practices in the country where CSR undergoes a less structured platform.

  16. Corporate interests, philanthropies, and the peace movement.

    Wright, T; Rodriguez, F; Waitzkin, H

    1986-01-01

    Corporate and philanthropic involvement in the peace movement is growing. In considering medical peace groups as examples, we have studied the ways that corporate and philanthropic funding have shaped the course of activism. Our methods have included: review of the Foundations Grant Index from 1974-1983; analysis of corporations' and foundations' criteria for grants in the categories of peace, arms control, and disarmament; interviews with leaders of activist organizations and with foundation officials; and our own experiences in the peace movement. Corporate interests in preventing nuclear war stem from a concern for global stability in which world markets may expand, and from a hope to frame issues posed by the peace movement in a way that will not challenge basic structures of power and finance. Several general features make peace groups respectable and attractive to philanthropies; an uncritical stance toward corporate participation in the arms race; a viewpoint that the main danger of nuclear war stems from a profound, bilateral conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union; and a single-issue focus that does not deal with the many related problems reflecting the injustices of capitalism. The two major medical groups working for peace, Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), have accomplished many goals; however, their adherence to subtle criteria of respectability and their dependence on philanthropic funding have limited the scope of their activism. The struggle for peace can not succeed without fundamental changes in the corporate system that initiates, maintains, and promotes the arms race.

  17. Corporate culture: It's impact on corporate life and business ...

    Corporate culture: It's impact on corporate life and business practices in Nigeria. ... on the work behaviour of management strategists and business policy makers. ... culture include, multinational organizations as well as mergers/acquisitions.

  18. Corporate plan 1989

    1988-12-01

    The paper presents the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council's second Corporate Plan 1989. The Corporate Plan comprises statements of the current objectives of the Astronomy and Planetary Science Board, the Engineering Board, the Nuclear Physics Board, the Atmospheric Sciences and Computing Centre, along with a discussion of the mechanisms for their attainment. The Annex contains a description of some scientific highlights between 1985-1989, as well as a review of progress between 1984-5 to 1987-8. (U.K.)

  19. Trends in corporate greening

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    , if a general change of attitude has taken place in the business community or if companies just comply with the required minimum standard set by legislation. Based on a series of surveys this paper reports on the trends in implementing corporate environmental management in Danish industry up till the entrance......The concept of corporate environmental management has existed for the last two to three decades. Many companies have fully or partly adopted the concept in their efforts to eliminate or reduce the impacts on the natural environment caused by their business activities. The question is, however...

  20. Transnational Corporate Ties: A Synopsis of Theories and Empirical Findings

    Michael Nollert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In general, corporations are not isolated actors in an economic “war of all against all” but members of corporate networks of global reach. Although the literature on globalization emphasizes the increasing economic power of these networks and postulates the formation of a transnational capitalist class, there is still a lack of empirical findings. The article starts with a review of theoretical perspectives (resource dependence, social capital, coordination of markets, financial hegemony, class hegemony, inner circle, and transnational capitalist class which focuses on the functions and structures of corporate interlocks at the national and the transnational level. The subsequent section offers an outline of empirical studies concerning transnational corporate networks. These analyses of corporate ties (interlocking directorates, financial participations and policy group affiliations suggest the emergence of transnational economic elites whose members, however, have not lost their national identity. In the final section, the theoretical perspectives will be assessed and some prospects are sketched out. Finally, it will be argued that the disintegration of the world society, which is considerably driven by rent-seeking corporate networks, can only be restrained if a potential global regulatory agency will be anchored in a post-Washington consensus.

  1. Closing the Legitimacy Gap in Corporate Governance: Governing the Multinational Corporation by Means of Democratic Decision Making

    Schneider, Anselm

    2010-01-01

    Beyond national peculiarities, corporate governance practice is mainly centered on the protection of investors’ rights. However, this view neglects the fundamental changes of the operating conditions of business due to globalization and the weakening of regulatory frameworks. Weak or absent enforcement of contracts, increasingly unfettered negative externalities of corporate action, and involvement of private actors in the provision of public goods change the role of business in a fundamental...

  2. Corporate Identity as a Factor of Corporate Security

    Elena B. Perelygina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Forming-upof the corporate identity is based on cognitive, affective and conative elements of corporate culture. The group as an entity choosing goals and values ensures a certain response to standards and values of corporate culture within the parameters of its social responsibility. Corporate security as security of community and cooperation acts as a form of organizational and ethical approach to developing socially responsible attitude of government and business.

  3. Corporate governance, corporate finance and stock markets in emerging countries

    Singh, Ajit

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the inter-relationship between corporate governance, financing of corporate growth and stock market development in emerging countries. It explores both theoretically and empirically the nature of the inter-relationships between these phenomena, as well their implications for economic policy. It concentrates on how corporate growth is financed, an area where the literature has identified important anomalies in relation to corporate behaviour and governance. The paper prov...

  4. Corporate identity as a factor of corporate security

    Perelygina, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Forming-up of the corporate identity is based on cognitive, affective and conative elements of corporate culture. The group as an entity choosing goals and values ensures a certain response to standards and values of corporate culture within the parameters of its social responsibility. Corporate security as security of community and cooperation acts as a form of organizational and ethical approach to developing socially responsible attitude of government and business.

  5. Global Derivatives

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    approaches to dealing in the global business environment." - Sharon Brown-Hruska, Commissioner, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, USA. "This comprehensive survey of modern risk management using derivative securities is a fine demonstration of the practical relevance of modern derivatives theory to risk......" provides comprehensive coverage of different types of derivatives, including exchange traded contracts and over-the-counter instruments as well as real options. There is an equal emphasis on the practical application of derivatives and their actual uses in business transactions and corporate risk...... management situations. Its key features include: derivatives are introduced in a global market perspective; describes major derivative pricing models for practical use, extending these principles to valuation of real options; practical applications of derivative instruments are richly illustrated...

  6. Organic, Gas, and Element Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Fluids of the Newly Discovered Extensive Hydrothermal Area in the Wallis and Futuna Region (SW Pacific

    C. Konn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two newly discovered hydrothermal vent fields of the Wallis and Futuna region, Kulo Lasi and Fatu Kapa, were sampled for fluid geochemistry. A great geochemical diversity was observed and assigned to the diversity of lithologies as well as the occurrence of various processes. Kulo Lasi fluids likely formed by interaction with fresh volcanic rocks, phase separation, and mixing with magmatic fluid. Conversely, the geochemistry of the Fatu Kapa fluids would be mostly due to water/felsic lavas reactions. In terms of organic geochemistry, fluids from both fields were found to be enriched in formate, acetate, and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs: n-alkanes, n-fatty acids, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Concentrations of SVOCs reached a few ppb at most. The distribution patterns of SVOCs indicated that several processes and sources, at once of biogenic, thermogenic, and abiogenic types, likely controlled organic geochemistry. Although the contribution of each process remains unknown, the mere presence of organics at the μM level has strong implications for metal dispersion (cycles, deposition (ore-forming, and bioavailability (ecosystems, especially as our fluxes estimations suggest that back-arc hosted vent fields could contribute as much as MOR to the global ocean heat and mass budget.

  7. Corporate branding with the help of corporate real estate

    Appel - Meulenbroek, H.A.J.A.; Havermans, D.W.Q.; Kempen, van A.J.M.; Lundstrom, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, many companies try to attract customers by bundling all marketing efforts under a common corpo-rate brand to reflect the organization’s identity. The principle of corporate branding suggests that the corporate brand ought to be thoroughly embedded throughout the entire company in order to

  8. The integration of corporate governance in corporate social responsibility disclosures

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, not only has attention to corporate governance increased but also the notion has broadened considerably, and started to cover some aspects traditionally seen as being part of corporate social responsibility (CSR). CSR, corporate governance and their interlink seem particularly

  9. Hubungan Corporate Governance, Corporate Social Responsibilities dan Corporate Financial Performance Dalam Satu Continuum

    Etty Murwaningsari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the influence of Good Corporate Governance, represented by institutional ownership and managerial ownership, on Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance, and also to observe the possible influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Financial Performance. This research examines 126 manufacturing companies which are listed in Indonesian Stock Exchange (ISX and have issued an audited financial statement for 2006. The statistical method used to test the hypothesis is Path Analysis. The result suggests that Good Corporate Governance influences both the disclosure of Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance and that Corporate Social Responsibility significantly influences Corporate Financial Performance. The result also suggests that CEO Tenure, the controlling variable, holds a significant influence on the disclosure of Corporate Social Responsibility. Yet, there is no strong evidence to support the type of industries as an influencing factor of Corporate Social Responsibility. Furthermore, we found that the latter condition would also apply when we analyze the influence of Corporate Secretary and Nomination and Remuneration Committee on Corporate Financial Performance. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi pengaruh antara struktur Coorporate Governance yang diproksikan sebagai kepemilikan institusional, kepemilikan manajerial terhadap corporate social responsibility dan corporate social responsibility terhadap corporate financial performance. Penelitian menggunakan data sekunder dari laporan tahunan 2006 perusahaan publik yang terdapat di Pusat Referensi Pasar Modal (PRPM Bursa Efek Indonesia (BEI. Sampel dalam penelitian ini sebanyak 126 perusahaan. Melalui pendekatan analisa jalur (path analysis menunjukkan Good Corporate Governance yaitu kepemilikan managerial dan institusional mempunyai pengaruh terhadap

  10. Female Directors on Corporate Boards: Does Female Leadership Drive Corporate Environmental Transparency?

    Phua Michelle Siew Huei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of female directors on corporate boardroom on the extent of corporate environmental disclosure (CED of 260 Malaysian listed companies in year 2013. Resource dependence theory is utilized as the theoretical framework to explain the role of female directors on corporate boards. Content analysis is employed to gauge the extent of CED based on a self-constructed index that is derived from Global Reporting Initiatives (GRI and prior studies. Multiple regression is conducted and findings revealed that female directors– presence and female holding multiple directorships to be significant predictors of extent of CED. The findings lend support to the resource dependence theory on the contribution of board gender diversity and are useful for both policy makers and regulators.

  11. Geochemistry of serpentinites in subduction zones: A review

    Deschamps, Fabien; Godard, Marguerite; Guillot, Stéphane; Hattori, Kéiko

    2013-04-01

    Over the last decades, numerous studies have emphasized the role of serpentinites in the subduction zones geodynamics. Their presence and effective role in this environment is acknowledged notably by geophysical, geochemical and field observations of (paleo-) subduction zones. In this context, with the increasing amount of studies concerning serpentinites in subduction environments, a huge geochemical database was created. Here, we present a review of the geochemistry of serpentinites, based on the compilation of ~ 900 geochemical analyses of abyssal, mantle wedge and subducted serpentinites. The aim was to better understand the geochemical evolution of these rocks during their subduction history as well as their impact in the global geochemical cycle. When studying serpentinites, it is often a challenge to determine the nature of the protolith and their geological history before serpentinisation. The present-day (increasing) geochemical database for serpentinites indicates little to no mobility of incompatible elements at the scale of the hand-sample in most serpentinized peridotites. Thus, Rare Earth Elements (REE) distribution can be used to identify the initial protolith for abyssal and mantle wedge serpentinites, as well as magmatic processes such as melt/rock interactions taking place before serpentinisation. In the case of subducted serpentinites, the interpretation of trace element data is more difficult due to secondary enrichments independent of the nature of the protolith, notably in (L)REE. We propose that these enrichments reflect complex interactions probably not related to serpentinisation itself, but mostly to fluid/rock or sediment/rock interactions within the subduction channel, as well as intrinsic feature of the mantle protolith which could derive from the continental lithosphere exhumed at the ocean-continent transition. Additionally, during the last ten years, numerous studies have been carried out, notably using in situ approaches, to better

  12. Governance & Corporate Social Responsibility - virksomheders ansvar for udvikling

    Bomholdt, Anders; Lund, Ditte Nissen; Dueholm, Line

    2008-01-01

    Summary Through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and especially within an initiative like the United Nations Global Compact, business has been given co-responsibility for development issues. By invitation from Kofi Annan, then UN Secretary-General, the Global Compact seeks to involve the private sector in the support of the Millennium Development Goals. In order to do so the Global Compact advocates 10 principles on human rights, workers rights, environmental issues and anti-corruption t...

  13. Conservatism in Corporate Valuation

    Bach, Christian

    Using a CCAPM based risk adjustment model, consistent with general asset pricing theory, I perform corporate valuations of a large sample of stocks listed on NYSE, AMEX and NASDAQ. The model is different from the standard CAPM model in the sense that it discounts forecasted residual income for ri...

  14. Trends in corporate greening

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    , if a general change of attitude has taken place in the business community or if companies just comply with the required minimum standard set by legislation. Based on a series of surveys this paper reports on the trends in implementing corporate environmental management in Danish industry up till the entrance...... of the new millennium in order to indicate how practice has evolved....

  15. Corporate governance through codes

    Haxhi, I.; Aguilera, R.V.; Vodosek, M.; den Hartog, D.; McNett, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The UK's 1992 Cadbury Report defines corporate governance (CG) as the system by which businesses are directed and controlled. CG codes are a set of best practices designed to address deficiencies in the formal contracts and institutions by suggesting prescriptions on the preferred role and

  16. Contractual Corporate Governance

    Goergen, M.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Companies have the choice to deviate from their national corporate governance standards by opting into another system. They can do so via contractual devices – such as cross-border mergers and acquisitions, (re)incorporations, and cross-listings – which enable firms to choose their preferred level

  17. Corporate Training in Museums

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  18. Corporate social responsibility

    Arsić Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis. Definition emphasizes three basic characteristics of CSR. CSR is voluntary concept, it covers environmental issues and interaction with stakeholders, not only shareholders, is taken into account.

  19. Microbiology and Geochemistry of Antarctic Paleosols

    Mahaney, W. C.; Malloch, D.; Hancock, R. G. V.; Campbell, I. B.; Sheppard, D.

    2000-08-01

    Samples of ancient soils from horizons in paleosols from the Quartermain Mountains (Aztec and New Mountain areas of the Antarctic Dry Valleys) were analyzed for their chemical composition and microbiology to determine the accumulation and movement of salts and other soluble constituents. The salt concentrations are of special interest because they are considered to be a function of age, derived in part from nearby oceanic and high altitude atmospheric sources. The geochemistry of ancient Miocene-age paleosols in these areas is the direct result of the deposition and weathering of till, derived principally from dolerite and sandstone source rock, in association with airborne-influxed salts. Paleosols nearer the coast have greater contents of chlorine, and farther inland near the Inland Ice Sheet, nitrogen tends to increase on a relative basis. The accumulation and vertical distribution of salts and other soluble chemical elements indicate relative amounts of movement in the profile over long periods of time, to the order of several million years. Iron, both in total concentration and in the form of various extracts, indicates it can be used as a geochronometer to assess the buildup of goethite plus hematite over time in the paleosols. Trends for ferrihydrite, a partially soluble Fe-hydroxide, shows limited profile translocation that might be related to the movement of salt. Six of the eight selected subsamples from paleosol horizons in three soil profiles contained nil concentrations of bacteria and fungi. However, two horizons at depths of between three to eight centimeters yielded several colonies of the fungi Beauveria bassiana and Penicillium spp., indicating some input of organic carbon. Beauveria bassiana is often reported in association with insects and is used commercially for the biological control of some insect pests. Penicillium species are commonly isolated from Arctic, temperate and tropical soils and are known to utilize a wide variety of organic

  20. Corporate Governance in Costa Rica

    Gilberto E. Arce; Edgar Robles C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines corporate governance practices in Costa Rica. First, it estimates corporate governance charter measures using firm-level data for 87 Costa Rican firms and studies their impact on the firms` performance; here, the mean of the corporate governance charters for the publicly traded firms is equal to 56. 14. Second, new evidence is presented on de jure and de facto corporate governance charter measures at the firm level and on their effect on the performance of the firm. The re...

  1. Theoretical Framework for Corporate Governance

    Georgescu Cristina Elena

    2012-01-01

    History has revealed that there is a never-ending evolution of theories or models of corporate governance. Companies are trying to instill the sense of governance into their corporate structure. This article is a review of literature on the range of theories in corporate governance. The fundamental theories in corporate governance began with the agency theory, expanded into stewardship theory and stakeholder theory and evolved to transaction cost theory. However, these theories address the ca...

  2. Corporate volunteering - motivation for voluntary work

    Debora Azevedo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, when the welfare state is a responsibility of the entire society, organizations in the private sector assume co-responsibility for social issues. They are also pressured by the challenges presented by technological advances and the globalization , involving new parameters and requirements for quality. In this context, the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (RSC emerges as an option for solutions to the issues related to the company and the whole community. Among the actions of the RSC is the Corporate Volunteering-program, which aims to promote / encourage employes to do voluntary work. A central issue when talking about volunteering is the withdrawal of these (SILVA and FEITOSA, 2002; TEODÓSIO, 1999 and, in accordance with the Community Solidarity (1997, one of the possible causes for the withdrawal is the lack of clarity as to the motives and expectations that lead the person to volunteer themselves. This study uses qualitative research and triangulation of feedback from volunteers, coordinators of volunteers and social organizations, to present a framework from which it is possible to analyze the various motivations for the volunteer work. Key words: Corporate Volunteering program. Volunteering. Corporate social responsibility.

  3. Behavioral corporate governance : four empirical studies

    van der Laan, G.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis consists of studies of corporate governance from a behavioral perspective. The chapters are about trust between chief executive officers (CEOs) and board chairpersons, asymmetric effects of corporate social responsibility on corporate financial performance, compliance with corporate

  4. Corporal Punishment and the Schools.

    Bauer, Gordon B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand and evaluate the continued prevalence of corporal punishment in school systems, this article reviews the following topics: (1) historical issues; (2) current demographics and correlates; (3) the effectiveness of corporal punishment in school settings; (4) myths; (5) alternatives to corporal punishment; and (6) social policy.…

  5. Uruguay - Corporate Governance Country Assessment

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of Uruguay's corporate governance policy framework, enforcement and compliance practices. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Uruguay. The report identifies several key next steps that focus on implementa...

  6. De Ratio van Corporate Governance

    A. de Jong (Abe)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAbe de Jong (1970) is Professor in Corporate Finance and Corporate Governance at RSM Erasmus University. He obtained a PhD in finance at Tilburg University (1999). His research and teaching interests are in the area of empirical corporate finance and include capital structure choice,

  7. Public radiotelevision Corporations in European Union and the emerging use of Web 2.0 to communicate CSR

    Tania FERNÁNDEZ LOMBAO FERNÁNDEZ LOMBAO

    2014-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility is a concept that defines the model of corporate governance based on responsible, horizontal and interactive accountability as opposed to closed and rail control systems. This type of management has been associated, at an initial moment, with private enterprise in the context of globalization, although gradually being implemented in the public, and consequently in the state-owned broadcasting corporations of the European Union. The three first corporations who ...

  8. Petrography and Geochemistry of the Proterozoic Sandstones of ...

    22

    studied to infer their provenance, intensity of paleo-weathering and ... geochemistry of clastic sedimentary rocks is widely studied to the tectonic setting, ...... Dickinson, W. R., 1985 Interpreting provenance relations from detrital modes ..... Carboniferous clastic rocks in west Junggar, Xinjiang, China: a case from the Hala-alat.

  9. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and bulk organic geochemistry of black ...

    Stratigraphy, sedimentology and bulk organic geochemistry of black shales from the Proterozoic. Vindhyan Supergroup (central India). S Banerjee1,∗. , S Dutta. 2. , S Paikaray. 1 and U Mann. 2. 1. Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, India. 2. Forschungszentrum ...

  10. Modal analysis and geochemistry of two sandstones of the Bhander ...

    and tectonic setting interpretations are based on modal analysis and whole rock geochemistry. The average ... that major part of the sediments were derived from the granitic source area. The sandstone ...... The geochemical gap shown by trace and rare ... of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research,. New Delhi, in ...

  11. 10 CFR 960.4-2-2 - Geochemistry.

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Postclosure Guidelines § 960.4-2-2 Geochemistry. (a) Qualifying condition. The present and... peak cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment by a factor of 10 as compared...

  12. Geochemistry and Petrogenesis of Biabanak–Bafq Mafic Mgmatism ...

    59

    13185-1494. Email: m_poshtkoohi@yahoo.com; Mobile No: +98 912 209 39 73 ...... petrologie et tectonique du precambrien et de sa couverture, Ph.D. thesis, universite ..... Applications of the 190Pt–186OS isotope system to geochemistry and.

  13. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    Faure, K.

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: thermometry, tracers, reaction mechanisms and chemostratigraphy. 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  14. The geochemistry of banded iron formations in the sukumaland ...

    The geochemistry of banded iron formations in the sukumaland greenstone belt of Geita, northern Tanzania: evidence for mixing of hydrothermal and clastic ... the hydrothermal deposits have been contaminated, by up to 20% by weight, with detrital material having a composition similar to modern deep-sea pelagic clays.

  15. Stable isotope geochemistry. 3. rev. and enl. ed.

    Hoefs, J.

    1987-01-01

    Stable Isotope Geochemistry is an authoritative book comprising theoretical and experimental principles; surveying important fractionation mechanisms affecting the most important elements; discussing the natural variations of geologically important reservoirs. This updated 3rd edition, with a completely rewritten and extended main part, contains two new chapters on stable isotope composition of mantle material and on changes of the ocean during the geological past. (orig.)

  16. Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations.

    Castleman, Barry; Allen, Barbara; Barca, Stefania; Bohme, Susanna Rankin; Henry, Emmanuel; Kaur, Amarjit; Massard-Guilbaud, Genvieve; Melling, Joseph; Menendez-Navarro, Alfredo; Renfrew, Daniel; Santiago, Myrna; Sellers, Christopher; Tweedale, Geoffrey; Zalik, Anna; Zavestoski, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    At a conference held at Stony Brook University in December 2007, "Dangerous Trade: Histories of Industrial Hazard across a Globalizing World," participants endorsed a Code of Sustainable Practice in Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety for Corporations. The Code outlines practices that would ensure corporations enact the highest health and environmentally protective measures in all the locations in which they operate. Corporations should observe international guidelines on occupational exposure to air contaminants, plant safety, air and water pollutant releases, hazardous waste disposal practices, remediation of polluted sites, public disclosure of toxic releases, product hazard labeling, sale of products for specific uses, storage and transport of toxic intermediates and products, corporate safety and health auditing, and corporate environmental auditing. Protective measures in all locations should be consonant with the most protective measures applied anywhere in the world, and should apply to the corporations' subsidiaries, contractors, suppliers, distributors, and licensees of technology. Key words: corporations, sustainability, environmental protection, occupational health, code of practice.

  17. Geomicrobiology; inseparable from low temperature geochemistry & mineralogy

    Southam, G.

    2009-05-01

    Bacteria play an important role in catalyzing a wide array of biogeochemical processes that affect the dissolution of minerals, the aqueous geochemistry of their surroundings and secondary mineral formation. Processes occurring at the bacteria-mineral interface can occur on the scale of nanoenvironments and will normally extend to microenvironments or even, to macroscopic features where extensive growth of bacteria is supported. The action of bacteria in these systems can produce a wide range of biomarkers that can be preserved over geologic time periods. Possible biomarkers include dissolution features in mineral substrates, fossil structures of individual cells to complex cell-cell associations, and chemical (isotopic and organic) signatures. In any system, we need to focus at the scale of the bacteria themselves to appreciate the actual chemistry of their surroundings and the kinds of reactions that they can catalyse. For example, photosynthetic microbial mats in an Atlin, BC wetland create ideal conditions for biologically induced precipitation of magnesium carbonates, specifically dypingite Mg5(CO3)4(OH)25H2O, which we were unable to reproduce abiotically. The preservation of biosignatures over geologic time presents obvious challenges, and the effect of diagenesis on fossils and their mineralogical assemblages deserves attention, especially with respect to the preservation and analysis of materials on (or from) Mars. For this, we need to rely on our Earth analogue sites as a way to triage the wide range of samples that are available for collection and analysis. The preservation of organic materials and cells in salts is particularly interesting. Conversely, the hematite nodules on Mars may not be good samples to target in the search for a Martian biosphere. The possibility of finding an extant biosphere increases with depth; however, evidence from Earth's deep subsurface demonstrates that it does not contain an abundant biosphere. Bacteria thrive in

  18. Corporate Climate Strategies

    Bjarnø, Ole-Christian; Maltha, Jonas

    2003-01-01

    at establishing operational guidelines for energy-intensive industries to navigate and gain competitive advantages in a diverse and risky business environment. Based on a literature study of strategic environmental management and carbon management, this article aims to establish such guidelines for corporate......Since the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change outlined the first embryonic plans for an emissions market, a significant uncertainty about the value on carbon, in concert with a swift development in energy business, has brought about the concept of carbon management. Carbon management aims...... strategic carbon management for medium to large companies with greenhouse gas intensive activities. The guideline framework is established on the basis of a generic strategy structure in which the factors influencing corporate climate strategies are identified. It is concluded that there is little rationale...

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility

    Liempd, Dennis van; Warming-Rasmussen, Bent; Abild-Nielsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Målet med denne artikel er at klargøre, at der findes forskellige teoretiske tilgange til ansvarlig leverandørstyring og Corporate Social Responsibility (i det følgende kaldt CSR). Endvidere er det målet at belyse, at området er i kraftig udvikling og forventes at få øget betydning for revisor i...... ansvarlig leverandørstyring og CSR. I artiklen konkluderes følgende: - at udviklingen i Corporate Social Responsibility indikerer, at etik er den mest betydende faktor (driver); (jf. afsnit 1)- at etik som primær driver vil betyde, at virksomheden vil gå ud over lovens minimumkrav, og stræbe efter de...

  20. A new corporate governance

    Ion Bucur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of corporate governance has become increasingly important as globalisation has begun to accelerate and the economic and financial turmoil have intensified. Post-crisis context has imposed the need to expand the prospects for analysis over governance and companies, as well as the need to identify new ways of administration and resource management. From this perspective, the author aims to highlight the conditions, factors and events that have generated profound changes within the business environment, while the analysis is focusing on contemporary changes in the systems of corporate governance and economic mutations, especially in terms of the companies. The establishment of new governance rules is demanding a theoretical approach based on new methodological requirements which are needed to reform theoretical foundations and to promote creative and effective shapes and governance systems.

  1. CORPORATE CULTURE AND COMPETITION

    ROGOJANU Angela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Culture is one of those terms that are difficult to express distinctly, but everyone knows it when they sense it. Many articles have been written in recent years about corporate culture, which can be looked at as a system. Inputs include feedback from society, professions, laws, stories, heroes, values on competition or service, etc. Outputs are organizational behaviors, technologies, strategies, image, products, services, appearance, etc. Most organizations don't consciously try to create a certain culture, as it is typically created unconsciously, based on the values of the top management or the founders of an organization. In this paper we try to see whether corporate culture has any influence on competition and if it has, whether it is a positive one or a negative one.

  2. Corporate Responsible Behavior in Multinational Enterprise

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to analyze how leadership influenced corporate responsible behavior in a complex multinational organization with ethical principles imposed by concrete actions on regulatory, environmental and international labor issues. Increasing functional specialization, multinational...... diversification and global expansion also diluted those values. Originality/value: Corporate responsible behavior is a significant challenge in large organizations with many and diverse multinational stakeholders. Ethical conduct derives from executive morality, but the role of leaders as instigators...... diversity and business acquisitions challenged the core values and called for more formal enforcement. Core values executed through investment in positive economic externalities enhanced the reputation and facilitated sustainable collaborative solutions. Design/methodology/approach: This single-case study...

  3. An Internal Audit Perspective on Differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles

    Raluca Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to realize an analysis from an internal audit perspective of European Corporate Governance Codes, in regards with Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development – OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. The research methodology used a classification of countries by legal regime, trying to obtain a global view over the differences between the European corporate governance codes and the OECD Principles provisions, from internal audit’s perspective. T...

  4. Econometric Study of the Relationship between Dimensions of Corporate Responsibility in the Multinational Companies

    Grosu Maria

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Responsibility, seen as a fundamental principle of corporate governance, aims contribution must have companies in the development of the modern society. Although it is widely discussed in the literature, the association of corporate responsibility - multinationals assumes, that the globalization of business, multinational companies are ones that have to initiate socially responsible actions, in order to meet changing requirements interest of more sophisticated. Most studies focused ...

  5. Corporate Brand Value Shifting from Identity to Innovation Capability: from Coca-Cola to Apple

    Ray R. Gehani

    2016-01-01

    Corporate brand value, a key corporate asset, has traditionally relied on stakeholder interactions, heritage, and corporate identity. In dynamic fast clock-speed industries (information technology and consumer electronics), we note that brand values change dramatically within a few years based on their innovativeness. Using grounded theory approach and multi-case study method we examine how Apple, Samsung, Toyota, and Coca-Cola sustained their most valuable global brands while Kodak and Gener...

  6. Integrating Corporate Social Responsability Programs into the Ethical Dimension of the Organization

    Ibrian CARAMIDARU; Sabina IRIMIE

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to indicate the need to integrate corporate social responsibility programs into the global ethical vision of organizations. Such an approach requires the definition of the corporation in relation to the moral values it assumes and the ways in which moral values occur within the organization. On this foundation, the authors examined the various implications that moral values have on the initiation and conduct of corporate social responsibility programs.

  7. NEW CORPORATE REPORTING TRENDS. ANALYSIS ON THE EVOLUTION OF INTEGRATED REPORTING

    Dragu Ioana; Tiron-Tudor Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the new corporate reporting trends of the 21st century. Integrated reporting has been launched through a common initiative of the International Integrated Reporting Committee and global accounting organizations. However, the history of integrated reports starts before the initiative of the IIRC, and goes back in time when large corporations begun to disclose sustainability and corporate social responsibility information. Further on, we claim that the ...

  8. Conservatism in Corporate Valuation

    Bach, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Using a CCAPM based risk adjustment model, consistent with general asset pricing theory, I perform corporate valuations of a large sample of stocks listed on NYSE, AMEX and NASDAQ. The model is different from the standard CAPM model in the sense that it discounts forecasted residual income for risk in the numerator rather than trough the cost of equity, in the denominator. Further, the risk adjustment is based on assumptions about the time series properties of residual income return and consu...

  9. Corporate Hybrid Bonds

    Ahlberg, Johan; Jansson, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid securities do not constitute a new phenomenon in the Swedish capital markets. Most commonly, hybrids issued by Swedish real estate companies in recent years are preference shares. Corporate hybrid bonds on the other hand may be considered as somewhat of a new-born child in the family of hybrid instruments. These do, as all other hybrid securities, share some equity-like and some debt-like characteristics. Nevertheless, since 2013 the interest for the instrument has grown rapidly and ha...

  10. NRPB corporate plan

    Clarke, Roger

    1995-01-01

    As with all non-departmental public bodies, the National Radiological Protection Board is required to prepare a Corporate Plan each year. The Plan for 1995/1996 to 1999/2000 is now available as a Board report; extracts from the introductory section are given here. They deal with the Board's statutory duty to provide advice and conduct research and with its power to provide services, all in relation to ionising and non-ionising radiations. (author)

  11. Realizing Corporate Responsibility

    Girschik, Verena

    and practices at the nascent stages of institutional change. To address this question, the dissertation develops a micro-sociological approach to institutional change that brings to light how actors struggle over meaning in power relations by focusing on processes of positioning and framing. The three articles...... in this dissertation unfold distinct yet interdependent processes of positioning and framing that constitute new ways of performing and understanding corporate responsibility....

  12. Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility

    Planer-Friedrich, Lisa; Sahm, Marco

    2017-01-01

    We examine the strategic use of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in imperfectly competitive markets. The level of CSR determines the weight a firm puts on consumer surplus in its objective function before it decides upon supply. First, we consider symmetric Cournot competition and show that the endogenous level of CSR is positive for any given number of firms. However, positive CSR levels imply smaller equilibrium profits. Second, we find that an incumbent monopolist can use CSR as an en...

  13. Students’ Perceptions of Forest Industry’s Corporate Social Responsibility – A Comparative Analysis of Finland, China and the USA

    Raitanen, Piritta

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenal globalization of business is the main incentive for the study of business ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). With an increase in transnational trade over the past decades, an understanding of acceptable business practices across cultural boundaries is particularly important. Public concern for global issues such as climate change, raw material procurement, human rights, labor policies and corporate governance has significantly increased. Business corporations are...

  14. Calcium Isotope Geochemistry: Research Horizons and Nanoscale Fractionation Processes

    Watkins, J. M.; Depaolo, D. J.; Richter, F. M.; Fantle, M. S.; Simon, J. I.; Ryerson, F. J.; Ewing, S. A.; Turchyn, A. V.; Yang, W.; Owens, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    Interest in studies of calcium isotope variations in nature continues to increase. Investigations span human biology, plants and soils, oceanography and paleoclimate, early solar system processes, aqueous geochemistry, and silicate liquid structure. Variations in the 44Ca/40Ca ratio are generally small, about 5 ‰, but gradual small improvements in analytical capability now yield 0.05 to 0.1 ‰ resolution. The field is still plagued by a lack of universal standards for isotope ratios and data representation, but these are secondary issues. Traditional isotopic systems have been based in equilibrium thermodynamics, which can explain the magnitude and sign of observed mass-dependent fractionation behavior. For Ca isotopes this is not the case. There is still no reliable way to estimate the equilibrium free energy associated with isotopic exchange between most phases of interest. Experiments are difficult to interpret because it is almost impossible to precipitate minerals from aqueous solution at equilibrium at low temperature. Some studies suggest that, for example, there is no equilibrium isotopic fractionation between calcite and dissolved aqueous Ca. There is good evidence that most Ca isotopic fractionation is caused by kinetic effects. The details of the controlling processes are still missing, and without this mechanistic understanding it is difficult to fully understand the implications of natural isotopic variations. Recent work on dissolved Ca, calcite, and sulfates in both laboratory and natural settings is shedding light on where the fractionation may arise. There is emerging evidence for mass dependent fractionation associated with aqueous diffusion, but probably the primary source of the effects is in the details of precipitation of minerals from solution. This makes the fractionation potentially dependent on a number of factors, including solution composition and mineral growth rate. The next challenge is to develop appropriate experimental tests and

  15. Perspectives of Corporate Governance in Croatian Banking Sector

    Tea Golja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Financial market of any country firstly has to be “secure”, but although financial market is regulated and monitored, we were witnesses of bad examples (Island. So, globally all aspects of corporate governance became interesting: ownership; nature of activities; liquidity ratios, etc. The goal of this paper is to give perspectives of corporate governance in Croatian banking sector. The results of the research conducted in October 2010 are presented. The situation regarding corporate governance issues in banks is highlighted. According to the research in Croatian banks in the future corporate governance should give more attention to responsiveness; equity; efficiency and effectiveness; and on accountability. Mentioned principles are not clearly defined and recognizable. These will assure differentiation on market and trust of all stakeholders.

  16. An Empirical Perspective on the Culture - Corporate Social Responsibility Relationship

    Dumitru ZAIȚ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Business competition and pressure of European directives put Romanian company in a position to find answers to issues related to long-term survival and development. In this context we believe it is necessary to analyze some of the most important components that should be taken into consideration at the strategic level: national and organizational culture. The results indicate that corporate social responsibility is supported by learning and change-oriented organizational culture, but also by a favorable cultural and national economic framework. Based on these theoretical considerations we intent to emphasize the relationships between national culture / corporate culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR, elaborating an empirical argument by analyzing the results provided by Global 100, an annual project initiated by Corporate Knights Inc. (Davos. Starting with 2005, it has the largest database in the world and an appropriate evaluation methodology that provides a ranking of the top 100 most responsible companies in the world.

  17. How do Regional Headquarters Influence Corporate Decisions in Networked MNCs?

    Mahnke, Volker; Ambos, Björn; Nell, Phillip Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In networked MNCs where knowledge and power are distributed, corporate strategy processes benefit from input arising from many different levels of the organization. Recently, the regional (i.e., supra-national) level has been emphasized as an important additional source of knowledge and input......, and as a bridge between local subsidiaries and global corporate headquarters. This paper builds theory on the antecedents to regional headquarters' influence on corporate decisions (i.e., organizational, behavioral, and motivational). Based on a survey of regional headquarters in Europe and their relations...... with MNC headquarters, we provide empirical evidence that a regional headquarters' autonomy and signaling behavior have significant effects on its influence on corporate strategy. Furthermore, we find support for our hypothesis that the regional headquarters' charter moderates such bottom–up influence....

  18. Efeito da reeducação postural global no alinhamento corporal e nas condições clínicas de indivíduos com disfunção temporomandibular associada a desvios posturais Effect of global postural reeducation on body alignment and on clinical status of individuals with temporomandibular disorder associated to postural deviations

    Débora Basso

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo visou verificar o efeito da técnica de reeducação postural global (RPG nas condições físicas, psicológicas e psicossociais, assim como no alinhamento corporal, de indivíduos com disfunção temporomandibular (DTM associada a desvio postural. Participaram 20 indivíduos com DTM e com desvio postural confirmado por exame físico, avaliados, antes e depois do tratamento de RPG, pelos critérios diagnósticos de desordens temporomandibulares (RDC/TMD, na sigla em inglês e quanto às medidas angulares, por fotogrametria digital. O tratamento consistiu em 10 sessões semanais de RPG. Os resultados após o tratamento mostram, na classificação da disfunção, maior predomínio de desordens apenas musculares (em detrimento das articulares e por deslocamento de disco e redução da intensidade da dor orofacial; o percentual de indivíduos sem depressão aumentou de 10% para 35%; o percentual de indivíduos com classificação normal de sintomas físicos (excluindo itens de dor passou de 30% para 55%. Foi encontrada melhora estatisticamente significante na maioria das medidas angulares, exceto nos ângulos frontais dos membros inferiores e ângulo perna/retropé direito. O alinhamento horizontal da cabeça e as medidas de lordose cervical e lombar, com valores normais antes da RPG, não se modificaram. Conclui-se que, com o tratamento de RPG, os indivíduos apresentaram importantes melhoras dos sintomas físicos e psicológicos da DTM, assim como melhora do alinhamento e simetria corporais.The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of the technique of global postural re-education (GPR on body alignment and clinical status of individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD associated to postural deviations. Twenty individuals with both TMD and postural deviations confirmed by physical examination were assessed, before and after treatment, by the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD and as to

  19. Legitimising Corporate Sustainability Reporting Throughout the World

    Faisal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores corporate sustainability disclosure practices in a global context. A unique sample of 2009 sustainability reports from some of the world’s largest companies in 24 diverse countries are examined using a comprehensive disclosure index. These reports are analysed to better understand how company characteristics and institutional factors explain sustainability communication using a legitimacy theory framework. The world renowned Global ReportingInitiative 2006 guidelines are used as the benchmark disclosure index checklist. The empirical results indicate that the average level of sustainability disclosure is a surprisingly high 61.9 percent.Statistical analysis indicates that high profile industries and additional assurance procedures influence the disclosure of more sustainability information. Interestingly, companies operating inemerging country systems disclose more sustainability information than Anglo-Saxon or Communitarian jurisdictions. Consistent with legitimacy theory, these results suggest that these globally well known firms use sustainability disclosure as a legitimising tool.

  20. Pengungkapan Corporate Social Responsibility, Struktur Corporate Governance dan Nilai Perusahaan

    Salmah Pattisahusiwa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the corporate social responsibility has a significant interest in Indonesia because believed to increase corporate’s value for shareholders. This study aims to find the effect of corporate social responsibility disclosure and corporate governance structure on corporate value. The data were taken from annual report of mining companies listed in Indonesian Stock Exchange for period of 2014-2015. The sample collection has been done by using purposive sampling with the certain criteria so that 18 companies which meet criteria have been obtained as samples. Multiple Regression analysis was employed to analyze data. The result of this research show that corporate social responsibility disclosure and corporate governance structure have significant effect to thecorporate value.

  1. Solidarity Action in Global Labor Networks

    Wad, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Globalization transforms workforces of transnational corporation from predominantly home countrydominated workforces into foreign-dominated, multinational workforces. Thus, the national grounding of trade unions as the key form of labor organizing is challenged by new multinational compositions...... and cross-border relocations of corporate employment affecting working conditions of employees and trade unions in local places. We assume that economic globalization is characterized by expanding global corporate network of vertically and horizontally integrated (equity-based) and disintegrated (nonequity......-based) value chains. We also assume that globalization can both impede and enable labor empowerment. Based on these premises the key question is, how can labor leverage effective power against management in global corporate networks? This question is split into two subquestions: a) How can labor theoretically...

  2. Corporate social responsibility, corporate reputation and employee engagement

    Ali, Imran; Ali, Jawaria Fatima

    2011-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been outlined as voluntarily additional legal duties of organization to serve environment and community. This voluntarily actions of corporate help them to develop reputation which can shape favorable attitude of employees towards work. Employee engagement is an attitude of commitment and involvement of employee towards their work and organization. Researchers have proved that engaged employees are more productive, more likely to achieve corporate go...

  3. Corporations as social contractors : a study on corporate social responsibility

    Kalstad, Marius Aas

    2007-01-01

    This thesis takes up the issue of the role of business in today s society, in the form of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The research question is: Do corporations/does business have responsibilities beyond maximising profit for owners? Social contract theory, as presented by Hobbes and Locke, is used to morally justify a corporate responsibility that goes beyond the traditional business responsibility of maximising profit for stolckholders. Further, the stakeholder model is proscribed...

  4. The Essential Elements of Corporate Law. What is Corporate Law?

    Armour, John; Hansmann, Henry; Kraakman, Reinier

    2017-01-01

    This article is the first chapter of the second edition of “The Anatomy of Corporate Law: A Comparative and Functional Approach”, by Reinier Kraakman, John Armour, Paul Davies, Luca Enriques, Henry Hansmann, Gerard Hertig, Klaus Hopt, HidekiKanda and Edward Rock (Oxford University Press, 2009). The book as a whole provides a functional analysis of Corporate (or Company) Law in Europe, the U.S., and Japan. Its organization reflects the structure of Corporate Law throughout all jurisdictions, w...

  5. Corporate environmental responsibility – a key determinant of corporate reputation

    Cristina Ganescu; Laura Dindire

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the trend of the relationship between corporate environmental responsibility and corporate reputation by focusing on a study of the European automotive sector. The starting point of our research is content analysis of the sustainability or social responsibility reports published in 2010, 2011, and 2012 by 13 businesses operating in the European automotive industry. Content analysis was carried out in order to identify the indicators used to assess corporate enviro...

  6. Corporate political activities, religiosity and corporate decision making

    Low, Yik Pui

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the recent increase in corporate political spending and the Supreme Court’s decision in allowing firms to freely use their treasury funds for political purposes (Citizens United v Federal Election Commission, 2010), this study examines the impact of corporate political activity (CPA) on its decision making. CPA is defined as the firm’s total annual lobbying expenses arising from the engagement of internal and external lobbyists while corporate decision making is measured in terms...

  7. Ben & Jerry's Struggles with Corporate Social Responsibility in an International Context

    Murray, J. Haskell

    2015-01-01

    This case study allows students to apply their corporate law and ethical knowledge to a socially focused business in a global environment. The assignments provide opportunities for reflection on some of the challenges facing Ben & Jerry's as the company attempted to pursue corporate social responsibility in three separate, but related,…

  8. "Think Differently, Get Creative": Producing Precarity in India's Corporate Theater Culture Industry

    Saddler, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    In India's rapidly developing global cities, large multinational corporations implement theater-based corporate training programs that are designed to inspire employees to be more dynamic, aspirational, and self-motivated at work. Offering a performance ethnography of a week-long "Theatre in Excellence" program hosted in Bangalore…

  9. Corporate Social Responsibility and the Oil Industry in the Russian Arctic

    Henry, Laura A.; Nysten-Haarala, Soili; Tulaeva, Svetlana; Tysyachnyuk, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Examining the oil and gas industry in the Russian Arctic, this article investigates the gap between corporate social responsibility (CSR) as articulated in corporate offices and implemented at the local level. In Russia, global CSR norms interact with weak formal institutions and the strong

  10. The making of a transnational capitalist class: corporate power in the twenty-first century

    Carroll, W.K.; Carson, C.; Fennema, M.; Heemskerk, E.; Sapinski, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the world, there has been a growing wave of interest in global corporate power and the rise of a transnational capitalist class, triggered by economic and political transformations that have blurred national borders and disembedded corporate business from national domiciles. Using social

  11. Corporate marketing: Apocalypse, advent and epiphany

    Balmer, JMT

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - this paper aims to explain the nature and relevance of corporate marketing and details the antecedents of the territory. Corporate marketing is a marketing and management paradigm which synthesises practical and theoretical insights from corporate image and reputation, corporate identity, corporate communications and corporate branding, among other corporate-level constructs. Design/methodology/approach – via the adoption of a quadrivium; a traditional classical, four-part, app...

  12. COMPETING CONCEPTIONS OF GLOBALIZATION

    Leslie Sklair

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Globalization is a relatively new idea in the social sciences, although people who work in and write about the mass media, transnational corporations and international business have been using it for some time. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the ways in which sociologists and other social scientists use ideas of globalization and to evaluate the fruitfulness of these competing conceptions. The central feature of the idea of globalization is that many contemporary problems cannot be adequately studied at the level of nation-states, that is, in terms of each country and its inter-national relations. Instead, they need to be conceptualized in terms of global processes. Some have even gone so far as to predict that global forces, by which they usually mean transnational corporations and other global economic institutions, global culture or globalizing belief systems/ideologies of various types, or a combination of all of these, are becoming so powerful that the continuing existence of the nation-state is in serious doubt. This is not a necessary consequence of most theories of globalization. The argument of this paper is that much of the globalization literature is confused because not all those who use the term distinguish it clearly enough from internation-alization, and some writers appear to use the two terms interchangeably. I argue that a clear distinction must be drawn between the inter-national and the global. The hyphen in inter-national is to distinguish (inadequate conceptions of the global' founded on the existing even if changing system of nation-states, from (genuine conceptions of the global based on the emergence of global processes and a global system of social relations not founded on national characteristics or nation-states. This global system theory is the framework for my own research. Globalization studies can be categorized on the basis of four research clusters:1. The world-systems approach; 2. The global

  13. Do Methods Matter in Global Leadership Development? Testing the Global Leadership Development Ecosystem Conceptual Model

    Walker, Jennie L.

    2018-01-01

    As world communication, technology, and trade become increasingly integrated through globalization, multinational corporations seek employees with global leadership skills. However, the demand for these skills currently outweighs the supply. Given the rarity of globally ready leaders, global competency development should be emphasized in business…

  14. Corporate Taxation and Multinational Activity

    Peter Egger; Simon Loretz; Michael Pfaffermayr; Hannes Winner

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of corporate taxation on multinational activity. A numerically solvable general equilibrium model of trade and multinational firms is used to incorporate the following components of corporate taxation: parent and host country statutory corporate tax rates, withholding tax rates, and parent and host country depreciation allowances. We account for their differential impact under alternative methods of double taxation relief (i.e., credit, exemption, and deduction)...

  15. Essential Elements of Corporate Law

    Kraakman, Reinier H.; Armour, John; Hansmann, Henry

    2009-01-01

    This article is the first chapter of the second edition of The Anatomy of Corporate Law: A Comparative and Functional Approach, by Reinier Kraakman, John Armour, Paul Davies, Luca Enriques, Henry Hansmann, Gerard Hertig, Klaus Hopt, Hideki Kanda and Edward Rock (Oxford University Press, 2009). The book as a whole provides a functional analysis of corporate (or company) law in Europe, the U.S., and Japan. Its organization reflects the structure of corporate law across all jurisdictions, while ...

  16. Strategic Leadership of Corporate Sustainability

    Strand, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Strategic leadership and corporate sustainability have recently come together in conspicuously explicit fashion through the emergence of top management team (TMT) positions with dedicated corporate sustainability responsibilities. These TMT positions, commonly referred to as 'Chief Sustainability......? What effects do corporate sustainability TMT positions have at their organizations? We consider these questions through strategic leadership and neoinstitutional theoretical frameworks. Through the latter, we also engage with Weberian considerations of bureaucracy. We find that the reasons why...

  17. Perancangan Corporate Identity Brotherwood Decoration

    Ciputra, Ongky Permana; Bangsa, Petrus Gogor; Christianna, Aniendya

    2015-01-01

    Sebagai Perusahaan interior di Surabaya, “BROTHERWOOD” sedang membangun citra positif melalui penguatan corporate identity secara menyeluruh.Oleh karena itu “Brotherwood” memerlukan corporate identity dan mengaplikasikannya pada media promosi dan informasi yang sesuai dengan karakter dari target audience dan target market-nya.Dengan menggunakan corporate identity diharapkan “Brotherwood” menjadi lebih dikenal oleh target audience dan target market-nya sehingga membuat market “Brotherwood” men...

  18. Corporate Governance Disclosure in Malaysia

    ONG, Wei Jiin

    2006-01-01

    This research provides evidence on corporate governance disclosure in Malaysia based on a sample of 25 Malaysian public listed companies on the Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (KLCI) in the year 1998 and 2005 that are listed on the Bursa Malaysia. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine whether after the launch of the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance (HLFC, 2000) following the 1997/98 financial crisis, corporate governance in Malaysia has improved in terms of disclosure information ...

  19. THE SOUND OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    DUMITRASCU LUMINITA MIHAELA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the corporate governance and corporate social responsibility in music industry, by reviewing the literature and investigating the aspects in the context of a sample made by top companies in this domain. The paper spotlighting the mutual connections between corporate governance and corporate social responsibility. The research methodology used consists in investigate the corporate governance codes. It’s about a qualitative interpretive research methodology that was adopted. The findings suggest the intercorelation of corporate governance with corporate social responsibility. The main contribution of the author consists in the fact that the added value of this paper and the original contribution leads in the intercorelation of these two aspects of corporate governance and corporate social responsibility, the findings beeing interesting, implying that recent preoccupation with corporate governance in music industry is starting to be equable by some attention to social responsibility aspects, with growing appreciation of their interdependencies. Previous literature has researched corporate governance and corporate social responsibility independently. Due to this fact, this paper is considering them jointly. The paper is important for both practical and theoretical aspects: for managers and also can serve as the basis for future research on this topic. The current paper is realized in the doctoral program entitled “PhD in Economics at the Standards of European Knowledge- DoEsEc”, scientific coordinator Prof. PhD Niculae Feleaga, Institution: The Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, Faculty of Accounting and Management Informatic System, Department of International Accounting, period of research 2009-2012.

  20. Sustainability and corporate environmental focus

    Madsen, Henning; Sinding, Knud; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1997-01-01

    has ranged widely, including different aspects of corporate environmental management, dedicated "green accounting" and "green auditing" and consumer behaviour and "green marketing". Furthermore, this growth has taken place against a background of generally increasing environmental awareness. The paper...... environmental perceptions, driving forces, and corporate responses. The final section discusses the possibility that corporate environmental management, and the many people involved in this area, are less deeply concerned with environmental imperatives than is usually expressed....

  1. Network Culture, Performance & Corporate Responsibility

    Silvio M. Brondoni

    2003-01-01

    The growth and sustainability of free market economies highlights the need to define rules more suited to the current condition of market globalisation and also encourages firms to adopt more transparent and accountable corporate responsibility (and corporate social responsibility, namely the relationship between the company, environment and social setting). From a managerial perspective, corporate responsibility is linked to ensure the lasting pursuit of the company mission, seeking increasi...

  2. Corporate social responsibility in Ukraine

    Polyakova, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the article are considered essence of corporate social responsibility and terms necessary for realization of social activity management subjects. Hikes over are brought to realization of corporate social responsibility, meaningfulness of large and middle business is certain in becoming of social responsibility of enterprises. It is set that exactly midsize business must come forward as a main motor of economic development of Ukraine. Becoming features and modern state of corporate social r...

  3. FINANCING DECISION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    ANDREI STANCULESCU; DAN NICOLAE IVANESCU; PETRE BREZEANU

    2011-01-01

    This paper sustains the existence of a biunivocal link between a company’s financing decision and the corporate governance. On the one hand, the financing decision has an impact on corporate performance, which has been confirmed. According to the agency theory, the financing decision will contribute to solving interest conflicts between shareholders and managers. On the other hand, the corporate governance mechanism provides the proper contractual framework for attracting financing resources....

  4. Global gamesmanship.

    MacMillan, Ian C; van Putten, Alexander B; McGrath, Rita Gunther

    2003-05-01

    Competition among multinationals these days is likely to be a three-dimensional game of global chess: The moves an organization makes in one market are designed to achieve goals in another in ways that aren't immediately apparent to its rivals. The authors--all management professors-call this approach "competing under strategic interdependence," or CSI. And where this interdependence exists, the complexity of the situation can quickly overwhelm ordinary analysis. Indeed, most business strategists are terrible at anticipating the consequences of interdependent choices, and they're even worse at using interdependency to their advantage. In this article, the authors offer a process for mapping the competitive landscape and anticipating how your company's moves in one market can influence its competitive interactions in others. They outline the six types of CSI campaigns--onslaughts, contests, guerrilla campaigns, feints, gambits, and harvesting--available to any multiproduct or multimarket corporation that wants to compete skillfully. They cite real-world examples such as the U.S. pricing battle Philip Morris waged with R.J. Reynolds--not to gain market share in the domestic cigarette market but to divert R.J. Reynolds's resources and attention from the opportunities Philip Morris was pursuing in Eastern Europe. And, using data they collected from their studies of consumer-products companies Procter & Gamble and Unilever, the authors describe how to create CSI tables and bubble charts that present a graphical look at the competitive landscape and that may uncover previously hidden opportunities. The CSI mapping process isn't just for global corporations, the authors explain. Smaller organizations that compete with a portfolio of products in just one national or regional market may find it just as useful for planning their next business moves.

  5. Teaching Mineralogy, Petrology and Geochemistry in the 21st Century: Instructional Resources for Geoscience Faculty

    Mogk, D. W.; Beane, R. J.; Whitney, D. L.; Nicolaysen, K. E.; Panero, W. R.; Peck, W. H.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry (MPG) are pillars of the geoscience curriculum because of their relevance in interpreting Earth history and processes, application to geo-hazards, resources, and environmental issues, and contributions to emerging fields such as geology and human health. To keep faculty current in scientific advances in these fields, and in modern instructional methods, the On the Cutting Edge program convened a workshop at the University of Minnesota in August, 2011. This workshop builds on the previous 15 year's work that has been focused on identifying, aggregating, and developing high-quality collections of teaching activities and related resources, and in building a community of scholars in support of excellence in instruction in MPG courses. The goals of the workshop were to: a) develop an integrated, comprehensive and reviewed curriculum for MPG courses, and to seek ways to make connections with the larger geoscience curriculum; b) to explore emerging topics in MPG such as geobiology and climate change; c) demonstrate effective methods in teaching MPG in the context of Earth system science; d) share effective teaching activities and strategies for the classroom, laboratory and field including advances in pedagogy, assessments and research on learning; e) keep faculty current on recent advances in mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry research and to apply these findings to our teaching; f) explore and utilize current societal and global issues that intersect mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry to heighten the relevancy of course content for students; and h) meet colleagues and foster future teaching and research collaborations. A significant outcome of this workshop is a peer reviewed of collection of 300+ existing teaching activities, and a gap analysis to identify teaching activities needed to make these collections comprehensive and coherent. In addition, a series of thematic collections were developed to assist high priority

  6. Inter-Corporeity

    Algis Mickūnas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The essay explicates the phenomenological problematic of intersubjectivity on the level of bodily interaction with the world and with others. On this level, the concept of visibility is transformed in terms of the primacy of bodily “I can” and the kinaesthetic awareness that pervades all perceptual fields. In addition, the investigations into kinaesthetic awareness lead to the understanding that one’s own bodily action is extended as well as varied by the kinaesthetic activities of others and thus form an inter-corporeal field wherein visibility is located. Such an extended awareness is the bodily counterpart of transcendental domain. 

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility Within the Smartphone Industry

    Mach, Pascal; Atlason, Reynir Smari; Gerstlberger, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    portray commitments to the economy, society and to the environment, especially with in the public media. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) influences most processes within firms, also the product development. This research handles five smartphone manufacturers and their performance within the economic......, environmental and social area. CSR reports are assessed by using a proven methodology by Morhardt, Baird, & Freeman, based on the G4 Global Sustainability Guidelines. Results show that smartphone manufacturers tend to focus mostly on the environmental sphere within CSR, where Microsoft scored the highest of all...

  8. Au-bearing magnetite mineralizaion in Kashmar (alteration, mineralization, geochemistry, geochemistry and fluid inclusions;

    Alireza Almasi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The study area is located in the central part of the Khaf- Kashmar- Bardaskan volcano-plotunic belt (briefly KKBB. Several IOCG deposits such as Tanourjeh Au-bearing magnetite deposit and Kuh-e-Zar Specularite-rich Au deposit have been explored in KKBB. Geology, alteration, mineralization, geochemistry and fluid inclusion results in Kashmar suggest the IOCG type Au-bearing magnetite mineralization. These IOCG deposits at KKBB form at an active continental arc related to SSZ-type Sabzevar oceanic subduction. Materials and methods Use of Landsat 7+, IRS and Aster satellites. Petrography and alteration Studies in 150 thin sections of volcanic and intrusive rocks. Sampling of ore-bearing quartz vein and mineralography. Preparation of 28 geochemistry samples by the chip composite method of ore-bearing quartz vein and analyzing them in the ACME laboratory by Aqua Regia 1DX1. Fluid inclusions studies of 14 samples of quartz and barite related to the ore minerals of ore-bearing quartz vein by THM600 stage of Linkam company. Results Magmatic events in Kashmar occur at Paleocene-Eocene and include: (1 old mafic - intermediate volcano-plutonic series; (2 felsic volcanic and granitoids; and (3 parallel swarm dykes which are youngest (Almasi et al., 2016. Geochemically, Kashmar rocks are metaluminous to highly peraluminous and Tholeitic to calc-alkaline and shoshonitic in composition (Almasi et al., 2016. The field characteristics, together with isotope and geochemical analyses show that all rock types are essentially co-magmatic and post-collisional I-type (Almasi et al., 2016. Alteration of Kashmar is described in two ways: (1 intense ellipsoidal-linear Argillic-Sillicification and low sericitic with Silica caps and with medium widespread and propylitic alterations in triple regions, next to Dorouneh fault; and (2 Medium Hematite-Carbonate-Chlorite-Silicification alterations in Kamarmard heights. In parts of near the Doruneh fault, sometimes

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Gavrea Corina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance is a key element of today’s economic reality being more and more present in many countries around the world. This paper has two main objectives. The first one is to offer more insight into the concept of corporate governance by a thorough literature review and by presenting and analyzing a framework of corporate governance. The second objective of this paper is to investigate the corporate governance situation in three developing economies (Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary. The World Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development published a series of reports on corporate governance. The present study uses data from these reports in order to illustrate how these developing economies are dealing with corporate governance. Based on ROSC Reports a corporate governance score was calculated. As this score shows, there is room for improvement for all three developing economies. This study is important because it shows the differences in corporate governance among developing economies and the need to study these nations at the individual country level. Corporate governance has many benefits for developing economies. It helps developing economies to register sustainable growth rates, to increases investors’ confidence in the national economy, and to increase the ability of capital markets to mobilize savings.

  10. Corporate Accounting Policy Efficiency Improvement

    Elena K. Vorobei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the issues of efficient use of different methods of tax accounting for the optimization of income tax expenses and their consolidation in corporate accounting policy. The article makes reasoned conclusions, concerning optimal selection of depreciation methods for tax and bookkeeping accounting and their consolidation in corporate accounting policy and consolidation of optimal methods of cost recovery in production, considering business environment. The impact of the selected methods on corporate income tax rates and corporate property tax rates was traced and tax recovery was estimated.

  11. Creditor Governance and Corporate Policies

    Arnold, Marc; Westermann, Ramona

    This paper analyzes the impact of debt covenant renegotiations on corporate policies. We develop a structural model of a levered firm that can renegotiate debt both at investment and in corporate distress. Covenant renegotiation at investment disciplines equity holders in their financing...... and investment decisions and, hence, mitigates the agency cost of debt. Our model explains the empirical intensity and patterns of the occurrence of debt renegotiation. We also quantify the role of debt covenant renegotiations as a governance channel on corporate financial policies and on the value of corporate...

  12. VT Regional Development Corporation (RDC)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Department of Economic Development partners with the twelve Regional Development Corporations around the state to provide technical assistance. They can assist...

  13. Aligning corporate greenhouse-gas emissions targets with climate goals

    Krabbe, Oskar; Linthorst, Giel; Blok, Kornelis; Crijns-Graus, Wina; Vuuren, Van Detlef P.; Höhne, Niklas; Faria, Pedro; Aden, Nate; Pineda, Alberto Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Corporate climate action is increasingly considered important in driving the transition towards a low-carbon economy. For this, it is critical to ensure translation of global goals to greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets at company level. At the moment, however, there is a lack of

  14. Aligning corporate greenhouse-gas emissions targets with climate goals

    Krabbe, Oskar; Linthorst, Giel; Blok, Kornelis|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07170275X; Crijns-Graus, Wina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/308005015; Van Vuuren, Detlef P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11522016X; Höhne, Niklas; Faria, Pedro; Aden, Nate; Pineda, Alberto Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Corporate climate action is increasingly considered important in driving the transition towards a low-carbon economy. For this, it is critical to ensure translation of global goals to greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets at company level. At the moment, however, there is a lack of clear

  15. Corporate brand positioning and differentiation in the luxury automotive industry

    Kotiranta, V. (Ville)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Global luxury automotive industry faces one of the most competitive and dynamic markets in the world. The focus of this research has been to discover the corporate strategies relating to competitive positioning and differentiation via brand personality. Both Aaker brand personality framework and specifically for this industry developed luxury automotive strategy framework are applied for content analysis data, whic...

  16. The Corporate University and Training: Return on Investment

    Newell, Marshall D.

    2013-01-01

    With a global marketplace, companies are seeking ways to manage knowledge with tools, such as the corporate university toward gaining a competitive advantage. Research has identified a common goal is to sustain competitive advantage. With a competitive advantage, a company may achieve a higher profitability. Thus far, research has provided limited…

  17. Towards University 2.0: A Space where Academic Education Meets Corporate Training

    Nikolov, Roumen

    2009-01-01

    Nikolov, R. (2009). Towards University 2.0: A Space where Academic Education Meets Corporate Training. IPROF-09: ICT Professionalism: a Global Challenge. February, 12-15, 2009, Arnhem, The Netherlands.

  18. Iodine and human health, the role of environmental geochemistry and diet, a review

    Fuge, Ron; Johnson, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Iodine is an essential element in the human diet and a deficiency can lead to a number of health outcomes collectively termed iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). The geochemistry of iodine is dominated by its volatility with volatilisation of organo-iodine compounds and elemental iodine from biological and non-biological sources in the oceans being a major component of its global cycle. As a result of the dominant oceanic source, iodine is strongly enriched in near-coastal soils, however, the major zone of marine influence generally stretches to only 50–80 km inland and terrestrial sources of volatilised iodine, from wetlands, soils and plants are also an important aspect of its global geochemical cycle. Iodine in soils is strongly bound with transfer factors from soil to plants being generally small and as a consequence there is only limited uptake of iodine through the plant root system. It is likely that uptake of atmospheric iodine by the aerial parts of plants is an essential process and, along with iodine deposited on plant surfaces, is a major source for grazing animals. Human intake of iodine is mainly from food with some populations also obtaining appreciable quantities of iodine from drinking water. Plant-derived dietary iodine is generally insufficient as evidenced from the low dietary iodine of strict vegan diets. Seafood provides major iodine-rich dietary items but other inputs are mainly from adventitious sources, such as the use of iodised salt and from dairy produce, which is a rich source mainly due to cattle-feed being fortified with iodine, and to the use of iodine-containing sterilants in the dairy industry. While the distribution and geochemistry of iodine are reflected in the global distribution of IDD, the recent upsurge of IDD in developed countries would seem to reflect changes in diet. - Highlights: • Iodine is an ultra-trace element in the lithosphere. • Volatilisation from marine and terrestrial sources is vital in iodine's global

  19. An Internal Audit Perspective on Differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles

    Raluca Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to realize an analysis from an internal audit perspective of European Corporate Governance Codes, in regards with Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development – OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. The research methodology used a classification of countries by legal regime, trying to obtain a global view over the differences between the European corporate governance codes and the OECD Principles provisions, from internal audit’s perspective. The findings suggest that the specificities of internal audit function when studying the differences between European Corporate Governance Codes and OECD Principles lead to different treatment.

  20. The 8th ICGG International Conference on Gas Geochemistry Preface: Fluids and tectonics

    F. Italiano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The 8th International Conference on Gas Geochemistry provided the opportunity for scientists from different countries to meet each other, exchange ideas on the state of the art in gas geochemistry, and discuss advance in fluid geochemistry. The 8th ICGG meeting focused on three main geologic environments currently interacting with the human life: volcanoes, earthquakes and hydrocarbons. Ninety-four presentations gave participants chance to cover a variety of important research topics on gas geochemistry in geosciences including: gas migration in terrestrial and marine environments, Earth degassing and its relation to seismicity, volcanic eruptions, rare gases and application of isotope techniques, measurement and analytical techniques.

  1. Perancangan Corporate Identity Astro Rent Car Surabaya

    Gunardi, Yohanes Calvin; Negara, I Nengah Sudika; Aryanto, Hendro

    2017-01-01

    Corporate Identity merupakan hal yang krusial dalam perkembangan sebuah Perusahaan dalam segi internal maupun eksternal. Dalam membuat perancangan Corporate identity yang efektif, perancangan ini menampilkan segala teori dan ilmu yang berhubungan dengan Corporate identity. Dengan adanya perancangan ini diharapkan para pembaca mengerti betapa pentingnya peran sebuah corporate identity yang tepat dan mengena.Kata kunci: corporate identity, Astro, logo.

  2. 20 CFR 404.1006 - Corporation officer.

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporation officer. 404.1006 Section 404... Corporation officer. If you are an officer of a corporation, you are an employee of the corporation if you are... director of a corporation, we consider you to be self-employed when you work as a director. ...

  3. Corporate Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development | Iyayi ...

    This paper aimed at a theoretical exposition of the influence of corporate innovation on entrepreneurial development. To achieve this purpose a review of extant literature on innovation and creativity, concept of corporate innovation process of corporate innovation, approaches to corporate innovation, corporate innovation ...

  4. Global Account Management

    Hollensen, Svend; Wulff, Vlad Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Global account management (GAM) has become a critical issue for many multinational corporations that compete in a fast changing global market environment. In this article, we approach GAM from a benchlearning perspective, synthesize selected literature and examine case studies in order to underline...... the importance of multilevel relationships in strategic business-to-business relationships. The purpose of this study is to address various issues related to multilevel relationships in strategic partnerships (e.g. the recruitment of the global account manager and his supporting team, turf wars and compensation...

  5. Strontium isotopic geochemistry of intrusive rocks, Puerto Rico, Greater Antilles

    Jones, L.M.; Kesler, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    The strontium isotope geochemistry is given for three Puerto Rican intrusive rocks: the granodioritic Morovis and San Lorenzo plutons and the Rio Blanco stock of quartz dioritic composition. The average calculated initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios are 0.70370, 0.70355 and 0.70408, respectively. In addition, the San Lorenzo data establish a whole-rock isochron of 71 +- 2 m.y., which agrees with the previously reported K-Ar age of 73 m.y. Similarity of most of the intrusive rocks in the Greater Antilles with respect to their strontium isotopic geochemistry regardless of their major element composition indicates that intrusive magmas with a wide range of composition can be derived from a single source material. The most likely source material, in view of the available isotopic data, is the mantle wedge overlying the subduction zone. (orig.)

  6. The geochemistry of stable chlorine and bromine isotopes

    Eggenkamp, Hans [Onderzock and Beleving, Bussum (Netherlands)

    2014-11-01

    First book solely dedicated to the geochemistry of chlorine and bromine isotopes. Detailed description of analytical techniques, including their advantages and disadvantages. Indication of research fields where measurement of these isotopes is especially useful. This book provides detailed information on the history, analysis and applications of chlorine and bromine isotope geochemistry. Chlorine and bromine are geochemically unique as they prefer to exist as single charged negative ions. For this reason isotope fractionation reflects mostly processes that are not related to changes in the redox state and this fractionation is generally modest. The book will describe the processes that are most easily detected using these isotopes. Also isotope variations, and processes that cause them, measured in oxidised species such as perchlorates and in organic molecules will be described in this book.

  7. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  8. Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-08-23

    This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

  9. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY. EXAMPLE ROSIA MONTANA GOLD CORPORATION

    Vasile Burja; Silvia – Stefania Mihalache

    2010-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility, a concept without a world accepted definition is starting to beused in Romania as well. This is the reason why in the present article we try to make a theoreticaldescription of the present concept and to exemplify it by presenting the responsible activities of acorporation in Romania, Rosia Montana Gold Corporation.

  10. The Impact of Corporate Board Meetings on Corporate Performance ...

    Our findings suggest a statistically significant and positive association between the frequency of corporate board meetings and corporate performance, implying that SA boards that meet more frequently tend to generate higher financial performance. A further investigation indicates a significant non-monotonic link between ...

  11. Corporate environmental responsibility – a key determinant of corporate reputation

    Cristina GĂNESCU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the trend of the relationship between corporate environmental responsibility and corporate reputation by focusing on a study of the European automotive sector. The starting point of our research is content analysis of the sustainability or social responsibility reports published in 2010, 2011, and 2012 by 13 businesses operating in the European automotive industry. Content analysis was carried out in order to identify the indicators used to assess corporate environmental responsibility. The methodology aimed to produce an evaluation model for corporate environmental responsibility based on the following variables reported by companies: carbon dioxide emissions, water consumption, energy consumption, and amount of waste. Corporate reputation of sampled organizations was assessed based on content analysis of the 2010, 2011, and 2012 reports of the Reputation Institute. We applied the correlation of panel data and emphasised the fact that high levels of corporate environmental responsibility sustain high levels of corporate reputation. The study highlights the theoretical considerations that support this relationship. As companies become increasingly accountable, the methodology described in our study can be developed in further research by using other variables to measure corporate environmental responsibility.

  12. Corporate Schooling Meets Corporate Media: Standards, Testing, and Technophilia

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational publishing corporations and media corporations in the United States have been converging, especially through the promotion of standardization, testing, and for-profit educational technologies. Media and technology companies--including News Corp, Apple, and Microsoft--have significantly expanded their presence in public schools to sell…

  13. Business Development Corporation, Inc.

    Jasek, S.

    1995-12-31

    Business Development Corporation, Inc., is a company specializing in opportunity seeking and business development activities in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} post communist Central and Eastern Europe, with particular emphasis on the Republics of Poland and Slovakia. The company currently focuses its expertise on strategic investing and business development between Central Europe and the United States of America. In Poland and Slovakia, the company specializes in developing large scale energy and environmental {open_quotes}infrastructure{close_quotes} development projects on the federal, state, and local level. In addition, the company assists large state owned industries in the transformation and privatization process. Business Development Corporation has assisted and continues to assist in projects of national importance. The staff of experts advise numerous large Polish and Slovak companies, most owned or in the process of privatization, on matters of restructuring, finance, capital structure, strategic parternships or investors, mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with U.S. based firms. The company also assists and advises on a variety of environmental and energy matters in the public and private sector.

  14. Multilevel corporate environmental responsibility.

    Karassin, Orr; Bar-Haim, Aviad

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel empirical study of the antecedents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been identified as "the first knowledge gap" in CSR research. Based on an extensive literature review, the present study outlines a conceptual multilevel model of CSR, then designs and empirically validates an operational multilevel model of the principal driving factors affecting corporate environmental responsibility (CER), as a measure of CSR. Both conceptual and operational models incorporate three levels of analysis: institutional, organizational, and individual. The multilevel nature of the design allows for the assessment of the relative importance of the levels and of their components in the achievement of CER. Unweighted least squares (ULS) regression analysis reveals that the institutional-level variables have medium relationships with CER, some variables having a negative effect. The organizational level is revealed as having strong and positive significant relationships with CER, with organizational culture and managers' attitudes and behaviors as significant driving forces. The study demonstrates the importance of multilevel analysis in improving the understanding of CSR drivers, relative to single level models, even if the significance of specific drivers and levels may vary by context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. HEXIS CORPORAL Y ESCRITURA

    CÁNDIDA ELIZABETH VIVERO MARÍN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La hexis corporal puede ser utilizada con gran provecho por la teoría literaria feminista como herramienta metodológica para explicar el proceso escritural y la estructura del texto literario escrito por hombres o mujeres. La hexis corporal puede contribuir a la comprensión de la compleja relación que se establece entre la escritura y las normas sociales, ya que permite dilucidar cómo los cuerpos sexuados actúan, se mueven e interactúan entre sí ajustándose a esas normas sociales que determinan sus comportamientos. Así mismo, mediante esta categoría de análisis se podría explicar, en última instancia, la resistencia política de la escritura femenina, pues también tiene que ver con una política del cuerpo que da un significado de más valor o de menos reconocimiento según la posición social de los cuerpos, la que se traslada a la escritura misma.

  16. Rethinking ethical issues in global business environment | Mirwoba ...

    In the wake of globalization and liberalization policy, business ethics ... a push for diversity that has resulted into corporate business cultures that are ... The impediment of global business ethics is the phenomenon that, unlike established laws ...

  17. How Corporate Governance Affects Strategy of Corporations : - Lessons from Enron Corporation -

    Ahmed, Hameed; Najam, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Corporate governance is a subject of academic and professional debate. It has and it will continue to be a topic under scrutiny for subsequent deliberations since there are many different research dimensions and contexts associated with it. However, it has been observed that the linkage between corporate governance and strategy of a corporation remains as an untapped area with considerable avenues of research. This paper tends to explore this linkage, using Enron scandal as backdrop. In the a...

  18. Application of environmental isotope tracing technology to geothermal geochemistry

    Shang Yingnan

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent application and development of environmental isotope tracing technology to geothermal geochemistry in the following aspects: gas isotopes (He, C) tracing of warm springs; H, O isotope tracing on the origin and cause of geothermal water, environmental isotope dating of geothermal water, and the advantage of excess parameter of deuterium (d) in geothermal research. The author also suggests that isotope method should combine with other geological methods to expand its advantage. (authors)

  19. Strategic Complexity and Global Expansion

    Oladottir, Asta Dis; Hobdari, Bersant; Papanastassiou, Marina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the determinants of global expansion strategies of newcomer Multinational Corporations (MNCs) by focusing on Iceland, Israel and Ireland. We argue that newcomer MNCs from small open economies pursue complex global expansion strategies (CGES). We distinguish....... The empirical evidence suggests that newcomer MNCs move away from simplistic dualities in the formulation of their strategic choices towards more complex options as a means of maintaining and enhancing their global competitiveness....

  20. A review of corporate sustainability reporting tools (SRTs).

    Siew, Renard Y J

    2015-12-01

    Sustainability reporting has been increasingly adopted by corporations worldwide given the demand of stakeholders for greater transparency on both environmental and social issues. The popularity of such reporting is evidenced by the development of a range of tools in the last two decades - Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), AA1000 and Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) inter alia. These tools, referred to collectively as corporate sustainability reporting tools (SRTs) are important as they serve to inform the progress of corporations towards achieving sustainability goals. However, the rapid growth of corporate SRTs, with different criteria and methodology has created major complications for stakeholders. This paper makes a genuine contribution by providing a review of some of these major tools, spanning across a wide spectrum - framework, standards, ratings and indices. A critique of SRTs is also given. Institutional investors, governments, practitioners and individuals may find this review useful in terms of understanding the nature of different corporate SRTs. As well, it can serve as a useful reference for the development of the next generation of corporate SRTs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.