WorldWideScience

Sample records for gliders

  1. Toy Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Toy designers at Hasbro, Inc. wanted to create a foam glider that a child could fly with little knowledge of aeronautics. But early in its development, the Areo Nerf gliders had one critical problem: they didn't fly so well. Through NASA's Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center, Hasbro was linked with aeronautical experts at Langley Research Center. The engineers provided information about how wing design and shape are integral to a glider's performance. The Hasbro designers received from NASA not only technical guidance but a hands-on tutorial on the physics of designing and flying gliders. Several versions of the Nerf glider were realized from the collaboration. For instance, the Super Soaring Glider can make long-range, high performance flights while the Ultra-Stunt Glider is ideal for performing aerial acrobatics.

  2. Undersea gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, G.; Jones, C.; Ferguson, J.; Bose, N.

    2007-01-01

    Undersea gliders offer an alternative propulsion paradigm to the propeller-driven autonomous underwater vehicle by using buoyancy change and wings to produce forward motion. By operating at slow speed (<0.5 ms-1 ) and being frugal with the electrical power available to the vehicle’s control and support systems and sensor payload (typically less than 1 W on average), long endurance can be achieved (over six months, or over 3,000 km). With two-way satellite communications from the sea surfac...

  3. Underwater Gliders: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Javaid Muhammad Yasar; Ovinis Mark; Nagarajan T; Hashim Fakhruldin B M

    2014-01-01

    Underwater gliders are a type of underwater vehicle that transverse the oceans by shifting its buoyancy, during which its wings develop a component of the downward motion in the horizontal plane, thus producing a forward force. They are primarily used in oceanography sensing and data collection and play an important role in ocean research and development. Although there have been considerable developments in these gliders since the development of the first glider concept in 1989, to date, no ...

  4. Underwater Gliders: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Muhammad Yasar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are a type of underwater vehicle that transverse the oceans by shifting its buoyancy, during which its wings develop a component of the downward motion in the horizontal plane, thus producing a forward force. They are primarily used in oceanography sensing and data collection and play an important role in ocean research and development. Although there have been considerable developments in these gliders since the development of the first glider concept in 1989, to date, no review of these gliders have been done. This paper reviews existing underwater gliders, with emphasis on their respective working principles, range and payload capacity. All information on gliders available in the public domain or published in literature from the year 2000-2013 was reviewed. The majority of these gliders have an operational depth of 1000 m and a payload of less than 25 kg. The exception is a blend-body shape glider, which has a payload of approximately 800 kg and an operational depth around about 300 m. However, the commercialization of these gliders has been limited with only three know examples that have been successfully commercialized.

  5. Autonomous Underwater Gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Wood,; Stephen,

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles are only now being marketed as robust commercial vehicles for many industries, and of these vehicles underwater gliders are becoming the new tool for oceanographers. Satellites have provided scientists and marine specialists with measurements of the sea surface such as temperature since the late 1970s, and data via subsurface oceanographic moorings since the 1950's. As stated by David Smeed of the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, England, that "gliders...

  6. An Analysis of Undersea Glider Architectures and an Assessment of Undersea Glider Integration into Undersea Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, buoyancy driven underwater gliders are deployed globally to gather oceanographic data from across the worlds oceans. This thesis examines the utility of underwater gliders within the context of providing additional U.S. Navy capabilities. An extensive survey of available underwater gliders was undertaken and the resultant survey pool of ten gliders down selected to five gliders of fixed wing configuration. A comprehensive architectural analysis was then conducted of seven key archi...

  7. An Analysis of Undersea Glider Architectures and an Assessment of Undersea Glider Integration into Undersea Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    roll) Pitch gross control provided by buoyancy system, fine pitch control provided by moveable ballast longitudinally. Yaw control provided by...on a coast. This application bridges the capability of the glider from military to humanitarian applications and may provide useful in recognizing...UUVs bridging the capabilities between underwater glider endurance and AUV capacity. For glider operations, operators are most likely stationed

  8. Underwater Gliders by Dr. Kevin Smith [video

    OpenAIRE

    Naval Postgraduate School Physics

    2015-01-01

    NPS Physics NPS Physics Research Projects Underwater glider research is currently underway in the physics department at the naval postgraduate in Monterey Ca. Dr. Kevin Smith is a specialist in underwater acoustics and sonar systems. He and his team are currently focused on autonomous underwater gliders and developing systems capable of detecting parameters in the ocean and listening for various sources of sound.

  9. Ocean Research Enabled by Underwater Gliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Underwater gliders are autonomous underwater vehicles that profile vertically by changing their buoyancy and use wings to move horizontally. Gliders are useful for sustained observation at relatively fine horizontal scales, especially to connect the coastal and open ocean. In this review, research topics are grouped by time and length scales. Large-scale topics addressed include the eastern and western boundary currents and the regional effects of climate variability. The accessibility of horizontal length scales of order 1 km allows investigation of mesoscale and submesoscale features such as fronts and eddies. Because the submesoscales dominate vertical fluxes in the ocean, gliders have found application in studies of biogeochemical processes. At the finest scales, gliders have been used to measure internal waves and turbulent dissipation. The review summarizes gliders' achievements to date and assesses their future in ocean observation.

  10. An Expansion of Glider Observation STrategies to Systematically Transmit and Analyze Preferred Waypoints of Underwater Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    exercis ead over time i e rendezvous C function. nformation ne that set of po antify the relat are combined to as a morpho runs independ rs. EMPath a...Glider pilots do not use the temporal waypoint estimate from GOST in their control of the glider; waypoints are simply treated as a sequence of points...glider pilots’ interpretation of points as only sequential instead of temporal will eliminate this as a hindrance to the system’s use. Further

  11. Air Launch from a Towed Glider

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research effort is exploring the concept of launching a rocket from a glider that is towed by an aircraft. The idea is to build a relatively inexpensive...

  12. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Weather

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Weather. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops...

  13. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, MOSE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, MOSE. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops near...

  14. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Telemetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Telemetry. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops...

  15. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, AIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, AIS. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops near...

  16. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, CTD

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, CTD. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that develops near...

  17. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Phytoflash

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, Phytoflash. The MAGI mission is to use the Wave Glider to sample the late summer chlorophyll bloom that...

  18. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 139: Mission 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  19. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 114: Mission 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  20. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 139: Mission 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  1. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 139: Mission 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  2. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 523: Mission 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  3. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 139: Mission 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  4. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 523: Mission 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  5. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 139: Mission 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  6. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 139: Mission 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  7. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 139: Mission 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  8. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 523: Mission 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  9. PacIOOS Ocean Gliders: SeaGlider 114: Mission 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a part of PacIOOS, ocean gliders provide very detailed information about the physical and chemical condition of the waters around the Hawaiian Islands....

  10. Cumulus Humilis: Wireless Mesh Networking for Gliders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baardman, Roel; Meratnia, Nirvana

    Digital communication between gliders would be beneficial because exchange of information has the potential to provide insight not only to the pilot but also other pilots and people on the ground. However, such a communication does not exist. In this paper we present a solution for the exchange of

  11. Slocum Gliders - Advances in the Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clayton; Allsup, Ben

    2013-04-01

    "The projects that I have always liked best are the ones conceived on the spur of the moment by an inquisitive individual. We try to reserve twenty percent of our Slocums to pursue such sudden inspirations. They are generally the most exciting; they evolve in unexpected ways and reveal new dimensions of the unknown about the ocean." Henry Stommel, The SLOCUM Mission, 1989. Abstract Two decades have passed since Stommel's futuristic article popularized Doug Webb's underwater glider concept. Stommel's imagination was sparked by the opportunity gliders provided to broaden our understanding of the oceans and perhaps even more important to him, by the potential it had to draw peoples interest and excitement for ocean dynamics. Slocum Gliders have helped to redefine range and endurance in the world of AUVs, and as mobile sensor platforms have made a significant impact on our ability to better see into the world's oceans. Teledyne Webb Research will provide an overview of the latest Slocum G2 design; the hybrid thruster, increased buoyancy pump displacement, latest sensor suites, and an update on the energy harvesting Slocum Thermal E Twin. Three main mission objectives will be reviewed: polar regions, urban shelves, and long duration transects approximating the course of the Challenger expedition of 1872-76. Having made the first ever oceanic crossing by an AUV, Slocum glider RU27 is presently on display at the Smithsonian Ocean Hall. Another Slocum G2 named Silbo, having completed the Iceland - Azores - Canary Islands legs, is now on its way across the Southern Atlantic to Brazil and continues to draw together the International Consortium of Ocean Observing Labs (I-COOL) focusing on international and educational outreach. With the advent of procurements of Slocum gliders in large numbers by both the US Navy and the Ocean Observation Initiative (OOI) Coastal and Open Ocean we are on the cusp to realizing Stommel's vision of fleets roaming the oceans.

  12. NRL Glider Data Report for the Shelf-Slope Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    glider deployed in November had a software malfunction, the glider deployed in December had a serious leak , and the glider deployed in January 2016...images from all of the optical properties are consistent, and show similar water body characteristics, with the exception of Phycoeritherin, which...Log scale. The CDOM signal does correspond well with the water mass changes of the Temperature and Salinity images. 12 Figure 11. CDOM waterfall

  13. Dynamics and Control of Underwater Gliders I: Steady Motions

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudian, N.; Geisbert, J.; Woolsey, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes analysis of steady motions for underwater gliders, a type of highly efficient underwater vehicle which uses gravity for propulsion. Underwater gliders are winged underwater vehicles which locomote by modulating their buoyancy and their attitude. Several such vehicles have been developed and have proven their worth as efficient long-distance, long-duration ocean sampling platforms. To date, the primary emphasis in underwater glider development has been on locomotive effici...

  14. Research on Operational Aspects of Large Autonomous Underwater Glider Fleets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fratantoni, David M

    2007-01-01

    This program supported research on the operational and management issues stemming from application of large fleets of autonomous underwater gliders to oceanographic research and rapid environmental...

  15. Optimal trajectory planning for a UAV glider using atmospheric thermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagabo, Wilson B.

    An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Glider (UAV glider) uses atmospheric energy in its different forms to remain aloft for extended flight durations. This UAV glider's aim is to extract atmospheric thermal energy and use it to supplement its battery energy usage and increase the mission period. Given an infrared camera identified atmospheric thermal of known strength and location; current wind speed and direction; current battery level; altitude and location of the UAV glider; and estimating the expected altitude gain from the thermal, is it possible to make an energy-efficient based motivation to fly to an atmospheric thermal so as to achieve UAV glider extended flight time? For this work, an infrared thermal camera aboard the UAV glider takes continuous forward-looking ground images of "hot spots". Through image processing a candidate atmospheric thermal strength and location is estimated. An Intelligent Decision Model incorporates this information with the current UAV glider status and weather conditions to provide an energy-based recommendation to modify the flight path of the UAV glider. Research, development, and simulation of the Intelligent Decision Model is the primary focus of this work. Three models are developed: (1) Battery Usage Model, (2) Intelligent Decision Model, and (3) Altitude Gain Model. The Battery Usage Model comes from the candidate flight trajectory, wind speed & direction and aircraft dynamic model. Intelligent Decision Model uses a fuzzy logic based approach. The Altitude Gain Model requires the strength and size of the thermal and is found a priori.

  16. Cyclic fatigue resistance of R-Pilot, WaveOne Gold Glider, and ProGlider glide path instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cangül; İnan, Uğur; Demiral, Murat; Keleş, Ali

    2018-02-17

    The aim of the present study was to compare the cyclic fatigue resistance of R-Pilot (VDW; Munich, Germany) with ProGlider (Denstply Sirona; Ballaigues, Switzerland) and WaveOne Gold Glider (Denstply Sirona; Ballaigues, Switzerland) glide path instruments. R-Pilot, ProGlider, and WaveOne Gold Glider instruments were collected (n = 15) and tested in a dynamic cyclic fatigue test device, which has an artificial canal with 60° angle of curvature and a 5-mm radius of curvature. All instruments were operated until fracture occurred, and both time to fracture (TF) and the lengths of the fractured fragments were recorded. Mean and standard deviations of TF and fragment length were calculated for each reciprocating system. TF data and fractured fragment length data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests (P  0.05). Weibull analysis revealed that WaveOne Gold Glider showed the highest predicted TF value for 99% survival rate, which was followed by R-Pilot and ProGlider. Regarding the length of the fractured tips, there were no significant differences among the instruments (P > 0.05). The reciprocating WaveOne Gold Glider and R-Pilot instruments had significantly higher cyclic fatigue resistance than rotary ProGlider instruments. This study reported that novel reciprocating glide path instruments exhibited higher cyclic fatigue resistance than rotating glide path instrument.

  17. Glider communications and controls for the sea sentry mission.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, John Todd; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn

    2005-03-01

    This report describes a system level study on the use of a swarm of sea gliders to detect, confirm and kill littoral submarine threats. The report begins with a description of the problem and derives the probability of detecting a constant speed threat without networking. It was concluded that glider motion does little to improve this probability unless the speed of a glider is greater than the speed of the threat. Therefore, before detection, the optimal character for a swarm of gliders is simply to lie in wait for the detection of a threat. The report proceeds by describing the effect of noise on the localization of a threat once initial detection is achieved. This noise is estimated as a function of threat location relative to the glider and is temporally reduced through the use of an information or Kalman filtering. In the next section, the swarm probability of confirming and killing a threat is formulated. Results are compared to a collection of stationary sensors. These results show that once a glider has the ability to move faster than the threat, the performance of the swarm is equal to the performance of a stationary swarm of gliders with confirmation and kill ranges equal to detection range. Moreover, at glider speeds greater than the speed of the threat, swarm performance becomes a weak function of speed. At these speeds swarm performance is dominated by detection range. Therefore, to future enhance swarm performance or to reduce the number of gliders required for a given performance, detection range must be increased. Communications latency is also examined. It was found that relatively large communication delays did little to change swarm performance. Thus gliders may come to the surface and use SATCOMS to effectively communicate in this application.

  18. Stability analysis of hybrid-driven underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wen-dong; Wang, Shu-xin; Wang, Yan-hui; Song, Yang; Zhu, Ya-qiang

    2017-10-01

    Hybrid-driven underwater glider is a new type of unmanned underwater vehicle, which combines the advantages of autonomous underwater vehicles and traditional underwater gliders. The autonomous underwater vehicles have good maneuverability and can travel with a high speed, while the traditional underwater gliders are highlighted by low power consumption, long voyage, long endurance and good stealth characteristics. The hybrid-driven underwater gliders can realize variable motion profiles by their own buoyancy-driven and propeller propulsion systems. Stability of the mechanical system determines the performance of the system. In this paper, the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider developed by Tianjin University is selected as the research object and the stability of hybrid-driven underwater glider unitedly controlled by buoyancy and propeller has been targeted and evidenced. The dimensionless equations of the hybrid-driven underwater glider are obtained when the propeller is working. Then, the steady speed and steady glide path angle under steady-state motion have also been achieved. The steady-state operating conditions can be calculated when the hybrid-driven underwater glider reaches the desired steady-state motion. And the steadystate operating conditions are relatively conservative at the lower bound of the velocity range compared with the range of the velocity derived from the method of the composite Lyapunov function. By calculating the hydrodynamic coefficients of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider, the simulation analysis has been conducted. In addition, the results of the field trials conducted in the South China Sea and the Danjiangkou Reservoir of China have been presented to illustrate the validity of the analysis and simulation, and to show the feasibility of the method of the composite Lyapunov function which verifies the stability of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider.

  19. Optical Backscattering Measured by Airborne Lidar and Underwater Glider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Churnside

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The optical backscattering from particles in the ocean is an important quantity that has been measured by remote sensing techniques and in situ instruments. In this paper, we compare estimates of this quantity from airborne lidar with those from an in situ instrument on an underwater glider. Both of these technologies allow much denser sampling of backscatter profiles than traditional ship surveys. We found a moderate correlation (R = 0.28, p < 10−5, with differences that are partially explained by spatial and temporal sampling mismatches, variability in particle composition, and lidar retrieval errors. The data suggest that there are two different regimes with different scattering properties. For backscattering coefficients below about 0.001 m−1, the lidar values were generally greater than the glider values. For larger values, the lidar was generally lower than the glider. Overall, the results are promising and suggest that airborne lidar and gliders provide comparable and complementary information on optical particulate backscattering.

  20. Flight Software Development for the Liberdade Flying Wing Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    gliders. Bigger gliders are more efficient at horizontal transport. Surveys of natural and man-made flyers ( McMasters , 1974) confirm this relation...The other benefit of a large wing area is that it reduces the coefficient of lift and the associated induced drag (the largest component of drag at...greater reduction in specific energy consumption than does a proportionally smaller lift coefficient . Increases in aspect ratio, in turn, must be

  1. Monterey Bay ambient noise profiles using underwater gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K.; Miller, Chris W.; Joseph, John

    2013-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4799131 In 2012, during two separate week-long deployments, underwater gliders outfitted with external hydrophones profiled the upper 100-200 m of the Monterey Bay. The environment contained various noises made by marine mammals, ships, winds, and earthquakes. Unlike hydrophone receivers moored to a fixed location, moving gliders measure noise variability across a wide terrain. However, underwater mobile s...

  2. Gliders of World War II: ’The Bastards No One Wanted’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    experienced the consistent recycling of gliders from mission to mission. James Mrazek’s The Glider War and John L. Lowden’s Silent Wings at War are two...Germans were able to transform the glider, curiosities of the 1920’s and 30’s, into an effective element of airborne warfare. With the single

  3. Measuring sea surface height with a GNSS-Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Maqueda, Miguel Angel; Penna, Nigel T.; Foden, Peter R.; Martin, Ian; Cipollini, Paolo; Williams, Simon D.; Pugh, Jeff P.

    2017-04-01

    A GNSS-Wave Glider is a novel technique to measure sea surface height autonomously using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It consists of an unmanned surface vehicle manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a Wave Glider, and a geodetic-grade GNSS antenna-receiver system, with the antenna installed on a mast on the vehicle's deck. The Wave Glider uses the differential wave motion through the water column for propulsion, thus guaranteeing an, in principle, indefinite autonomy. Solar energy is collected to power all on-board instrumentation, including the GNSS system. The GNSS-Wave Glider was first tested in Loch Ness in 2013, demonstrating that the technology is capable of mapping geoid heights within the loch with an accuracy of a few centimetres. The trial in Loch Ness did not conclusively confirm the reliability of the technique because, during the tests, the state of the water surface was much more benign than would normally be expect in the open ocean. We now report on a first deployment of a GNSS-Wave Glider in the North Sea. The deployment took place in August 2016 and lasted thirteen days, during which the vehicle covered a distance of about 350 nautical miles in the north western North Sea off Great Britain. During the experiment, the GNSS-Wave Glider experienced sea states between 1 (0-0.1 m wave heights) and 5 (2.5-4 m wave heights). The GNSS-Wave Glider data, recorded at 5 Hz frequency, were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS-GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations. Filtered with a 900 s moving-average window, the PPP heights reveal geoid patterns in the survey area that are very similar to the EGM2008 geoid model, thus demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS-Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. The residual of subtracting the modelled or measured marine geoid from the PPP signal combines information

  4. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper.

  5. Barents Sea Monitoring with a SEA EXPLORER Glider

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Michael; Béguery, Laurent; Oziel, Laurent; Gascard, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The use of gliders in the Polar Regions offers clever and inexpensive methods for large scale monitoring and exploration. In August and September of 2014, a SEA EXPLORER glider successfully completed a 388 km mission in the central Barents Sea to monitor the physical and biological features over a transect between 72° 30' N and 74° 30' N latitude and between 32° E and 33° E longitude, as part of the European FP7 ACCESS project and in cooperation with the Institute of M...

  6. Upper-stratospheric glider flights for low-g experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Adam

    Near Space Corporation's fully-operational High Altitude Shuttle System (HASS) consists of a glider carried to 100,000ft by a high altitude balloon. Originally intended to safely return sensitive instrumentation from altitude back to Earth, the glider provides the opportunity to fly ultra-smooth "parabolas" for low-g experimentation. This work models the dynamic behavior of the glider using aerodynamic parameters of a scaled F-4 Phantom to determine the optimal flight path during descent. Low-g parabola and pull-up pairs are flown until the altitude drops below 18km, approaching the maximum altitude of controlled airspace. With this model, it was found that eleven low-g parabolas can be flown to yield 137 seconds of total test time at an average RMS g-loading of 4.9x10 -2. By changing the weighting factor of the merit function, a tradeoff can be made to increase total test time at the expense of increasing g-loading, or vice-versa. A preliminary design exercise for an improved glider is conducted based on lessons learned from the scaled F-4 flight results.

  7. The transport glider | Alexander | Scientia Militaria: South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 2 (1980) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. The transport glider.

  8. Variable-Structure Control of a Model Glider Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Anderson, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    A variable-structure control system designed to enable a fuselage-heavy airplane to recover from spin has been demonstrated in a hand-launched, instrumented model glider airplane. Variable-structure control is a high-speed switching feedback control technique that has been developed for control of nonlinear dynamic systems.

  9. New technologies for marine research: five years of glider activities at IMEDEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simón Ruiz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the glider activities carried out in the last 5 years by the IMEDEA Department of Marine Technologies, Operational Oceanography and Sustainability (TMOOS. TMOOS has been operating gliders in the Western Mediterranean Sea since 2006 and has set-up electronic and maintenance laboratories in order to establish a key glider port in the area. Twenty-two glider missions have been performed to date and over 17000 hydrographic and biogeochemical profiles collected. TMOOS is using gliders for operational, technological and scientific objectives. Studies of path planning analysis and adaptive sampling for gliders in combination with other platforms have been undertaken and new methodologies have been developed to process data from gliders. Thus far, IMEDEA gliders have contributed to the better understanding of mesoscale processes in the upper ocean, including the coupling between the physical and biogeochemical process of the marine ecosystem and, in combination with remote sensing observations, high-resolution glider data has enabled advances in new methodologies to improve coastal altimetry. Gliders have also proved to be important platforms for the development of operational oceanography tools and useful vehicles on which to test and implement new sensors for ocean monitoring.

  10. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations from Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Alfred K; Donaghay, Percy L; Moore, Casey; Arrieta, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The long term goal is to transition existing prototype autonomous profiling nutrient analyzers into commercial products that can be readily deployed on autonomous profiling moorings, coastal gliders...

  11. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations From Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Alfred K; Donaghay, Percy L; Moore, Casey; Arrieta, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The long term goal is to transition existing prototype autonomous profiling nutrient analyzers into commercial products that can be readily deployed on autonomous profiling moorings, coastal gliders...

  12. BILATERAL HYDRONEPHROSIS IN A SUGAR GLIDER (PETAURUS BREVICEPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Lara; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Jiménez, David A; Mayer, Joerg; Divers, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    An adult, intact male sugar glider ( Petaurus breviceps ) presented for acute caudal abdominal swelling. Treatment by the referring veterinarian included aspiration of urine from the swelling. On physical examination, mild depression, pale mucus membranes, and caudal abdominal swelling were noted. Focused ultrasonographic assessment revealed a fluid-filled caudal abdominal structure and subjective bladder wall thickening. The following day, the sugar glider was severely depressed. Hematology results included hypoglycemia, hyperkalemia, hyponatremia, and azotemia. Ultrasonography revealed bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter. Despite supportive care, the animal died. Postmortem examination confirmed bilateral ureteral dilation, renal petechial hemorrhage, and dilation of the right renal pelvis. Submucosal edema, hemorrhage, and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the urinary bladder, ureters, and renal pelvises were noted. Hyperplasia of the urinary bladder and ureteral epithelium, coupled with inflammation, may have caused functional obstruction leading to bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter. This is the first reported case of hydronephrosis in a marsupial.

  13. A Wave Glider for Studies of Biofouling and Ocean Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Report: A Wave Glider for Studies of Biofouling and Ocean Productivity The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the...Biofouling and Ocean Productivity Report Term: 0-Other Email: john.breier@utrgv.edu Distribution Statement: 1-Approved for public release; distribution is...sensors, and engineered test surfaces was procured to study controls on ocean productivity , plankton distribution, larval settling, and biofouling. We

  14. Ocean gliders as key component within the AORAC-SA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, C.; Hernandez Brito, J.; Castro, A.; Rueda, M. J.; Llinas, O.

    2016-02-01

    The Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance Coordination and Support Action (AORAC-SA) is designed to provide scientific, technical and logistical support to the EU in developing and implementing transAtlantic Marine Research Cooperation between the European Union, the United States of America and Canada. The Coordination and Support Action (CSA) is carried out within the framework of the Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance (AORA) as outlined in the Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation (May 2013). The CSA will be responsible for the organization of expert and stakeholder meetings, workshops and conferences required by the AORA and related to identified research priorities support actions and other initiatives as they arise, taking into account related Horizon 2020 supported transAtlantic projects and on-going national and EU collaborative projects. The AORAC-SA support and governance structure comprises a Secretariat and Management Team, guided by a high-level Operational Board, representative of the major European Marine Research Programming and Funding Organizations as well as those of the USA and Canada. As example of this research cooperative framework, ocean gliders have become nowadays a common, innovative and sustainable ocean-observations tool for the Atlantic basin, linking research groups, govermental institutions and private companies from both sides in terms of technical developments, transatlantic missions in partnership, training forums, etc. aiming to develop common practices and protocols for a better ocean resources management and understanding. Within this context, the Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands (PLOCAN), as AORAC-SA partner, is working on specific actions like ocean glider observations programs (endurance line) by AtlantOS project (www.atlantos-h2020.eu), related new technical developments by NeXOS FP-7 project (www.nexosproject.eu) and a yearly International Glider School forum hosting (www.gliderschool.eu).

  15. Vertical suspsended sediment fluxes observed from ocean gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckelbach, Lucas; Carpenter, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Many studies trying to understand a coastal system in terms of sediment transport paths resort to numerical modelling - combining circulation models with sediment transport models. Two aspects herein are crucial: sediment fluxes across the sea bed-water column interface, and the subsequent vertical mixing by turbulence. Both aspects are highly complex and have relatively short time scales, so that the processes involved are implemented in numerical models as parameterisations. Due to the effort required to obtain field observations of suspended sediment concentrations (and other parameters), measurements are scarce, which makes the development and tuning of parameterisations a difficult task. Ocean gliders (autonomous underwater vehicles propelled by a buoyancy engine) provide a platform complementing more traditional methods of sampling. In this work we present observations of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and dissipation rate taken by two gliders, each equipped with optical sensors and a microstructure sensor, along with current observations from a bottom mounted ADCP, all operated in the German Bight sector of the North Sea in Summer 2014. For about two weeks of a four-week experiment, the gliders were programmed to fly in a novel way as Lagrangian profilers to water depths of about 40 m. The benefit of this approach is that the rate of change of SSC - and other parameters - is local to the water column, as opposed to an unknown composition of temporal and spatial variability when gliders are operated in the usual way. Therefore, vertical sediment fluxes can be calculated without the need of the - often dubious - assumption that spatial variability can be neglected. During the experiment the water column was initially thermally stratified, with a cross-pycnocline diffusion coefficient estimated at 7\\cdot10-5 m2 s-1. Halfway through the experiment the remnants of tropical storm Bertha arrived at the study site and caused a complete mixing of the water

  16. Hedgehogs and sugar gliders: respiratory anatomy, physiology, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dan H

    2011-05-01

    This article discusses the respiratory anatomy, physiology, and disease of African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) and sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps), two species commonly seen in exotic animal practice. Where appropriate, information from closely related species is mentioned because cross-susceptibility is likely and because these additional species may also be encountered in practice. Other body systems and processes are discussed insofar as they relate to or affect respiratory function. Although some topics, such as special senses, hibernation, or vocalization, may seem out of place, in each case the information relates back to respiration in some important way. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Glider-Assisted Link Disruption Restoration Mechanism in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhigang; Wang, Ning; Su, Yishan; Yang, Qiuling

    2018-02-07

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become a hot research topic. In UASNs, nodes can be affected by ocean currents and external forces, which could result in sudden link disruption. Therefore, designing a flexible and efficient link disruption restoration mechanism to ensure the network connectivity is a challenge. In the paper, we propose a glider-assisted restoration mechanism which includes link disruption recognition and related link restoring mechanism. In the link disruption recognition mechanism, the cluster heads collect the link disruption information and then schedule gliders acting as relay nodes to restore the disrupted link. Considering the glider's sawtooth motion, we design a relay location optimization algorithm with a consideration of both the glider's trajectory and acoustic channel attenuation model. The utility function is established by minimizing the channel attenuation and the optimal location of glider is solved by a multiplier method. The glider-assisted restoration mechanism can greatly improve the packet delivery rate and reduce the communication energy consumption and it is more general for the restoration of different link disruption scenarios. The simulation results show that glider-assisted restoration mechanism can improve the delivery rate of data packets by 15-33% compared with cooperative opportunistic routing (OVAR), the hop-by-hop vector-based forwarding (HH-VBF) and the vector based forward (VBF) methods, and reduce communication energy consumption by 20-58% for a typical network's setting.

  18. EGO: Towards a global glider infrastructure for the benefit of marine research and operational oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testor, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    In the 1990 s, while gliders were being developed and successfully passing first tests, their potential use for ocean research started to be discussed in international conferences because they could help us improve the cost-effectiveness, sampling, and distribution of the ocean observations (see OceanObs'99 Conference Statement - UNESCO). After the prototype phase, in the 2000 s, one could only witness the growing glider activity throughout the world. The first glider experiments in Europe brought together several teams that were interested in the technology and a consortium formed naturally from these informal collaborations. Since 2006, Everyone's Gliding Observatories (EGO - http://www.ego-network.org) Workshops and Glider Schools have been organized, whilst becoming the international forum for glider activities. Some key challenges have emerged from the expansion of the glider system and require now setting up a sustainable European as well as a global system to operate glider and to ensure a smooth and sustained link to the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). Glider technology faces many scientific, technological and logistical issues. In particular, it approaches the challenge of controlling many steerable probes in a variable environment for better sampling. It also needs the development of new formats and procedures in order to build glider observatories at a global level. Several geographically distributed teams of oceanographers now operate gliders, and there is a risk of fragmentation. We will here present results from our consortium who intends to solve most of these issues through scientific and technological coordination and networking. This approach is supported by the ESF through Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST). The COST Action ES0904 "EGO" started in July 2010 aiming to build international cooperation and capacities at the scientific, technological, and organizational levels, for sustained observations of the

  19. Cross-coherent vector sensor processing for spatially distributed glider networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brendan; Sabra, Karim G

    2015-09-01

    Autonomous underwater gliders fitted with vector sensors can be used as a spatially distributed sensor array to passively locate underwater sources. However, to date, the positional accuracy required for robust array processing (especially coherent processing) is not achievable using dead-reckoning while the gliders remain submerged. To obtain such accuracy, the gliders can be temporarily surfaced to allow for global positioning system contact, but the acoustically active sea surface introduces locally additional sensor noise. This letter demonstrates that cross-coherent array processing, which inherently mitigates the effects of local noise, outperforms traditional incoherent processing source localization methods for this spatially distributed vector sensor network.

  20. Temperature, salinity, and other measurements collected using gliders in the Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0065238)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Glider oceanographic data (temperature, salinity) collected in support of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event in the Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0065238).

  1. Depth-averaged instantaneous currents in a tidally dominated shelf sea from glider observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckelbach, Lucas

    2016-12-01

    Ocean gliders have become ubiquitous observation platforms in the ocean in recent years. They are also increasingly used in coastal environments. The coastal observatory system COSYNA has pioneered the use of gliders in the North Sea, a shallow tidally energetic shelf sea. For operational reasons, the gliders operated in the North Sea are programmed to resurface every 3-5 h. The glider's dead-reckoning algorithm yields depth-averaged currents, averaged in time over each subsurface interval. Under operational conditions these averaged currents are a poor approximation of the instantaneous tidal current. In this work an algorithm is developed that estimates the instantaneous current (tidal and residual) from glider observations only. The algorithm uses a first-order Butterworth low pass filter to estimate the residual current component, and a Kalman filter based on the linear shallow water equations for the tidal component. A comparison of data from a glider experiment with current data from an acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed nearby shows that the standard deviations for the east and north current components are better than 7 cm s-1 in near-real-time mode and improve to better than 6 cm s-1 in delayed mode, where the filters can be run forward and backward. In the near-real-time mode the algorithm provides estimates of the currents that the glider is expected to encounter during its next few dives. Combined with a behavioural and dynamic model of the glider, this yields predicted trajectories, the information of which is incorporated in warning messages issued to ships by the (German) authorities. In delayed mode the algorithm produces useful estimates of the depth-averaged currents, which can be used in (process-based) analyses in case no other source of measured current information is available.

  2. A thermal engine for underwater glider driven by ocean thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yanan; Wang, Yanhui; Ma, Zhesong; Wang, Shuxin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal engine with a double-tube structure is developed for underwater glider. • Isostatic pressing technology is effective to increase volumetric change rate. • Actual volumetric change rate reaches 89.2% of the theoretical value. • Long term sailing of 677 km and 27 days is achieved by thermal underwater glider. - Graphical Abstract: - Abstract: Underwater glider is one of the most popular platforms for long term ocean observation. Underwater glider driven by ocean thermal energy extends the duration and range of underwater glider powered by battery. Thermal engine is the core device of underwater glider to harvest ocean thermal energy. In this paper, (1) model of thermal engine was raised by thermodynamics method and the performance of thermal engine was investigated, (2) thermal engine with a double-tube structure was developed and isostatic pressing technology was applied to improve the performance for buoyancy driven, referencing powder pressing theory, (3) wall thickness of thermal engine was optimized to reduce the overall weight of thermal engine, (4) material selection and dimension determination were discussed for a faster heat transfer design, by thermal resistance analysis, (5) laboratory test and long term sea trail were carried out to test the performance of thermal engine. The study shows that volumetric change rate is the most important indicator to evaluating buoyancy-driven performance of a thermal engine, isostatic pressing technology is effective to improve volumetric change rate, actual volumetric change rate can reach 89.2% of the theoretical value and the average power is about 124 W in a typical diving profile. Thermal engine developed by Tianjin University is a superior thermal energy conversion device for underwater glider. Additionally, application of thermal engine provides a new solution for miniaturization of ocean thermal energy conversion.

  3. The 2014-2015 Warming Anomaly in the Southern California Current System: Glider Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaba, K. D.; Rudnick, D. L.

    2016-02-01

    During 2014-2015, basin-wide patterns of oceanic and atmospheric anomalies affected surface waters throughout the North Pacific Ocean. We present regional physical and biological effects of the warming, as observed by our autonomous underwater gliders in the southern California Current System (SCCS). Established in 2006, the California Glider Network provides sustained subsurface observations for monitoring the coastal effects of large-scale climate variability. Along repeat sections that extend to 350-500 km in offshore distance and 500 m in depth, Spray gliders have continuously occupied CalCOFI lines 66.7, 80, and 90 for nearly nine years. Following a sawtooth trajectory, the gliders complete each dive in approximately 3 hours and over 3 km. Measured variables include pressure, temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, and velocity. For each of the three lines, a comprehensive climatology has been constructed from the multiyear timeseries. The ongoing surface-intensified warming anomaly, which began locally in early 2014 and persists through present, is unprecedented in the glider climatology. Reaching up to 5°C, positive temperature anomalies have been generally confined to the upper 50 m and persistent for over 20 months. The timing of the warming was in phase along each glider line but out of phase with equatorial SST anomalies, suggesting a decoupling of tropical and mid-latitude dynamics. Concurrent physical oceanographic anomalies included a depressed thermocline and high stratification. An induced biological response was apparent in the deepening of the subsurface chlorophyll fluorescence maximum. Ancillary atmospheric data from the NCEP North American Mesoscale (NAM) model indicate that a combination of surface forcing anomalies, namely high downward heat flux and weak wind stress magnitude, caused the unusual warm, downwelling conditions. With a strong El Niño event in the forecast for winter 2015-2016, our sustained glider network will

  4. Natural hydrocarbon seeps observation with underwater gliders and UV fluorescence sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet, V.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrocarbons may leak to the near-surface from subsurface accumulations, from mature source rock, or by buoyancy along major cross-strata routes. The presence of migrating near-surface hydrocarbons can provide strong evidence for the presence of a working petroleum system, as well as valuable information on source, maturity, and migration pathways. Detection and characterization of hydrocarbons in the water column may then help to de-risk hydrocarbon plays at a very preliminary stage of an exploration program. In order to detect hydrocarbons in the water column, an underwater glider survey was conducted in an offshore frontier area. Driven by buoyancy variation, underwater gliders enable collecting data autonomously along the water column for weeks to months. Underwater gliders are regularly piloted from shore by satellite telemetry and do not require a surface supervising vessel resulting in substantial operational costs savings. The data compiled, over 700m depth of the water column, included temperature, salinity, pressure, dissolved oxygen and hydrocarbon components (phenanthrene and naphthalene) measured by "MINIFLUO" sensors to particularly target representative crude oil compounds Two gliders were deployed at sea, one from coast in shallow water and the other one offshore on the survey area. Both accurately squared the survey area following pre-defined lines and cross lines. Data files were transmitted by satellite telemetry in near real time during the performance of the mission for real time observations and appropriate re-positioning of the gliders. Using rechargeable underwater gliders increased reliability reducing the risk of leakage and associated logistics during operation at sea. Despite strong evidences of seabed seepages such as pockmarks, faults, etc, over the area of interest, no hydrocarbon indices were detected in the water column, which was confirmed later by seabed sample analysis. The use of glider platforms for hydrocarbon detection has

  5. Using an autonomous Wave Glider to detect seawater anomalies related to submarine groundwater discharge - engineering challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, P.; Brueckmann, W.; Schmidt, M.; Balushi, H. A.; Abri, O. A.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal aquifer systems are amongst the most precious and vulnerable water resources worldwide. While differing in lateral and vertical extent they commonly show a complex interaction with the marine realm. Excessive groundwater extraction can cause saltwater intrusion from the sea into the aquifers, having a strongly negative impact on the groundwater quality. While the reverse pathway, the discharge of groundwater into the sea is well understood in principle, it's mechanisms and quantities not well constrained. We will present a project that combines onshore monitoring and modeling of groundwater in the coastal plain of Salalah, Oman with an offshore autonomous robotic monitoring system, the Liquid Robotics Wave Glider. Eventually, fluxes detected by the Wave Glider system and the onshore monitoring of groundwater will be combined into a 3-D flow model of the coastal and deeper aquifers. The main tool for offshore SGD investigation project is a Wave Glider, an autonomous vehicle based on a new propulsion technology. The Wave Glider is a low-cost satellite-connected marine craft, consisting of a combination of a sea-surface and an underwater component which is propelled by the conversion of ocean wave energy into forward thrust. While the wave energy propulsion system is purely mechanical, electrical energy for onboard computers, communication and sensors is provided by photovoltaic cells. For the project the SGD Wave Glider is being equipped with dedicated sensors to measure temperature, conductivity, Radon isotope (222Rn, 220Rn) activity concentration as well as other tracers of groundwater discharge. Dedicated software using this data input will eventually allow the Wave Glider to autonomously collect information and actively adapt its search pattern to hunt for spatial and temporal anomalies. Our presentation will focus on the engineering and operational challenges ofdetecting submarine groundwater discharges with the Wave Glider system in the Bay of Salalah

  6. A Glider-Assisted Link Disruption Restoration Mechanism in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Jin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs have become a hot research topic. In UASNs, nodes can be affected by ocean currents and external forces, which could result in sudden link disruption. Therefore, designing a flexible and efficient link disruption restoration mechanism to ensure the network connectivity is a challenge. In the paper, we propose a glider-assisted restoration mechanism which includes link disruption recognition and related link restoring mechanism. In the link disruption recognition mechanism, the cluster heads collect the link disruption information and then schedule gliders acting as relay nodes to restore the disrupted link. Considering the glider’s sawtooth motion, we design a relay location optimization algorithm with a consideration of both the glider’s trajectory and acoustic channel attenuation model. The utility function is established by minimizing the channel attenuation and the optimal location of glider is solved by a multiplier method. The glider-assisted restoration mechanism can greatly improve the packet delivery rate and reduce the communication energy consumption and it is more general for the restoration of different link disruption scenarios. The simulation results show that glider-assisted restoration mechanism can improve the delivery rate of data packets by 15–33% compared with cooperative opportunistic routing (OVAR, the hop-by-hop vector-based forwarding (HH-VBF and the vector based forward (VBF methods, and reduce communication energy consumption by 20–58% for a typical network’s setting.

  7. Model of a thermal driven volumetric pump for energy harvesting in an underwater glider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcão Carneiro, J.; Gomes de Almeida, F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater gliders are one of the most promising approaches to achieve an increase of human presence in the oceans. Among existing solutions, thermal driven gliders present long range and endurance capabilities, offering the possibility of remaining years beneath water collecting and transmitting data to shore. A key component in thermal gliders lies in the process used to collect ocean's thermal energy. In this paper a new quasi-static model of a thermal driven volumetric pump, for use in underwater gliders, is presented. The study also encompasses an analysis of the influence different hydraulic system parameters have on the thermodynamic cycle efficiency. Finally, the paper proposes a simple dynamic model of a heat exchanger that uses commercially available materials for the Phase Change Material (PCM) container. Simulation results validate the models developed. - Highlights: • A new model of a thermal driven volumetric pump for underwater gliders is proposed. • The effect hydraulic system parameters have on the cycle efficiency is analyzed. • The energy efficiency may be increased tenfold using adequate hydraulic parameters. • It's shown that the PCM PVT transition surface may not alter the cycle efficiency.

  8. Estimating uncertainty in subsurface glider position using transmissions from fixed acoustic tomography sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Uffelen, Lora J; Nosal, Eva-Marie; Howe, Bruce M; Carter, Glenn S; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Heaney, Kevin D; Campbell, Richard L; Cross, Patrick S

    2013-10-01

    Four acoustic Seagliders were deployed in the Philippine Sea November 2010 to April 2011 in the vicinity of an acoustic tomography array. The gliders recorded over 2000 broadband transmissions at ranges up to 700 km from moored acoustic sources as they transited between mooring sites. The precision of glider positioning at the time of acoustic reception is important to resolve the fundamental ambiguity between position and sound speed. The Seagliders utilized GPS at the surface and a kinematic model below for positioning. The gliders were typically underwater for about 6.4 h, diving to depths of 1000 m and traveling on average 3.6 km during a dive. Measured acoustic arrival peaks were unambiguously associated with predicted ray arrivals. Statistics of travel-time offsets between received arrivals and acoustic predictions were used to estimate range uncertainty. Range (travel time) uncertainty between the source and the glider position from the kinematic model is estimated to be 639 m (426 ms) rms. Least-squares solutions for glider position estimated from acoustically derived ranges from 5 sources differed by 914 m rms from modeled positions, with estimated uncertainty of 106 m rms in horizontal position. Error analysis included 70 ms rms of uncertainty due to oceanic sound-speed variability.

  9. Measurement and analysis of self-noise in hybrid-driven underwater gliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hybrid-driven Underwater Glider (HUG is a new type of submersible vehicle which combines the functions of traditional Autonomous Underwater Vehicles(AUVand Autonomous Underwater Gliders(AUG. In order to study its noise source distribution and basic self-noise characteristics, a self-noise acquisition system based on the HUG was designed and developed, and a noise analysis test carried out in a free-field pool. In August 2016, the sea trial of the Petrel II glider was conducted in the South China Sea, with observation data at a depth range of 1 000 m as the research object. The self-noise data of the glider platform under different working conditions was obtained through the step-by-step operation method. The experimental analysis and results show that the self-noise acquisition system is stable. The contribution of mechanical noise to self-noise is greatest when the glider works in the gliding mode, while the self-noise band above 500 Hz is closely related to the work of the buoyancy adjustment unit, and peaks at 1 kHz. According to the analysis of the basic characteristics of self-noise, this provides some guidance for the implementation of vibration and noise reduction.

  10. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  11. Parametric geometric model and hydrodynamic shape optimization of a flying-wing structure underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-yu; Yu, Jian-cheng; Zhang, Ai-qun; Wang, Ya-xing; Zhao, Wen-tao

    2017-12-01

    Combining high precision numerical analysis methods with optimization algorithms to make a systematic exploration of a design space has become an important topic in the modern design methods. During the design process of an underwater glider's flying-wing structure, a surrogate model is introduced to decrease the computation time for a high precision analysis. By these means, the contradiction between precision and efficiency is solved effectively. Based on the parametric geometry modeling, mesh generation and computational fluid dynamics analysis, a surrogate model is constructed by adopting the design of experiment (DOE) theory to solve the multi-objects design optimization problem of the underwater glider. The procedure of a surrogate model construction is presented, and the Gaussian kernel function is specifically discussed. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The hydrodynamic performance of the optimized flying-wing structure underwater glider increases by 9.1%.

  12. Mapping sub-surface geostrophic currents from altimetry and a fleet of gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A.; Chiggiato, J.; Schroeder, K.

    2013-04-01

    Integrating the observations gathered by different platforms into a unique physical picture of the environment is a fundamental aspect of networked ocean observing systems. These are constituted by a spatially distributed set of sensors and platforms that simultaneously monitor a given ocean region. Remote sensing from satellites is an integral part of present ocean observing systems. Due to their autonomy, mobility and controllability, underwater gliders are envisioned to play a significant role in the development of networked ocean observatories. Exploiting synergism between remote sensing and underwater gliders is expected to result on a better characterization of the marine environment than using these observational sources individually. This study investigates a methodology to estimate the three dimensional distribution of geostrophic currents resulting from merging satellite altimetry and in situ samples gathered by a fleet of Slocum gliders. Specifically, the approach computes the volumetric or three dimensional distribution of absolute dynamic height (ADH) that minimizes the total energy of the system while being close to in situ observations and matching the absolute dynamic topography (ADT) observed from satellite at the sea surface. A three dimensional finite element technique is employed to solve the minimization problem. The methodology is validated making use of the dataset collected during the field experiment called Rapid Environmental Picture-2010 (REP-10) carried out by the NATO Undersea Research Center-NURC during August 2010. A marine region off-shore La Spezia (northwest coast of Italy) was sampled by a fleet of three coastal Slocum gliders. Results indicate that the geostrophic current field estimated from gliders and altimetry significantly improves the estimates obtained using only the data gathered by the glider fleet.

  13. A climatology of the California Current System from a network of underwater gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L.; Zaba, Katherine D.; Todd, Robert E.; Davis, Russ E.

    2017-05-01

    Autonomous underwater gliders offer the possibility of sustained observation of the coastal ocean. Since 2006 Spray underwater gliders in the California Underwater Glider Network (CUGN) have surveyed along California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) lines 66.7, 80.0, and 90.0, constituting the world's longest sustained glider network, to our knowledge. In this network, gliders dive between the surface and 500 m, completing a cycle in 3 h and covering 3 km in that time. Sections extend 350-500 km offshore and take 2-3 weeks to occupy. Measured variables include pressure, temperature, salinity, and depth-average velocity. The CUGN has amassed over 10,000 glider-days, covering over 210,000 km with over 95,000 dives. These data are used to produce a climatology whose products are for each variable a mean field, an annual cycle, and the anomaly from the annual cycle. The analysis includes a weighted least-squares fit to derive the mean and annual cycle, and an objective map to produce the anomaly. The final results are variables on rectangular grids in depth, distance offshore, and time. The mean fields are finely resolved sections across the main flows in the California Current System, including the poleward California Undercurrent and the equatorward California Current. The annual cycle shows a phase change from the surface to the thermocline, reflecting the effects of air/sea fluxes at the surface and upwelling in the thermocline. The interannual anomalies are examined with an emphasis on climate events of the last ten years including the 2009-2010 El Niño, the 2010-2011 La Niña, the warm anomaly of 2014-2015, and the 2015-2016 El Niño.

  14. Glider-based computing in reaction-diffusion hexagonal cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Wuensche, Andrew; De Lacy Costello, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    A three-state hexagonal cellular automaton, discovered in [Wuensche A. Glider dynamics in 3-value hexagonal cellular automata: the beehive rule. Int J Unconvention Comput, in press], presents a conceptual discrete model of a reaction-diffusion system with inhibitor and activator reagents. The automaton model of reaction-diffusion exhibits mobile localized patterns (gliders) in its space-time dynamics. We show how to implement the basic computational operations with these mobile localizations, and thus demonstrate collision-based logical universality of the hexagonal reaction-diffusion cellular automaton

  15. Shelf sea tidal currents and mixing fronts determined from ocean glider observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Peter M. F.; Berx, Barbara; Gallego, Alejandro; Hall, Rob A.; Heywood, Karen J.; Hughes, Sarah L.; Queste, Bastien Y.

    2018-03-01

    Tides and tidal mixing fronts are of fundamental importance to understanding shelf sea dynamics and ecosystems. Ocean gliders enable the observation of fronts and tide-dominated flows at high resolution. We use dive-average currents from a 2-month (12 October-2 December 2013) glider deployment along a zonal hydrographic section in the north-western North Sea to accurately determine M2 and S2 tidal velocities. The results of the glider-based method agree well with tidal velocities measured by current meters and with velocities extracted from the TPXO tide model. The method enhances the utility of gliders as an ocean-observing platform, particularly in regions where tide models are known to be limited. We then use the glider-derived tidal velocities to investigate tidal controls on the location of a front repeatedly observed by the glider. The front moves offshore at a rate of 0.51 km day-1. During the first part of the deployment (from mid-October until mid-November), results of a one-dimensional model suggest that the balance between surface heat fluxes and tidal stirring is the primary control on frontal location: as heat is lost to the atmosphere, full-depth mixing is able to occur in progressively deeper water. In the latter half of the deployment (mid-November to early December), a front controlled solely by heat fluxes and tidal stirring is not predicted to exist, yet a front persists in the observations. We analyse hydrographic observations collected by the glider to attribute the persistence of the front to the boundary between different water masses, in particular to the presence of cold, saline, Atlantic-origin water in the deeper portion of the section. We combine these results to propose that the front is a hybrid front: one controlled in summer by the local balance between heat fluxes and mixing and which in winter exists as the boundary between water masses advected to the north-western North Sea from diverse source regions. The glider observations

  16. Results of the first Wave Glider experiment in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Aulicino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A wave-propelled autonomous vehicle (Wave Glider instrumented with a variety of oceanographic and meteorological sensors was launched from Gulf of Naples on the 12th of September 2012 for a two-week mission in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The main objective of the mission was a preliminary evaluation of the potential of commercial autonomous platforms to provide reliable measurements of sea surface parameters which can complement existing satellite based products moving from the local to the synoptic scale. To this aim Wave Glider measurements were compared to equivalent, or near-equivalent, satellite products achieved from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer sensors onboard the EOS (Earth Observing System satellite platforms and from AVISO (Archiving Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic Data. Level-3 near real time and Level-4 reprocessed sea surface foundation temperature products provided by the CMEMS (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service were also included in this study as well as high resolution model output supplied by NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean. The Wave Glider was equipped with sensors to measure temperature, salinity, currents, as well as Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM, turbidity and refined fuels fluorescence. The achieved results confirmed the emerging value of Wave Gliders in the framework of multiplatform monitoring systems of the ocean surface parameters. In particular, they showed that Wave Glider measurements captured the southern Tyrrhenian Sea major surface oceanographic features, including the coast to open sea haline gradient and the presence of a cyclone-anticyclone system in the southeastern sub-region. The Wave Glider also had the capability to monitor upper ocean currents at finer spatial and temporal scales than satellite altimetric observations and model outputs. Nonetheless, results stressed the existence of several limits in the combined

  17. The 2014-2015 warming anomaly in the Southern California Current System observed by underwater gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaba, Katherine D.; Rudnick, Daniel L.

    2016-02-01

    Large-scale patterns of positive temperature anomalies persisted throughout the surface waters of the North Pacific Ocean during 2014-2015. In the Southern California Current System, measurements by our sustained network of underwater gliders reveal the coastal effects of the recent warming. Regional upper ocean temperature anomalies were greatest since the initiation of the glider network in 2006. Additional observed physical anomalies included a depressed thermocline, high stratification, and freshening; induced biological consequences included changes in the vertical distribution of chlorophyll fluorescence. Contemporaneous surface heat flux and wind strength perturbations suggest that local anomalous atmospheric forcing caused the unusual oceanic conditions.

  18. Shelf sea tidal currents and mixing fronts determined from ocean glider observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. F. Sheehan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tides and tidal mixing fronts are of fundamental importance to understanding shelf sea dynamics and ecosystems. Ocean gliders enable the observation of fronts and tide-dominated flows at high resolution. We use dive-average currents from a 2-month (12 October–2 December 2013 glider deployment along a zonal hydrographic section in the north-western North Sea to accurately determine M2 and S2 tidal velocities. The results of the glider-based method agree well with tidal velocities measured by current meters and with velocities extracted from the TPXO tide model. The method enhances the utility of gliders as an ocean-observing platform, particularly in regions where tide models are known to be limited. We then use the glider-derived tidal velocities to investigate tidal controls on the location of a front repeatedly observed by the glider. The front moves offshore at a rate of 0.51 km day−1. During the first part of the deployment (from mid-October until mid-November, results of a one-dimensional model suggest that the balance between surface heat fluxes and tidal stirring is the primary control on frontal location: as heat is lost to the atmosphere, full-depth mixing is able to occur in progressively deeper water. In the latter half of the deployment (mid-November to early December, a front controlled solely by heat fluxes and tidal stirring is not predicted to exist, yet a front persists in the observations. We analyse hydrographic observations collected by the glider to attribute the persistence of the front to the boundary between different water masses, in particular to the presence of cold, saline, Atlantic-origin water in the deeper portion of the section. We combine these results to propose that the front is a hybrid front: one controlled in summer by the local balance between heat fluxes and mixing and which in winter exists as the boundary between water masses advected to the north-western North Sea from diverse source

  19. Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, C3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Liquid Robotics Wave Glider, Honey Badger (G3), 2015, C3. C3 board number 8215 (not coated) appears as board_id=32, task_id=23. C3 board number 771 (coated) appears...

  20. Development of An Autonomous Underwater Glider for Observing Physical Ocean Parameters in Indonesian Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajie Linarka, Utoyo; Riyanto Trilaksono, Bambang; Sagala, M. Faisal; Hidayat, Egi; Sopaheluwakan, Ardhasena; Rizal, Jose; Heriyanto, Eko; Amsal Harapan, Ferdika; Eka Syahputra Makmur, Erwin

    2017-04-01

    Conducting a sustained monitoring and surveying of physical ocean parameters for research or operational purposes using moorings and ships would require high cost. Development of an inexpensive instrument capable to perform such tasks not only could reduce cost and risks but also increase cruising range and depth. For that reason, a prototype of underwater glider was developed, named "GaneshBlue". GaneshBlue works based on gliding principles which utilizes pitch angle and buoyancy control for moving. For one gliding movement, GaneshBlue passed through 5 phases of surface, descent, transition, ascent and back to surface. The glider is equipped with basic navigation system and remote control, programmable survey planning, temperature and salinity sampling instruments, lithium batteries for power supply, and information processing software. A field test at the shallow water showed that GaneshBule has successfully demonstrated gliding and surfacing movements with surge motion speed reaching 20 cm s-1and 20 m in depths. During the field test the glider was also equipped with three instruments, i.e. Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) to estimate glider's speed and orientation; MiniCT to acquire temperature and conductivity data; and Altisounder to determine its distance to sea surface and to seabed. In general, all the instruments performed well but filter algorithm needs to be implemented on data collection procedure to remove data outliers.

  1. Mission Planning and Decision Support for Underwater Glider Networks: A Sampling on-Demand Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Gabriele; Cococcioni, Marco; Alvarez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an optimal sampling approach to support glider fleet operators and marine scientists during the complex task of planning the missions of fleets of underwater gliders. Optimal sampling, which has gained considerable attention in the last decade, consists in planning the paths of gliders to minimize a specific criterion pertinent to the phenomenon under investigation. Different criteria (e.g., A, G, or E optimality), used in geosciences to obtain an optimum design, lead to different sampling strategies. In particular, the A criterion produces paths for the gliders that minimize the overall level of uncertainty over the area of interest. However, there are commonly operative situations in which the marine scientists may prefer not to minimize the overall uncertainty of a certain area, but instead they may be interested in achieving an acceptable uncertainty sufficient for the scientific or operational needs of the mission. We propose and discuss here an approach named sampling on-demand that explicitly addresses this need. In our approach the user provides an objective map, setting both the amount and the geographic distribution of the uncertainty to be achieved after assimilating the information gathered by the fleet. A novel optimality criterion, called Aη, is proposed and the resulting minimization problem is solved by using a Simulated Annealing based optimizer that takes into account the constraints imposed by the glider navigation features, the desired geometry of the paths and the problems of reachability caused by ocean currents. This planning strategy has been implemented in a Matlab toolbox called SoDDS (Sampling on-Demand and Decision Support). The tool is able to automatically download the ocean fields data from MyOcean repository and also provides graphical user interfaces to ease the input process of mission parameters and targets. The results obtained by running SoDDS on three different scenarios are provided and show that So

  2. Mission Planning and Decision Support for Underwater Glider Networks: A Sampling on-Demand Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Gabriele; Cococcioni, Marco; Alvarez, Alberto

    2015-12-26

    This paper describes an optimal sampling approach to support glider fleet operators and marine scientists during the complex task of planning the missions of fleets of underwater gliders. Optimal sampling, which has gained considerable attention in the last decade, consists in planning the paths of gliders to minimize a specific criterion pertinent to the phenomenon under investigation. Different criteria (e.g., A, G, or E optimality), used in geosciences to obtain an optimum design, lead to different sampling strategies. In particular, the A criterion produces paths for the gliders that minimize the overall level of uncertainty over the area of interest. However, there are commonly operative situations in which the marine scientists may prefer not to minimize the overall uncertainty of a certain area, but instead they may be interested in achieving an acceptable uncertainty sufficient for the scientific or operational needs of the mission. We propose and discuss here an approach named sampling on-demand that explicitly addresses this need. In our approach the user provides an objective map, setting both the amount and the geographic distribution of the uncertainty to be achieved after assimilating the information gathered by the fleet. A novel optimality criterion, called A η , is proposed and the resulting minimization problem is solved by using a Simulated Annealing based optimizer that takes into account the constraints imposed by the glider navigation features, the desired geometry of the paths and the problems of reachability caused by ocean currents. This planning strategy has been implemented in a Matlab toolbox called SoDDS (Sampling on-Demand and Decision Support). The tool is able to automatically download the ocean fields data from MyOcean repository and also provides graphical user interfaces to ease the input process of mission parameters and targets. The results obtained by running SoDDS on three different scenarios are provided and show that So

  3. Mission Planning and Decision Support for Underwater Glider Networks: A Sampling on-Demand Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Ferri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an optimal sampling approach to support glider fleet operators and marine scientists during the complex task of planning the missions of fleets of underwater gliders. Optimal sampling, which has gained considerable attention in the last decade, consists in planning the paths of gliders to minimize a specific criterion pertinent to the phenomenon under investigation. Different criteria (e.g., A, G, or E optimality, used in geosciences to obtain an optimum design, lead to different sampling strategies. In particular, the A criterion produces paths for the gliders that minimize the overall level of uncertainty over the area of interest. However, there are commonly operative situations in which the marine scientists may prefer not to minimize the overall uncertainty of a certain area, but instead they may be interested in achieving an acceptable uncertainty sufficient for the scientific or operational needs of the mission. We propose and discuss here an approach named sampling on-demand that explicitly addresses this need. In our approach the user provides an objective map, setting both the amount and the geographic distribution of the uncertainty to be achieved after assimilating the information gathered by the fleet. A novel optimality criterion, called A η , is proposed and the resulting minimization problem is solved by using a Simulated Annealing based optimizer that takes into account the constraints imposed by the glider navigation features, the desired geometry of the paths and the problems of reachability caused by ocean currents. This planning strategy has been implemented in a Matlab toolbox called SoDDS (Sampling on-Demand and Decision Support. The tool is able to automatically download the ocean fields data from MyOcean repository and also provides graphical user interfaces to ease the input process of mission parameters and targets. The results obtained by running SoDDS on three different scenarios are provided

  4. Assimilating bio-optical glider data during a phytoplankton bloom in the southern Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Daniel E.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Hemmings, John C. P.; Smith, Walker O., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    The Ross Sea is a region characterized by high primary productivity in comparison to other Antarctic coastal regions, and its productivity is marked by considerable variability both spatially (1-50 km) and temporally (days to weeks). This variability presents a challenge for inferring phytoplankton dynamics from observations that are limited in time or space, which is often the case due to logistical limitations of sampling. To better understand the spatiotemporal variability in Ross Sea phytoplankton dynamics and to determine how restricted sampling may skew dynamical interpretations, high-resolution bio-optical glider measurements were assimilated into a one-dimensional biogeochemical model adapted for the Ross Sea. The assimilation of data from the entire glider track using the micro-genetic and local search algorithms in the Marine Model Optimization Testbed improves the model-data fit by ˜ 50 %, generating rates of integrated primary production of 104 g C m-2 yr-1 and export at 200 m of 27 g C m-2 yr-1. Assimilating glider data from three different latitudinal bands and three different longitudinal bands results in minimal changes to the simulations, improves the model-data fit with respect to unassimilated data by ˜ 35 %, and confirms that analyzing these glider observations as a time series via a one-dimensional model is reasonable on these scales. Whereas assimilating the full glider data set produces well-constrained simulations, assimilating subsampled glider data at a frequency consistent with cruise-based sampling results in a wide range of primary production and export estimates. These estimates depend strongly on the timing of the assimilated observations, due to the presence of high mesoscale variability in this region. Assimilating surface glider data subsampled at a frequency consistent with available satellite-derived data results in 40 % lower carbon export, primarily resulting from optimized rates generating more slowly sinking diatoms. This

  5. Evidence that a Highway Reduces Apparent Survival Rates of Squirrel Gliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. McCall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Roads and traffic are prominent components of most landscapes throughout the world, and their negative effects on the natural environment can extend for hundreds or thousands of meters beyond the road. These effects include mortality of wildlife due to collisions with vehicles, pollution of soil and air, modification of wildlife behavior in response to noise, creation of barriers to wildlife movement, and establishment of dispersal conduits for some plant and animal species. In southeast Australia, much of the remaining habitat for the squirrel glider, Petaurus norfolcensis, is located in narrow strips of Eucalyptus woodland that is adjacent to roads and streams, as well as in small patches of woodland vegetation that is farther from roads. We evaluated the effect of traffic volume on squirrel gliders by estimating apparent annual survival rates of adults along the Hume Freeway and nearby low-traffic-volume roads. We surveyed populations of squirrel gliders by trapping them over 2.5 years, and combined these data with prior information on apparent survival rates in populations located away from freeways to model the ratio of apparent annual survival rates in both site types. The apparent annual survival rate of adult squirrel gliders living along the Hume Freeway was estimated to be approximately 60% lower than for squirrel gliders living near local roads. The cause of the reduced apparent survival rate may be due to higher rates of mortality and/or higher emigration rates adjacent to the Hume Freeway compared with populations near smaller country roads. Management options for population persistence will be influenced by which of these factors is the primary cause of a reduced apparent survival rate.

  6. Practical performance evaluation of the Wave Glider in geophysical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hiroko; Hamano, Yozo

    2016-04-01

    The Wave Glider (WG), manufactured by Liquid Robotics Inc. of California, USA, is the first wave and solar powered autonomous sea surface vehicle. It has led the way to make ocean data collection and communications easier and safer, lower risk and cost, and real-time. By analyzing data from a long-term deployment of the WG in the sea to investigate the feasibility, an assessment of operating characteristics informs the potential utility of the WG to identify the parameters for a seafloor experiment designed the WG as a station-keeping gateway. We apply the WG in the following two observation systems that we have been developing. First, after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami, we have developed a real-time offshore tsunami monitoring system using a new type of seafloor tsunami sensor called Vector TsunaMeter (VTM) able to directly estimate the tsunami propagation vector based on the electromagnetic induction theory to provide early and reliable information at the coastal area. The WG equipped with both an acoustic modem and a satellite communication modem is used in the system as a relay platform for data transfer and communications between the sea bottom observatory and the land station. We had some experiments beginning with newly developing of the VTM in November 2012 to complete as a real-time monitoring system using the WG in March 2014. During the last experiment, we succeeded in detecting the micro-tsunami associated with the 2014 Iquique, Chile earthquake with Mw 8.2 on April 1 to confirm the practical utility of the WG. Second, since the Nishinoshima volcano of the Bonin Islands erupted in November 2013, we have been developing an isolated volcanic activity monitoring system using the unmanned WG vehicle. In this system the WG plays roles not only in a relay station with a satellite communication modem but also in a multi-purpose observatory platform with microphone for detecting acoustic waves in the air due to eruptions, with hydrophones for detecting

  7. CFD approach to modelling, hydrodynamic analysis and motion characteristics of a laboratory underwater glider with experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogang Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are buoyancy propelled vehicle which make use of buoyancy for vertical movement and wings to propel the glider in forward direction. Autonomous underwater gliders are a patented technology and are manufactured and marketed by corporations. In this study, we validate the experimental lift and drag characteristics of a glider from the literature using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach. This approach is then used for the assessment of the steady state characteristics of a laboratory glider designed at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT Madras. Flow behaviour and lift and drag force distribution at different angles of attack are studied for Reynolds numbers varying from 105 to 106 for NACA0012 wing configurations. The state variables of the glider are the velocity, gliding angle and angle of attack which are simulated by making use of the hydrodynamic drag and lift coefficients obtained from CFD. The effect of the variable buoyancy is examined in terms of the gliding angle, velocity and angle of attack. Laboratory model of glider is developed from the final design asserted by CFD. This model is used for determination of static and dynamic properties of an underwater glider which were validated against an equivalent CAD model and simulation results obtained from equations of motion of glider in vertical plane respectively. In the literature, only empirical approach has been adopted to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients of the AUG that are required for its trajectory simulation. In this work, a CFD approach has been proposed to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients and validated with experimental data. A two-mass variable buoyancy engine has been designed and implemented. The equations of motion for this two-mass engine have been obtained by modifying the single mass version of the equations described in the literature. The objectives of the present study are to understand the glider dynamics adopting a CFD approach

  8. The Wave Glider°: A New Autonomous Surface Vehicle to Augment MBARI's Growing Fleet of Ocean Observing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougher, B. B.

    2011-12-01

    Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's (MBARI) evolving fleet of ocean observing systems has made it possible to collect information and data about a wide variety of ocean parameters, enabling researchers to better understand marine ecosystems. In collaboration with Liquid Robotics Inc, the designer of the Wave Glider autonomous surface vehicle (ASV), MBARI is adding a new capability to its suite of ocean observing tools. This new technology will augment MBARI research programs that use satellites, ships, moorings, drifters, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to improve data collection of temporally and spatially variable oceanographic features. The Wave Glider ASV derives its propulsion from wave energy, while sensors and communications are powered through the use of two solar panels and batteries, enabling it to remain at sea indefinitely. Wave Gliders are remotely controlled via real-time Iridium burst communications, which also permit real-time data telemetry. MBARI has developed Ocean Acidification (OA) moorings to continuously monitor the chemical and physical changes occurring in the ocean as a result of increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The moorings are spatially restricted by being anchored to the seafloor, so during the summer of 2011 the ocean acidification sensor suite designed for moorings was integrated into a Wave Glider ASV to increase both temporal and spatial ocean observation capabilities. The OA sensor package enables the measurement of parameters essential to better understanding the changing acidity of the ocean, specifically pCO2, pH, oxygen, salinity and temperature. The Wave Glider will also be equipped with a meteorological sensor suite that will measure air temperature, air pressure, and wind speed and direction. The OA sensor integration into a Wave Glider was part of MBARI's 2011 summer internship program. This project involved designing a new layout for the OA sensors

  9. Diversity-based acoustic communication with a glider in deep water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H C; Howe, Bruce M; Brown, Michael G; Andrew, Rex K

    2014-03-01

    The primary use of underwater gliders is to collect oceanographic data within the water column and periodically relay the data at the surface via a satellite connection. In summer 2006, a Seaglider equipped with an acoustic recording system received transmissions from a broadband acoustic source centered at 75 Hz deployed on the bottom off Kauai, Hawaii, while moving away from the source at ranges up to ∼200 km in deep water and diving up to 1000-m depth. The transmitted signal was an m-sequence that can be treated as a binary-phase shift-keying communication signal. In this letter multiple receptions are exploited (i.e., diversity combining) to demonstrate the feasibility of using the glider as a mobile communication gateway.

  10. Hydrographical and dynamical reconstruction of the Warm Core Cyprus Eddy from gliders data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Anthony; Testor, Pierre; Hayes, Dan; Ruiz, Simon; Mauri, Elena; Charantonis, Anastase; d'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Mortier, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    In the 80s, the POEM (Physical Oceanography of the Eastern Mediterranean) cruises in the Levantine Basin first revealed the presence of a very pronounced dynamical structure off Cyprus: The Cyprus Warm Core Eddy. Since then, a large amount of data have been collected thanks to the use of autonomous oceanic gliders (+8000 profiles since 2009). Part of those profiles were carried out in the upper layers down to 200 m, and we take benefit of a novel approach named ITCOMP SOM that uses a statistical approach to extend them down to 1000 m (see [1] for more details). This dataset have a particularly good spatio-temporal coverage in 2009 for about a month, thanks to simultaneous deployments of several gliders (up to 6). In this study, we present a set of 3D reconstruction of the dynamical and hydrographical characteristics of the Warm Core Cyprus Eddy between 2009 and 2015. Moreover, chlorophyll-a fluorescence data measured by the gliders give evidence to strong vertical velocities at the edge of the eddy. We discuss possible mechanisms (frontogenesis, symmetric instability) that could generate such signals and provide an assessment of the role of this peculiar circulation feature on the circulation and biogeochemistry of the Levantine basin. Reference: [1] Charantonis, A., P. Testor, L. Mortier, F. D'Ortenzio, S. Thiria (2015): Completion of a sparse GLIDER database using multi-iterative Self-Organizing Maps (ITCOMP SOM), Procedia Computer Science, 51(1):2198-2206. DOI: 10.1016/j.procs.2015.05.496

  11. Partly standing internal tides in a dendritic submarine canyon observed by an ocean glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rob A.; Aslam, Tahmeena; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.

    2017-08-01

    An autonomous ocean glider is used to make the first direct measurements of internal tides within Whittard Canyon, a large, dendritic submarine canyon system that incises the Celtic Sea continental slope and a site of high benthic biodiversity. This is the first time a glider has been used for targeted observations of internal tides in a submarine canyon. Vertical isopycnal displacement observations at different stations fit a one-dimensional model of partly standing semidiurnal internal tides - comprised of a major, incident wave propagating up the canyon limbs and a minor wave reflected back down-canyon by steep, supercritical bathymetry near the canyon heads. The up-canyon internal tide energy flux in the primary study limb decreases from 9.2 to 2.0 kW m-1 over 28 km (a dissipation rate of 1 - 2.5 ×10-7 Wkg-1), comparable to elevated energy fluxes and internal tide driven mixing measured in other canyon systems. Within Whittard Canyon, enhanced mixing is inferred from collapsed temperature-salinity curves and weakened dissolved oxygen concentration gradients near the canyon heads. It has previously been hypothesised that internal tides impact benthic fauna through elevated near-bottom current velocities and particle resuspension. In support of this, we infer order 20 cm s-1 near-bottom current velocities in the canyon and observe high concentrations of suspended particulate matter. The glider observations are also used to estimate a 1 °C temperature range and 12 μmol kg-1 dissolved oxygen concentration range, experienced twice a day by organisms on the canyon walls, due to the presence of internal tides. This study highlights how a well-designed glider mission, incorporating a series of tide-resolving stations at key locations, can be used to understand internal tide dynamics in a region of complex topography, a sampling strategy that is applicable to continental shelves and slopes worldwide.

  12. Evolution of the Marginal Ice Zone: Adaptive Sampling with Autonomous Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    release; distribution is unlimited. Evolution of the Marginal Ice Zone: Adaptive Sampling with Autonomous Gliders Craig M. Lee, Luc Rainville and Jason I...missions in ice-covered waters , where they provide several unique capabilities. Ice-capable Seagliders can maintain persistent (many months) sampling ...irradiance. Careful calibration casts, including water sampling , were conducted during both the deployment and recovery cruises. An example of a

  13. Properties of the Agulhas Current's Inshore Front During The Shelf Agulhas Glider Experiment (SAGE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, M.; Swart, S.; Goschen, W.

    2016-02-01

    The response of coastal and shelf regions to changes in the Agulhas Current remains poorly studied. This is partly due to observational challenges associated with sampling western boundary currents. Cross-shelf exchange in such energetic current systems occurs through a range of meso- ( 50-200 km) and sub-meso (sample the energetic inshore regions of the Agulhas Current at a high spatial (100's of meters to 3km - well within the sub-mesoscale range) and temporal (0.5-4 hourly) resolution. In April 2015, two SeaGliders were deployed off Port Elizabeth (34S) at the inshore edge of the Agulhas Current as part of the Shelf Agulhas Glider Experiment (SAGE), testing for the very 1st time the feasibility of operating autonomous platforms in this highly turbulent and energetic western boundary current system. For a period of approximately two months, the Seagliders provided continuous observations at the inshore boundary of the Agulhas Current at an unprecedented spatial resolution. Observations from the Seagliders showed that at the inshore edge of the Agulhas Current, both surface and depth averaged currents are aligned in a south-west / north- east direction, with stronger flows encountered over deeper regions of the shelf, when the gliders are closer to the Agulhas Current. In the absence of large meanders, the mean flow at the inshore boundary of the Agulhas Current is characterised by strong shear with a counter current flowing in opposite direction to the mean current field. Instances of counter currents occur 45% of the time in the surface flow and 54% of the time in the depth-averaged record. More than 80% of return flow occurrences occur when glider is in water depth of less than 200m.

  14. Enabling Persistent Autonomy for Underwater Gliders with Ocean Model Predictions and Terrain Based Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eStuntz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective study of ocean processes requires sampling over the duration of long (weeks to months oscillation patterns. Such sampling requires persistent, autonomous underwater vehicles, that have a similarly long deployment duration. The spatiotemporal dynamics of the ocean environment, coupled with limited communication capabilities, make navigation and localization difficult, especially in coastal regions where the majority of interesting phenomena occur. In this paper, we consider the combination of two methods for reducing navigation and localization error; a predictive approach based on ocean model predictions and a prior information approach derived from terrain-based navigation. The motivation for this work is not only for real-time state estimation, but also for accurately reconstructing the actual path that the vehicle traversed to contextualize the gathered data, with respect to the science question at hand. We present an application for the practical use of priors and predictions for large-scale ocean sampling. This combined approach builds upon previous works by the authors, and accurately localizes the traversed path of an underwater glider over long-duration, ocean deployments. The proposed method takes advantage of the reliable, short-term predictions of an ocean model, and the utility of priors used in terrain-based navigation over areas of significant bathymetric relief to bound uncertainty error in dead-reckoning navigation. This method improves upon our previously published works by 1 demonstrating the utility of our terrain-based navigation method with multiple field trials, and 2 presenting a hybrid algorithm that combines both approaches to bound navigational error and uncertainty for long-term deployments of underwater vehicles. We demonstrate the approach by examining data from actual field trials with autonomous underwater gliders, and demonstrate an ability to estimate geographical location of an underwater glider to 2

  15. A multidisciplinary glider survey of an open ocean dead-zone eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstensen, Johannes; Schütte, Florian; Pietri, Alice; Krahmann, Gerd; Fiedler, Björn; Löscher, Carolin; Grundle, Damian; Hauss, Helena; Körtzinger, Arne; Testor, Pierre; Viera, Nuno

    2016-04-01

    The physical (temperature, salinity) and biogeochemical (oxygen, nitrate, chlorophyll fluorescence, turbidity) structure of an anticyclonic modewater eddy, hosting an open ocean dead zone, is investigated using observational data sampled in high temporal and spatial resolution with autonomous gliders in March and April 2014. The core of the eddy is identified in the glider data as a volume of fresher (on isopycnals) water in the depth range from the mixed layer base (about 70m) to about 200m depth. The width is about 80km. The core aligns well with the 40 μmolkg-1 oxygen contour. From two surveys about 1 month apart, changes in the minimal oxygen concentrations (below 5μmolkg-1) are observed that indicate that small scale processes are in operation. Several scales of coherent variability of physical and biogeochemical variable are identified - from a few meters to the mesoscale. One of the gliders carried an autonomous Nitrate (N) sensor and the data is used to analyse the possible nitrogen pathways within the eddy. Also the highest N is accompanied by lowest oxygen concentrations, the AOU:N ratio reveals a preferred oxygen cycling per N.

  16. Motion analysis and trials of the deep sea hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan-hui; Wu, Zhi-liang; Wang, Shu-xin

    2017-03-01

    A hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II has been developed and field tested. It is equipped with an active buoyancy unit and a compact propeller unit. Its working modes have been expanded to buoyancy driven gliding and propeller driven level-flight, which can make the glider work in strong currents, as well as many other complicated ocean environments. Its maximal gliding speed reaches 1 knot and the propelling speed is up to 3 knots. In this paper, a 3D dynamic model of Petrel-II is derived using linear momentum and angular momentum equations. According to the dynamic model, the spiral motion in the underwater space is simulated for the gliding mode. Similarly the cycle motion on water surface and the depth-keeping motion underwater are simulated for the level-flight mode. These simulations are important to the performance analysis and parameter optimization for the Petrel-II underwater glider. The simulation results show a good agreement with field trials.

  17. The Relative Concentrations of Nutrients and Toxins Dictate Feeding by a Vertebrate Browser, the Greater Glider Petauroides volans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora M Jensen

    Full Text Available Although ecologists believe that vertebrate herbivores must select a diet that allows them to meet their nutritional requirements, while avoiding intoxication by plant secondary metabolites, this is remarkably difficult to show. A long series of field and laboratory experiments means that we have a good understanding of the factors that affect feeding by leaf-eating marsupials. This knowledge and the natural intraspecific variation in Eucalyptus chemistry allowed us to test the hypothesis that the feeding decisions of greater gliders (Petauroides volans depend on the concentrations of available nitrogen (incorporating total nitrogen, dry matter digestibility and tannins and of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs, potent antifeedants unique to Eucalyptus. We offered captive greater gliders foliage from two species of Eucalyptus, E. viminalis and E. melliodora, which vary naturally in their concentrations of available nitrogen and FPCs. We then measured the amount of foliage eaten by each glider and compared this with our laboratory analyses of foliar total nitrogen, available nitrogen and FPCs for each tree offered. The concentration of FPCs was the main factor that determined how much gliders ate of E. viminalis and E. melliodora, but in gliders fed E. viminalis the concentration of available nitrogen was also a significant influence. In other words, greater gliders ate E. viminalis leaves with a particular combination of FPCs and available nitrogen that maximised the nutritional gain but minimised their ingestion of toxins. In contrast, the concentration of total nitrogen was not correlated with feeding. This study is among the first to empirically show that browsing herbivores select a diet that balances the potential gain (available nutrients and the potential costs (plant secondary chemicals of eating leaves. The major implication of the study is that it is essential to identify the limiting nutrients and relevant toxins in a system in

  18. Energy consumption of ProTaper Next X1 after glide path with PathFiles and ProGlider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berutti, Elio; Alovisi, Mario; Pastorelli, Michele Angelo; Chiandussi, Giorgio; Scotti, Nicola; Pasqualini, Damiano

    2014-12-01

    Instrument failure caused by excessive torsional stress can be controlled by creating a manual or mechanical glide path. The ProGlider single-file system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) was recently introduced to perform a mechanical glide path. This study was designed to compare the effect of a glide path performed with PathFiles (Dentsply Maillefer) and ProGlider on torque, time, and pecking motion required for ProTaper Next X1 (Dentsply Maillefer) to reach the full working length in simulated root canals. Forty Endo Training Blocks (Dentsply Maillefer) were used. Twenty were prepared with a mechanical glide path using PathFiles 1 and 2 (the PathFile group), and 20 were prepared with a mechanical glide path using a ProGlider single file (the ProGlider group). All samples were shaped with ProTaper Next X1 driven by an endodontic motor connected to a digital wattmeter. The required torque for root canal instrumentation was analyzed by evaluating the electrical power consumption of the endodontic engine. Electric power consumption (mW/h), elapsed time (seconds), and number of pecking motions required to reach the full working length with ProTaper Next X1 were calculated. Differences among groups were analyzed with the parametric Student t test for independent data (P < .05). Elapsed time and electric power consumption were significantly different between groups (P = .0001 for both). ProGlider appears to perform more efficiently than PathFiles in decreasing electric power consumption of ProTaper Next X1 to reach the full working length. This study confirmed the ability of ProGlider to reduce stress in ProTaper Next X1 during shaping through a glide path and preliminary middle and coronal preflaring. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. PLOCAN glider portal: a gateway for useful data management and visualization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Tania; Lorenzo, Alvaro; Viera, Josue; Barrera, Carlos; José Rueda, María

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays monitoring ocean behavior and its characteristics involves a wide range of sources able to gather and provide a vast amount of data in spatio-temporal scales. Multiplatform infrastructures, like PLOCAN, hold a variety of autonomous Lagrangian and Eulerian devices addressed to collect information then transferred to land in near-real time. Managing all this data collection in an efficient way is a major issue. Advances in ocean observation technologies, where underwater autonomous gliders play a key role, has brought as a consequence an improvement of spatio-temporal resolution which offers a deeper understanding of the ocean but requires a bigger effort in the data management process. There are general requirements in terms of data management in that kind of environments, such as processing raw data at different levels to obtain valuable information, storing data coherently and providing accurate products to final users according to their specific needs. Managing large amount of data can be certainly tedious and complex without having right tools and operational procedures; hence automating these tasks through software applications saves time and reduces errors. Moreover, data distribution is highly relevant since scientist tent to assimilate different sources for comparison and validation. The use of web applications has boosted the necessary scientific dissemination. Within this argument, PLOCAN has implemented a set of independent but compatible applications to process, store and disseminate information gathered through different oceanographic platforms. These applications have been implemented using open standards, such as HTML and CSS, and open source software, like python as programming language and Django as framework web. More specifically, a glider application has been developed within the framework of FP7-GROOM project. Regarding data management, this project focuses on collecting and making available consistent and quality controlled datasets as

  20. A Low Cost Approach to the Design of Autopilot for Hypersonic Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wang; Weihua, Zhang; Ke, Peng; Donghui, Wang

    2017-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel integrated guidance and control (IGC) approach to improve the autopilot design with low cost for hypersonic glider in dive and pull-up phase. The main objective is robust and adaptive tracking of flight path angle (FPA) under severe flight scenarios. Firstly, the nonlinear IGC model is developed with a second order actuator dynamics. Then the adaptive command filtered back-stepping control is implemented to deal with the large aerodynamics coefficient uncertainties, control surface uncertainties and unmatched time-varying disturbances. For the autopilot, a back-stepping sliding mode control is designed to track the control surface deflection, and a nonlinear differentiator is used to avoid direct differentiating the control input. Through a series of 6-DOF numerical simulations, it’s shown that the proposed scheme successfully cancels out the large uncertainties and disturbances in tracking different kinds of FPA trajectory. The contribution of this paper lies in the application and determination of nonlinear integrated design of guidance and control system for hypersonic glider.

  1. Marine mammal tracks from two-hydrophone acoustic recordings made with a glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsel, Elizabeth T.; Munoz, Tessa; Siderius, Martin; Mellinger, David K.; Heimlich, Sara

    2017-04-01

    A multinational oceanographic and acoustic sea experiment was carried out in the summer of 2014 off the western coast of the island of Sardinia, Mediterranean Sea. During this experiment, an underwater glider fitted with two hydrophones was evaluated as a potential tool for marine mammal population density estimation studies. An acoustic recording system was also tested, comprising an inexpensive, off-the-shelf digital recorder installed inside the glider. Detection and classification of sounds produced by whales and dolphins, and sometimes tracking and localization, are inherent components of population density estimation from passive acoustics recordings. In this work we discuss the equipment used as well as analysis of the data obtained, including detection and estimation of bearing angles. A human analyst identified the presence of sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) regular clicks as well as dolphin clicks and whistles. Cross-correlating clicks recorded on both data channels allowed for the estimation of the direction (bearing) of clicks, and realization of animal tracks. Insights from this bearing tracking analysis can aid in population density estimation studies by providing further information (bearings), which can improve estimates.

  2. Assimilating bio-optical glider data during a phytoplankton bloom in the southern Ross Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Kaufman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ross Sea is a region characterized by high primary productivity in comparison to other Antarctic coastal regions, and its productivity is marked by considerable variability both spatially (1–50 km and temporally (days to weeks. This variability presents a challenge for inferring phytoplankton dynamics from observations that are limited in time or space, which is often the case due to logistical limitations of sampling. To better understand the spatiotemporal variability in Ross Sea phytoplankton dynamics and to determine how restricted sampling may skew dynamical interpretations, high-resolution bio-optical glider measurements were assimilated into a one-dimensional biogeochemical model adapted for the Ross Sea. The assimilation of data from the entire glider track using the micro-genetic and local search algorithms in the Marine Model Optimization Testbed improves the model–data fit by  ∼ 50 %, generating rates of integrated primary production of 104 g C m−2 yr−1 and export at 200 m of 27 g C m−2 yr−1. Assimilating glider data from three different latitudinal bands and three different longitudinal bands results in minimal changes to the simulations, improves the model–data fit with respect to unassimilated data by  ∼ 35 %, and confirms that analyzing these glider observations as a time series via a one-dimensional model is reasonable on these scales. Whereas assimilating the full glider data set produces well-constrained simulations, assimilating subsampled glider data at a frequency consistent with cruise-based sampling results in a wide range of primary production and export estimates. These estimates depend strongly on the timing of the assimilated observations, due to the presence of high mesoscale variability in this region. Assimilating surface glider data subsampled at a frequency consistent with available satellite-derived data results in 40 % lower carbon export, primarily

  3. GNSS Wave Glider: First results from Loch Ness and demonstration of its suitability for determining the marine geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, N. T.; Morales Maqueda, M.; Williams, S. D.; Foden, P.; Martin, I.; Pugh, J.

    2013-12-01

    We report on a first deployment of a GNSS Wave Glider designed for precise, unmanned, autonomous, mobile self-propelled sea level and sea state measurement in the open ocean. The Wave Glider, equipped with a dual frequency GPS+GLONASS receiver, was deployed in Loch Ness, Scotland, autonomously travelling 32 km in a north-easterly direction along the length of the loch in 26 hours, propelled by energy generated from waves of typical amplitude only 100-150 mm and frequency on the order 0.5-1 Hz. The Wave Glider GNSS data were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS+GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations at either end of the loch. The PPP heights of the loch's surface revealed a clear geoid gradient of about 30 mm/km (i.e. just under 1 m over the whole length of the loch), very similar to both the EGM2008 and OSGM02 geoid models, demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. After applying a low pass filter, the GNSS heights showed local deviations from both EGM2008 and OSGM02, potentially caused by omission errors or a lack of gravity data over Loch Ness. In addition to dual frequency GNSS data, the Wave Glider also recorded inclinometer data, bathymetry, and surface currents, which, in combination with tide gauge and wind data, were used to further control and interpret the GNSS time series.

  4. Monitoring the Algerian Basin through glider observations, satellite altimetry and numerical simulations along a SARAL/AltiKa track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulicino, G.; Cotroneo, Y.; Ruiz, S.; Sánchez Román, A.; Pascual, A.; Fusco, G.; Tintoré, J.; Budillon, G.

    2018-03-01

    The Algerian Basin is a key component of the general circulation in the Western Mediterranean Sea. The presence of both fresh Atlantic water and more saline Mediterranean water gives the basin an intense inflow/outflow regime and complex circulation patterns. Energetic mesoscale structures that evolve from meanders of the Algerian Current into isolated cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies dominate the area, with marked repercussions on biological activity. Despite its remarkable importance, this region and its variability are still poorly known and basin-wide knowledge of its meso- and submesoscale features is still incomplete. Studying such complex processes requires a synergistic approach that involves integrated observing systems. In recent years, several studies have demonstrated the advantages of combined use of autonomous underwater vehicles, such as gliders, with a new generation of satellite altimetry. In this context, we present results of an observational program conducted in the Algerian Basin during fall 2014 and 2015 that aimed to advance our knowledge of its main features. The study was carried out through analysis of high resolution glider observations, collected along the Algerian BAsin Circulation Unmanned Survey (ABACUS) chokepoint, in synergy with co-located SARAL/AltiKa altimetric products and CMEMS numerical simulations. Results show that glider-derived dynamic height and SARAL/AltiKa absolute dynamic topography have similar patterns, with RMS of the differences ranging between 1.11 and 2.90 cm. Even though larger discrepancies are observed near the Balearic and Algerian coasts, correlation coefficients between glider and satellite observations seem mostly to be affected by reduced synopticity between the measurements. Glider observations acquired during the four surveys reveal the presence of several water masses of Atlantic and Mediterranean origin (i.e., AW and LIW at different modification levels) with marked seasonal variability.

  5. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and other measurements usings glider in the Coastal S Indian, South Indian and other locations from 2008 to 2013 (NCEI Accession 0118687)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider and Slocum Glider data from the oceans around Australia collected by ANFOG in framework of IMOS initiative of the Australian Government since February 2009...

  6. Subsurface seeding of surface harmful algal blooms observed through the integration of autonomous gliders, moored environmental sample processors, and satellite remote sensing in southern California

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.; Birch, James M.; Marin, Roman; Scholin, Chris A.; Caron, David A.; Seubert, Erica L.; Howard, Meredith D. A.; Robertson, George L.; Jones, Burton

    2015-01-01

    effluent plumes, and other processes. Multi-month Webb Slocum glider deployments combined with MBARI environmental sample processors (ESPs), weekly pier sampling, and ocean color data provided a multidimensional characterization of the development

  7. Monitoring water masses properties by Glider in Sardinia Channel during summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gana, Slim; Iudicone, Daniele; Ghenim, Leila; Mortier, Laurent; Testor, Pierre; Tintoré, Joaquin; Olita, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    1. Summary In the framework of the EC funded project, PERSEUS (WP3, Subtask 3.3.1: Repeated glider sections in key channels and sub-basin) and with the support of JERICO TNA (EU-FP7), a deep water glider (up to 1000m) was deployed from the R/V Tethys in the Sardinia Channel and has carried out 3 return trips during the period spanning from the 16th of August 2014 to the 19th of September 2014. The Gilder was equipped with CTD, O2 sensors, Fluorometers (ChlA), back scattering from 470 to 880 nm and was programmed to follow a path close to SARAL satellite track #887. During this experiment, a significant dataset, as never obtained before for this area, has been collected. The innovation stands in the high spatial resolution, in the temporal repetitivity and in the number of parameters sampled simultaneously. The first step of the work will focuses on the analysis of the hydrological properties of the existing water masses in the area. 2. Frame and aim of the experiment The Sardinia Channel is a zonally oriented passage connecting the Algerian and the Tyrrhenian basins, with a sill depth of about 1900 m. In spite of the considerable amount of work achieved and accurate results obtained about the circulation in the Western Mediterranean Sea, during the last 20 years, the Sardinia Channel is still one of the region where the dynamical processes and water exchanges are not clearly identified. Previous studies (Garzoli S. and C. Maillard, 1979, and Ozturgut Erdogan, 1975) pointed out the complexity of the processes in the region and the role of the bottom topography in sustaining them, and provided a first estimation of the involved fluxes. The main knowledge about the water masses crossing this region mostly concerns the AW (Atlantic Water) and the LIW (Levantine Intermediate Water). Along the Algerian coast, the AW is transported mainly by the Algerian current (AC Millot, 1985) from which the anticyclonic Algerian eddies (AEs, Puillat et al., 2002; Taupier-Letage et al

  8. Measuring pH variability using an experimental sensor on an underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, Michael P.; Kaiser, Jan; Heywood, Karen J.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Boutin, Jacqueline; Shitashima, Kiminori; Lee, Gareth; Legge, Oliver; Onken, Reiner

    2017-05-01

    Autonomous underwater gliders offer the capability of measuring oceanic parameters continuously at high resolution in both vertical and horizontal planes, with timescales that can extend to many months. An experimental ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) sensor measuring pH on the total scale was attached to a glider during the REP14-MED experiment in June 2014 in the Sardinian Sea in the northwestern Mediterranean. During the deployment, pH was sampled at depths of up to 1000 m along an 80 km transect over a period of 12 days. Water samples were collected from a nearby ship and analysed for dissolved inorganic carbon concentration and total alkalinity to derive the pH for validating the ISFET sensor measurements. The vertical resolution of the pH sensor was good (1 to 2 m), but stability was poor and the sensor drifted in a non-monotonous fashion. In order to remove the sensor drift, a depth-constant time-varying offset was applied throughout the water column for each dive, reducing the spread of the data by approximately two-thirds. Furthermore, the ISFET sensor required temperature- and pressure-based corrections, which were achieved using linear regression. Correcting for this decreased the apparent sensor pH variability by a further 13 to 31 %. Sunlight caused an apparent sensor pH decrease of up to 0.1 in surface waters around local noon, highlighting the importance of shielding the sensor from light in future deployments. The corrected pH from the ISFET sensor is presented along with potential temperature, salinity, potential density anomalies (σθ), and dissolved oxygen concentrations (c(O2)) measured by the glider, providing insights into the physical and biogeochemical variability in the Sardinian Sea. The pH maxima were identified close to the depth of the summer chlorophyll maximum, where high c(O2) values were also found. Longitudinal pH variations at depth (σθ > 28. 8 kg m-3) highlighted the variability of water masses in the Sardinian

  9. The impact of underwater glider observations in the forecast of Hurricane Gonzalo (2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, G. J.; Domingues, R. M.; Kim, H. S.; Domingues, R. M.; Halliwell, G. R., Jr.; Bringas, F.; Morell, J. M.; Pomales, L.; Baltes, R.

    2017-12-01

    The tropical Atlantic basin is one of seven global regions where tropical cyclones (TC) are commonly observed to originate and intensify from June to November. On average, approximately 12 TCs travel through the region every year, frequently affecting coastal, and highly populated areas. In an average year, 2 to 3 of them are categorized as intense hurricanes. Given the appropriate atmospheric conditions, TC intensification has been linked to ocean conditions, such as increased ocean heat content and enhanced salinity stratification near the surface. While errors in hurricane track forecasts have been reduced during the last years, errors in intensity forecasts remain mostly unchanged. Several studies have indicated that the use of in situ observations has the potential to improve the representation of the ocean to correctly initialize coupled hurricane intensity forecast models. However, a sustained in situ ocean observing system in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea dedicated to measuring subsurface thermal and salinity fields in support of TC intensity studies and forecasts has yet to be implemented. Autonomous technologies offer new and cost-effective opportunities to accomplish this objective. We highlight here a partnership effort that utilize underwater gliders to better understand air-sea processes during high wind events, and are particularly geared towards improving hurricane intensity forecasts. Results are presented for Hurricane Gonzalo (2014), where glider observations obtained in the tropical Atlantic: Helped to provide an accurate description of the upper ocean conditions, that included the presence of a low salinity barrier layer; Allowed a detailed analysis of the upper ocean response to hurricane force winds of Gonzalo; Improved the initialization of the ocean in a coupled ocean-atmosphere numerical model; and together with observations from other ocean observing platforms, substantially reduced the error in intensity forecast

  10. Robust post-stall perching with a simple fixed-wing glider using LQR-Trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Joseph; Cory, Rick; Tedrake, Russ

    2014-01-01

    Birds routinely execute post-stall maneuvers with a speed and precision far beyond the capabilities of our best aircraft control systems. One remarkable example is a bird exploiting post-stall pressure drag in order to rapidly decelerate to land on a perch. Stall is typically associated with a loss of control authority, and it is tempting to attribute this agility of birds to the intricate morphology of the wings and tail, to their precision sensing apparatus, or their ability to perform thrust vectoring. Here we ask whether an extremely simple fixed-wing glider (no propeller) with only a single actuator in the tail is capable of landing precisely on a perch from a large range of initial conditions. To answer this question, we focus on the design of the flight control system; building upon previous work which used linear feedback control design based on quadratic regulators (LQR), we develop nonlinear feedback control based on nonlinear model-predictive control and ‘LQR-Trees’. Through simulation using a flat-plate model of the glider, we find that both nonlinear methods are capable of achieving an accurate bird-like perching maneuver from a large range of initial conditions; the ‘LQR-Trees’ algorithm is particularly useful due to its low computational burden at runtime and its inherent performance guarantees. With this in mind, we then implement the ‘LQR-Trees’ algorithm on real hardware and demonstrate a 95 percent perching success rate over 147 flights for a wide range of initial speeds. These results suggest that, at least in the absence of significant disturbances like wind gusts, complex wing morphology and sensing are not strictly required to achieve accurate and robust perching even in the post-stall flow regime. (papers)

  11. SEADYN Analysis of a Tow Line for a High Altitude Towed Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of using a system, consisting of a tow aircraft, glider and tow line, which would enable subsonic flight at altitudes above 24 km (78 kft) has previously been investigated. The preliminary results from these studies seem encouraging. Under certain conditions these studies indicate the concept is feasible. However, the previous studies did not accurately take into account the forces acting on the tow line. Therefore in order to investigate the concept further a more detailed analysis was needed. The code that was selected was the SEADYN cable dynamics computer program which was developed at the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center. The program is a finite element based structural analysis code that was developed over a period of 10 years. The results have been validated by the Navy in both laboratory and at actual sea conditions. This code was used to simulate arbitrarily-configured cable structures subjected to excitations encountered in real-world operations. The Navy's interest was mainly for modeling underwater tow lines, however the code is also usable for tow lines in air when the change in fluid properties is taken into account. For underwater applications the fluid properties are basically constant over the length of the tow line. For the tow aircraft/glider application the change in fluid properties is considerable along the length of the tow line. Therefore the code had to be modified in order to take into account the variation in atmospheric properties that would be encountered in this application. This modification consisted of adding a variable density to the fluid based on the altitude of the node being calculated. This change in the way the code handled the fluid density had no effect on the method of calculation or any other factor related to the codes validation.

  12. In situ phytoplankton distributions in the Amundsen Sea Polynya measured by autonomous gliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Schofield

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Amundsen Sea Polynya is characterized by large phytoplankton blooms, which makes this region disproportionately important relative to its size for the biogeochemistry of the Southern Ocean. In situ data on phytoplankton are limited, which is problematic given recent reports of sustained change in the Amundsen Sea. During two field expeditions to the Amundsen Sea during austral summer 2010–2011 and 2014, we collected physical and bio-optical data from ships and autonomous underwater gliders. Gliders documented large phytoplankton blooms associated with Antarctic Surface Waters with low salinity surface water and shallow upper mixed layers (< 50 m. High biomass was not always associated with a specific water mass, suggesting the importance of upper mixed depth and light in influencing phytoplankton biomass. Spectral optical backscatter and ship pigment data suggested that the composition of phytoplankton was spatially heterogeneous, with the large blooms dominated by Phaeocystis and non-bloom waters dominated by diatoms. Phytoplankton growth rates estimated from field data (≤ 0.10 day−1 were at the lower end of the range measured during ship-based incubations, reflecting both in situ nutrient and light limitations. In the bloom waters, phytoplankton biomass was high throughout the 50-m thick upper mixed layer. Those biomass levels, along with the presence of colored dissolved organic matter and detritus, resulted in a euphotic zone that was often < 10 m deep. The net result was that the majority of phytoplankton were light-limited, suggesting that mixing rates within the upper mixed layer were critical to determining the overall productivity; however, regional productivity will ultimately be controlled by water column stability and the depth of the upper mixed layer, which may be enhanced with continued ice melt in the Amundsen Sea Polynya.

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2011-06-20 to 2011-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0145917)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2011-07-22 to 2011-08-06 (NCEI Accession 0145918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_251 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2013-07-18 to 2013-08-06 (NCEI Accession 0145922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2010-10-01 to 2010-10-15 (NCEI Accession 0145915)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2010-04-16 to 2010-04-21 (NCEI Accession 0145911)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2011-09-01 to 2011-09-28 (NCEI Accession 0145919)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2010-07-08 to 2010-08-07 (NCEI Accession 0145913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2011-04-12 to 2011-05-04 (NCEI Accession 0145916)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2009-09-01 to 2009-09-04 (NCEI Accession 0145910)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2009-06-10 to 2009-07-03 (NCEI Accession 0145908)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_092 deployed by Oregon Health & Science University; Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 2010-08-30 to 2010-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0145914)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the CMOP observatory SATURN, funded by NOAA and NSF. Glider operations have historically been seasonal (April-September),...

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Control Actuation System with Fuzzy-PID Logic Controlled Brushless Motor Drives for Missiles Glider Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraj, Murali; Arulmozhiyal, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    A control actuation system has been used extensively in automotive, aerospace, and defense applications. The major challenges in modeling control actuation system are rise time, maximum peak to peak overshoot, and response to nonlinear system with percentage error. This paper addresses the challenges in modeling and real time implementation of control actuation system for missiles glider applications. As an alternative fuzzy-PID controller is proposed in BLDC motor drive followed by linkage mechanism to actuate fins in missiles and gliders. The proposed system will realize better rise time and less overshoot while operating in extreme nonlinear dynamic system conditions. A mathematical model of BLDC motor is derived in state space form. The complete control actuation system is modeled in MATLAB/Simulink environment and verified by performing simulation studies. A real time prototype of the control actuation is developed with dSPACE-1104 hardware controller and a detailed analysis is carried out to confirm the viability of the proposed system.

  5. High-frequency internal waves and thick bottom mixed layers observed by gliders in the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Robert E.

    2017-06-01

    Autonomous underwater gliders are conducting high-resolution surveys within the Gulf Stream along the U.S. East Coast. Glider surveys reveal two mechanisms by which energy is extracted from the Gulf Stream as it flows over the Blake Plateau, a portion of the outer continental shelf between Florida and North Carolina where bottom depths are less than 1000 m. Internal waves with vertical velocities exceeding 0.1 m s-1 and frequencies just below the local buoyancy frequency are routinely found over the Blake Plateau, particularly near the Charleston Bump, a prominent topographic feature. These waves are likely internal lee waves generated by the subinertial Gulf Stream flow over the irregular bathymetry of the outer continental shelf. Bottom mixed layers with O(100) m thickness are also frequently encountered; these thick bottom mixed layers likely form in the lee of topography due to enhanced turbulence generated by O(1) m s-1 near-bottom flows.

  6. GLIDERS - A web-based search engine for genome-wide linkage disequilibrium between HapMap SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broxholme John

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of tools for the examination of linkage disequilibrium (LD patterns between nearby alleles exist, but none are available for quickly and easily investigating LD at longer ranges (>500 kb. We have developed a web-based query tool (GLIDERS: Genome-wide LInkage DisEquilibrium Repository and Search engine that enables the retrieval of pairwise associations with r2 ≥ 0.3 across the human genome for any SNP genotyped within HapMap phase 2 and 3, regardless of distance between the markers. Description GLIDERS is an easy to use web tool that only requires the user to enter rs numbers of SNPs they want to retrieve genome-wide LD for (both nearby and long-range. The intuitive web interface handles both manual entry of SNP IDs as well as allowing users to upload files of SNP IDs. The user can limit the resulting inter SNP associations with easy to use menu options. These include MAF limit (5-45%, distance limits between SNPs (minimum and maximum, r2 (0.3 to 1, HapMap population sample (CEU, YRI and JPT+CHB combined and HapMap build/release. All resulting genome-wide inter-SNP associations are displayed on a single output page, which has a link to a downloadable tab delimited text file. Conclusion GLIDERS is a quick and easy way to retrieve genome-wide inter-SNP associations and to explore LD patterns for any number of SNPs of interest. GLIDERS can be useful in identifying SNPs with long-range LD. This can highlight mis-mapping or other potential association signal localisation problems.

  7. Measuring structure deformations of a composite glider by optical means with on-ground and in-flight testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakunowicz, Jerzy; Święch, Łukasz; Meyer, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    In aeronautical research experimental data sets of high quality are essential to verify and improve simulation algorithms. For this reason the experimental techniques need to be constantly refined. The shape, movement or deformation of structural aircraft elements can be measured implicitly in multiple ways; however, only optical, correlation-based techniques are able to deliver direct high-order and spatial results. In this paper two different optical metrologies are used for on-ground preparation and the actual execution of in-flight wing deformation measurements on a PW-6U glider. Firstly, the commercial PONTOS system is used for static tests on the ground and for wind tunnel investigations to successfully certify an experimental sensor pod mounted on top of the test bed fuselage. Secondly, a modification of the glider is necessary to implement the optical method named image pattern correlation technique (IPCT), which has been developed by the German Aerospace Center DLR. This scientific technology uses a stereoscopic camera set-up placed inside the experimental pod and a stochastic dot matrix applied to the area of interest on the glider wing to measure the deformation of the upper wing surface in-flight. The flight test installation, including the preparation, is described and results are presented briefly. Focussing on the compensation for typical error sources, the paper concludes with a recommended procedure to enhance the data processing for better results. Within the presented project IPCT has been developed and optimized for a new type of test bed. Adapted to the special requirements of the glider, the IPCT measurements were able to deliver a valuable wing deformation data base which now can be used to improve corresponding numerical models and simulations.

  8. Wind-driven Circulation and Freshwater Fluxes off Sri Lanka: 4D-Sampling with Autonomous Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    off Sri Lanka: 4D- Sampling with Autonomous Gliders Craig M. Lee, Luc Rainville and Jason I. Gobat Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington... sampling allows us to quantify the properties of the water masses moving in and out of the Bay of Bengal (Figs. 4 and 5). During the Winter Monsoon, a large...lateral stirring and diapycnal mixing contribute to water mass evolution and transformation. OBJECTIVES The Seaglider program focuses on understanding how

  9. Simultaneous application of multiple platforms (Glider, Scanfish, profiling mooring, CTD) to improve detection and quantification of temporal ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D.; Prien, R. D.; Lips, U.; Naumann, M.; Liblik, T.; Schulz-Bull, D. E.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean dynamics are difficult to observe given the broad spectrum of temporal and spatial scales. Robotic technology can be used to address this issue, and help to investigate the variability of physical and biogeochemical processes. This work focuses on ocean robots and in particular on glider technology which seems to be one of the most promising oceanographic tools for future marine research. In this context, we present the results of an observational program conducted in the Baltic Sea combining a profiling mooring (GODESS - Gotland Deep Environmental Sampling Station) and glider technology (Slocum). The temporal variability is captured by the mooring, while the spatial variability is obtained from the glider sampling the surrounding area. Furthermore, classical CTD-measurements and an underwater vehicle (Scanfish) are used simultaneously by two different research vessels to validate and complement the observing network. The main aim of the study is to identify possible synergies between the different platforms and to get a better understanding of maximizing the information content of the data collected by this network. The value and the quality of the data of each individual platform is analyzed and their contribution to the performance of the network itself evaluated.

  10. Autonomous Gliders Observed Physical and Biogeochemical Interplay at Submesoscale during Deep Convection in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, A.; Testor, P.; Damien, P.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Prieur, L. M.; Estournel, C.; Marsaleix, P.; Mortier, L.

    2016-02-01

    Since 2010, sustained observations of the circulation and water properties of the NW Mediterranean Sea have been carried out by gliders in the framework of the MOOSE observatory (Mediterranean Ocean Observatory System for the Environment: http://www.moose-network.fr/). They regularly sampled the wintertime Northern Current (NC), the deep convection zone as well as the North Balearic Front (NBF) collecting a great amount of physical and biogeochemical measurements.During periods of deep convection, the offshore mixed layer can reach great depths (>2300 m) in the Gulf of Lions. Baroclinic fronts then become very intense and reveal a lot of variability at submesoscale in the upper 500 m or so. In terms of process, symmetric instability has been evidenced to occurr during strong wind events by gliders measurements. Complementary analysis performed with the help of a high-resolution regional model (dx,dy=1 km) highlight the prominent role of downfront winds in triggering this instability. Important vertical exchanges of oceanic tracers at the front approximately aligned with isopycnals of magnitude O(100m/day) occur in response to this strong atmospheric forcing. Finally, gliders measurements of Chl-a fluorescence show how this frontal instability seems to stimulate phytoplankton growth in frontal regions during harsh wintertime conditions.

  11. Seafloor Geodesy usi­ng Wave Gliders to study Earthquake and Tsunami Hazards at Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiakumar, S.; Barbot, S.; Hill, E.; Peng, D.; Zerucha, J.; Suhaimee, S.; Chia, G.; Salamena, G. G.; Syahailatua, A.

    2016-12-01

    Land-based GNSS networks are now in place to monitor most subduction zones of the world. These provide valuable information about the amount of­ geodetic strain accumulated in the region, which in turn gives insight into the seismic potential. However, it is usually impossible to resolve activity on the megathrust near the trench using land-based GNSS data alone, given typical signal-to-noise ratios. Ship-based seafloor geodesy is being used today to fill this observation gap. However, surveys using ships are very expensive, tedious and impractical due to the large areas to be covered. Instead of discrete missions using ships, continuous monitoring of the seafloor using autonomous marine robots would aid in understanding the tectonic setting of the seafloor better at a potentially lower cost, as well as help in designing better warning systems. Thus, we are developing seafloor geodesy capabilities using Wave Gliders, a new class of wave-propelled, persistent marine autonomous vehicle using a combination of acoustic and GNSS technologies. We use GNSS/INS to position the platform, and acoustic ranging to locate the seafloor. The GNSS/INS system to be integrated with the Wave Gliders has stringent requirements of low power, light weight, and high accuracy. All these factors are equally important due to limited power and space in the Wave Gliders and the need for highly accurate and precise measurements. With this hardware setup, a limiting factor is the accuracy of measurement of the sound velocity in the water column. We plan to obtain precise positioning of seafloor by exploring a measurement setup that minimizes uncertainties in sound velocity. This will be achieved by making fine-resolution measurements of the two-way travel time of the acoustic waves underwater using the Wave Gliders, and performing statistical signal processing on this data to obtain more reliable sound velocity measurement. This enhanced seafloor geodetic technique using Wave Gliders should

  12. Measuring pH variability using an experimental sensor on an underwater glider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Hemming

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous underwater gliders offer the capability of measuring oceanic parameters continuously at high resolution in both vertical and horizontal planes, with timescales that can extend to many months. An experimental ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET sensor measuring pH on the total scale was attached to a glider during the REP14-MED experiment in June 2014 in the Sardinian Sea in the northwestern Mediterranean. During the deployment, pH was sampled at depths of up to 1000 m along an 80 km transect over a period of 12 days. Water samples were collected from a nearby ship and analysed for dissolved inorganic carbon concentration and total alkalinity to derive the pH for validating the ISFET sensor measurements. The vertical resolution of the pH sensor was good (1 to 2 m, but stability was poor and the sensor drifted in a non-monotonous fashion. In order to remove the sensor drift, a depth-constant time-varying offset was applied throughout the water column for each dive, reducing the spread of the data by approximately two-thirds. Furthermore, the ISFET sensor required temperature- and pressure-based corrections, which were achieved using linear regression. Correcting for this decreased the apparent sensor pH variability by a further 13 to 31 %. Sunlight caused an apparent sensor pH decrease of up to 0.1 in surface waters around local noon, highlighting the importance of shielding the sensor from light in future deployments. The corrected pH from the ISFET sensor is presented along with potential temperature, salinity, potential density anomalies (σθ, and dissolved oxygen concentrations (c(O2 measured by the glider, providing insights into the physical and biogeochemical variability in the Sardinian Sea. The pH maxima were identified close to the depth of the summer chlorophyll maximum, where high c(O2 values were also found. Longitudinal pH variations at depth (σθ > 28. 8 kg m−3 highlighted the variability of

  13. The Intelligent Control System and Experiments for an Unmanned Wave Glider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yulei; Wang, Leifeng; Li, Yiming; Li, Ye; Jiang, Quanquan

    2016-01-01

    The control system designing of Unmanned Wave Glider (UWG) is challenging since the control system is weak maneuvering, large time-lag and large disturbance, which is difficult to establish accurate mathematical model. Meanwhile, to complete marine environment monitoring in long time scale and large spatial scale autonomously, UWG asks high requirements of intelligence and reliability. This paper focuses on the "Ocean Rambler" UWG. First, the intelligent control system architecture is designed based on the cerebrum basic function combination zone theory and hierarchic control method. The hardware and software designing of the embedded motion control system are mainly discussed. A motion control system based on rational behavior model of four layers is proposed. Then, combining with the line-of sight method(LOS), a self-adapting PID guidance law is proposed to compensate the steady state error in path following of UWG caused by marine environment disturbance especially current. Based on S-surface control method, an improved S-surface heading controller is proposed to solve the heading control problem of the weak maneuvering carrier under large disturbance. Finally, the simulation experiments were carried out and the UWG completed autonomous path following and marine environment monitoring in sea trials. The simulation experiments and sea trial results prove that the proposed intelligent control system, guidance law, controller have favorable control performance, and the feasibility and reliability of the designed intelligent control system of UWG are verified.

  14. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, Vera; Baeye, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume), and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume). Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  15. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Van Lancker

    Full Text Available As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume, and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume. Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  16. Mean hydrography on the continental shelf from 26 repeat glider deployments along Southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Austin, Tim; Everett, Jason D.; Griffin, David; Hollings, Ben; King, Edward; Mantovanelli, Alessandra; Milburn, Stuart; Pasquer, Benedicte; Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Robertson, Robin; Stanley, Dennis; Suthers, Iain; White, Dana

    2016-08-01

    Since 2008, 26 glider missions have been undertaken along the continental shelf of southeastern Australia. Typically these missions have spanned the continental shelf on the inshore edge of the East Australian Current from 29.5-33.5°S. This comprehensive dataset of over 33,600 CTD profiles from the surface to within 10 m of the bottom in water depths ranging 25-200 m provides new and unprecedented high resolution observations of the properties of the continental shelf waters adjacent to a western boundary current, straddling the region where it separates from the coast. The region is both physically and biologically significant, and is also in a hotspot of ocean warming. We present gridded mean fields for temperature, salinity and density, but also dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a fluorescence indicative of phytoplankton biomass. This data will be invaluable for understanding shelf stratification, circulation, biophysical and bio-geochemical interactions, as well as for the validation of high-resolution ocean models or serving as teaching material.

  17. Turbulence and Mixing in a Shallow Shelf Sea From Underwater Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Larissa K. P.; Merckelbach, Lucas M.; Carpenter, Jeffrey R.

    2017-11-01

    The seasonal thermocline in shallow shelf seas acts as a natural barrier for boundary-generated turbulence, damping scalar transport to the upper regions of the water column and controlling primary production to a certain extent. To better understand turbulence and mixing conditions within the thermocline, two unique 12 and 17 day data sets with continuous measurements of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (ɛ) collected by autonomous underwater gliders under stratified to well-mixed conditions are presented. A highly intermittent ɛ signal was observed in the stratified thermocline region, which was mainly characterized by quiescent flow (turbulent activity index below 7). The rate of diapycnal mixing remained relatively constant for the majority of the time with peaks of higher fluxes that were responsible for much of the increase in bottom mixed layer temperature. The water column stayed predominantly strongly stratified, with a bulk Richardson number across the thermocline well above 2. A positive relationship between the intensity of turbulence, shear, and stratification was found. The trend between turbulence levels and the bulk Richardson number was relatively weak but suggests that ɛ increases as the bulk Richardson number approaches 1. The results also highlight the interpretation difficulties in both quantifying turbulent thermocline fluxes as well as the responsible mechanisms.

  18. The Intelligent Control System and Experiments for an Unmanned Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yulei; Wang, Leifeng; Li, Yiming; Li, Ye; Jiang, Quanquan

    2016-01-01

    The control system designing of Unmanned Wave Glider (UWG) is challenging since the control system is weak maneuvering, large time-lag and large disturbance, which is difficult to establish accurate mathematical model. Meanwhile, to complete marine environment monitoring in long time scale and large spatial scale autonomously, UWG asks high requirements of intelligence and reliability. This paper focuses on the “Ocean Rambler” UWG. First, the intelligent control system architecture is designed based on the cerebrum basic function combination zone theory and hierarchic control method. The hardware and software designing of the embedded motion control system are mainly discussed. A motion control system based on rational behavior model of four layers is proposed. Then, combining with the line-of sight method(LOS), a self-adapting PID guidance law is proposed to compensate the steady state error in path following of UWG caused by marine environment disturbance especially current. Based on S-surface control method, an improved S-surface heading controller is proposed to solve the heading control problem of the weak maneuvering carrier under large disturbance. Finally, the simulation experiments were carried out and the UWG completed autonomous path following and marine environment monitoring in sea trials. The simulation experiments and sea trial results prove that the proposed intelligent control system, guidance law, controller have favorable control performance, and the feasibility and reliability of the designed intelligent control system of UWG are verified. PMID:28005956

  19. Characterization of Convective Plumes Associated With Oceanic Deep Convection in the Northwestern Mediterranean From High-Resolution In Situ Data Collected by Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, Félix; Bosse, Anthony; Testor, Pierre; L'Hévéder, Blandine; Mortier, Laurent; Smeed, David

    2017-12-01

    Numerous gliders have been deployed in the Gulf of Lions (northwestern Mediterranean Sea) and in particular during episodes of open-ocean deep convection in the winter 2012-2013. The data collected represents an unprecedented density of in situ observations providing a first in situ statistical and 3-D characterization of the important mixing agents of the deep convection phenomenon, the so-called plumes. A methodology based on a glider-static flight model was applied to infer the oceanic vertical velocity signal from the glider navigation data. We demonstrate that during the active phase of mixing, the gliders underwent significant oceanic vertical velocities up to 18 cm s-1. Focusing on the data collected by two gliders during the 2012-2013 winter, 120 small-scale convective downward plumes were detected with a mean radius of 350 m and separated by about 2 km. We estimate that the plumes cover 27% of the convection area. Gliders detected downward velocities with a magnitude larger than that of the upward ones (-6 versus +2 cm s-1 on average). Along-track recordings of temperature and salinity as well as biogeochemical properties (dissolved oxygen, fluorescence, and turbidity) allow a statistical characterization of the water masses' properties in the plumes' core with respect to the "background": the average downward signal is of colder (-1.8 × 10-3 °C), slightly saltier (+4.9 × 10-4 psu) and thus denser waters (+7.5 × 10-4 kg m-3). The plunging waters are also on average more fluorescent (+2.3 × 10-2 μg L-1). The plumes are associated with a vertical diffusion coefficient of 7.0 m2 s-1 and their vertical velocity variance scales with the ratio of the buoyancy loss over the Coriolis parameter to the power 0.86.

  20. High-resolution view of the spring bloom initiation and net community production in the Subantarctic Southern Ocean using glider data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thomalla, Sandy J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available the need for a high-resolution approach to resolving biogeochemical processes. In this study, 5.5 months of continuous, high-resolution (3 h, 2 km horizontal resolution) glider data from spring to summer in the Atlantic Subantarctic Zone is used...

  1. The seasonal cycle of mixed layer dynamics and phytoplankton biomass in the Sub-Antarctic Zone: A high-resolution glider experiment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swart, S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -resolution glider data (3 hourly, 2 km horizontal resolution), from~6 months of sampling (spring through summer) in the Sub-Antarctic Zone, is used to assess 1) the different forcing mechanisms driving variability in upper ocean physics and 2) how thesemay...

  2. Glider and remote sensing observations of the upper ocean response to an extended shallow coastal diversion of wastewater effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.; Teel, Elizabeth N.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Caron, David A.; Jones, Burton

    2016-01-01

    The Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) diverted wastewater discharge (5.3 × 108 l d−1) from its primary deep (56 m) outfall 8 km offshore, to a secondary shallower (16 m) outfall 1.6 km offshore for a period of three weeks. It was anticipated that the low salinity and density of the effluent would cause it to rise to the surface with limited dilution, elevating nutrient concentrations in near-surface waters and stimulating phytoplankton blooms in the region. Three Teledyne Webb Slocum gliders and a Liquid Robotics surface wave glider were deployed on transects near the outfalls to acquire high spatial and temporal coverage of physical and chemical parameters before, during, and after the wastewater diversion. Combined autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean color data indicated that phytoplankton biomass increased in the upper water column in response to the diversion, but that the magnitude of the response was spatially patchy and significantly less than expected. Little evidence of the plume or its effects was detectable 72 h following the diversion. The effluent plume exhibited high rates of dilution and mixed throughout the upper 20 m and occasionally throughout the upper 40 m during the diversion. Rapid plume advection and dilution appeared to contribute to the muted impact of the nutrient-rich effluent on the phytoplankton community in this coastal ecosystem.

  3. Glider and remote sensing observations of the upper ocean response to an extended shallow coastal diversion of wastewater effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.

    2016-06-21

    The Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) diverted wastewater discharge (5.3 × 108 l d−1) from its primary deep (56 m) outfall 8 km offshore, to a secondary shallower (16 m) outfall 1.6 km offshore for a period of three weeks. It was anticipated that the low salinity and density of the effluent would cause it to rise to the surface with limited dilution, elevating nutrient concentrations in near-surface waters and stimulating phytoplankton blooms in the region. Three Teledyne Webb Slocum gliders and a Liquid Robotics surface wave glider were deployed on transects near the outfalls to acquire high spatial and temporal coverage of physical and chemical parameters before, during, and after the wastewater diversion. Combined autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean color data indicated that phytoplankton biomass increased in the upper water column in response to the diversion, but that the magnitude of the response was spatially patchy and significantly less than expected. Little evidence of the plume or its effects was detectable 72 h following the diversion. The effluent plume exhibited high rates of dilution and mixed throughout the upper 20 m and occasionally throughout the upper 40 m during the diversion. Rapid plume advection and dilution appeared to contribute to the muted impact of the nutrient-rich effluent on the phytoplankton community in this coastal ecosystem.

  4. Glider and remote sensing observations of the upper ocean response to an extended shallow coastal diversion of wastewater effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegers, Bridget N.; Teel, Elizabeth N.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Caron, David A.; Jones, Burton H.

    2017-02-01

    The Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) diverted wastewater discharge (5.3 × 108 l d-1) from its primary deep (56 m) outfall 8 km offshore, to a secondary shallower (16 m) outfall 1.6 km offshore for a period of three weeks. It was anticipated that the low salinity and density of the effluent would cause it to rise to the surface with limited dilution, elevating nutrient concentrations in near-surface waters and stimulating phytoplankton blooms in the region. Three Teledyne Webb Slocum gliders and a Liquid Robotics surface wave glider were deployed on transects near the outfalls to acquire high spatial and temporal coverage of physical and chemical parameters before, during, and after the wastewater diversion. Combined autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean color data indicated that phytoplankton biomass increased in the upper water column in response to the diversion, but that the magnitude of the response was spatially patchy and significantly less than expected. Little evidence of the plume or its effects was detectable 72 h following the diversion. The effluent plume exhibited high rates of dilution and mixed throughout the upper 20 m and occasionally throughout the upper 40 m during the diversion. Rapid plume advection and dilution appeared to contribute to the muted impact of the nutrient-rich effluent on the phytoplankton community in this coastal ecosystem.

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp010 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the East Coast - US/Canada from 2015-04-09 to 2015-06-25 (NCEI Accession 0139261)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-11-05 to 2016-02-18 (NCEI Accession 0145664)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-03-10 to 2016-06-28 (NCEI Accession 0155280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp064 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-05-17 to 2016-08-23 (NCEI Accession 0156410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp050 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2016-03-30 to 2016-07-20 (NCEI Accession 0155979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp064 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-10-30 to 2016-02-03 (NCEI Accession 0145715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-09-13 to 2016-12-14 (NCEI Accession 0157580)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp056 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-03-29 to 2017-07-01 (NCEI Accession 0164292)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp010 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the East Coast - US/Canada from 2017-07-07 to 2017-09-12 (NCEI Accession 0166618)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp039 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-01-22 to 2015-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0138033)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-01-09 to 2015-04-27 (NCEI Accession 0137984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp035 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-03-31 to 2015-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0138032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-05-01 to 2014-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0137974)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp001 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2015-01-12 to 2015-04-08 (NCEI Accession 0137973)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp063 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-02-03 to 2016-05-17 (NCEI Accession 0153552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp063 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-09-15 to 2014-11-04 (NCEI Accession 0137991)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp052 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-08-14 to 2015-01-09 (NCEI Accession 0137990)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp065 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the East Coast - US/Canada from 2015-10-01 to 2016-01-07 (NCEI Accession 0145716)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp050 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2015-02-06 to 2015-05-14 (NCEI Accession 0137988)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp018 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2014-06-10 to 2014-09-21 (NCEI Accession 0138030)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp053 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2015-08-29 to 2015-12-13 (NCEI Accession 0145713)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-11-30 to 2017-03-14 (NCEI Accession 0162197)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ud_134 deployed by University of Delaware in the Southern Oceans from 2015-01-24 to 2015-02-15 (NCEI Accession 0137993)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this glider mission is to do station keeping to resolve the time series of Palmer Deep within the operating CODAR fields off of Anvers Island. This...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-09-01 to 2016-09-22 (NCEI Accession 0156659)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru24 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Oceans from 2015-01-05 to 2015-01-17 (NCEI Accession 0137970)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this glider mission is to do act as a drifter, but taking hourly dives to 100m to measure the phyto-physiological response of a phytoplankton...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-08-17 to 2016-09-16 (NCEI Accession 0156601)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp031 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2015-09-10 to 2015-12-16 (NCEI Accession 0145667)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-11-25 to 2014-11-27 (NCEI Accession 0137979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-07-14 to 2016-07-20 (NCEI Accession 0156658)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp039 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-02-18 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0156570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-11-24 to 2016-03-10 (NCEI Accession 0145666)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp066 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the East Coast - US/Canada from 2015-12-17 to 2016-04-06 (NCEI Accession 0153789)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-06-28 to 2016-08-23 (NCEI Accession 0156400)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp055 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the East Coast - US/Canada from 2015-07-16 to 2015-10-16 (NCEI Accession 0145714)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-08-13 to 2015-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0145665)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-06-11 to 2014-09-15 (NCEI Accession 0137978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru30 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-09-01 to 2016-09-26 (NCEI Accession 0156681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the TEMPESTS (The Experiment to Measure and Predict East coast STorm Strength), funded by NOAA through CINAR (Cooperative...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider whoi_406 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-09-02 to 2016-09-20 (NCEI Accession 0156640)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the TEMPESTS (The Experiment to Measure and Predict East coast STorm Strength), funded by NOAA through CINAR (Cooperative...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru05 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Oceans from 2015-02-01 to 2015-02-08 (NCEI Accession 0145657)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Glider deployed to perform cross canyon transects of Palmer Deep within the operating CODAR fields off of Anvers Island. This multi-platform field study will...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp053 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2016-07-20 to 2016-10-20 (NCEI Accession 0156796)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp041 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-09-08 to 2016-12-14 (NCEI Accession 0157607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp042 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2016-11-04 to 2017-02-23 (NCEI Accession 0161310)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp052 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-07-28 to 2016-02-18 (NCEI Accession 0145670)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp064 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the |Coastal Waters of California from 2016-12-14 to 2017-03-29 (NCEI Accession 0162258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp024 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2017-01-30 to 2017-05-08 (NCEI Accession 0162888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-12-14 to 2017-03-28 (NCEI Accession 0162257)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-08-14 to 2014-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0137967)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-03-05 to 2013-03-23 (NCEI Accession 0137964)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp001 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2016-08-15 to 2016-11-16 (NCEI Accession 0157002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp026 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2017-04-20 to 2017-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0164709)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp054 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-03-17 to 2016-10-11 (NCEI Accession 0156772)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-02-18 to 2016-06-02 (NCEI Accession 0153551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-09-16 to 2014-09-29 (NCEI Accession 0137968)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider blue deployed by University of Massachusetts; University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-08-18 to 2016-08-22 (NCEI Accession 0156657)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) glider deployment. This is the second of a series of yearly seasonal...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp055 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-03-14 to 2017-06-28 (NCEI Accession 0163867)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-10-08 to 2015-10-27 (NCEI Accession 0153545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp052 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-09-06 to 2017-03-14 (NCEI Accession 0162198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-10-17 to 2013-11-06 (NCEI Accession 0137966)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru05 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Ocean from 2016-02-02 to 2016-02-17 (NCEI Accession 0145658)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this glider mission is to take cross sections of temperature and salinity in the continental shelf near Palmer Station. The Long Term Ecological...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-04-05 to 2017-07-11 (NCEI Accession 0164208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-03-28 to 2017-07-11 (NCEI Accession 0164207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp066 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the East Coast - US/Canada from 2016-08-18 to 2016-09-28 (NCEI Accession 0156697)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp007 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the East Coast - US/Canada from 2017-04-27 to 2017-08-21 (NCEI Accession 0165175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp049 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-05-18 to 2017-08-24 (NCEI Accession 0165396)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-09-06 to 2016-11-30 (NCEI Accession 0157115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-06-02 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0156569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp034 deployed by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and US Navy; Naval Postgraduate School in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-04-05 to 2017-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0163370)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from MBARI and Naval Postgraduate School. (Supported by Naval Postgraduate School Naval Research Program, CeNCOOS and MBARI.) The National...

  12. Physical, chemical and meteorological data from CTD and other instruments from Wave Gliders in the Pacific Ocean in support of the Pacific Crossing (PacX) Challenge from 18 November 2011 to 14 February 2013 (NODC Accession 0114435)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset was generated by a group of 4 Wave Gliders, referred to as Papa Mau, Benjamin, Piccard Maru, and Fontaine Maru. The vehicles were launched from San...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru32 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-08-10 to 2016-08-19 (NCEI Accession 0156390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-09-17 to 2015-10-07 (NCEI Accession 0145711)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-08-18 to 2015-09-09 (NCEI Accession 0145710)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru26d deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Ocean from 2014-12-25 to 2015-01-28 (NCEI Accession 0137971)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this glider mission is to take cross sections of temperature and salinity in the continental shelf near Palmer Station. The Long Term Ecological...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru24 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Oceans from 2015-01-26 to 2015-02-11 (NCEI Accession 0145659)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this glider mission is to take hourly dives to 100m to measure the photo-physiological response of a phytoplankton population over Palmer Deep. The...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru26d deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Ocean from 2016-02-01 to 2016-03-07 (NCEI Accession 0153547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this glider mission is to take cross sections of temperature and salinity in the continental shelf near Palmer Station. The Long Term Ecological...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ud_134 deployed by University of Delaware in the Southern Oceans from 2015-01-05 to 2015-01-21 (NCEI Accession 0137992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this glider mission is to do cross canyon transects of Palmer Deep within the operating CODAR fields off of Anvers Island. This multi-platform field...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru05 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Oceans from 2015-01-05 to 2015-01-13 (NCEI Accession 0137962)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Glider deployed to perform cross canyon transects of Palmer Deep within the operating CODAR fields off of Anvers Island. This multi-platform field study will...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider unit_191 deployed by University of Alaska - Fairbanks in the Southern Oceans from 2015-01-05 to 2015-02-26 (NCEI Accession 0145717)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this glider mission is to do along canyon transects of Palmer Deep within the operating CODAR fields off of Anvers Island. This multi-platform field...

  2. Temperature and salinity measurements taken from the BLUE, PENOBSCOT and other Slocum glider platforms in the Coastal N Atlantic, Coastal S Atlantic and other locations from 2012 to 2014 (NCEI Accession 0123079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements found in dataset IOOS taken from the BLUE (Slocum glider; WMO 4801504; operated by Univ. of Massachusetts Dartmouth), PENOBSCOT...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2012-10-25 to 2012-11-05 (NCEI Accession 0145723)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider ru23 was deployed prior to the movement of Hurrican Sandy into the Mid-Atlantic Bight and was deployed to sample the sub-surface waters during the...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider clark deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Caribbean Sea from 2015-07-15 to 2015-08-30 (NCEI Accession 0145718)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider with a thermal-recharging engine. Low-cost, high energy density, safe, long-duration easily recharged power has been identified as a...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider blue deployed by University of Massachusetts; University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-05-18 to 2016-06-06 (NCEI Accession 0153544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) glider deployment. This is the first of a series of yearly seasonal deployments...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp006 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2015-12-14 to 2016-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0153787)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru05 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Oceans from 2015-01-15 to 2015-02-01 (NCEI Accession 0137963)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Glider deployed to perform cross canyon transects of Palmer Deep within the operating CODAR fields off of Anvers Island. This multi-platform field study will...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru25d deployed by Korea Polar Research Institute in the Southern Oceans from 2014-01-04 to 2014-01-13 (NCEI Accession 0145709)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — KOPRI is an international collaboration between the Korean Polar Research Institute and Rutgers University to deploy gliders in the Amundsen polynya. The ice sheets...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru25d deployed by Korea Polar Research Institute in the Southern Oceans from 2016-01-21 to 2016-02-06 (NCEI Accession 0153546)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — KOPRI is an international collaboration between the Korean Polar Research Institute and Rutgers University to deploy gliders in the Amundsen polynya. The ice sheets...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru24 deployed by Korea Polar Research Institute in the Southern Oceans from 2014-01-04 to 2014-01-13 (NCEI Accession 0145708)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — KOPRI is an international collaboration between the Korean Polar Research Institute and Rutgers University to deploy gliders in the Amundsen polynya. The ice sheets...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider clark deployed by Teledyne Webb Research Corporation in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-08-22 to 2013-10-05 (NCEI Accession 0145721)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Test deployment of a Slocum 1000m thermal glider off the West coast of Hawai'i, Hawaii in preparation for a cross Pacific Ocean deployment. The National Centers for...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru31 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Gulf of Mexico from 2016-01-13 to 2016-02-12 (NCEI Accession 0145722)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Glider deployed as part of the CONsortium for oil spill exposure pathways in COastal River-Dominated Ecosystems (CONCORDE). The goal of the project is to use a...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-06-05 to 2014-09-05 (NCEI Accession 0137981)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru31 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Gulf of Mexico from 2015-10-28 to 2015-11-01 (NCEI Accession 0153548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Glider deployed as part of the CONsortium for oil spill exposure pathways in COastal River-Dominated Ecosystems (CONCORDE). The goal of the project is to use a...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp047 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-08-27 to 2016-03-17 (NCEI Accession 0145668)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp027 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2015-06-16 to 2015-09-23 (NCEI Accession 0145712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-09-23 to 2015-01-09 (NCEI Accession 0137975)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp063 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-08-23 to 2016-08-28 (NCEI Accession 0156530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-04-27 to 2015-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0137976)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-08-13 to 2014-11-25 (NCEI Accession 0137983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp040 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-04-09 to 2015-07-14 (NCEI Accession 0138034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp051 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-11-12 to 2015-01-08 (NCEI Accession 0137989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp020 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2015-12-16 to 2016-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0153550)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp048 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-01-27 to 2015-08-27 (NCEI Accession 0145669)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-01-08 to 2015-04-09 (NCEI Accession 0137980)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp066 deployed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the East Coast - US/Canada from 2017-04-16 to 2017-08-02 (NCEI Accession 0164674)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp048 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-01-16 to 2014-07-29 (NCEI Accession 0138035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp047 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-06-23 to 2015-01-22 (NCEI Accession 0137987)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp020 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2014-08-03 to 2014-12-12 (NCEI Accession 0137977)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp031 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2014-04-12 to 2014-08-02 (NCEI Accession 0138031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp018 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2016-02-18 to 2016-05-28 (NCEI Accession 0153549)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp049 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-04-05 to 2016-06-02 (NCEI Accession 0153788)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  13. Complementary Use of Glider Data, Altimetry, and Model for Exploring Mesoscale Eddies in the Tropical Pacific Solomon Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdeau, L.; Verron, J.; Chaigneau, A.; Cravatte, S.; Kessler, W.

    2017-11-01

    Mesoscale activity is an important component of the Solomon Sea circulation that interacts with the energetic low-latitude western boundary currents of the South Tropical Pacific Ocean carrying waters of subtropical origin before joining the equatorial Pacific. Mixing associated with mesoscale activity could explain water mass transformation observed in the Solomon Sea that likely impacts El Niño Southern Oscillation dynamics. This study makes synergetic use of glider data, altimetry, and high-resolution model for exploring mesoscale eddies, especially their vertical structures, and their role on the Solomon Sea circulation. The description of individual eddies observed by altimetry and gliders provides the first elements to characterize the 3-D structure of these tropical eddies, and confirms the usefulness of the model to access a more universal view of such eddies. Mesoscale eddies appear to have a vertical extension limited to the Surface Waters (SW) and the Upper Thermocline Water (UTW), i.e., the first 140-150 m depth. Most of the eddies are nonlinear, meaning that eddies can trap and transport water properties. But they weakly interact with the deep New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent that is a key piece of the equatorial circulation. Anticyclonic eddies are particularly efficient to advect salty and warm SW coming from the intrusion of equatorial Pacific waters at Solomon Strait, and to impact the characteristics of the New Guinea Coastal Current. Cyclonic eddies are particularly efficient to transport South Pacific Tropical Water (SPTW) anomalies from the North Vanuatu Jet and to erode by diapycnal mixing the high SPTW salinity.

  14. Stability and economy analysis based on computational fluid dynamics and field testing of hybrid-driven underwater glider with the water quality sensor in Danjiangkou Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid-driven underwater glider is a new kind of unmanned platform for water quality monitoring. It has advantages such as high controllability and maneuverability, low cost, easy operation, and ability to carry multiple sensors. This article develops a hybrid-driven underwater glider, PETRELII, and integrates a water quality monitoring sensor. Considering stability and economy, an optimal layout scheme is selected from four candidates by simulation using computational fluid dynamics method. Trials were carried out in Danjiangkou Reservoir—important headwaters of the Middle Route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project. In the trials, a monitoring strategy with polygonal mixed-motion was adopted to make full use of the advantages of the unmanned platform. The measuring data, including temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH, turbidity, chlorophyll, and ammonia nitrogen, are obtained. These data validate the practicability of the theoretical layout obtained using computational fluid dynamics method and the practical performance of PETRELII with sensor.

  15. Subsurface seeding of surface harmful algal blooms observed through the integration of autonomous gliders, moored environmental sample processors, and satellite remote sensing in southern California

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.

    2015-04-01

    An observational study was performed in the central Southern California Bight in Spring 2010 to understand the relationship between seasonal spring phytoplankton blooms and coastal processes that included nutrient input from upwelling, wastewater effluent plumes, and other processes. Multi-month Webb Slocum glider deployments combined with MBARI environmental sample processors (ESPs), weekly pier sampling, and ocean color data provided a multidimensional characterization of the development and evolution of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Results from the glider and ESP observations demonstrated that blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. can develop offshore and subsurface prior to their manifestation in the surface layer and/or near the coast. A significant outbreak and surface manifestation of the blooms coincided with periods of upwelling, or other processes that caused shallowing of the pycnocline and subsurface chlorophyll maximum. Our results indicate that subsurface populations can be an important source for “seeding” surface Pseudo-nitzschia HAB events in southern California.

  16. High accuracy navigation information estimation for inertial system using the multi-model EKF fusing adams explicit formula applied to underwater gliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haoqian; Chen, Xiyuan; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The underwater navigation system, mainly consisting of MEMS inertial sensors, is a key technology for the wide application of underwater gliders and plays an important role in achieving high accuracy navigation and positioning for a long time of period. However, the navigation errors will accumulate over time because of the inherent errors of inertial sensors, especially for MEMS grade IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) generally used in gliders. The dead reckoning module is added to compensate the errors. In the complicated underwater environment, the performance of MEMS sensors is degraded sharply and the errors will become much larger. It is difficult to establish the accurate and fixed error model for the inertial sensor. Therefore, it is very hard to improve the accuracy of navigation information calculated by sensors. In order to solve the problem mentioned, the more suitable filter which integrates the multi-model method with an EKF approach can be designed according to different error models to give the optimal estimation for the state. The key parameters of error models can be used to determine the corresponding filter. The Adams explicit formula which has an advantage of high precision prediction is simultaneously fused into the above filter to achieve the much more improvement in attitudes estimation accuracy. The proposed algorithm has been proved through theory analyses and has been tested by both vehicle experiments and lake trials. Results show that the proposed method has better accuracy and effectiveness in terms of attitudes estimation compared with other methods mentioned in the paper for inertial navigation applied to underwater gliders. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intercomparison of numerical simulations, satellite altimetry and glider observations in the Algerian Basin during fall 2014 and 2015: focus on a SARAL/AltiKa track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulicino, Giuseppe; Cotroneo, Yuri; Ruiz, Simon; Sanchez Roman, Antonio; Pascual, Ananda; Fusco, Giannetta; Tintoré, Joaquin; Budillon, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    The Algerian Basin is a key-place for the study of the general circulation of the Western Mediterranean Sea and its role in reaction to climate change. The presence of both fresh Atlantic waters and more saline resident Mediterranean ones characterizes the basin with an intense inflow/outflow regime and complex circulation patterns. Very energetic mesoscale structures, that evolve from meander of the Algerian Current to isolated cyclonic and anti-cyclonic eddies, dominate the area with marked repercussions on the biological activity. Despite their remarkable importance, this region and its variability are still poorly known and basin-wide high resolution knowledge of its mesoscale and sub-mesoscale features is still incomplete. The monitoring of such complex processes requires a synergic approach that involves integrated observing systems. In recent years, several studies proved the advantages of the combined use of autonomous underwater vehicles, such as gliders, with a new generation of satellite altimeters. In this context, we present the first results of a new integrated oceanographic observing system built up in the Algerian Basin during fall 2014 and 2015, aiming at advancing our knowledge on its main features. The study was realized through the analysis of glider high resolutions three-dimensional observations, collected along the Algerian BAsin Circulation Unmanned Survey (ABACUS) monitoring line, in synergy with co-located SARAL/AltiKa altimetric products and CMEMS numerical simulations. The achieved results confirm that glider derived dynamic height and SARAL/AltiKa absolute dynamic topography present similar patterns, with RMS of the differences ranging between 1.11 and 2.90 cm. Generally, the maximum discrepancies are located nearby the Balearic Islands and the Algerian Coast, but it is important to remark that the correlation coefficients seem to mostly depend on the synopticity between in situ and satellite measurements. Still, this study confirm that

  18. Study of the Algorithm of Backtracking Decoupling and Adaptive Extended Kalman Filter Based on the Quaternion Expanded to the State Variable for Underwater Glider Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoqian Huang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High accuracy attitude and position determination is very important for underwater gliders. The cross-coupling among three attitude angles (heading angle, pitch angle and roll angle becomes more serious when pitch or roll motion occurs. This cross-coupling makes attitude angles inaccurate or even erroneous. Therefore, the high accuracy attitude and position determination becomes a difficult problem for a practical underwater glider. To solve this problem, this paper proposes backing decoupling and adaptive extended Kalman filter (EKF based on the quaternion expanded to the state variable (BD-AEKF. The backtracking decoupling can eliminate effectively the cross-coupling among the three attitudes when pitch or roll motion occurs. After decoupling, the adaptive extended Kalman filter (AEKF based on quaternion expanded to the state variable further smoothes the filtering output to improve the accuracy and stability of attitude and position determination. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed BD-AEKF method, the pitch and roll motion are simulated and the proposed method performance is analyzed and compared with the traditional method. Simulation results demonstrate the proposed BD-AEKF performs better. Furthermore, for further verification, a new underwater navigation system is designed, and the three-axis non-magnetic turn table experiments and the vehicle experiments are done. The results show that the proposed BD-AEKF is effective in eliminating cross-coupling and reducing the errors compared with the conventional method.

  19. Study of the algorithm of backtracking decoupling and adaptive extended Kalman filter based on the quaternion expanded to the state variable for underwater glider navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haoqian; Chen, Xiyuan; Zhou, Zhikai; Xu, Yuan; Lv, Caiping

    2014-12-03

    High accuracy attitude and position determination is very important for underwater gliders. The cross-coupling among three attitude angles (heading angle, pitch angle and roll angle) becomes more serious when pitch or roll motion occurs. This cross-coupling makes attitude angles inaccurate or even erroneous. Therefore, the high accuracy attitude and position determination becomes a difficult problem for a practical underwater glider. To solve this problem, this paper proposes backing decoupling and adaptive extended Kalman filter (EKF) based on the quaternion expanded to the state variable (BD-AEKF). The backtracking decoupling can eliminate effectively the cross-coupling among the three attitudes when pitch or roll motion occurs. After decoupling, the adaptive extended Kalman filter (AEKF) based on quaternion expanded to the state variable further smoothes the filtering output to improve the accuracy and stability of attitude and position determination. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed BD-AEKF method, the pitch and roll motion are simulated and the proposed method performance is analyzed and compared with the traditional method. Simulation results demonstrate the proposed BD-AEKF performs better. Furthermore, for further verification, a new underwater navigation system is designed, and the three-axis non-magnetic turn table experiments and the vehicle experiments are done. The results show that the proposed BD-AEKF is effective in eliminating cross-coupling and reducing the errors compared with the conventional method.

  20. Study of the Algorithm of Backtracking Decoupling and Adaptive Extended Kalman Filter Based on the Quaternion Expanded to the State Variable for Underwater Glider Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haoqian; Chen, Xiyuan; Zhou, Zhikai; Xu, Yuan; Lv, Caiping

    2014-01-01

    High accuracy attitude and position determination is very important for underwater gliders. The cross-coupling among three attitude angles (heading angle, pitch angle and roll angle) becomes more serious when pitch or roll motion occurs. This cross-coupling makes attitude angles inaccurate or even erroneous. Therefore, the high accuracy attitude and position determination becomes a difficult problem for a practical underwater glider. To solve this problem, this paper proposes backing decoupling and adaptive extended Kalman filter (EKF) based on the quaternion expanded to the state variable (BD-AEKF). The backtracking decoupling can eliminate effectively the cross-coupling among the three attitudes when pitch or roll motion occurs. After decoupling, the adaptive extended Kalman filter (AEKF) based on quaternion expanded to the state variable further smoothes the filtering output to improve the accuracy and stability of attitude and position determination. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed BD-AEKF method, the pitch and roll motion are simulated and the proposed method performance is analyzed and compared with the traditional method. Simulation results demonstrate the proposed BD-AEKF performs better. Furthermore, for further verification, a new underwater navigation system is designed, and the three-axis non-magnetic turn table experiments and the vehicle experiments are done. The results show that the proposed BD-AEKF is effective in eliminating cross-coupling and reducing the errors compared with the conventional method. PMID:25479331

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; Center for Ocean Observing Leadership in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2017-04-24 to 2017-05-11 (NCEI Accession 0164191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This deployment is part of the New...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; Center for Ocean Observing Leadership in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-10-03 to 2016-10-17 (NCEI Accession 0162480)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Sverdrup deployed by Texas A&M University; Texas A&M University - College Station; Geochemical and Environmental Research Group in the Gulf of Mexico from 2017-09-02 to 2017-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0166617)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Qantifying mixing parameters and processes of the northern Gulf of Mexico using gliders. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data...

  4. THE TRANSPORT GLIDER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Page 1 ... powered aircraft landing on captured airfields. Since the end of that war airborne forces have continued to play a considerable role in the various smaller military clashes .... Tetrach Mark IVand Locust tanks onto Landing Zones in support of Airborne Troops. --". -~-~-~~. Fig 3. The Waco CG-13A was an American ...

  5. THE MILITARY GLIDER REVISITED

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    briefest life span of any major military equipment type - spanning not ... that country. The disadvantages of this to PLAN ... increasingly hamper the employment of heli- .... time, both attack and medium helicopters could .... balance out his armoured superiority and to im- ... derable flexibility to our operations and enhance.

  6. Glider and satellite high resolution monitoring of a mesoscale eddy in the Algerian basin: effects on the mixed layer depth and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotroneo, Yuri; Aulicino, Giuseppe; Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Budillon, Giorgio; Fusco, Giannetta; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2016-04-01

    Despite of the extensive bibliography about the circulation of the Mediterranean Sea and its sub-basins, the debate on mesoscale dynamics and its impacts on biochemical processes is still open because of their intrinsic time scales and of the difficulties in sampling. In order to clarify some of these processes, the "Algerian BAsin Circulation Unmanned Survey - ABACUS" project was proposed and realized through access to JERICO Trans National Access (TNA) infrastructures between September and December 2014. In this framework, a deep glider cruise was carried out in the area between Balearic Islands and Algerian coasts to establish an endurance line for monitoring the basin circulation. During the mission, a mesoscale eddy, identified on satellite altimetry maps, was sampled at high-spatial horizontal resolution (4 km) along its main axes and from surface to 1000 m depth. Data were collected by a Slocum glider equipped with a pumped CTD and biochemical sensors that collected about 100 complete casts inside the eddy. In order to describe the structure of the eddy, in situ data were merged with new generation remotely sensed data as daily synoptic sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll concentration (Chl-a) images from MODIS satellites as well as sea surface height and geostrophic velocities from AVISO. From its origin along the Algerian coast in the eastern part of the basin, the eddy propagated to north-west at a mean speed of about 4 km/day with a mean diameter of 112/130 km, a mean elevation of 15.7 cm and clearly distinguished by the surrounding waters thanks to its higher SST and Chl-a values. Temperature and salinity values along the water column confirm the origin of the eddy from the AC showing the presence of recent Atlantic water in the surface layer and Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) in the deeper layer. Eddy footprint is clearly evident in the multiparametric vertical sections conducted along its main axes. Deepening of temperature, salinity and

  7. The impact of covariance localization on the performance of an ocean EnKF system assimilating glider data in the Ligurian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchetti, Silvia; Alvarez, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Data assimilation through an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is not exempt from deficiencies, including the generation of long-range unphysical correlations that degrade its performance. The covariance localization technique has been proposed and used in previous research to mitigate this effect. However, an evaluation of its performance is usually hindered by the sparseness and unsustained collection of independent observations. This article assesses the performance of an ocean prediction system composed of a multivariate EnKF coupled with a regional configuration of the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS) with a covariance localization solution and data assimilation from an ocean glider that operated over a limited region of the Ligurian Sea. Simultaneous with the operation of the forecast system, a high-quality data set was repeatedly collected with a CTD sensor, i.e., every day during the period from 5 to 20 August 2013 (approximately 4 to 5 times the synoptic time scale of the area), located on board the NR/V Alliance for model validation. Comparisons between the validation data set and the forecasts provide evidence that the performance of the prediction system with covariance localization is superior to that observed using only EnKF assimilation without localization or using a free run ensemble. Furthermore, it is shown that covariance localization also increases the robustness of the model to the location of the assimilated data. Our analysis reveals that improvements are detected with regard to not only preventing the occurrence of spurious correlations but also preserving the spatial coherence in the updated covariance matrix. Covariance localization has been shown to be relevant in operational frameworks where short-term forecasts (on the order of days) are required.

  8. Differential activation of brain regions involved with error-feedback and imitation based motor simulation when observing self and an expert's actions in pilots and non-pilots on a complex glider landing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Daniel E; Terzibas, Cengiz; Cassel, Daniel B; Callan, Akiko; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sato, Masa-Aki

    2013-05-15

    In this fMRI study we investigate neural processes related to the action observation network using a complex perceptual-motor task in pilots and non-pilots. The task involved landing a glider (using aileron, elevator, rudder, and dive brake) as close to a target as possible, passively observing a replay of one's own previous trial, passively observing a replay of an expert's trial, and a baseline do nothing condition. The objective of this study is to investigate two types of motor simulation processes used during observation of action: imitation based motor simulation and error-feedback based motor simulation. It has been proposed that the computational neurocircuitry of the cortex is well suited for unsupervised imitation based learning, whereas, the cerebellum is well suited for error-feedback based learning. Consistent with predictions, pilots (to a greater extent than non-pilots) showed significant differential activity when observing an expert landing the glider in brain regions involved with imitation based motor simulation (including premotor cortex PMC, inferior frontal gyrus IFG, anterior insula, parietal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and middle temporal MT area) than when observing one's own previous trial which showed significant differential activity in the cerebellum (only for pilots) thought to be concerned with error-feedback based motor simulation. While there was some differential brain activity for pilots in regions involved with both Execution and Observation of the flying task (potential Mirror System sites including IFG, PMC, superior parietal lobule) the majority was adjacent to these areas (Observation Only Sites) (predominantly in PMC, IFG, and inferior parietal loblule). These regions showing greater activity for observation than for action may be involved with processes related to motor-based representational transforms that are not necessary when actually carrying out the task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro comparison of the cyclic fatigue resistance of HyFlex EDM, One G, and ProGlider nickel titanium glide path instruments in single and double curvature canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Koray; Uslu, Gülşah; Özyürek, Taha

    2017-11-01

    It was aimed to compare the cyclic fatigue resistances of ProGlider (PG), One G (OG), and HyFlex EDM (HEDM) nickel titanium glide path files in single- and double-curved artificial canals. 40 PG (16/0.02), 40 OG (14/0.03), and 40 HEDM (10/0.05) single-file glide path files were used in the present study. Sixty files were subjected to cyclic fatigue test by using double-curved canals and 60 files by using single-curved canal ( n = 20). The number of cycles to fracture (NCF) was calculated and the length of the fractured fragment (FL) was determined by a digital micro-caliper. Twelve pieces of fractured files were examined with scanning electron microscope to determine fracture types of the files ( n = 2). The NCF and the FL data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test using SPSS 21 software ( p < 0.05). In all of the groups, NCF values were significantly lower in double-curved canals when compared to single-curved canals ( p < 0.05). For both of single- and double-curved canals, NCF values of HEDM group in apical and coronal curvatures were found to be significantly higher than NCF values of PG and OG groups ( p < 0.05). In both of single- and double-curved canals, NCF value of PG group was found significantly higher than OG group ( p < 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, HEDM glide path files were found to have the highest cyclic fatigue resistance in both of single- and double-curved canals.

  10. THE COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC-MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF EFFICIENCY OF APPLICATION ON THE ACW OF THE ULTRALIGHT X-32 "BEKAS" PLANE AND THE MOTOR HANG-GLIDER MD-50S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the comparative economic-mathematical analysis of size of profit per a flight hour on use at the avia- tion-chemical works (ACW of two types of super light aircraft X-32 “Bekas” and a glider MD-50S which are widely used when cultivating farmland nowadays. The list of indicators which are used while carrying out the comparative technical and economic analysis of considered ultralights is given at the beginning of the article. Further their numerical values nec- essary for computations are given. The mathematical formula for calculation with use of the given data of profit on carrying out ACW with use of the considered models of the aircraft equipment is presented. Values of profit are calculated by means of the tabular Microsoft Excel editor for various values of cultivated farmland length and distance of approach from airfield to the cultivated plot. The applied values of cultivated farmland length lie in the range from 0.5 to 10 kilometers, and ap-proach distances vary from 0.5 to 2 kilometers respectively. Calculations are executed for each of two compared ultralights and results are given in a tabular form respectively. On the basis of the analysis of the obtained tabular data conclusions are drawn under what values of input and variables in the form of farmland length and distance of approach profit margin for each of two ultralights will be larger or smaller in comparison with each other. In the final part of article total conclusions about the most preferable ultralight of two compared for operation in fields of various configuration during ACW are drawn. At the end recommendations to the aviation enterprises about application of the most expedient option of ultralight for obtaining bigger profit margin on carrying out ACW.

  11. PRANDTL-D Sub-Scale Glider

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dryden researchers are experimenting with a new wing shape that could significantly increase aircraft efficiency. The team has built upon the research of the German...

  12. CFD Analysis of the SBXC Glider Airframe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    as control servos , controls surfaces gaps, and push rods.  Considering trim conditions. This first attempt to develop an aerodynamic analysis for...Accessed 10 April 2016. [13] K. Y. W. and H. Bang, The Finite Element Method Using Matlab, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press LLC, 2000, pp. 1–2. [14] J. Tu

  13. Application of Density Estimation Methods to Datasets from a Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    humpback and sperm whales as well as different dolphin species. OBJECTIVES The objective of this research is to extend existing methods for cetacean...collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources...estimation from single sensor datasets. Required steps for a cue counting approach, where a cue has been defined as a clicking event (Küsel et al., 2011), to

  14. Acoustically-Equipped Ocean Gliders for Environmental and Oceanographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    operations, including use of tactical sonars, have been linked to marine mammal strandings and fatalities ( Barlow and Gisiner, 2006), particularly of...REFERENCES Barlow , J., and R. Gisiner. 2006. Mitigating, monitoring, and assessing the effects of anthropogenic sound on beaked whales. J

  15. Interim Heavy Airlift: Sea Base Logistics Glider Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    would not permit that.31 In the postwar production slump, the only known commercial application, Winged Cargo Inc., hauled fresh strawberries and...training or design issues include access to the payload under a collapsed airframe, jammed doors, and other hard landing side effects. 42 NSWCDD/TR

  16. E-Glider: Active Electrostatic Flight for Airless Body Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The environment near the surface of airless bodies (asteroids, comets, Moon) is electrically charged due to Sun's photoelectric bombardment. Charged dust is ever...

  17. Evaluation of Glider Coatings Against Biofouling for Improved Flight Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    and used to conduct assays of survivorship with approximately 100 nauplii larvae ofArtemia sp. (brine shrimp ). The larvae were exposed to the...seal (D). These coatings showed higher mortality of brine shrimp as well as 100% mortality of cypris larvae during the settlement assay which...brine shrimp compared to the glass control; however these did not inhibit settlement and were evidently not toxic to the cypris larvae . All other

  18. Emulating avian orographic soaring with a small autonomous glider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Alex; Marino, Matthew; Clothier, Reece; Watkins, Simon; Peters, Liam; Palmer, Jennifer L

    2015-12-17

    This paper explores a method by which an unpowered, fixed-wing micro air vehicle (MAV) may autonomously gain height by utilising orographic updrafts in urban environments. These updrafts are created when wind impinges on both man-made and natural obstacles, and are often highly turbulent and very localised. Thus in contrast to most previous autonomous soaring research, which have focused on large thermals and ridges, we use a technique inspired by kestrels known as 'wind-hovering', in order to maintain unpowered flight within small updrafts. A six-degree-of-freedom model of a MAV was developed based on wind-tunnel tests and vortex-lattice calculations, and the model was used to develop and test a simple cascaded control system designed to hold the aircraft on a predefined trajectory within an updraft. The wind fields around two typical updraft locations (a building and a hill) were analysed, and a simplified trajectory calculation method was developed by which trajectories for height gain can be calculated on-board the aircraft based on a priori knowledge of the wind field. The results of simulations are presented, demonstrating the behaviour of the system in both smooth and turbulent flows. Finally, the results from a series of flight tests are presented. Flight tests at the hill were consistently successful, while flights around the building could not be sustained for periods of more than approximately 20 s. The difficulty of operating near a building is attributable to significant levels of low-frequency unsteadiness (gustiness) in the oncoming wind during the flight tests, effectively resulting in a loss of updraft for sustained periods.

  19. Feasibility of Tactical Air Delivery Resupply Using Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    produced by the 3D Robotics Company, is a low cost, commercially available automated guidance unit based on a 168MHz/252MIPS Cortex -M4F processor ...high-pressure tolerant laptop, an interface processor and dropsondes, which are hand- sized, parachute driven wind sensors. 13 Figure 6. JPADS in...integrated backup systems for in-flight recovery and manual override with dedicated processor and stand-alone power supply, and dedicated terminals for a

  20. A Dropsonde Glider with Adaptive Trajectory Planning, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dropsondes are one of the primary atmospheric measurement tools available to researchers. Current dropsondes are deployed with a free fall parachute trajectory,...

  1. Long-Endurance Maritime Surveillance with Ocean Glider Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    response to fluid viscosity , as well as magnesium sulfate and boric acid molecules found in seawater (Francois and Garrison 1982). As a result, its...Hemipelagic Terrigenous Clay ) is derived from the Bottom Sediment Type (BST) database maintained by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office Acoustics

  2. Application of Density Estimation Methods to Datasets Collected From a Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    2832. PUBLICATIONS Küsel, E.T., Siderius, M., and Mellinger, D.K., “Single-sensor, cue- counting population density estimation: Average ...contained echolocation clicks of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus). This species is also known to occur in the Gulf of Mexico where data is...Because such approach considers the entire click bandwidth, the average probability of detection of thousands of click realizations, and hence the

  3. 75 FR 7936 - Airworthiness Directives; SCHEIBE-Flugzeugbau GmbH Model SF 25C Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... the lower side of the wing), disconnect the aileron from the wings, disconnect the elevator from the... connected to the ribs and the spar with steel tube rivets, no further action is required. (3) If the aileron hinges or the stabilizer to fuselage fittings are connected to the ribs and the spar with brass tube...

  4. Integration of an Acoustic Modem onto a Wave Glider Unmanned Surface Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    of the wave and ωτ represents the phase of the wave. After some amount of math and taking the limit as ω →∞ , we arrive at a form of the eikonal ...the phase front. (5.5) 22 0A Aτ τ∇ ⋅∇ + ∇ = The transport equation and the eikonal equation can be solved by using multiple methods to give

  5. 76 FR 5 - Feathering Propeller Systems for Light-Sport Aircraft Powered Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... expenditure by State, local or Tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 million... Tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector; such a mandate is deemed to be a..., while still maintaining low cockpit workload and pilot distraction. Design and Standards Under the...

  6. Remote Sensing and Underwater Glider Observations of a Springtime Plume in Western Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumes are commonly observed in satellite imagery of western Lake Superior following storm events, and represent a significant cross-shelf pathway for sediment and other constituents. However, their subsurface extent is poorly understood. This study reports results from plume ob...

  7. The Penguin: a Low Reynolds Number Powered Glider for Station Keeping Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, J. K.; Greene, D. W.; Lee, T. T.; Matier, P. T.; Mccarthy, T. R.; Mcguire, R. J.; Schuette, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The Penguin is a low Reynolds number (approx. 100,000) remotely piloted vehicle (RPV). It was designed to fly three laps indoors around two pylons in a figure-eight course while maximizing loiter time. The Penguin's low Reynolds number mission is an important one currently being studied for possible future flights in the atmospheres of other planets and for specialized military missions. Although the Penguin's mission seemed quite simple at first, the challenges of such low Reynolds number flight have proven to be quite unique. In addition to the constraint of low Reynolds number flight, the aircraft had to be robust in its control, highly durable, and it had to carry a small instrument package. The Penguin's flight plan, concept, performance, aerodynamic design, weight estimation, structural design, propulsion, stability and control, and cost estimate is detailed.

  8. Autonomous gliders reveal features of the water column associated with foraging by adelie penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, L Alex; Schofield, Oscar; Fraser, William R

    2010-12-01

    Despite their strong dependence on the pelagic environment, seabirds and other top predators in polar marine ecosystems are generally studied during their reproductive phases in terrestrial environments. As a result, a significant portion of their life history is understudied which in turn has led to limited understanding. Recent advances in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technologies have allowed satellite-tagged Adélie penguins to guide AUV surveys of the marine environment at the Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site on the western Antarctic Peninsula. Near real-time data sent via Iridium satellites from the AUVs to a centralized control center thousands of miles away allowed scientists to adapt AUV sampling strategies to meet the changing conditions of the subsurface. Such AUV data revealed the water masses and fine-scale features associated with Adélie penguin foraging trips. During this study, the maximum concentration of chlorophyll was between 30 and 50 m deep. Encompassing this peak in the chlorophyll concentration, within the water-column, was a mixture of nutrient-laden Upper Circumpolar Deep (UCDW) and western Antarctic Peninsula winter water (WW). Together, data from the AUV survey and penguin dives reveal that 54% of foraging by Adélie penguins occurs immediately below the chlorophyll maximum. These data demonstrate how bringing together emerging technologies, such as AUVs, with established methods such as the radio-tagging of penguins can provide powerful tools for monitoring and hypothesis testing of previously inaccessible ecological processes. Ocean and atmosphere temperatures are expected to continue increasing along the western Antarctic Peninsula, which will undoubtedly affect regional marine ecosystems. New and emerging technologies such as unmanned underwater vehicles and individually mounted satellite tracking devices will provide the tools critical to documenting and understanding the widespread ecological change expected in polar regions.

  9. 78 FR 77567 - Airworthiness Directives; Schempp-Hirth Flugzeugbau GmbH Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Document Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West Building... in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except...) of this AD: This service information contains German to English translation. EASA used the English...

  10. 78 FR 26241 - Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH Powered Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this AD... We reviewed Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH Mandatory Service Bulletin MSB 36-108, dated February 28... Industries GmbH Mandatory Service Bulletin MSB 36-108 and Diamond Aircraft [[Page 26243

  11. 75 FR 74608 - Airworthiness Directives; CENTRAIR Models 101, 101A, 101P, and 101AP Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ....societe.com . You may review copies of the referenced service information at the FAA, Small Airplane..., France; telephone: +33 (0)254 370796; fax: +33 (0)54. 374864; Internet: http://www.societe.com . (3) You...

  12. The smallest Gliders in the Ocean- Temperature Recordings from Pteropods using SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, N.; Orland, I. J.; Valley, J. W.; Kozdon, R.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2016-02-01

    During the last few decades, the development, refinement and application of geochemical methods have lead to the establishment of new proxies to estimate global change. The oxygen isotope composition of carbonate shells formed by marine organisms is a widely used proxy for past ocean temperatures. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a high spatial-resolution in situ technique, allowing oxygen isotope measurements on very small samples (down to 3 μm spot size). Pteropods are pelagic mollusks, producing shells made out of aragonite, which is more soluble than calcite in seawater, making them one of the first responders to climate change. They calcify closely at the aragonite- seawater equilibrium and are therefor ideal candidates to reconstruct temperatures based on their d18O. The oxygen isotopic composition of pteropod shells from sediment traps, net tows and a culture study from the Fram Strait will be presented. Specimens travelled in the Westspitsbergen Current prior to sinking into the sediment. During this transport specimens continue to grow, sequentially adding aragonite to the shell. We show that when using traditional (whole shell) δ18O measurements, the isotopic signatures of whole shells reflect the latitudinal gradient. Combining this with SIMS-derived δ18O measurements on individual shell parts, however, reveals that this is only half the story: Comparing δ18O of earlier (produced further South) and later shell parts (produced further North) shows that pteropods calcify in sequentially shallower water depths, overriding the latitudinal South to North temperature gradient. Combining traditional and novel δ18O measurements can potentially not only allow the reconstruction of temperature/ global warming, but also to assess ecological key parameters, such as habitat depth, at the same time.

  13. Estimating Oceanic Primary Production Using Vertical Irradiance and Chlorophyll Profiles from Ocean Gliders in the North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Victoria S; Smyth, Timothy J; Martin, Adrian P; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Thompson, Andrew F; Damerell, Gillian; Painter, Stuart C

    2015-10-06

    An autonomous underwater vehicle (Seaglider) has been used to estimate marine primary production (PP) using a combination of irradiance and fluorescence vertical profiles. This method provides estimates for depth-resolved and temporally evolving PP on fine spatial scales in the absence of ship-based calibrations. We describe techniques to correct for known issues associated with long autonomous deployments such as sensor calibration drift and fluorescence quenching. Comparisons were made between the Seaglider, stable isotope ((13)C), and satellite estimates of PP. The Seaglider-based PP estimates were comparable to both satellite estimates and stable isotope measurements.

  14. Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis wind products with in situ wave glider wind observations in the Southern Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmidt, KM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available observations in the Southern Ocean 2 3 Kevin M. Schmidta, Sebastiaan Swartb,c,d, Chris Reasonc, Sarah Nicholsonb,c 4 a Marine Research Institute, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, South Africa 5 b Southern Ocean Carbon & Climate Observatory, Council...

  15. Ocean robotics: 21st century sustainable science & marine resource management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swart, S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available marine robots? Swart et al., 2012 The CSIR Glider Fleet 14 GLIDERS: 5 PROFILING & 4 SURFACE GLIDERS = Glider deployment & ship CTD station = ship based underway measurements September 2012 – March 2013 Gough&Is. STF SAF APF G o u g h / T r i...

  16. World saviour in undergarment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothstein, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    En analyse af Jesus-teologi i The Aetherius Society, hvor nytestamentlig mytologi glider over i UFO-forestillinger.......En analyse af Jesus-teologi i The Aetherius Society, hvor nytestamentlig mytologi glider over i UFO-forestillinger....

  17. WATER TEMPERATURE, SALINITY, and others collected from SeaGlider 573 in South Atlantic Ocean from 2012-09-25 to 2013-02-15 (NCEI Accession 0131501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CSIR-SOCCO Southern Ocean Seasonal Cycle Experiment (SOSCEx) was planned around five cruises to the SAZ between the austral winter of 2012 and the late summer of...

  18. Optimal Estimation of Glider’s Underwater Trajectory with Depth-Dependent Correction Using the Navy Coastal Ocean Model with Application to Antisubmarine Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    step study. 2010 IEEE International Conf. on Robotics and Autonomation, Anchorage, Alaska, IEEE Xplore , 4770‒4777, doi:10.1109/ ROBOT.2010.5509240...Autonomation, Karlsruhe, Germany, IEEE Xplore , 5565‒5570, doi:10.1109/ ICRA.2013.6631376. Webb, D. C., P. J. Simonetti, C. P. Jones, 2001: SLOCUM: An...unmanned underwater vehicles for very shallow water mine countermeasures. Proc. OCEANS 2003, San Diego, California, IEEE , 1417‒1423. doi:10.1109

  19. Aeronautics. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education: What Pilot, Astronaut, or Aeronautical Engineer didn't Start out with a Toy Glider?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Pat (Editor); Huetter, Ted (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Welcome to the exciting world of aeronautics. The term aeronautics originated in France, and was derived from the Greek words for "air" and "to sail." It is the study of flight and the operation of aircraft. This educator guide explains basic aeronautical concepts, provides a background in the history of aviation, and sets them within the context of the flight environment (atmosphere, airports, and navigation). The activities in this guide are designed to be uncomplicated and fun. They have been developed by NASA Aerospace Education Services Program specialists, who have successfully used them in countless workshops and student programs around the United States. The activities encourage students to explore the nature of flight, and experience some real-life applications of mathematics, science, and technology. The subject of flight has a wonderful power to inspire learning.

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru29 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the South Atlantic Ocean from 2015-06-23 to 2016-03-31 (NCEI Accession 0154378)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Third leg of the ru29 Challenger mission from Brazil to South Africa. The Challenger Mission is a re-creation of the first global scientific ocean survey conducted...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ud_134 deployed by University of Delaware in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-08-30 to 2016-09-07 (NCEI Accession 0156682)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The scales of the sensing and prediction of bioluminescence represent a significant research challenge. Relevant scales range from 10s-1000s of meters and time...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-08-15 to 2014-09-05 (NCEI Accession 0145663)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-08-16 to 2013-08-27 (NCEI Accession 0145660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider bass deployed by University of South Florida in the Gulf of Mexico from 2015-08-27 to 2015-09-04 (NCEI Accession 0145707)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This deployment is in support of understanding the complex dynamics of prediction and evolution of eastern Gulf of Mexico Harmful Algal Blooms. The National Centers...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG610 deployed by Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the Caribbean Sea from 2015-02-06 to 2015-04-27 (NCEI Accession 0137961)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Murphy deployed by Nova Southeastern University and University of South Florida in the Gulf of Mexico from 2015-08-09 to 2015-08-19 (NCEI Accession 0160070)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The focus of this deployment is the study of Deep-Pelagic Nekton. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data in this archival...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Murphy deployed by Nova Southeastern University and University of South Florida in the Gulf of Mexico from 2017-04-26 to 2017-05-07 (NCEI Accession 0162537)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The focus of this deployment is the study of Deep-Pelagic Nekton. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data in this archival...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider murphy deployed by Nova Southeastern University and University of South Florida in the Gulf of Mexico from 2016-08-10 to 2016-08-17 (NCEI Accession 0157609)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The focus of this deployment is the study of Deep-Pelagic Nekton. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data in this archival...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru01 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Ocean from 2014-01-04 to 2014-01-16 (NCEI Accession 0138009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program in Antarctica is a long term study focused on understanding how the marine system regulates the ecology of the West...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru22 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-08-04 to 2014-08-22 (NCEI Accession 0138014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project is a comprehensive observational and analytical program to examine the dynamics and source waters of the relaxation flows in a coastal upwelling system...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru22 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-08-25 to 2014-09-23 (NCEI Accession 0138015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project is a comprehensive observational and analytical program to examine the dynamics and source waters of the relaxation flows in a coastal upwelling system...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru01 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Ocean from 2014-01-20 to 2014-01-21 (NCEI Accession 0138010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program in Antarctica is a long term study focused on understanding how the marine system regulates the ecology of the West...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG609 deployed by Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-07-19 to 2014-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0131705)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru01 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Ocean from 2014-02-17 to 2014-02-25 (NCEI Accession 0138012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program in Antarctica is a long term study focused on understanding how the marine system regulates the ecology of the West...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-07-17 to 2014-08-06 (NCEI Accession 0145662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-09-12 to 2013-10-24 (NCEI Accession 0145661)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru01 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Ocean from 2014-01-23 to 2014-01-30 (NCEI Accession 0138011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program in Antarctica is a long term study focused on understanding how the marine system regulates the ecology of the West...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru24 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Southern Ocean from 2013-01-22 to 2013-01-30 (NCEI Accession 0137969)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program in Antarctica is a long term study focused on understanding how the marine system regulates the ecology of the West...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG547 deployed by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2016-08-04 to 2016-11-02 (NCEI Accession 0157712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG610 deployed by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2016-08-04 to 2016-11-01 (NCEI Accession 0157656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG609 deployed by Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the Caribbean Sea from 2016-03-10 to 2016-06-02 (NCEI Accession 0154495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG610 deployed by Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2015-08-11 to 2015-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0145656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG630 deployed by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the Caribbean Sea from 2016-07-21 to 2016-11-10 (NCEI Accession 0157713)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG609 deployed by US DOC; NOAA; OAR; Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the Caribbean Sea from 2016-07-21 to 2016-11-10 (NCEI Accession 0157655)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG609 deployed by Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the Caribbean Sea from 2015-07-15 to 2015-11-16 (NCEI Accession 0145655)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Sam deployed by University of South Florida in the Gulf of Mexico from 2016-07-29 to 2016-08-12 (NCEI Accession 0156389)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The focus of this deployment is the collection of multiple acoustic datasets and water column parameters to be used toward assisting fish stock assessments. The...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Sam deployed by University of South Florida in the Gulf of Mexico from 2017-05-16 to 2017-06-11 (NCEI Accession 0163362)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The focus of this deployment is the collection of multiple acoustic datasets and water column parameters to be used toward assisting fish stock assessments. The...

  8. Near-realtime oceanographic profile data collected by Gliders from 20100528 to 20100830 as part of the GTSPP in response to the 20100420 Deepwater Horizon oil spill event (NODC Accession 0065724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data products and in situ oceanographic data collected in response to the Deepwater Horizon Event in the Gulf of Mexico (May 2010). The Global Temperature and...

  9. 76 FR 31354 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning the Transit Connect Electric Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... are drilled into the glider and brackets are installed to support the battery pack and other electric assembly components. The fuel door of the glider is removed, assembled into a charge port, and the charge...-voltage battery is removed. Station 2: A U.S.-origin battery pack, U.S. engine bay wiring harness, German...

  10. Advanced Undersea Warfare Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Glider can self-destruct or enter a hibernation state to be retrieved at a future time. Figure 4.19: Glider Recovery Assisted by Helicopter Retrieval 97...analysis using a physics based sensor model is recommended.79 Finally, Simkit, an open source Java based program DES maintained by Professor Arnold Buss of

  11. The Study of Upper Ocean Stratification that Controls Propagation of Internal Tidal Bores in Coastal Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    glider AUV, a SeaHorse moored profiler, and a thermistor chain to evaluate changes in conductivity, pressure, temperature, salinity, and optics over a...Tethys long- range propeller-driven AUV, a Spray glider AUV, a SeaHorse moored profiler, and a thermistor chain to evaluate changes in conductivity...21 3. SeaHorse : Moored Profiler ...............................................................26 4. T

  12. The Physics of Soaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kenneth W.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the nature and orientation of the forces that allow an engineless airplane (a glider or sailplane) to fly. A glider flying at constant velocity provides a nice example of an object moving under the action of several forces that add to zero. (WRM)

  13. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds, and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    diameter cardboard tube, weighs 1 lb. 11 GliderSonde Deployment Sequence 1. GliderSonde is powered inside the deployment tube by pressing a button...wings are unfolded by a continuous rotation servo and locked in place by a spring-loaded detent mechanism. The flight control servos are also

  14. 78 FR 69456 - Notice To Reinstate a Previously Approved Information Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... pilot accrued the flight time, airplane single- and multi-engine, night, instrument, rotorcraft, glider... NTSB accepts paper copies of Form 6120.1 sent via postal mail or facsimile, as well as electronic...

  15. Safety aspects for underwater vehicles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhan, R.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Dabholkar, N.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Maurya, P.

    instrumentation is intelligent small Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV’s), autonomous profilers, gliders [1], etc. The ultimate aim in all autonomous platforms research and development is to reach the stage of unescorted missions with minimum failures...

  16. 14 CFR 61.19 - Duration of pilot and instructor certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... medical certificate. (3) For student pilots seeking a glider rating, balloon rating, or a sport pilot... calendar months from the month in which it was issued, renewed, or reinstated, as appropriate. (e) Ground...

  17. PRANTL-M

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A CubeSat sized flying wing glider capable of science and terrain mapping missions on Mars. Designed to be much smaller, lighter, and cheaper than previous Mars...

  18. "Data like a movie instead of a photo” - continuous water sensor data collection, 2015 Lake MI CSMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the 2015 Lake Michigan CSMI effort we collected continuous undulating tow and autonomous glider data including conductivity, temperature, depth, fluorescence, and backscatter across the northern half of Lake Michigan. During the same period, we also collected discreet vert...

  19. 36 CFR 327.4 - Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., helicopters, ultra-light aircraft, motorized hang gliders, hot air balloons, any non-powered flight devices or..., material or equipment by parachute, balloon, helicopter or other means onto or from project lands or waters...

  20. Adaptive Oceanographic Sampling in a Coastal Environment Using Autonomous Gliding Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fratantoni, David

    2003-01-01

    ... and modular sensor payload. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of adaptive sampling strategies and the intelligent control of large glider fleets operating within the framework of an autonomous oceanographic sampling network...

  1. Wavegliders for Arctic Surface Observations and Navigation Support (DURIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    the summer, is expensive and there are very few to choose from, so the employment of unmanned systems is potentially very attractive. The Wave Glider...Sea, but instead it was necessary to drive east to Kaktovik (a village on Barter Island), about 100 miles, then proceed north into open water off the...of the two systems . The distance between the two Wave Gliders was between 20 and 50 km during this period, and the two measurements are highly

  2. Hydrodynamic Modeling for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Using Computational and Semi-Empirical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Geisbert, Jesse Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Buoyancy driven underwater gliders, which locomote by modulating their buoyancy and their attitude with moving mass actuators and inflatable bladders, are proving their worth as efficient long-distance, long-duration ocean sampling platforms. Gliders have the capability to travel thousands of kilometers without a need to stop or recharge. There is a need for the development of methods for hydrodynamic modeling. This thesis aims to determine the hydrodynamic parameters for the governing equat...

  3. Thermal Stability of Al2O3/Silicone Composites as High-Temperature Encapsulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yiying

    Underwater gliders are robust and long endurance ocean sampling platforms that are increasingly being deployed in coastal regions. This new environment is characterized by shallow waters and significant currents that can challenge the mobility of these efficient (but traditionally slow moving) vehicles. This dissertation aims to improve the performance of shallow water underwater gliders through path planning. The path planning problem is formulated for a dynamic particle (or "kinematic car") model. The objective is to identify the path which satisfies specified boundary conditions and minimizes a particular cost. Several cost functions are considered. The problem is addressed using optimal control theory. The length scales of interest for path planning are within a few turn radii. First, an approach is developed for planning minimum-time paths, for a fixed speed glider, that are sub-optimal but are guaranteed to be feasible in the presence of unknown time-varying currents. Next the minimum-time problem for a glider with speed controls, that may vary between the stall speed and the maximum speed, is solved. Last, optimal paths that minimize change in depth (equivalently, maximize range) are investigated. Recognizing that path planning alone cannot overcome all of the challenges associated with significant currents and shallow waters, the design of a novel underwater glider with improved capabilities is explored. A glider with a pneumatic buoyancy engine (allowing large, rapid buoyancy changes) and a cylindrical moving mass mechanism (generating large pitch and roll moments) is designed, manufactured, and tested to demonstrate potential improvements in speed and maneuverability.

  4. Optimal Paths in Gliding Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolek, Artur

    Underwater gliders are robust and long endurance ocean sampling platforms that are increasingly being deployed in coastal regions. This new environment is characterized by shallow waters and significant currents that can challenge the mobility of these efficient (but traditionally slow moving) vehicles. This dissertation aims to improve the performance of shallow water underwater gliders through path planning. The path planning problem is formulated for a dynamic particle (or "kinematic car") model. The objective is to identify the path which satisfies specified boundary conditions and minimizes a particular cost. Several cost functions are considered. The problem is addressed using optimal control theory. The length scales of interest for path planning are within a few turn radii. First, an approach is developed for planning minimum-time paths, for a fixed speed glider, that are sub-optimal but are guaranteed to be feasible in the presence of unknown time-varying currents. Next the minimum-time problem for a glider with speed controls, that may vary between the stall speed and the maximum speed, is solved. Last, optimal paths that minimize change in depth (equivalently, maximize range) are investigated. Recognizing that path planning alone cannot overcome all of the challenges associated with significant currents and shallow waters, the design of a novel underwater glider with improved capabilities is explored. A glider with a pneumatic buoyancy engine (allowing large, rapid buoyancy changes) and a cylindrical moving mass mechanism (generating large pitch and roll moments) is designed, manufactured, and tested to demonstrate potential improvements in speed and maneuverability.

  5. New Polyazine-Bridged RuII,RhIII and RuII,RhI Supramolecular Photocatalysts for Water Reduction to Hydrogen Applicable for Solar Energy Conversion and Mechanistic Investigation of the Photocatalytic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rongwei

    Underwater gliders are robust and long endurance ocean sampling platforms that are increasingly being deployed in coastal regions. This new environment is characterized by shallow waters and significant currents that can challenge the mobility of these efficient (but traditionally slow moving) vehicles. This dissertation aims to improve the performance of shallow water underwater gliders through path planning. The path planning problem is formulated for a dynamic particle (or "kinematic car") model. The objective is to identify the path which satisfies specified boundary conditions and minimizes a particular cost. Several cost functions are considered. The problem is addressed using optimal control theory. The length scales of interest for path planning are within a few turn radii. First, an approach is developed for planning minimum-time paths, for a fixed speed glider, that are sub-optimal but are guaranteed to be feasible in the presence of unknown time-varying currents. Next the minimum-time problem for a glider with speed controls, that may vary between the stall speed and the maximum speed, is solved. Last, optimal paths that minimize change in depth (equivalently, maximize range) are investigated. Recognizing that path planning alone cannot overcome all of the challenges associated with significant currents and shallow waters, the design of a novel underwater glider with improved capabilities is explored. A glider with a pneumatic buoyancy engine (allowing large, rapid buoyancy changes) and a cylindrical moving mass mechanism (generating large pitch and roll moments) is designed, manufactured, and tested to demonstrate potential improvements in speed and maneuverability.

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Stommel deployed by Texas A&M University; Texas A&M University - College Station; Geochemical and Environmental Research Group in the Gulf of Mexico from 2016-08-05 to 2016-09-05 (NCEI Accession 0156568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This deployment is to investigate conditions in the region of the Flower Garden Banks after a die-off was reported. The National Centers for Environmental...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Stommel deployed by Texas A&M University; Texas A&M University - College Station; Geochemical and Environmental Research Group in the Gulf of Mexico from 2017-06-27 to 2017-07-05 (NCEI Accession 0164085)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monitoring the baseline water quality across the Texas shelf. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data in this archival package...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Stommel deployed by Texas A&M University; Texas A&M University - College Station; Geochemical and Environmental Research Group in the Gulf of Mexico from 2017-01-20 to 2017-05-07 (NCEI Accession 0162538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monitoring the baseline water quality across the Texas shelf. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data in this archival package...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Revellie deployed by Texas A&M University; Texas A&M University - College Station; Geochemical and Environmental Research Group in the Coastal Waters of Gulf of Mexico from 2016-06-29 to 2016-07-15 (NCEI Accession 0156372)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This deployment is to investigate hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data in this...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Howdy deployed by Texas A&M University; Texas A&M University - College Station; Geochemical and Environmental Research Group in the Coastal Waters of Gulf of Mexico from 2016-06-30 to 2016-07-14 (NCEI Accession 0156371)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This deployment is to investigate hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the data in this...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider Howdy deployed by Texas A&M University; Texas A&M University - College Station; Geochemical and Environmental Research Group in the Coastal Waters of Gulf of Mexico from 2016-09-02 to 2016-09-05 (NCEI Accession 0156591)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This deployment is to investigate mixing and microstructure in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  12. Increase the glyde path diameter improves the centering ability of F6 Skytaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Mario; Cocco, Armando; Zhurakivska, Khrystyna; Ciavarella, Domenico; Muzio, Lorenzo Lo

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of glide path preparation, performed with PathGlider 0.15 (Komet Brasseler GmbH & Co., Lemgo, Germany) and PathGlider 0.20 (Komet Brasseler GmbH & Co., Lemgo, Germany), on the centering ability of 25-size F6 Skytaper in J-shape simulated root canals, compared with no glide path executed. Sixty J-shaped ISO 15 0.02 taper endo training blocks (Dentsply Maillefer) were assigned to three groups ( n = 20 for each group). Photographic images were taken on endoblocks before and after shaping procedures. After superimposition, the software AutoCAD 2013 (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, USA) was used for record the centering and shaping ability at 9 different levels from the apex. Shaping procedures including the using of PathGlider 0.20 resulted in a lower amount of resin removed and in a clear improvement of centering ability of the Skytaper 0.25 at almost all reference point levels. Within the limitations of this study, it could be concluded that the glide path procedure, performed with the PathGlider 0.20 before the shaping with 25-size F6 Skytaper, might determine a lower amount of resin removed and a better centering ability compared with the groups without glide path procedure and those treated with PathGlider 0.15.

  13. Critical properties of unlimited gliding: Unexpected flocking behavior driven by the exchange of information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigus-Kwiatkowska, Marta; Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by albatrosses that use thermal lifts to fly across oceans we develop a simple model of gliders that serves us to study theoretical limitations of unlimited exploration of the Earth. Our studies, grounded in physical theory of continuous percolation and biased random walks, allow us to identify a variety of percolation transitions, which are understood as providing potentially unlimited movement through a space in a specified direction. We discover an unexpected phenomenon of self-organization of gliders in clusters, which resembles the flock organization of birds. This self-organization is intriguing, as it occurs thanks to exchange of information only and without any particular rules that could favor the clustering of the gliders (in contrast to the causes well known in literature, like, for example, attractive forces used in the Vicsek-type models or fitness functions used in evolutionary computation).

  14. Cooperative Position Aware Mobility Pattern of AUVs for Avoiding Void Zones in Underwater WSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Nadeem; Ejaz, Mudassir; Abdul, Wadood; Alamri, Atif; Almogren, Ahmad; Niaz, Iftikhar Azim; Guizani, Nadra

    2017-03-13

    In this paper, we propose two schemes; position-aware mobility pattern (PAMP) and cooperative PAMP (Co PAMP). The first one is an optimization scheme that avoids void hole occurrence and minimizes the uncertainty in the position estimation of glider's. The second one is a cooperative routing scheme that reduces the packet drop ratio by using the relay cooperation. Both techniques use gliders that stay at sojourn positions for a predefined time, at sojourn position self-confidence (s-confidence) and neighbor-confidence (n-confidence) regions that are estimated for balanced energy consumption. The transmission power of a glider is adjusted according to those confidence regions. Simulation results show that our proposed schemes outperform the compared existing one in terms of packet delivery ratio, void zones and energy consumption.

  15. Vertical Variability of Anoxia Along the Northern Omani Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queste, B. Y.; Piontkovski, S.; Heywood, K. J.

    2016-02-01

    Three autonomous underwater gliders were deployed along a 80 km transect extending from Muscat out into the Gulf during both monsoons and the intermonsoon season as part of a project funded by ONR Global and the UK NERC. The gliders surveyed the top 1000m across the continental shelf, the steep continental slope, and the Sea of Oman while measuring temperature, salinity, oxygen, chlorophyll a fluorescence, optical backscatter, photosyntheticall active radiation and providing estimates of depth-averaged currents and up/downwelling. The data show the depth of the surface oxycline varying by 50m across the transect as a function of mixed layer depth. Below, we observed high variability, on the order of days, in the oxygen profile with the boundary of the suboxic zone (glider transect. During periods of minimal flow, it was constrained to 10km beyond the shelf break. PGW was also present in mesoscale eddies beyond the shelf break.

  16. [Glide path management of rotary nickel-titanium instruments in simulated root canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Bai, Y H; Hou, X M

    2018-02-18

    To compare the shaping ability of ProGlider, HyFlex EDM Glidepath File and RaCe ISO 10 with that of PathFile and stainless steel K-file hand instruments in simulated root canals. A total of 60 simulated resin blocks were divided randomly into five groups (n=12), each group prepared with each instrument, respectively. Preparation time was recorded. Pre- and post-operative images were obtained using a scanner and superimposed using Photoshop. The material removal from the inner and outer canal walls beginning from 0 mm at the end point of the canal were measured using ImageJ. Centering ability was determined, accordingly. The data were analyzed using the One-Way ANOVA at a significance level of P0.05). The removal of resin from the outer wall at the apical portion was significantly lower for HyFlex EDM Glidepath File than for ProGlider (PEDM Glidepath File the second most, and the other 3 groups among the same levels. As far as the centering ability was concerned, at the apical portion, HyFlex EDM Glidepath File was the best, ProGlider the second best, no significant difference identified among the other 3 groups. At the curvature portion, ProGlider and HyFlex EDM Glidepath File were the best, PathFile the second, RaCe ISO 10 the third, the worst was the SS K-file. At the straight portion, the difference amongt the 5 groups was not significant. The shaping abilities of ProGlider, HyFlex EDM Glidepath File and RaCe ISO 10 were better or comparable to that of PathFile, while the preparation time for ProGlider reduced significantly, and HyFlex EDM Glidepath File and RaCe ISO 10 removed significantly more resin at the straight portion of the canal.

  17. Large Gaps in Canopy Reduce Road Crossing by a Gliding Mammal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney van der Ree

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Roads and traffic reduce landscape connectivity and increase rates of mortality for many species of wildlife. Species that glide from tree to tree may be strongly affected by roads and traffic if the size of the gap between trees exceeds their gliding capability. Not only are wide roads likely to reduce crossing rates, but mortality may also be increased if gliders that do cross have poor landing opportunities. The road-crossing behavior of 47 squirrel gliders (Petaurus norfolcensis was investigated in southeast Australia using radio-tracking. The proportion of gliders crossing one or both roadways of a freeway where trees were present or absent from the center median was compared to that at single-lane country roads (control. The proportion of gliders crossing the road at control sites (77% was similar to the proportion that crossed one or both roadways at the freeway with trees in the median (67%, whereas only a single male (6% crossed the freeway where trees were absent from the median. The frequency of crossing for each individual was also similar at control sites and freeway sites with trees in the median. The almost complete lack of crossing at sites where trees were absent from the median was attributed to the wider gap in canopy (50 - 64 m vs. 5 - 13 m at sites with trees in the median. This suggests that traffic volume, up to 5,000 vehicles per day on each roadway, and the other characteristics of the freeway we studied are not in themselves complete deterrents to road crossing by squirrel gliders. This study demonstrates that retaining and facilitating the growth of tall trees in the center median of two-way roads may mitigate the barrier effect of roads on gliders, thus contributing positively to mobility and potentially to connectivity. This information will be essential for the assessment of road impacts on gliding species using population viability models.

  18. Interpreting operational altimetry signals in near-coastal areas using underwater autonomous vehicles and remotely sensed ocean colour data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrione, Ines; Oddo, Paolo; Russo, Aniello; Coelho, Emanuel

    2017-04-01

    During the LOGMEC16 (Long-Term Glider Mission for Environmental Characterization) sea trial carried out in the eastern Ligurian Sea (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea), two oceanographic gliders rated to a maximum depth of 1000m were operating continuously from 3 May to 27 June 2016. When possible, glider tracks were synchronized with the footprints of contemporaneous altimeters (i.e., Jason 2, Altika and Cryosat 2). Temperature and salinity measured by the gliders along the tracks that were co-localized with the altimeter passages, were used to calculate along-track dynamic heights. The latter were then compared with near-real time absolute sea level CMEMS-TAPAS (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service - Tailored Product for Data Assimilation) product. TAPAS provides along-track sea level anomaly (SLA) estimates together with all the terms used in the correction and the associated Mean Dynamic Topography. Where available, the CMEMS near-real time 1km resolution, Aqua-MODIS ocean colour data was also used as a tracer of the main oceanographic features of the region. Comparison between SLA derived from gliders and TAPAS along common transects, indicates that differences increase for larger sampling time lags between platforms and especially when time differences exceed 20 hrs. In fact, contemporaneous ocean color images reveal the presence of several mesoscale/sub-mesoscale structures (i.e., transient meanders and filaments), suggesting that the oceanographic variability of the region is likely the main cause for the differences observed between the glider and altimetry-based SLA. Results from this study provide additional evidence of the advantages on using a networked ocean observing system. In fact, the interpretation of in-situ observations obtained from a continuously operating sampling platform (also during ongoing experiments at sea) can be greatly improved when combined with other operational datasets, as the CMEMS SLA used here.

  19. Statistics of AUV's Missions for Operational Ocean Observation at the South Brazilian Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, F. A.; São Tiago, P. M.; Oliveira, A. L. S. C.; Barmak, R. B.; Miranda, T. C.; Guerra, L. A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The high costs and logistics limitations of ship-based data collection represent an obstacle for a persistent in-situ data collection. Satellite-operated Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV's) or gliders (as these AUV's are generally known by the scientific community) are presented as an inexpensive and reliable alternative to perform long-term and real-time ocean monitoring of important parameters such as temperature, salinity, water-quality and acoustics. This work is focused on the performance statistics and the reliability for continuous operation of a fleet of seven gliders navigating in Santos Basin - Brazil, since March 2013. The gliders performance were evaluated by the number of standby days versus the number of operating days, the number of interrupted missions due to (1) equipment failure, (2) weather, (3) accident versus the number of successful missions and the amount and quality of data collected. From the start of the operations in March 2013 to the preparation of this work (July 2015), a total of 16 glider missions were accomplished, operating during 728 of the 729 days passed since then. From this total, 11 missions were successful, 3 missions were interrupted due to equipment failure and 2 gliders were lost. Most of the identified issues were observed in the communication with the glider (when recovery was necessary) or the optode sensors (when remote settings solved the problem). The average duration of a successful mission was 103 days while interrupted ones ended on average in 7 days. The longest mission lasted for 139 days, performing 859 continuous profiles and covering a distance of 2734 Km. The 2 projects performed together 6856 dives, providing an average of 9,5 profiles per day or one profile every 2,5 hours each day during 2 consecutive years.

  20. Assessing the sampling strategy in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, Félix; Testor, Pierre; Bosse, Anthony; Heslop, Emma; L'Hévéder, Blandine; Arsouze, Thomas; Houpert, Loic; Mortier, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    The deployment of numerous autonomous platforms (gliders, argo floats, moorings) added to the repeated ship cruises in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea account for a considerable data coverage of the area through the past 10 years. In this study, we analyse the in-situ observations' ability to assess for the changes in the Northwester Mediterranean basin water masses properties over time. Comparing the observed time series for the different regions and different water masses to that of a glider simulator in the NEMO-Med12 model, we estimate both the quality of the model and the skill of the in-situ observations in reproducing the evolution of the basin properties.

  1. SJP0704Pg001ED

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Page 1 ... landing on the coast of Normandy was celebrated on 6 June. 2004. In a moving multinational ceremony at Arromanches we were reminded of the valour, courage and gallantry of the young men ... past glider 2 on landing, hit a hump and broke in two, its wooden fuselage shattered. It was now just after midnight.

  2. Safety First: Safety--The Elementary Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Activities involving the construction of a model solar oven, soda bottle rocket, catapult, bridge, roller coaster, playground, and plane glider all have one thing in common. They are examples of STEM project activities for elementary students. STEM is one of the areas of emphasis in the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS), which…

  3. 75 FR 5203 - Certification of Aircraft and Airmen for the Operation of Light-Sport Aircraft; Modifications to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... training courses approved under part 141. 22. Revise the minimum safe-altitude requirements for powered... that glider pilots are permitted to fly at that altitude. One commenter suggested that training in the... pilots receive training in reduced aircraft performance at high-density altitudes and in the effect of...

  4. The Challenges of Adopting Mission Command Philosophy in the Armenian Armed Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    invited to watch a soccer match in Armenia, which initiated the new process named “ football diplomacy.” However, the Grand National Assembly of Turkey...Maier (section 2) were on the gliders that had to conduct emergency landings far from the objective. The unit was without two important leaders for the

  5. Dynamical Characterization of a Low Oxygen Submesoscale Coherent Vortex in the Eastern North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, A.; Karstensen, J.

    2018-03-01

    A submesoscale coherent vortex (SCV) with a low oxygen core is characterized from underwater glider and mooring observations from the eastern tropical North Atlantic, north of the Cape Verde Islands. The eddy crossed the mooring with its center and a 1 month time series of the SCV's hydrographic and upper 100 m currents structure was obtained. About 45 days after, and ˜100 km west, the SCV frontal zone was surveyed in high temporal and spatial resolution using an underwater glider. Satellite altimetry showed the SCV was formed about 7 months before at the Mauritanian coast. The SCV was located at 80-100 m depth, its diameter was ˜100 km and its maximum swirl velocity ˜0.4 m s-1. A Burger number of 0.2 and a vortex Rossby number 0.15 indicate a flat lens in geostrophic balance. Mooring and glider data show in general comparable dynamical and thermohaline structures, the glider in high spatial resolution, the mooring in high temporal resolution. Surface maps of chlorophyll concentration suggest high productivity inside and around the SCV. The low potential vorticity (PV) core of the SCV is surrounded by filamentary structures, sloping down at different angles from the mixed layer base and with typical width of 10-20 km and a vertical extent of 50-100 m.

  6. Lagrangian coherent structure assisted path planning for transoceanic autonomous underwater vehicle missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A G; García-Garrido, V J; Mancho, A M; Wiggins, S; Coca, J; Glenn, S; Schofield, O; Kohut, J; Aragon, D; Kerfoot, J; Haskins, T; Miles, T; Haldeman, C; Strandskov, N; Allsup, B; Jones, C; Shapiro, J

    2018-03-15

    Transoceanic Gliders are Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) for which there is a developing and expanding range of applications in open-seas research, technology and underwater clean transport. Mature glider autonomy, operating depth (0-1000 meters) and low energy consumption without a CO 2 footprint enable evolutionary access across ocean basins. Pursuant to the first successful transatlantic glider crossing in December 2009, the Challenger Mission has opened the door to long-term, long-distance routine transoceanic AUV missions. These vehicles, which glide through the water column between 0 and 1000 meters depth, are highly sensitive to the ocean current field. Consequently, it is essential to exploit the complex space-time structure of the ocean current field in order to plan a path that optimizes scientific payoff and navigation efficiency. This letter demonstrates the capability of dynamical system theory for achieving this goal by realizing the real-time navigation strategy for the transoceanic AUV named Silbo, which is a Slocum deep-glider (0-1000 m), that crossed the North Atlantic from April 2016 to March 2017. Path planning in real time based on this approach has facilitated an impressive speed up of the AUV to unprecedented velocities resulting in major battery savings on the mission, offering the potential for routine transoceanic long duration missions.

  7. 76 FR 8281 - Amendment to Class B Airspace; Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... comments received and the FAA's responses are contained in the ``Discussion of Comments'' section below... further west to remain clear should they decide not to contact the Cleveland Terminal Radar Approach... MSL, the FAA believes impacts to local area or cross-country glider flight operation at 67D will be...

  8. Design and Performance Evaluation Study of a Prototype of a Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    balsa wood and the winglets were made of 1/32” aircraft ply. 3. Components and Loading The prototype was first tested for its aerodynamic ...14 IV. AERODYNAMICS STUDIES..................................................................................17 A. BASIC... AERODYNAMICS FOR GLIDERS ..............................................17 B. SIMULATION USING ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES ..........................18 1

  9. Physical and biological characteristics of the winter-summer transition in the Central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zarokanellos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Sofianos, Sarantis. S.; Jones, Burton

    2017-01-01

    of the CRS. Ship-based and glider observations in the CRS between March and June 2013 capture key features of the transition from winter to summer and depict the impact of the eddy activity on the EBC flow. Less saline and relatively warmer water of Indian

  10. 14 CFR 91.213 - Inoperative instruments and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... specific operations by this part. (c) A person authorized to use an approved Minimum Equipment List issued... a master minimum equipment list has not been developed; or (ii) Small rotorcraft, nonturbine-powered small airplane, glider, or lighter-than-air aircraft for which a Master Minimum Equipment List has been...

  11. Model of multicomponent micro-Doppler signal in environment MatLab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucheryavenko Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article illustrates the problem of measuring the speed glider component targets in the presence of a turboprop effect of the reflected signal in a pulse-Doppler radar, proposed a model turboprop signal component and an algorithm for its suppression

  12. Probing Earth’s conductivity structure beneath oceans by scalar geomagnetic data: autonomous surface vehicle solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvshinov, Alexey; Matzka, Jürgen; Poedjono, Benny

    2016-01-01

    to the conductivity structure beneath the ocean. We conclude that the sensitivity, depending on the bathymetry gradient, is typically largest near the coast offshore. We show that such sea-surface marine induction surveys can be performed with the Wave Glider, an easy-to-deploy, autonomous, energy-harvesting floating...

  13. Descriptive and analytical epidemiology of accidents in five categories of sport aviation aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, R.R.A.; de Voogt, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports and compares causes of, and factors contributing to, 2,118 documented accidents of sport aviation represented by diverse aircraft types including balloons and blimps, gliders, gyroplanes, and ultralights. For the 26-year period, accidents were aircraft-specific regarding

  14. Evolution of physical and biological characteristics of mesoscale eddy in north-central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zarokanellos, Nikolaos; Jones, Burton

    2015-01-01

    -central Red Sea (NCRS) where anticyclonic eddies have been observed. The study began with a ship-based characterization of the eddy and was followed by a three-month observational time series using an autonomous glider equipped with a CTD, oxygen sensor

  15. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 141 - Commercial Pilot Certification Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) For a lighter-than-air balloon course: Two solo flights if the course is for a hot air balloon rating...-lift. (f) Glider. (g) Lighter-than-air airship. (h) Lighter-than-air balloon. 2. Eligibility for... lighter-than-air category with a balloon class rating. (b) Ground training must include the following...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix I to Part 141 - Additional Aircraft Category and/or Class Rating Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... lighter-than-air category and a hot air balloon class rating. (1) For the private pilot certificate, the... lighter-than-air additional hot air balloon class rating. (1) For the private pilot certificate, the...-lift. (f) Glider. (g) Lighter-than-air airship. (h) Lighter-than-air balloon. 2. Eligibility for...

  17. Dynamic partitioning and coverage control with asynchronous one-to-base-station communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, Rushabh; Frasca, Paolo; Durham, Joseph W.; Carli, Ruggero; Bullo, Francesco

    We propose algorithms to automatically deploy a group of mobile robots and provide coverage of a non-convex environment with communication limitations. In settings such as hilly terrain or for underwater ocean gliders, peer-to-peer communication can be impossible and frequent communication to a

  18. Cyclic fatigue resistances of several nickel-titanium glide path rotary and reciprocating instruments at body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, K; Uslu, G; Gündoğar, M; Özyürek, T; Grande, N M; Plotino, G

    2018-01-31

    To compare the cyclic fatigue resistance of the One G, ProGlider, HyFlex EDM and R-Pilot glide path NiTi files at body temperature. Twenty One G (size 14, .03 taper), 20 ProGlider (size 16, .02 taper), 20 HyFlex EDM (size 10, .05 taper) and 20 R-Pilot (size 12.5, .04 taper) instruments were operated in rotation at 300 rpm (One G, ProGlider and HyFlex) or in reciprocation (R-Pilot) at 35 °C in artificial canals that were manufactured by reproducing the size and taper of the instrument until fracture occurred. The time to fracture was recorded in seconds using a digital chronometer, and the length of the fractured fragments was registered. Mean data were analysed statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc Tukey tests via SPSS 21.0 software. The statistical significance level was set at 5%. The cyclic fatigue resistance of the R-Pilot files was significantly greater than the other instruments, and the One G was significantly lower (P EDM and the ProGlider (P > 0.05). No significant difference (P > 0.05) was evident in the mean length of the fractured fragments of the various instruments. The cyclic fatigue resistance of the R-Pilot reciprocating glide path file was significantly greater than that of the rotary HyFlex EDM, ProGlider and One G glide path files. © 2018 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Developments in Acoustic Navigation and Communication for High-Latitude Ocean Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobat, J.; Lee, C.

    2006-12-01

    Developments in autonomous platforms (profiling floats, drifters, long-range gliders and propeller-driven vehicles) offer the possibility of unprecedented access to logistically difficult polar regions that challenge conventional techniques. Currently, however, navigation and telemetry for these platforms rely on satellite positioning and communications poorly suited for high-latitude applications where ice cover restricts access to the sea surface. A similar infrastructure offering basin-wide acoustic geolocation and telemetry would allow the community to employ autonomous platforms to address previously intractable problems in Arctic oceanography. Two recent efforts toward the development of such an infrastructure are reported here. As part of an observational array monitoring fluxes through Davis Strait, development of real-time RAFOS acoustic navigation for gliders has been ongoing since autumn 2004. To date, test deployments have been conducted in a 260 Hz field in the Pacific and 780 Hz fields off Norway and in Davis Strait. Real-time navigation accuracy of ~1~km is achievable. Autonomously navigating gliders will operate under ice cover beginning in autumn 2006. In addition to glider navigation development, the Davis Strait array moorings carry fixed RAFOS recorders to study propagation over a range of distances under seasonally varying ice cover. Results from the under-ice propagation and glider navigation experiments are presented. Motivated by the need to coordinate these types of development efforts, an international group of acousticians, autonomous platform developers, high-latitude oceanographers and marine mammal researchers gathered in Seattle, U.S.A. from 27 February -- 1 March 2006 for an NSF Office of Polar Programs sponsored Acoustic Navigation and Communication for High-latitude Ocean Research (ANCHOR) workshop. Workshop participants focused on summarizing the current state of knowledge concerning Arctic acoustics, navigation and communications

  20. Micro-CT evaluation of several glide path techniques and ProTaper Next shaping outcomes in maxillary first molar curved canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alovisi, M; Cemenasco, A; Mancini, L; Paolino, D; Scotti, N; Bianchi, C C; Pasqualini, D

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the ability of ProGlider instruments, PathFiles and K-files to maintain canal anatomy during glide path preparation using X-ray computed micro-tomography (micro-CT). Forty-five extracted maxillary first permanent molars were selected. Mesio-buccal canals were randomly assigned (n = 15) to manual K-file, PathFile or ProGlider groups for glide path preparation. Irrigation was achieved with 5% NaOCl and 10% EDTA. After glide path preparation, each canal was shaped with ProTaper Next X1 and X2 to working length. Specimens were scanned (isotropic voxel size 9.1 μm) for matching volumes and surface areas and post-treatment analyses. Canal volume, surface area, centroid shift, canal geometry variation through ratio of diameter ratios and ratio of cross-sectional areas were assessed in the apical and coronal levels and at the point of maximum canal curvature. One-way factorial anovas were used to evaluate the significance of instrument in the various canal regions. Post-glide path analysis revealed that instrument factor was significant at the apical level for both the ratio of diameter ratios and the ratio of cross-sectional areas (P flare the root canal compared with K-file and PathFile. PathFile and ProGlider demonstrated a significantly lower centroid shift compared with K-file at the apical level (P = 0.023). Post-shaping analysis demonstrated a more centred preparation of ProGlider, compared with PathFile and K-files, with no significant differences for other parameters. Use of ProGlider instruments led to less canal transportation than PathFiles and K-files. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Near-Real-Time Acoustic Monitoring of Beaked Whales and Other Cetaceans Using a Seaglider™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K.; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M.; Luby, James C.; Jump, William A.; Shilling, Geoffrey B.; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S.; Schorr, Gregory S.; Baird, Robin W.

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle – a glider – equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  2. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Klinck

    Full Text Available In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical

  3. Validation of Sentinel-3A altimetry data by using in-situ multi-platform observations near Mallorca Island (western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Román, Antonio; Heslop, Emma; Reeve, Krissy; Rodriguez, Daniel; Pujol, Isabelle; Faugère, Yannice; Torner, Marc; Tintoré, Joaquín; Pascual, Ananda

    2017-04-01

    In the frame of the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) Sea Level Thematic Assembly Center (SL-TAC), a glider mission was undertaken between May and June 2016 along the same track as the overpass of the Sentinel 3A satellite in the Southern Mallorca region. Moreover, a one-day ship mission on May 30, synchronous with the overpass of the satellite, captured two transects of moving vessel ADCP close to the coastal area. The aim was to compare the along track altimeter products and multi-platform in-situ observations in the southern coastal zone of the Mallorca Island and the Algerian Basin. In addition, we explored the potential of the Synthetic Aperture Radar Mode (SARM) instrumentation of Sentinel-3 mission, which enables the satellite to measure nearest the coasts with both higher spatial resolution and higher precision than previous missions. With the ultimate goal of contributing to a more complete understanding of both ocean and coastal physical processes and the biogeochemical impacts. The analyses presented here are conducted through the comparison of Absolute Dynamic Topography (ADT) obtained from the Sentinel-3A altimetry measurements along ground-track #713 and Dynamic Height (DH) derived from temperature and salinity profiles measured by the glider along the trajectory followed by the satellite. Moreover, currents derived from altimetry and in-situ glider data along the track followed by the satellite; and from ADCP data collected in the coastal region are analysed. Results show a good agreement between ADT from altimetry and DH from glider data with maximum differences of around 2 cm that promote a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1 cm, the correlation coefficient between both datasets is 0.89. The satellite data closely resemble the geostrophic velocity pattern observed by the glider measurements along the Algerian Current, and also the ADCP data in the coastal zone, exhibiting a RMSE lower than 10 cm/s and a correlation coefficient

  4. Deep drivers of mesoscale circulation in the central Rockall Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, T. J.; Alyenik, D.; Dumont, E.; Inall, M.

    2014-11-01

    Mesoscale variability in the central Rockall Trough between about 56 and 58° N has been investigated using a combination of ship-borne, underwater glider and gridded satellite altimeter measurements. Altimeter observations show that mesoscale features such as eddies and large scale circulation cells are ubiquitous phenomena. They have horizontal length scales of order 100 km with vertical scales of over 1000 m and are associated with mean current speeds (over the upper 1000 m) of 15 ± 7 cm s-1. Monthly area averaged surface Eddy Kinetic Energy (EKE) has substantial inter-annual variability, which at times can dominate a mean seasonal signal that varies from a maximum in May (74 cm2 s-2) to a minimum in October (52 cm2 s-2) and has increased gradually since 1992 at about 1.1 cm2 s-2 per year. A five month glider mission in the Trough showed that much of this energy comes from features that are located over 1000 m below the surface in the deep cold waters of the Trough (possibly from eddies associated the North Atlantic Current). The surface currents from altimeters had similar magnitude to the drift currents averaged over 1000 m from the glider in the stratified autumn, but were half the deep water speed during late winter. Although the mesoscale features move in an apparent random manner they may also be quasi-trapped by submarine topography such as seamounts. Occasionally anti-cyclonic and cyclonic cells combine to cause a coherent westward deflection of the European slope current that warms the Rockall side of the Trough. Such deflections contribute to the inter-annual variability in the observed temperature and salinity that are monitored in the upper 800 m of the Trough. By combining glider and altimeter measurements it is shown that altimeter measurements fail to observe a 15 cm s-1 northward flowing slope current on the eastern side and a small persistent southward current on the western side. There is much to be gained from the synergy between satellite

  5. In-flight investigations of the unsteady behaviour of the boundary layer with infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Mariusz; Smusz, Robert; de Groot, Klaus; Meyer, Joerg; Kucaba-Pietal, Anna; Rzucidlo, Pawel

    2017-04-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) has been well established in wind tunnel and flight tests for the last decade. Former applications of IRT were focused, in nearly all cases, on steady measurements. In the last years, requirements of unsteady IRT measurements (up to 10 Hz) have been formulated, but the problem of a very slow thermal response of common materials of wind tunnel models or airplane components has to be overcome by finding a surface modification with a fast thermal response (low heat capacity, low thermal conductivity and high thermal diffusivity). Therefore, lab investigations of potential material combinations and flight tests with a ‘low cost’ aircraft, i.e. a glider with a modified wing surface, were conducted. In order to induce unsteady conditions (rapid change of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition), special maneuvers of a glider during IRT measurements were performed.

  6. Cooperative Position Aware Mobility Pattern of AUVs for Avoiding Void Zones in Underwater WSNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Nadeem; Ejaz, Mudassir; Abdul, Wadood; Alamri, Atif; Almogren, Ahmad; Niaz, Iftikhar Azim; Guizani, Nadra

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose two schemes; position-aware mobility pattern (PAMP) and cooperative PAMP (Co PAMP). The first one is an optimization scheme that avoids void hole occurrence and minimizes the uncertainty in the position estimation of glider’s. The second one is a cooperative routing scheme that reduces the packet drop ratio by using the relay cooperation. Both techniques use gliders that stay at sojourn positions for a predefined time, at sojourn position self-confidence (s-confidence) and neighbor-confidence (n-confidence) regions that are estimated for balanced energy consumption. The transmission power of a glider is adjusted according to those confidence regions. Simulation results show that our proposed schemes outperform the compared existing one in terms of packet delivery ratio, void zones and energy consumption. PMID:28335377

  7. In-flight investigations of the unsteady behaviour of the boundary layer with infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szewczyk, Mariusz; Smusz, Robert; Kucaba-Pietal, Anna; Rzucidlo, Pawel; De Groot, Klaus; Meyer, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) has been well established in wind tunnel and flight tests for the last decade. Former applications of IRT were focused, in nearly all cases, on steady measurements. In the last years, requirements of unsteady IRT measurements (up to 10 Hz) have been formulated, but the problem of a very slow thermal response of common materials of wind tunnel models or airplane components has to be overcome by finding a surface modification with a fast thermal response (low heat capacity, low thermal conductivity and high thermal diffusivity). Therefore, lab investigations of potential material combinations and flight tests with a ‘low cost’ aircraft, i.e. a glider with a modified wing surface, were conducted. In order to induce unsteady conditions (rapid change of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition), special maneuvers of a glider during IRT measurements were performed. (paper)

  8. Azure Dynamics transit connect : EV2010VE : upfitting to a battery electric vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldham, B. [Azure Dynamics Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Transit Connect is a delivery vehicle brought to North America in 2010 that was initially released in Europe as part of Ford's global platform program. The stock layout includes the front engine; front wheel drive; fuel tank in rear; gasoline in North America; and diesel in Europe. This presentation described what Azure Dynamics Corporation did to improve the engine, transmission, energy storage, power steering, air conditioning, and generator. An overview of Transit Connect was provided. The presentation discussed design consideration, with particular reference to crash worthiness; durability; and total cost of implementation. Electrical harness and the total cost of implementation were also addressed. Other topics that were presented included the glider based design; a glider based design commonized platform; and additional design features. tabs., figs.

  9. Cooperative Position Aware Mobility Pattern of AUVs for Avoiding Void Zones in Underwater WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Javaid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose two schemes; position-aware mobility pattern (PAMP and cooperative PAMP (Co PAMP. The first one is an optimization scheme that avoids void hole occurrence and minimizes the uncertainty in the position estimation of glider’s. The second one is a cooperative routing scheme that reduces the packet drop ratio by using the relay cooperation. Both techniques use gliders that stay at sojourn positions for a predefined time, at sojourn position self-confidence (s-confidence and neighbor-confidence (n-confidence regions that are estimated for balanced energy consumption. The transmission power of a glider is adjusted according to those confidence regions. Simulation results show that our proposed schemes outperform the compared existing one in terms of packet delivery ratio, void zones and energy consumption.

  10. Physical Controls on Oxygen Distribution and Denitrification Potential in the North West Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queste, Bastien Y.; Vic, Clément; Heywood, Karen J.; Piontkovski, Sergey A.

    2018-05-01

    At suboxic oxygen concentrations, key biogeochemical cycles change and denitrification becomes the dominant remineralization pathway. Earth system models predict oxygen loss across most ocean basins in the next century; oxygen minimum zones near suboxia may become suboxic and therefore denitrifying. Using an ocean glider survey and historical data, we show oxygen loss in the Gulf of Oman (from 6-12 to water across the Gulf of Oman and waters exported to the wider Arabian Sea.

  11. CSIR in aerospace: An engine for future industrial growth

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Kavendra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available for industry impact 3 A brief summary of previous and current activities in SA aerospace Argos-II Airborne Observation System SumbandilaSat Satellite 4 RAVIN Light Aircraft JS1 Championship Glider Sling Light Sport Aircraft AIRBUS SUPPLIER... BOEING SUPPLIER SAAB Light Fighter Aircraft Airbus Military Transport Agusta Military Helicopter A brief summary of previous and current activities in SA aerospace A-Darter Short Range Air to Air Missile 5 Test flight centre Alkantpan...

  12. Business Case Analysis of the Towed Gilder Air Launched System (TGALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Darryl W.; Nguyen, McLinton B.; Seibold, Robert W.; Wong, Frank C.; Budd, Gerald D.

    2017-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation developed an integrated Business Case Analysis (BCA) model on behalf of the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC). This model evaluated the potential profitability of the Towed Glider Air Launched System (TGALS) concept, under development at AFRC, identifying potential technical, programmatic, and business decisions that could improve its business viability. The model addressed system performance metrics; development, production and operation cost estimates; market size and product service positioning; pricing alternatives; and market share.

  13. Chemical exposure among professional ski waxers--characterization of individual work operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freberg, Baard Ingegerdsson; Olsen, Raymond; Thorud, Syvert; Ellingsen, Dag G; Daae, Hanne Line; Hersson, Merete; Molander, Paal

    2013-04-01

    Preparation of skis prior to skiing competitions involves several individual work operations and the use of a wide variety of chemically based ski waxing products to improve the performance of the skis, including products used after skiing for wax removal and ski sole cleaning. Modern ski waxes consist mainly of petroleum-derived straight-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, perfluoro-n-alkanes or polyfluorinated n-alkanes. The wax cleaning products contain solvents such as neat aliphatic hydrocarbons (aliphates) or a mixture with limonene. Different ski waxing work operations can result in contaminated workroom atmospheres. The aim of this study was to assess the chemical exposures related to the individual ski waxing work operations by investigating the specific work operations in controlled model experiments. Four main work operations with potential exposures were identified: (i) application of glider waxes, (ii) scraping and brushing of applied glider waxes, (iii) application of base/grip waxes, and (iv) ski sole cleaning. Aerosol particle masses were sampled using conical samplers equipped with 37-mm PVC, 5-µm pore size filters and cyclones equipped with 37-mm PVC, 0.8-µm pore size filters for the inhalable and the respirable aerosol mass fractions, respectively. For measurements of particle number concentrations, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer was used. Mean aerosol particle mass concentrations of 18.6 mg m(-3) and 32.2 mg m(-3) were measured during application of glider wax powders in the respirable and in the inhalable aerosol mass fractions, respectively. Particle number concentration of ~900 000 particles cm(-3) was measured during application of glider wax powder products. Ski sole cleaning with products containing aliphates displayed solvent air concentrations up to 62.5 p.p.m. This study shows that the potential exposure to generated particles during ski waxing and ski preparation is considerable, especially during work using glide wax powders.

  14. The Effects of Sediment Properties on Low Frequency Acoustic Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    boring 5 locations (BH-15 and BH-8). We used three different correlation relationships to convert the reported N -values from the borings to a...to converge to the correct result. Adjoint inversions were performed in this study using synthetic acoustic data created using glider based sound...shear speed values estimated from the SPT blow counts (using three different methods) contained in boring log BH-15. Right panel shows the

  15. Remarks on building of low-powered airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsdorff, Werner V

    1924-01-01

    If the low-powered airplane is to be used advantageously by private individuals, the most important consideration is a smaller fuel consumption and, hence, a lower engine power. From experiments with gliders, it appears entirely possible, by utilizing ascending winds (on the weather side of mountains and those generated by the heat of the sun) and by employing engine flight intermittently, as required to fly long distances over land.

  16. Physics experiments with Nintendo Wii controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Martyn D.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of the use of Nintendo Wii game controllers in physics demonstrations. The main features of the controller relevant to physics are outlined and the procedure for communicating with a PC is described. A piece of software written by the author is applied to gathering data from a controller suspended from a spring undergoing simple harmonic motion, a pair of controllers mounted on colliding gliders on a linear air track, and a person jumping from a balance board.

  17. Traian Vuia – the Romanian inventor who first flew a powered airplane in 1906

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu FILIMON

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As observed the beginning of heavier than air devices started with Wright Brothers who flew in 1903 the first catapulted airplane equipped with an engine, similar to present motor gliders. In March 1906 took place the first flight of Vuia’s monoplane using on board installations. Since then a real competition between manufacturers has started to improve their airplanes as they become more efficient. Traian Vuia’s first flights and his beginnings are explained below.

  18. Proceedings of the AIAA/FAA Joint Symposium on General Aviation Systems Held in Wichita, Kansas on 16-17 March 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    include Glob Hirth and Limbach, both of Germany. These engines have also found application in motor gliders certified under JAR 22. The Limbach...the Mazda rotary. There are belt, chain, and gear reduction offerings with various torsional damping schemes included. These modifiers will work on an...aviation singles. Norton Motors in England, most famous for motorcycles, has developed a 300 cc. per rotor two rotor liquid cooled rotary engine. It is

  19. Learning to Fly: The Wright Brothers' Adventure. A Guide for Educators and Students with Activities in Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, R.; Benson, T.; Galica, C.; McCredie, P.

    2003-01-01

    This guide was produced by the NASA Glenn Research Center Office of Educational Programs in Cleveland, OH, and the NASA Aerospace Educational Coordinating Committee. It includes activity modules for students, including the history of the Wright Brothers and their family in Dayton, Ohio and flight experimentation in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Student activities such as building models of the Wright Brothers glider and writing press releases of the initial flight are included.

  20. Towards an Autonomous Space In-Situ Marine Sensorweb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S.; Doubleday, J.; Tran, D.; Thompson, D.; Mahoney, G.; Chao, Y.; Castano, R.; Ryan, J.; Kudela, R.; Palacios, S.; hide

    2009-01-01

    We describe ongoing efforts to integrate and coordinate space and marine assets to enable autonomous response to dynamic ocean phenomena such as algal blooms, eddies, and currents. Thus far we have focused on the use of remote sensing assets (e.g. satellites) but future plans include expansions to use a range of in-situ sensors such as gliders, autonomous underwater vehicles, and buoys/moorings.

  1. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-01-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosi...

  2. The RITMARE Ocean Observing System for the Italian Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crise, A.

    2016-02-01

    Among its objectives, the Italian RITMARE Flagship Programme has the aim to produce a prototype of the RITMARE Ocean observing system explicitelly designed to provide a powerful infrastructure to the Italian marine science community, to help implement national and Europen environmental regulations and to contribute to the future European Ocean Observing System. The projects takes advantage of the existing platforms (fixed-point moorings, HF and X-band radars, gliders, satellite products), that constitute the basic components of the system. The structure of the RITMARE Ocean observing system is composed by a permanent component (mooring network, satellite images, HF radars) and relocatable component (gliders, drifters, relocatable infrastructures). The increasing number of available relocatable/expandable platforms allow a much larger flexibility in term of allocation of observations but requires an sampling strategy the can be modified according the scientific and socio-economic priorities. As an example, RITMARE focus is set on an experiment on the South Adriatic Pit convective area and its dynamic interactions with the adjacent Bari Canyon cascading site. (Central Mediterranean Sea). Additional effort is paid to support innovation for sensors (e.g. ship-borne LIDAR, stereo-optic directional wave detection, X-band radar innovative products), operational employment of gliders (e.g. Wave Glider) and new class of operational models. The integration can be obtained at different level: the is expected to be achieved at ICT level by defining standard interfaces (NedCDF, SOS) and catalogs in order to facilitate the discovery, viewing and downloading services of data and products. The implementation of a distributed platform-oriented RT repositories adopt a number of THREDDS web servers that act as endpoints for the RITMARE portal. The final aim is to decouple the platforms from the observations, moving from a set of observation to a suite of Essential Ocean Variables by

  3. Strategy for sustainability of the Joint European Research Infrastructure Network for Coastal Observatories - JERICO

    OpenAIRE

    Puillat, Ingrid; Farcy, Patrick; Durand, Dominique; Petihakis, George; Morin, Pascal; Kriegger, Magali; Petersen, Wilhelm; Tintoré, Joaquin; Sorensen, Kai; Sparnocchia, Stefania; Wehde, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The JERICO European research infrastructure (RI) is integrating several platform types i.e. fixed buoys, piles, moorings, drifters, Ferryboxes, gliders, HF radars, coastal cable observatories and the associated technologies dedicated to the observation and monitoring of the European coastal seas. The infrastructure is to serve both the implementation of European marine policies and the elucidation of key scientific questions through dedicated observation and monitoring plans. It includes obse...

  4. Når retsstaten bliver lykkeobjekt, bliver boligpolitikkens racisme usynlig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissenbakker, Mons; Myong, Lene

    2018-01-01

    Regeringens plan om at ’nedbryde’ bestemte boligområder er heldigvis blevet mødt med kritik og modstand. En del af kritikken har rammesat retsstaten som lovpakkens egentlige offer, men hvilke perspektiver glider i baggrunden, når kritikken samler sig om retsstaten som lykkeobjekt? Lovpakken sætte...... endnu engang strukturel racisme og statssanktioneret vold på den politiske dagsorden....

  5. Hydrodynamic characteristics in the Levantine Basin in autumn 2016 - The CINEL experiment (CIrculation and water mass properties in the North-Eastern Levantine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Elena; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Gerin, Riccardo; Hayes, Dan; Gildor, Hezi; Kokkini, Zoi

    2017-04-01

    During the CINEL experiment, currents and thermohaline properties of the water masses in the eastern areas of the Levantine Basin (Mediterranean Sea) were monitored with mobile autonomous systems in October-December 2016. Two gliders were operated together with satellite-tracked drifters and Argo floats to study the complex circulation features governing the dynamics near the coast and in the open sea. Strong mesoscale and sub-basin scale eddies were detected and were crossed several times by the gliders during the experiment. The physical and biogeochemical parameters were sampled, showing peculiar characteristics in some of the mesoscale features and a probable interaction with a persistent coastal current off Israel. The in-situ observations were interpreted in concert with the distribution of tracers (sea surface temperature, chlorophyll) and altimetry data obtained from satellites. Numerical simulations with a high resolution model in which deep profiles of temperature and salinity from gliders were assimilated, were used in near-real time to fine tune the observational array and to help with the interpretation of the local dynamics.

  6. Update on GPS-Acoustics Measurements on the Continental Slope of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    Land-based GPS measurements suggest the megathrust is locked offshore along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. However, land-based data alone lack geometric resolution to constrain the how the slip is distributed. GPS-Acoustic measurements can provide these constraints, but using traditional GPS-Acoustic approaches employing a ship is costly. Wave Gliders, a wave- and solar-powered, remotely-piloted sea surface platform, provide a low cost method for collecting GPS-A data. We have adapted GPS-Acoustic technology to the Wave Glider and in 2016 began annual measurements at three sites in the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ). Here, we review positioning results collected during summer 2017 at two sites on the continental slope of the Cascadia Subduction Zone: One site is approximately 45 NM offshore central Oregon and the other approximately 50 NM offshore central Washington State. A third site is approximately 90 NM offshore central Oregon on the incoming Juan de Fuca plate. We will report on initial results of the GPS-A data collection and operational experiences of the missions in 2016 and 2017. Wave Glider based GPS-A measurement have the potential to significantly increase the number and frequency of measurements of strain accumulation in Cascadia Subduction Zone and elsewhere.

  7. A maritime decision support system to assess risk in the presence of environmental uncertainties: the REP10 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Raffaele; Cococcioni, Marco; Mourre, Baptiste; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Rixen, Michel

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work is to report on an activity carried out during the 2010 Recognized Environmental Picture experiment, held in the Ligurian Sea during summer 2010. The activity was the first at-sea test of the recently developed decision support system (DSS) for operation planning, which had previously been tested in an artificial experiment. The DSS assesses the impact of both environmental conditions (meteorological and oceanographic) and non-environmental conditions (such as traffic density maps) on people and assets involved in the operation and helps in deciding a course of action that allows safer operation. More precisely, the environmental variables (such as wind speed, current speed and significant wave height) taken as input by the DSS are the ones forecasted by a super-ensemble model, which fuses the forecasts provided by multiple forecasting centres. The uncertainties associated with the DSS's inputs (generally due to disagreement between forecasts) are propagated through the DSS's output by using the unscented transform. In this way, the system is not only able to provide a traffic light map ( run/ not run the operation), but also to specify the confidence level associated with each action. This feature was tested on a particular type of operation with underwater gliders: the glider surfacing for data transmission. It is also shown how the availability of a glider path prediction tool provides surfacing options along the predicted path. The applicability to different operations is demonstrated by applying the same system to support diver operations.

  8. Ocean Observing Public-Private Collaboration to Improve Tropical Storm and Hurricane Predictions in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.; Leung, P.; McCall, W.; Martin, K. M.; Howden, S. D.; Vandermeulen, R. A.; Kim, H. S. S.; Kirkpatrick, B. A.; Watson, S.; Smith, W.

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, Shell partnered with NOAA to explore opportunities for improving storm predictions in the Gulf of Mexico. Since, the collaboration has grown to include partners from Shell, NOAA National Data Buoy Center and National Center for Environmental Information, National Center for Environmental Prediction, University of Southern Mississippi, and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System. The partnership leverages complementary strengths of each collaborator to build a comprehensive and sustainable monitoring and data program to expand observing capacity and protect offshore assets and Gulf communities from storms and hurricanes. The program combines in situ and autonomous platforms with remote sensing and numerical modeling. Here we focus on profiling gliders and the benefits of a public-private partnership model for expanding regional ocean observing capacity. Shallow and deep gliders measure ocean temperature to derive ocean heat content (OHC), along with salinity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence, and CDOM, in the central and eastern Gulf shelf and offshore. Since 2012, gliders have collected 4500+ vertical profiles and surveyed 5000+ nautical miles. Adaptive sampling and mission coordination with NCEP modelers provides specific datasets to assimilate into EMC's coupled HYCOM-HWRF model and 'connect-the-dots' between well-established Eulerian metocean measurements by obtaining (and validating) data between fixed stations (e.g. platform and buoy ADCPs) . Adaptive sampling combined with remote sensing provides satellite-derived OHC validation and the ability to sample productive coastal waters advected offshore by the Loop Current. Tracking coastal waters with remote sensing provides another verification of estimate Loop Current and eddy boundaries, as well as quantifying productivity and analyzing water quality on the Gulf coast, shelf break and offshore. Incorporating gliders demonstrates their value as tools to better protect offshore oil and gas assets

  9. Assessment of the Implementation of GNSS into Gliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Kubáč

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Global navigation satellite systems are increasingly part of our lives and many industries including aviation. Glider flying is no exception in this trend. Global navigation satellite systems were part of gliding since the early 1990s. First as official recording devices for simple evidence of sporting performances, then as navigation systems, anti-collision systems and emergency location transmitters. Development of recording application was initiated and supported by International Gliding Commission of World Air Sports Federation in way of certifications for flight recorders. The use of navigation and other modern instruments in gliders has brought many benefits but also risks. However, the advantages outweigh the disadvantages and these systems are now integral part of gliding. With this wide usage of global navigation satellite systems devices, there is great many possibilities how and in which way one can use these systems. Pilots must orient themselves in varied selection of products, which they can use to choose one solution, that fits him. Therefore, to find out how and if pilots use these devices, we created questionnaire survey among 143 Czech glider pilots. We found out, that 84% of them are using global navigation satellite systems devices for official record of flight and for navigation as well. More than half of pilots is using free, not built-in devices. Most common devices are mobile phones up to 5 inches of screen diagonal in combination with approved flight recorder without display. If pilots use mobile device for navigation, 52% of them is using one with Windows Mobile operating system, 33% use Android. Navigational software on these mobile devices is then almost tied between SeeYou Mobile, XCSoar and LK8000. Knowledge about usage preference of global navigation systems devices should help pilots with selection and overall orientation in subject.

  10. Performance analysis of jump-gliding locomotion for miniature robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, A; Zufferey, Jean-Christohphe; Floreano, Dario; Kovač, M

    2015-03-26

    Recent work suggests that jumping locomotion in combination with a gliding phase can be used as an effective mobility principle in robotics. Compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase, the potential benefits of hybrid jump-gliding locomotion includes the ability to extend the distance travelled and reduce the potentially damaging impact forces upon landing. This publication evaluates the performance of jump-gliding locomotion and provides models for the analysis of the relevant dynamics of flight. It also defines a jump-gliding envelope that encompasses the range that can be achieved with jump-gliding robots and that can be used to evaluate the performance and improvement potential of jump-gliding robots. We present first a planar dynamic model and then a simplified closed form model, which allow for quantification of the distance travelled and the impact energy on landing. In order to validate the prediction of these models, we validate the model with experiments using a novel jump-gliding robot, named the 'EPFL jump-glider'. It has a mass of 16.5 g and is able to perform jumps from elevated positions, perform steered gliding flight, land safely and traverse on the ground by repetitive jumping. The experiments indicate that the developed jump-gliding model fits very well with the measured flight data using the EPFL jump-glider, confirming the benefits of jump-gliding locomotion to mobile robotics. The jump-glide envelope considerations indicate that the EPFL jump-glider, when traversing from a 2 m height, reaches 74.3% of optimal jump-gliding distance compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase which only reaches 33.4% of the optimal jump-gliding distance. Methods of further improving flight performance based on the models and inspiration from biological systems are presented providing mechanical design pathways to future jump-gliding robot designs.

  11. Observational and numerical evidence for ocean frontogenesis inducing submesoscale processes and impacting biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, M.; Ruiz, S.; Pascual, A.; Olita, A.; Mahadevan, A.; Tovar, A.; Troupin, C.; Tintore, J.; Capet, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of ALBOREX, a multi-platform and multi-disciplinary experiment completed in May 2014 as a part of PERSEUS EU funded project. This unique process-oriented experiment in the eastern Alboran Sea (Western Mediterranean) examined mesoscale and submesoscale dynamics at an intense front. The field campaign, conducted during 8 days, included 25 drifters, 2 gliders, 3 Argo floats and one ship (66 CTDs and 500 biochemical samples). The drifters followed coherently an anticyclonic gyre. ADCP data showed consistent patterns with currents up to 1 m/s in the southern part of the domain and Rossby numbers up to 1.5 suggesting significant ageostrophic motion. We show observational evidence for mesoscale frontogenesis produced by the confluence of (fresh) Atlantic Water and the resident (more saline) Mediterranean Water. This confluence resulted in lateral density gradients of the order of 1 kg/m3 in 10 km and associated vertical velocities of about ±20 m/day, diagnosed using the QG Omega equation. However, the vertical velocity is likely underestimated due to unresolved submesoscale processes (<10 km), which are induced by intense mesoscale frontogenesis. In order to assess the role of these submesoscale processes in the frontal vertical transport, a high-resolution Process Ocean Model Study is initialized with hydrographic data (0.5-1 km resolution) from underwater gliders. Numerical results show that observed lateral buoyancy gradients are large enough to trigger submesoscale mixed layer instabilities. The coupling between mesoscale and submesoscale phenomena can explain remarkable subduction events of chlorophyll and oxygen captured by ocean gliders, as well as local increases of primary production.

  12. Globalizing Lessons Learned from Regional-scale Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    The Mid Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) has accumulated a decade of experience designing, building and operating a Regional Coastal Ocean Observing System for the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). MARACOOS serves societal goals and supports scientific discovery at the scale of a Large Marine Ecosystem (LME). Societal themes include maritime safety, ecosystem decision support, coastal inundation, water quality and offshore energy. Scientific results that feed back on societal goals with better products include improved understanding of seasonal transport pathways and their impact on phytoplankton blooms and hypoxia, seasonal evolution of the subsurface Mid Atlantic Cold Pool and its impact on fisheries, biogeochemical transformations in coastal plumes, coastal ocean evolution and impact on hurricane intensities, and storm sediment transport pathways. As the global ocean observing requirements grow to support additional societal needs for information on fisheries and aquaculture, ocean acidification and deoxygenation, water quality and offshore development, global observing will necessarily evolve to include more coastal observations and forecast models at the scale of the world's many LMEs. Here we describe our efforts to share lessons learned between the observatory operators at the regional-scale of the LMEs. Current collaborators are spread across Europe, and also include Korea, Indonesia, Australia, Brazil and South Africa. Specific examples include the development of a world standard QA/QC approach for HF Radar data that will foster the sharing of data between countries, basin-scale underwater glider missions between internationally-distributed glider ports to developed a shared understanding of operations and an ongoing evaluation of the global ocean models in which the regional models for the LME will be nested, and joint training programs to develop the distributed teams of scientists and technicians

  13. Physical and geochemical drivers of CDOM variability near a natural seep site in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, C. R.; Powers, L.; Medeiros, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on the continental shelf and slope can serve as a marker for fresh water influence, indicate the presence of hydrocarbons, and provide important clues about nutrient content and organic matter cycling. Autonomous underwater vehicles such as gliders allow for subsurface measurement of CDOM fluorescence for weeks to months; these time series may be especially valuable in the northern Gulf of Mexico, where CDOM inputs of both terrestrial and oil and gas sources can be significant. Data from a recent glider deployment near a natural seep site (GC600) on the continental slope over 180km from shore suggest simultaneous influence of Mississippi plume water and hydrocarbon inputs in the upper 200m, with variability in fluorescence at a range of vertical and temporal scales. We will explore patterns in spatial and temporal variability of glider-measured hydrography, dissolved oxygen, and bio-optical data (CDOM, chlorophyll-a, backscatter fluorescence), and use their combination to infer a terrigenous and/or fossil fuel source(s). Taking advantage of a combination of satellite sea surface temperature, ocean color, wind, and data from moored and mobile platforms, we will examine physical controls on transport and vertical mixing of CDOM and the potential role of nonlinear mesoscale eddies, which can trap water in their interior and may transport river- or hydrocarbon-derived CDOM over long distances. The combined data set will be used to consider and potentially constrain the effect of photodegradation and other biogeochemical causes for CDOM fluorescence variability in the upper 200m.

  14. Submesoscale cyclones in the Agulhas Current

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available of about 0.6m s�1. Surface currents were considerably stronger, averaging 0.4m s�1 and reaching maximum values of 1.8m s�1. The strongest surface currents were toward the southwest and observed in deep waters, where the gliders approached the AC (Figures 1c..., J. Phys. Oceanogr., 45(9), 2294–2314. Eriksen, C. C., T. J. Osse, R. D. Light, T. Wen, T. W. Lehman, P. L. Sabin, J. W. Ballard, and A. M. Chiodi (2001), Seaglider: A long-range auton- omous underwater vehicle for oceanographic research, IEEE J...

  15. Localizations in cellular automata with mutualistic excitation rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Every cell of two-dimensional cellular automaton with eight-cell neighborhood takes three states: resting, excited and refractory, and updates excited to refractory and refractory to resting states unconditionally. A resting cell excites depending on number of excited and refractory neighbors. We made exhaustive study of spatio-temporal excitation dynamics for all rules of this type and selected several classes of rules. The classes supporting self-localizations are studied in details. We uncover basic types of mobile (gliders) and stationary localizations, and characterize their morphology and dynamics.

  16. United States Army, Seventh Army Field Order No. 1 (ANVIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1944-07-29

    sites in the ARGENS’Valley (See Operat Lone Instruc- tions No.1), bobwcon FREJUS and LE L,U~.. fr.o’! ground-observed enen:y Artillery fire. ,(8) Protcct...1� pcroonncl will be cautioned thnt ,ll:-:criccm and British porn - o chute nnd glider troops will be opcr at tng inland fro,:: the ben ch ea , A...defended. At immediate site there is a light 3-gun battery and a 4-gun c/d battery. 915918 map XXXIII-46 586. Radar coast-watcher. Position: Details

  17. Naval War College Review. Volume 64, Number 2, Spring 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    NBR Analysis (Seattle, Wash.: National Bureau of Asian Research, June 2002); Scobell and Wortzel, eds., China’s Growing Military Power; and Alan D...flat rubber deck—the “carpet”—along which the land- ing aircraft was to skid. Tests with modified gliders dropped onto such a surface showed that a...ill conceived, and so scotched, a scheme by X Corps to employ a unit of the 1st Marine Division for a rubber -raft crossing of the Han River to seize

  18. Assessing Sonar Performance in Realistic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada (Department of National Defence), 2012 c© Sa Majesté la Reine en droit du Canada (Ministère de la Défense... Victoria Class submarine. Q316 included a number of objectives specific to the ASPIRE project. These included demonstrating the use of gliders for the... Victoria Class C3 Optimization’ for the high level architecture for synthetic environment simulations • 20EA05: ‘Support to CMS: Ruggedized Sonar Test

  19. Exploring bird aerodynamics using radio-controlled models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    A series of radio-controlled glider models was constructed by duplicating the aerodynamic shape of soaring birds (raven, turkey vulture, seagull and pelican). Controlled tests were conducted to determine the level of longitudinal and lateral-directional static stability, and to identify the characteristics that allowed flight without a vertical tail. The use of tail-tilt for controlling small bank-angle changes, as observed in soaring birds, was verified. Subsequent tests, using wing-tip ailerons, inferred that birds use a three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing tip (wing tip vortices) to control adverse yaw and to create a small amount of forward thrust in gliding flight.

  20. Design of a bio-inspired controller for dynamic soaring in a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, Renaud; Doncieux, Stéphane; Meyer, Jean-Arcady

    2006-09-01

    This paper is inspired by the way birds such as albatrosses are able to exploit wind gradients at the surface of the ocean for staying aloft for very long periods while minimizing their energy expenditure. The corresponding behaviour has been partially reproduced here via a set of Takagi-Sugeno-Kang fuzzy rules controlling a simulated glider. First, the rules were hand-designed. Then, they were optimized with an evolutionary algorithm that improved their efficiency at coping with challenging conditions. Finally, the robustness properties of the controller generated were assessed with a view to its applicability to a real platform.

  1. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Miscellaneous Exotic Companion Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Angela M; Miwa, Yasutsugu

    2016-09-01

    Unusual mammalian species such as the hedgehog, sugar glider, and miniature pig are encountered with increasing frequency in exotic companion medicine. Disease of the oral cavity can occur in any species; although occasionally encountered in exotic mammalian species, it is rarely described in the literature. Anatomy and dentition vary significantly; diagnosis and treatment are often extrapolated from that known in other species. The best-documented disease of the oral cavity in this group of species is oral neoplasia in the hedgehog. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Luffing of planar sails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper the luffing of an unstiffened, two-dimensional impervious membrane is examined. When a sail boat is close-hauled the sails are required to generate high 'lift' with minimum drag. They therefore operate, as do those on hang-wing gliders, at incidences below the stall. However, unlike solid wings they must also avoid negative incidences for then a sail begins to lose its concave shape, to become S shaped and finally, as the incidence is further reduced, to oscillate, a behaviour known as luffing

  3. The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment II: Autonomous Platforms and Mixed Layer Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Perry, M.; Fennel, K.; Gray, A.; Rehm, E.; Briggs, N.; Sackmann, B. S.; Gudmundsson, K.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment (NAB08) employed a system of drifting floats, mobile gliders and ship-based measurements to resolve patch-scale physical and biological variability over the 3- month course of an entire bloom. Although both autonomous and ship-based elements were essential to achieving NAB08 goals, the autonomous system provided a novel perspective by employing long-range gliders to repeatedly survey the volume surrounding a drifting Lagrangian float, thus characterizing patch- scale bloom evolution. Integration of physical and biogeochemical sensors (temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, light transmission, optical backscatter, spectral light, and nitrate) and development of in situ calibration techniques were required to support this new autonomous approach. Energetic, small-scale eddy activity at the experiment site (southeast of Iceland, near the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and Marine Light Mixed Layer sites) produced a swift, heterogeneous velocity field that challenged the gliders" operational abilities and drove refinements to the piloting techniques used to maintain float-following surveys. Although intentionally deployed outside of energetic eddies, floats and gliders were rapidly entrained into these features. Floats circulated within eddies near the start and end of the experiment, drifting generally northwest, across the basin, in-between. An eddy sampled late in the deployment provided particularly interesting signatures, with elevated biological signals manifest consistently in one quadrant. As measurements were collected in a parcel-following Lagrangian frame, this suggests energetic small-scale exchange process (such as vertical or lateral mixing) paired with fast-acting biological processes capable of modifying the newly entrained water as it navigates its path around the eddy. Despite this energetic kilometer-scale heterogeneity, broadly distributed platforms appeared to

  4. Integrated Study of the Dynamics of the Kuroshio Intrusion and Effects on Acoustic Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-08-03

    strong flow , and then making their way west to reinsert into the boundary flow at 122° 30’ E. Glider data were used to initialize the MIT-MSEAS model for...Office of Naval Research Address (line 1): 875 N Randolph Street City, State , Zip: Arlington, VA 22203-1995 Principal Investigator: Craig M...City, State , Zip: Seattle, WA 98105-6698 Phone Number: 206-685-7656 Fax Number: 206-543-6785 Email: craig@apl.washington.edu Website: https

  5. NASA Armstrong's Approach to Store Separation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuff, Chris; Bui, Trong

    2015-01-01

    Presentation will an overview of NASA Armstrong's store separation capabilities and how they have been applied recently. Objective of the presentation is to brief Generation Orbit and other potential partners on NASA Armstrong's store separation capabilities. It will include discussions on the use of NAVSEP and Cart3D, as well as some Python scripting work to perform the analysis, and a short overview of this methodology applied to the Towed Glider Air Launch System. Collaboration with potential customers in this area could lead to funding for the further development of a store separation capability at NASA Armstrong, which would boost the portfolio of engineering expertise at the center.

  6. Observations of seasonal exchange in the Celtic Sea slope region from underwater gilders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Marie; Inall, Mark; Smeed, David; Palmer, Matthew; Dumont, Estelle; Aleynik, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    Between June 2012 and January 2013, four underwater gliders, profiling to a maximum depth of 1000m, occupied a transect between 47.6°N, 10.3°W and 48.4°N, 9.3°W, perpendicular to the Celtic Sea continental slope. Due to the significant and well-documented internal tide activity in this region and the relatively slow through-water speed of gliders it is first demonstrated that the chosen sampling methodology minimised aliasing of the internal tide. Gliders were flown along a repeat transect and care was taken to ensure that each location was sampled at a different phase of the tide on repeat occupations. Through monthly averaging of the transect data, the effects of the internal tide are minimised and the lower frequency processes made visible. In this presentation we highlight the importance of the lower frequency variability in contributing to cross-slope exchange. Analysis of monthly averaged glider transect data suggests two distinct regimes; 1) Summer, June - October, when the surface water was temperature stratified and, 2) Winter, from October to January, when the seasonal thermocline was mixed down to below the depth of the shelf break (200 m). During the stratified summer months a well-defined shelf break salinity front limits the exchange of water between the ocean and the shelf, preventing the spread of the more saline, sub-surface ocean water (centred at ~150m) onto the shelf. Nevertheless, some cross-slope flow is identified during these months: an intermediate depth salinity minimum (centred at ~600m) is observed to upwell (from 600m to 200-300m) up the slope, sometimes continuing onto the shelf. As the stratification is eroded during the winter months, subsurface upwelling switches to downwelling, and the intermediate depth salinity minimum (~600m) retreats away from the slope region removing it as a potential source of oceanic water on the shelf. Downwelling near to the slope does however allow for an intrusion of the shallower high salinity

  7. Debris extrusion by glide-path establishing endodontic instruments with different geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hong Ha

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Creating the glide-path using nickel-titanium rotary files produced lower amounts of debris extrusion than using manual stainless-steel files. The progressive taper design of ProGlider, the center-off cross-section of One G, and the alternative-pitch design of ScoutRace may have increased the efficiencies of debris removal with minimal extrusion during glide-path preparation. Glide-path preparation using NiTi rotary files have better clinical efficiency than the manual stainless-steel file.

  8. Throttleable GOX/ABS launch assist hybrid rocket motor for small scale air launch platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Zachary S.

    Aircraft-based space-launch platforms allow operational flexibility and offer the potential for significant propellant savings for small-to-medium orbital payloads. The NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center's Towed Glider Air-Launch System (TGALS) is a small-scale flight research project investigating the feasibility for a remotely-piloted, towed, glider system to act as a versatile air launch platform for nano-scale satellites. Removing the crew from the launch vehicle means that the system does not have to be human rated, and offers a potential for considerable cost savings. Utah State University is developing a small throttled launch-assist system for the TGALS platform. This "stage zero" design allows the TGALS platform to achieve the required flight path angle for the launch point, a condition that the TGALS cannot achieve without external propulsion. Throttling is required in order to achieve and sustain the proper launch attitude without structurally overloading the airframe. The hybrid rocket system employs gaseous-oxygen and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) as propellants. This thesis summarizes the development and testing campaign, and presents results from the clean-sheet design through ground-based static fire testing. Development of the closed-loop throttle control system is presented.

  9. BIRD-LIKE HEAD ON A CHAMELEON BODY: NEW SPECIMENS OF THE ENIGMATIC DIAPSID REPTILE MEGALANCOSAURUS FROM THE LATE TRIASSIC OF NORTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIO RENESTO

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new Megalancosaurus specimens collected from the Norian (Late Triassic Calcare di Zorzino (Zorzino Limestone Formation (Bergamo, Lombardy, Northern Italy, and from the coeval Dolomia di Forni (Forni Dolostone Formation (Udine, Friuli, North-eastern Italy improve our knowledge of skeletal anatomy and mode of life of this genus. Morphology of observable skull elements and cervical vertebrae in one of the new specimens shows some resemblance to the possible Triassic bird Protoavis, while the postcranial skeleton of Megalancosaurus is completely non-avian. This may suggest that either Megalancosaurus and Protoavis developed a similar neck structure as a response to the same functional requirement, or that part of the disarticulated material ascribed to Protoavis may indeed belong to a Megalancosaurus-like reptile. Megalancosaurus shows a very high adaptation to arboreal life and a peculiar feeding strategy. Recent suggestions that Megalancosaurus may have been a glider and a possible model for bird ancestry are discussed. Some skeletal features of Megalancosaurus may indeed be interpreted as gliding adaptation, but evidence is weak, and if this reptile was a glider, however, its gliding bauplan should have been completely different from the one usually accepted for bird ancestors, showing instead more morphological similarities with gliding squirrels, phalangeriids and putative ancestors of bats and pterosaurs (according to a non cursorial model for these latter. 

  10. Cyclonic entrainment of preconditioned shelf waters into a frontal eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, J. D.; Macdonald, H.; Baird, M. E.; Humphries, J.; Roughan, M.; Suthers, I. M.

    2015-02-01

    The volume transport of nutrient-rich continental shelf water into a cyclonic frontal eddy (entrainment) was examined from satellite observations, a Slocum glider and numerical simulation outputs. Within the frontal eddy, parcels of water with temperature/salinity signatures of the continental shelf (18-19°C and >35.5, respectively) were recorded. The distribution of patches of shelf water observed within the eddy was consistent with the spiral pattern shown within the numerical simulations. A numerical dye tracer experiment showed that the surface waters (≤50 m depth) of the frontal eddy are almost entirely (≥95%) shelf waters. Particle tracking experiments showed that water was drawn into the eddy from over 4° of latitude (30-34.5°S). Consistent with the glider observations, the modeled particles entrained into the eddy sunk relative to their initial position. Particles released south of 33°S, where the waters are cooler and denser, sunk 34 m deeper than their release position. Distance to the shelf was a critical factor in determining the volume of shelf water entrained into the eddy. Entrainment reduced to 0.23 Sv when the eddy was furthest from the shelf, compared to 0.61 Sv when the eddy was within 10 km of the shelf. From a biological perspective, quantifying the entrainment of shelf water into frontal eddies is important, as it is thought to play a significant role in providing an offshore nursery habitat for coastally spawned larval fish.

  11. A regression modeling approach for studying carbonate system variability in the northern Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Wiley; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Winsor, Peter; Statscewich, Hank; Whitledge, Terry E.

    2013-01-01

    northern Gulf of Alaska (GOA) shelf experiences carbonate system variability on seasonal and annual time scales, but little information exists to resolve higher frequency variability in this region. To resolve this variability using platforms-of-opportunity, we present multiple linear regression (MLR) models constructed from hydrographic data collected along the Northeast Pacific Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) Seward Line. The empirical algorithms predict dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) using observations of nitrate (NO3-), temperature, salinity and pressure from the surface to 500 m, with R2s > 0.97 and RMSE values of 11 µmol kg-1 for DIC and 9 µmol kg-1 for TA. We applied these relationships to high-resolution NO3- data sets collected during a novel 20 h glider flight and a GLOBEC mesoscale SeaSoar survey. Results from the glider flight demonstrated time/space along-isopycnal variability of aragonite saturations (Ωarag) associated with a dicothermal layer (a cold near-surface layer found in high latitude oceans) that rivaled changes seen vertically through the thermocline. The SeaSoar survey captured the uplift to aragonite saturation horizon (depth where Ωarag = 1) shoaled to a previously unseen depth in the northern GOA. This work is similar to recent studies aimed at predicting the carbonate system in continental margin settings, albeit demonstrates that a NO3--based approach can be applied to high-latitude data collected from platforms capable of high-frequency measurements.

  12. High-resolution observations in the western Mediterranean Sea: the REP14-MED experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Reiner; Fiekas, Heinz-Volker; Beguery, Laurent; Borrione, Ines; Funk, Andreas; Hemming, Michael; Hernandez-Lasheras, Jaime; Heywood, Karen J.; Kaiser, Jan; Knoll, Michaela; Mourre, Baptiste; Oddo, Paolo; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Queste, Bastien Y.; Russo, Aniello; Shitashima, Kiminori; Siderius, Martin; Thorp Küsel, Elizabeth

    2018-04-01

    The observational part of the REP14-MED experiment was conducted in June 2014 in the Sardo-Balearic Basin west of Sardinia (western Mediterranean Sea). Two research vessels collected high-resolution oceanographic data by means of hydrographic casts, towed systems, and underway measurements. In addition, a vast amount of data was provided by a fleet of 11 ocean gliders, time series were available from moored instruments, and information on Lagrangian flow patterns was obtained from surface drifters and one profiling float. The spatial resolution of the observations encompasses a spectrum over 4 orders of magnitude from 𝒪(101 m) to 𝒪(105 m), and the time series from the moored instruments cover a spectral range of 5 orders from 𝒪(101 s) to 𝒪(106 s). The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the huge data set which has been utilised by various studies, focusing on (i) water masses and circulation, (ii) operational forecasting, (iii) data assimilation, (iv) variability of the ocean, and (v) new payloads for gliders.

  13. Antares DLR H2. Studies and experimental data for a fuel cell propulsion module for general aviation airplanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallo, Josef; Rathke, Philipp; Stephan, Thomas; Schirmer, Johannes [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik

    2013-06-01

    The Institute of Technical Thermodynamics of the German Aerospace Center (DLR e.V.) has been conducting research on airborne fuel cell systems for several years. One important mainstay in this context is the flying testbed Antares DLR H2. This fuel cell powered motor glider permits scientific research of fuel cell systems under airborne conditions. The Antares DLR H2 is the first manned fuel cell powered motor glider with the ability to take off and fly merely by fuel cell power. In August 2012 a new generation fuel cell propulsion module has been integrated successfully into this aircraft, providing significant improvements over the former systems. During September 2012 long-distance flight testing has been carried out in which an overall flight time of more than 11 hours and an overall distance of nearly 1500 km have been flown. In this paper an overview of the design of the fuel cell propulsion module is provided. Furthermore exemplary measurements, focusing on the tank system during flight, are presented. (orig.)

  14. Eutrophication monitoring for Lake Superior's Chequamegon ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A priority for the Lake Superior CSMI was to identify susceptible nearshore eutrophication areas. We developed an integrated sampling design to collect baseline data for Lake Superior’s Chequamegon Bay to understand how nearshore physical processes and tributary loading relate to observed chlorophyll concentrations. Sampling included ship-based water samples combined with vertical CTD casts, continuous in situ towing and data collected from an autonomous underwater glider. Sampling was conducted during June, July and September. The glider collected regional data as part of three extended missions in Lake Superior over the same periods. During the study, two significant storm events impacted the western end of Lake Superior; the first occurred during July 11-12, with 8-10 inches of rain in 24hrs, and the second on July 21 with winds in excess of 161 km/h. Using GIS software, we organized these diverse temporal data sets along a continuous time line with temporally coincident Modis Satellite data to visualize surface sediment plumes in relation to water quality measurements. Preliminary results suggest that both events impacted regional water quality, and that nearshore physical forces (upwelling and currents) influenced the spatial variability. Results comparing in situ measures with remotely sensed images will be discussed. not applicable

  15. Quantifying How Observations Inform a Numerical Reanalysis of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, B. S.

    2017-11-01

    When assimilating observations into a model via state-estimation, it is possible to quantify how each observation changes the modeled estimate of a chosen oceanic metric. Using an existing 2 year reanalysis of Hawaii that includes more than 31 million observations from satellites, ships, SeaGliders, and autonomous floats, I assess which observations most improve the estimates of the transport and eddy kinetic energy. When the SeaGliders were in the water, they comprised less than 2.5% of the data, but accounted for 23% of the transport adjustment. Because the model physics constrains advanced state-estimation, the prescribed covariances are propagated in time to identify observation-model covariance. I find that observations that constrain the isopycnal tilt across the transport section provide the greatest impact in the analysis. In the case of eddy kinetic energy, observations that constrain the surface-driven upper ocean have more impact. This information can help to identify optimal sampling strategies to improve both state-estimates and forecasts.

  16. Influence of a glide path on the dentinal crack formation of ProTaper Next system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinç Aktemur Türker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim was to evaluate dentinal crack formation after root canal preparation with ProTaper Next system (PTN with and without a glide path. Materials and Methods Forty-five mesial roots of mandibular first molars were selected. Fifteen teeth were left unprepared and served as controls. The experimental groups consist of mesiobuccal and mesiolingual root canals of remaining 30 teeth, which were divided into 2 groups (n = 15: Group PG/PTN, glide path was created with ProGlider (PG and then canals were shaped with PTN system; Group PTN, glide path was not prepared and canals were shaped with PTN system only. All roots were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 mm from the apex, and the sections were observed under a stereomicroscope. The presence/absence of cracks was recorded. Data were analyzed with chi-square tests with Yates correction. Results There were no significant differences in crack formation between the PTN with and without glide path preparation. The incidence of cracks observed in PG/PTN and PTN groups was 17.8% and 28.9%, respectively. Conclusions The creation of a glide path with ProGlider before ProTaper Next rotary system did not influence dentinal crack formation in root canals.

  17. New evidence for mammaliaform ear evolution and feeding adaptation in a Jurassic ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhe-Xi; Meng, Qing-Jin; Grossnickle, David M.; Liu, Di; Neander, April I.; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Ji, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Stem mammaliaforms are forerunners to modern mammals, and they achieved considerable ecomorphological diversity in their own right. Recent discoveries suggest that eleutherodontids, a subclade of Haramiyida, were more species-rich during the Jurassic period in Asia than previously recognized. Here we report a new Jurassic eleutherodontid mammaliaform with an unusual mosaic of highly specialized characteristics, and the results of phylogenetic analyses that support the hypothesis that haramiyidans are stem mammaliaforms. The new fossil shows fossilized skin membranes that are interpreted to be for gliding and a mandibular middle ear with a unique character combination previously unknown in mammaliaforms. Incisor replacement is prolonged until well after molars are fully erupted, a timing pattern unique to most other mammaliaforms. In situ molar occlusion and a functional analysis reveal a new mode of dental occlusion: dual mortar-pestle occlusion of opposing upper and lower molars, probably for dual crushing and grinding. This suggests that eleutherodontids are herbivorous, and probably specialized for granivory or feeding on soft plant tissues. The inferred dietary adaptation of eleutherodontid gliders represents a remarkable evolutionary convergence with herbivorous gliders in Theria. These Jurassic fossils represent volant, herbivorous stem mammaliaforms associated with pre-angiosperm plants that appear long before the later, iterative associations between angiosperm plants and volant herbivores in various therian clades.

  18. Rainfall Effects on the Kuroshio Current East of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Lin, Chen-Chih; Ho, Chung-Ru

    2017-04-01

    Changes of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the open oceans are related to precipitation and evaporation. SSS has been an indicator of water cycle. It may be related to the global change. The Kuroshio Current, a western boundary current originating from the North Equatorial Current, transfers warm and higher salinity to higher latitudes. It flows northward along the east coasts of Luzon Island and Taiwan Island to Japan. In this study, effects of heavy rainfall on the Kuroshio surface salinity east of Taiwan are investigated. Sea surface salinity (SSS) data taken by conductivity temperature depth (CTD) sensor on R/V Ocean Researcher I cruises, conductivity sensor on eight glider cruises, and Aquarius satellite data are used in this study. The rain rate data derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) are also employed. A glider is a kind of autonomous underwater vehicle, which uses small changes in its buoyancy in conjunction with wings to convert vertical motion to horizontal in the underwater without requiring input from an operator. It can take sensors to measure salinity, temperature, and pressure. The TRMM/TMI data from remote sensing system are daily and are mapped to 0.25-degree grid. The results show a good correlation between the rain rate and SSS with a correlation coefficient of 0.86. The rainfall causes SSS of the Kuroshio surface water drops 0.176 PSU per 1 mm/hr rain rate.

  19. Performance of an autonomously deployable telemetered deep ocean seismic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jonathan; Laske, Gabe; Orcutt, John; Babcock, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    We describe a transformative technology that can provide near real-time telemetry of sensor data from the ocean bottom without a moored buoy or a cable to shore. The breakthrough technology that makes this system possible is an autonomous surface vehicle called a Wave Glider developed by Liquid Robotics, which harvests wave and solar energy for motive and electrical power. For navigation, the wave glider is equipped with a small computer, a GPS receiver, a rudder, solar panels and batteries, AIS ship detection receiver, weather station, and an Iridium satellite modem. Wave gliders have demonstrated trans-oceanic range and long-term station keeping capabilities. We present results from several deployments of a prototype system that demonstrate the feasibility of this concept. The system comprises ocean bottom package (OBP) and an ocean surface gateway (OSG). Acoustic communications connect the OBP instruments with OSG while communications between the gateway and land are provided by the Iridium satellite constellation. The most recent deployment of the OBP was off the edge of the Patton Escarpment some 300 km west of San Diego in 4000 m of water. The OSG was launched about 30 km west of San Diego harbor and programmed to navigate to the site of the ocean bottom package. Arriving after 161 hours, the OSG then commenced holding station at the site for the next 68 days. Speeds over-the-ground varied with wind, wave, and surface current conditions but averaged 0.5 m/s while winds varied between 0 m/s and 17 m/s and wave heights between 0.2 m and 5.9 m. Over this period the median total data latency was 260 s and the data loss less that 0.2% when the wave glider was within 1.5 km of the central point. We have also tested a full-scale model of a towable ocean bottom package, which demonstrated that a wave glider could tow and navigate an autonomously deployable ocean bottom package. Taken together, these tests have demonstrated that the concept is viable for long

  20. Long-Endurance, Ice-capable Autonomous Seagliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Craig; Gobat, Jason; Shilling, Geoff; Curry, Beth

    2013-04-01

    Autonomous Seagliders capable of extended (many months) operation in ice-covered waters have been developed and successfully employed as part of the US Arctic Observing Network. Seagliders operate routinely in lower-latitude oceans for periods of up to 9 months to provide persistent sampling in difficult, remote conditions, including strong boundary currents and harsh wintertime subpolar seas. The Arctic Observing Network calls for sustained occupation of key sections within the Arctic Ocean and across the critical gateways that link the Arctic to lower-latitude oceans, motivating the extension of glider technologies to permit operation in ice-covered waters. When operating in open water, gliders rely on GPS for navigation and Iridium satellite phones for data and command telemetry. Ice cover blocks access to the sea surface and thus prevents gliders from using these critical services. When operating under ice, ice-capable Seagliders instead navigate by trilateration from an array of RAFOS acoustic sound sources and employ advanced autonomy to make mission-critical decisions (previously the realm of the human pilot) and identify and exploit leads in the ice to allow intermittent communication through Iridium. Davis Strait, one of the two primary pathways through which Arctic waters exit into the subpolar North Atlantic, provided a convenient site for development of ice-capable Seagliders at a location where the resulting measurements could greatly augment the existing observing system. Initial testing of 780 Hz RAFOS sources in Davis Strait, substantiated by the performance of the operational array, indicates effective ranges of 100-150 km in ice-covered waters. Surface ducting and reflection off the ice bottom significantly degrade the range from the 500+ km expected in ice-free conditions. Comparisons between GPS and acoustically-derived positions collected during operations in ice-free conditions suggest 1-2 km uncertainty in the acoustically-derived positions

  1. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    The high cost of acquiring geodetic data from the sea floor has limited the observations available to help us understand and model the behavior of seafloor geodetic processes. To address this problem, the Pacific GPS Facility at the University of Hawaii is developing a cost effective approach for accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure without the requirement for costly ship time. There is a recognized need to vastly increase our underwater geodetic observing capacity. Most of the largest recorded earthquakes and most devastating tsunamis are generated at subduction zones underwater. Similarly, many volcanoes are partly (e.g. Santorini) or completely (e.g. Loihi) submerged, and are not well observed and understood. Furthermore, landslide features ring many ocean basins, and huge debris deposits surround many volcanic oceanic islands. Our approach will lower the cost of collecting sea-floor geodetic data, reducing the barriers preventing us from acquiring the information we need to observe and understand these types of structures and provide a direct societal benefit in improving hazard assessment. The capability is being developed by equipping one of the University of Hawaii Wave Gliders with an integrated acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, processing unit, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider will interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the sea floor to maintain a near-continuous stream of pressure and temperature data, but seafloor pressure data includes contribution from a variety of sources and on its own may not provide the accuracy required for geodetic investigations. Independent measurements of sea surface pressure and sea surface height can be used to remove these contributions from the observed sea floor pressure timeseries. We will integrate our seafloor pressure measurements with air

  2. Energy extraction from atmospheric turbulence to improve flight vehicle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chinmay Karsandas

    Small 'bird-sized' Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have now become practical due to technological advances in embedded electronics, miniature sensors and actuators, and propulsion systems. Birds are known to take advantage of wind currents to conserve energy and fly long distances without flapping their wings. This dissertation explores the possibility of improving the performance of small UAVs by extracting the energy available in atmospheric turbulence. An aircraft can gain energy from vertical gusts by increasing its lift in regions of updraft and reducing its lift in downdrafts - a concept that has been known for decades. Starting with a simple model of a glider flying through a sinusoidal gust, a parametric optimization approach is used to compute the minimum gust amplitude and optimal control input required for the glider to sustain flight without losing energy. For small UAVs using optimal control inputs, sinusoidal gusts with amplitude of 10--15% of the cruise speed are sufficient to keep the aircraft aloft. The method is then modified and extended to include random gusts that are representative of natural turbulence. A procedure to design optimal control laws for energy extraction from realistic gust profiles is developed using a Genetic Algorithm (GA). A feedback control law is designed to perform well over a variety of random gusts, and not be tailored for one particular gust. A small UAV flying in vertical turbulence is shown to obtain average energy savings of 35--40% with the use of a simple control law. The design procedure is also extended to determine optimal control laws for sinusoidal as well as turbulent lateral gusts. The theoretical work is complemented by experimental validation using a small autonomous UAV. The development of a lightweight autopilot and UAV platform is presented. Flight test results show that active control of the lift of an autonomous glider resulted in approximately 46% average energy savings compared to glides with fixed

  3. Cooperative vehicle control, feature tracking and ocean sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Edward A.

    This dissertation concerns the development of a feedback control framework for coordinating multiple, sensor-equipped, autonomous vehicles into mobile sensing arrays to perform adaptive sampling of observed fields. The use of feedback is central; it maintains the array, i.e. regulates formation position, orientation, and shape, and directs the array to perform its sampling mission in response to measurements taken by each vehicle. Specifically, we address how to perform autonomous gradient tracking and feature detection in an unknown field such as temperature or salinity in the ocean. Artificial potentials and virtual bodies are used to coordinate the autonomous vehicles, modelled as point masses (with unit mass). The virtual bodies consist of linked, moving reference points called virtual leaders. Artificial potentials couple the dynamics of the vehicles and the virtual bodies. The dynamics of the virtual body are then prescribed allowing the virtual body, and thus the vehicle group, to perform maneuvers that include translation, rotation and contraction/expansion, while ensuring that the formation error remains bounded. This methodology is called the Virtual Body and Artificial Potential (VBAP) methodology. We then propose how to utilize these arrays to perform autonomous gradient climbing and front tracking in the presence of both correlated and uncorrelated noise. We implement various techniques for estimation of gradients (first-order and higher), including finite differencing, least squares error minimization, averaging, and Kalman filtering. Furthermore, we illustrate how the estimation error can be used to optimally choose the formation size. To complement our theoretical work, we present an account of sea trials performed with a fleet of autonomous underwater gliders in Monterey Bay during the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network (AOSN) II project in August 2003. During these trials, Slocum autonomous underwater gliders were coordinated into triangle

  4. Evolution of physical and biological characteristics of mesoscale eddy in north-central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zarokanellos, Nikolaos

    2015-04-01

    Eddies appear to be important to both the physical and biogeochemical dynamics of the Red Sea. Numerical simulations of physical dynamics and remote sensing studies of chlorophyll concentration and sea surface height in the Red Sea indicate their importance to the upper portions of the sea (Raitsos et al., 2013; Yao et al., 2014; Zhan et al., 2014). Despite their apparent importance, process studies of these eddies have been lacking. In March 2013 we began an extended observational study of the north-central Red Sea (NCRS) where anticyclonic eddies have been observed. The study began with a ship-based characterization of the eddy and was followed by a three-month observational time series using an autonomous glider equipped with a CTD, oxygen sensor, and optical sensors for chlorophyll, CDOM and optical backscatter. The ship-based study captured an initial snapshot of an anticyclonic eddy and it\\'s associated biological and bio-optical distributions. Initially, chlorophyll distributions tended to mirror the density distribution, with deeper isopycnals and chlorophyll maximum depth in the anticyclonic eddy center. The anticyclone eddy in March had an along basin diameter of 150 km, penetrated vertically less than 150 m and elevated near surface chlorophyll concentrations appeared along its outer boundary. The shallowing of the pycnocline of the outer boundaries of the anticyclone eddy on March may elevate nutrients into the lower euphotic zone, contributing to phytoplankton productivity and biomass within the eddy. This eddy contains most of the kinetic energy of the region with the maximum velocities up to 30 - 35 cm/s. The eddy appeared to interact with the coastal reefs where exchange particulate and dissolved matter may occur. The autonomous glider provided the spring-to-summer progression of the system with increasing stratification, shallowing of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum, and fluctuations in the position and intensity of the eddy. Our glider effort

  5. Transport and Thermohaline Structure in the Western Tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonau, Martha Coakley

    Transport and thermohaline structure of water masses and their respective variability are observed and modeled in the western tropical North Pacific using autonomous underwater gliders, Argo climatology and a numerical ocean state estimate. The North Equatorial Current (NEC) advects subtropical and subpolar water masses into the region that are transported equatorward by the Mindanao Current (MC). Continuous glider observations of these two currents from June 2009 to December 2013 provide absolute geostrophic velocity, water mass structure, and transport. The observations are compared to Argo climatology (Roemmich and Gilson, 2009), wind and precipitation to assess forcing, and annual and interannual variability. Observations are assimilated into a regional ocean state estimate (1/6°) to examine regional transport variability and its relationship to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomena (ENSO). The NEC, described in Chapter 1, is observed along 134.3°E, from 8.5°N to 16.5°N. NEC thermocline transport is relatively constant, with a variable subthermocline transport that is distinguished by countercurrents centered at 9.6°N and 13.1°N. Correlation between thermocline and subthermocline transport is strong. Isopycnals with subducted water masses, the North Pacific Tropical Water and North Pacific Intermediate Water, have the greatest fine-scale thermohaline variance. The NEC advects water masses into the MC, described in Chapter 2, that flows equatorward along the coast of Mindanao. Gliders observed the MC at a mean latitude of 8.5°N. The Mindanao Undercurrent (MUC) persists in the subthermocline offshore of the MC, with a net poleward transport of intermediate water typical of South Pacific origin. The variable subthermocline transport in the MC/MUC has an inverse linear relationship with the Nino 3.4 index and strongly impacts total transport variability. For each the MC and NEC, surface salinity and thermocline depth have a strong relationship with ENSO

  6. Rocketing into the future the history and technology of rocket planes

    CERN Document Server

    van Pelt, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Rocketing into the Future journeys into the exciting world of rocket planes, examining the exotic concepts and actual flying vehicles that have been devised over the last one hundred years. Lavishly illustrated with over 150 photographs, it recounts the history of rocket planes from the early pioneers who attached simple rockets on to their wooden glider airplanes to the modern world of high-tech research vehicles. The book then looks at the possibilities for the future. The technological and economic challenges of the Space Shuttle proved insurmountable, and thus the program was unable to fulfill its promise of low-cost access to space. However, the burgeoning market of suborbital space tourism may yet give the necessary boost to the development of a truly reusable spaceplane.

  7. Basic flight mechanics a simple approach without equations

    CERN Document Server

    Tewari, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    This book presents flight mechanics of aircraft, spacecraft, and rockets to technical and non-technical readers in simple terms and based purely on physical principles. Adapting an accessible and lucid writing style, the book retains the scientific authority and conceptual substance of an engineering textbook without requiring a background in physics or engineering mathematics. Professor Tewari explains relevant physical principles of flight by straightforward examples and meticulous diagrams and figures. Important aspects of both atmospheric and space flight mechanics are covered, including performance, stability and control, aeroelasticity, orbital mechanics, and altitude control. The book describes airplanes, gliders, rotary wing and flapping wing flight vehicles, rockets, and spacecraft and visualizes the essential principles using detailed illustration. It is an ideal resource for managers and technicians in the aerospace industry without engineering degrees, pilots, and anyone interested in the mechanic...

  8. Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Traffic Management (UTM): Enabling Low-Altitude Airspace and UAS Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2014-01-01

    Many civilian applications of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have been imagined ranging from remote to congested urban areas, including goods delivery, infrastructure surveillance, agricultural support, and medical services delivery. Further, these UAS will have different equipage and capabilities based on considerations such as affordability, and mission needs applications. Such heterogeneous UAS mix, along with operations such as general aviation, helicopters, gliders must be safely accommodated at lower altitudes. However, key infrastructure to enable and safely manage widespread use of low-altitude airspace and UAS operations therein does not exist. Therefore, NASA is exploring functional design, concept and technology development, and a prototype UAS Traffic Management (UTM) system. UTM will support safe and efficient UAS operations for the delivery of goods and services

  9. Study of water masses variability in the Mediterranean Sea using in-situ data / NEMO-Med12 model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margirier, Félix; Testor, Pierre; Mortier, Laurent; Arsouze, Thomas; Bosse, Anthony; Houpert, Loic; Hayes, Dan

    2016-04-01

    In the past 10 years, numerous observation programs in the Mediterranean deployed autonomous platforms (moorings, argo floats, gliders) and thus considerably increased the number of in-situ observations and the data coverage. In this study, we analyse time series built with profile data on interannual scales. Sorting data in regional boxes, we follow the evolution of different water masses in the basin and generate indexes to characterize their evolution. We then put those indexes in relation with external (atmospheric) forcings and present an intercomparison with the NEMO-Med12 model to estimate both the skill of the model and the relevance of the data-sampling in reproducing the evolution of water masses properties.

  10. Frontal dynamics boost primary production in the summer stratified Mediterranean sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olita, Antonio; Capet, Arthur; Claret, Mariona; Mahadevan, Amala; Poulain, Pierre Marie; Ribotti, Alberto; Ruiz, Simón; Tintoré, Joaquín; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Pascual, Ananda

    2017-06-01

    Bio-physical glider measurements from a unique process-oriented experiment in the Eastern Alboran Sea (AlborEx) allowed us to observe the distribution of the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) across an intense density front, with a resolution (˜ 400 m) suitable for investigating sub-mesoscale dynamics. This front, at the interface between Atlantic and Mediterranean waters, had a sharp density gradient (Δ ρ ˜ 1 kg/m3 in ˜ 10 km) and showed imprints of (sub-)mesoscale phenomena on tracer distributions. Specifically, the chlorophyll-a concentration within the DCM showed a disrupted pattern along isopycnal surfaces, with patches bearing a relationship to the stratification (buoyancy frequency) at depths between 30 and 60 m. In order to estimate the primary production (PP) rate within the chlorophyll patches observed at the sub-surface, we applied the Morel and Andrè (J Geophys Res 96:685-698 1991) bio-optical model using the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) from Argo profiles collected simultaneously with glider data. The highest production was located concurrently with domed isopycnals on the fresh side of the front, suggestive that (sub-)mesoscale upwelling is carrying phytoplankton patches from less to more illuminated levels, with a contemporaneous delivering of nutrients. Integrated estimations of PP (1.3 g C m-2d-1) along the glider path are two to four times larger than the estimations obtained from satellite-based algorithms, i.e., derived from the 8-day composite fields extracted over the glider trip path. Despite the differences in spatial and temporal sampling between instruments, the differences in PP estimations are mainly due to the inability of the satellite to measure DCM patches responsible for the high production. The deepest (depth > 60 m) chlorophyll patches are almost unproductive and probably transported passively (subducted) from upper productive layers. Finally, the relationship between primary production and oxygen is also investigated

  11. Elk Valley Coal innovation paving the way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.; Ednie, H.; Weldon, H.

    2006-09-15

    Elk Valley Coal maintains performance optimization across its six metallurgical coal operations. Performance, personnel issues, and training are discussed. Programmes at Fording River, Greenhills, and Coal Mountain are described. Fording River is implementing new computer systems and high-speed wireless networks. The pit control system and the equipment maintenance and remote maintenance programmes are being improved. The Glider Kit program to rebuild major equipment is described. Safety and productivity measures at Greenhills include testing and evaluation of innovations such as the Drilling and Blasting System (DABS), a payload monitor on a shovel, and two GPS-based systems. Blasting methods, a timing study that examines wall stability, fragmentation simulation, and the Six Mine structure at Coal Mountain are described. 5 photos.

  12. NOxTOy: A miniaturised new instrument for reactive nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dommen, J.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Neininger, B.; Clark, N.

    2000-01-01

    Emission of nitrogen oxides (NO, NO 2 ) and hydrocarbons into the atmosphere lead, under sunlight, to the formation of ozone and other photo oxidants. To better understand the ozone forming processes, the production and concentration of the nitrogen containing reaction products like nitric acid (HNO 3 ) or peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN) have to be determined. In a joint project with other research institutions and a private enterprise a miniaturised instrument was developed under a KTI contract. It is possible to measure several nitrogen oxides, NO 2 , NO x , NO y , PAN, HNO 3 and O x simultaneously. The dimensions and the power consumption of the instrument are suited for the operation in a motor glider and in a van. First measurements have been successfully performed and are presented. (authors)

  13. Cellular automata in cytoskeletal lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S A; Watt, R C; Hameroff, S R

    1984-01-01

    Cellular automata (CA) activities could mediate biological regulation and information processing via nonlinear electrodynamic effects in cytoskeletal lattice arrays. Frohlich coherent oscillations and other nonlinear mechanisms may effect discrete 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -11/ s interval events which result in dynamic patterns in biolattices such as cylindrical protein polymers: microtubules (MT). Structural geometry and electrostatic forces of MT subunit dipole oscillations suggest neighbor rules among the hexagonally packed protein subunits. Computer simulations using these suggested rules and MT structural geometry demonstrate CA activities including dynamical and stable self-organizing patterns, oscillators, and traveling gliders. CA activities in MT and other cytoskeletal lattices may have important biological regulatory functions. 23 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  14. Heat and salt budgets over the Gulf Stream North Wall during LatMix survey in winter 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Rios, A.; Shearman, R. K.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Lee, C.; Gula, J.; Klymak, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    As part of the ONR-sponsored LatMix Experiment, ship-based and glider-based observations following a Lagrangian float are used to examine the evolution of temperature, salinity and density along the Gulf Stream north wall in wintertime. Satellite observations during the survey and the in-situ measurements showed the presence of submesoscale (1) calculated for this regions corroborates the possibility of submesoscale dynamics. Using a heat and salinity budget, we show that surface forcing, entrainment from below and advection by the mean flow velocities are not sufficient to explain the observed rate of change of heat and salinity in the mixed layer. Although confidence estimates prevent an accurate flux divergence calculation, Reynold flux estimates are consistent with a cross-frontal exchange that can reproduce the observed temporal trends.

  15. AERODYNAMIC LOAD OF AN AIRCRAFT WITH A HIGHLY ELASTIC WING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Schoř

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a method for calculation of air loads of an aircraft with an elastic wing is presented. The method can predict a redistribution of air loads when the elastic wing deforms. Unlike the traditional Euler or Navier-Stokes CFD to FEM coupling, the method uses 3D panel method as a source of aerodynamic data. This makes the calculation feasible on a typical recent workstation. Due to a short computational time and low hardware demands this method is suitable for both the preliminary design stage and the load evaluation stage. A case study is presented. The study compares a glider wing performing a pull maneuver at both rigid and and elastic state. The study indicates a significant redistribution of air load at the elastic case.

  16. First Middle East Aircraft Parabolic Flights for ISU Participant Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletser, Vladimir; Frischauf, Norbert; Cohen, Dan; Foster, Matthew; Spannagel, Ruven; Szeszko, Adam; Laufer, Rene

    2017-06-01

    Aircraft parabolic flights are widely used throughout the world to create microgravity environment for scientific and technology research, experiment rehearsal for space missions, and for astronaut training before space flights. As part of the Space Studies Program 2016 of the International Space University summer session at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, a series of aircraft parabolic flights were organized with a glider in support of departmental activities on `Artificial and Micro-gravity' within the Space Sciences Department. Five flights were organized with manoeuvres including several parabolas with 5 to 6 s of weightlessness, bank turns with acceleration up to 2 g and disorientation inducing manoeuvres. Four demonstration experiments and two experiments proposed by SSP16 participants were performed during the flights by on board operators. This paper reports on the microgravity experiments conducted during these parabolic flights, the first conducted in the Middle East for science and pedagogical experiments.

  17. Modeling the seasonal cycle of the oxygen minimum zone over the continental shelf off Concepción, Chile (36.5° S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, J.; Mediavilla, D.; Pizarro, O.

    2012-06-01

    We analyze the seasonal dynamics of oxygen concentrations in the southernmost part of the Eastern South Pacific oxygen minimum zone (ESP's OMZ), offshore of Concepción, Chile (~37° S). We use data from a time series over the continental shelf off Concepción, as well as other hydrographic data and measurements from moored instruments and ocean gliders to evaluate temporal and spatial variability in this region. We identify two extreme modes (winter and summer) that characterize the seasonal variability. A simple model that account for the main physical and biological processes that influences the oxygen concentration was developed. According to our results, the seasonal variability of the dissolved oxygen in the study region is mainly driven by lateral (advective and diffusive) transport that connect the waters over the shelf with poorly oxygenated water from the slope, which is in turn, advected southward by the Peru-Chile Undercurrent.

  18. Shape matters: improved flight in tapered auto-rotating wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yucen; Vincent, Lionel; Kanso, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Many plants use gravity and wind to disperse their seeds. The shape of seed pods influence their aerodynamics. For example, Liana seeds form aerodynamic gliders and Sycamore trees release airborne ``helicopters.'' Here, we use carefully-controlled experiments and high-speed photography to examine dispersion by tumbling (auto-rotation) and we focus on the effect of geometry on flight characteristics. We consider four families of shapes: rectangular, elliptic, tapered, and sharp-tip wings, and we vary the span-to-chord ratio. We find that tapered wings exhibit extended flight time and range, that is, better performance. A quasi-steady two-dimensional model is used to highlight the mechanisms by which shape affects flight performance. These findings could have significant implications on linking seedpod designs to seed dispersion patterns as well as on optimizing wing design in active flight problems.

  19. The formation of a subsurface anticyclonic eddy in the Peru-Chile Undercurrent and its impact on the near-coastal salinity, oxygen, and nutrient distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Soeren; Kanzow, Torsten; Krahmann, Gerd; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Dengler, Marcus; Lavik, Gaute

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a subsurface anticyclonic eddy in the Peru-Chile Undercurrent (PCUC) in January and February 2013 is investigated using a multiplatform four-dimensional observational approach. Research vessel, multiple glider, and mooring-based measurements were conducted in the Peruvian upwelling regime near 12°30'S. The data set consists of >10,000 glider profiles and repeated vessel-based hydrography and velocity transects. It allows a detailed description of the eddy formation and its impact on the near-coastal salinity, oxygen, and nutrient distributions. In early January, a strong PCUC with maximum poleward velocities of ˜0.25 m/s at 100-200 m depth was observed. Starting on 20 January, a subsurface anticyclonic eddy developed in the PCUC downstream of a topographic bend, suggesting flow separation as the eddy formation mechanism. The eddy core waters exhibited oxygen concentration of deficit of ˜17 μmol/L, and potential vorticity close to zero, which seemed to originate from the bottom boundary layer of the continental slope. The eddy-induced across-shelf velocities resulted in an elevated exchange of water masses between the upper continental slope and the open ocean. Small-scale salinity and oxygen structures were formed by along-isopycnal stirring, and indications of eddy-driven oxygen ventilation of the upper oxygen minimum zone were observed. It is concluded that mesoscale stirring of solutes and the offshore transport of eddy core properties could provide an important coastal open ocean exchange mechanism with potentially large implications for nutrient budgets and biogeochemical cycling in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru.

  20. Assessment and intercomparison of numerical simulations in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juza, Mélanie; Mourre, Baptiste; Renault, Lionel; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2014-05-01

    The Balearic Islands Coastal Observing and Forecasting System (SOCIB, www.socib.es) is developing high resolution numerical simulations (hindcasts and forecasts) in the Western Mediterranean Sea (WMOP). WMOP uses a regional configuration of the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS, Shchepetkin and McWilliams, 2005) with a high spatial resolution of 1/50º (1.5-2km). Thus, theses simulations are able to reproduce mesoscale and in some cases sub-mesoscale features that are key in the Mediterranean Sea since they interact and modify the basin and sub-basin circulation. These simulations are initialized from and nested in either the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS, 1/16º) or Mercator-Océan simulations (MERCATOR, 1/12º). A repeated glider section in the Ibiza Channel, operated by SOCIB, has revealed significant differences between two WMOP simulations using either MFS or MERCATOR (hereafter WMOP-MFS and WMOP-MERC). In this study, MFS, MERCATOR, WMOP-MFS and WMOP-MERC are compared and evaluated using available multi-platform observations such as satellite products (Sea Level Anomaly, Sea Surface Temperature) and in situ measurements (temperature and salinity profiles from Argo floats, CTD, XBT, fixed moorings and gliders; velocity fields from HF radar and currentmeters). A quantitative comparison is necessary to evaluate the capacity of the simulations to reproduce observed ocean features, and to quantify the possible simulations biases. This will in turn allow to improve the simulations, so as to produce better ocean forecast systems, to study and better understand ocean processes and to address climate studies. Therefore, various statistical diagnostics have been developed to assess and intercompare the simulations at various spatial and temporal scales, in different sub-regions (Alboran Sea, Western and Eastern Algerian sub-basins, Balearic Sea, Gulf of Lion), in different dynamical zones (coastal areas, shelves and "open" sea), along key sections (Ibiza and

  1. The Ocean Tracking Network and its contribution to ocean biological observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whoriskey, F. G.

    2016-02-01

    Animals move to meet their needs for food, shelter, reproduction and to avoid unfavorable environments. In aquatic systems, it is essential that we understand these movements if we are to sustainably manage populations and maintain healthy ecosystems. Thus the ability to document and monitor changes in aquatic animal movements is a biological observing system need. The Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) is a global research, technology development, and data management platform headquartered at Dalhousie University, in Halifax, Nova Scotia working to fill this need. OTN uses electronic telemetry to document the local-to-global movements and survival of aquatic animals, and to correlate them to oceanographic or limnological variables that are influencing movements. Such knowledge can assist with planning for and managing of anthropogenic impacts on present and future animal distributions, including those due to climate change. OTN works with various tracking methods including satellite and data storage tag systems, but its dominant focus is acoustic telemetry. OTN is built on global partnerships for the sharing of equipment and data, and has stimulated technological development in telemetry by bringing researchers with needs for new capabilities together with manufacturers to generate, test, and operationalize new technologies. This has included pioneering work into the use of marine autonomous vehicles (Slocum electric gliders; Liquid Robotics Wave Glider) in animal telemetry research. Similarly, OTN scientists worked with the Sea Mammal Research Unit to develop mobile acoustic receiver that have been placed on grey seals and linked via Bluetooth to a satellite transmitter/receiver. This provided receiver coverage in areas occupied by the seals during their typically extensive migrations and allowed for the examination of ecosystem linkages by documenting behavioral interactions the seals had with the physical environment, conspecifics, and other tagged species.

  2. Comparison of the cyclic fatigue resistance of 5 different rotary pathfinding instruments made of conventional nickel-titanium wire, M-wire, and controlled memory wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, Ismail Davut; Kaval, Mehmet Emin; Ertas, Hüseyin; Sen, Bilge Hakan

    2015-04-01

    This study compared the cyclic fatigue resistance of current nickel-titanium rotary path-finding instruments. Five types of nickel-titanium rotary pathfinding instruments were used in steel canals with a 90° curvature and a curvature radius of 3 mm (n = 10) and 5 mm (n = 10). The cyclic fatigue of the following instruments was tested at 4 mm from the tip: PathFile (#16 and a .02 taper; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), G-File (#12 and a .03 taper; Micro-Mega, Besançon Cedex, France), Scout Race (#15 and a .02 taper; FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland), HyFlex GPF (#15 and a .02 taper; Coltene-Whaledent, Allstetten, Switzerland), and ProGlider (#16 with a mean taper of .04125 and a .02 at the first 4 mm from the tip, Dentsply Maillefer). The length of the fractured parts was measured, and the number of cycles to fracture (NCF) was calculated. The data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α = .05). After Bonferroni correction, the new P value was set as .005. The difference in the cyclic fatigue of all the files at both curvatures was statistically significant (P values from .0035 to less than .0001). The ranking of the instruments from the highest to the lowest NCF was as follows: HyFlex GPF, G files, ProGlider, PathFile, and Scout Race. The length of the fractured part of the instruments was similar in all the groups (P > .05). All the tested instruments had a lower NCF at a curvature radius of 3 mm when compared with a curvature radius of 5 mm (P instrument was the highest, and the curvature radius had a significant effect on the fatigue resistance. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Marine Atmospheric Surface Layer and Its Application to Electromagnetic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    An important application of the atmospheric surface layer research is to characterize the near surface vertical gradients in temperature and humidity in order to predict radar and radio communication conditions in the environment. In this presentation, we will give an overview of a new research initiative funded under the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI): the Coupled Air-Sea Processes and EM Ducting Research (CASPER). The objective is to fully characterize the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as an electromagnetic (EM) propagation environment with the emphasis of spatial and temporal heterogeneities and surface wave/swell effects, both of which contravene the underlying assumptions of Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) used in coupled environmental forecast models. Furthermore, coastal variability in the inversion atop the MABL presents a challenge to forecast models and also causes practical issues in EM prediction models. These issues are the target of investigation of CASPER. CASPER measurement component includes two major field campaigns: CASPER-East (2015 Duck, NC) and CASPER-West (2018 southern California). This presentation will show the extensive measurements to be made during the CASPER -East field campaign with the focus on the marine atmospheric surface layer measurements with two research vessels, two research aircraft, surface flux buoy, wave gliders, ocean gliders, tethered balloons, and rawinsondes. Unlike previous research on the marine surface layer with the focus on surface fluxes and surface flux parameterization, CASPER field campaigns also emphasize of the surface layer profiles and the validation of the surface layer flux-profile relationship originally derived over land surfaces. Results from CASPER pilot experiment and preliminary results from CASPER-East field campaign will be discussed.

  4. The Fram Strait integrated ocean observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrbach, E.; Beszczynska-Möller, A.; Rettig, S.; Rohardt, G.; Sagen, H.; Sandven, S.; Hansen, E.

    2012-04-01

    A long-term oceanographic moored array has been operated since 1997 to measure the ocean water column properties and oceanic advective fluxes through Fram Strait. While the mooring line along 78°50'N is devoted to monitoring variability of the physical environment, the AWI Hausgarten observatory, located north of it, focuses on ecosystem properties and benthic biology. Under the EU DAMOCLES and ACOBAR projects, the oceanographic observatory has been extended towards the innovative integrated observing system, combining the deep ocean moorings, multipurpose acoustic system and a network of gliders. The main aim of this system is long-term environmental monitoring in Fram Strait, combining satellite data, acoustic tomography, oceanographic measurements at moorings and glider sections with high-resolution ice-ocean circulation models through data assimilation. In future perspective, a cable connection between the Hausgarten observatory and a land base on Svalbard is planned as the implementation of the ESONET Arctic node. To take advantage of the planned cabled node, different technologies for the underwater data transmission were reviewed and partially tested under the ESONET DM AOEM. The main focus was to design and evaluate available technical solutions for collecting data from different components of the Fram Strait ocean observing system, and an integration of available data streams for the optimal delivery to the future cabled node. The main components of the Fram Strait integrated observing system will be presented and the current status of available technologies for underwater data transfer will be reviewed. On the long term, an initiative of Helmholtz observatories foresees the interdisciplinary Earth-Observing-System FRAM which combines observatories such as the long term deep-sea ecological observatory HAUSGARTEN, the oceanographic Fram Strait integrated observing system and the Svalbard coastal stations maintained by the Norwegian ARCTOS network. A vision

  5. Interactive Learning Modules: Enabling Near Real-Time Oceanographic Data Use In Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D. L.; Fundis, A. T.; Risien, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the Education and Public Engagement (EPE) component of the NSF's Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) is to provide a new layer of cyber-interactivity for undergraduate educators to bring near real-time data from the global ocean into learning environments. To accomplish this, we are designing six online services including: 1) visualization tools, 2) a lesson builder, 3) a concept map builder, 4) educational web services (middleware), 5) collaboration tools and 6) an educational resource database. Here, we report on our Fall 2012 release that includes the first four of these services: 1) Interactive visualization tools allow users to interactively select data of interest, display the data in various views (e.g., maps, time-series and scatter plots) and obtain statistical measures such as mean, standard deviation and a regression line fit to select data. Specific visualization tools include a tool to compare different months of data, a time series explorer tool to investigate the temporal evolution of select data parameters (e.g., sea water temperature or salinity), a glider profile tool that displays ocean glider tracks and associated transects, and a data comparison tool that allows users to view the data either in scatter plot view comparing one parameter with another, or in time series view. 2) Our interactive lesson builder tool allows users to develop a library of online lesson units, which are collaboratively editable and sharable and provides starter templates designed from learning theory knowledge. 3) Our interactive concept map tool allows the user to build and use concept maps, a graphical interface to map the connection between concepts and ideas. This tool also provides semantic-based recommendations, and allows for embedding of associated resources such as movies, images and blogs. 4) Education web services (middleware) will provide an educational resource database API.

  6. The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data Acquisition Functions and Its Built-In Automated Python Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. J.; Vardaro, M.; Crowley, M. F.; Glenn, S. M.; Schofield, O.; Belabbassi, L.; Garzio, L. M.; Knuth, F.; Fram, J. P.; Kerfoot, J.

    2016-02-01

    The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), funded by the National Science Foundation, provides users with access to long-term datasets from a variety of oceanographic sensors. The Endurance Array in the Pacific Ocean consists of two separate lines off the coasts of Oregon and Washington. The Oregon line consists of 7 moorings, two cabled benthic experiment packages and 6 underwater gliders. The Washington line comprises 6 moorings and 6 gliders. Each mooring is outfitted with a variety of instrument packages. The raw data from these instruments are sent to shore via satellite communication and in some cases, via fiber optic cable. Raw data is then sent to the cyberinfrastructure (CI) group at Rutgers where it is aggregated, parsed into thousands of different data streams, and integrated into a software package called uFrame. The OOI CI delivers the data to the general public via a web interface that outputs data into commonly used scientific data file formats such as JSON, netCDF, and CSV. The Rutgers data management team has developed a series of command-line Python tools that streamline data acquisition in order to facilitate the QA/QC review process. The first step in the process is querying the uFrame database for a list of all available platforms. From this list, a user can choose a specific platform and automatically download all available datasets from the specified platform. The downloaded dataset is plotted using a generalized Python netcdf plotting routine that utilizes a data visualization toolbox called matplotlib. This routine loads each netCDF file separately and outputs plots by each available parameter. These Python tools have been uploaded to a Github repository that is openly available to help facilitate OOI data access and visualization.

  7. Next generation sensing platforms for extended deployments in large-scale, multidisciplinary, adaptive sampling and observational networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. N.; Meinig, C.; Mordy, C. W.; Lawrence-Slavas, N.; Cokelet, E. D.; Jenkins, R.; Tabisola, H. M.; Stabeno, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    New autonomous sensors have dramatically increased the resolution and accuracy of oceanographic data collection, enabling rapid sampling over extremely fine scales. Innovative new autonomous platofrms like floats, gliders, drones, and crawling moorings leverage the full potential of these new sensors by extending spatiotemporal reach across varied environments. During 2015 and 2016, The Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration Program at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory tested several new types of fully autonomous platforms with increased speed, durability, and power and payload capacity designed to deliver cutting-edge ecosystem assessment sensors to remote or inaccessible environments. The Expendable Ice-Tracking (EXIT) gloat developed by the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) is moored near bottom during the ice-free season and released on an autonomous timer beneath the ice during the following winter. The float collects a rapid profile during ascent, and continues to collect critical, poorly-accessible under-ice data until melt, when data is transmitted via satellite. The autonomous Oculus sub-surface glider developed by the University of Washington and PMEL has a large power and payload capacity and an enhanced buoyancy engine. This 'coastal truck' is designed for the rapid water column ascent required by optical imaging systems. The Saildrone is a solar and wind powered ocean unmanned surface vessel (USV) developed by Saildrone, Inc. in partnership with PMEL. This large-payload (200 lbs), fast (1-7 kts), durable (46 kts winds) platform was equipped with 15 sensors designed for ecosystem assessment during 2016, including passive and active acoustic systems specially redesigned for autonomous vehicle deployments. The senors deployed on these platforms achieved rigorous accuracy and precision standards. These innovative platforms provide new sampling capabilities and cost efficiencies in high-resolution sensor deployment

  8. Deciphering the Temporal and Spatial Complexity in Submarine Canyons in Antarctica: the Role of Mixed Layer Depth in Regulating Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, F.; Kohut, J. T.; Schofield, O.; Oliver, M. J.; Gorbunov, M. Y.

    2016-02-01

    There is a high spatial and temporal variability in the biophysical processes regulating primary productivity in submarine canyons in the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). WAP canyon heads are considered biological "hotspots" by providing predictable food resource and driving penguin foraging locations. Because the physiology and composition of the phytoplankton blooms and the physical mechanisms driving them aren't well understood, we aim to characterize the dynamics of the spring phytoplankton bloom at the head of a canyon in the WAP. A 6-year record of Slocum glider deployments is analyzed, corresponding to over 16,000 water column profiles. The mixed layer depth (MLD), determined by the maximum of the buoyancy frequency criteria, was found to be the MLD definition with the highest ecological relevance. The same holds true for other regions in Antarctica such as the Ross and Amundsen Seas. A FIRe sensor on a glider was used to evaluate physiological responses of phytoplankton to canyon dynamics using fluorescence kinetics. Initial results show a spatial influence, with increased photosynthetic efficiencies found at the canyon head. The strongest signal was the seasonal cycle. The shoaling of the MLD in early January results in increased chlorophyll a concentrations and as MLD deepens in mid season due to wind forcing, phytoplankton concentrations decrease, likely due to decreased light availability. A consistent secondary peak in chlorophyll matches a shoaling in MLD later in the growth season. A steady warming and increase in salinity of the MLD is seen throughout the season. Spatial differences were recorded at the head of the canyon and result from the local circulation. Shallower MLD found on the northern region are consistent with a fresher surface ocean (coastal influence) and increased chlorophyll concentrations. The southern region is thought to be more oceanic influenced as intrusions of warm deep water (mUCDW) to the upper water column were recorded

  9. Particulate Matter Resuspension in Mississippi Bight Evaluated with CONCORDE's Synthesis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S. J.; Quas, L. M.; Miles, T. N.; Pan, C.; Cambazoglu, M. K.; Soto Ramos, I. M.; Greer, A. T.; Church, I.; Wiggert, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    The CONsortium for oil spill exposure pathways in COastal River-Dominated Ecosystems (CONCORDE) was established to investigate the complex fine-scale biological, chemical and physical interactions in a marine system controlled by pulsed-river plume dynamics. During CONCORDE's spring 2016 field campaign, the In Situ Ichthyoplankton Imaging System (ISIIS) on the R/V Point Sur and the Scanfish on the R/V Pelican comprehensively characterized the physical and biological structure in the region. Increased suspended particulate matter was observed by the ISIIS, with concentrations at depth sufficient to completely occlude the in situ images of planktonic organisms. Data was also collected on the continental shelf during the spring cruise by the RU31 glider in the proximity of the Mississippi River Delta, east of the ISIIS / Scanfish transects. Backscatter and salinity observed by the Scanfish and glider showed elevated suspended particulate matter and increased salinity, suggesting a linkage to shoreward advection from the continental shelf of oceanic waters that are sufficiently energetic to drive sediment resuspension. As part of the CONCORDE research effort, a four-dimensional biogeochemical/lower trophic level synthesis model for Mississippi Sound and Bight has been developed, based on the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System. This study utilizes CONCORDE's synthesis model to investigate the physical forcing mechanisms affecting the increased suspended particulate matter concentration observed in the Mississippi Bight during spring 2016, and advection pathways between estuarine and shelf waters in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The results show that episodic, advection-driven resuspension is a critical aspect controlling suspended sediment distributions in Mississippi Bight, which has implications for observed spatio-temporal patterns of planktonic species.

  10. Oceanids command and control (C2) data system - Marine autonomous systems data for vehicle piloting, scientific data users, operational data assimilation, and big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, J. J. H.; Phillips, A.; Lorenzo, A.; Kokkinaki, A.; Hearn, M.; Gardner, T.; Thorne, K.

    2017-12-01

    The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) operate a fleet of approximately 36 autonomous marine platforms including submarine gliders, autonomous underwater vehicles, and autonomous surface vehicles. Each platform effectivity has the capability to observe the ocean and collect data akin to a small research vessel. This is creating a growth in data volumes and complexity while the amount of resource available to manage data remains static. The OceanIds Command and Control (C2) project aims to solve these issues by fully automating the data archival, processing and dissemination. The data architecture being implemented jointly by NOC and the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) includes a single Application Programming Interface (API) gateway to handle authentication, forwarding and delivery of both metadata and data. Technicians and principle investigators will enter expedition data prior to deployment of vehicles enabling automated data processing when vehicles are deployed. The system will support automated metadata acquisition from platforms as this technology moves towards operational implementation. The metadata exposure to the web builds on a prototype developed by the European Commission supported SenseOCEAN project and is via open standards including World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) RDF/XML and the use of the Semantic Sensor Network ontology and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) SensorML standard. Data will be delivered in the marine domain Everyone's Glider Observatory (EGO) format and OGC Observations and Measurements. Additional formats will be served by implementation of endpoints such as the NOAA ERDDAP tool. This standardised data delivery via the API gateway enables timely near-real-time data to be served to Oceanids users, BODC users, operational users and big data systems. The use of open standards will also enable web interfaces to be rapidly built on the API gateway and delivery to European research infrastructures that include aligned

  11. Seasonal Cycles of Oceanic Transports in the Eastern Subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Stefan F.; Cunningham, Stuart A.; Johnson, Clare; Houpert, Loïc.; Holliday, N. Penny; Behrens, Erik; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus W.

    2018-02-01

    The variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) may play a role in sea surface temperature predictions on seasonal to decadal time scales. Therefore, AMOC seasonal cycles are a potential baseline for interpreting predictions. Here we present estimates for the seasonal cycle of transports of volume, temperature, and freshwater associated with the upper limb of the AMOC in the eastern subpolar North Atlantic on the Extended Ellett Line hydrographic section between Scotland and Iceland. Due to weather, ship-based observations are primarily in summer. Recent glider observations during other seasons present an opportunity to investigate the seasonal variability in the upper layer of the AMOC. First, we document a new method to quality control and merge ship, float, and glider hydrographic observations. This method accounts for the different spatial sampling rates of the three platforms. The merged observations are used to compute seasonal cycles of volume, temperature, and freshwater transports in the Rockall Trough. These estimates are similar to the seasonal cycles in two eddy-resolving ocean models. Volume transport appears to be the primary factor modulating other Rockall Trough transports. Finally, we show that the weakest transports occur in summer, consistent with seasonal changes in the regional-scale wind stress curl. Although the seasonal cycle is weak compared to other variability in this region, the amplitude of the seasonal cycle in the Rockall Trough, roughly 0.5-1 Sv about a mean of 3.4 Sv, may account for up to 7-14% of the heat flux between Scotland and Greenland.

  12. Using physical models to study the gliding performance of extinct animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, M A R; Evangelista, Dennis; Yang, Karen

    2011-12-01

    Aerodynamic studies using physical models of fossil organisms can provide quantitative information about how performance of defined activities, such as gliding, depends on specific morphological features. Such analyses allow us to rule out hypotheses about the function of extinct organisms that are not physically plausible and to determine if and how specific morphological features and postures affect performance. The purpose of this article is to provide a practical guide for the design of dynamically scaled physical models to study the gliding of extinct animals using examples from our research on the theropod dinosaur, †Microraptor gui, which had flight feathers on its hind limbs as well as on its forelimbs. Analysis of the aerodynamics of †M. gui can shed light on the design of gliders with large surfaces posterior to the center of mass and provide functional information to evolutionary biologists trying to unravel the origins of flight in the dinosaurian ancestors and sister groups to birds. Measurements of lift, drag, side force, and moments in pitch, roll, and yaw on models in a wind tunnel can be used to calculate indices of gliding and parachuting performance, aerodynamic static stability, and control effectiveness in maneuvering. These indices permit the aerodynamic performance of bodies of different shape, size, stiffness, texture, and posture to be compared and thus can provide insights about the design of gliders, both biological and man-made. Our measurements of maximum lift-to-drag ratios of 2.5-3.1 for physical models of †M. gui suggest that its gliding performance was similar to that of flying squirrels and that the various leg postures that might have been used by †M. gui make little difference to that aspect of aerodynamic performance. We found that body orientation relative to the movement of air past the animal determines whether it is difficult or easy to maneuver.

  13. Degree of Landscape Fragmentation Influences Genetic Isolation among Populations of a Gliding Mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrea C.; Walker, Faith M.; Goldingay, Ross L.; Ball, Tina; van der Ree, Rodney

    2011-01-01

    Forests and woodlands are under continuing pressure from urban and agricultural development. Tree-dependent mammals that rarely venture to the ground are likely to be highly sensitive to forest fragmentation. The Australian squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis) provides an excellent case study to examine genetic (functional) connectivity among populations. It has an extensive range that occurs in a wide band along the east coast. However, its forest and woodland habitat has become greatly reduced in area and is severely fragmented within the southern inland part of the species' range, where it is recognised as threatened. Within central and northern coastal regions, habitat is much more intact and we thus hypothesise that genetic connectivity will be greater in this region than in the south. To test this we employed microsatellite analysis in a molecular population biology approach. Most sampling locations in the highly modified south showed signatures of genetic isolation. In contrast, a high level of genetic connectivity was inferred among most sampled populations in the more intact habitat of the coastal region, with samples collected 1400 km apart having similar genetic cluster membership. Nonetheless, some coastal populations associated with urbanisation and agriculture are genetically isolated, suggesting the historic pattern observed in the south is emerging on the coast. Our study demonstrates that massive landscape changes following European settlement have had substantial impacts on levels of connectivity among squirrel glider populations, as predicted on the basis of the species' ecology. This suggests that landscape planning and management in the south should be focused on restoring habitat connectivity where feasible, while along the coast, existing habitat connectivity must be maintained and recent losses restored. Molecular population biology approaches provide a ready means for identifying fragmentation effects on a species at multiple scales

  14. Degree of landscape fragmentation influences genetic isolation among populations of a gliding mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C Taylor

    Full Text Available Forests and woodlands are under continuing pressure from urban and agricultural development. Tree-dependent mammals that rarely venture to the ground are likely to be highly sensitive to forest fragmentation. The Australian squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis provides an excellent case study to examine genetic (functional connectivity among populations. It has an extensive range that occurs in a wide band along the east coast. However, its forest and woodland habitat has become greatly reduced in area and is severely fragmented within the southern inland part of the species' range, where it is recognised as threatened. Within central and northern coastal regions, habitat is much more intact and we thus hypothesise that genetic connectivity will be greater in this region than in the south. To test this we employed microsatellite analysis in a molecular population biology approach. Most sampling locations in the highly modified south showed signatures of genetic isolation. In contrast, a high level of genetic connectivity was inferred among most sampled populations in the more intact habitat of the coastal region, with samples collected 1400 km apart having similar genetic cluster membership. Nonetheless, some coastal populations associated with urbanisation and agriculture are genetically isolated, suggesting the historic pattern observed in the south is emerging on the coast. Our study demonstrates that massive landscape changes following European settlement have had substantial impacts on levels of connectivity among squirrel glider populations, as predicted on the basis of the species' ecology. This suggests that landscape planning and management in the south should be focused on restoring habitat connectivity where feasible, while along the coast, existing habitat connectivity must be maintained and recent losses restored. Molecular population biology approaches provide a ready means for identifying fragmentation effects on a species at

  15. Modification of deep waters in Marguerite Bay, western Antarctic Peninsula, caused by topographic overflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Hugh J.; Meredith, Michael P.; Brearley, J. Alexander

    2017-05-01

    Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) intrudes from the mid-layers of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current onto the shelf of the western Antarctic Peninsula, providing a source of heat and nutrients to the regional ocean. It is well known that CDW is modified as it flows across the shelf, but the mechanisms responsible for this are not fully known. Here, data from underwater gliders with high spatial resolution are used to demonstrate the importance of detailed bathymetry in inducing multiple local mixing events. Clear evidence for overflows is observed in the glider data as water flows along a deep channel with multiple transverse ridges. The ridges block the densest waters, with overflowing water descending several hundred metres to fill subsequent basins. This vertical flow leads to entrainment of overlying colder and fresher water in localised mixing events. Initially this process leads to an increase in bottom temperatures due to the temperature maximum waters descending to greater depths. After several ridges, however, the mixing is sufficient to remove the temperature maximum completely and the entrainment of colder thermocline waters to depth reduces the bottom temperature, to approximately the same as in the source region of Marguerite Trough. Similarly, it is shown that deep waters of Palmer Deep are warmer than at the same depth at the shelf break. The exact details of the transformations observed are heavily dependent on the local bathymetry and water column structure, but glacially-carved troughs and shallow sills are a common feature of the bathymetry of polar shelves, and these types of processes may be a factor in determining the hydrographic conditions close to the coast across a wider area.

  16. Using Combined Marine Spatial Planning Tools and Observing System Experiments to define Gaps in the Emerging European Ocean Observing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, G.; Pinardi, N.; Vukicevic, T.; Le Traon, P. Y.; Fernandez, V.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean observations are critical to providing accurate ocean forecasts that support operational decision making in European open and coastal seas. Observations are available in many forms from Fixed platforms e.g. Moored Buoys and tide gauges, underway measurements from Ferrybox systems, High Frequency radars and more recently from underwater Gliders and profiling floats. Observing System Simulation Experiments have been conducted to examine the relative contribution of each type of platform to an improvement in our ability to accurately forecast the future state of the ocean with HF radar and Gliders showing particular promise in improving model skill. There is considerable demand for ecosystem products and services from today's ocean observing system and biogeochemical observations are still relatively sparse particularly in coastal and shelf seas. There is a need to widen the techniques used to assess the fitness for purpose and gaps in the ocean observing system. As well as Observing System Simulation Experiments that quantify the effect of observations on the overall model skill we present a gap analysis based on (1) Examining where high model skill is required based on a marine spatial planning analysis of European seas i.e where does activity take place that requires more accurate forecasts? and (2) assessing gaps based on the capacity of the observing system to answer key societal challenges e.g. site suitability for aquaculture and ocean energy, oil spill response and contextual oceanographic products for fisheries and ecosystems. The broad based analysis will inform the development of the proposed European Ocean Observing System as a contribution to the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS).

  17. Intense mesoscale variability in the Sardinia Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Aniello; Borrione, Ines; Falchetti, Silvia; Knoll, Michaela; Fiekas, Heinz-Volker; Heywood, Karen; Oddo, Paolo; Onken, Reiner

    2015-04-01

    From the 6 to 25 June 2014, the REP14-MED sea trial was conducted by CMRE, supported by 20 partners from six different nations. The at-sea activities were carried out onboard the research vessels Alliance (NATO) and Planet (German Ministry of Defense), comprising a marine area of about 110 x 110 km2 to the west of the Sardinian coast. More than 300 CTD casts typically spaced at 10 km were collected; both ships continuously recorded vertical profiles of currents by means of their ADCPs, and a ScanFish® and a CTD chain were towed for almost three days by Alliance and Planet, respectively, following parallel routes. Twelve gliders from different manufacturers (Slocum, SeaGliderTM and SeaExplorer) were continuously sampling the study area following zonal tracks spaced at 10 km. In addition, six moorings, 17 surface drifters and one ARVOR float were deployed. From a first analysis of the observations, several mesoscale features were identified in the survey area, in particular: (i) a warm-core anticyclonic eddy in the southern part of the domain, about 50 km in diameter and with the strongest signal at about 50-m depth (ii) another warm-core anticyclonic eddy of comparable dimensions in the central part of the domain, but extending to greater depth than the former one, and (iii) a small (less than 15 km in diameter) cold-core cyclonic eddy of Winter Intermediate Water in the depth range between 170 m and 370 m. All three eddies showed intensified currents, up to 50 cm s-1. The huge high-resolution observational data set and the variety of observation techniques enabled the mesoscale features and their variability to be tracked for almost three weeks. In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the mesoscale dynamic behaviour and their interactions, assimilation studies with an ocean circulation model are underway.

  18. ALBOREX: an intensive multi-platform and multidisciplinary experiment in the Alboran Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Allen, John; Olita, Antonio; Tovar, Antonio; Oguz, Temel; Mahadevan, Amala; Poulain, Pierre; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2015-04-01

    An intensive multi-platform and multidisciplinary experiment was completed in May 2014 as part of PERSEUS EU Project. 25 drifters, 2 gliders, 3 Argo floats and one ship were dedicated to sample an area of about 50x50 km in the eastern Alboran Sea during one week. The experiment, which also includes 66 CTD stations and 500 water samples (salinity, chlorophyll and nutrients), was designed to capture the intense but transient vertical exchanges associated with mesoscale and submesoscale features. The vertical motion associated with mesoscale and submesoscale features such as ocean eddies, filaments and fronts plays a major role in determining ocean productivity, due to the exchange of properties between the surface and the ocean interior. Understanding the relationship between these physical and biological processes is crucial for predicting the marine ecosystems response to changes in the climate system and to sustainable marine resource management. However, to understand the links between mesoscale and submesoscale features and ecosystem responses, it is necessary to collect data at a range of temporal and spatial scales, and then combine these data with coupled physical and biochemical models. Data from thermosalinograph revealed a sharp surface salinity front with values ranging from 36.6 (Atlantic Waters) to 38.2 (Mediterranean Waters) in conjunction with a filament in temperature. Drifters followed a massive anticyclonic gyre. Near real time data from ADCP showed coherent patterns with currents up to 1m/s. Gliders detected a subduction of chlorophyll located in areas adjacent to the front. We also present results on the horizontal strain rate, relative vorticity and quasi-geostrophic vertical motion to understand the dynamics of this intense ocean front.

  19. Project CONVERGE: Impacts of local oceanographic processes on Adélie penguin foraging ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohut, J. T.; Bernard, K. S.; Fraser, W.; Oliver, M. J.; Statscewich, H.; Patterson-Fraser, D.; Winsor, P.; Cimino, M. A.; Miles, T. N.

    2016-02-01

    During the austral summer of 2014-2015, project CONVERGE deployed a multi-platform network to sample the Adélie penguin foraging hotspot associated with Palmer Deep Canyon along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. The focus of CONVERGE was to assess the impact of prey-concentrating ocean circulation dynamics on Adélie penguin foraging behavior. Food web links between phytoplankton and zooplankton abundance and penguin behavior were examined to better understand the within-season variability in Adélie foraging ecology. Since the High Frequency Radar (HFR) network installation in November 2014, the radial component current data from each of the three sites were combined to provide a high resolution (0.5 km) surface velocity maps. These hourly maps have revealed an incredibly dynamic system with strong fronts and frequent eddies extending across the Palmer Deep foraging area. A coordinated fleet of underwater gliders were used in concert with the HFR fields to sample the hydrography and phytoplankton distributions associated with convergent and divergent features. Three gliders mapped the along and across canyon variability of the hydrography, chlorophyll fluorescence and acoustic backscatter in the context of the observed surface currents and simultaneous penguin tracks. This presentation will highlight these synchronized measures of the food web in the context of the observed HFR fronts and eddies. The location and persistence of these features coupled with ecological sampling through the food web offer an unprecedented view of the Palmer Deep ecosystem. Specific examples will highlight how the vertical structure of the water column beneath the surface features stack the primary and secondary producers relative to observed penguin foraging behavior. The coupling from the physics through the food web as observed by our multi-platform network gives strong evidence for the critical role that distribution patterns of lower trophic levels have on Adélie foraging.

  20. Climate change impacts on southern Ross Sea phytoplankton composition, productivity, and export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Daniel E.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Smith, Walker O.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Dinniman, Michael S.; Hemmings, John C. P.

    2017-03-01

    The Ross Sea, a highly productive region of the Southern Ocean, is expected to experience warming during the next century along with reduced summer sea ice concentrations and shallower mixed layers. This study investigates how these climatic changes may alter phytoplankton assemblage composition, primary productivity, and export. Glider measurements are used to force a one-dimensional biogeochemical model, which includes diatoms and both solitary and colonial forms of Phaeocystis antarctica. Model performance is evaluated with glider observations, and experiments are conducted using projections of physical drivers for mid-21st and late-21st century. These scenarios reveal a 5% increase in primary productivity by midcentury and 14% by late-century and a proportional increase in carbon export, which remains approximately 18% of primary production. In addition, scenario results indicate diatom biomass increases while P. antarctica biomass decreases in the first half of the 21st century. In the second half of the century, diatom biomass remains relatively constant and P. antarctica biomass increases. Additional scenarios examining the independent contributions of expected future changes (temperature, mixed layer depth, irradiance, and surface iron inputs from melting ice) demonstrate that earlier availability of low light due to reduction of sea ice early in the growing season is the primary driver of productivity increases over the next century; shallower mixed layer depths additionally contribute to changes of assemblage composition and export. This study further demonstrates how glider data can be effectively used to facilitate model development and simulation, and inform interpretation of biogeochemical observations in the context of climate change.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding how the global ocean responds to climate change requires knowing the natural behavior of individual regions and anticipating how future changes will affect each region differently. It

  1. Paradigm change in ocean studies: multi-platform observing and forecasting integrated approach in response to science and society needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintoré, Joaquín

    2017-04-01

    -platform approach in ocean observation. Three examples from the integration capabilities of SOCIB facilities will be presented and discussed. First the quasi-continuous high frequency glider monitoring of the Ibiza Channel since 2011, an important biodiversity hot spot and a 'choke' point in the Western Mediterranean circulation, has allowed us to reveal a high frequency variability in the North-South exchanges, with very significant changes (0.8 - 0.9 Sv) occurring over periods of days to week of the same order as the previously known seasonal cycle. HF radar data and model results have also contributed more recently to better describe and understand the variability at small scales. Second, the Alborex/Perseus project multi-platform experiment (e.g., RV catamaran, 2 gliders, 25 drifters, 3 Argo type profilers & satellite data) that focused on submesoscale processes and ecosystem response and carried out in the Alborán Sea in May 2014. Glider results showed significant chlorophyll subduction in areas adjacent to the steep density front with patterns related to vertical motion. Initial dynamical interpretations will be presented. Third and final, I will discuss the key relevance of the data centre to guarantee data interoperability, quality control, availability and distribution for this new approach to ocean observation and forecasting to be really efficient in responding to key scientific state of the art priorities, enhancing technology development and responding to society needs.

  2. Forelimb preferences in quadrupedal marsupials and their implications for laterality evolution in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Acquisition of upright posture in evolution has been argued to facilitate manual laterality in primates. Owing to the high variety of postural habits marsupials can serve as a suitable model to test whether the species-typical body posture shapes forelimb preferences in non-primates or this phenomenon emerged only in the course of primate evolution. In the present study we aimed to explore manual laterality in marsupial quadrupeds and compare them with the results in the previously studied bipedal species. Forelimb preferences were assessed in captive grey short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) in four different types of unimanual behaviour per species, which was not artificially evoked. We examined the possible effects of sex, age and task, because these factors have been reported to affect motor laterality in placental mammals. Results In both species the direction of forelimb preferences was strongly sex-related. Male grey short-tailed opossums showed right-forelimb preference in most of the observed unimanual behaviours, while male sugar gliders displayed only a slight, not significant rightward tendency. In contrast, females in both species exhibited consistent group-level preference of the left forelimb. We failed to reveal significant differences in manual preferences between tasks of potentially differing complexity: reaching a stable food item and catching live insects, as well as between the body support and food manipulation. No influence of subjects’ age on limb preferences was found. Conclusions The direction of sex-related differences in the manual preferences found in quadrupedal marsupials seems to be not typical for placental mammals. We suggest that the alternative way of interhemispheric connection in absence of corpus callosum may result in a fundamentally distinct mechanism of sex effect on limb preferences in marsupials compared to placentals. Our data confirm the idea that non

  3. Rapid Development of Bespoke Unmanned Platforms for Atmospheric Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobester, A.; Johnston, S. J.; Scanlan, J. P.; Hart, E. E.; O'Brien, N. S.

    2012-04-01

    The effective deployment of airborne atmospheric science instruments often hinges on the development cycle time of a suitable platform, one that is capable of delivering them to the desired altitude range for a specified amount of time, along a pre-determined trajectory. This could be driven by the need to respond rapidly to sudden, unexpected events (e.g., volcano eruptions, nuclear fallout, etc.) or simply to accommodate the iterative design and flight test cycle of the instrument developer. A shorter development cycle time would also afford us the ability to quickly adapt the hardware and control logic in response to unexpected results during an experimental campaign. We report on recent developments aimed at meeting this demand. As part of the Atmospheric Science Through Robotic Aircraft (ASTRA) initiative we have investigated the use of rapid prototyping technologies to this end, both on the 'airframe' of the platform itself and on the on-board systems. We show how fast multi-disciplinary design optimization techniques, coupled with computer-controlled additive manufacturing (3D printing) and laser cutting methods and electronic prototyping (using standard, modular, programmable building blocks) can lead to the delivery of a fully customized platform integrating a given instrument in a timescale of the order of ten days. Specific examples include the design and testing of a balloon-launched glider sensorcraft and a stratospheric balloon system. The 'vehicle' for the latter was built on a 3D printer using a copolymer thermoplastic material and fitted with a sacrificial protective 'cage' laser-cut from an open-cell foam. The data logging, tracking, sensor integration and communications services of the platform were constructed using the .net Gadgeteer open source hardware kit. The flight planning and eventual post-flight recovery of the system is enabled by a generic, stochastic trajectory simulation tool, also developed as part of the ASTRA initiative. This

  4. SOCIB applications for oceanographic data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupin, Charles; Pau Beltran, Joan; Frontera, Biel; Gómara, Sonia; Lora, Sebastian; March, David; Sebastian, Kristian; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2015-04-01

    The Balearic Islands Coastal Ocean Observing and Forecasting System (SOCIB, http://www.socib.es), is a multi-platform Marine Research Infrastructure that provides free, open and quality-controlled data from near-shore to the open sea. To collect the necessary data, the SOCIB system is made up of: a research vessel, a high-frequency (HF) radar system, weather stations, tide gauges, moorings, drifting buoys, ARGO profilers, and gliders (autonomous underwater vehicles). In addition, the system has recently begun incorporating oceanographic sensors attached to sea turtles. High-resolution numerical models provide forecast for hydrodynamics (ROMS) and waves (SAPO). According to SOCIB principles, data have to be: discoverable and accessible; freely available; interoperable, quality-controlled and standardized. The Data Centre (DC) manages the different steps of data processing, including: acquisition using SOCIB platforms (gliders, drifters, HF radar, ...), numerical models (hydrodynamics, waves, ...) or information generated by other data sources, distribution through dedicated web and mobile applications dynamic visualisation. The SOCIB DC constitutes an example of marine information systems within the framework of new coastal ocean observatories. In this work we present some of the applications developed for specific type of users, as well as the technologies used for their implementation: DAPP (Deployments application, http://apps.socib.es/dapp/), a web application to display information related to mobile platform trajectories. LW4NC2 (http://thredds.socib.es/lw4nc2), a web application for multidimensional (grid) data from NetCDF files (numerical models, HF radar). SACOSTA (http://gis.socib.es/sacosta), a viewer for cartographic data such as environmental sensitivity of the coastline. SEABOARD (http://seaboard.socib.es), a tool to disseminate SOCIB real time data to different types of users. Smart-phone apps to access data, platform trajectories and forecasts in real

  5. Seasonal evolution of physical processes and biological responses in the northern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Asfahani, Khaled

    2017-12-01

    A sequence of autonomous underwater glider deployments were used to characterize the spatial-temporal variability of the region over an eight month period from late September to May. Strongly stratified system was found in early fall with significant gradients in both temperature (T) and salinity (S), during winter T < 23°C and minimum S of 40.3 psu was observed and resulting in weakened stratification that enables deep convective mixing and upwelling of deep water by cyclonic circulations in the region leading to significant biomass increase. Throughout the entire observational period the slope of the 28 and 28.5 kg/m3 isopycnals remained sloping downward from offshore toward the coast reflected a persistent northward geostrophic flow. The depth of the 180 μmol/kg isopleth of oxygen, indicative of the top of the nutricline, paralleled the depth of the 28 kg/m3, but remained slightly deeper than the isopycnal. The deep winter mixing did not penetrate the nutricline where the mixed layer was deeper near the coast. However, because of the cyclonic signature the 28 kg/m3 rose to the surface offshore, injecting nutrients into the surface layer and promoting increased biomass in the central Red Sea. With the presence of cyclonic eddies, there was evidence of subduction associated with the cross-eddy circulation. This subducted flow was toward the coast within the domain of the glider observations. During this period, increases in the particulate backscatter were associated with increased chlorophyll indicating that the suspended particles were primarily phytoplankton particles. Within the mean northward flow there is a cross-basin flow wherein water is upwelled near the center of the Red Sea, there is a eastward component to the northward flow, and subsequent downwelling near the coasts. Within the surface flow subductive processes lead not only to a horizontal flow, but also a downward component toward the coast. Overall transport is very 3-dimensional in the

  6. New technological developments provide deep-sea sediment density flow insights: the Monterey Coordinated Canyon Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, T. C.; Kieft, B.; Chaffey, M. R.; Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Herlien, R.; Bird, L.; Klimov, D.; Paull, C. K.; Gwiazda, R.; Lundsten, E. M.; Anderson, K.; Caress, D. W.; Sumner, E. J.; Simmons, S.; Parsons, D. R.; Talling, P.; Rosenberger, K. J.; Xu, J.; Maier, K. L.; Gales, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Monterey Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) deployed an array of instruments along the Monterey Canyon floor to characterize the structure, velocity and frequency of sediment flows. CCE utilized novel technologies developed at MBARI to capture sediment flow data in unprecedented detail. 1. The Seafloor Instrument Node (SIN) at 1850 meters depth housed 3 ADCPs at 3 different frequencies, CTD, current meter, oxygen optode, fluorometer/backscatter sensor, and logged data at 10 second intervals or faster. The SIN included an acoustic modem for communication with shore through a Wave Glider relay, and provided high-resolution measurements of three flow events during three successive deployments over 1.5 years. 2. Beachball-sized Benthic Event Detectors (BEDs) were deployed on or under the seafloor to measure the characteristics of sediment density flows. Each BED recorded data from a pressure sensor and a 3-axis accelerometer and gyro to characterize motions during transport events (e.g. tumble vs rotation). An acoustic modem capable of operating through more than a meter of sediment enabled communications with a ship or autonomous surface vehicle. Multiple BEDs were deployed at various depths in the canyon during CCE, detecting and measuring many transport events; one BED moved 9 km down canyon in 50 minutes during one event. 3. Wave Glider Hot Spot (HS), equipped with acoustic and RF modems, acted as data relay between SIN, BEDs and shore, and acoustically located BEDs after sediment density flows.. In some cases HS relayed BED motion data to shore within a few hours of the event. HS provided an acoustic console to the SIN, allowing shore-based users to check SIN health and status, perform maintenance, etc. 4. Mapping operations were conducted 4 times at the SIN site to quantify depositional and erosional patterns, utilizing a prototype ultra-high-resolution mapping system on the ROV Doc Ricketts. The system consists of a 400-kHz Reson 7125 multibeam sonar, a 3

  7. Multifunctional Web Enabled Ocean Sensor Systems for the Monitoring of a Changing Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Castro, Ayoze; Corrandino, Luigi; del Rio, Joaquin; Delory, Eric; Garello, Rene; Heuermann, Rudinger; Martinez, Enoc; Pearlman, Francoise; Rolin, Jean-Francois; Toma, Daniel; Waldmann, Christoph; Zielinski, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    to platform integration phase will provide standard mechanisms for a truly plug'n'work connection. Through this, NeXOS Instruments will maintain within themselves specific information about how a platform (buoy controller, AUV controller, Observatory controller) has to configure and communicate with the instrument without the platform needing previous knowledge about the instrument. This mechanism is now being evaluated in real platforms like a Slocum Glider from Teledyne Web research, SeaExplorer Glider from Alseamar, Provor Float from NKE, and others including non commercial platforms like Obsea seafloor cabled observatory. The latest developments in the NeXOS sensors and the integration into an observation system will be discussed, addressing demonstration plans both for a variety of platforms and scientific objectives supporting marine management.

  8. Ovis: A framework for visual analysis of ocean forecast ensembles

    KAUST Repository

    Hollt, Thomas; Magdy, Ahmed; Zhan, Peng; Chen, Guoning; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Hansen, Charles D.; Hadwiger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel integrated visualization system that enables interactive visual analysis of ensemble simulations of the sea surface height that is used in ocean forecasting. The position of eddies can be derived directly from the sea surface height and our visualization approach enables their interactive exploration and analysis.The behavior of eddies is important in different application settings of which we present two in this paper. First, we show an application for interactive planning of placement as well as operation of off-shore structures using real-world ensemble simulation data of the Gulf of Mexico. Off-shore structures, such as those used for oil exploration, are vulnerable to hazards caused by eddies, and the oil and gas industry relies on ocean forecasts for efficient operations. We enable analysis of the spatial domain, as well as the temporal evolution, for planning the placement and operation of structures.Eddies are also important for marine life. They transport water over large distances and with it also heat and other physical properties as well as biological organisms. In the second application we present the usefulness of our tool, which could be used for planning the paths of autonomous underwater vehicles, so called gliders, for marine scientists to study simulation data of the largely unexplored Red Sea. © 1995-2012 IEEE.

  9. A review on existing OSSEs and their implications on European marine observation requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Marine observations are essential for understanding marine processes and improving the forecast quality, they are also expensive. It has always been an important issue to optimize sampling schemes of marine observational networks so that the value of marine observations can be maximized and the cost can be lowered. Ocean System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is an efficient tool in assessing impacts of proposed future sampling schemes on reconstructing and forecasting the ocean and ecosystem conditions. In this study existing OSSE research results from EU projects (such as JERICO, OPEC, SANGOMA, E-AIMS and AtlantOS), institutional studies and review papers are collected and analyzed, according to regions (Arctic, Baltic, N. Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea) and instruments/variables. The preliminary results show that significant gaps for OSSEs in regions and instruments. Among the existing OSSEs, Argo (Bio-Argo and Deep See Argo), gliders and ferrybox are the most often investigated instruments. Although many of the OSSEs are dedicated for very specific monitoring strategies and not sufficiently comprehensive for making solid recommendations for optimizing the existing networks, the detailed findings for future marine observation requirements from the OSSEs will be summarized in the presentation. Recommendations for systematic OSSEs for optimizing European marine observation networks are also given.

  10. Generative complexity of Gray-Scott model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    In the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion system one reactant is constantly fed in the system, another reactant is reproduced by consuming the supplied reactant and also converted to an inert product. The rate of feeding one reactant in the system and the rate of removing another reactant from the system determine configurations of concentration profiles: stripes, spots, waves. We calculate the generative complexity-a morphological complexity of concentration profiles grown from a point-wise perturbation of the medium-of the Gray-Scott system for a range of the feeding and removal rates. The morphological complexity is evaluated using Shannon entropy, Simpson diversity, approximation of Lempel-Ziv complexity, and expressivity (Shannon entropy divided by space-filling). We analyse behaviour of the systems with highest values of the generative morphological complexity and show that the Gray-Scott systems expressing highest levels of the complexity are composed of the wave-fragments (similar to wave-fragments in sub-excitable media) and travelling localisations (similar to quasi-dissipative solitons and gliders in Conway's Game of Life).

  11. Ultra Low Power, Radiation Tolerant UHF Radio Technologies for In Situ Communication Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, N. E.

    2001-01-01

    For future deep space missions, significant reductions in the mass and power requirements for short-range telecommunication systems will be critical in enabling a wide variety of new mission concepts. These possibilities include penetrators, gliders, miniature rovers, and sensor networks. Under joint funding from NASA's Cross Enterprise and JPL's Telecommunications and Mission technology programs, recent development activity has focused on the design of ultralow mass and power transceiver systems and subsystems suitable for operation in a flight environment. For these efforts, the functionality of the transceiver has been targeted towards a specific Mars communications scenario. However, the overall architecture is well suited to any short or medium range application where a remote probe will aperiodically communicate with a base station, possibly an orbiter, for the eventual purpose of relaying science information back to Earth. In 2001, these sponsors have been augmented with collaborative expertise and funding from JPL's Center for Integrated Space Microsystems in order to migrate existing concepts and designs to a System on a Chip (SOAC) solution. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Developing Low-Power Transceiver Technologies for In Situ Communication Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, N.; Cheetham, C.; Mojaradi, H.; Neal, J.

    2001-07-01

    For future deep-space missions, significant reductions in the mass and power requirements for short-range telecommunication systems will be critical in enabling a wide variety of new mission concepts. These possibilities include penetrators, gliders, miniature rovers, balloons, and sensor networks. The recent development activity reported in this article has focused on the design of ultra-low-mass and -power transceiver systems and subsystems suitable for operation in a flight environment. Under these efforts, the basic functionality of the transceiver has been targeted towards a Mars microprobe communications scenario. However, the overall transceiver architecture is well suited to any short- or medium-range application where a remote probe will aperiodically communicate with a base station, possibly an orbiter, for the eventual purpose of relaying science information back to Earth. Additionally, elements of the radio architecture can be applied in situations involving surface-to-surface communications, thereby enabling different mission communications topologies. Through a system analysis of these channels, both the applicability and benefit of very low power communications will be quantitatively addressed.

  13. A theoretical analysis of pitch stability during gliding in flying snakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, Farid; Ross, Shane D; Socha, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-01-01

    Flying snakes use their entire body as a continuously morphing ‘wing’ to produce lift and shallow their glide trajectory. Their dominant behavior during gliding is aerial undulation, in which lateral waves are sent posteriorly down the body. This highly dynamic behavior, which is unique among animal gliders, should have substantial effects on the flight dynamics and stability of the snakes, resulting from the continuous redistribution of mass and aerodynamic forces. In this study, we develop two-dimensional theoretical models to assess the stability characteristics of snakes in the pitch direction. Previously measured force coefficients are used to simulate aerodynamic forces acting on the models, and undulation is simulated by varying mass. Model 1 is a simple three-airfoil representation of the snake’s body that possesses a passively stable equilibrium solution, whose basin of stability contains initial conditions observed in experimental gliding trajectories. Model 2 is more sophisticated, with more degrees of freedom allowing for postural changes to better represent the snake’s real kinematics; in addition, a restoring moment is added to simulate potential active control. The application of static and dynamic stability criteria show that Model 2 is passively unstable, but can be stabilized with a restoring moment. Overall, these models suggest that undulation does not contribute to stability in pitch, and that flying snakes require a closed-loop control system formed around a passively stable dynamical framework. (papers)

  14. Wintertime re-ventilation of the East Greenland Current's Atlantic-origin Overflow Water in the western Iceland Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våge, Kjetil; Håvik, Lisbeth; Papritz, Lukas; Spall, Michael; Moore, Kent

    2017-04-01

    The Deep Western Boundary Current constitutes the lower limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, and, as such, is a crucial component of the Earth's climate system. The largest and densest contribution to the current stems from the overflow plume that passes through Denmark Strait. A main source of Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW) is the East Greenland Current (EGC). The DSOW transported by the EGC originates from the Atlantic inflow into the Nordic Seas. This is then transformed into Atlantic-origin Overflow Water while progressing northward through the eastern part of the Nordic Seas. Here we show, using measurements from autonomous gliders deployed from fall 2015 to spring 2016, that the Atlantic-origin Overflow Water transported toward Denmark Strait by the EGC was re-ventilated while transiting the western Iceland Sea in winter. In summer, this region is characterized by an upper layer of cold, fresh Polar Surface Water that is thought to prevent convection. But in fall and winter this fresh water mass is diverted toward the Greenland shelf by enhanced northerly winds, which results in a water column that is preconditioned for convection. Severe heat loss from the ocean to the atmosphere offshore of the ice edge subsequently causes the formation of deep mixed layers. This further transforms the Atlantic-origin Overflow Water and impacts the properties of the DSOW, and hence the deepest and densest component of the lower limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

  15. Sustaining observations in the polar oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, E P

    2014-09-28

    Polar oceans present a unique set of challenges to sustained observations. Sea ice cover restricts navigation for ships and autonomous measurement platforms alike, and icebergs present a hazard to instruments deployed in the upper ocean and in shelf seas. However, the important role of the poles in the global ocean circulation provides ample justification for sustained observations in these regions, both to monitor the rapid changes taking place, and to better understand climate processes in these traditionally poorly sampled areas. In the past, the vast majority of polar measurements took place in the summer. In recent years, novel techniques such as miniature CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) tags carried by seals have provided an explosion in year-round measurements in areas largely inaccessible to ships, and, as ice avoidance is added to autonomous profiling floats and gliders, these promise to provide further enhancements to observing systems. In addition, remote sensing provides vital information about changes taking place in sea ice cover at both poles. To make these observations sustainable into the future, improved international coordination and collaboration is necessary to gain optimum utilization of observing networks. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-organisation in Cellular Automata with Coalescent Particles: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Benjamin; Sablik, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    This article introduces new tools to study self-organisation in a family of simple cellular automata which contain some particle-like objects with good collision properties (coalescence) in their time evolution. We draw an initial configuration at random according to some initial shift-ergodic measure, and use the limit measure to describe the asymptotic behaviour of the automata. We first take a qualitative approach, i.e. we obtain information on the limit measure(s). We prove that only particles moving in one particular direction can persist asymptotically. This provides some previously unknown information on the limit measures of various deterministic and probabilistic cellular automata: 3 and 4-cyclic cellular automata [introduced by Fisch (J Theor Probab 3(2):311-338, 1990; Phys D 45(1-3):19-25, 1990)], one-sided captive cellular automata [introduced by Theyssier (Captive Cellular Automata, 2004)], the majority-traffic cellular automaton, a self stabilisation process towards a discrete line [introduced by Regnault and Rémila (in: Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science 2015—40th International Symposium, MFCS 2015, Milan, Italy, Proceedings, Part I, 2015)]. In a second time we restrict our study to a subclass, the gliders cellular automata. For this class we show quantitative results, consisting in the asymptotic law of some parameters: the entry times [generalising K ůrka et al. (in: Proceedings of AUTOMATA, 2011)], the density of particles and the rate of convergence to the limit measure.

  17. Non-equilibrium trajectory dynamics and the kinematics of gliding in a flying snake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socha, John J; Jafari, Farid; Miklasz, Kevin; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2010-01-01

    Given sufficient space, it is possible for gliding animals to reach an equilibrium state with no net forces acting on the body. In contrast, every gliding trajectory must begin with a non-steady component, and the relative importance of this phase is not well understood. Of any terrestrial animal glider, snakes exhibit the greatest active movements, which may affect their trajectory dynamics. Our primary aim was to determine the characteristics of snake gliding during the transition to equilibrium, quantifying changes in velocity, acceleration, and body orientation in the late phase of a glide sequence. We launched 'flying' snakes (Chrysopelea paradisi) from a 15 m tower and recorded the mid-to-end portion of trajectories with four videocameras to reconstruct the snake's body position with mm to cm accuracy. Additionally, we developed a simple analytical model of gliding assuming only steady-state forces of lift, drag and weight acting on the body and used it to explore effects of wing loading, lift-to-drag ratio, and initial velocity on trajectory dynamics. Despite the vertical space provided to transition to steady-state gliding, snakes did not exhibit equilibrium gliding and in fact displayed a net positive acceleration in the vertical axis, an effect also predicted by the analytical model.

  18. Changes in the number of eggs loaded in Pantala flavescens females with age from mass flights (Odonata: Libellulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Yuta; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-11-01

    The wandering glider dragonfly Pantala flavescens migrates to Japan every spring, where the population increases until autumn, in which mass flights often occur, followed by death in the winter. There have been no reports to date on the maturation process of this species throughout its lifespan in Japan. We collected females from mass flights when the flight height was low, and classified them into seven age stages by examining their wing condition. Very few females of the older stage were collected from the mass flights. The wing condition corresponded with the change in body color and with the egg production process in the ovaries. While pre-reproductive-stage females did not release eggs when treated with our artificial oviposition technique, each reproductive-stage female released about 640 eggs. Nearly all eggs released were fertilized. The ovaries developed with the stage, and reproductive-stage females had about 1100 ovarioles. The estimated maximum fecundity was about 29,000 eggs. The lifetime number of eggs laid of P. flavescens should be revealed by dissection.

  19. Interaction of the Faroe Bank Channel overflow with Iceland Basin intermediate waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullgren, Jenny E.; Fer, Ilker; Darelius, Elin; Beaird, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The narrow and deep Faroe Bank Channel (FBC) is an important pathway for cold, dense waters from the Nordic Seas to flow across the Iceland-Scotland ridge into the North Atlantic. The swift, turbulent FBC overflow is associated with strong vertical mixing. Hydrographic profiles from a shipboard survey and two Slocum electric gliders deployed during a cruise in May-June 2012 show an intermediate water mass characterized by low salinity and low oxygen concentration between the upper waters of Atlantic origin and the dense overflow water. A weak low-salinity signal originating north-east of Iceland is discernible at the exit of the FBC, but smeared out by intense mixing. Further west (downstream) marked salinity and oxygen minima are found, which we hypothesize are indicators of a mixture of Labrador Sea Water and Intermediate Water from the Iceland Basin. Water mass characteristics vary strongly on short time scales. Low-salinity, low-oxygen water in the stratified interface above the overflow plume is shown to move along isopycnals toward the Iceland-Faroe Front as a result of eddy stirring and a secondary, transverse circulation in the plume interface. The interaction of low-salinity, low-oxygen intermediate waters with the overflow plume already at a short distance downstream of the sill, here reported for the first time, affects the final properties of the overflow waters through entrainment and mixing.

  20. Glide back booster wind tunnel model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricop, M. V.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Stoica, C. I.; Niculescu, M. L.; Neculaescu, A. M.; Persinaru, A. G.; Boscoianu, M.

    2017-07-01

    Affordable space access requires partial or ideally full launch vehicle reuse, which is in line with clean environment requirement. Although the idea is old, the practical use is difficult, requiring very large technology investment for qualification. Rocket gliders like Space Shuttle have been successfullyoperated but the price and correspondingly the energy footprint were found not sustainable. For medium launchers, finally there is a very promising platform as Falcon 9. For very small launchers the situation is more complex, because the performance index (payload to start mass) is already small, versus medium and heavy launchers. For partial reusable micro launchers this index is even smaller. However the challenge has to be taken because it is likely that in a multiyear effort, technology is going to enable the performance recovery to make such a system economically and environmentally feasible. The current paper is devoted to a small unitary glide back booster which is foreseen to be assembled in a number of possible configurations. Although the level of analysis is not deep, the solution is analyzed from the aerodynamic point of view. A wind tunnel model is designed, with an active canard, to enablea more efficient wind tunnel campaign, as a national level premiere.